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Volume 121 No. 2

AUGUST 18, 2012 - AUGUST 24, 2012

The AFRO Celebration

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ith this edition, the AFRO celebrates its 120th anniversary. We have canvassed an enormous number of archived editions and special publications to share the AFRO’s coverage of the Black community over the past 120 years. In the process we have been reminded of the complex personality of the African-American community. This anniversary edition is divided into 8 sections with a total of 128 pages. It is among the largest editions of the AFRO in the history of the company. Each section reflects a distinct category of our coverage. In creating these sections we couldn’t avoid noticing how each section disclosed a unique aspect of an important trait of the African-American community. There is current news in the first section and for those historic items that pique your interest, find them in the archives on afro.com. Over the 120 years each succeeding generation changed, sometimes radically, the manner and style of the community. The contrast between the AFRO‘s news of the post Victorian era of the first decade of the 20th century and that of succeeding decades is a stark realization of that evolution. Such differences can be seen in the front pages replicated in the sections of this special commemorative edition. There is one clear ever-present continuum throughout the existence of this newspaper and that is the removal of the shackles that have always impeded the Black race simply because of its color. There isn’t any edition that doesn’t call out some form of discrimination African-Americans citizens are being unjustly subjected to in this country. The Civil Rights section reflects many of these anti-discrimination battles and wars, some of which continue today. In contrast, however, the many social and other community pleasantries over the 120 years make for an otherwise pleasurable

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Your History • Your Community • Your News

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Copyright © 2012 by the Afro-American Company


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The AFRO Celebration Continued from Page 1

excursion into the depths of “us enjoying each other.” The Society, Sports and Entertainment sections reflect many of the high points of this coverage. Another continuum in the Black community is the Church. From the AFRO’s beginning in the basement of Baltimore’s revered Sharon Baptist Church, the coverage shows the scaffolding and primary support structure the African-American community has always received through the spiritual guidance emanating from the Black Church. The Church section captures the ups and downs reflected in the extensive coverage of the Black Church’s personalities, leaders and members over the years. This 120th Anniversary Edition is dedicated to the people who are working, and those who have worked at some point in their lives, at the AFRO. The fruits of their sacrifices to ‘get the news out’ over the years is reflected in these pages. From Mrs. Eva Barnes, the oldest living AFRO former employee who just celebrated her 100th birthday this week, to the current staff and their families, the past and present AFRO Board of Directors and shareholders for their guidance:

Thanks to each and every one of you!

AFRO File Photos and Front Pages From the top: *President Barack Obama, First Lady Michelle Obama with daughters, Sasha and Malia. November 14, 2008.

City Desk 1935

Jackson and the AKAs. August 4, 1984. Thousands Mourn At C.C. Spaulding Rites. August 5, 1952. For the First Time! Nov. 7, 1970. Cab Calloway, Mr. Hi-De-Ho Man, released an album under that title in 1974. Joe Louis World’s Champ. June 26, 1937.

Celebrating 100 Years

Matron Felled by Cane in ‘Old Plantation’ Setting. Feb. 12, 1963 John Murphy III, grandson of AFRO founder and AFRO Publisher, 1974-1986. Glorious Gloria!! September 3, 1955. 218 Students Arrested; February 19, 1963. Downed 20 Planes. September 18, 1943. Carl Murphy. AFRO Publisher 1922-1967. Dodgers Sign Up Jackie. April 12, 1947. AFRO Founder John H. Murphy Sr. Martin Luther King. He Foresaw Death, Then Conquered All Fear of It. September 23, 1958. Frances Murphy II, first woman to chair the AFRO board and Washington AFRO Publisher, 19871999. Award –winning sports journalist Sam Lacy.

AFRO File Photo circa 1960s

Mrs. Eva Barnes, who recently celebrated her 100th birthday, was a proofreader for the AFRO for more than 30 years.


120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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AUGUST 18, 2012 - AUGUST 24, 2012

Republicans Take Obama to the Woodshed Again, Through Holder

woodshed. “This is all aimed at the President,” Cummings said. “This is all about trying to weaken him. There is It seems that House Republicans are not yet a distinct purpose in all of this.” finished raking Attorney General Eric H. Holder Cummings said the campaign to discredit Holder, Jr. over the coals regarding the botched federal law a notoriously strong-minded Black man known to stand his ground, is also motivated by a desire by enforcement operation that funneled U.S. firearms Republicans to keep the attorney general’s attention to Mexican drug cartels. House Republicans filed a federal civil lawsuit diverted from his efforts to protect voter rights. If against Holder Aug. 13 to compel the attorney efforts to reduce the number of minority, poor and elderly voters are successful, Obama will face a stiffer general to produce documents related to the tactic, challenge in his re-election effort in November. dubbed “Operation Fast and Furious,” in which “Most Democrats, including me, feel that what authorities allowed guns to pass into the hands of gun smugglers in order to track them up the cartels’ Rep. Elijah Cummings (right) said the lawsuit filed against Attorney General Eric Holder they are doing to Eric Holder is uncalled for, unfair food chains. and unwarranted,” Cummings said. “This is the (left) is motivated by an attempt to discredit President Obama (center). first time in the history of this country that a cabinet “We are filing charges against Attorney General Cummings (D-Md.) said the American people need to understand official has been found in contempt.” Eric Holder tomorrow,” Oversight and Government quite clearly what recent acts by some of his colleagues across Reform Committee Chairman Darrell Issa (R-Calif.) tweeted Cummings said he was there two weeks before the contempt the aisle in Congress have in mind as they pursue the case Aug. 12. vote when Holder met with Issa and two other legislators. Holder against Holder. Quite simply, they are taking the President to the In an interview the day the lawsuit was filed, Rep. Elijah Continued on A14 By Avis Thomas-Lester and Zenitha Prince AFRO Staff

Md. General Assembly Approves Killings Drop in Prince George’s Gambling Expansion Bill By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

Allows Casino in PG County, Table Games The Associated Press ANNAPOLIS, Md. — The Maryland General Assembly early Wednesday passed a measure to allow a new casino in Prince George’s County as well as table games such as poker and roulette at gambling halls. After the House of Delegates passed the bill 71-58 late Tuesday night, the Senate concurred early Wednesday and passed the measure by a vote of 32-14. The vote sends the measure to Democratic Gov. Martin O’Malley, who has scheduled a bill signing for Wednesday. Senate President Thomas V. Mike Miller, a driving force behind the measure, said Maryland stands to reap great benefits from the new casino site. “This is an ideal site,” Miller, D-Calvert, said after the measure was passed. “It’s immediately adjacent to Washington D.C. Conventioneers coming to Washington, D.C., will come to

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Prince George’s County to play these machines.” The measure would also significantly lower the state’s high tax rate on slot machine gambling at two casino sites, Anne

Continued on A5

In the Quest to Draw More Souls, Turner Memorial AME Redefines Itself By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer HYATTSVILLE, Md. — Turner Memorial AME Church sits at a fork in the road of an unassuming community in Hyattsville, a transitioning church in a county full of thriving megachurches. On this Sunday morning, the doors are open for all who will come and if the Rev. William H. Lamar IV’s prayers

Continued on A7

morguefile

“The Cut” is Dismantled By Maria Morales Special to the AFRO

JESSUP, Md. — They called it “The Cut,” named for Jessup’s Cut, the community that straddled the B&O Railroad track that ran along the East Coast. But most people who referred to the Maryland House of Correction in Jessup by that nickname did so because of the maximum security prison’s controversial and often violent history. Closed since 2007, the facility is now being demolished brick by brick, the 133-year-old prison’s dignified end a sharp contrast to its harried past. An inmate crew from a neighboring facility at the Jessup prison complex is being trained in asbestos and hazardous materials removal, learning skills that could be useful when they are released from prison. Workers are also salvaging bricks, beams and scrap metal to use for other prisons in the state system and are preserving artifacts. The strategy has saved the state more than $100,000 in reusable materials and millions of dollars in demolition costs, according to Mark Vernarelli, public information officer for the Maryland Department of Corrections. A second round of tours of the House of Correction is being Continued on A8

Photo by Avis Thomas-Lester

Rev. Lamar brings home a point during a recent Sunday sermon.

UPPER MARLBORO, Md. — Prince George’s County law enforcement officials are reporting a record drop in homicides this year, a decrease they are attributing to new law enforcement strategies. As of Aug. 13, 40 murders have been reported, 30 fewer than the 70 tallied on the same date last year. That represents an almost 43 percent reduction, good news to an urban-suburban county which last year saw 14 killings in the first two weeks of the year. Last year’s number led county officials to re-evaluate how they were fighting crime overall. On the same date in 2011, the county had 70, which is a 42.9 percent reduction in the murder rate. That caused the county to re-evaluate how it handled fighting crime overall. Prince George’s State’s Attorney Angela Alsobrooks said that the groundwork for the reduction was actually set in stone last summer when the county launched its Summer Crime Initiative. “It’s a collaborative sort of effort; it’s the police department, it’s the state’s attorney’s office and we work in conjunction with other agencies,” she said. “It’s designed to target certain areas based on crime information.” The county took that program and turned it into its Transforming Neighborhoods Initiative, which was launched in April 2012. Police officials added more patrol officers and detectives to evening tours of duty January, May and August. Officials said three months are critical to how the county fights crime the rest of the year. County officials also changed the way non-fatal shootings are investigated. They started allocating more forensic resources to these incidents because, according to Assistant Police Chief Kevin Davis, these crimes would often lead to retaliation and additional bloodshed. The forensics unit was removed from the Bureau of Criminal Investigation and a Bureau

Copyright © 2012 by the Afro-American Company

of Forensic Science and Intelligence was created. “We need to prosecute people with better and more forensic evidence,” Davis said. “A confession is certainly one thing, but we want the DNA, we want the hair fiber, we want the fingerprints and we want all the other things that go into making a prosecution a good one and a successful one.” The police department has also re-established its relationship with several federal, state and regional law enforcement agencies. According to Davis, this was

Prince George’s State’s Attorney Angela Alsobrooks important to insure that couny officials could call for help outside the county. “The world, in general, has certainly gotten smaller,” he said. “Law enforcement – our world has gotten smaller as well. Our jurisdictional lines are blurred. Our bad guys don’t recognize boundaries. Sometimes we get too territorial or too isolated if we just think that we can work within the boundaries of Prince George’s County to impact public safety.” Meanwhile, the state’s attorney’s office is forging its own partnerships. However, both Davis and Alsobrooks said the most important partnership may be the one between law enforcement and the residents “The two are not disconnected,” she said. “The crime goes down when the community is engaged. They give us information and they


November 1, 2008 - November 7, 2008, The Washington Afro-American

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Jennifer Hudson and Relatives Identify Body of Her Slain NephewA5

120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition By Alan King AFRO Staff Writer

sport-utility vehicle sought in connection with the murder of Hudson’s mother and brother. The white, 1994 Chevrolet Suburban with Illinois license

from a neighbor about a suspicious vehicle. The man noticed the vehicle while walking his dog. According to the Chicago Tribune, the boy had been shot multiple times in the back seat of the vehicle. The SUV, registered to Hudson’s murdered brother, was towed with the boy’s body inside is being four Olympic goldand medals processed evidence technifrom 1992bythrough 2000 and cians andset workers. The record body in 1996, the world was removed and taken to timelater in the 200-meter at the Cook County Medical 19.32. Examiner’s Johnsonoffice. was elected into Hudson and other family the U.S. Track and Field Hall members arrived at the Medical of Fame in 2004. Three years Examiner’s office mid-afterlater, he opened the Michael noon to identify the body. Johnson training Given thePerformance choice between lookfacility in McKinney, Texas, ing directly at the body or

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

posted fliers bearing his photograph around the city. On stripped of her medals and Considered by many to be the U.S.Jennifer NationalHudson Track asked and Sunday, sentenced to six months in among the greatest U.S. Field Hall of Fame in 1978. for the public’s help in finding Jennifer Hudson and other federal prison for i lying track and field Olympian, In 1996, he In was to the her nephew. hernamed MySpace relatives positively identified about drug use and for lying Lewis won nine gold medals California Black Sports blog, she thanked fans andHall supabout her involvement in a from 1984 through 1996. of Fame.. taught, porters for He theirlater prayers and check-fraud scheme. She later He was selected in 1984 first at Oberlin College offered a $100,000 reward to declared bankruptcy. and later at Santa Monica by the National Basketball anyone who returned the boy By Perry Green After prison, Jones, 36, Community College, where Association (NBA)’s Chicago alive. of the Women’s Sports investigation, AFRO Sports Editor heSince was athe sociology professor, wrote On the Right Track Bulls and by the National Federation. According to Hudson – who gained stardom track coach and interim detailing her rise and tragic Football League’s (NFL) sesamestreet.org, she’s on the appearing onaccording “American More than 30 Africanathletic director, fall in the world of track Dallas Cowboys. However, he after advisory board of Sesame Idol,” then won anCollege American athletes left the to the and Santa Monica and field. A former college never played for either team. Street’s “Healthy Habits Academy Award for her role in 2012 Summer Olympic information office. basketball star at North His star as a media for Life” program and is a the movie Dreamgirls has Games in London with Both have written–books. Carolina, she also played personality rose and fell, motivational speaker. She stayed out of the public eye. new gold medals, including briefly for the Tulsa Shock is co-chair of the President’s though, with failed attempts at Smith’s Silent Gesture was The Chicago Tribune reportfan favorites like gymnast published in 2007. The John of the Women’s National Council on Fitness, Sports and acting and singing including Julian King, Jennnifer Hudson’s nephew. ed that a parade of cars moved Gabrielle Douglas and Carlospast Story: Sportshome Basketball Association Nutrition. an off-key performance of the slowly herthe family’s runners Allyson Felix and Momentmorning, That Changed (WNBA). Vonetta Flowers – She national anthem the start A spokesman for the office the murders but isatbeing held in Monday past thethe Sonya Richards-Ross. World was released in 2011. was the first of a nationallytold the newspaper that Hudson jail for parole violation after viewing it on a wall-mounted news vans, reporters and curiWhile some of the Black Leon andous Michael Spinks Black person to televised NBA onlookers. gold medalists may show up – Boxers Leon and Michael win an Olympic Courtesy Photos game. His image Neighbors stood Jennifer Hudson and her mom, Darnell who in future Olympic Games, Spinks made quietly history and in the gold medal Donerson during recovered recently was killed, as well as her brother, Jason. others will never share another the Winter Games 1976 Summerreflected Games in and he was a TV on the “remained strong for her famibeing convicted of attempted Olympics spotlight. for a Montreal when they became as she won the analyst during the video screen, the family chose violence. ly” and was clearly its leader. murder and Olympic vehicular Games hijack- in theInfirst plate X584859 was found on the latter. According to the front of of thebrothers Hudson’s chance medals, pair to two-woman the bodytoofwin hermore 7-year-old “She held hands with her famiing. Cook County records show home, Chicago’s West Side after Tribune, Hudson said, “Yes, menmedals in heavy nephew Monday, just hours other know their place in the win gold in jackets the same bobsled event London. ly,” the spokesman said. “It that he pleaded guilty to both police that’s him.” hooded came to after his body was found in a Olympic spotlight has gone sport at the sweatshirts same Olympics duringreceived the 2002a 7 a.m. call Tommie Smith and was obviously a very emotional charges in 1999. He was also kiss the twin crosses forever. But while they may games. Leonwhite competed asbara Winter Olympics and John Carlos moment.” convicted in 1998 for possesing theheavyweight, names of Donerson and never grace another Olympic light Michael as in Salt Lake City. – The two sprinters The boy – the son of Julia sion of a stolen motor vehicle. Jason. podium, their success this a middleweight. According to will forever be Hudson, Jennifer’s sister – had He was released from prison in “Everybody is sick of going summer may thrust them Both brothers boxed VonettaFlowers. remembered for been missing since Friday, 2006 after serving seven years through stuff like this,” Artisha into a lifetime of fame and professionally. Leon Spinks com, she racialmurder activism when a relative found Julian’s for the attempted and West, a former resident of the fortune. Douglas is already a beat famed heavyweight originally the 1968 grandmother, Darnell car hijackingduring charges. area told the Tribune. “We all prime example and gold medal winner attempted Olympic Games No wonder Obama’s campaign is Donerson, 57, and his uncle, and Dallas Cowboys players By Alan King of how a gold The boy remained missing have to stick together. All these trying to distance him from the Tony Romotoand Terrell Owens, AFROcan Staff Writer boost an medal instantly Muhammed Aliare in dying, his eighth to qualify in Mexico Jason Hudson, 29, shot to death through a long weekendCity. in young children and group, saying, “Barack Obama among theinnames submitted to Olympian’s financial status. pro bout to take the world title. compete had won in his grandmother’s home in which policeSmith and volunteers for what?” Never Organized with ACORN.” the 7000 block of South Yale election officials. candidate John ShePresidential recently inked a multiSeven months later, Ali retook Summer Olympic gold in the Hurdevents said those workers, who But Obama’s ties to ACORN run McCain’s attackendorsement on ACORN – Avenue. million dollar the title, the first in a series 200-meter dash Game Wikimedia Commons long and deep. He taught classes were doing those things without Associated Community An Amber Alert – a desigdeal with Kellogg’s. of defeats from which Leon with a time of as a sprinter, Boxer Leon Spinks, (left), won gold medal in the light heavyweight division for ACORN. ACORN’s or permisThey evena endorsed Organization Reform nation for high-risk missing But what for about the Now – Spinks never recovered. He 19.83, the first but after aknowledge few during the 1976 Summer Olympics in Montreal, alongside brother, Michael. Carl sion, were fired. him for President. confirms the successgold of the children – was issued Friday African-American ended his career with a record time the event failed attempts track isand field athlete, won nine gold medals from 1984 “The evidence thatLewis, has sur-(right), Butformer now ACORN in trouble. organization, the head of the after Julian was discovered medalists past? Where of 26-17-3, according to media had been run she decided through faced so far shows they faked 1996. Reporter: There are at least group says. missing after the murders. are “This they now? The AFRO reports. For some time, Leon in less than 20 to focus on 11 investigations across the is testimony to the work forms to get paid for work they Police arrested William reviewed some of the former Spinks was homeless. He seconds. Carlos bobsledding. At didn’t do, not to stuff ballot country involving thousands of we’ve done and success we’ve Balfour, the missing boy’s steplegendary Black athletes to has sustained himself doing Jackie Joyner-Kersee – had won bronze in the same 26, Flowers would eventually which serves both young and boxes.” ACORN, she said, is the potentially fraudulent ACORN had,” Maude Hurd, president of father and estranged husband see how they did after the odd jobs and working around Joyner-Kersee rose to fame event. As they stood on the find her niche as the No. 1 adult athletes. It is used by the victim of fraud, not the perpetra- forms. ACORN, said in an interview of Julia, at his girlfriend’s cheering stopped: boxing training facilities. His as a silver medalist in the Olympic podium, both men brakewoman in bobsledding. Dallas Cowboys. tor of it. Announcer: Massive voter with the AFRO. Southside apartment several Johnson, currently Dominique Dawes – She son, Corey, is a former boxing women’s heptathlon during the raised black-gloved fists in The University Hurd said the onlyofthings fraud. And the44, Obama campaign hours “When this attack started, we after the murders. bogus are theathletics charges website thempaid more $800,000 serves as athan BBC sports to an made history during champion. 1984 Olympic Games in Los the “Black Power salute” Alabama’s had just announced thatthe we1996 had Balfour’s mother, Michele, has selves.that AndFlowers, factcheck.40, orgwas ACORN frontwrites for getfor outthe the vote told registered Games 1.3 million new votanalystand Olympic in Atlanta Michael enjoyed greater Angeles. She won gold medals in protest of the racially noted reporters that her son had agrees. into the Alabama efforts. ers,” she “That’s to say inducted Daily Telegraph.. Recent when shesaid. became thejust first in the 1988 success. He made history as nothing to doSummer with theGames slayings. segregated conditions of the It concluded, “Neither Pressuring banks to issue risky that someone’s remarks linking slavery and Black gymnastrunning to win scared a gold in Korea the heptathlon and a light heavyweight when U.S. at Hudson the time. Sports Hall of Fame in 2011 Balfourinremains a suspect in Jason ACORN nor its employees have loans. Nationwide voter fraud. becauseDawes of ACORN’s success.” athletic superiority triggered medal. was only 19 the long jump. She won a third he took the title, fighting as The athletes’ protest led as the first Alabaman to win a been found guilty of, or even A Barack Obama. Bad judgment. McCain,when who she is running controversy. years-old earnedfor her Winter gold medal during the 1992 a heavyweight, from Larry to a suspension from the U.S. Games gold medal. charged with, castingshe fraudulent ambition. Too risky president on as theaRepublican Marion Jones – Shefor gold medal member oftick- graduate Games in Barcelona. Holmes. He retired after a Olympic team. They received of UAB, returned Blind votes.” America. et, lashed out at ACORN in the captured America’s heart the U.S. women’s gymnastics After retiring from bout in 1988 when Mike no endorsement offers, only to the university six years ago The problem came about prifinal debate against Barack with a five gold-medal competition, she has engaged team, but retired two years Tyson knocked him out in a death threats. However, and is an assistant coach for Since McCain’s comments, Obama, contending the group “is marily because of the way SQUARE HIGH minute and a half, the only performance at the 2000 in philanthropy through later. She later graduated with among many Blacks, they the track and field team there. ACORN’s 87 offices have been on the verge of maybe perpetrat- ACORN operates. Rather than Olympic Games in Sydney, the Jackie Joyner-Kersee aing bachelor’s loss of the 32 he fought as a were seen as heroes. She alsovolunteers, wrote Running on rely on it pays peobombarded with threats and one of thedegree greatestfrom frauds in Australia, earning the label Foundation, which provides the University of Maryland, professional. Unlike many After retiring from track, Ice: The Overcoming Faith of ple, many of them poor or unem- racist mail. voter history in this country, “Fastest Woman on Earth.” training for youngsters and College Park, and has fighters, Michael Spinks, who Carlos tried to play in the Vonetta Flowers. ployed, to sign up new voters. The day after the presidential maybe destroying the fabric of But life after track proved adults. She is a member of developed a career in acting, NFL as a receiver but was was inducted into the Boxing Michael Johnson – The idea was to help both those debate, vandals broke into the democracy.” tumultuous. Boston In 2007 modeling and television hampered by a knee injury Hall of Fame in 1994, retired Usain Bolt, U.S. doing being registered and those organization’s andshe Seattle the board of directors for Factcheck.org, a non-partisan Before the registration. offices andusing stole computers. admitted performanceUSA Track & Field (USATF), and was out of the league a production. healthy and wealthy. He lives sprinter Michael Johnson Web site, found those claims to NOTin ONalmost-seclusion THE LIST BREAD explained, have a After a Cleveland be “exaggerated,” with “noinevienhancing drugsrepresentative during the national governing body year later. Dawes also became, near wasMaud considered the“We “Fastest zero tolerance policy forHe deliberappeared TV, an She e-mail was dence the of any such democracythe 2000on Games. was of the sport. Carl Lewis – Smith was inducted into 2004, youngest president Wilmington, Del. Man on the Planet.” won ate falsification of registration.” sent to the local office saying she destroying fraud.” Most news account neglect to “is going to have her life ended.” Hurd believes the McCain A worker in Providence, R.I., charges were politically motivat- point out that ACORN is required by law to turn in all reg- received a threatening call sayed. LEFT RIGHT istration forms. And they also fail ing, “We know you get off work She said, “Because it’s lowContinued from A4 to note that it was the organizaat 9” and uttered racial epithets. and moderate-income people, A callerCounty to one office left a and people of color, I believe the tion, in many instances, that first Arundel and Baltimore, to offset the financial impact of statewide but not in Prince George’s County, table games brought the phony registrations message on the answering McCain campaign thinks those the future Prince George’s casino. would be allowed — but not a new casino. to the attention of authorities. machine, saying: “Hi, I was just voters are going to vote Critics said casino owners were the real winners. Speculation has focused on the National Harbor complex The McCain camp apparently calling to let you know that Democratic, which is not neces“To me, it’s all about making room for another pig at the along the Potomac River, which is close to Washington and isn’t interested in those fine Barack Obama needs to get sarily true.” gambling trough,” said Delegate Herb McMillan, R-Anne northern Virginia points, preferring to air misleadhung. He’s a (expletive deleted) ACORN is no stranger to Arundel. “The problem is that while all the casino pigs are One of the biggest changes made by the House relates to ing ads that seek to link Obama nigger, and he’s a piece of controversy. getting fat, there’s barely going to be a crumb left to benefit the lowering the tax rate for the new Maryland Live! casino in For 38 years, the non-partisan to ACORN, thereby undercutting (expletive deleted). You guys are people when they’re done.” Anne Arundel County, the state’s largest casino. The tax rate fraudulent, and you need to go to organization has fought for social his political support. But supporters said the nearly $200 million in added extra would also be cut for a planned casino in Baltimore, where McCain: I’m John McCain hell. All the niggers on oak trees. and economic justice for lowrevenue a year once the program is fully implemented will be Caesars Entertainment has secured a license to build a casino and I approve this message. They’re gonna get all hung honand moderate-income 1 BANANA Announcer: Who is Barack eys, they’re going to get assassiAmericans. With 400,000 memnear Oriole Park at Camden Yards and M&T Bank Stadium, ber families organized into more Obama? A man with “a political nated, they’re gonna get killed.” home of the Baltimore Ravens. baptism performed at warp Another message said, “You than 1,200 neighborhood chapThe tax rate for Maryland Live! would be lowered by 8 speed.” Vast ambition. After col- liberal idiots. Dumb (expletive ters in 110 cities nationwide, percentage points. The rate for the planned Caesars casino deleted). Welfare bums. You ACORN has over the years seen lege, he moved to Chicago. would drop 7 percentage points. guys just (expletive deleted) its share of criticism while advo- Became a community organizer. Maryland casinos also would get an additional tax rate cut, There, Obama met Madeleine come to our country, consume cating for affordable housing, if they agree to take over ownership of slot machines. Delegate Herb McMillan, R-Anne Arundel Talbot, part of the Chicago every natural resource— there is, living wages, healthcare for the Maryland Live! would get a further tax rate reduction of branch of ACORN. He was so and make a lot of babies. That’s underserved— and while organ8 percentage points for buying the machines. Other casinos impressive that he was asked to all you guys do. And then suck izing voter registration drives. would get a 6 percentage-point rate cut. train the ACORN staff. up the welfare and expect everyBut none has been as withering far from insignificant. The changes mean Maryland Live! would keep 49 percent What did ACORN in Chicago one else to pay for your hospital and baseless as this one. “Two-hundred million dollars is not a crumb,” said Delegate of the money generated by the casino, instead of 33 percent. engage in? Bullying banks. bills for your kids. I jus’ say let With the presidential election Before age five, every room a classroom. Kumar Barve, D-Montgomery. The Baltimore casino would keepis46 percent. Intimidation tactics. Disruption your kids die. That’s the best less than two weeks away, State analysts estimate the state’s education trust fund would Maryland Live! could later seek an of business. ACORN forced move. Just let your children die. ACORN’s detractors allege the Fun learning opportunities are everywhere. Simpleadditional things like2 percent with Forget about paying for hospital get about $174 million in added revenue in fiscal year counting 2017, and approval from a new commission, and Baltimore organization has engaged in mas- banks to issue risky home loans. identifying shapes activate a child’s learning ability,could seek 3 bills for them. I’m nothas gonna doawarded for the Prince George’s sive voter registration fraud after The same types of loans that assuming a license been percent more. and help them enter school more prepared. That’s why PNC caused the financial crisis we’re it. You guys are about lowlifes. And I the reported discovery of bogus casino. That’s $32 million less than the initial Senate bill Supporters the bill say Maryland Live! is getting the founded Grow Up Great and its of Spanish-language equivalent Crezca in today. hope youhave all die.” names, such as Mickey Mouse $ reductions, because it would be closer to the new would provided. The revenue would rise to $199 million higher tax con Éxito, a 10-year, 100 million program to help prepare young hateIncalls inHurd fiscalthinks year the 2019. the will next fiscal year, the state would casino, Cos., whichSesame owns the Anne Arundel childrenget for school and and life. the PickCordish up a free bilingual Street™ cease aboutsoon. $60 million more. County casino, can’t purchase slot machines as cheaply as the “Happy, Healthy, Ready for School” kit at a PNC branch. It’s filled “In twoHouse weeks,amended I think these The the measure Tuesday night to allow owners of the state’s other larger casinos. with all kinds of simple, everyday things you can do to help a child attacks will be over. But I think it veterans’ groups to have five instant pull tab gamblinglearn. Together,The measure also our enables Marylandsocasinos — the Prince we can work with communities an entire will be harder for us to get our machines at their facilities, with the veterans and the state George’s site would be the sixth allowable location generation won’t just grow up... but grow up great. — to be name back on good graces Identification Statements splitting the money at first before the profits are allocated to a open 24 hours. The bill also reshapes the current State Lottery because they really trashed us in Baltimore Afro-American — (USPS 040-800) is published weekly by The Afro-American state veterans fund after 2014. Agency and the State Lottery and Gaming Control Agency. the last few weeks.” Newspapers, 2519 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-4602. Subscription Rate: To find out more, go to pncgrowupgreat.com Baltimore - 1 Year - $30.00 (Price includes tax.) Checks for subscriptions should be made A key part of the bill lowers the state’s 67-percent tax rate Meanwhile, lawmakers failed to reconcile differences on a But ACORN will not be or call 1-877-PNC-GROW. payable to: The Afro-American Newspaper Company, 2519 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD to varying degrees for the state’s casinos, partly to offset added measure to address dog-biting liability, prompted by a ruling deterred. 21218-4602. Periodicals postage paid at Baltimore, MD. competition from a new casino in Prince George’s County by the state’s highest court in April that determined pit bulls to “We’ve been fighting for a POSTMASTER: Send addresses changes to: The Afro-American Newspaper Company, 2519 andtime, also for to divest stateforfrom purchasing expensive slot be “inherently dangerous.” The ruling means that in an attack long over 30the years, N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-4602. the rights of low- and moderatemachines. involving a pit bull, plaintiffs in civil lawsuits don’t have to The Washington Afro-American & Washington Tribune — (0276-6523) is published income people all across Voters would havethe to approve the gambling expansion prove the animal’s prior violent behavior for the owner to be weekly by the Afro-American Newspapers at 1917 Benning Road, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002-4723. Subscription Rate: Washington - 1 Year - $30.00. Periodical Postage paid country,” Hurd said. “We’re in November. Voters in Prince George’s County would need held liable for damages. The ruling also means landlords can be at Washington, D.C. going to continue to fight for site. If the ballot question passes to approve the new casino held liable in such cases. POSTMASTER: Send addresses changes to: The Washington Afro-American economic justice in our commu& Washington Tribune, 2519 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218-4602. nities.” TM /©2008 Sesame Workshop. All rights reserved. ©2008 The PNC Financial Services Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Where Are They Now?

African-American Gold Medalists Soared, Fell After the Olympics

“She held hands with her family. It was obviously a very emotional moment.”

ACORN Fights Back

Leader Calls Voter Registration Fraud Charges ‘Bogus’

Md. General Assembly

“To me, it’s all about making room for another pig at the gambling trough.”


A6

120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

20 Years on the Black Side of Vinyl By Alexis Taylor Special to the AFRO BALTIMORE, Md. — House music thumps on a record player. The lights are low. There are records everywhere. They are pasted to the ceiling. They line shelves by the thousands. They are piled on the staircase. They decorate hats and T-shirt available for sale. Larry Jeter sits on a stool behind the counter greeting by first name most of the customers who saunter into “the record store on the corner.” Since opening Dimensions in Music, what may be Baltimore’s only Black-owned record store in 1992, Jeter has amassed a collection of well over 100,000 vinyl 45s and LPs and a loyal list of customers.

segregated local hotels. Jeter studied music at the Peabody Conservatory and started his own career as a musician, but his dream was always to

“I always wanted to do a store that had a lot of different things going on. I wanted dimensions. So I said, ‘Why not call it Dimensions in Music?’” — Larry Jeter “God, Jesus, and a good customer base” are the keys to his shop’s success, he said. Born and raised in West Baltimore, Jeter said he couldn’t imagine himself doing anything other than music. He was born into it. His father was a jazz musician who often loaned the family couch to celebrity musicians who could play to integrated audiences, but were barred from staying in then-

Your History • Your Community • Your News

The Afro-American Newspapers

Baltimore Office • Corporate Headquarters 2519 N. Charles Street Baltimore, Maryland 21218-4602 410-554-8200 • Fax: 1-877-570-9297 www.afro.com Founded by John Henry Murphy Sr., August 13, 1892 Washington Publisher Emerita - Frances L. Murphy II Chairman of the Board/Publisher - John J. Oliver, Jr. Executive Assistant - Takiea Hinton - 410-554-8222 Receptionist - Wanda Pearson - 410-554-8200 Director of Development & Sponsorships Susan Gould - 410-554-8289- sgould@afro.com

Larry Jeter, owner of Dimensions in Music own his own record store. In 1972, straight out of high school, he landed a job in the record department of E.J. Korvette’s Westside store. One year later, he moved to Music Liberated, then located on Saratoga Street. He worked there for a decade before being hand-picked to manage the now-defunct downtown Douglas’ record store. “You really had to know your stuff,” said Jeter. “We were selling 1,000 records a day.” When Douglas’ closed in 1990, Jeter knew it was time to strike out on his own. “I was laying in the bed one morning thinking about a Lonnie Liston Smith song called ‘Expansions,’ and I said, ‘I always wanted to do a store that had a lot of different things going on,’” Jeter recalled. “I wanted dimensions. So I said, ‘Why not call it Dimensions in Music?’” Dimensions in Music, or DM as it is known to loyal customers, located on Park Avenue, features untold numbers of musical genres. The catalog categories range from underground to mainstream hip hop, jazz to spoken word and soul to classical. The collection also includes R&B, reggae, rock and doo-wop. What’s not inside the store is probably contained in a shed

Baltimore Advertising Manager Robert Blount - 410-554-8246 - rblount@afro.com Sr. Advertising Account Executive - Annie Russ - 410-554-8235 Advertising Account Executive - Marquise Goodwin - 410-554-8274

built next to Jeter’s home specifically for overflow. And what’s not there can be ordered. Jeter’s wife, Donna Gaither, remembers the doubt some acquaintances voiced when they opened their original location on Charles Street, where the Tremont Grand Hotel now stands. “People said ‘Businesses like this, small Black-owned businesses, never last five years,’” Gaither recalled. “I guess we broke the mold. Who would have thought we would last 20 years, given the record industry and the survival rate of small Black independent Photo by Alexis Taylor businesses?” In the old store, Jeter held live jazz sessions that were televised on the local cable channel, bringing in celebrity artists and also providing a venue for some local musicians. Jeter is contemplating bringing back the jazz series and though he doesn’t encourage aspiring entrepreneurs to follow him into the unpredictable business, he said he expects to own the shop for years to come. “Larry Jeter has been a huge supporter for up and coming talent from a city that historically produces great musicians and artists,” said Marc Evans, 41, a Baltimore singer and songwriter who said he sometimes caught the jazz show during his undergrad years at Morgan State University. “I remember buying Maysa’s first solo album…and collectable vinyl from various house and soul artists.” Baltimore musician, singer, and songwriter Adrian Blu recalled stumbling into the shop 20 years ago. “I had been hearing a lot about the store,” he said. “That day I purchased two records—El DeBarge’s ‘Somebody Loves You’ and Dianne Reeves ‘Better Days.’” Blu said he’s still a fan. “DM carries a vibration and an energy that preserves what music and the arts have always been about—community and diversity,” he said.

Pastor Receives Honorary Doctorate

Director of Finance - Jack Leister - 410-554-8242 Archivist - John Gartrell - 410-554-8265

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Director, Community & Public Relations Diane W. Hocker - 410-554-8243 Editorial Executive Editor - Avis Thomas-Lester Editor - Dorothy Boulware Acting Editor - Gregory Dale - editor@afro.com Production Department - 410-554-8288 Global Markets Director - Benjamin M. Phillips IV - 410-554-8220 bphillips@afro.com Baltimore Circulation/Distribution Manager Sammy Graham - 410-554-8266

John C Bugg III, Agent 6711 Belair Road Baltimore, MD 21206 Bus: 410-661-6056 www.johnbugginsurance.com

Washington Office 1917 Benning Road, N.E. Washington, D.C. 20002-4723 202-332-0080 • Fax: 1-877-570-9297

Get discounts up to 5-40%.* Saving money is important. That’s why you can count on me to get you all the discounts you deserve. GET TO A BETTER STATE™. CALL ME TODAY.

General Manager - Edgar Brookins - ext. 116 Office Administrator - Mia Hayes-Hawkins - ext. 112 Washington Circulation/Distribution Manager Edgar Brookins - 202-332-0080, ext. 116

Customer Service, Home Delivery and Subscriptions: 410-554-8234 • Customer Service@afro.com Billing Inquiries: 410-554-8226 Nights and Weekends: 410-554-8282

*Discounts vary by state. 1101282.1

State Farm, Home Office, Bloomington, IL

BOWIE, Md. — The Rev. Jonathan L. Weaver, pastor of Greater Mt. Nebo A.M.E. Church in Bowie, received an honorary doctorate in June from Sojourner Douglass College. The commencement was held at the Meyerhoff Symphony Hall in Baltimore. The degree is conferred upon those whose lives and achievements exemplify the mission and purpose of the college. Weaver was nominated by the education committee of his church, said Barbara Wood, head of Greater Mt. Nebo’s education ministry.


120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

A7

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

In the Quest

It’s time to stock up!

Continued from A4

are answered, they will remain to bring in the congregation’s service, members praised open for a long time. with enthusiasm. Older multicultural neighbors for It will not be, however, women in their finest church games, a college fair, food, without change and some hats and middle-aged vendors and entertainment. hard work. Turner Memorial women in West African The church is doing was organized in 1919 in garb celebrated side by side. outreach at nearby Buck Washington, D.C., and There were a smattering of Lodge Middle School, a flourished there for more teenagers and young children. school that is more than 75 than eight decades. Like The choir, co-directed by percent Hispanic. The church several other D.C. churches Lamar’s brother, Marty is partnering with the school looking for more space to Lamar, sang several popular to create a STEM—science, accommodate their growing gospel songs, including technology, engineering and memberships and expanding William McDowell’s “I mathematics—program for ministries, the church moved Won’t Go Back,” along students. to Prince George’s County in with traditional hymns. “We want to be a church 2003 and settled into a threethat appeals to all,” said Lamar’s wife, Courtney, a level sanctuary in the 7200 Patricia A. Browne, of Ph.D. who teaches at Bowie block of 16th Place. Springdale, who grew up in State University, assists the Now, the church and its the church and serves on the church in technology-related new pastor are examining diversity team. “We want to concerns and many programs. what it needs to do to spur take advantage of the fact that However, Lamar readily growth in an area where we have members of every admitted that he’s going churches with thousands generation represented at the to need to attract younger of members are increasing church, which provides us a members. He has allowed and a community where the rich opportunity for crossmore creative expression in demographics are shifting. dancing, singing and other Lamar said he does forms of art—as long as not begrudge the huge it glorifies God. Christian churches to which many comedian Steffon Vann people are flocking, performed briefly on a because they serve a recent Sunday. purpose. Turner Memorial “Young people are not has a purpose too, he said. just going to start coming “Many of those because I’m here,” he churches have found ways continued. “The culture to place the needs of their has to change.” constituency at the core Attorney Kisha Brown, of how they develop and 34, of College Park, said do ministry,” Lamar said. Lamar has changed the “There are enough people dynamic of the Sunday and enough communities in services. Photo by Avis Thomas-Lester the metropolitan area that “On youth Sundays, if we placed the needs of he’s allowed the young Rev. Lamar those outside [the church] people to wear the shirts in the center of ministry, or colors of the high generational enrichment.” then they would be attracted.” school or college they attend,” At a recent worship Lamar, who celebrated she said. “During the Trayvon service, the church’s oldest his 38th birthday on Aug. 12, Martin situation, we had a member, Joel McLeod, 102, was raised in Macon, Ga., ‘Wear Your Hoodie to Church led the congregation in a and Jacksonville, Fla. He Day.’ He just makes sure traditional hymn, playing the graduated from Florida A&M that…we know what’s going harmonica as accompaniment. on in the real world.” University in Tallahassee. A multi-generational trio— In 1999, he completed Duke Lamar said that the road two members were in their University Divinity School ahead for the church is long 30s and one was in her and received his first pastoral but that the members, working 90s—joined together for a appointment to St. Phillip together, can accomplish what medley. Liturgical dancers AME Church in Monticello, needs to be done to grow. who performed ranged in Fla. Over the next nine years, “What a pastoral leader age from 5 to 80-something. he served as pastor at St. can do is corral the gifts and Phillip, Greater St. Paul AME Lamar recognized every graces of those who are there, generation—from babies to in Orlando and New Bethel work together on a common McLeod. AME in Jacksonville. vision and mission, and pray “Every congregation In early 2008, he went that by the power of the spirit, back to Duke Divinity School doesn’t have that,” Brown said. we can move together toward On a recent Sunday to train Christian leaders. that,” he said. However, he said, God told him to return to the ministry and in February 2011, he took the position as Turner Memorial’s pastor. Lamar said he grew up middle class and when he became pastor of Turner Memorial, he inherited a congregation of middle-class members. This was both a blessing and a curse, he said. The African-American middle class was launched out of churches just like his decades ago when churches were the center of Black life. However, now, as Blacks have been able to achieve the so-called American dream, many have abandoned the church. Lamar wants to reverse that trend. “What I thought 15-20 years ago when I decided to go to seminary was [that] I wanted be a part of a church that could attract folk like me, who had gone to college, came back to church to serve and to worship the God that made possible their success,” he said, adding that he wanted to “then sow that back into communities that did not have it.” That’s his goal at Turner Memorial. To start, he wants to attract more congregants. Half of the church’s 500 members—about 250 attend services regularly—are over 50 years old. He’s has also reached out to the church’s Latino and African neighbors. Log on to WWW.AFRO.COM and register to win! A Latino congregation THIS FILM IS RATED R FOR STRONG BLOODY VIOLENCE THROUGHOUT. NO pURCHASE NECESSARY. Supplies are limited. Two passes per winner. Each pass admits one. Seating is not guaranteed and is on a shares space in the church, first-come, first-served basis. Employees of all promotional partners and the Afro American are not eligible. All decisions are final. worshipping on Wednesdays and Saturdays. A community day is scheduled in October www.theexpendables2film.com | www.facebook.com/Expendables2Movie

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A8

120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

“The Cut” Continued from A4

planned following the success of a two-day tour during the first weekend in August when more than 2,000 visitors roamed the grounds and many

more expressed interest in the remains of one of the state’s oldest incarceration sites. Most of the visitors were Jessup residents, former

employees and their families, and also family members of former inmates. The group included a judge and a former Baltimore City homicide

detective who had played roles in sending criminals there, Vernarelli said. The crowd included penal and criminal justice scholars, as

well. “It was the first and only opportunity to look inside the storied institution,” Vernarelli said.

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Built in 1879, the House of Correction was one of the oldest penal facilities in the state and at its peak, teemed with convicts from the Baltimore and Washington D.C. areas. It could no longer accommodate the volume of inmates housed there, he said. “Historically, the two biggest jurisdictions, Baltimore City and Prince George’s County, send us more inmates than any other counties in the state,” Vernarelli said. Gov. Martin O’Malley (D) shut down the House of Correction in 2007 as one of his first major acts in office. The move followed an attack on corrections officer David McGuinn, who died after he was stabbed by two inmates while on duty in July 2006. The officer’s death capped a long string of bloody incidents and escalating violence at the prison, where drug trafficking, gang activity and escapes were common. The result was a shuffling of the state’s 2,000 inmates to relocate 845 prisoners from The Cut. “It was a tremendous, bold move to close it with such resolve and so quickly,” Vernarelli said. The site still houses five correctional facilities: Patuxent Institution; Maryland Correctional Institution-Jessup, a mediumsecurity prison for males; Maryland Correctional Institution for Women, the only state prison for women; Brockbridge Correction Facility, a pre-release unit for men; and Jessup Correctional Institution, a maximumsecurity prison for men. “As many bad things that happened here, a lot of inmates changed because of the programs that were offered here,” Vernarelli said. “But that is never talked about. Vast education programs including GED and writing classes were offered and even Pell grants for those who wanted higher education. Those inmates are now leading productive lives as taxpaying members of society.” Despite its demise, the reputation of The Cut lives on in an online archives and in references in popular TV dramas like “Homicide: Life on the Street” and “The Wire,” both based in Baltimore. The railroad line, now owned by CXR, still runs within 200 feet of the prison.


120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

Shari Flicking, Clarence Massey, Denise Dorsey, Dana Green, Takiea Hinton, John Gartrell, Vickie Johnson, Benjamin Phillips IV, Dan Harmon, Perry Green, Jake Oliver, Diane Hocker, Wanda Pearson, Dorothy Boulware, Ron Taylor, Avis Thomas-Lester, Jack Leister, Cheryl Cooper, Mark Gatewood, Krishana Davis, Alexis Taylor, Marquise Goodwin, Sammy Graham, Robert Blount. Inset: George Barnette, Irie Harris, Mia Hayes-Hawkins, Edgar Brookins

A9


A10

120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

The Afro-American, August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

Sergeant John H. Murphy Sr.: Story of a Civil War Veteran AFRO Founder Writes to His Children

“I was in the wilderness with General Grant, and in North Carolina with General Sherman when he captured the Rebel army of General Joe Johnston.” Excerpts from a letter by John H Murphy, Sr., written December 5, 1920, to be opened December 25, 1940. I always wanted to live long enough to celebrate my 100th birthday. Grandpa Bennie died at 80 but grandmother Rachel was bright and cheerful at 95. Today I am 80 and I’d like to go another 20 years, so as to beat her record. Just in case I don’t make it, I’ll celebrate anyhow by writing this letter which is not to be opened until December 25, 1940. I’ll be 100 then if I live, and my children’s idea of a celebration will be to give me a cake I can’t digest and invite in young people whose slang I can’t understand. The War Foretold By 1940 the United States will probably be at war again. I have lived through the Mexican War, the Indian Campaigns, the Civil War, Spanish-American War and the World War. Wars are for young people. All wars are fought for freedom, and governments are wise. They promise citizens something in order to have them risk their lives freely for the homeland—booty, adventure, comradeship, pensions, good pay, travel, uniforms and brass bands plus martial music that makes hearts beat faster. It doesn’t take long to train soldiers. I enlisted March 18, 1864, and by Summer was fighting with General Grant in the Wilderness. By April, 1865, I was in North Carolina with General Sherman when he captured the rebel army of General Joe Johnston. Ours was the 30th Regiment, U.S. Colored Maryland Volunteers. We entered this war with 151 men in our company and came out with 79. We lost 24 men by transfer to the navy, 24 were killed and 24 more sick, lost or deserted. That was a real war for liberty. I went in a slave and came out a freedman. I went in a chattel and came out as a man with the blue uniform of my country as a guarantee of freedom, and a sergeant’s stripes on my arms to prove that there is promotion for those who can earn it.

World War I and Skirmish

Compared with the Civil War, the Spanish War and the World War were just skirmishes. Today we have lost a great deal of what I thought had been gained in 1865. The nation welshed on Lincoln. It used the 50 years after emancipation gradually to enslave the common people again. If the next great war lasts long enough, we will get real freedom again. A nation in extremity treats its humblest citizens kindly. My father was Benjamin Murphy, 1813-95. His father was a Benjamin, 1763-1849. I should have been named Benjamin myself, instead of John Henry. The women folks in our home have been called Susan, Ann, Rachel, Caroline and Elizabeth. A family ought always stick to its old names. Gives them something to tie to.

Jack of Many Trades

I’d like to be around when this is opened to see what the boys have done with the AFROAMERICAN. It’s one thing I didn’t fail in. I have been a white-washer, a soldier, a porter, a janitor, a postal employee and a printer. Looks like I’ll die a printer, but I almost didn’t. I was near enough to failure that day the Lancet offered a merger. I had the plant and they had the editorial brains. It looked like a good plan to merge. I was taking in $70 to $90 a week and didn’t have enough some weeks to pay the help. And then instead of merging, they offered to buy me out. I suggested $2,000, and they laughed. “Two thousand dollars for the AFRO? We’ll pay $100 and six months from now we’ll be able to get it for nothing.” That made me mad and I walked out of that conference determined to make good. After all, I had some pride.

A Wife and 10 Children

There was another reason I had to make good. I had a wife and 10 children—a child nearly every two and one-half years between 1868 and 1892. Nobody wants his wife to believe him a failure. He sometimes doesn’t care what his children think, but he always likes to be a hero to her. If the AFRO-AMERICAN lives, it will be because I couldn’t let

her down. I remember the day I first saw Martha Howard. I was mustered out of the army, and rushed home to see my mother. We lived at 4 Forney Alley and, like a kid, I rushed into the back way to surprise her. Instead, I surprised myself, for there in the kitchen, with her skirt rolled up and pinned in the back, so as to make it an apron, was as pretty a freckled face girl as I had ever seen. Her sleeves were rolled and she was “rubbing out” a few things at the wash tub.

Who Is That Girl?

I hardly got to my mother’s room, where she was lying down, before I asked, “Who’s that girl?” “Just a neighbor,” mother said. “She dropped in to see me and when she found me unwell, stayed to put things to rights.” After a while, I went back in the kitchen. The dress was down, and so were the sleeves. The place was bright and shining; so were her eyes. I remember how she picked up my cap and coat where I had dropped them; put the cap on her head and pressed the stripes on the coat sleeve with thoughtful fingers. This was the army blue, and this was the soldier who fought with Abe Lincoln and Grant and Sherman to free the slaves.

It Took A Year

I said to myself, “John, that’s the girl for you if she’ll have you.” And I lost no time. But it took me a year to put it over because father George Howard wasn’t anxious to have his daughter marry a penniless soldier who would have to take his bride to live with his parents. I looked at that 500-acre farm of his stocked with horses, oxen, cows and chickens, and promised her a world that would be gay with the laughter of children and happy because I worshipped her. Father George was reluctant, but the two of us won him over, and on January 2, 1868, we were married. After the second child came, we named it George Benjamin and went to live on Saratoga Street in a house Father George gave his daughter.

Children and Jobs

From then on, there were for me children and jobs. I kept the home together all Winter and for 30 Summers packed the whole brood off to Father George in the country where they worked on the farm. Back they came in the Fall laden with dried fruit, preserves, vegetables and meat to last through the cold weather. Wallpaper succeeded white-washing and I was out of a job. As a war veteran, I was appointed to the postal service immediately discharged when the Democrats came in with Cleveland. I became a porter, then a janitor, ran a feed store and finally landed in a print shop as manager. I had to make good my pledges to Martha and Father George. Neither of them lived to see us do all the things we planned. I wished they could be here today just as I should like to be around in 1940.

Horse Feathers!

The AFRO-AMERICAN has its own building now and a circulation of 8,500. It has 16 employees and pays them every week, but that is horse feathers to what it can do. I measure a newspaper not in buildings, equipment and employees—those are trimmings. A newspaper succeeds because its management believes in itself, in God and in the present generation. It must always ask itself. Whether it has kept faith with the common people; Whether it has no other goal except to see that their liberties are preserved and their future assured; Whether it is fighting to get rid of slums, to provide jobs for everybody; Whether it stays out of politics except to expose corruption and condemn injustice, race prejudice and the cowardice of compromise. The AFRO-AMERICAN must become a bi-weekly, then a tri-weekly, and eventually, when advertising warrants, a daily. It has always had a loyal constituency who believe it is honest, decent and progressive. It is that kind of newspaper now and I hope it never changes. JOHN H. MURPHY December 25, 1920

Continued on A11 1940

1944

Members of Murphy Family join Mr. & Mrs. John H. Murphy Jr to celebrate their 21st wedding anniversary and her birthday — left to right Frances Murphy, George B. Murphy Sr, Sadie Murphy, Vashti Turley Murphy, Carl Murphy, Marie and John Murphy Jr (honorees), D. Arnett Murphy and Grace Murphy.

1930

3rd Generation Family Members — Younger Days; 1st row: Genesta Gilbert Lane, Jean Murphy Queen, Carlita M. Jones, Vashti M. Matthews; 2nd row: Rebecca M Young, Mae M. Dyson, Clementine M. Knox, Elizabeth M. Oliver, Ida M. Peters, and Elizabeth M. Moss; 3rd row: James Murphy, Howard Murphy, John Oliver, Sr., Noah Thompson, and John H. Murphy, III.

1910

Early family Photo of Martha and John Murphy (seated) surrounded by children and spouses

AFRO Headquarters location at 628 N. Eutaw St for most of its 120 years until 1992 when it relocated to 2519 N. Charles St.


120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012, The Afro-American

Four generations of Murphy family members have managed this

enterprise, The AFRO American Newspapers, that began six decades ago when Civil War veteran John H. Murphy Sr. merged his one-page weekly church publication, the Sunday School Helper with two other church publications, The Ledger (owned by George F. Bragg of Baltimore’s St. James Episcopal Church) and the Afro American (published by the Rev. William M. Alexander, pastor of Baltimore’s Sharon Baptist Church). The consolidation was made possible by a loan from Mr. Murphy’s wife, Martha Howard Murphy, who was also co-founder of the Colored Women’sChristian Association. Upon his death in 1922, Mr. Murphy had served as publisher for 30 years and built the newspaper into the most widely circulated Black paper along the coastal Atlantic and had used it to challenge Jim Crow practices in Maryland as well as across the country. He left to his 10 children who grew up working in the business that was to become the largest Black newspaper plant in the country, operated by 138 employees with a weekly circulation of 14,000. Anticipating the AFRO’s longevity, he penned a letter to his family that was sealed until what would have been his 100th birthday, Dec. 25, 1940 (printed separately). His five sons had been trained in different aspects of the newspaper business with four assuming active roles as the company’s second generation of management. The same year he died, his son Daniel also passed, having contracted lead poison after a quarter century of service in the composing room. Carl J. Murphy who had joined his father in 1918 as editor became president, publisher and later chairman of the board; John H. Murphy Jr. was the head of circulation and production; D. Arnett Murphy was responsible for advertising and assisted with national distribution and George B. Murphy served on the board. Upon assuming the reins, the Murphy brothers embarked on an ambitious expansion plan that included acquisitions. Critical to their success was their investment in employees and providing them opportunities to excel. The result was generations of family members as well as employees, the AFRO’s extended family. The AFRO American under Carl Murphy’s editorial control rose to national prominence and grew to 13 editions including Baltimore and Washington twice weekly, Philadelphia, Richmond, Newark, and six regional National weekly publications; thus establishing The AFRO American Newspapers’ brand throughout the east coast and across the south, impacting many Black communities and affecting social change on a national scale. Its editorial pages advocated for the hiring of African Americans by police and fire departments; pressed for Black representation in the legislatures, and demanded the establishment of state supported universities to educate minorities. Always at the forefront of the struggle to attain equal rights and treatment for all citizens in our community, the AFRO dispatched an army of journalists to capture photos and record in-depth stories to shine the light of truth on what are now historical events. The social, community, church and sports pages provided unparalleled coverage of life in our communities that were often overlooked and minimized in general distribution newspapers. Never afraid of controversy, the beacon at times exposed less than honorable behavior by members of the community but always extended the opportunity for individuals to tell their side of the story. In the 1930’s, Frances Murphy, one of the founder’s daughters, launched “The Clean Block” campaign. Still in existence today, the campaign developed into an annual event aimed at reducing crime and improving the appearance of inner-city neighborhoods. In recent years, the program embraced green initiatives and is now called AFRO Clean Green Block campaign. With the establishment of the AFRO Honor Roll in the 1940’s

A11

and Mrs. Santa program in the 1950’s, the daughters and granddaughters of the founder had firmly established what is now AFRO Charities. During World War II, the paper stationed several of its reporters in Europe, the Aleutians, Africa, Japan and other parts of the South Pacific and provided its readers with first-hand coverage of the war. One of its reporters was Carl Murphy’s daughter Elizabeth Murphy Phillips Moss who was the first Black female correspondent. She would follow in her father’s footsteps serving in a number of editorial leadership positions and ultimately vice president and publisher until her retirement in 1976 as part of the third generation leadership team that assumed management of the company upon Carl Murphy’s death in 1967. Other members of this leadership team included John H. Murphy III who cut his teeth at the Philadelphia AFRO and rose through the ranks to become president in 1961 and later chairman of the board (1976 – 1986); John J. Oliver Sr. whose career began as a mechanical superintendent and held a number of positions in production until being elected president (1976 – 1986), Frances L. Murphy II, chairman of the board (1970 – 1974) and publisher of the Washington AFRO in the 1990s until her retirement and Mae Murphy Dyson, corporate secretary who served as D. Arnett’s right hand and continued in a board leadership position until her retirement. In the 1960’s facing changes in the print publishing business, the AFRO expanded by launching a monthly called Dawn magazine that, at the height of its 20 year print run, was inserted into more than 2 million Black newspapers across the country. In 1986, John J. Oliver Jr and Frances M Draper, along with fourth generation family members Arthur W. Murphy and Benjamin M. Phillips IV formed the core leadership group that currently manages the paper today. Laura W. Murphy assumed Arthur Murphy’s position when he passed. Since assuming the chairman of the board, CEO and publisher position, Jake Oliver and his team have guided the paper through technological and business transitions. The company has been at the forefront of launching new technology including being one of the first African- American newspaper websites. He recognized early on that the future of the media company we still call the AFRO American Newspapers rests on its ability to successfully implement electronic products including special print and electronic supplements, e-Editions, e-Blasts and now social media platform initiatives. As was the case with previous generations, the Murphy family has attracted the 5th generation family group members to serve on the company board of directors alongside current family members and non-family directors. The environment the company operates in today is vastly different; however, the need for what the AFRO provides is even more crucial than ever as evidenced by the comparison of yesterday’s stories with today’s. Inequality and injustice are still being experienced by the communities the AFRO considers its readership. AFRO pages show many examples of progress but unfortunately, they also poignantly show how much more must be done to honor the challenge given by the founder to his family in 1920. Representing more than 95 percent of the privately held company stock, the Murphy Family has every confidence in its leadership to grow the company and deliver on the promises made to its readership. 1917/18 1989

2012

John “Jake” Oliver, Jr, Chairman, CEO & Publisher; Frances M. Draper, Treasurer; Benjamin M. Phillips IV, Secretary

Founder with Sons; Seated: George B. Murphy, John H. Murphy Sr, Daniel Murphy Standing: John H. Murphy, Jr. D. Arnett Murphy, Carl Murphy

1970

2000

Elizabeth Murphy Phillips Moss 1900

Frances L. Murphy II

1910

1930 John H. Murphy, III 1864

Founder John H. Murphy, Sr working at his desk

1890

Carl J. Murphy

Founder John H. Murphy, Sr. formal portrait

1900

John & Martha 5 daughters — left to right Harriett Murphy Gilbert, Eva Sue Purdy, Maria Lavina Thompson, Rose Murphy Oliver and Frances Murphy

Sergeant John H. Murphy

Martha Howard Murphy — Invested in Dream


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120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

AFRO Stories

Virginia Girl Ordered Boyfriend Through AFRO Pen Pal Ad By Barbara Booker Wood I grew up in Chesterfield County, Va., in Bon Air, a rural hamlet west of Richmond. Times were difficult for my family and others in our neighborhood. Though money was scarce, my parents often found money to purchase the Richmond AFRO newspaper. Our entire family looked forward to reading it. Everybody knew everybody in Bon Air. The families supported one another. Whenever an adult noticed

inappropriate behavior by anyone’s child, it was swiftly corrected and reported to the parents. As a curious high school student at Carver High, the only high school for African Americans in all of Chesterfield County, I wanted to broaden my knowledge beyond my community and school. One day in 1958, while reading the AFRO, I noticed a section called “Pen Pals” As the middle child, I often felt overlooked in the family. My parents had each other, as

did my two older siblings and my two younger siblings. I felt left out. I placed my name and address in the Richmond AFRO to find a pen pal to learn about the lifestyles of others. Two or three people responded, but our pen pal relationships soon ended. Then, I started writing a sergeant in the U.S. Marines who was stationed in D.C. We exchanged letters, pictures and post cards. We shared stories about our families and he told me about his work. When I was a junior in high school, we

decided that we should meet face to face. I invited him to my home. He met my parents and siblings. He later also met many of my neighbors. It became a joke among the neighbors. Whenever they

saw his 1957 yellow Ford Fairlane 500 convertible drive through Bon Air, they would say, laughing, “He’s the one the middle Booker girl ordered from the AFRO newspaper.” I recall many Sunday afternoons when my Marine and I went to Bayshore Beach, a segregated beach in the Tidewater area. We ate, talked and laughed. But after two years, we began to grow apart. His travels increased and during my senior year of high school, I met someone else. Though we continued to exchange letters, he

Longtime AFRO reader Barbara Booker Wood recalls meeting a beau through a Richmond AFRO pen pals ad.

visited less frequently. Our last correspondence was in 196l. God allowed this extraordinary military man, my pen pal, to make my life as a teenager more fulfilling. Congratulations AFROAmerican Newspapers on 120 Years! The AFRO will always have a special place in my heart and memories! Wood, 70, is retired from the federal government. She lost contact with Sgt. John Hardy, her pen pal, but learned several years ago that he has since died. She is the author of “Middle Child: This Is My Story.” The foreword was penned by legendary AFRO writer Sam Lacy.

Barbara Booker Wood has kept pen pal John Hardy’s letter for 51 years. He is deceased.

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120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

A8

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

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The Baltimore Afro-American, March 3, 2007 - March 9, 2007

Editorial

John J. Oliver Jr., Chairman of the Board/Publisher Frances L. Murphy II, Washington Publisher Emeritus Dorothy Boulware, Editor

God Bless You, Mr. Stockett!

Thomas Stockett. That’s Stockett. S-t-o-c-k-e-t-t. That’s the way he identified himself on voice mail. As if we could forget his distinctive voice. As if we could forget the smile that greeted us each morning. Or the devilish twinkle in his eye. Or the gracious manner with which he accepted the help he needed—never begrudging us the joy we received with every opportunity to serve. A mellow Thomas Stockett he was these last few years; probably not the full measure of the physical man who left his indelible mark on the AFRO. But, absolutely, the full measure of the artist, who could say with one illustration what our hundreds of choice words could not convey: Assailing segregation; Lambasting the absurdities of lynching; "He told it all in 53 years and left nothing out. Railing against racism in every form; Decrying the denigration of inequalit; He put it out there so everyone could get it. All Sounding the alarm whenever necessary; this from a quiet man who could easily be He depicted our joy and our sorrow; overlooked because of his easy temperament." He announced our celebrations; Marked our milestones;

1965

Pounded on the closed doors of opportunity; Knocked down walls that prevented us; Trumpeted the liberation of the oppressed; Captured our heroes—a mighty roll call too long to list; Nailed our traitors and Spoke the forbidden and betrayed the hidden with his pen and ink. He told it all in 53 years and left nothing out. He put it out there so everyone could get it. All this from a quiet man who could easily be overlooked because of his easy temperament. And for every kindness he received? “God bless you! God’s gonna bless you,” was his habitual reply. For a cup of water. For a new pen. For an extra assignment and especially for a piece of chocolate. God bless you! He spent the last two days at the AFRO cleaning his office and fasting. When asked about the reason for the fast, his response was that he wanted something from God. We hope he got what he asked for. God bless you, Mr. Stockett.

First AFRO Cartoon, 1955

1966

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1959

1968

1965

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1967


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120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

Holder Continued from A4

told them that he had presented several documents, including some that were not requested. He asked if additional documents were turned over, if he could count on the legislators to act in good faith and make a sincere effort to reach a resolution to the debacle. Holder contends that he was not aware of Fast and Furious and that he was lied to be federal law enforcement officials when he inquired into the allegations of gunwalking. “Mr. Issa said ‘No,’” Cummings said. “I am convinced Mr. Issa already had in mind what he planned to do.” The GOP-controlled House voted in June to censure Holder, citing his refusal to turn over documents related to the Justice Department’s reaction to the congressional investigation. The “gunwalking” operation resulted in the loss of more than 1,000 weapons, some of which were used to commit crimes, including the slaying of Border Patrol Agent Brian Terry in December 2010. The Justice Department gave congressional investigators thousands of pages of documents related to the operation. But the department declined to pass on documents related to its internal communication concerning the matter, and the White House supported that decision by invoking executive privilege. The Republican complaint, which was filed in the U.S. District Court for the District of Columbia, seeks to invalidate

Obama’s invocation of privilege and compel Holder to produce the documents. In a statement, Issa said President Obama was trying to “obstruct the truth.” “President Obama exceeded his authority by asserting executive privilege over subpoenaed documents related to the Justice Department’s cover-up of Operation Fast and Furious,” Issa said. “Waiting nearly eight months after the subpoena had been issued to assert a meritless claim of privilege, the President’s decision was a calculated political maneuver designed to stop the release of documents until after November’s elections.” But Democrats and some political analysts say it’s Republicans that are being motivated by politics. “I think it is kind of a political version of guerilla warfare,” said Lester Spence, associate professor of political science at Johns Hopkins University. Though he hesitated from engaging in “conspiracy theories,” Spence added, one motive for the GOP’s persistence in targeting Holder could be his department’s work in enforcing voting rights. “I don’t want to sound too conspiratorial but one argument could be that the more Holder is tied up with this lawsuit, the less resources he has to expend on fighting against efforts to keep African Americans from voting,” he said, referring to GOPfueled voter ID and other laws that seem tailored to suppress voters of color. In responding to the House’s sanction in June, Holder called the move a “crass effort and grave disservice to the American people.”

®

“As a result of the action taken today by the House, an unnecessary court conflict will ensue,” Holder stated June 28. “My efforts to resolve this matter short of such a battle were rebuffed by Congressman Issa and his supporters. It’s clear that they were not interested in bringing an end to this dispute or obtaining the information they claimed to seek. Ultimately, their goal was the vote that – with the help of special interests – they now have engineered.” Black congressional lawmakers, who walked out on the vote to censure Holder, also condemned their Republican colleagues for the lawsuit, saying it detracted from more important issues. “While this Congress should be addressing critical issues like creating jobs and fixing our economy, House Republicans continue their plot to discredit Attorney General Holder,” said Rep. Emanuel Cleaver, (D-Mo.), chairman of the Congressional Black Caucus, in a statement. “This partisan effort to distract Americans from Republican inaction on the real problems we face every day continues,” he added. “It’s a waste of tax payers’ money and it’s a disgrace to the American people. It is past time for Congress to get serious, work together, and do what is necessary to get this country focused on issues that really matter.” Cummings said he believes the shenanigans will result in a backlash. “I think people get it,” he said. “When I talk to Blacks and Whites, they say they feel that [Holder] is being abused and disrespected and they are offended by it. I have heard that from Democrats and some of my Republican friends.”


120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

A15

NAACP Investigating Alleged Police Beating By George Barnette AFRO Staff Writer

LAUREL, Md. — The Prince George’s County Chapter of the NAACP is investigating an incident in which a man claims he was beaten by a Laurel police officer while handcuffed. Bob Ross, president of the chapter, led a group of concerned citizens to the Laurel Municipal Center Aug. 13. They wanted to learn details of the arrest and alleged beating of D’Ante R. Williams, 27, outside the Laurel Station Bar and Grill on Aug. 5. Police were called to the Baltimore Avenue bar to break up a fight. Williams was taken into custody and that’s when, he said, PFC J. Diaz-Chavarria punched him in the face. Williams, who was identified in court records as a resident of Laurel and Cottage City, was charged with seconddegree assault, disorderly conduct, failure to obey a police officer and resisting arrest, according to court documents. He was released the next day on $3,000 bond. He filed suit three days after the alleged beating asking for $3 million in compensatory and punitive damages from the city of Laurel and DiazChavarria. His suit alleges assault, negligence and emotional distress. Ross said city officials provided little information about their response to Williams’ claims. City officials would not say if DiazChavarria had been placed on leave pending the outcome of the inquiry into the incident or

if he remained on duty. “No, we didn’t find out anything,” Ross said. “We are prepared to take this case to the [Department of Justice] if need be.” A cell phone video of the incident taken by a man who was identified by Williams’ lawyer as a bystander was released to NBC 4 News in Washington, D.C. The video

D’Ante Williams, 27, who was allegedly beaten by a Laurel police officer. shows what appears to be two police officers escorting an African American man whose arms are clasped behind his back. At one point, the police officer on the man’s right appears to punch him in the face. Valerie Cunningham, who ran unsuccessfully for Laurel mayor in 2011, met with Mayor Craig Moe. “I had three questions that I wanted to ask just about police policy and procedure,” she said. “The mayor declined to make any statements with regard to the actual case. He said that

he would follow up on my questions with the city solicitor.” Moe told reporters that he had seen the video and is aware that the city was being sued. Williams attorney, Jimmy Bell, would not comment on the circumstances that led to Williams being handcuffed, but he said the officer had no right to use force. He sent a reporter a photo of Williams showing open wounds and scrapes on his face and right shoulder. When asked why Williams’ face and shoulder were scraped and bore open wounds when he claimed he was punched, Bell said his client told him the shoulder scrape was received in a different incident. He had no explanation as to why there were open wounds on Williams’ face. “The video is there. You see it,” Bell said. “My client is handcuffed and defenseless and this officer is just hitting him repeatedly. We’re not going to let them think this is okay.” A man who responded to a call at the bar and identified himself as the manager said Williams and a friend were inside the bar on Aug. 5 until they were ejected for being rowdy. He said they sneaked back in and at one point assaulted the security guard who had put them out. Another security guard intervened and the skirmish moved out to the parking lot. That’s when police arrived, the man said. Ross said he was unconcerned about the allegation. “Once he’s put into handcuffs, the police are in control,” he said.

Both Bell and Ross questioned the city’s ability to conduct an impartial internal investigation. Ross said he

wants the officer off the streets until the investigation is concluded. The city has until early September to respond to

the lawsuit, Bell said. “It’s clear to us that it’s a violation of civil rights,” Ross said.

TRISTAR PIEXECUTIVE CTURES PRESENTSMUSICIN ASSOCIATION WITH STAGE 6 FILMS A DEBRA MARTIN CHASE/T.D. JAKES/AKIL PRODUCTIONS PRODUCTION EXECUTIVE “SPARKLE” MUSIC CONSULTANT R. KELLY BY SALAAM REMI PRODUCERS WHITNEY HOUSTON HOWARD ROSENMAN GAYLYN FRAICHE AVRAM BUTCH KAPLAN PRODUCED STORY BY DEBRA MARTIN CHASE T.D. JAKES SALIM AKIL MARA BROCK AKIL CURTIS WALLACE BY JOEL SCHUMACHER AND HOWARD ROSENMAN SCREENPLAY DIRECTED BY MARA BROCK AKIL BY SALIM AKIL

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

Civil Rights Cover AFRO File Photos and Front Pages From Top • U.S. Marshalls Halt Wild Mob in Ala. May 27, 1961.

Civil Rights The mission of the AFRO family has always been to improve the plight of African Americans. From the days when the newspaper was founded to bring information and heighten awareness to facilitate financial, political and educational independence, to present efforts to expose today’s more subtle forms of racism, the AFRO has been steadfast. When the NAACP’s legal team, including Baltimore-born attorney Thurgood Marshall, decided to challenge segregation at the University of Maryland, they came to the AFRO. In a memo in March 1933, a university registrar referred to the AFRO as “a Baltimore newspaper published by Colored people.” Jim Crow was exposed on the pages of the AFRO, as were his racist cohorts, like Birmingham’s Eugene “Bull” Connor, the separatist police commissioner who responded to cries for equality with hoses and dogs, and Richard B. Russell Jr., the U.S. senator from Georgia who was considered Congress’ staunchest opponent of equality for Blacks. Hate groups and laws that promulgated segregation were challenged. The heroes of what would come to be called the Civil Rights Movement were heralded. There were stories about soldiers being mistreated, lynchings, church burnings and threats to voters at the polls. Long before the White media found stories like Emmitt Till’s murder, AFRO journalist Moses Newson was in the court room writing his observations. Marches made news, as did the unexplained disappearances of Black men who been embroiled in the struggle. When the suspected killers of civil rights workers James Chaney, Michael Schwerner and Andrew Goodman were released with little more than a few hours of time lost in 1965, the AFRO covered it in story, in commentaries and in editorials cartoons. “Day Mississippi Will Never Forget” trumpeted the banner headline on page 1 on June 28, 1966. One story, entitled “The March,” reported that 20,000 protesters “from all creeds and persuasions” had taken to the streets of Jackson, wearing buttons with slogans like “Total Equality” and “Black Power’s the Greatest” to stand against hate. “Singing and clapping hands in sporadic chants, marchers defied Mississippi’s militant racists,” wrote AFRO correspondent Frank Hunt. “They thronged the area around the white capital building and heard some of the nation’s top civil rights leaders praise their courage…” A story that ran next to it titled “In D.C.,” by Bernard Garnett, reported that 1,000 turned out to condemn President Lyndon B. Johnson for failing to send in protection for a group of protesters. The crowd also demanded that home rule be established in the District immediately. Lawrence Guyot of Northwest Washington, one of the founders of the Mississippi Freedom Democratic Party, remembers the AFRO being thrown off the train in his hometown of Pass Christian, Miss., by Pullman porters. “They’d drop them as they passed our town and we’d go pick them up and distribute them,” he said. “We never said a word about it. We considered it a family matter— providing information.”

All photos, AFRO File Photos

• Members of the Newark Branch NAACP continued its intensive picketing campaign against the F.W. Woolworth Company store at busy Board and Market Streets with the cooperation of CORE and union officials. April 16, 1960. • S. Africa Afire. Sit Down at a Glance. April 5, 1960

Mrs. Mamie Till Bradley tells the story of her son Emmett, who, at 15, was brutally murdered in Money, Mass. Oct. 21, 1955.

• Thirty Thousand D.C. Unemployed Refuse to be Guinea Pigs • Police carry an unidentified girl from First National Bank in East St. Louis, Ill., where about 30 demonstrators were arrested in a sit-in. Members of the youth committee of the NAACP, entered the bank singing hymns and praying, to protest allegedly biased hiring practices. When police arrived, they sat down and refused to leave. August 24, 1963. • 218 Students Arrested; $90,000 Bail Set for 150. February 19, 1963. • Martin Luther King: He Foresaw Death, Then Conquered All Fear of It. September 23, 1958. • Price to Pay: A Gwynn Oak Park demonstrator being hauled to jail during the famous 1963 protest sit-in to desegregate the amusement park.

Pickets Continue at Ford Theatre. The Baltimore NAACP this week began its third year of picketing the Ford Theatre because of its segregation seating policy. Among the picketers on Friday night were, from left, Daniel P. Atwood, chairman of the picket committee; Patten J. Mitchell and M. Bracey. July 1964.

• Luncheon Guest Leaves: Gov. J. Millard Tawes is flanked by members of the Civic Interest Group as he leaves Miller’s Restaurant where he attended a birthday party. The restaurant is segregated and Gov. Tawes’ office later explained that no picket line had been outside the restaurant when he entered. April 14, 1962. • U.S. Sues KKK. June 8, 1946. • LBJ Signs New Rights Law. July 4, 1964.

Thurgood Marshall at Land Grant meeting. circa 1960s

• Job opportunities demonstration being conducted by the Richmond NAACP and its Virginia Union and Youth Chapters. They began with a march to City Hall where City council was in special session. Picketing continued from that point. Prominent in photo, from left, are Brenda Blake, Everett Miles, the Rev. David T. Shannon, university pastor and pastor of Ebenezer Baptist Church and Wilbur Wilson. August 13, 1963.

Mrs. Virginia McGuire, president of D.C. NAACP and Charles Houston, Dec. 22, 1934. Officers of the City-Wide Young People’s Forum. Juanita E. Jackson, president, 1933.

• Local 480 IUE, AFL-CIO, team up with members of the Jersey City Branch NAACP to picket the F.W. Woolworth Store located in Jersey City’s Journal Square. Pickets urged withholding patronage at the store until the firm desegregated eating facilities in southern lunch counters. April 9, 1960. • Discrimination Shown by American Officers Arouses the Ire of the French People. January 3, 1919. • Triple Lynching. August 8, 1964. • Again They Answer Their Country’s Call. Supreme Court Declares Segregation Void. November 10, 1917.

Congratulations and thank you

to The Afro-American on 120 years of service to the people of Maryland.

James Scott, Jr. PENAN & SCOTT, P.C. Congratulates The AFRO American Newspapers

circa 1943

Congratulations to

The AFRO AMERICAN NEWSPAPER on your

120th Anniversary from the Baltimore City Branch NAACP Founded 1912

In Honor of the Barbara A. Mikulski U.S. Senator for Maryland

120th Anniversary

www.mikulski.senate.gov www.twitter.com/SenatorBarb www.facebook.com/SenatorMikulski

www.penanscott.com

Tessa Hill-Aston, President and the Executive Committee 8 W. 26th Street, Baltimore 21218 (410) 366-3300


120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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Civil Rights From a Front Seat By Moses J. Newson Former Afro Editor and award-winning journalist My first assignment for the Afro-American newspapers granted me a role in one of the most significant civil rights stories since the Supreme Court in 1954 ruled public school segregation unconstitutional – and knocked out the onerous “separate but equal” doctrine it upheld in 1896’s Plessy v. Ferguson. Moses J. Newson During five years with the Memphis Tri-State Defender before joining the AFRO in 1957, there had been stories such as school desegregation in Hoxie, Ark., and Clinton, Tenn., and the Emmett Till trial in Mississippi. None of them posed any real threat of personal violence. That was about to change. On Sept.5, the morning after Gov. Orval Faubus called out the Arkansas National Guard to prevent Central High School from being desegregated, I was in front of the school when guard Lt. Col. Marion E. Johnson said my presence there would be a problem. It was professionally embarrassing to be escorted from the scene by guardsmen while strategically located White newsmen watched. Some shot photographs of my being moved. When Mrs. Daisy Bates, area NAACP leader and Little Rock Nine mentor, announced when they would be at Central High, Jimmy Hicks, Amsterdam News; L. Alex Wilson, my former newspaper boss; and photog Earl Davy joined in plans to witness their entry. Angry protesters lined the Mrs. Daisy Bates speaks to sidewalks. Someone yelled 600 at NAACP membership that the students were inside meeting in Baltimore, Central and suddenly we were March 15, 1959. under violent attack. His camera smashed, Davy ran off behind some houses. Taking some licks, Hicks and I ran ahead of the mob down 16th Street. Wilson refused to join us. He’d run from the Ku Klux Klan years before in Leesburg, Fla., and promised himself he’d never do that again. Wilson got clobbered. Pressured by the NAACP and others, on Sept. 24 President Dwight

Eisenhower federalized the Arkansas National Guard and sent in the army’s101st Airborne Division to ensure that desegregation took place. His unprecedented action meant that violence or threats of violence could no longer be used as a legal excuse to avoid courtordered desegregation.. **** In 1961, James Farmer, director of the Congress of Racial Equality, wanted a few journalists to travel South on a May 4-17 Freedom Ride to test whether court decisions and an Interstate Commerce Commission ruling banning segregation in public transportation were being enforced. I signed on. So did Simeon Booker of Johnson Publications, his photographer, Theodore W. Gaffney of Washington, DC, and freelancer Charlotte Devree. The seven Black and six White Freedom Riders sat where they pleased on the regular scheduled Greyhound and Trailways buses CORE used. Whites would use station facilities designated for “Colored” and Black Riders did the reverse. The farther South they went, the more dangerous the journey became. The first blood I saw involved now-Congressman John Lewis and two White Riders who were assaulted in a Rock Hill, S.C. bus station. In Atlanta, the Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. shared sobering news. KKK members and others were saying the Riders would not get out of Alabama alive. Of more concern to me, Farmer’s father died and he was taking a brief leave. I was on the Greyhound bus rolling toward Anniston, Ala., Sunday, May 14, Mother’s Day, when it was learned that an angry mob was waiting there. At the station mob members started banging on the bus with various types of weapons. They dared Riders to come off the bus, called them every insulting name thinkable, punctured bus tires and then followed the Greyhound until it had to stop. No one knew two Alabama state police in civilian clothes, Ell Cowling and Harry Sims, were passengers. Cowling pulled his pistol and blocked the door. An explosive missive pushed through a broken window landed in the empty seat behind me. A few sparks hit me on my right ear and head. Almost immediately the bus filled with black smoke. I stuck my camera beneath my seat and decided to stay aboard as long as possible. Riders leaving the bus were being attacked. (The charred camera is on view at the Newseum in Washington, D.C.) My thoughts turned to survival and my family back home. Outside the burning bus was a sickening sight of what Americans were doing to fellow citizens: people gagging, staggering or crawling around struggling to get the smoke out of their lungs. Officer Cowling said this was as tough a situation as he’d ever been in. Several of us waiting at the Anniston hospital had no way out of the city that night until Birmingham civil rights leader Rev. Fred L. Shuttlesworth sent a caravan of cars to get us. During the wait, there was a chance to call the AFRO night editor

CONGRATULATIONS ON 120 YEARS OF TELLING “OUR” STORY! ASSOCIATED BLACK CHARITIES VALUES OUR 27 YEAR PARTNERSHIP WITH THE AFRO AMERICAN

responsible leadership MISSION Associated Black Charities is a public foundation that facilitates the creation of measurably healthier and wealthier communities throughout the state of Maryland through responsible leadership and philanthropic investment.

to inform him of the story I’d have – and to ask him to tell my wife I was okay. Things were even more devastatingly shocking in Birmingham, not just because of the vicious beatings Riders suffered, but because of the collusion of police there with mob members. Incredibly, policemen, including higher-ups, had schemed with the attackers to absent themselves from the station for an agreed upon time while the Riders would be beaten. Getting out of A new busload of Freedom Riders, Birmingham including four white college professors proved nerve and three colored students, arrives in wracking: Montgomery, Ala., under guard of police mob members and the National Guard. Center, with were at the glasses, is the Rev. William S. Coffin Jr. bus station, At left, partly hidden is Dr. David F. Swift bus drivers and behind him, wearing glasses, is Dr. refused to John D. Maguire. May 29, 1961. move vehicles carrying Riders, mob members showed up at the airport after Riders voted to fly to New Orleans – and for good measure the segregationists battered John Seigenthaler, an aide to Atty. Gen. Robert Kennedy. The Freedom Ride seemed to be over. However, before the mass meeting in New Orleans ended, a group of courageous and dedicated young people in Nashville, including Diane Nash and John Lewis, insisted it could not end in defeat because of violence. They shocked many by resuming the Ride in Alabama, then moving it on to Mississippi, where despite facing some brutal treatment; scores of additional Riders were added. Author Raymond Arsenault says 436 Riders eventually participated. **** At first it was hard to believe. James Meredith, a military veteran, was serious about enrolling at the University of Mississippi. Still, in September of 1962, I was in a rented car with Jimmy Hicks en route from Memphis to Ole Miss in Oxford. It was downright scary listening on the radio to what was taking place. Federal marshals were engaged in a raging tear-gas throwing, gunfire shootout with state officers and armed civilian volunteers. Hicks had visited Oxford earlier in the week and knew Black reporters were not welcome on campus that night. Two people, one of them a reporter, had been killed on campus during the fighting. Many were injured, among them U. S. marshals and newsmen. The sting of tear gas was still in the air the next morning. Marshals assigned to protect Meredith were keeping the media from him. The lead on my first story after the shootout started this way: “Defiant Gov. Ross Barnett pushed the Magnolia State to the brink of ‘a little civil war’ Thursday ….” Directly or indirectly, most of the Black workers in Oxford depended on paychecks from the university but almost to a person, they supported Meredith. One provided this headline: ‘That boy is delivering us here in Mississippi.’ **** Finally, writing and producing at least two pages of pictures from two Democratic and two Republican presidential nominating conventions, can be taxing. The 1976 GOP in Kansas City, Mo. has an important relevance to today’s party. Conservatives took over party apparatus there. At the time, the GOP included a large number of liberal/moderate Senate and House members, enough to make it possible for President Lyndon Johnson to push through the 1964 civil rights and the 1965 voter rights legislation. Talking on the convention floor to delegates such as Senators Charles “Mac” Mathias and Edward Brooke as well as Baltimoreans Marshall Jones and Archie Jones, it was clear they were concerned about possible purges of their fellow liberal/moderate members. It appears they had good reason. And that has serious civil rights implications.

philanthropic investment OUR HISTORY ABC has been dedicated to creating strong, healthy, and economically viable communities in order to create a better life, especially for African American children and families. But with an evolution in leadership and an urgency dictated by the economic and social climate, ABC is leading a new charge to close the health and wealth gaps that put so many African American families at a disadvantage in achieving the American dream. PLEASE SUPPORT ABC! Be a part of the solution to improve the issues and conditions in the region. • Make a generous donation to ABC’s annual campaign. • Designate ABC through your work place giving campaign. • Volunteer through ABC to support other Maryland non-profit organizations. Your gift of money, time, and talents is an opportunity to create a healthier, wealthier, and happier community for all of us!

If you are a workplace donor, please consider designating your gift to ABC: United Way of Central Maryland (UWCM)

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Combined Charity Campaign (CCC)

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Maryland Charity Campaign (MCC)

“Wishing you 120 more memorable years!”

BLOUNT / CLARKE FAMILY

Visit www.abc-md.org to donate now.

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Happy 120th Birthday to the Afro American Newspapers —The Gould Family

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Combined Federal Campaign (CFC)

1114 Cathedral Street | Baltimore, MD 21201 | 410-659-0000

GORFINE, SCHILLER & GARDYN, P.A.

Certified Public Accountants & Business Consultants

Barry B. Bondroff, CPA Officer

10045 Red Run Boulevard, Suite 250 Owings Mills, MD 21117-4831

240 S. Potomac St., Ste 305 Hagerstown, MD 21740

TEL 301-739-9000 DIRECT TEL 410-517-6800 • 800-333-0272 FAX 301-739-8345 DIRECT FAX 410-517-6801 CELL 443-286-9000 www.GSG-cpa.com EMAIL bbondroff@GSG-cpa.com


120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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Washington, D.C.: “I congratulate you upon your assignment to this highly important professional task…we stand on the threshold of a great future,” Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune tells these trainees after their final assembly for American Red Cross workers at American University. They are, from left, Dorothee Hawkins, Arria Jean Richmond, Mrs. Bethune, Marian Williams and Rena Miller Ross. circa 1936

Walter P. Carter holds court at City Hall in 1968.

The Rev. Martin Luther King Jr. shakes hands with G.C. Gomillion of Tuskegee Institute. president of the Tuskegee Civic Association. July 20, 1957.

Protest Budget Slash. Hilburn Cade, Morgan State College senior, speaks with other students who, at a mass meeting this week, decided to march on Annapolis and protest drastic cuts made in the school’s budget by Governor Lane. Despite an appeasement of some $200,000 contained in the governor’s supplementary budget, the students will still protest lack of funds needed for general repairs. March 22, 1947.

A policeman and a demonstrator tussle on the ground during the demonstrations against the bombing in Vietnam. A police inspector was injured during the scuffle. April 25, 1972.

For human dignity: Students from four New England colleges utilizing their Eastern vacation for this purpose, picketed the White House on Good Friday in support of lunch counter “sit-ins.” April 19, 1961.

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Background image: Jan. 23, 1943 Afro American

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When you’re ready to start the next adventure in your life, come to Springhouse. Our residents’ days are filled with social engagements, gatherings, stimulating conversations with friends and about 30 activities to participate in weekly, including daily exercise.

Donald G. Murray in front of the Court of Appeals in Annapolis after being sworn in as a member of the Maryland State Bar along with 85 white applicants. Murray passed the examination given by the State Board of Law Examiners with a mark of 210 ½. He is a graduate of the University of Maryland and was admitted to the law school three years ago, after a legal flight by the NAACP. He is also an honor graduate of Amherst College, Oct. 14, 1959.

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Clarence Mitchell and Mrs. Mary McLeod Bethune watching a film depicting her life. April 30, 1938.

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

Romare Bearden Romare Bearden is widely known as an extraordinary artist, and considered one of the most important of the 20th century. His extensive body of work included early paintings with religious themes, the use of shapes and symbols to recall elements of the southern lifestyle and collage to express the rhythms of Black music. And throughout his career he provided support and encouragement for younger artists. His many interests included writing music and even designing sets for the Alvin Ailey Dance Company. But not many are aware that he spent some of his earliest years railing at the injustices of society through his cartoons on the AFRO commentary pages. From 1935-1937, Bearden pressed back with his skillful pen against any opposition aimed at the righteous freedom and progress of the African-American community specifically and all minorities in general.

AFRO Cartoonist, 1935-1937

Traveler, the Road Leads On and On

The Real Judge at Scottsboro

Do You Call That Religion?

Shall the Tail Wag the Dog?

“The Ghost Walk”

“ The Bla

ck Cat in

Why Sta y In Dixie

?

the Path

ead for “The Battle Ah

Colored”

The Iron Heel of Fascism

I Wonder Where My Colored

Colored Labor Still Bears the Brunt of the Burdon...

ue as Shall Mob Rule Contin e? Justic

Freed Through United Effort

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thern

the Expression of Sou

“Sure, we’ll promised ‘em anything to get their vote

Supports Are?


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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

Members of the Baltimore NAACP Youth Council who are all set to join in the National demonstration against lynching on February 12. With ropes around their necks and carrying placards, they are pushing the sales of lynch buttons over the entire city. From left, they are, Maceo Howard, Miss Lilian Lottier, Miss Vivian Young, Miss Esther Denkins, Ulysses Glover, Miss Marian Jackson, Lorenzo Perry, Miss Juanita Jackson, head of the national youth group and Bowen Jackson. circa 1930s

National Council of Negro Women Conference attendees, Mrs. M.L. Blackwell, Washington; Mrs. Sarai Patton, New York; Mrs. Mary F. Thompson, Miss Dorothy Height and Mrs. Marie Howard, Mt. Vernon, N.Y. Nov. 2, 1940 in Washington, D.C.

March for Baltimore. circa 1950s

Mrs. Lillie M. Jackson. May, 1959

Protestors in front of Brager’s in downtown Baltimore in 1936.


120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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Brown Demonstration

In conference at National Urban League headquarters to discuss plans for the 25th anniversary are, from left, Lester B. Granger, secretary of the Worker’s bureau; R. Maurice Moss, secretary to anniversary committee; Robert S. Abbott, chairman of the anniversary committee; T. Arnold Hill, acting executive secretary; L. Hollingsworth Wood, chairman of the executive board; Elmer Anderson Carter, editor, “Opportunity” Journal of Negro Life and C.C. Spaulding, chairman of the Emergency Advisory Council for Negroes. October 1935.

Scene of recent anti-apartheid demonstration downtown, protesting South African’s government’s censorship of black life in Anania. November 1977.

Malcolm X

A Horizon House protestor. May 24, 1966

Last Laugh: Minutes after AFRO photographer took this photo of Klansman Vernon Naimaster, Horizon House owners agreed to open to all. Unhappy Klansmen slinked away. May 24, 1966


120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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Announcing a Public Scoping Meeting for NEC FUTURE What will the Northeast Corridor (NEC) rail system look like in future years? How well will it function for intercity and local travelers? What will it take for the NEC to provide the service, reliability, and speeds necessary to support regional economic growth now and into the future? Come to a public meeting to help shape the scope of study for NEC FUTURE, the Federal Railroad Administration’s (FRA) planning and environmental evaluation of alternatives for improving the rail network from Boston to Washington, D.C. NEC FUTURE is being conducted in compliance with the National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA), Section 106 of the National Historic Preservation Act of 1966, and FRA’s Procedures for Considering Environmental Impacts and related regulations. NEC FUTURE is the planning framework for developing a Passenger Rail Corridor Investment Plan for the NEC, comprised of a Tier I Environmental Impact Statement (EIS) and a Service Development Plan that will evaluate a broad range of alternatives for improving rail passenger service. BALTIMORE AND WASHINGTON, DC METRO AREAS SCOPING MEETINGS City, State Location Date and Time Baltimore, MD

University of Baltimore, Thumel Conference Facilities August 15, 2012 11 W. Mount Royal Street 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

Washington, DC

Metropolitan Washington Council of Governments 777 N. Capitol Street, NE

August 21, 2012 4:30 to 7:30 p.m.

In support of the Tier 1 EIS, the FRA has scheduled nine public Scoping Meetings throughout the NEC. At these open house meetings, the public will have an opportunity to view project information, speak to the NEC FUTURE team, and provide written or oral comments. All meeting locations are accessible to persons with disabilities. Persons requiring special assistance should contact the project team by email at info@necfuture.com at least five days prior to the meeting. For more information, dates and directions to meetings in nine different locations, or to make a comment online, visit our website www.necfuture.com or email the NEC FUTURE team at info@necfuture.com.

Best Wishes & Continued Success to Afro American Newspaper on your 120th Anniversary Blacks In Government Regional XI Council “Making A BIG Difference”

Shirley A. Jones, Esq. Regional XI President Membership Information @ www.bignet.org or www.bigrxi.org 202-667-3280

Aug. 31, 1963 Richmond Afro American


120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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120 Years - The Afro-American Special Edition

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To educaTe. To empower.To enlighTen.

macY’S congraTulaTeS The afro-american newSpaperS on

of ouTSTanding journaliSm

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120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

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120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

Politics and Military The AFRO’s political and military coverage was unrivaled. When Jesse Owens took gold in Berlin in the 1936 Olympics, the AFRO told When the House of Representatives excluded Congressman Adam Clayton the story. When boxer Joe Louis avenged his having been knocked out by Max Powell Jr. after he was accused of corruption in 1967, the AFRO covered the Schmeling by dropping the German fighter in the first round in 1938, the AFRO had story from the disgruntlement of his constituents in Harlem in the early days to it. his victory in regaining his seat after a Supreme Court battle. When track athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, When a young Black senator from Illinois, who many thought winners of gold and bronze medals, respectively, in the 1968 had no chance of being elected, was sworn in as our nation’s Olympics in Mexico City, were barred from the U.S. team first African-American president in 2009, the AFRO was there. after raising clenched fists to signify Black Power, the AFRO In 1982, when Baltimore lawyer Kurt Schmoke challenged the reported it on the front page. White incumbent who had beaten the city’s first Black state’s It chronicled, in detail, the struggle of Jackie Robinson to attorney, the AFRO stoked huge numbers of Blacks to go out break the color barrier in Major League Baseball, but it also and vote, then celebrated Schmoke’s success. Five years later, ran stories about those who had it somewhat easier making the AFRO covered Schmoke’s historic election as Baltimore’s their way in professional sports, like Althea Gibson and Wilma first African-American mayor. Rudolph, Jim Brown, Bill Russell, The world’s most compelling Kareem Abdul Jabar, Magic Johnson, political-military stories unfolded on the pages of the Wes Unseld, Eugene “Big Daddy” Lipscomb, Tiger Woods AFRO, from a story in July 1935 about Emperor Haile and Venus and Serena Williams. Locally, the paper kept tabs Selassie of Ethiopia calling on women to join the army on the Orioles and the Ravens and the Red Skins. The list as Italian dictator Benito Mussolini’s troops stood could go on and on throughout 120 years. poised for attack to an editorial in March 1968 pointing And for more than 60 of those years, the AFRO’s sports out the hypocrisy of Whites focusing on Black crime, pages were anchored by the insightful writing of awardunemployment and welfare, but failing to credit us for winning journalist Sam Lacy. Lacy’s coverage of the sports sending our sons in disproportionately high numbers to scene, especially his love of baseball, was part information fight and die in Vietnam. and part crusade against racial intolerance. He championed The AFRO had bureaus in Europe long before the cause of desegregating baseball, agitating to the many White newspapers. The first Black female war point that he is credited by many with helping to spur its correspondent, Elizabeth Murphy Philips, integration. was a granddaughter of AFRO founder John H. Murphy Lacy reported live from the baseball diamond, to the Sr. When the Black pilots in Tuskegee, Ala., were boxing ring to the gridiron. Despite the fact that his career dispatched to Europe, the AFRO covered the story. The started in the depths of segregation, his colleagues, Black AFRO’s Black war correspondents were on the front lines and White, recognized the value of his work. He was the and behind the scenes in every major conflict, telling the first Black member of the Baseball Writers Association pertinent stories that White media ignored, or telling the of America, the first African American to be named to same stories from a Black perspective. the Maryland Media Hall of Fame, was named to the When then-Col. Benjamin O. Davis Jr., Black Athletes Hall of Fame and received the Lifetime commander of the 332nd Fighter Group, was promoted Achievement Award from the National Association of to brigadier general following in the footsteps of his Black Journalists. In his latter years, journalists from father, Brig. Gen. B.O. Davis Sr., the AFRO noted on around the world called to get just a little glimpse of its July 23, 1945 front page that it marked a “series of firsts” for Blacks. On the same page, famed AFRO war correspondent Ollie Stewart reported “by cable” from France aboard a Navy ship, “the only colored person aboard,” other than the mess crew. A third story reported that Gen. “Ike” Eisenhower praised Black troops in a farewell news conference and a fourth bore the headline “10 GI’s in Mixed Combat Unit Honored for Heroism.” To capture the extensive coverage of World War II, publisher Carl Murphy compiled “This is Our War,” a collection of stories written by Phillips, Stewart, Art Carter, Herbert Frisby, Max Johnson and Vincent Tubbs.

AFRO File Photos and Front Pages From the top *D.C. Men in Germany. These members of the 628th Tank Battalion taking part in the 28th Infantry Division’s summer training program in Germany are, left, Pfc. Frederick R. Jackson, son of Mr. and Mrs. Otho M. Jackson of 37 R St., N.E. and Pvt. John A. Crockett, nephew of Albert Butler, 827 Ninth St., N.E. The 28th is bolstering the NATO defenses in Europe. August 23, 1952. *A World War II soldier in parade. Harding, Coolidge and Weller. November 5, 1920. Pilots Tell of Nazi Cruelty. May 26, 1945 For the First Time! November 7, 1970. Downed 20 Planes. September 18, 1943 Mfume Declares for Congress. 1986. * Luxembourg. 155mm Howitzer Gun Crew No. 1, Battery A. Field Artillery. Pfc. Frank Russel, Brooklyn, New York; Col. Van E. Lyse, Versene, Alabama; Pvt. Floyd Harelson, Benton, Miss.; Pvt. Leon Witicar, Raymond, Miss. And Pvt. Tony Eruing, West Miss. November 16, 1944. Marion Barry. 1979 I’m Not a Red. May 3, 1952. Troops Won’t Pick Cotton. January 8, 1944 * The famed 367th Infantry Regiment, the “Buffaloes” of World War I, was presented the colors in New York in 1918. This photo ran on the AFRO front page, March 29, 1918. The unit arrived in Brest, France, June 29, 1918 and gave outstanding service in the Battle of Metz, France, receiving the French citation for the battle. They were organized in Upton, New York in 1917. Typical of the soldiers of that day, they wore strap leggings. Our President. November 14, 2008.

All pages: AFRO File Photos

Verna Jones, chair, Maryland Public Policy Committee National Black Women’s Health Project. April 23, 1994.

Del. Elijah Cummings of the 39th Legislative District of Maryland.


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Parren J. Mitchell Mayor Schmoke Mayor Washington Afro American Newspaper Dec. 19, 1987

Within the same short time frame we witnessed the jubilant inaugural of the first black elected to the office of Mayor of the City of Baltimore, Kurt Schmoke and we wept over the untimely death of Mayor Harold Washington of Chico, that City’s first black mayor. Both events demand that we reflect on the circumstances under which both men were elected. Chicago was, and still is a very racist city. Below a certain social and economic level, racial segregation in Chicago is complete. Under the iron grip of former Mayor Daley, blacks were taken for granted and especially in the political process where blacks could only run for public office if they bore the Daley machine seal of approval. Except for a small white liberal group, the attitude toward a black mayor was “hell no,” Never! We will not accept a black mayor.” The attitude was closely akin to the fulminations of George Wallace – “Segregation now-segregation forever.” No major city in America is free from racism and despite good progress, racism remains a fact in the political process in Baltimore. However, in sharp contrast with Chicago, Baltimore’s attitude was that the election of a black mayor was inevitable. The city’s movers and shakers, to some extent, began to lay the ground work for the acceptance of a black mayor. In Chicago, Harold Washington’s

first victory was a naked, raw display of black political power. Angered by the contempt with which they were treated by Daley’s successors, they became a tightly knit, unified black community

whose political slogan was “our time has come.” White resistance to and outrageous conduct against Harold Washington only intensified black political zeal. It must be remembered that a part of this black awakening was caused by Ralph Metcalfe who had broken the strength of the Daley Machine when he defied it and waged a winning campaign for a seat in the U.S. Congress. Before and after his election, Ralph Metcalfe was the target of an unrelentingly savage campaign because he defied the machine, proving that it was not invincible. Harold Washington, a friend for whom I had respect and brotherly love, was an audacious gut fighter

Congratulations to

who took on his opposition with all the force and vigor he commanded. Mayor Schmoke’s election was devoid of the bitterness that characterized Washington’s first mayoral campaign. How did this happen? First, the personality of Kurt Schmoke does not lend itself to the creation of deep divisions in the community. One rather jaundiced political commentator said, “It’s hard to dislike Kurt Schmoke.” Second, as was also true to Chicago, the political ground work has been done. In 1968, Judge Joseph C. Howard defied the principle that one could only vote for sitting judges and was elected to the Supreme Bench of the City of Baltimore. In 1970, Milton B. Allen became the first black states attorney for the City of Baltimore. It had been shown that blacks could win in citywide elections. Third, though former Mayor Schaefer emulated Richard Daley; he did not build up a comparable political organization from the precinct level up. There were no political lieutenants to carry out his will in the hope that by so doing, they would be permitted to move up the political ladder. Donald Schaefer called all the shots. Despite the fact that Baltimore’s mayoral election pitted a black against a black I predict there will be no bitter divisions in the black community nor between the black and white communities. A jubilant inaugural in Baltimore and an aching grief especially for “the little people” in Chicago. “The old order changeth, yielding pace to the new.” Mayor Schmoke, we are proud of you and wish you much success. Mayor Washington, we are grateful to you and bid you a loving farewell.

The AFRO American Newspapers

The Afro-American on 120 years of making history and serving our community.

Invested in Baltimore for 75 years. We’re passionate about our hometown. After all, Thomas Rowe Price, Jr., founded his investment management firm in Baltimore in 1937. And here we’ve remained, even as we’ve grown to be a global enterprise of over 5,000 associates. We proudly serve the communities wherever we work and live through civic contributions and

U.S. Senator Ben Cardin

the volunteer efforts of our associates. As we celebrate our 75th anniversary, we congratulate The AFRO American Newspapers

Please join us at:

on their 120th Anniversary edition of the paper.

BenCardin @BenCardinformd BenCardin2012 www.bencardin.com

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Afro American Newspaper May 15, 1956

Adam Clayton Powell Jr. By Irwin Ross

(With Robert G. Spivak and David Gelman)

Before his election to the House of Representatives in 1944, Adam Clayton Powell Jr. announced that “I will never be a machine man. I will represent the colored people first. I will represent after that all the American people.” It was a rather vaulting claim for a lone would-be freshman congressman. But what disturbed Powell’s critics was the chauvinist order of priorities. Some days later he was backtracking abjectly: “I promised to represent this district first – not only the colored but each and every citizen of this area, irrespective of race, creed or political affiliation.” He had wriggled out of that spot, but the Gaffes have continued with the years. After he got down to Washington, the DAR refused the use of Constitution Hall for a concert by Powell’s wife, Hazel Scott. Both the President and Mrs. Truman roundly criticized the DAR’s action. But Powell was distressed that Mrs. Truman went through with her commitment to attend a DAR tea. “From now on Mrs. Truman is the Last Lady of the land,” he exclaimed to the press. A “gratuitous insult,” a Pittsburgh weekly called the crack. No colored leader rose to second Powell, and many expressed themselves as being embarrassed. Ernest E. Johnson, then head of the Washington Bureau of the Associated Negro Press, wrote: “Somebody ought to tell the colored Congressman from New York that in the holy pursuit of

racial justice – and even in the search for legitimate publicity – there are limits beyond which one does not go for fear of overstepping the bounds of public decency.” Today Powell says that he regrets the remark about Mrs. Truman. He explains that reporters had nailed him for a comment while he was marching in a St. Patrick’s Day parade and the column had momentarily halted. The exuberance of the occasion apparently had just led him to pop off too quickly. Powell has many regrets – not the least his long involvement with the Communists. This passionate attachment started with the Scottsboro case in the early ‘30’s and continued until late in 1946. There was never anything sub-rosa about the affair. Powell was pre-eminently a joiner. His 1945 biographical handout lists his membership on the board of directors of three leading Communist-front groups – The National Negro Congress, the Council of American-Soviet Friendship and the National Federation of Constitutional Liberties. But Powell’s comradeship went beyond the periphery of front groups. In January 1944, he appeared at a Community Party rally in Madison Square Garden – a combined Lenin Memorial Meeting and a 20th anniversary celebration of the Daily Worker. Powell got top billing along with Earl Browder and William Z. Foster. The Daily Worker later reported: “The Rev. A. Clayton Powell delivered a fighting speech which evoked tremendous applause.

Especially when he called his own paper, the People’s Voice, the ‘Lenox Avenue edition of the Daily Worker.’” That was a characterization of the paper normally made by Powell’s detractors. Powell and Charles Buchanan, who runs the Savoy Ballroom, had started the People’s Voice in February, 1942. It was to be Powell’s personal organ and naturally a militant, fighting paper for the colored race’s cause. In effect, it was the organ of the latter day Popular Front. The Paper’s ambitions soon outran its resources. In the summer, a circulation slump and mounting debts led Powell and Buchanan to welcome the good offices of Ferdinand Smith, then a Communist leader in the National Maritime Union, and Max Gergan, then a fervent partyliner and now an antiCommunist. Yergan and Smith brought in new money and took over 51 percent of the stock in return for assuming the paper’s debts. Powell continued as chief editor. He now says that he had a contract giving him exclusive editorial control, but the Communists on the staff eventually undercut him. This complaint hardly squares with his expression of pleasure, in 1944, that the PV was the Harlem version of the Daily Worker. In 1944 Powell thought he was in the best of company. The affection, of course, was by no means one-sided. The Communists gave Powell fervent support in his campaign for

Adam Clayton Powell Jr.

Continued on page C8

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CONGRATULATIONS to The AFRO Newspaper On 120 Years of Publicizing News to the African American Community!


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Adam Clayton Powell Jr. Continued on page C6

Congress. Powell was equally helpful to Communist Ben Davis when he ran for the City Council. And above all else, the Communists were among the most effective unpaid press agents that Powell had. Powell is sorry now that it all happened, but he will not plead ignorance or innocence. He adds that if the circumstances were the same today, with the colored people facing grievous wrongs and there being no outsiders to help, save zealous Communists, he would again favor a united front. “But I don’t expect to see the same circumstances again,” he says. “America has changed.” He has surprising difficulty, however, in chronicling his disenchantment with the Communists. I asked him how he managed to survive the period of the Nazi-Soviet Pact. “Just when was the pact?” he asked. Having been enlightened, he confessed, “I have great

difficulty accounting for my rationalization in that period.” Nor can he put a precise date on his break with the Communists. From newspaper files, however, it seems that the time was late in 1946, when he resigned from the People’s Voice. For the last several years, Powell has been a militant anti-Communist. At the Bandung Conference, last year, he made a very effective defense of America’s treatment of colored people in reply to the canards of the Communists. Powell went to Bandung ostensibly as a newspaper columnist, and then, being the only American legislator there, soon promoted himself to the rank of unofficial observer. He received gobs of free publicity, but was hardly the embarrassment the State Department had originally anticipated. Colored leaders regard Powell as an extremely touchy subject. Roy Wilkins, executive director of the NAACP, points out that Powell is always available

to sponsor civil rights legislation. Other spokesmen, while looking askance at his flamboyance, concede that his dramatic flair can be a “battering ram” against public indifference. But although there is an understandable reluctance

Associations. “I am concerned about the civil rights planks and the candidates of both parties, but at the moment I am more concerned about this ridiculous idea that comes from within our group to have us lay asideeven temporarily-the one

everybody to pray. The disruptive effects of such an undertaking were immediately apparent to more reflective brethren. Dr. Joseph H. Jackson, president of the 5,000,000-member National Baptist Convention, protested that he was in favor of prayer, but definitely not

Many leaders and spokesmen look askance at Adam Powell’s flamboyance but they all concede that his dramatic flair can be a “ battering ram” against public indifference to the problems of his people. to break ranks, on occasion colored leaders have been compelled to take issue with him. When he announced in 1952, that colored people would boycott the 1952 Presidential election because of dissatisfaction with the civil rights planks of both parties, a number of his own people chastised him. Typical was the comment of William R. Hudgins, president of the Carver Federal Savings and Loan

weapon we have with which to fight our battle or press our demands – the almighty ballot.” But Powell just goes rolling on, untouched by criticism or consistency. Late in February, when Powell and a ministerial group launched plans for a Deliverance Day of Prayer on behalf of the bus boycotters of Montgomery, Ala. Grandiose plans were announced for a one-hour work stoppage to enable

of work stoppage. Powell immediately retreated – and wired Jackson. “Work stoppage idea completely erroneous.” He has thereafter repeated many times that the reports were inaccurate, never that the original idea was misguided. But when pressed on the point, he will generously concede that he can understand how reporter’s honestly got the wrong idea from the unfortunate wording

Decades ago, I worked as an “Afro-boy,” delivering the newspaper on Tuesday and Friday each week. Today, I join all of the Baltimore AFRO American family in expressing our shared appreciation to the AFRO for the paper’s many contributions to our lives. For families like my own, new to Baltimore from the fields of South Carolina in the 1950s, the AFRO gave “a voice to the voiceless.” So, it has been for 120 years. So it remains today and, God willing, for the decades to come. Thank you, AFRO.

Congressman Elijah Cummings ********** Authority: Ronald Thompson, Treasurer, Cummings for Congress Campaign Committee, P.O. Box 1631, Baltimore, MD 21218. FEC: C00310318. Contributions to Federal Congressional Campaigns are not tax deductible.

of his original statement. He is currently rounding out his sixth term in the House. There was a time, some old friends believe, when he thought that he might one day sit in the U.S. Senate. An understandable ambition, but it is doubtful that Powell any longer entertains it, if he ever did. He cannot aspire to the bench, for he is no lawyer. An important diplomatic post, under a Democratic administration, seems unlikely, given Powell’s dexterity in getting his foot into his mouth. He can, of course, try to make more money, though at the moment he and his wife are comfortably fixed, with a combined income between $75,000 and $100,000 a year. But, like his father, he has a zest for real estate; recently he bought and renovated a group of old houses in Washington and is in the process of making a sizable profit. He is a man of surprising energy, and at 47, he can look forward to filling a whole shelf full of unfilled scrapbooks. Some years ago, he had two minor heart attacks, but they have not slowed him down at all. They have merely caused him to slim his waistline to a svelte 187 pounds or so. To keep in shape, he goes without lunch, has only tea and grapefruit for breakfast. He knows how to relax, He waxes floors and polishes furniture at his bachelor house in Washington, often cooks the meal (curries are his specialty) at the handsome home he shares with Hazel and Adam 3rd in Fleetwood. Often he only cooks for himself and his son, for Hazel is off on tour six months of the year. Rumors crop up every so often of marital discord, but both firmly deny it. Of Powell’s success as a popular leader, it might be said that only in America, in the last two decades, could it have occurred. Demagogy cannot flourish in a vacuum; it must be fed by massive discontent – and certainly the discontents of our colored citizens have been both reasonable and compelling. Powell has had other assets; the respectability of a clergyman and the initially large following of a congregation many thousand strong. But primarily he has done well because he can effortlessly strike a responsive chord. Whether he is talking about high rents, or job discrimination, or the difficulty of colored citizens in getting mortgage money, he is touching on issues about which few colored people can feel indifferent. His proposals may be flamboyant and impractical, but he has made himself a vehicle of genuine protest. The more responsible leaders of the colored community are left to pick up the pieces, but it is Powell that the voter remembers. On that simple truth he has built a career. Last of a five-part series. Read more on Afro.com.


Volume No. American 13 120 Years 117 - The Afro Special Edition

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752012 CENTS August 18, 2012 - August 24, C9

NOVEMBER 8, 2008 - NOVEMBER14, 2008

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OPINION Finally, Something of Our Own A12

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President-elect Barack Obama waves to the crowd after giving his acceptance speech at Grant Park in Chicago Tuesday night, Nov. 4, after being elected the 44th president of the United States and the first African American.

Barack Obama Makes History By Zenitha Prince Washington Bureau Chief Barack Obama, the son of a Black man from Kenya and a White woman from Kansas, has been elected president of the United States, a country whose Constitution had to be amended nearly 200 years ago in order for African Americans to vote. “I had to pinch myself,” said U.S. Rep. Elijah Cummings (D-Md.), a national co-chairman of the Obama campaign. “When we started this race, people laughed at us. Now, we see Barack Obama, a man of color, become the president of the United States.” Obama won a lopsided victory in the Electoral College Tuesday, defeating an older and more experienced John McCain by a 2-to-1 margin en route to becoming the first Democrat to win a majority of the popular vote since 1976. Obama became presidentelect by winning 95 percent of the Black vote, 68 percent of Latino ballots, and 59 percent of voters 18 to 34 years old, according to a survey conducted by NBC and the Wall Street Journal. Obama won as large a share of the White vote as any Democrat in the past two decades. He won 43

percent, compared to John F. Kerry, who won 41 percent in 2004, and Al Gore, who captured 42 percent in 2000. Although the constitution was amended in 1870 to allow Blacks to vote, it wasn’t until the passage of the 1965 Voting Rights Act that African Americans, especially those in the South, could vote without trickery or fear of retaliation. With some election returns still trickling in Wednesday, Obama held a 338-161 lead over McCain in electoral votes. McCain, in his concession speech before supporters in Phoenix, Ariz., summed up the results best. “The American people have spoken. And they have spoken clearly,” he said. The first indication that McCain would have difficulty making inroads into Obama’s lead came at around 8:30 p.m. when Pennsylvania was called for the Democratic candidate by a 10-percentage point margin. The McCain campaign had said earlier that they had to win the state to have a viable chance at victory. Ohio, Florida, Nevada, New Mexico, Virginia, Continued on A4

Voters Brave Rain, Long Lines to Cast Ballots By Alan King and Sean Yoes AFRO Staff Writers BALTIMORE – Voting at West Baltimore’s Gwynns Fall Elementary School normally takes 20 minutes on Election Day. On Tuesday, however, it took two hours, even if you had shown up at 10 a.m., supposedly an off-peak period. Even the rain did not shorten the line as ex-felons, among others, stood patiently in line. More than any time in the past, there was an abundance of teenagers, many of them voting for the first time. Wanda Boyd, waiting to vote at the Dunbar Day Care Center on North Eden Street in Baltimore, relished the importance of Continued on A6

Copyright © 2008 by the Afro-American Company

“When I get in there, I’m going to hit the Obama button 100 times to make sure they count my vote.”


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This Is Our War

From every arena of war, stories came from soldiers and from their families who were happy to share them with the entire community through the AFRO. Stories also came from AFRO correspondents like Ollie Stewart, Art Carter, Herbert Frisby, Max Johnson, Elizabeth Phillips and Vincent Tubbs; so many, in fact, that the publisher in 1944, Carl Murphy, committed them to a collection called, This Is Our War. These are just two in the book that can be referenced in the AFRO Archives.

Congratulations

Happy 120th Anniversary

to the AFRO on 120 years of serving and empowering our community!

Congratulations to the AFRO for 120 years of outstanding service to our communities. For decades, the AFRO was the only source of reliable news on the issues most important to African Americans in Maryland and throughout the country. The AFRO is a beacon of integrity and pride for so many, and I wish you great success as you continue to build upon your rich history of excellence.

Since 1892, the AFRO American Newspapers have chronicled historic events and promoted positive social change. On behalf of the residents of Baltimore City, Mayor Stephanie Rawlings-Blake would like to extend her wholehearted congratulations and wishes for much success in the decades to come.

Sincerely,

GOVERNOR • 2014 www.anthonybrown.com By Authority: Friends of Anthony Brown, Gerard Boden, Treasurer.

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s e h c n e r T e h t s r From e i d l o S k c from Bla

I Wor ld War

Letters

Seeing Things

When it’s five-thirty in the evening and retreat and all is done. I sit and smoke my pipe and watch the setting of the sun. I see the smoke above my pipe form rings so round and blue I see a face in each blue ring and of course the face is you. When it’s ten o’clock at night and taps are blown so very low, I lie awake a thinking of the times not long ago; And all my thoughts are of one girl, whom I know is true. Then I go to sleep and dream, and all my dreams of then of you. But, when the German stops his murdering and a raiding on the sea And the submarines are sunken and the German soldiers flee. And the Kaiser doffs his helmet to the old Red, White and Blue With the rest of this victorious bunch, then I’ll return to you.

James Young Med. Dept. 368th Infantry.

OOOOOOOOOO

Wants to Get Home

Corporal John W. Roberts, Co. D 808 Pioneer Infantry, now in France writes to his brother, Henry F. Roberts, 516 Bloom Street that he is all right and his greatest wish is to get back home. He had been reported killed in action, but thanks be to God, I received a letter Tuesday, Dec. 11, dated the 6th of last month, and he wishes his many friends, sisters and brothers a merry Christmas and a happy New Year and wants us all to pray for him. OOOOOOOOOO

Writes with Gas Mask On

The following letter was written to Mrs. Lola M. Haynes of 509 Laurens Street by her husband, Sergeant Wm. S. Haynes. “I am well at the present. I am writing with my gas mask on and my steel helmet nearby as we are very near the battlefront. The shells are bursting all around and gas attacks going on. All of the boys are well and we have our spiritual meetings. Our lieutenant who is our chaplain is a good man and is doing wonderful work with our boys. Please ask Dr. Brooks to give a minute of prayer for our boys. Our meetings have brought many a man to God. May God bless you all. I have seen thousands of dirty

Pvt. John T. Nicholas Ord. Detachment 351 F.A.A.E.F. Writes to his brother Mr. Jesse Nicholas, Glenwood Ave., Govans, that he is well and getting Hun prisoners. They are a hard looking set. along fairly well. He says that he hears the Hun’s Sergeant William S. Haynes bullets whistling past him quite often but he is not Headquarters 808 Pioneer Infantry afraid because he is not chicken-hearted, neither is he nervous. OOOOOOOOOO OOOOOOOOOO Pvt. Frank Hardin 13 Depot Labor Co. A.E.F. Torpedoed Into War Service Writes to Mrs. Elsie Bailey that he is well and A Rest Camp in France: doing well. He wishes to be remembered to all of his Eric de Castro, 17 years old, of the Danish West friends back home. Indies, tells a unique story of how he became a OOOOOOOOOO member of the French Foreign Legion. Three years ago he left home on a passing ship Drink Wine for Coffee and in no search of adventure and romance, but Wagoner Isaac Wanser attracted by promises of an easy life and good pay. 372 Supply Co. A.E.F. There was a war on at the time, but Eric knew nother Writes to his friend, Miss Annie J. Curtis, about it and cared less. For a year he sailed and Centreville, Md. that he is well and getting along steamed the seas under a Danish flag entirely un fine. He sends her a coupon for his Christmas box heedful of European news. Later he joined a British and asks her to please send him some tobacco and ship and was torpedoed. That was in 1916. The ship cigarettes. He is a little blue for America and hopes was the Mount Haven. to be home soon. Eric was captured by the German submarine, carried to Germany and put in a prison camp for OOOOOOOOOO three months where he was compelled to shovel Has Been Made Corporal coal for 14 hours a day. He escaped from Germany Corp. Edgar Johnson on a Norwegian steamer. This steamer was also 808 Pioneer Inf. Co. AEF torpedoed. Eric was injured in the leg by a piece of Writes to his mother, Mrs. Henrietta Pinckney, the torpedo and carried to a hospital at Bergen. After 703 Stirling St. that he is well and getting along being cured the desire to go on the sea again seized fine. He is really enjoying army life and has worked him and he got aboard a small steamer bound for himself up to corporal. He desires her to send him Rouen. cigarettes for Christmas as they are hard to get in On landing at Rouen he did not know that he had France. to have papers to go ashore, so he was arrested and put into prison. After remaining in prison a short OOOOOOOOOO while he heard about the war and on being asked whether he would like to enlist or remain in prison, Private Samuel J. Downes he chose the former and joined the French Foreign Writes to his friend John Frisby that he is well at Legion. present and everything so far has been fine. He has not been on night duty for sometime but expects OOOOOOOOOO to et a five days furlough soon. The only thing that Mrs. Clara Anderson of Still Pond, Md. received worries him is when he thinks of the old times that the following letter from her husband, Pvt. Perry he and his friend had together. He thinks that he Anderson who is somewhere in France serving in the may be home by the first of the year; if so then he Quarter Master Corps: will review the good old times we used to have once Dear wife – I received your letter tonight and was more. very glad to hear from you so often. I am well and getting along fine and hope this letter will find you well and the rest of the family also. Well Clara, we are having a fine time over here. The YMCA sends American girls out to give us concerts. It seems somewhat like home. One girl played “Take Me Back to Old Virginia.” I thought about our victrola. And Rodeheaver is over here; he came out with the YMCA and sang “Brighten the Corner.” The record we have sounded exactly like him. I haven’t seen any of our boys from home since I left. I have seen several German prisoners. They are fierce looking people. My regards to all inquiring friends. I remain you affectionate husband, Pvt. Perry O. Anderson, World War 1 soldiers kept families abreast of news from U.S. Army the front.

Opportunity to Join Genetics Research Study ClinSeq™ is an exciting new study that is looking at how genes may cause or contribute to common diseases, such as heart disease. The ClinSeq™ study needs volunteers who: • Are African American, African or Afro-Caribbean • Are between the ages of 45 and 65 • Have a primary care physician or a community health center where they receive healthcare • Have not smoked in the past year • Live in the metropolitan Washington, DC or Baltimore areas Interested individuals who are eligible to participate will have an initial evaluation that includes several blood tests, an EKG, an echocardiogram and possibly a heart CAT scan. These tests are free of charge, and participants are compensated $100 upon completion of their initial appointment. Participants are asked to be part of the study for several years. For more information, please contact Sandra Epps at (301) 402-0020.

MECU of Baltimore Inc. Congratulates

The Afro American Newspaper On its 120th Anniversary

If you or a family member live work, worship or attend school in Baltimore City, you can join MECU! For more information on becoming a MECU member visit us at www.mecu.com or call 410-752-8313.

Borrow Smart...Borrow from MECU Federally Insured by the NCUA


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Fight for Nassig, Germany. Negro infantry and tanks of the 12th Armored Division prepare to attack from these woods. They make their plans while reading a map, left center. April 18, 1945. World War I soldiers greeted by cilivians. Elizabeth “Bettye” M. Phillips, the first American female war correspondent. November, 1944.

Benjamin O. Davis Jr. at Tuskegee Airbase, 1942

Famed AFRO war correspondent, Art Carter 1944

Sgt. Leon Bradford, Miss Delores Teel, Lt. L.C. Maye and Pvt. Andrew Robinson deeply engrossed in the game. September 25, 1943.

Congratulations Afro-American Newspaper on your 120 years of excellent service to the Baltimore metropolitan area

P-B Health Home Care Agency, Inc. Jackie Bailey RN, MBA, CEO

2535 Saint Paul St. Baltimore, Md 21218 Tel# 410-235-1060 www.P-BHealth.com

RN Case Manager Positions Available –East/West Balto.– Full Time with Benefits Productivity Incentives

Sgt. and Mrs. Andrew Brown were married in Washington recently. The bride, the former Hilda N. Gordon, is the daughter of Mr. and Mrs. John D. Gordon.


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477th Composite Group in West Coast Maneuvers. December 7, 1946.

Graduate School USA congratulates The Afro-American on its 120 years of dedicated service to the community.

AFRO-081812-OE

graduateschool.edu

(888) 744-GRAD

Coppin State University College of Health Professions ▪ Advocacy ▪ Collaborative Partnership ▪ Community Engagement ▪ Compassionate Community Healthcare ▪ Competence ▪ Customer Service ▪ Cutting Edge Instructional Technology ▪ Diversity of Values, Culture, and Research ▪ Excellence ▪ Lifelong Learning ▪ Respect for Others ▪ Nursing Research ▪ Scholarly Endeavors

Offering the following programs: Doctor of Nursing Practice (DNP) Master of Science in Nursing (MSN) Post Masters Certification/Family Nurse Practitioner Accelerated 2nd Degree (BSN)

RN to BSN Traditional BSN GNA/CNA Training Bachelor of Science in Health Information Management (BS)

Training from the College of Health Professions ▪ Increases your knowledge base ▪ Increases your earning capacity ▪ Increases quality patient outcomes Health & Human Services Building ▪ 2601 West North Avenue ▪ Baltimore, MD 21216

For more information about our programs email us at healthprofessions@coppin.edu or call 410-951-3970 Half Page ALL Programs Ad AFRO-AMERICAN ANNIVERSARY ED.indd 1

7/17/2012 1:52:54 PM


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Authority: O’Say Can You See PAC, Martin F. Cadogan, Treasurer


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Community and Business AFRO readers turned to the newspapers for news of what was happening where they lived as much as for national and international developments, so editors and reporters were committed to covering Black communities. In D.C. the newspapers’ commitment to the people it covered was personified by Frances L. Murphy, II, the publisher and granddaughter of AFRO founder John H. Murphy Sr. Frances L. Murphy, who died in 2007, spent countless hours speaking to groups and attending social and service events, always with a stack of five AFROs in her purse to drop off for the education of anyone who had not seen it. There were stories about church news, neighborhood events and tragedies. On March 24, 1956, the Baltimore AFRO’s front page bore a photo of Mrs. Julia Williams, 82, with the identification line “Saw Pastor Die.” The story contained Williams’ account of the death of the Rev. Wilbur Walters, apparently from a heart attack after returning from a funeral. “He was saying what a nice funeral it was… and how she was a lovely person. All of a sudden, he fell out of the chair,” Williams told the AFRO. The same page featured stories about an athlete’s wife who had been gifted $1,000 to allow her to accompany her husband to seven track meets and another about NAACP founder W.E.B. Du Bois being barred from speaking on Long Island. Communities competed in the annual Clean Block campaign, now touted as the oldest environmental program in the country. Neighborhoods committed to keeping their streets clean, their doors and window sills painted, their greenery well trimmed and housed in car tires and above all, in Baltimore, keeping the storied white marble steps immaculate. And the block that excelled was crowned winner and given treats all the families could enjoy. The community pages were also the place readers checked for the products they needed. Ads ranged from national products like Tums to local car dealers who wanted to let Blacks know green was the only color with which they were concerned. For Black-owned businesses, the AFRO was one of the few places to ply their wares or services. Madame C.J. Walker, inventor of a bevy of Black hair care products, advertised in the pages of the AFRO. There were ads for Black banks, Black insurance companies, Black funeral homes Black hair salons and Black boutiques. There were announcements for African-American-owned restaurants and companies available to cater parties and weddings.

Clark Atlanta University When the nation’s first private liberal arts college for African Americans, Clark College (1869), joined with the nation’s first African-American graduate school, Atlanta University (1865), what emerged was one of the world’s foremost institutions of higher learning, Clark Atlanta University (CAU). Rooted in nearly 200 years of rich cultural heritage and tradition, CAU today is one of America’s great universities, embracing global diversity and leadership development. As the largest of the nation’s 39 member UNCF institutions, CAU sets the pace for academic excellence, research and service.

International City, Global Education Located in the heart of Atlanta, one of the world’s great international cities, CAU is the only co-ed undergraduate institution in the prestigious Atlanta University Center. Our 4,000 students enjoy the cachet of a private education alongside classmates from around the nation and the world, all engaged in academic pursuits at the bachelor’s, master’s and doctoral levels in 38 areas of study. CAU students enjoy Atlanta’s rich, international arts and culture, access to international corporate and political forums and, of course, world-class shopping and entertainment. Our students also enjoy study abroad opportunities at universities around the globe.

A Legacy to Uphold Once at the heart of student involvement in the Civil Rights Movement, CAU today provides

opportunities to address issues that plague a global population, from safe drinking water for third world citizens to HIV/AIDS prevention in local communities, to engineering nanotechnologies to cure disease worldwide. Whether you want to research cancer therapies, revolutionize the music industry, teach calculus or be the next global CEO, Clark Atlanta is where you will find your place in history. At CAU, you will walk in the footsteps of legendary alumni like poet, author and activist James Weldon Johnson, Rev. Dr. Ralph David Abernathy, educator Marva Collins, Tony Award-winning director Kenny Leon, journalist Jacque Reid and former professors W.E.B. DuBois and Whitney M. Young, Jr. More important, you will carve your own pathway to excellence. At Clark Atlanta University, you won’t just learn about how the world has changed. You will become a leader, empowered and ready to change the world for the better!

Apply Now for Admission to Clark Atlanta University! • admissions.cau.edu • Call 404-880-6605 • Visit Us on Campus: 223 James P. Brawley Dr., SW Atlanta, GA 30314

Become a Part of Panther Nation Today!

admissions.cau.edu

admissions.cau.edu

Learn. Lead. Change the World!


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Druid Hill Park. 1947

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Easter Sunday. April 1942

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Sept. 3 1955

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AFRO Clean Block in the 1300 block of Gilmore Street, June 28, 1945.

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The Safety Patrol of the Turner Elementary School is one of the best trained to be found any place. Pupils are selected in the first grade for certain “errand” duties and work their way up. Moses Pounds, rear left, is patrol captain. May 6, 1958.

Inquiry, Innovation, and Inclusivity

“Thank you for keeping our heritage ALIVE!”

On the occasion of our own special milestone – The Centennial –

THE PARK SCHOOL of BALTIMORE stands with the Afro-American in celebration of its historic 120-year commitment to Community Service, Education, and Social Change.

congratulations and thank you to the afro www.parkschool.net

HOURS: MONDAY THRU FRIDAY: 10:00 AM - 6:00 PM EXAMINATION BY APPOINTMENT SAT: 9:00 AM - 12:00 PM

Ashburton Opticians 3020 LIBERTY HEIGHTS AVENUE BALTIMORE, MD 21215 (410) 664 - 9436 (443) 524-2302 (FAX) www.AshburtonOpticians.com

André H. Smith OPTICIAN

F. Hocker and Associates Dental Laboratory

Congratulations to the

Afro American Newspapers for 120 years of serving the community from Calvin Mims and CALMI Electrical Company, Inc. Calmi ElECtriCal Co 220 N FraNkliNtowN rd BaltimorE, md 21223 CALMI services clients in Md. and D.C. for electrical construction, maintenance & control installations in commercial, industrial & institutional environments.

Congratulates The AFRO-American Newspapers Crowns & Bridges•Partials •Dentures•Casts•Flex 3308 Ayrdale Avenue Baltimore, MD 21216 410-578-0659 Frank A. Hocker Sr., CEO

Joyce A. Smith OPTICIAN


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Clean block workers are restoring the 1500 block of Presstman St. to its former beauty. Marble is being cleaned, doorways and sills are being painted white. A tag day party netted $45, with which paint is being bought. Viola Carte and Albert Keys, two of the block’s workers, are shown. July 3, 1943

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AFRO paper carriers Wallace Reddicks, Earl Gray, Andrew Sutton and Robert McNeil Feb. 28, 1953

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AFRO paper boys on a NYC trip. 1953

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A 1932 soup line in Baltimore.

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Albert Jennings, William Carter and Forrest Connor. Aug. 17, 1940

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Easter Parade, Laurens Street and Pennsylvania Avenue. 1956

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Set for Kickoff. Raymond V. Haysbert, vice president and general manager of H.G. Parks will launch his drive, 12:30 p.m., along with other division chairmen, the annual kick-off luncheon to be held at the Lord Baltimore Hotel. Sept. 24, 1968

Huge End-of-Summer Clearance Sale at

SANKOFA AFRICAN & WORLD BAZAAR For the best selection of African Clothing in the Baltimore metro area

• Easy-wear sundresses, short sets and sun hats

Superior Care, Convenience and Community Connection are our commitment to you. At Linden Medical Group, we offer you more than access to a Primary Care Physician, we offer a stronger doctor-patient relationship. A relationship that provides you with preventive care, care for minor injuries and management of chronic health issues.

• Authentic elegant clothing from West Africa • Kente strips & shawls • African & World Music • Musical instruments • Knowledge cards • Jewelry. Lots of jewelry • Elegant Greeting Cards • Unique gifts • Museum-quality Tribal Art

Up toOn se5le0ct%ed Oitemffs Sale

Monday, Aug. 20 to

Saturday, Sept. 8

2442 N. Charles Street, Baltimore, MD 21218 410.366.0886 Hrs: Monday-Saturday 11:00 am - 6:30 pm

Visa, MC, Amex, Discover, gift cards accepted. No lay-away on clearance items. All clearance sales final.

And when you need specialty care, Linden Medical Group connects you to an extensive network of Specialty Physicians. We’re Linden Medical Group, giving you primary and specialty care to help you lead a healthier life. CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT at one of our locations right in your neighborhood.

ARMORY PLACE 827 Linden Ave. Baltimore, MD 21201 410-225-8800

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NOW OPEN

HERITAGE CROSSING 312 Martin Luther King, Jr. Blvd. Baltimore, MD 21201 410-225-8855 WWW.MARYLANDGENERAL.ORG


Johns Hopkins Medicine congratulates The Afro-American Newspapers on 120 years of dedicated service to the community.

hopkinsmedicine.org


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Standing Victor March, Cynthia Malloy, Annette March and Erich March. Seated are J. Roberta March and William March in the new chapel facilities of the March Funeral Home Establishment. 1978

Happy 120th Anniversary

TO THE AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPER

Thank you for supporting the community and building a better Baltimore!

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AFRO newsies won a trip to Disneyland in California. July 1960

___________________________________________

Jones & Associates A Professional Corporation

_________________________________________________

Attorneys and Counselors at Law

Congratulations to The Afro on your 120th Anniversary

Bon Secours Baltimore Health System

Congratulates The Afro American Newspaper on its

Thank You for your decades of service to our community, and being the chronicler and

120th Anniversary

voice of truth that sheds light on our history and our present.

Your connection to hope, help and healing to build a stronger, healthier community. Harborplace Tower, Suite 2700 111 South Calvert Street Baltimore, Maryland 21202 (410) 385-5240 www.JonesAssociatesLaw.com

Nathaniel E. Jones, Jr. James H. Fields J. Darrell Peterson

www.bonsecoursbaltimore.com


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We Honor the Men and Women who “got the paper to the people”

Afro Paperboys and Papergirls

Rev. Dr. Richards T. Adams 1941-1947

Steven G. Allen 1962

Marian Anderson 1945

Judge Robert M. Bell 1956

Jerome Collins 1949

Brian K. Cuthrell 1970-1973

E. Lloyd Davis 1938

Richard N. Dixon 1950

Calvin Dotson 1954

Donald D. Garnett 1949-1952

David Gathers 1961

Doni Glover 1975-1978

Michael Eugene Johnson 1966-1970

Ralph L. King 1939

Myrtle Koger 1935

Kweisi Mfume 1961-1965

Michael Bowen Mitchell 1953-1960

William H. Murphy Jr. 1953-1961

Vernon Nelson 1951-1952

John J. Oliver Jr. 1957-1961

Benjamin M. Phillips IV 1964-1965

Grace Pullum 2002

Joseph Pullum 1945-Present

Leroy Pullum 1943

Leonard W. Ross Jr. 1955

Thomas Sanders 1968

William Levi Smith Jr. 1949-1952

Carl Swann 1961-1965

Frances L. Tavares 1941-1948

Howard L. Tutman III 1972-1973

Anthony C. Ward 1930-1938

James Adams 1940’s Helena Alexander 1945 Ernest Barbo 1953 Alfred Barnes 1940’s John Boone 1950 James E. Britton, Jr 1972 Michael Brooks Arthur Brown 1941-1950 James “Winky” Camphor 1944-1945 Walter Cole 1951 Wayne Cole 1951 Bill Coleman 1948-1952 Joseph T. Craig 1941-1945

Dr. James E. Wood Jr. 1959

Chester Davis 1955 Clyde Davis 1965 Vinson Davis 1955 Ralph Dixon 1949 Corneilus Dorsey 1941-1950 William Dorsey 1941-1950 Cassius Evans 1941-1951 Hugh Evans 1941-1952 Theodoric Evans 1941-1951 Calvin Fields 1958-1960 Carolyn Fugett 1953 Robert Gee 1941-1947 Eugene Gillis 1960

William “Seed” Gross 1940’s Orlando Hamlet 1950 Carl Harris 1952 Myra Harris 1952 Miles G. Harrison, MD 1959 Robert House 1965-1967 Nathan Irby, Jr. 1938 Samuel James 1942-1952 William James 1942-1952 Anthony Johnson 1974 Daniel Johnson 1940’s G.I. Johnson 1951 George L. Johnson 1953-1964 James Johnson 1941-1951 Alvin Jones 1941-1951 Patricia Lamb 1966 George Lee 1940 Owen Lee 1940 William Lee 1941-1950 Augustus Leonard 1940’s Donald Lewis 1940-1950 Reginald F. Lewis 1953-1956 Sherman Lewis 1940-1950 Davina Lofton 2008 Rev. Dr. Francis Manns Jr. 1955-1959 Roland Marritt 1950 Rodger Murphy Matthews (LTC-Ret) 19631965 Agnes Duggins McClendon 1952 Anthony Mills 1959

Congressman Elijah E. Cummings 1960-1964

Twilla Dixon Mitchell 1961 Jeanne “Candy” Morris 1955 Shirley Neal 1999 Vernon Nelson 1951-1952 Rev. Al Nichols 1936-1945 Clifford Owens 1951 Donald Owens 1951 Leon Patterson 1954 Dr. Theodore Patterson 1940-1946 Mabel W. Purvis 1937-1942 David Rhone 1948-1956 Philip Roane 1940’s Norman Reginald Ross 1972-1973 Gregory “Xavier” Scroggins 1970-1971 Israel (Benny) Singleton 1942 Carl Edward Smith 1947-1951 Joseph “Joe” Smith 1942-1952 Clover Street 1941-1950 John Street 1941-1950 Morning Sunday 1990-1991 William Swales 1948 George Sykes 1950 Roy Sykes 1950 Howard L. Tutman, Jr. 1955 Mark Tutman 1979 Nina Cole Wallace 1951 Elijah Washington 1947-1949 Tyrone Wells 1959-1964 Rufus Williams 1940’s Corneilus Woodson 1941-1947


HOWARD UNIVERSITY

Howard University, one of the nation’s leading research universities, is dedicated to educating students from diverse backgrounds at the undergraduate, graduate and professional levels. Guided by our extraordinary cadre of faculty, students are immersed in cutting edge scholarship and innovation including nanotechnology, human genome research and atmospheric science as well as the social sciences, arts and humanities on four campuses including the North Campus in Beltsville, Maryland. Since its inception more than 140 years ago, Howard University has been at the forefront of preparing globally competent students for positions of leadership and social responsibility. twitter.com/HowardU facebook.com/howarduniversity


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Sports When Jesse Owens took gold in Berlin in the 1936 Olympics, the AFRO told the story. When boxer Joe Louis avenged his having been knocked out by Max Schmeling by dropping the German fighter in the first round in 1938, the AFRO had it. When track athletes Tommie Smith and John Carlos, winners of gold and bronze medals, respectively, in the 1968 Olympics in Mexico City, were barred from the U.S. team after raising clenched fists to signify Black Power, the AFRO reported it on the front page. It chronicled, in detail, the struggle of Jackie Robinson to break the color barrier in Major League Baseball, but it also ran stories about those who had it somewhat easier making their way in professional sports, like Althea Gibson and Wilma Rudolph, Jim Brown, Bill Russell, Kareem Abdul Jabar, Magic Johnson, Wes Unseld, Eugene “Big Daddy” Lipscomb, Tiger Woods and Venus and Serena Williams. Locally, the paper kept tabs on the Orioles and the Ravens and the Red Skins. The list could go on and on throughout 120 years. And for more than 60 of those years, the AFRO’s sports pages were anchored by the insightful writing of award-winning journalist Sam Lacy. Lacy’s coverage of the sports scene, especially his love of baseball, was part information and part crusade against racial intolerance. He championed the cause of desegregating baseball, agitating to the point that he is credited by many with helping to spur its integration. Lacy reported live from the baseball diamond, to the boxing ring to the gridiron. Despite the fact that his career started in the depths of segregation, his colleagues, Black and White, recognized the value of his work. He was the first Black member of the Baseball Writers Association of America, the first African American to be named to the Maryland Media Hall of Fame, was named to the Black Athletes Hall of Fame and received the Lifetime Achievement Award from the National Association of Black Journalists. In his latter years, journalists from around the world called to get just a little glimpse of his experience. He could regale any audience with his exploits, but loved nothing more than digging into a good sports story and the story was always better when he told it. He filed the last dispatch of his “A to Z” column from his hospital bed in 2003 on the day before he died at age 99.

Cover Key of AFRO File Photos and Front Pages From the Top: • Here’s the Ohio Speedster Finishing. Jesse Owens. June 27, 1936. • Monumental Golf Club. November 3, 1945 • Douglass in high spirit for debut. September 21, 1957. • Joe Louis. December 26, 1936. • Carl Lewis. February 22, 1997. • Fans accept ‘new’ Redskins, 40,000 cheer Mitchell & Co. October 2, 1962. • Michael Jordan. May 3, 1997 • Althea Gibson. 1962 • Arthur Ashe, tennis great – rights activist laid to rest. February 13, 1993. • Short Story: ‘Winnah, New Champ!’ October 2, 1962. • Sam Lacy in earlier days. • Fighter to Minister. Muhammad Ali, (Cassius Clay), former world’s heavyweight boxing champion came to Baltimore this week as a full fledged Muslim minister. It was his first visit since being stripped of his crown for refusing to obey army induction orders. He struck above poses while answering a reporter’s questions. Oct. 3, 1967. • Dodgers Sign Up Jackie. April 12, 1947.

All pages: AFRO File Photos

Take the Right Step on the Path to Homeownership

The Maryland Mortgage Program is the place to start! Closing cost assistance of at least $5,000 and 30-year fixed rate mortgages. Learn more about special incentives for veteran and active military homebuyers

800.638.7781 • www.mmprogram.org Maryland Department of Housing and Community Development


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Carl Lewis makes the leap. February 22, 1997

Track star Jackie Joyner explodes on the field at the 1986 Goodwill Games proving she is the world’s greatest woman athlete. 1986

Jesse Owens, the world’s fastest human. Feb. 25, 1941

BEYA STEM Global Competitiveness Conference

Please join us February 7-9, 2013 Career Communications

in Washington DC at the

Marriot Wardman Park Hotel

Group, Inc.

for the 27th Black Engineer of the Year

the AFRO American

For more information, please visit www.beya.org

proudly congratulates Newspaper for

STEM Conference!

120 years of service!

Washington D.C. photos by Jake McGuire


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Monumental Golf Club. Nov. 3, 1945

Oct. 2, 1962 AFRO Jan. 2, 1979 AFRO

Sam Lacy

Eligible for a CASH REWARD

$31,000.00

You can remain anonymous

On March 2, 1996, 23-year-old Jody LeCornu (while in her white Honda) was shot in the back from the rear of her car in the Drumcastle Shopping Center (previously Caldor parking lot) on York Road in Precinct 6/Towson. She drove across York Road to the Giant York Road Plaza where she died. A black male driving a white BMW followed LeCornu into the York Road Plaza, took unknown items from her car, returned to his vehicle and left the scene.

Anyone with information is asked to call Baltimore County Police at 410-307-2020 or Metro Crime Stoppers at 1-866-756-2587

Feb. 13, 1993 AFRO


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1948

1988

Marion Jones in Olympic stride. March 28, 1999

Sam Lacy’s last column. May 17, 2003

Olympic champion Florence Griffin Joyner. 2003

Scottie Pippen and Michael Jordan May 3, 1997

DPR

DC DEPARTMENT OF PARKS AND RECREATION

Move Football

Boxing

Grow Be Green Senior Programs

Teen Programs

Community Gardens

Gardening

AND MUCH MORE !

dpr.dc.gov

@dcdpr Vincent C. Gray, Mayor

(202) 673-7647


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Members of the Baltimore Elite Giants baseball team beside the Jacob Ruppert trophy, which they won by defeating the Homestead Grays, 2-0, for the Negro National League championship. September 30, 1939

Jackie Robinson

Sept. 3, 1920 AFRO

April 12, 1947 AFRO

Congratulations to the

Afro American Newspapers on 120 years! Captain Eric A. Nielsen President (410) 276-1337 3720 Dillon Street Baltimore, Md 21224

Founded in 1852, Maryland Pilots have been instrumental in creating minority opportunities by being one of the first national pilot associations to welcome AfricanAmerican and female members.

This is the starting line-up of the Washington Homestead Grays, 1944 World Champions, about to leave the dugout for practice drill in preparation for the upcoming doubleheader with the New York Black Yankees. The order in which they will go to bat is, from right to left, Jimmy Bell, Jerry Benjamin, Dave Hoskins, Buck Leonard, Josh Gibson, Sammy Bankhead, Bob Robinson or Ray Battle and Jelly Jackson. May 19, 1945

On Behalf of the Board &Staff of The National Coalition on Black Civic Participation and it’s initiatives: 2012 Unity Voter Empowerment Campaign Black Women’s Roundtable Black Men’s Roundtable Black Youth Vote! Foot Soldiers for Democracy

Baltimore County congratulates The AFRO American Newspapers

on their 120th anniversary. As part of the history being commemorated on this significant occasion, the Benjamin Banneker Historical Park and Museum, now a national landmark site, has a story to share. Visit and learn about Benjamin Banneker, a free African-American astronomer, mathematician, surveyor, and farmer on the actual site of the Banneker 17th-century farmstead at 300 Oella Avenue in Catonsville, Baltimore County.

ENJOYBALTIMORECOUNTY.COM 410-887-2849

The Afro Newspaper

We Congratulate for 120 years of service as the voice of the Black community For 120 years The Afro Newspaper has excelled in their efforts to: educate, inform, challenge, entertain and empower our community

We Salute You! The NCBCP is a 501 (c) 3 non-profit, non-partisan, organization dedicated to a nonprofit, non-partisan organization dedicated to increasing civic engagement in Black and underserved communities. With the 2012 theme “Stand Your Ground” the National Coalition, through it’s Unity 2012 campaign, is working nationally to ensure that black voters register to vote, verify their voting status, and are allowed to cast a vote that counts on Election Day. For more information on NCBCP on twitter: @ncbcp.

www.ncbcp.org


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1957 ad

Evander Holyfield. March 15, 1997

Joe Louis. Dec. 26, 1936

Mike Tyson

Promoter Don King, left, joins boxer Mike Tyson during a Harlem news conference, June 20, 1995. Tyson came home to a festive hero’s welcome after three years in prison, basking in the cheers of a sweltering crowd and shielded from questions about his rape of a beauty queen. Dec. 18, 1989

Oct. 2, 1962 AFRO

Nov. 15, 1966 AFRO

Talking. Listening. Thinking. Looking. Fighter to Minister. Muhammad Ali, (Cassius Clay), former world’s heavyweight boxing champion came to Baltimore as a full fledged Muslim minister. It was his first visit since being stripped of his crown for refusing to obey army induction orders. He struck above poses while answering a reporter’s questions. Oct. 3, 1967


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Sept. 6, 1960

Presenting the award to women’s finalist Mimi Kanarek at the Baltimore Tennis Club Tournament at Druid Hill Park in Baltimore is Buddy Young, National Brewing Co. representative, while Joseph Boston and John Wood, right, club officers, look on. July 17, 1962.

Sept. 7, 1957

Althea Gibson with Baltimore Mayor J. Harold Grady. 1962

Congratulations to

AFRO 120th Anniversary Commemorative Edition 2012 1st Mariner Bank is committed to our community. We are always looking for ways to improve the areas where our employees live, work and play. When 1st Mariner partners with local organizations, our employees often offer their time and knowledge, as well as funds. Stop by your local branch today and find out how we built this bank for you.

For more information, call 410-558-3343 or 1-866-362-4500. www.1stmarinerbank.com


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Cover Key of AFRO File Photos and Front Pages • The marching unit of the Monumental Lodge of Elks is shown as it stepped out in the parade at the national Elks convention in Philadelphia.

Society

• Gadabouting USA with Lula Jones Garrett. January 1, 1963.

In the earliest days of the 20th century, as the AFRO was forging a name as one of the nation’s preeminent news operations, African Americans were creating their own social institutions. Institutions that were to come to life on the AFRO’s society pages, where brides who would never have been depicted in White media stood elegantly and beautifully in flowing white wedding gowns and debutantes smiled shyly as they made their entrance escorted by their fathers in tuxedos. For decades, women’s editor Lula Jones MacKay shepherded onto the social pages feature and news stories about everything related to Black society, from engagements and marriages to openings and exhibits, from recitals and concerts to repasts and receptions. Largely locked out of White society, Blacks formed groups out of common interests—fraternities and sororities, social clubs, organizations based on educational achievement, occupations and hobbies. The newspaper covered the service organizations—the NAACP, the Urban League, the National Council of Negro Women and its formidable longtime head, Dr. Dorothy Height. As the story of Black society went untold in White America, the first black fraternity, Alpha Phi Alpha, was formed in 1906 by seven students at Cornell University. About the same time, Sigma Pi Phi Fraternity, also called the Boule, was formed for professional men. In 1913, the first black sorority, Alpha Kappa Alpha, was incorporated. But while Blacks embraced each other in social groups, many were not open to everybody. Having their own prerequisites; some required a certain social standing or income, while others excluded darker-skinned African Americans who could not pass the so-called brown bag test. Unable to find images of themselves in other media, African American women looked to the AFRO for information about their fashion, health, hair styling and beauty. Products to help them enhance their looks, like Bee-Dee Hair and Scalp Treatment, whose ad admonished women that “Beauty begins with the hair,” and Lydia Pinkham’s Compound for women’s “middle age symptoms” were offered. Our cultural and arts news was featured in every edition. MacKay’s social columns, “Gadabouting in Baltimore” and Gadabouting in the USA” were the places to have your events touted. And then there were announcements about promotions, anniversaries and “Divorce and Separation Reports.” “Quit After One Week,” headlined a story from Aug. 15, 1942 when Mrs. Gladys W. Horne of U Street NW in the District sued for divorce. “Seven days of marital bliss was all she got out of her marriage,” the first sentence said.

• Gadabouting in Baltimore. August 2, 1958. • Jackson and the AKAs. August 4, 1984. • Thousands Mourn C.C. Spaulding Rites. • Mr. and Mrs. William George at a Guardsmen celebration. February 25, 1939. • Elks Capture Atlantic City. August 20. 1952. • Three Wives: A New Illustrated Love Serial about Baltimore Society People. April 2, 1927. • Hosts and guests “get in the groove” at the Guardsmen’s dance at the Lincoln Colonnade in Washington, D.C. March 4, 1939. • David Peter and Miss Dolly LaRue at a Guardsmen event. February 25, 1939. • Delta Sigma Theta sing the sorority hymn at the 40th anniversary banquet held in Washington at Howard U.’s Baldwin Hall. January 1953. • Physician’s Daughter Becomes Bride of Veteran in Double Ring Ceremony in Baltimore Church. November 2, 1946 • AKA Line. Pledgees of Beta Lambda Chapter, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority at Miner Teachers College, also sold NAACP Christmas Seals during their probation. November 12, 1953. • Dr. Ruth Taylor of Gary, Ind. Is present for the dedication of the historical archives of the Black Women’s Lives at Howard University. May 19, 1970. • Photonews: Penn Relays Photo Page. May 1, 1937. • Contestants for the Delta Sigma Theta’s “Man of the Year” award are, from left, standing, Darold Wilson, Joseph Giles, Roland Ganges, Larry Davis; seated, Elijah Williams, Anthony Dorsey and Maynard Dartch. October 14, 1967

All photos: AFRO File Photos

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Delta Sigma Theta sing the sorority hymn at the 40th anniversary banquet held in Washington at Howard U.’s Baldwin Hall. 1953

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[ Delta founders and national officers of Delta Sigma Theta Sorority cutting the ribbon at the April 28 dedication of the historical archives of the Black Women’s Lives, a repository at Howard University. They are, from left, Dr. Ruth Taylor of Gary, Ind., national secretary; Bertha Pitts, Campbelle, Seattle, a founder; Thelma T. Daley, Baltimore, national president; Oceola McCarthy Adams, New York City, founder; Cinona Cargile Alexander, Jacksonville, Fla., founder; Grace White Ware, Cleveland, Ohio; Elsie Cook, New York, second national vice president.

B’more CELEBRATED

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AKA Line. Pledgees of Beta Lambda Chapter, Alpha Kappa Alpha Sorority at Miner Teachers College, also sold NAACP Christmas Seals during their probation. First row, from left, Misses Karen Weaver, Ruth Bannister, Peggy Cooper, Loretta Crawford, Juanita Robinson. Second row, from left, Janet Craig, Suzanne Armour, Elaine DeVine, Dolores Poynter, Gwendolyn Hughes; third row, Elsie Ross, Delores Stevenson, Sylvia Young, Jacquelyn Twyman, Janet Page; fourth row, Barbara Thompson, Judine Bishop, Dorothy Smoot, Shirley L. Brooks, Arlyce Stamps. November 12, 1953.

[

The Hilton Baltimore joins AFRO-American Newspapers in celebrating 120 years of excellence. We congratulate you on reaching this historic milestone!

BOOK AT BALTIMORE.HILTON.COM OR 1.800.HILTONS 401 West Pratt Street Baltimore, Maryland 21201 Baltimore.Hilton.com 1-443-573-8700 Publication:Afro American Newspaper Size: 5.62 x 5 Job Number: 249-2012 Run Date:Aug 2012 Dana Communications 609.466.9187

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Contestants for the Delta Sigma Theta’s “Man of the Year” award are, from left, standing, Darold Wilson, Joseph Giles, Roland Ganges, Larry Davis; seated, Elijah Williams, Anthony Dorsey and Maynard Dartch. October 14, 1967

[


 
 The
Baltimore
Chapter,
The
Links
Incorporated
 Congratulates The
Afro
American
Newspapers
 for
120
years
of
 “Continuously
publishing
the
news
of
and
about
the
African
American
Community”
 
 Chapter
Members:

Dominique
Wilmot

Allen,
MD;
Barbara
Blount

Armstrong;
Esther
A.
Leslie
Avery;
Diane
 Bell‐McKoy;
Deidra
Bishop;
Marsha
Brown‐
Mathews,
MD;
Charlene
Cooper
Boston,
PhD;
Robbie
Chissell;
 Erica
Cryor,
Esq.;
Mellasenah
I.
Edwards,
DMA;
Wilhelma
Garner‐Brown;
Angela
D.
Greene,
Esq.;
Cardrienne
 Griffin;
Terri
Hackett,
PhD;
Jeanette
Hairston;
Betty
Harris;
Janie
Greenwood
Harris,
Esq.;
Carla
Hayden,
PhD;
 Nikita
Haysbert;
Ellen
D.
Howard;
Miriam
Hutchins,
Esq.;
Patricia

Jessamy,
Esq.;
Crystal
Watkins
Johansson,
 MD,
PhD;
Shirley
Kane;
Margret
Land;
Sylvia
Law;
Sheila
Lawson;
Angela
Leonard,
PhD;
Michelle
Lipkowitz,
 Esq.;
E.
Francine
Stokes
McElveen,
Esq.;
Vashti
Murphy
McKenzie,
Rt.
Rev.;
Claudette
McPherson;
Christine
 J.
Moore;
Dana
Petersen
Moore,
Esq.;
Darlene
Wade
Moss;
Camay
Murphy;
Lydia
Mussenden;
Joy
Owens;
 Barbara
Owings;
Stephanie
Rawlings‐
Blake,
Esq.;
Lynn
M.
Reed;
Sharon
Richardson;
Patricia
Roulhac;
 Marion
Russell;
Roslyn
L..
Smith;
Minnie
Smoot;
Linda
H.Taulton;
F.
Aileen
Taylor;
Faith
Thomas,
Esq.;
 LaVerne
Turner;
Patricia
Whitmore‐
Kendall,
PhD;
Mary
Sue
Welcome,
Esq.;
Janice
Wilcox;
Patricia
Wilson;
 Rosetta
Kerr
Wilson.
 


The marching unit of the Monumental Lodge of Elks is shown as it stepped out in the parade at the national Elks convention in Philadelphia.


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[ [ David Peter, Miss Dooly LaRue and Joel Clark leaving a Washington Guardsmen party in 1939.

Hosts and guests “get in the groove” at the Guardsmen’s dance at the Lincoln Colonnade in Washington, D.C. March 4, 1939

[

[ [ [

[ These dancers were guests of the D.C. Chapter of the Guardsmen. March 1, 1941

[ [

Miss Lucile Walker, Mrs. Theodore Jackson, Mr. and Mrs. William George snapped on the balcony. February 25, 1939

[

[[

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[ In April 1939, young Guardsmen from Washington, D.C., Philadelphia, New York, and Baltimore partied at Baltimore’s Strand Ballroom on Pennsylvania Avenue.


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[

Many of the Jills of the Jack and Jill Social Club. January 4, 1987

[

[

[

A Prince Hall Masons Parade, Philadelphia

[

“Child labor will be curbed.” It’s what Secretary of Labor Frances Perkins told Howard University students last week. She is shown above with Dean Lucy Slowe and members of Howard’s Women’s League. From left, Dean Slowe, Sec. Perkins, Miss Evelyn Brandon, H.U. junior and vice president of the Women’s League and Miss Marian Martin, senior, president of the league. Feb. 26, 1937

[

[

The Baltimore Chapter of the National Association of Guardsmen Congratulates

The Afro American Newspapers for 120 Years of Keeping the Community Informed

You have meant so much to so many! We wish you continued success!

Aaron Burnett Guy Bragg Frank Coakley Michael Cryor Thomas Day Edwin Franze Marcellous Frye J.P. Grant Raymond Gray

Argin Hutchins Louis Hutt Howard Jessamy William Jews Terry Jones Kevin Johnson Earl Kidwell Ricardo Kimbers

John ‘Jake’ Oliver Theo Rodgers George Russell, Sr. Hubert Skinner Kerry Staton Doug Able Dwight Taylor Reginald Thomas Kenneth Thompson

Charles Ware Larry Jennings Donald Wilson Danny Bell Bryant Jenkins Thomas Morehead Walt Pearson Zed Smith


120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012 December 25, 2010 - December 31, 2010, The Afro-American

The annual “Holiday Splendor Dinner Dance Benefit,” sponsored by the Prince George’s County Delta Alumnae Foundation, was held recently in the elegance of Camelot in Upper Marlboro, Md. Committee co-chairwomen Kathleen Driver and Miriam Brewer welcomed 300 guests as they orchestrated an evening to remember with a spectacular dinner and dancing. Eddimae Tisdale, foundation chairwoman and Dr. Charlene Dukes, mistress of ceremony, acknowledged special guests and corporate sponsors, which included Prince George’s County Council members Camille Exum, D-Dist. 7, and Samuel Dean, D-Dist. 6, and Dr. Evonne Jones, a platinum sponsor. The successful affair supports the programs offered by Elizabeth Stroud and Barnell Herring, the Prince George’s County Alumnae Chapter (PGCAC) of members of Delta Sigma Theta’s Montgomery Delta Sigma Theta Sorority. PGCAC Chaplain Frenchettia Payne (center) and guests

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Committee chairwomen Kathleen Driver and Miriam Brewer

PGCAC member Angelita Dozier and guest William Robinson, former dean, University of the District of Columbia School of Law, and Arlene Robinson, retired magistrate judge for the District of Columbia

County, Md. and Washington, D.C. chapters

Washington AFRO General Manager Edgar Brookins, Renee Allen, Norma Hatot, foundation vice chairwoman, and Morris King

Board of directors, Prince George's County Delta Alumnae Foundation Barbara Davis and her sister, PGCAC member Gladys Fountain

Friends of the foundation, Henri Cooper and Felicia Brown

Board member Delores McClain (center) and her guests

PGCAC charter member Edna Becton Pittmon and guests

Diane Venable, PGCAC president, and Eddimae Tisdale, foundation chairwoman

Angela Gantt-Holmes, PGCAC photographer, and Dr. Charlene M. Dukes, president, Prince George's Community College, mistress of ceremony

Holiday Splendor Planning Committee

Doris and Wendell Williams and Carl and Marva Younger

Photos by Danita Delaney and Rob Roberts

Members of Omega Psi Phi’s Tau Pi chapter, their families and friends gathered recently at the BWI Airport Marriott for “Holiday with Omega,”

honoring the chapter’s commitment to the region and kicking off the fraternity’s centennial. “Our beloved fraternity is

Brother Gerald and Blanche Greenfield

Cecelia Green, James Lee, Angie Boyle and Mike Davis

Charmetra L. Parker, Esq. and Maj. Terence L. Parker, U.S. Marines

Gaynelle Evans and Brother Art Colbert

about to enter its centennial year, while our chapter celebrates its 36th year of service in this community. The men of Omega have made a difference in the lives of many through continuing volunteer efforts, and we plan to continue that rich tradition of helping others less fortunate and in need,” said Douglas E. Moore, president of the Tau Pi Foundation Fund. “The cardinal principles that we hold so dearly – Manhood, Scholarship, Perseverance, and Uplift – carry an even greater relevance today, than when they were set forth by our founders more than 99 years ago.” The event, hosted by the Tau Pi Foundation Fund, included music from the Panama Band, door prizes, a fur coat raffle from Mano Schwartz, cash bar and more. The night’s standout moment came when Tony Story dropped on one knee and proposed to Cheryl Roher, who was all smiles as she agreed to the marriage.

Brother George and Cyndi Kent

Alfreda Edwards and Charles Smith, Lisa and Robert Burris, Chavis Williams and James Haile

Patrice White, winner of the fur coat, and Harry Evans III from Mano Schwartz

Tony Story proposes marriage to Cheryl Roher she accepted

Brother Dan Brown being escorted into festivities by Miss Sophia Williams Sophia Williams, Amanda Otey, Iris Freeman and Lavin Williams

Members enjoy music from the Panama Band Photos by Rob Roberts


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Dancers at the Baltimore chapter of Guardsmen’s New Year’s Eve gala. Jan. 15, 2011

[

[

[

Links leadership luncheon Faith Thomas, president, Erica Cryor, Mary Welcome, Susan Fales-Hill, author, and Joyce Knox Moorehead. Sept. 24, 2011

[

Former national presidents of The Links, at the 65th anniversary in Washington, DC. Dec. 17 2011 AKAs Celebrate in Style AKA chapter members, Barbara Bellamy and Linda Hall, stepping out on the runway. Washington AFRO Dec.10, 2011

[ [

Alpha brothers encircling the Founders Table singing the Alpha Hymn, NOVA Alphas Award Scholarship. Washington AFRO July16, 2011

Howard L. Tutman III and Lori Tutman at Kappa Vegas was hosted by the Baltimore Alumni Chapter of Kappa Alpha Psi Fraternity. March 27, 2010

17th Annual Stone Soul Picnic Chuck Brown, godfather of GoGo. Washington AFRO August 18 2007

[

Baltimore Deltas 95th Founders Day

Guardsman George Russell and wife, Marion at Guardsmen’s New Year’s Eve gala. Jan. 15, 2011

Pat Jessamy, Stephanie Rawlings-Blake, actress Sheryl Lee Ralph, Sheila Dixon, Salima S. Marriott. Feb. 28, 2008

[[

[

[

Ocielia Gibson, Miss Black Texas is crowned the 2011 Miss Black USA. Washington AFRO Aug. 20,2011

Members of the CBC, 2008 Congressional Black Caucus Weekend. Washington AFRO 10-4-2008


120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

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Mar. 5, 1927

Jan. 21, 1933

May 1, 1937

Sept. 13, 1945 Jan. 2, 1926

Nov 2, 1946 Aug. 7, 1926

AFRO Ad 1919

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120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

[

The pool of Scarlett’s Country Club where, a few days prior, a frantic bride-to-be saw her fiance dive to his death.

[ After federal seizure for back taxes, the driveway leading to Scarlett’s country club is barred by barricade and improvised barricade. Official papers posted on the latter and on advertising sign proclaims notice of government seizure. September 13, 1952

[

Happy 120th Anniversary

We Salute You!

First 50 years easiest. After 50 years, Mrs. Amy Johnson Whiten, wife of Martin A. Whiten, finds the way to a man’s heart is through his tummy. She is shown passing him a roll as 200 guests and eight children joined in the anniversary celebration at their home in Baltimore.

Aug. 4, 1984 AFRO

[ [ [

Best Wishes & Continued Success Best Wishes & Continued Success Best Wishes & Continued Wishes & Continued Success thSuccess

th On the 120 Afro’s 120 Anniversary th Anniversary On the Afro’s th On the120 Afro’sAnniversary 120 Anniversary n the Afro’s D.C. Chapter Washington, D.C. Chapter Chapter Washington, Washington, D.C. D.C. Chapter Washington, Inc. Continental Societies,Societies, Inc. Continental Continental Societies, Inc. Continental Societies, Inc.

The Philomathians, Inc. Congratulates

The Afro-American Newspapers Thelma T. Daley, President

Dick Gregory celebrates 75th Birthday. Washington AFRO Oct. 20, 2007

Ride for Life HIV / AIDS. Washington Oct. 6,2007

Wishing
Jake
Oliver
and

 The
Afro

 a
Happy
120th
Anniversary


 and
a
special
thanks
for
your
 service
to
Bal>more
 Caribbean Carnival. Washington AFRO June 30,2007


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If You Ask Me By B.M. Phillips Baltimore, Feb. 7, 1953

Frankie Lou

Did You Know That

July 2006

The columns on this page represent almost 100 years of social journalism. An unknown writer, chronicled his travels in Black communities around the country, especially the south, using the pseudonym of Colonel Midnight, hence, Midnight’s Musings. He talked about everything he saw, the people he encountered, the philosophies he espoused and those with which he disagreed. Elizabeth “Bettye” Phillips began the If You Ask Me column in 1953 with a more social touch but did not hesitate to speak her mind whether asked or not. Her sister, Frankie Lou Murphy renewed the column and continued it with much ado about everything until her death in 2007.

Mental illness is an ailment like pneumonia? You can get it tomorrow, but with proper care you can recover. Mental deficiency means you were born with some part of your brain missing? That part which you did not have at birth can not be grown back, but with education and care it can be trained so that you can get along fairly comfortably. Mental deficiencies can NOT be cured. The 200-odd mentally deficient children at Crownsville who are set for transfer to Rosewood Training School are like the 1,000 white mentally deficient children who are already there. They will never be able to return to society and make a living. Bettye Murphy The reason Dr. Clifton Perkins, Phillips Moss mental hygiene commissioner and other experts are anxious to put them all in one school is that Rosewood has training and rehabilitation facilities, qualified personnel to care for them. At Crownsville, where the 200 colored mental deficients are presently confined, there are no such facilities and the children are housed with criminally insane and other adults. Just like the state can not afford to duplicate the law training offered at the University of Maryland at say, Bowie or Morgan, it can not afford to duplicate the expert care and facilities at Rosewood.

Sound and Humane

So the transfer of all children with like ailments is the economically sound and humane thing to do. Those who oppose this move, and have temporarily halted it through court action are doing themselves and the state a real disservice. Many of the children involved may be 12 years in terms of age but actually their mental age has not developed along with their physical growth. One such child, a hydrocephalic, has a head as big as a tub – developed all out of proportion to his body. He has the understanding of a normal child two years old although he is actually 15 years of age. There are some white children at Rosewood like this too. But children with a mental deficiency do not know about color. The normal adults who are holding up the proper care of these mental deficients ought to have their heads examined. Who was it that said there are more crazy people outside the mental institutions than inside?

[ Midnight’s Musings - January 5, 1906 Mobile, Ala. – Before you read this letter we will be well into another year and one of the most eventful years in the world’s history will have been ushered into eternity. It has made many people sad and many happy and as I take up my pen to write this week it will be impossible for me to recall the many things which have occurred during the year. I have not been as faithful during the past 12 months as in previous years and it has been due to the office treatment. We have not fallen out but when I thought they had mistreated me I would not write. I have often thought of you readers though and have had a desire to know that each of you had made some progress and were pushing up the hill. I knew that I could not do much myself, but felt that I should wish others well. Old age is coming upon me and you must not expect too much of an old man in this world. Even in my old age I have traveled during the past 12 months just 71,897 miles, and you can put it down that it is doing some traveling. It has not been all sunshine, because in some instances I have been on the road for 24 and 36 hours with money in my pocket and could not find a piece of bread, because I was born before the McKinley tariff was put on color and got a deal of the black goods mixed in me. I have never in my life been taken at sight for a white man. My people have me believing

[

Orchids to

Episcopal Bishop Nobel C. Powell for calling attention of his rectors and members to the fact that the Episcopal church must let down its bars, allow all races to worship at churches in their neighborhood. Houston R. Jackson, school superintendent, who says no teacher will be disciplined for exercising his civil rights. Northern district policemen who were not taken in by that night club singer’s tale.

Thought of the Week

You may be deceived if you trust too much, but you will live in torment if you do not trust enough. —Frank Crane

that when I get to heaven I will be white but I doubt this very much. There is no reason why I should be white and if the Lord is going to make me white, then I will stop trying to get to heaven right now. I know what it is to be black down here where injustice is meted out for justice, and I am told that there is nothing but justice in heaven, then I would like to enjoy some privileges as a real black man and do not hesitate to say it. There have been a few changes made in Washington but you know about them. Hon. Judson W. Lyons, who used to write his name on the money of the United States, and on all the stocks and bonds to make them valid, has retired to private life, or he is now looking after his lucrative law practice, while Hon. W.T. Vernon is filling his place. If it were not for the fact that Dr. Vernon objects to it, I would tell you that he is a real black man, but if you see him it will not be necessary for me to tell you that. Prejudice or something else tried to get out of the public schools of Washington, one of the best teachers in the whole system. Miss Mattie Bowen, but the people would not stand for it and entered a protest and she has returned to her work. Miss Bowen without a doubt is a great woman and her real worth will never be known to the race. Many people have died during the year who have never died before in their lives. It is with a sad heart that I record the death of Bishop B. W. Arnett. I do not need to comment upon him or his work as it is an open book for us all. He was a factor in the race development and a man among men. But my friends, the hardest task I am called upon to perform at this hour, and as I write these

words my eyes are filled with tears. A very dear friend has been taken from me. Why should we weep, when we know that we are only here for a short time, and when one has lived well his years and been called to a better land, but my readers I cannot help but drop a tear over the grave of Mrs. Lulu M. Lampton, the wife of Dr. E.W. Lampton, financial secretary of the AME Church. She lived well her life and was a great help to her husband. She had the benefit of a thorough training through a good institution. Two bright little girls are now being raised by their sisters and father. I thank God for sparing me these many years. Many others have died but I will not mention them. I have received many letters asking me to say something about President Roosevelt and the soldiers. I must admit this question is too deep for me. I do not know the power of the President of the United States and I do not like to talk about things I do not know much about, but if he can do what he did, then there is something rotten with this government or with the Constitution of the United States. Just to think of it, the President, under the rule which he acted, could discharge the whole army and navy. He can sell out his country to some foreign power and have his orders carried out. If this is allowed to stand then some President can get in power and discharge the whole army of Negro soldiers or run us all right out. I wish this would happen and then some foreign power come in and give us a good thrashing. Then we would learn some sense. I have not said much on the question because I knew it was a case where the white men would take it up. God bless Senator Foraker.

[


033857B / MD CT Region 8/18/12 Afro-American_DC email early due: 8/6/12 11.00” x 20.00” B&W 85LPI C: Scott D: Robert P: Darlene

120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

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spOtlight On

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033857B.Supplier Diversity.indd 1

7/31/12 1:54 PM


Congratulations

to the AFRO on

120 successful years From


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Entertainment Josephine Baker. Cab Calloway. Paul Robeson. Lena Horne. Pearl Bailey. Bill Cosby. Beyonce. All of them have appeared in the pages of the AFRO. From the early days when we attended segregated clubs and other entertainment venues, the AFRO has been telling readers the best places to go and what they missed if they didn’t go. It has revealed the triumphs and tragedies of Black entertainers. A story on March 2, 1946, detailed how New York-born jazz singer Elizabeth Welch had been hailed the “Toast of London” at the prestigious Palladium Theater after escaping the “color bar” back home. When Lena Horne refused to play at a Miami hotel in February 1955 because the management had refused to provide “proper hotel accommodations,” the AFRO published details of the incident. When President and Mrs. Lyndon B. Johnson congratulated Pearl Bailey on stage on the closing night of “Hello Dolly” in Washington D.C. in November 1967, the AFRO carried a story and photo of the couple holding hands with the legend. A page one story entitled “At 68, Josephine Baker Went out a Star Again,” ran in April 1975 on the occasion of her death. And the AFRO has continued the tradition, noting Whitney Houston’s soaring victories at the peak of her career and the hills and valleys she scaled until the end. The newspapers feature news of the hottest concerts in the District—George Clinton and P-Funk infiltrating the Smithsonian Folk Life Festival this summer—to stories about entertainers trying to make it on Baltimore’s indie club scene. When a play about African-American women called “Dark Girls: The Story of Color, Gender and Race” drew rave audiences to Washington D.C.’s Warner Theater last winter, the AFRO passed the word. AFRO readers can search the newspaper’s extensive archives to discover what life was like for our singers, actors and artists in the days when the most talented among us were forced to sleep in their buses and eat meals handed out the back door in paper bags. Days when only the best of the best navigated the Chitlin’ Circuit from the Apollo in New York to the Uptown Theater in Philly to the Royal Theatre in Baltimore and the Howard Theatre in D.C., just to name a few stops. AFRO staffers agitated for equality. In a Nov. 6, 1951 story, AFRO reporter James L. Hicks chronicled an effort by the national NAACP to get the famed Stork Club of New York to stop discriminating after Josephine Baker waited more than an hour for a steak dinner. In a letter to NAACP scion Walter White, the club’s management blatantly told the civil rights organization that it would continue to bar “certain types of persons…despite pickets and other agitation.” An NAACP complaint to New York’s City Hall, asking that the club be forced to integrate or have its liquor license seized, resulted in no changes at the time. Now that some Blacks hold posts high in the entertainment industry, we are still on top of the story. Book reviews. Opera news. Art exhibits. Hip hop artists. Reggae trends. Dance recitals. R&B breakout performances. Profiles of legends and the up and coming. It’s all in the AFRO.

Romare Bearden Foundation September 2, 2011 marked the 100th anniversary of Romare Bearden’s birth. Institutions across the country have been celebrating with exhibitions, programs and displays reeecting the innuence of this great 20th century American master. Known for his innovation in collage, the artist also created in watercolor, printmaking, large-scale murals, and was known for his leadership and innuential writings. Last year the United States Postal Service issued 4 Bearden images on stamps to commemorative the artist’s contributions.

Entertainment Cover Key AFRO File Photos and Front Pages (from top) • A comely bevy of Easter bunnies performed in the holiday revue at the Howard Theatre. They are, front row, from left, Marian Davis, Grace Dash, Selma Sampson, Marie Wilson, Ruth Epps; back row, Lovey Lewis, Ollie Sayles, Bernice Aiken, Dottie Jackson, Mae Fortune and Bobby Dade. 1959 • Beyoncé. Dec. 10, 2005 • “Aretha Talks” July 2, 1968 • “10,000 View Sam Cooke” Dec. 13, 1964 • Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong, the King of Trumpeters, who has played before the royal heads of most of Europe, will be heard as guest on “Spotlight Bands,” on the Mutual Network, when the show salutes Geiger Field, Spokane, Wash. October 31, 1945 • Donald “Don” Cortez Cornelius, best known as the creator of Soul Train, a show that premiered upcoming Black singers and musicians and the latest in popular dances. With his signature outstanding Afro hairstyle, he hosted from 1971 to 1993, always closing the show with, “and in parting we wish you love, peace and soul!” July 1973 • Ella Fitzgerald performing at the Downbeat Club in New York City. 1949 • Regent Ad. January 1951 • Whitney Houston. 1991 • “In Honor of a King” July 4, 2009 • George Clinton. 2012 • Royal Theater Ad. April 10, 1926 • Lena Horne. 1983

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For more information on the Romare Bearden Foundation and the centennial tributes, please visit: www.beardenfoundation.org and www.beardencentennial.org.

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April 10, 1926

Ella Fitzgerald performing at the Downbeat Club in New York City, 1949.

Louis “Satchmo” Armstrong, the King of Trumpeters, who has played before the royal heads of most of Europe, was heard as a guest on “Spotlight Bands,” Oct. 31, on the Mutual Network. Oct. 31, 1945

Miss Marian Anderson sings in Baltimore’s Lyric Theater, April 13, 1965.

A comely bevy of Easter bunnies performed in the holiday revue at the Howard Theatre. They are, front row, from left, Marian Davis, Grace Dash, Selma Sampson, Marie Wilson, Ruth Epps; back row, Lovey Lewis, Ollie Sayles, Bernice Aiken, Dottie Jackson, Mae Fortune and Bobby Dade. 1959

Hello Dolly! Famed singer-actress Pearl Bailey performed her revival of Hello Dolly at the White House when President and Mrs. Ford entertained Egyptian President Anwar Sadat at a state dinner. 1969


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Josephine Baker, Oct. 19, 1935. Etta James, one of the big stars of the entertainment world, is featured on the James Brown Show at the Howard Theatre that runs through March 18, 1962.

Nov. 5, 1938

Ray Charles. Circa 1960s

Duke Ellington at Howard University March 7, 1942. Cab Calloway, December 1947.


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Fans of the fabulous Duke Ellington flocked to the Johns Hopkins University campus to hear the music master give a concert. When music time was over the Duke and several of his young fans went to the nearby Blue Jay Restaurant where the management doused the lights and closed up. The restaurant had been the scene earlier in the day of a demonstration over its racial segregation policy. To the right is Miss Ruth Fegley, executive director of Fellowship, Inc. Feb. 27, 1960

Count Basie and the incomparable Bette Davis preparing for one of CBS’ command performance broadcasts. April 5, 1947

Robert “Kool” Bell ,(right) of Kool & the Gang, received congratulations from Miles Davis and his wife, actress Cicely Tyson, at a showing of the musical “Your Arms to Short Too Box with God.”

The Smithsonian’s National Museum of African American History and Culture

congratulates

The Afro American Newspapers for 120 years of service to the community.

Smithsonian National Museum of African American History and Culture

Become a Charter Member of NMAAHC. Join Today!

Visit africanamerican.si.edu


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The marguee of the newly renovated, restored historic Howard Theatre reopened on April 9, 2012.

The Howard. Mar. 11, 1950

Dionne Warwick at a reopening event. 2012

George Clinton and the P-Funk Allstars performed as part of the reopening events. 2012 (left) Statue of the iconic Duke Ellington placed on the newly named Ellington Street Plaza(T St, NW) in front of the new Howard Theatre. 2012

This tap dance team presents a number called “Broadway” in the review, “It’s Springtime,” at the Howard Theatre. The affair was sponsored by and for the benefit of Saint Augustine’s Church School. From left, the dancers are Misses Clarice Williams, Doris Minor, Florence Johnson, Dolores Johnson, Vernice Butler, Jean Triplett and Mary Smith, all of Alexandria, Va. The review was staged by Alexandrines Theatrical Guild under the direction of Mrs. Loretta Dorsey, 318 S. Columbus St., Alexandria. Circa 1940s

from the Port of Baltimore

Gateway to your Getaway!


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(left) May 27, 1961

Mary Lou Williams. Oct. 25, 1947 Mary Lou Williams was a musician of whom Duke Ellington said, “She is like soul on soul.” Of herself, she said in an interview, “When other children were outside playing, I was inside on the piano.” Born in Atlanta, Ga. In 1910, she grew up in Philadelphia and her mother encouraged her music pursuits. Jazz was her genre and she composed “jazz for the giants” including the New York Philharmonic with whom she performed at Carnegie Hall. Near the end of her life her interests turned toward religion and she pioneered in the use of jazz as sacred music, writing jazz masses including “Mary Lou’s Mass” for which she was commissioned by the Vatican.

The Jackson Five: Tito, Michael, Jackie, Marlon and Jermaine. Circa 1960s

Don Cornelius. July 1973

We congratulate the

AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS on its

120th Anniversary Based on the Tuskegee Airmen

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Radio and concert singer, Anne Brown. Circa 1930s

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A testimonial dinner honoring Ralph (Petey) Greene is set for March 27, 1970 at the Shoreham Hotel. An ex-convict, Petey was paroled and then spent his time helping people get jobs, find housing, helping rehabilitating former drug addicts and ex-offenders and guiding young people to more meaningful lives.

Chuck Brown and the Soul Searchers. Circa 1970

Whitney Houston. 1991

A Real Winner: Lovely Lena Horne is the proud recipient of the NAACP 68th Spingarn Medal, awarded annually for high achievement by a Black American. 1983

Dec. 13, 1964

Marvin Gaye. Circa 1960s


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like the afr o Caesars entertainment is Committed to

people partnership prosperity philanthr opy Caesar’s HarraH’s Casino will bring

new jobs new opportunity new life to Baltimo r e .


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Church By Avis Thomas-Lester It is fitting that the AFRO has always had a special connection with the faith community since it started as a church bulletin. Founder John H. Murphy Sr., who was active in the Bethel AME Church in Baltimore in the late 19th century, established the Sunday School Helper in 1892 as a means to communicate with church members. A single copy cost 10 cents. One hundred copies could be purchased in one year for $7.50. The Sunday School Helper eventually merged with two other publications to form the AFRO-American. Bethel Church news was always some of the most sought information in the AFRO. At a time when African AME Americans were shut out of everything from a free, quality education to job and career opportunities, the churches stood as the beacon of the community, the place where movements were started and leaders anointed. When citizens in Montgomery, Ala., grew tired of being discriminated against in public transportation and staged a boycott, it was the churches that hosted the meetings, the ministers who organized the protest and the AFRO that covered the story. When there was news about local pastors, the community often found out about it in the pages of the AFRO. When couples were married and babies were christened, details of the services were reported here. When pastors and churches were consecrated, the AFRO noted the events. The Rev. I. H. Bonner, pastor of an AME church in Mobile, Ala., lobbied for votes in his quest to become bishop in the May 4, 1944 edition. The same page featured an ad announcing a gospel concert at Metropolitan Methodist Church in Baltimore featuring a female group from Camden, N.J. and a quartet from Norfolk. The AFRO’s readers have always been church-going folk. An announcement that a new pastor was moving into a church was just as important to them as information about a new business venture or law. When pastors retired, their congregations’ farewell dinners were featured in the AFRO. Even international political/church news made headlines, like the February 1969 assassination of Dr. Eduardo Chivambo Mondlane, a religious scholar educated in the United States, who was a leader of the Mozambique Liberation Front. When Maryland State Sen. C. Anthony Muse left the United Methodist Church and started a non-denominational church, members read details in the AFRO. The newspaper continues to cover the turmoil that broke out at Jericho City of Praise in Landover over control of the church’s massive assets after the death of the co-founder, the Apostle Betty R. Peebles, two years ago. For Black church goers, the AFRO has always been a necessary part of their reading regimen.

All pages AFRO File Photos

Nov. 4, 1939

Afro File Photos and Front pages From top clockwise: *Rev. Dr. A.C.D. Vaughn and Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke Arrest Bishop Brooks. April 2, 1927 Dr. Johnson at Union 45 Years. Nov. 17, 1917 Bethel’s Pastor Fights Charges. July 1, 1921 * Bishop Vashti McKenzie Revs. Hurst, Connor, Jones and Chappelle Elected. May 18, 1912 Great Rally at Bethel Nets $11,171. June 7, 1918 Minister is Driven Out of Anderson, S.C. Feb. 13, 1920 * The Rev. Dr. I. Logan Kearse

Sept. 9, 1939


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Metropolitan Baptist Church, R Street, between 12th and 13th Streets, N.W., Washington, D.C., is marked its 100th anniversary, Oct. 3, 1964. The Rev. Dr. E.C. Smith was pastor of the church.

Father Divine’s. 1936

Father Divine is shown leaving his newest “heaven,” Father Divine’s in New Rochelle where he gives his followers food at a slightly lower cost. Dec. 9, 1939

Metropolitan Baptist Church Choir, June 7,1958.

Metropolitan Baptist Usher Boards, Aug. 1, 1942.


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Sister M. Benigna Holland, Marian Anderson’s former accompaniest, playing piano at the Oblate Sisters Convent on Gun Road in Baltimore. Sept. 1978

Sharp Street Methodist Oblate Sisters

New Bethel AME Pastor, Rev. Dr. John Bryant, is shown with his wife, Mrs. Cecelia Bryant, and their son, Jamal, 4. May 19, 1975 Bethel AME

THE PRESIDENTS’ ROUNDTABLE, INC. Congratulates

Worshippers greet each other at Carron Baptist Church, April 22, 1969.

The AFRO AMERICAN NEWSPAPERS on your

120th Anniversary

Thank you for your leadership and service to our community

The Rev. Timothy J. Boddie.

National Evangelistic and Missionary Conference delegates, Newark, N.J., June 27, 1942.


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Bishop Vashti McKenzie officiates at the Homegoing services of Dr. Dorothy Height, chair of the National Council of Negro Women. April 2010.

The Right Rev. Vashti McKenzie was the first woman to become bishop in the AME Church. July 11, 2000.

Baltimore Mayor Kurt L. Schmoke presents a city proclamation congratulating the Rev. Dr. A.C.D Vaughn on the breadth and success of his ministry. 1995

7707 Allentown Road Fort Washington, MD 20744 | (301) 248-8833 www.ebenezerame.org

Come worship with us! Services Every Sunday 7:45 a.m. & 11:15 a.m. Rev. Dr. Grainger Browning, Jr. Senior Pastor Rev. Dr. Jo Ann Browning Co-Pastor

e Ebenezer AME Church congratulates the Afro-American Newspapers on 120 years of providing a voice for and of the community. ank you for your faithful service.

e best is yet to come!

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INSPIRING LEADERS | BUILDING GENERATIONS

....................................................................

MUSICAL MINISTRY:

KIM BURRELL

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120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

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Baptism conducted by Sweet Daddy Grace’s church. Sept. 9, 1939

Bishop Frank Madison Reid gives grandson, Frank Madison Reid 3rd a lesson in pitching shoes. Little Franks’s dad is also a minister and lives in Chicago, Ill. 1957

Daddy Grace playing the piano

The Ministry of Morning Star Baptist Church Celebrates The Contributions Of The Afro American Newspaper

Sweet Daddy Grace

You Have Passionately Told “Our Story” You Share Our Commitment To Building And Rebuilding Lives

Morning Star Baptist Church

154 Winters Lane, Catonsville, MD 21228 (410) 747-3417 www.msbcministries.org Follow Us @morningstarbap Bishop Dwayne C. Debnam, Pastor

Sharon Baptist Church congratulates the AFRO- American Newspapers on 120 years of being the greatest newspaper in this country. www.sharonbaptistbaltimore.org 1373 N. Stricker Street Baltimore, MD 21217

Rev. A.C.D. Vaughn, Senior Pastor Sharon Baptist

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Union Baptist Church in Turners Station, Baltimore County. Standing, Edith Johnson, Ruth Riddix, Juanita Gilliam, Beatrice Dowdy, Louie Patterson, Blanche Patterson. Seated Isabelle Ransome and Granville Cook. November 1993.

120 Years - The Afro American Special Edition

Rev. Banks and the congregation of New Shiloh Baptist Church in Turners Station.

Dr. Harrison J. Bryant, then pastor of Bethel AME in Baltimore, delivering the annual sermon to the divinity school at Morris Brown College.

The Rev. Dr. I. Logan Kearse, pastor of Cornerstone Baptist Church in Baltimore.


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H12 The Afro-American, August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

name to Kisha Nicole Berry and having applied to the court for an Order of Publication of the notice required by law in such cases; it is by the Court this 31st day of July, 2012 hereby. ORDERED, that a copy of this Order be published once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, to be completed within 30 days of filling of the application in the Afro American Newspapers, a newspaper of general circulation of the District of Columbia; and it is further ORDERED, that publication must begin no later than two days after the filling of the application; and it is further ORDERED, that the FINAL HEARING on this application to change name will be held in Judge-in-Chambers, Room 4220 In the District of Columbia at 500 Indiana 12:45:31 EDT 2012 DC LEGAL NOTICES Avenue NW Washington LEGAL NOTICES 20001, on the 18th day of September, 2012 at 3:30 pm. If any person desires to oppose this application, that person or his or her attorney must be present at the hearing or file written detailed objections five (5) days in advance of the hearing with Judge-in-Chambers and mail a copy to the applicant or applicant’s counsel; and it is further SO ORDERED JUDGE A TRUE COPY TEST: CLERK, SUPERIOR COURT THE DISTRICT OF Thu COLUMBIA TYPESET: Aug 09 8/10, 8/17, 8/24

August 1, 2009 - August 7, 2009, The Washington Afro-American

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TYPESET: Thu Aug 09 LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM405 Julia Washington Decedent Age: 79 NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Ronald Washington, whose

TYPESET: Thu Aug 09 12:44:19 address isEDT 4609 2012 E. Capitol

LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of the District of Columbia Civil Division Case No. 0006435-12 IN RE: Ahmed Arabi Hossen Applicant ORDER OF PUBLICATION CHANGE OF NAME

Ahmed Arabi Hossen having filed a complaint for judgment changing Ahmed Arabi Hossen name to David Ahmed Adams and having applied to the court for an Order of Publication of the notice required by law in such cases; it is by the Court this 8th day of August, 2012 hereby. ORDERED, that a copy of this order be published once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, in Afro American Newspapers, a newspaper of general circulation of the District of Columbia; and it is further ORDERED, that publication must begin no later than 12 days after the filling of the application; and it is further ORDERED, that the FINAL HEARING on this application to change name will be held in Judge-in-Chambers, Room 4220 In the District of Columbia at 500 Indiana Avenue NW Washington DC 20001, on the 27th day of September, 2012 at 4:00 pm. If any person desires to oppose this application, that person or his or her attorney must be present at the hearing or file written detailed objections five (5) days in advance of the hearing with Judge-in-Chambers and mail a copy to the applicant or applicant’s counsel; and it is further ORDERED, that: (Check all that apply) o the applicant must send the application for change of name and notice of final hearing to the Immigration and Customs Enforcement Agency, Washington Field Office, 2675 Prosperity Avenue, Fairfax, Virginia 22031 personally or by registered or certified mail and show proof or service be made by filing the affidavit/declaration of service. SO ORDERED JUDGE A TRUE COPY TEST: CLERK, SUPERIOR COURT THE DISTRICT OF Thu COLUMBIA TYPESET: Aug 09 8/17, 8/24, 8/31

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM667 Donald Carr Decedent Donald L. Wilson, Esq 805 15th Street, NW Suite 100 Washington DC 20005 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Gregory A. Carr, whose address is 6818 9th Street, NW Washington DC 20012 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Donald Carr, who died on March 5, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Gregory Carr Personal Representative 202-291-9346 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Street, SE Washington DC 20019, and Stephen Washington whose address is 9511 Acorn Park Street, Capitol Heights, MD 20743, were appointed personal representatives of the estate of Julia Washington, who died on November 16, 2011 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the Probate of Decedent’s Will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Ronald Washington Stephen Washington Personal Representative 240-601-9506 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS TYPESET:8/17, Thu8/24. Aug 09 8/31

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM404 Alphonso Washington Decedent Age: 76 Pamela A. Crockett Esq PO Box 1351 Lanham, MD 20706 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO 12:43:55 EDT HEIRS 2012 UNKNOWN

Ronald Washington, whose address is 4609 E. Capitol Street, SE Washington DC 20019, and Stephen Washington whose address is 9511 Acorn Park Street, Capitol Heights, MD 20743, were appointed personal representatives of the estate of Alphonso Washington, who died on September 6, 2011 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the Probate of Decedent’s Will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Ronald Washington Stephen Washington Personal Representative 240-601-9506 TRUE TEST COPY TYPESET: Thu Aug 09 REGISTER OF WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Superior Court of the District of Columbia Civil Division Case No. 0006207-12 IN RE: KIRK DOUGLASS II Applicant ORDER OF PUBLICATION CHANGE OF NAME

Kirk Douglass II having filed a complaint for judgment changing Kirk Douglass II name to Kisha Nicole Berry and having applied to the court for an Order of Publication of the notice required by law in such cases; it is by the Court this 31st day of July, 2012 hereby. ORDERED, that a copy of this Order be published once a week for three (3) consecutive weeks, to be completed within 30 days of filling of the application in the Afro American Newspapers, a newspaper of general circulation of the District of Columbia; and it is further ORDERED, that publication must begin no later than two days after the filling of the application; and it is further ORDERED, that the FINAL HEARING on this application to change name will be held in Judge-in-Chambers, Room 4220 In the District of Columbia at 500 Indiana Avenue NW Washington DC 20001, on the 18th day of September, 2012 at 3:30 pm. If any person desires to oppose this application, that person or his or her attorney must be present at the hearing or file written detailed objections five (5) days in ad-

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM718 Lloyd Melvin Lomax Decedent Michelle Lanchester, Attorney At Law 601 Pennsylvania Ave NW Suite 900 South Building Washington DC 20004 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Barbara J. Jackson, whose address is 1901 Wintergreen Ct. District Heights, MD 20747 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Lloyd Melvin Lomax, who died on April 16, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before 12:45:09 EDT February 17, 2013,2012 or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Barbara J. Jackson Personal Representative 202-220-3000 Attorney for PR TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS TYPESET: Thu Aug 09 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Superior Court of the District of Columbia Civil Division Case No. 0006408-12 IN RE: Carolyn Agnes Tyler Applicant ORDER OF PUBLICATION CHANGE OF NAME

Carolyn Agnes Tyler having filed a complaint for judgment changing Carolyn Agnes Tyler name to Carolyn Tyler Lovett and having applied to the court for an Order of Publication of the notice required by law in such cases; it is by the Court this 7th day of August, 2012 hereby. ORDERED, that publication must begin no later than 12 days after the filling of the application; and it is further ORDERED, that the FINAL HEARING on this application to change name will be held in Judge-in-Chambers, Room 4220 In the District of Columbia at 500 Indiana Avenue NW Washington DC 20001, on the 26th day of September, 2012 at 3:30 pm. If any person desires to oppose this application, that person or his or her attorney must be present at the hearing or file written detailed objections five (5) days in advance of the hearing with Judge-in-Chambers and mail a copy to the applicant or applicant’s counsel; and it is further ORDERED, that: (Check all that apply) o the applicant must send the application for change of name and notice of final hearing to the applicant’s creditors personally or by registered or certified mail 12:47:56 EDTof 2012 and show proof service by filling the affidavit/declaration of services. SO ORDERED JUDGE A TRUE COPY TEST: CLERK, SUPERIOR COURT THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA 8/17, 8/24, 8/31

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WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN-NEWSPAPER Legal Advertising Rates Effective October 1, 2006 PROBATE DIVISION (Estates) 202-879-9460/61 PROBATE NOTICES a. Order Nisi b. Small Estates (single publication) c. Notice to Creditors 1. Domestic 2. Foreign d. Escheated Estates e. Standard Probates

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TYPESET: Thu2012 Aug 09 12:49:09 TYPESET: Thu2012 Aug 09 12:47:10 TYPESET: Thu Aug 09 12:47:33 TYPESET: Thu2012 Aug 09 12:46:48 LEGALEDT NOTICES LEGALEDT NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGALEDT NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2011ADM1189 William N. Weston Decedent Patricia N. Young Esq 1223 Crittenden St NW Washington DC 20011 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Elizabeth H. Weston and Cheryl D. Jones, whose address are 1307 Gallatin St NW. Washington DC 20011 and 75 Pamela Ln, New Rochelle NY 10804 were appointed personal representative of the estate of William N. We s t o n , w h o d i e d o n September 27, 2011 with a Will, and will serve with Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent’s Will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Elizabeth H. Weston Cheryl D. Jones Personal Representative 202-726-2723 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM423 Grimm Eley Stephenson Decedent Sabina M. Lofty, Esq 1629 K Street, Suite 300 Washington DC 20005 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Mamie D. Stephenson, whose address is 2407 21st Place NE, Apt 2 Washington DC 20018 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Grimm Eley Stephenson, who died on September 18, 2002 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Mamie D. Stephenson Personal Representative 202-529-7570 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM361 Lorrayne Phillips Decedent Tina Smith Nelson Legal Counsel for the Elderly 601 E Street NW Washington DC 20049 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Melvin S. Phillips, whose address is 1165 46th Place SE, Washington DC 20019 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Lorrayne Phillips, who died on August 12, 2006 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Melvin S. Phillips Personal Representative 202-716-2766 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM746 Bernice Witherspoon Decedent Wesley L. Clarke 1629 K Street Suite 300 Washington DC 20006 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Willie Witherspoon, whose address is 1370 Franklin Street NE, Washington DC 20017-2446 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Bernice Witherspoon, who died on June 19, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Willie Witherspoon Personal Representative 202-257-9730 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31


August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012, The Afro-American

TYPESET: Tue2012 Aug 07 10:46:47 EDT TYPESET: Thu2012 Aug 09 12:48:22 TYPESET: EDT Thu2012 Aug 09 12:52:40 EDT TYPESET: Thu2012 Aug 09 12:54:27 EDT 2012 TYPESET: Thu Aug 09 12:54:49 EDT 2012 TYPESET: Thu Aug 09 12:45:54 TYPESET: EDT Thu2012 Aug 09 12:50:18 EDT

LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM732 Alvin Russell Evans Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Andia A. Evans, whose address is 1164 Neal Street NE, Washington DC 20002 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Alvin Russell Evans, who died on June 27, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Andia A. Evans Personal Representative 202-870-0094 Attorney for PR TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER WILLS TYPESET:OFThu Aug 09 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM574 Kenneth Rowe Decedent Stefan Shaibani Law Firm of Stefan Shaibani PLLC 1150 Connecticut Ave NW Suite 900 Washington DC 20036 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Alice Allen, and Michael Rowe, whose address is 4637 Hillside Road SE #2, Washington DC 20019, and 80 Joy Court, Martinsburg, WV 25401 were appointed personal representatives of the estate of Kenneth Rowe, who died on March 8, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Michael Rowe Alice Allen Personal Representative 202-862-4335 TRUE TEST COPY TYPESET:OFThu Aug 09 REGISTER WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM575 Dedario Knight Decedent Dr. Elena M. Tilly Esq 6931 Arlington Road #302 Bethesda MD 20814 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Toshika Knight, whose address is 3314 11th Street SE, Washington DC 20032 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Dedario Knight, who died on May 29, 2012 with a Will, and will serve with Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Toshika Knight Personal Representative 202-431-9935 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

LEGAL NOTICES

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM724 Renne Phyllis Parker Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

La Von D. Brown and Terri L. Parker, whose address are 10737 Castleton Turn, Upper Marlboro MD 20774, and 1819 29th Street SE, Washington DC 20020 were appointed personal representatives of the estate of Renee Phyllis Parker, who died on May 23, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 10, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 10, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 10, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter La Von D. Brown Terri L. Parker Personal 12:49:33 EDT 2012 Representative 202-251-0917 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER WILLS TYPESET:OFThu Aug 09 8/10, 8/17, 8/24

Superior Court of the District of Columbia Civil Division Case No. 6243-12 IN RE: Ann Cecelia Long Applicant ORDER OF PUBLICATION CHANGE OF NAME

Ann Cecelia Long having filed a complaint for judgment changing Anne Cecelia Long name to Khadijah Alima Long and having applied to the court for an Order of Publication of the notice required by law in such cases; it is by the Court this 1st day of August, 2012 hereby. ORDERED, that publication must begin no later than 12 days after the filling of the application; and it is further ORDERED, that the FINAL HEARING on this application to change name will be held in Judge-in-Chambers, Room 4220 In the District of Columbia at 500 Indiana Avenue NW Washington DC 20001, on the 19th day of September, 2012 at 3:30 pm. If any person desires to oppose this application, that person or his or her attorney must be present at the hearing or file written detailed objections five (5) days in advance of the hearing with Judge-in-Chambers and mail a copy to the applicant or applicant’s counsel; and it is further ORDERED, that: (Check all that apply) o the applicant must send the application for change of name and notice of final hearing to the applicant’s creditors personally or by registered or certified mail and show proof of service by filling the affidavit/declaration of services. SO ORDERED JOAN Z. JUDGE A TRUE COPY TEST: CLERK, SUPERIOR COURT THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA TYPESET: Thu Aug 09 8/10, 8/17, 8/24

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 12:48:4620001-2131 EDT 2012 Foreign No. 2012FEP68 Date of Death September 6, 2006 James T. Bennett Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS Viola Bennett whose address is 3211 Lassie Avenue, Suitland, MD 20746 was appointed personal representative of the estate of James T. Bennett, deceased, by Register of Wills Court for PG County, State of County MD, on July 23, 2012. Service of process may be made upon Steven A. Bennett, 1424 Independence Ave., SE Washington DC 20003 whose designation as District of Columbia agent has been filed with the Register of Wills, D.C. The decedent owned the following District of Colombia real property: 4220 7th Street, NW Washington DC 20011. Claims against the decedent may be presented to the undersigned and filed with the Register of Wills for the District of Columbia, Building A, 515 5th Street, NW 3rd Floor, Washington DC 20001 within 6 months from the date of first publication of this notice. (Strike preceding sentence if no real estate.) Viola Bennett Personal Representative 301-702-9423 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS Date of first publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspapers and/or periodical: The Daily Washington Law Reporter The Afro-American 8/17, 8/24, 8/31

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Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM271 MC REED Decedent Darrel S. Parker, Esq 1822-11th Street, NW Washington DC 20740 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM676 Dorothy M. Cox Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM696 Alline Boone Michael D. Breads Eq 8737 Colesville Road LL-100A Silver Spring MD 20910 Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM557 Edith Lily Wessely Butterworth Decedent c/o John M. Bixler Ross, Marsh & Foster Room 400 2001 L Street NW Washington DC 20036 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Foreign No. 2012FEP62 Date of Death June 7, 2010 Lynwood Horton Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Concrete General, Inc. is seeking MBE subcontractors & suppliers who perform various types of work relating to highway, bridge, & utility construction in the Maryland area. Call Mark Miller 301-9484450. EEO

Aldray Reed, whose address is 1525 Channing Street, NE, Washington DC 20018 was appointed personal representative of the estate of MC Reed, who died on December 22, 2011 with a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent´s will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 17, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 17, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 17, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Aldray Reed Personal Representative 240-461-9728 TRUE TEST COPY TYPESET: Aug 09 12:50:41 EDT 2012 REGISTER OFThu WILLS 8/17, 8/24. 8/31

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM204 Perry Lee Teague Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

M a r l e n e J o n e s K i n n e y, whose address is 3002 Great Oak Drive, Forestville MD 20747 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Perry Lee Teague, who died on July 13, 2010 with a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 10, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 10, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 10, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Marlene Jones Kinney Personal Representative 301-568-9266 12:49:58 EDT 2012 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS TYPESET:8/10, Thu8/17, Aug8/24 09

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM720 Zack S. Williams Decedent Theodora H. Brown Eq Law Office of Theodora H. Brown PLLC 3127 Cherry Road, NE Washington DC 20018 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Meta C. Williams, whose address is 3806 18th Street NE Washington DC 20018 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Zack S. Williams, who died on June 18, 2012 with a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 10, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 10, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 10, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Meta C. Williams Personal Representative 202-635-0262 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/10, 8/17, 8/24

Sandra V. Mason, whose address is 4727 Dunkirk Ave., Baltimore MD 21229 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Dorothy M. Cox, who died on January 25, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs a n d h e i r s w h o s e whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 3, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 3, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 3, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Sandra V. Mason Personal Representative 410-525-2924 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OFThu WILLS TYPESET: Aug 09 8/3, 8/10, 8/17

Superior Court of

the District of 12:51:26 EDT 2012

District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM379 Naomi Campbell Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Alfred Campbell, whose address is 6621 Highgate Drive, Ft Washington MD 20744 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Naomi Campbell, who died on March 22, 2012 with a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 10, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 10, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 10, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Alfred Campbell Personal Representative 301-899-9291 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS TYPESET: Thu8/17, Aug8/24 09 8/10,

Superior Court of

12:51:04 EDT 2012 the District of

District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM678 Gladys E. Jennings Decedent James E. McCollum Jr 7309 Baltimore Ave Ste 117 College Park, MD 20740 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Mary Elizabeth Jennings, whose address is 1300 Nalley Terrace, Hyattsville, MD 20785was appointed personal representative of the estate of Gladys E. Jennings, who died on August 16, 2003 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 10, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 10, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 10, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Mary Elizabeth Jennings Personal Representative 301-341-2226 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/10, 8/17, 8/24

Diane Boone-Pollard, whose address is 4979 Colbum Terrace, Hyattsville MD 20782 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Alline Boone, who died on March 31, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 3, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 3, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 3, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter 12:51:47 EDT 2012 Diane Boone-Pollard Personal Representative 240-603-1133 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OFThu WILLS TYPESET: Aug 09 8/3, 8/10, 8/17

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM688 Carl L. Mitchum Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Loretta Watson Mitchum, whose address is 3118 N Street SE Washington DC 20019 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Carl L. Mitchum, who died on January 28, 2012 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 3, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 3, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 3, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter LorettaEDT Watson Mitchum 12:52:09 2012 Personal Representative 202-526-1745 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS TYPESET: Thu8/10, Aug8/17 09 8/3,

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM700 Guy Potvin Decedent D. E. Thomas PO Box 10353 Washington DC 20020 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Paul W. Jones, whose address is 143 13th Street NE Washington DC 20002 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Guy Potvin, who died on April 9, 2012 with a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment (or to the probate of decedent’s Will) shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 3, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 3, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 3, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Paul W. Jones Personal Representative 202-546-1888 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS 8/3, 8/10, 8/17

University of Oxford (Oxford, U.K.), whose address is Development Office, University of Oxford Offices, Wellington Sqaure, Oxford Ox1 2 JD was appointed personal representative of the estate of Edith Lily Wessely Butterworth, who died on April 7, 2008 with a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs a n d h e i r s w h o s e whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 3, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 3, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship. Date of Publication: August 3, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter 12:53:43 EDT 2012 University of Oxford (Oxford, U.K.) Ewan McKendrick Personal Representative +44(0)1865 611530 TRUE TEST COPY TYPESET: Aug 09 REGISTER OFThu WILLS 8/3, 8/10, 8/17

Superior Court of the District of District of Columbia PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Administration No. 2012ADM707 Nona P. Gunn Decedent Wesley L. Clarke 1629 K Street Suite 300 Washington DC 20001 Attorney NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT, NOTICE TO CREDITORS AND NOTICE TO UNKNOWN HEIRS

Crystal L. Gunn Tucker, whose address is 1310 Dickens Street, Pittsburgh PA 15220 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Nona P. Gunn, who died on July 3, 2011 without a Will, and will serve without Court supervision. All unknown heirs and heirs whose whereabouts are unknown shall enter their appearance in this proceeding. Objections to such appointment shall be filed with the Register of Wills, D.C., 515 5th Street, N.W., 3rd Floor Washington, D.C. 20001, on or before February 3, 2013. Claims against the decedent shall be presented to the undersigned with a copy to the Register of Wills or filed with the Register of Wills with a copy to the undersigned, on or before February 3, 2013, or be forever barred. Persons believed to be heirs or legatees of the decedent who do not receive a copy of this notice by mail within 25 days of its first publication shall so inform the Register of Wills, including name, address and relationship.EDT 2012 12:53:22 Date of Publication: August 3, 2012 Name of newspaper: Afro-American Washington Law Reporter Crystal L. Gunn-Tucker Personal Representative 412-427-1383 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER WILLS TYPESET:OFThu Aug 09 8/3, 8/10, 8/17

SUPERIOR COURT OF THE DISTRICT OF COLUMBIA PROBATE DIVISION Washington, D.C. 20001-2131 Foreign No. 2011FEP48 Date of Death May 17, 2010 Alberta F. Christian Decedent NOTICE OF APPOINTMENT OF FOREIGN PERSONAL REPRESENTATIVE AND NOTICE TO CREDITORS

Paula A. Adkins whose address is 7814 Flake Avenue, Glenarden, MD 20706 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Alberta F. Christian, deceased, by the Orphan’s Court for Prince George’s County, State of Maryland on October 20, 2010. Service of process may be made upon LaRhonde L. Patterson c/o The Real Estate Store, 710 48th Street NE Washington DC 20019 whose designation as District of Columbia agent has been filed with the Register of Wills, D.C. The decedent owned the following District of Colombia real property: 1427 D Street SE Washington DC 20003. Claims against the decedent may be presented to the undersigned and filed with the Register of Wills for the District of Columbia, Building A, 515 5th Street NW 3rd Floor, Washington DC 20001 within 6 months from the date of first publication of this notice. (Strike preceding sentence if no real estate.) Paula A. Adkins Personal Representative(s) 301-773-0402 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS Date of first publication: August 8, 2012 Name of newspapers and/or periodical: The Daily Washington Law Reporter The Afro-American 8/3, 8/10, 8/17

Janet Young whose address is 2245 Sheffield Road, Raleigh NC 27610 was appointed personal representative of the estate of Lynwood Horton, deceased, by the General Court of Justice Court for Wake County, State of North Carolina on August 24, 2010. Service of process may be made upon Karen Smith1200 G Street NW Suite 800, Washington DC 20012/ 18509 Fontana Lane, Gaithersburg MD 20879 whose designation as District of Columbia agent has been filed with the Register of Wills, D.C. The decedent owned the following District of Colombia real property: 7417 8th Street, NW Washington DC 20012. Claims against the decedent may be presented to the undersigned and filed with the Register of Wills for the District of Columbia, Building A, 515 5th Street NW 3rd Floor, Washington DC 20001 within 6 months from the date of first publication of this notice. (Strike preceding sentence if no real estate.) Janet Young Personal Representative(s) 919-834-6538 TRUE TEST COPY REGISTER OF WILLS Date of first publication: August 8, 2012 Name of newspapers and/or periodical: The Daily Washington Law Reporter The Afro-American 8/3, 8/10, 8/17

To advertise in the AFRO Call 202-3320080

12:54:05 EDT 2012

MARYLAND LOTTERY WINNING NUMBERS WEEK ENDING SATURDAY, AUGUST 11, 2012 Midday Date Pick 3 08/05/12 325 08/06/12 948 07/07/12 340 08/08/12 969 08/09/12 659 08/10/12 524 08/11/12 842

Pick 4 0538 8345 2520 6172 7763 9497 0745

Evening Pick 3 462 254 224 979 668 785 690

Pick 4 9692 7821 9612 5363 8484 4420 5518

Mega Millions

Date 08/07/12 08/10/12

30 32 33 42 48 10 18 36 38 44 Date

Powerball

08/08/12 08/11/12

03 07 11 15 28 04 13 39 46 51

Date 08/06/12 08/09/12

Daily Bonus Match 5 Bonus 12 16 21 31 38 30 05 06 28 29 36 19 02 04 06 12 16 24 07 09 18 25 29 24 03 10 22 28 36 07 23 25 31 37 38 22 04 08 12 26 27 28 MEGA BALL 07 08

Megaplier

POWER BALL 12 01

MULTI-MATCH 19 20 22 27 31 41 01 04 10 17 19 40

For the most current Lottery information, go to mdlottery.com

12:55:08 EDT 2012

4 4


H14 The Afro-American, August 18, 2012 - August 24, 2012

August 1, 2009 - August 7, 2009, The Washington Afro-American

LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL Become a Foster Parent! NOTICES Treatment Foster Parents work from home, receive a tax-free stipend and professional 24 hour on-call support for providing shelter for a young person who has suffered abuse or neglect. For more information, call the CHOSEN Treatment Foster Care Program at 1-800-621-8834.

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Ad Network Classifieds are published in 65 newspapers. 25 words $175 (For more than 25 words there is an additional charge of $7 per word.) Call (410) 554-8200 All ads must be

AUCTION Wanted To Purchase Antiques & Fine Art, 1 item Or Entire Estate Or Collection, Gold, Silver, Coins, Jewelry, Toys, Oriental Glass, China, Lamps, Books, Textiles, Paintings, Prints almost anything old Evergreen Auctions 973-818-1100. Email evergreenauction@hotmail.com

AUTOS WANTED I Buy Any Junk Car $250 FLAT RATE CASH 1-800-277-1569

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY ADVERTISE YOUR NEXT AUCTION in 106 Maryland, Delaware and DC newspapers for one low cost of $495. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 4.2 million regional and local readers. For more information call Wanda at 1-855-721-6332 x 6 with the MarylandDelaware-DC Press Association 2.8 Million Eyes will read your ad - 5 days per week - Monday thru Friday in the DAILY CLASSIFIED CONNECTION for just $199 per day. Join the exclusive members of this network today! Place your ad in 14 MAJOR DAILY NEWSPAPERS in Maryland, Delaware and DC. Call 1-855-721-6332x6 or visit our website: www. mddcpress.com Buy 4 Weeks/Get 2 Weeks Free of Charge

EDUCATION Medical Billing Trainee Needed! Train to become a Medical Office Assistant. No Experience Needed! Career Technical Inst. gets you trained & job ready! HS Diploma or GED & Computer needed to qualify. 1-877-649-2671

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MISC. TRAINING AIR TRAFFIC CONTROLLER – Train to become an Air Traffic Controller in a secure government career at FAA approved AT-CTI school. Attend class to earn your associate degree by training at Aviation Institute of Maintenance in Chesapeake, VA. Median salary tops $100,000 (US BLS) with experience and full certification. Call toll free (877) 560-1001 for informa t ion. Hampton University/Aviation Institute of Maintenance.

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ADVERTISE Your Truck DRIVER JOBS in 106 newspapers for one low cost of $495. Your 25 word classified ad reaches over 4.1 regional and local readers. Call Wanda today at 1-855-721-6332 x 6 for more information or email her at wsmith@ mddcpress.com.

WATERFRONT PROPERTIES OCEAN CITY, MARYLAND. Best selection of affordable rentals. Full/ partial weeks. Call for FREE brochure. Open daily. Holiday Real Estate. 1-800-638-2102. Online reservations: www. holidayoc.com

LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES BOARD OF LIQUOR LICENSE COMMISSIONERS FOR BALTIMORE CITY NOTICE

Petitions have been filed by the following applicants for licenses to sell alcoholic beverages at the premises set opposite their respective names. The real property for these applications will be posted on Monday, August 13, 2012. Written protests concerning any application will be accepted until and including the time of the conference or hearing. Conferences and public hearings will be held on or after August 30, 2012. Interested parties should contact the office of the Board, 231 E. Baltimore Street, 6th Floor, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 or by calling (410) 396-4385 to determine the exact time and date that a particular application will be considered by the Board. Written protests will be acknowledged by the Board and such protestants will be notified as to the date, time and place of the hearing and/or conference. 1. CLASS “A” BEER, WINE & LIQUOR LICENSE JJYC, Inc. Transfer of ownership 2115 W. North Avenue Jennifer Youn, Barry Moore Southwest, LLC Expansion of premises 3212 Washington Blvd. Mark Baur, David Schwartz Samuel Mirabile 2. CLASS B BEER, WINE & LIQUOR RESTAURANT LICENSE BGBD, LLC Transfer of ownership 7209 Harford Road Anthony DeMartini, Michael Gentry Kevin Rhodes

results

1 Col. Inch Up to 20 Words

3. CLASS “BD7” BEER, WINE & LIQUOR LICENSE Chopper´s Lounge, Inc. Expansion-add live entertainment with 1531 Pennsylvania Avenue Raymond Nelson dancing, add accessory liquor store and carry-out food shop per BMZA 2012-0092

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4. CLASS “D” BEER & WINE LICENSE Food Life Point Baltimore, LLC Transfer of ownership & location from TYPESET: Mon Aug 13Street, 12:06:44 EDT 2012 1200 Steuart #C1B Peter Yaffee

City of Baltimore Department of Finance Bureau of Purchases Sealed proposals addressed to the Board of Estimates of Baltimore, will be received until, but not later than 11:00 a.m. local time on the following date(s) for the stated requirements: AUGUST 22, 2012 TEN WHEEL DUMP TRUCK B50002548 AUGUST 29, 2012 TURNOUT GEAR B50002461 INCONTINENT SUPPLIES B50002368 FORD TRANSIT CONNECT XLT VANS B50002570 INSTALLATION OF MOTORIZED SHADES B50002487 SEPTEMBER 12, 2012 OPERATE AND MANAGE THE DUBURNS SOCCER ARENA B50002380 PERSONAL CARE AND HOUSEKEEPING SERVICES. B50002394 THE ENTIRE SOLICITATION DOCUMENT CAN BE VIEWED AND DOWN LOADED BY VISITING THE CITYS WEB SITE: www.baltimorecitibuy.org

YOU KNOW YOU’RE IN THE KNOW... WHEN YOU READ THE AFRO

INSERTION DATE:

WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN -NEWSPAPER BALTIMORE AFRO-AMERICAN NEWSPAPER Legal Advertising Rates Effective October 1, 2006 PROBATE DIVISION (Estates) 202-879-9460/61 PROBATE NOTICES a. Order Nisi b. Small Estates (single publication) c. Notice to Creditors 1. Domestic 2. Foreign d. Escheated Estates e. Standard Probates

$ 60 per insertion $180.00 per 3 weeks $ 50 per insertion $ 60 per insertion $ 180.00 per 3 weeks $ 60 per insertion $ 180.00 per 3 weeks $ 60 per insertion $ 360.00 per 6 weeks $ 125.00

CIVIL NOTICES $ 80.00 $ 200.00

a. Name Changes 202-879-1133 b. Real Property

Kenwood Tavern, Inc. Expansion-add outdoor table service and 800 S. Kenwood Avenue Pauline Guiragoss off-premises catering Harcum, Raymond & Mitchell, Michael Transfer of ownership, request for live 134-36 W. 25th Street Raymond Harcum, Michael Mitchell entertainment

minimum ad rate is $26.74 per col. inch (an inch consists of up to 20 words). Mail in your ad on form below along with CHECK or MONEY ORDER to: WASHINGTON AFRO-AMERICAN CO., 1917 Benning Road, N.E., Washington, D.C. 20002-4723, Attn: Clsf. Adv. Dept.

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Harbor East Brewery, LLC New restaurant license with requests for 1000 Lancaster Street, Ste. B Rebecca Fischer, Courtney Mowry live entertainment, outdoor table service Robert Zissel and off-premises catering

923-937 Eastern Restaurant, LLC Transfer of ownership from a contract 923-27 Eastern Avenue Constantine Hadjis purchaser

BALTIMORE

1006 Fleet Street, request forAFRO outdoorClassified table Service & off-premises catering

Bradley´s of Fells Point, LLC Transfer of ownership from a 1703 Aliceanna Street Sandra Hinsche secured creditor, requests for live entertainment and outdoor table service

Fusaro, Inc. Transfer of ownership, request to add 336 N. Charles Street Freda Byrnes outdoor table service

202-332-0080 Buy it • Sell it Swap it • Lease it Rent it • Hire it

TYPESET: Mon Aug 13 12:04:44 EDT 2012

SAMPLE

treats “Hot Spots” from allergies on dogs & horses without steroids. At Southern States. www.happyjackinc.co

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FAMILY COURT 202-879-1212

DOMESTIC RELATIONS 202-879-0157 a. Absent Defendant b. Absolute Divorce c. Custody Divorce

$ 150.00 $ 150.00 $ 150.00

To place your ad, call 1-800-237-6892, ext. 262 Public Notices $50.00 & up depending on size Baltimore Legal Notices are $24.15 per inch. There is no flat rate — 1-800 (AFRO) 892 For Proof of Publication, please call 1-800-237-6892, ext. 244

TYPESET: Tue Aug 14 10:28:32 EDT 2012 LEGAL NOTICES

LEGAL NOTICES LEGAL NOTICES

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PUBLIC NOTICE OFFICE OF BOARDS & COMMISSIONS ARCHITECTURAL & ENGINEERING AWARDS COMMISSION MEETING AUGUST 22, 2012 - 2:45 P.M. A meeting of the Architectural & Engineering Awards Commission will be held on Wednesday, August 22, 2012 at 2:45 P.M. in Room 215 City Hall (Board of Estimates Chambers). If you require special accommodations to attend or participate in the meeting, please provide information about your requirements to Kumasi Vines at (410) 396-6883, five (5) business days in advance of the meeting. The following projects will be considered for award during the meeting: 1. PROJECT #1174 - ON-CALL TESTING AND INSPECTION SERVICES, BUREAU OF WATER AND WASTEWATER, DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS 2. PROJECT #1175 - ON-CALL BRIDGE DESIGN SERVICES, DEPARTMENT OF TRANSPORTATION

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Payment Policy for for legal noPayment Policy legal tice advertisements. Effective notice advertisements immediately, The Afro American Newspapers will require Effective immediately, The prepayment for publication Afro American Newspapers of all legal notices. Payment will require prepayment for will be accepted in the form publication of all legal notices. of checks, credit card or Payment will be accepted in money order. Any returned the form of check, credit card checks will be subject to a or money order. Any returned $25.00 processing fee and checks willin be to a mayresult thesubject suspension $25.00 fee and may of anyprocessing future advertising at result inour thediscretion. suspension of any future advertising at our disTYPESET: cretion.Mon Aug 13 12:07:52 EDT 2012

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TYPESET: Mon Aug 13 12:04:18 2012 LEGALEDT NOTICES Baltimore City Department of Transportation Design-Build Project Notice of Intent CENTRAL AVENUE STREETSCAPE AND HARBOR POINT CONNECTOR BRIDGE (TR #12317; FAP Pending; SHA Pending) The Baltimore City Department of Transportation is announcing its intent to enter into a Design-Build contract with a Design-Build Team, possessing both professional engineering design capability and qualified construction contracting capability for the Central Avenue Streetscape and Harbor Point Connector Bridge in Southeast Baltimore City. The proposed project consists of reconstructing Central Avenue between Baltimore Street and Lancaster Street (approximately 8 blocks) into an urban boulevard and extending Central Avenue onto Harbor Point via a +/- 260’ bridge. The rehabilitation of subsurface bridges carrying Lancaster Street, Aliceanna Street and Fleet Street will also be required, as will the rehabilitation of culverts under Central Avenue. The MTA’s Red Line Transit Project is expected to cross Central Avenue at Fleet Street underground, where a station will be built The City’s rehabilitation of Central Avenue and Storm Drain project from Eastern Avenue to Madison Street is currently under construction. Coordination with these ongoing projects will be required. This project is critical to the redevelopment of a former Allied Signal chemical plant now known as Harbor Point. The chemical plant was closed in the 1980s due to environmental contamination from the industrial operations (principal contaminants of concern identified by the EPA and MDE are hexavalent chromium and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons). An environmental remediation system installed in the late 1990s continues to contain chromium contaminated groundwater within the Harbor Point site. The proposed Harbor Point development could contain as much as 2.9 million square feet of residential and commercial buildings and a significant public open space; an important headquarters office building is expected to open on Harbor Point in October 2014. Additional transportation capacity is required to serve this building; therefore, it is the City´s intent to require the Design-Build Team to open the connector bridge and culvert structures in October 2014. Roadway reconstruction along Central Avenue may continue for a to-be-determined duration thereafter.

All necessary right-of-way for the project will be under the City´s control by the time of contract award, and the City will have completed NEPA approval as well by this time. Environmental permit authorizations will be based on the City´s concept design; however, these permits will be transferred to the Design-Build Team at contract award. Any revisions necessary to the permits and final authorizations (e.g. stormwater, erosion/sediment control, etc.) based on the final project design will be the responsibility of the Design-Build Team. The City and the Design-Build Team will jointly conduct community outreach activities during the design and construction phase. The total value of the project is preliminarily expected to be in the range of $25 - $35 million; federal-aid highway funds will be used in the construction. All federal-aid requirements, including the use of Disadvantaged Business Enterprises, will apply. Pursuant to the City´s Design-Build policy, the City will seek the establishment of separate DBE goals for engineering services and construction. Although goals have not yet been established for the project, similar projects built in the City using federal-aid highway funds have had a DBE goal of approximately 27%. Firms participating on a Design-Build Team must be pre-qualified (separately or jointly) by the Baltimore City Office of Boards and Commissions, which may be reached at 443-984-3880. Prequalification codes for this project are expected to be: A02602 (Bituminous Concrete Paving), C03300 (Concrete Construction), and D02620 (Curbs, Gutters and Sidewalks). The City intends to use a two-step, best value procurement method. A Request for Qualifications is expected to be issued in in the early Fall 2012 with Statements of Qualifications due 45-days thereafter. A short-list of Design-Build Teams will be invited to submit responses to a Request for Proposals in January 2013. Alternative technical concepts may be considered with regard to the structures elements of the project. It is the City´s goal to award a contract for the project in May 2013. Firms advancing to the second stage (RFP) but not awarded a contract will receive a $ stipend of $35,000. City policy requires that all firms participating on the project team approve of a Stipend Payment Plan which details how the stipend will be distributed among team members. This NOTICE OF INTENT is issued to allow potential proposers an opportunity to form Design-Build Teams in anticipation of the RFQ for this project. Although full evaluation criteria have not yet been established, firms are advised that the City will consider the extent to which the project engineers and contractors have worked together previously. No submittal is required at this time. No questions will be responded to until the RFQ is issued. The RFQ will be issued in local newspapers, on the City website and at www.emarylandmarketplace.com. A copy of the City’s Design-Build Policy can be found on the Department of Transportation TYPESET: Mon Aug 13 12:07:07 EDT 2012 page at www.baltimorecity.gov. DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS BUREAU OF WATER AND WASTE WATERNOTICE OF LETTING Sealed Bids or Proposals, in duplicate addressed to the Board of Estimates of the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore and marked for Sanitary Contract 931-Rehabilitation and Improvements to Sanitary Sewers at Various Locations in Baltimore City will be received at the Office of the Comptroller, Room 204, City Hall, Baltimore, Maryland until 11:00 A.M. on Wednesday, September 12, 2012. Positively no bids will be received after 11:00 A.M. Bids will be publicly opened by the Board of Estimates in Room 215, City Hall at Noon. The Contract Documents may be examined, without charge, at the Department of Public Works Service Center located on the first floor of the Abel Wolman Municipal Building, 200 N. Holliday Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 as of Friday, August 10, 2012 and copies may be purchased for a non-refundable cost of $30.00. Conditions and requirements of the Bid are found in the bid package. All contractors bidding on this Contract must first be prequalified by the City of Baltimore Contractors Qualification Committee. Interested parties should call 410-396-6883 or contact the Committee at 751 Eastern Avenue, Baltimore, Maryland 21202. If a bid is submitted by a joint venture (JV), then in that event, the document that established the JV shall be submitted with the bid for verification purposes. The Prequalification Category required for bidding on this project is B02552-Sewer Construction Cost Qualification Range for this work shall be $10,000,001.00 to $15,000,000.00 A “Pre-Bidding Information” session will be conducted at 300 Abel Wolman Municipal Building, Conference Room on August 20, 2012 at 10:00 A.M. Principal Item of work for this project are: Repair, replacement and rehabilitation of sanitary sewers, manholes, house connections, and appurtunances; as well as maintenance functions such as televising, cleaning and by-pass pumping at various locations, and other related work, including but not limited to paving and surface restoration. The contractor must be able to mobilize multiple work crews with the necessary equipment to perform the work as designated by the Engineer.Generally, this is a requirements type contract, and work assignments are on an urgent, as-needed basis. The contractor must be able to proceed with the work within forty-eight (48) hours of receipt of direction from the Engineer. The MBE goal is 9% The WBE goal is 3% SANITARY CONTRACT 931 APPROVED: Bernice H. Taylor Clerk, Board of Estimates APPROVED: Alfred H. Foxx Director of Public Works

LEGAL NOTICES

engineers and contractors have worked together previously. No submittal is required at this CITY time. OF No BALTIMORE questions will be responded to until the OF TRANSPORTATION RFQ is issued. DEPARTMENT The RFQ will be issued in local newspapers, on the City NOTICE OF LETTING website and at www.emarylandmarketplace.com. A copy of the City’s Design-Build Policy can be found on the Department of Transportation Sealed or Proposals, in duplicate addressed to the Board of Estimates page atBids www.baltimorecity.gov. of the Mayor and City Council of Baltimore and marked for TR13001 RECONSTRUCTION OF FOOTWAYS CITYWIDE will be received at the Office of the Comptroller, Room 204 City Hall, Baltimore, Maryland until 11:00 A.M. AUGUST 29, 2012. Positively no bids will be received after 11:00 A.M. Bids will be publicly opened by the Board of Estimates in Room 215, City Hall at Noon. The Contract Documents may be examined, without charge, at the Department of Public Works Service Center located on the first floor of the Abel Wolman Municipal Building, 200 N. Holliday Street, Baltimore, Maryland 21202 as of AUGUST 10, 2012 and copies may be purchased for a non-refundable cost of $75.00. Conditions and requirements of the Bid are found in the bid package. All contractors bidding on this Contract must first be prequalified by the City of Baltimore Contractors Qualification Committee. Interested parties should call (410) 396-6883 or contact the Committee at the Eastern Avenue Pumping Station, 751 Eastern Avenue and President St, Baltimore, Maryland 21202. If a bid is submitted by a joint venture (“JV”), then in that event, the document that established the JV shall be submitted with the bid for verification purposes. The Prequalification Category required for bidding on this project is A02601 (Portland Cement Concrete Paving). Cost Qualification Range for this work shall be $500,000.00 to $1,000,000.00 A “Pre-Bidding Information” session will be conducted at 10:00 A.M. on AUGUST 17, 2012 at the Charles L. Benton Building, 417 E. Fayette Street, 7th Floor, Frank Hooper Conference Room; Baltimore, MD 21201. Principal Items of work for this project are: 5” Concrete Sidewalk 73,000 Sq. Ft; 5” Concrete Sidewalk Damaged by Tree Roots 75,000 Sq. Ft.; Emergency Repairs for 5” Concrete Sidewalk 9,000 Sq. Ft. The MBE goal is 27% The WBE goal is 10%

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APPROVED: Bernice H. Taylor, Clerk Board of Estimates

TYPESET: Mon Aug 13 12:03:53 EDT 2012

EDUCATION Maryland State Department of Education (MSDE) is a State agency that develops and administers education, library, and rehabilitation programs, and is on the forefront of standards-based reform of public education for the citizens of Maryland. We are committed to promoting & maintaining a diverse workforce. We are currently accepting applications for the following positions within our Division of Certification and Accreditation: EDUCATION PROGRAM SPECIALIST I, EDUCATOR CERTIFICAITON SPECIALIST(S). (Position # 040482 & 087800) Annual Salary Range: $56,496- $82,514 & Comprehensive Benefit Package Master´s Degree or equivalent 36 credit hours of post-baccalaureate course work in Education, Educational Administration/Supervision or related field AND 4 years of professional teaching or administrative work in or affiliated with an education program; experience that includes the interpretation and application of policies and regulations and/or certification policies and procedures is desired. Note: 2 years of additional experience as defined above may be substituted for the Master´s Degree. EDUCATION PROGRAM SPECIALIST II, LEAD NONPUBLIC SCHOOLS APPROVAL SPECIALIST (Position # 039725) Annual Salary Range: $60,290- $88,030 & Comprehensive Benefit Package Master´s Degree or equivalent 36 credit hours of post-baccalaureate course work in Education, Special Education or closely related field AND 5 yrs of professional work experience in education that must include administrative and/or supervisory experience. Experience in the application of regulations is desirable. Note: 2 years of additional experience as defined above may be substituted for the Master´s Degree. For more information on these and other great opportunities with the MSDE, visit our website at www. marylandpublicschools.org. Qualified applicants should fax or mail application and resume to the Office of Human Resources, 200 W. Baltimore Street, Baltimore, MD, 21201. Please list position name and number. Applications andAug resumes will be EDT accepted TYPESET: Mon 13 12:05:53 2012until August 31, 2012. Fax: (410) 333-8950. AA/EOE

ACCOUNTING Fiscal Services Officer I CTR 17-13 State Salary Grade 16 Annual Salary Range: $41,074-$59,069 MSDE Ranked #1 in Public Education 4 years in a row and winner of the prestigious RACE TO THE TOP grant seeks the next member for our valued and respected team. Entrusted with assisting our agency with the continued program progression service our K-12 students this is contractual/temporary position serving as a fiscal services officer responsible for providing internal fiscal support for the Race to the Top (RTTT) grant, including grant management and financial analysis and reporting. Produces and analyzes appropriate reports; analyzes monthly budget variance reports for each RTTT project; analyzes end-of-year/carryover financial reports; assists in the preparation of all Race to the Top financial reports required by USDE; communicates with MSDE Program and Project Managers regarding budgetary issues; and, collaborates with Race to the Top Leadership Team for successful implementation of the grant. EDUCATION: A Bachelor´s Degree or equivalent 36 credit hours of baccalaureate course work in Finance, Accounting, Management, or Business EXPERIENCE: Three years of experience in public sector program financial management. Experience with State budgets and grant management is desirable. Experience with federal grants is also desirable. NOTE: Two years of additional experience as defined above may be substituted for the Bachelor´s Degree. For inquiries or an MSDE Application, contact 410-767-0019 or TTY/TDD 410-333-3045 or visit our website at www.marylandpublicschools.org. Appropriate accommodations for individuals with disabilities are available upon request. Applications should be received by the close of business August 3. 2012 via fax 410-333-8950 or e-mail: jobs@msde.state.md.us TYPESET: Mon Aug 13 12:05:17 EDT 2012

MARYLAND PORT ADMINISTRATION Transportation Engineer III Salary: $43,725.00 - $69,999.00 (Grade 17) Excellent benefits and leave package. Location: Baltimore, Maryland Closing Date: September 7, 2012 Description: The Maryland Port Administration has an opening in its Engineering Department for a Transportation Engineer III in its Design Unit. The incumbent of this position will work on large, complex engineering capital and maintenance projects. The incumbent will review contract drawings, specifications, estimates and schedules; prepare environmental permits; and apply advanced knowledge and expertise in specialized areas of port/marine engineering including deep water berths, piers, wharves, fenders, mooring systems, cranes and other cargo handling equipment, dredging, topographic and hydrographic surveys, grading, utilities, buildings and warehouses. Position Requirements: Visit https://jobs.mdot.state.md.us for full requirements and to apply online. To Apply: You must complete an MDOT (DTS-1) application for consideration. For an application, call 410-385-4446, or go to http://www.marylandtransportation.com/Employment/application. Apply online or mail your application to: Human Resources Department Maryland Port Administration 401 E. Pratt Street, Ste. 253 Baltimore, MD 21202 Attn: Transportation Engineer III

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The streetscape portion of work will be from Lancaster Street to Baltimore Street and will include full depth pavement reconstruction, new sidewalks, lighting, traffic signals, landscaping, green medians, and signage as well as environmental site design, drainage improvements, ADA upgrades, curb bump outs, and bike lanes. Utility work will include new electric duct banks. Other utilities may be added to the project by the time the RFQ is issued.

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