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Fall 2012

In this issue:

In West Michigan, AU Story Inspires Uncommon Generosity

Andra Stevens West Michigan Conference gift of $500,000 to build a welcome center at AU inspired an anonymous donor to match the contribution, increasing the gift to $1 million.

Central Congo Communicator Thanks AU Philip Brooks ‘I was learning how to lead; meanwhile, I was leading. … I am really a changed person after going to Africa University.’− Pierre T. Omadjela

Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly Dies at 92

Compiled from various websites First African-American woman elected to the United Methodist episcopacy leaves a rich legacy of leadership.

U.S.–Zimbabwe Connection Offers Hope Pamela Crosby Steadfast support of Africa University illustrates South Carolina congregation’s ‘transformational partnerships.’

The World Is Her Parish

Elaine Jenkins The Rev. Dr. Martha Orphe expresses her love for Africa by investing in Africa University.

Pittsburgh in 2004. She arranged for the AU choir to perform in concert in the district. She also hosted the choir members in her home for a fabulous meal prepared by her parents, who traveled from Louisiana to do so. “It was one of the high points of my parents’ lives to meet those young, vibrant, engaging students from Africa University,” Orphe reflected. “The meeting was especially poignant for my dad because he had traced his roots to Ghana through DNA testing,” she continued. In 2010, Orphe was formally inducted into the Richard E. “Dick” Reeves Legacy Society because she has included Africa University in her estate plans. Orphe said, “I love Mother Africa, and I want to invest in her future. I firmly believe that the most effective way to do so is by investing in the higher education of Africa’s young women and men. Africa University is the perfect institution to allow me to do so.” Orphe’s dream for Africa University is that one day it will become the premiere university for all of Africa and produce the next generation of African leaders. The late Dr. Nancy M. Carruth inducts the Rev. Dr. Martha Orphe into the Richard E. “Dick” Reeves Legacy Society, September 2010.

—Elaine Jenkins, Africa University Development Office

Martha Marie Orphe’s ministry has taken her to every continent but Antarctica. She has visited 21 countries to date and has visited Africa University at least four times that she can recall. Orphe is the youngest of six children born to Joseph and Dolores Orphe. She and her siblings were reared in St. Martinville, La. She graduated with honors from St. Martinville Senior High School in 1977; she earned her bachelor of arts degree in religion and computer science from Clark College (Atlanta) in 1982; her master of divinity degree from Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn.) in 1985; and her doctor of ministry degree from Wesley Theological Seminary (Washington, D.C.) in 1993. Orphe was ordained a deacon in the Louisiana Annual Conference in

1984 and an elder in the Western Pennsylvania Annual Conference in 1987. She served for more than 21 years in Western Pennsylvania, including seven years as district superintendent of the Pittsburgh District. In 2006, Orphe re-turned home to Louisiana to serve as the Conference Mission Zone director to supervise the rebuilding of 50 churches and communities in New Orleans and west Louisiana that were severely impacted by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. In the midst of her new ministry, grieved the death of her beloved mother, who died one week after Hurricane Katrina, and her beloved sister, who died two weeks after Hurricane Rita. Orphe currently serves as senior pastor of First Street Peck Wesley United Methodist Church and Williams Ross United Methodist Church located in New Orleans. Orphe has been actively engaged with Africa University since its inception in 1988. She has raised awareness, made friends and raised funds for the new university. Orphe was district superintendent when the General Conference of The United Methodist Church was held in

600412/50M

The World Is Her Parish

Celebrating the Connection between Africa University and United Methodist Congregations 100 Percent Support

Thank you for supporting Africa University through your 100 percent remittance of the Africa University Fund apportionment in 2011. Jurisdiction Total Support and Annual Conferences with 100 percent or more in 2011 (includes 2010 performance)

102% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 118.36% 102.86% 99.29% 100% 100% 100% 100% 151.51% 110.50%

2010 North Central Jurisdiction Dakotas East Ohio Illinois Great Rivers Iowa Minnesota Northern Illinois West Michigan West Ohio Wisconsin

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 133% 112.46% 110.34% 100%

2011

Northeastern Jurisdiction Baltimore-Washington Greater New Jersey New England New York Susquehanna Peninsula-Delaware Upper New York West Virginia Western Pennsylvania

100% 100% 100% 100% 99% 100% 100% 113.58% 114% 100.06% 110.87%

South Central Jurisdiction Central Texas 100% Louisiana 100.01% 100.04% North Texas 100.50% 100% Oklahoma Indian Missionary 100.05% 100% Southeastern Jurisdiction Florida Holston Kentucky North Carolina North Georgia Red Bird Missionary

100.02% 100%

100%

Western Jurisdiction Alaska United Methodist Desert Southwest

As Africa University celebrates 20 years of realized dreams, we look forward to your full support in 2012.

• Africa University is located in Old Mutare, Zimbabwe, and is the first fully accredited United Methodist–related educational institution on the African continent, established by action of the General Conference. • Africa University offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in six faculties of learning: agriculture and natural resources, education, health sciences, humanities and social sciences, management and administration and theology. The Institute of Peace, Leadership and Governance offers postgraduate diplomas and master’s programs.

Andra Stevens

all sectors, communities can make positive strides.” The West Michigan effort invests in Africa University’s ministry by providing affordable on-campus housing for visiting faculty, mission teams, clergy, youth and others who gather for seminars on topics ranging from food security to peacebuilding in Africa. “What is compelling is what the building is to be used for and how it fits into a ministry that is about strengthening reconciliation, nurturing leadership and shaping a new, more positive future,” said the Rev. Dr. Laurie Haller, the former Grand Rapids District superintendent, who served on the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM). Launched in June 2010, the campaign sent speakers out to share the Africa University story in pulpits and at other gatherings across the conference. Eric Mulanda, a theology student from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, itinerated in West Michigan and made presentations via Skype from Zimbabwe. Clergy and lay members of the conference visited the campus and returned to speak with knowledge and passion about the university. “You have to seize the moment, and this was that moment,” said Edwardson, who described the response of

Fall 2012

—Story by Andra Stevens, director of communications in the Africa University Development Office

individual donors as “just incredible.” Haller credits the success of the campaign to the deeply rooted mission culture among United Methodists in Michigan. The Grand Rapids District raised the majority of the funds, and the other five districts each pledged $20,000. Haller notes that the involvement of West Michigan’s district superintendents played a crucial role in the outcome. “There is a story to tell,” said Haller. “Africa University is a ministry that encompasses the four focus areas of our church. The Ubuntu Center project brought the whole conference together in mission in a way that we have not seen previously. Africa University isn’t just a name to us. It’s a ministry in which we have invested.” Going forward, Edwardson sees tremendous scope for growing West Michigan’s engagement with Africa University. “There is a huge opportunity to partner with West Michigan churches and educational institutions to further the success of Africa University on the continent,” said Edwardson.

In West Michigan, AU Story Inspires Uncommon Generosity

The Rev. Dr. Laurie Haller and the West Michigan delegation worked with AU staff to develop the Welcome Center plans in 2010.

Andra Stevens In June, United Methodist congregations in the West Michigan Conference surpassed their goal of $500,000 to build the Ubuntu Welcome/Gathering Center at Africa University. In an area that is just emerging from a decade of economic decline, United Methodists stretched themselves in giving. A layperson’s gift of $5,000, made from the floor of the annual conference event, took the campaign over its goal six months earlier than expected. An anonymous donor matched the conference’s $500,000, making $1 million available for the building and for equipment and furnishings. “West Michigan is making a statement of positive recognition of what Africa University has accomplished in its first 20 years of existence,” said Ed Edwardson, the campaign co-chair. “It speaks to our belief that Africa University truly can be a leader in transforming all of Africa. By providing ethical leadership for


—Elaine Jenkins, Africa University Development Office

Martha Marie Orphe’s ministry has taken her to every continent but Antarctica. She has visited 21 countries to date and has visited Africa University at least four times that she can recall. Orphe is the youngest of six children born to Joseph and Dolores Orphe. She and her siblings were reared in St. Martinville, La. She graduated with honors from St. Martinville Senior High School in 1977; she earned her bachelor of arts degree in religion and computer science from Clark College (Atlanta) in 1982; her master of divinity degree from Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn.) in 1985; and her doctor of ministry degree from Wesley Theological Seminary (Washington, D.C.) in 1993. Orphe was ordained a deacon in the Louisiana Annual Conference in

The late Dr. Nancy M. Carruth inducts the Rev. Dr. Martha Orphe into the Richard E. “Dick” Reeves Legacy Society, September 2010.

Fall 2012

100 Percent Support Thank you for supporting Africa University through your 100 percent remittance of the Africa University Fund apportionment in 2011.

In West Michigan, AU Story Inspires Uncommon Generosity

Jurisdiction Total Support and Annual Conferences with 100 percent or more in 2011 (includes 2010 performance)

2011

2010

North Central Jurisdiction Dakotas East Ohio Illinois Great Rivers Iowa Minnesota Northern Illinois West Michigan West Ohio Wisconsin

102% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 118.36% 102.86% 99.29% 100% 100% 100% 100% 151.51% 110.50%

Northeastern Jurisdiction Baltimore-Washington Greater New Jersey New England New York Susquehanna Peninsula-Delaware Upper New York West Virginia Western Pennsylvania

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 133% 112.46% 110.34% 100%

South Central Jurisdiction Central Texas 100% Louisiana 100.01% 100.04% North Texas 100.50% 100% Oklahoma Indian Missionary 100.05% 100% Southeastern Jurisdiction Florida Holston Kentucky North Carolina North Georgia Red Bird Missionary

100% 100% 100% 100% 99% 100% 100% 113.58% 114% 100.06% 110.87%

Western Jurisdiction Alaska United Methodist Desert Southwest

100.02% 100%

100%

As Africa University celebrates 20 years of realized dreams, we look forward to your full support in 2012.

• Africa University is located in Old Mutare, Zimbabwe, and is the first fully accredited United Methodist–related educational institution on the African continent, established by action of the General Conference. • Africa University offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in six faculties of learning: agriculture and natural resources, education, health sciences, humanities and social sciences, management and administration and theology. The Institute of Peace, Leadership and Governance offers postgraduate diplomas and master’s programs.

Andra Stevens

Elaine Jenkins The Rev. Dr. Martha Orphe expresses her love for Africa by investing in Africa University.

The World Is Her Parish

Pamela Crosby Steadfast support of Africa University illustrates South Carolina congregation’s ‘transformational partnerships.’

U.S.–Zimbabwe Connection Offers Hope

Compiled from various websites First African-American woman elected to the United Methodist episcopacy leaves a rich legacy of leadership.

Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly Dies at 92

Philip Brooks ‘I was learning how to lead; meanwhile, I was leading. … I am really a changed person after going to Africa University.’− Pierre T. Omadjela

Central Congo Communicator Thanks AU

Andra Stevens West Michigan Conference gift of $500,000 to build a welcome center at AU inspired an anonymous donor to match the contribution, increasing the gift to $1 million.

In West Michigan, AU Story Inspires Uncommon Generosity In this issue:

Fall 2012

Pittsburgh in 2004. She arranged for the AU choir to perform in concert in the district. She also hosted the choir members in her home for a fabulous meal prepared by her parents, who traveled from Louisiana to do so. “It was one of the high points of my parents’ lives to meet those young, vibrant, engaging students from Africa University,” Orphe reflected. “The meeting was especially poignant for my dad because he had traced his roots to Ghana through DNA testing,” she continued. In 2010, Orphe was formally inducted into the Richard E. “Dick” Reeves Legacy Society because she has included Africa University in her estate plans. Orphe said, “I love Mother Africa, and I want to invest in her future. I firmly believe that the most effective way to do so is by investing in the higher education of Africa’s young women and men. Africa University is the perfect institution to allow me to do so.” Orphe’s dream for Africa University is that one day it will become the premiere university for all of Africa and produce the next generation of African leaders.

1984 and an elder in the Western Pennsylvania Annual Conference in 1987. She served for more than 21 years in Western Pennsylvania, including seven years as district superintendent of the Pittsburgh District. In 2006, Orphe re-turned home to Louisiana to serve as the Conference Mission Zone director to supervise the rebuilding of 50 churches and communities in New Orleans and west Louisiana that were severely impacted by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. In the midst of her new ministry, grieved the death of her beloved mother, who died one week after Hurricane Katrina, and her beloved sister, who died two weeks after Hurricane Rita. Orphe currently serves as senior pastor of First Street Peck Wesley United Methodist Church and Williams Ross United Methodist Church located in New Orleans. Orphe has been actively engaged with Africa University since its inception in 1988. She has raised awareness, made friends and raised funds for the new university. Orphe was district superintendent when the General Conference of The United Methodist Church was held in

The World Is Her Parish

600412/50M

Celebrating the Connection between Africa University and United Methodist Congregations

The Rev. Dr. Laurie Haller and the West Michigan delegation worked with AU staff to develop the Welcome Center plans in 2010.

Andra Stevens In June, United Methodist congregations in the West Michigan Conference surpassed their goal of $500,000 to build the Ubuntu Welcome/Gathering Center at Africa University. In an area that is just emerging from a decade of economic decline, United Methodists stretched themselves in giving. A layperson’s gift of $5,000, made from the floor of the annual conference event, took the campaign over its goal six months earlier than expected. An anonymous donor matched the conference’s $500,000, making $1 million available for the building and for equipment and furnishings. “West Michigan is making a statement of positive recognition of what Africa University has accomplished in its first 20 years of existence,” said Ed Edwardson, the campaign co-chair. “It speaks to our belief that Africa University truly can be a leader in transforming all of Africa. By providing ethical leadership for

all sectors, communities can make positive strides.” The West Michigan effort invests in Africa University’s ministry by providing affordable on-campus housing for visiting faculty, mission teams, clergy, youth and others who gather for seminars on topics ranging from food security to peacebuilding in Africa. “What is compelling is what the building is to be used for and how it fits into a ministry that is about strengthening reconciliation, nurturing leadership and shaping a new, more positive future,” said the Rev. Dr. Laurie Haller, the former Grand Rapids District superintendent, who served on the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM). Launched in June 2010, the campaign sent speakers out to share the Africa University story in pulpits and at other gatherings across the conference. Eric Mulanda, a theology student from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, itinerated in West Michigan and made presentations via Skype from Zimbabwe. Clergy and lay members of the conference visited the campus and returned to speak with knowledge and passion about the university. “You have to seize the moment, and this was that moment,” said Edwardson, who described the response of

individual donors as “just incredible.” Haller credits the success of the campaign to the deeply rooted mission culture among United Methodists in Michigan. The Grand Rapids District raised the majority of the funds, and the other five districts each pledged $20,000. Haller notes that the involvement of West Michigan’s district superintendents played a crucial role in the outcome. “There is a story to tell,” said Haller. “Africa University is a ministry that encompasses the four focus areas of our church. The Ubuntu Center project brought the whole conference together in mission in a way that we have not seen previously. Africa University isn’t just a name to us. It’s a ministry in which we have invested.” Going forward, Edwardson sees tremendous scope for growing West Michigan’s engagement with Africa University. “There is a huge opportunity to partner with West Michigan churches and educational institutions to further the success of Africa University on the continent,” said Edwardson. —Story by Andra Stevens, director of communications in the Africa University Development Office


• Africa University Fund: Living beyond the Dream DVD (86000508) • Africa University Fund Brochure (86000407) Order these and other resources from United Methodist Communications by calling toll-free (888) 346-3862. Hours: Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Central Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

2

Pamela Crosby The mainstay of Africa University’s support in South Carolina is the local church. In the mountains, midlands and Low Country of the state, United Methodist congregations have opened their hearts to this far-flung ministry. Whether worshipping in large or small churches or in rural or urban settings, congregants are finding parallels to their own stories in the stories of African communities and of the young men and women who enroll at Africa University. By faithfully remitting 100% of their share of the Africa University Fund apportionment, making second-mile gifts in the form of scholarships or helping to build facilities, the contributions of local churches

—Philip Brooks is a freelance writer living in Nashville, Tenn.

Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly

Bishop Leontine Turpeau Current Kelly, 92, trailblazer, spiritual mother, champion for women of color in leadership and gift to The United Methodist Church, died June 28. The first African-American woman elected to the United Methodist episcopacy in 1984, Kelly ministered extensively within and beyond the church. To the Africa University family, Kelly was a wise, beloved friend. The first African-American woman to preside at a General

Conference, she officiated when the body unanimously passed legislation authorizing the founding of Africa University. Although illness prevented her from attending the 1991 groundbreaking ceremony, Kelly defied her doctor’s orders and attended Africa University’s first graduation ceremony in December 1994. In 2000, she invited family and friends to celebrate her 80th birthday with “gifts that will enable more young people to attend Africa University.” An endowed scholarship in her name has allowed a succession of future leaders to enroll at Africa University. Kelly is survived by two sons, Gloster B. and John David Current, and two daughters, Angella Current Felder and Pamela Lynne Kelly. Angella Current Felder followed her mother’s example by giving leadership to Africa

University and women of color. Current Felder retired as director of the United Methodist Office of Loans and Scholarships, Board of Higher Education and Ministry, in 2010. Current Felder is also the author of the Africa University story, The School of Dreams in the Valley of Hope. Contributions to Africa University in Kelly’s honor may be sent to The Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly Endowed Scholarship Fund, Africa University Development Office, P. O. Box 340007, Nashville, TN 372030007; (615) 340-7438; www.support-africauniversity.org. Funeral services were held July 5 at Jones Memorial United Methodist Church in San Francisco, where her daughterin-law, the Rev. Stacy Current, is the senior pastor. —Compiled from various Web sites

Andra Stevens

Honor your friends or family by sponsoring an Africa University student in their name.

Mike DuBose

Learn more about how you can put your faith into action by contacting the Africa University Development Office at (615) 340-7438, audevoffice@gbhem.org or www.support-africauniversity.org.

Africa University apportionment receipts from local churches provide the basics necessary to operate the university, such as utilities, equipment and faculty salaries.

choir as student coordinator. “I organized many activities, preparing the choir for last year’s graduation day, and the World Methodist Council event in Durban, South Africa. “I did not only study how to lead,” Omadjela continued, “but I (also) had time to practice. My bishop heard about all my responsibilities at Africa University. That is why he decided to give me a job in the church.” Earning a Ph.D. is Omadjela’s dream. His goal? To teach at Africa University. “From Africa University, I … have seen love in action,” he said. “I promise to serve the church which gave me a scholarship. I am really a changed person after going to Africa University.”

Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly Dies at 92

For more information, visit www.umcgiving.org or www.infoserv.umc.org.

Encourage your local church to set a 100 percent apportionmentremittance goal! Sending a portion of your goal each month makes it easier to reach full remittance by year’s end.

bishops in the Democratic Republic of the Congo from three to four. Thirteen annual conferences within the Congo Central Conference have a current aggregate membership of 2.3 million. “We are determined to show a difference in everything we do here,” Omadjela said. He credits Africa University with shaping him to become a leader. “What was good,” he explained, “is I was learning how to lead; meanwhile, I was leading. In intensive English, I was the class representative in a class of 96 students from five countries.” He organized an intensive English-language church service. He also worked as a sub-warden (residence assistant) for master’s students and led the Africa University

Andra Stevens

Philip Brooks After honing his leadership skills at Africa University, Pierre T. Omadjela Pierre T. Omadjela received a hard-to-refuse invitation from his bishop. In September 2011, Bishop David K. Yemba appointed Omadjela director of communications and development for the Central Congo Area. Graduating in June 2012, he was completing his last semester of master of business administration studies. Today Omadjela works in one of United Methodism’s flourishing areas, a fact confirmed by 2012 General Conference delegates, who increased the number of

Order a family of resources to help tell the story of the Africa University Fund apportionment:

Visit Africa University’s website at www.africau.edu.

U.S.–Zimbabwe Connection Offers Hope

Central Congo Communicator Thanks AU

Give Faithfully. Give Hope.

make teaching, research and learning possible. Along the coast between Charleston and Myrtle Beach is Murrell’s Inlet, where the Rev. Dr. B. Mike Alexander is senior pastor at Belin (pronounced Blain) Memorial UMC. Planted in 1925, Belin UMC served the whole community, including the descendants of the African slaves who had worked in the rice paddies of area plantations. The 2,200member congregation has a history of transformational partnerships that goes back generations and continues today through its steadfast support of AU.

Connected to family in Zimbabwe and Africa “We are God’s people and we have always supported the

higher education of young people,” says Alexander. “We are happy to pay our apportionment for Africa University and, as a pastor, I’m proud to serve a church that takes pride in paying apportionments in full. The members understand that we are a family connected to family and that means connected to family in Zimbabwe and Africa. “For us,” continues Alexander, “…if there is any hope for the future of the world, if barriers are ever going to be broken down between Republicans and Democrats, between Christians and Muslims, if there is any hope of coming together at all, it is with the young people who will come after us. The hope for Africa and for the world is in the young people who are getting an education at Africa University.” In supporting Africa University, South Carolina is developing leaders for all places, ministries and future opportunities on the continent and across the globe. More and more, United Methodists in South Carolina and beyond are coming to understand that Africa University is not only a project the church invests in, but that the institution is an integral part of the church’s growth, intellect, history and progress. With a reported 3.4 million members and rapid growth in Africa, the hope and future of The United Methodist Church is intricately connected to partnership on the African continent. It is that connection that keeps giving hope to the university, to The United Methodist Church and to the world. —Crosby is a freelance writer and former Africa University Fund account executive based in Nashville, Tenn.

How You Can Help Africa University continues to be the evidence of faith, hope and belief in the visions of dreamers. We are counting on you! Your church’s 100 percent apportionment remittance means 100 percent support of Africa University’s operational budget. Consider these additional ways of helping the university to educate new leaders for the nations of Africa: Planned Gifts –Planned gifts are the foundation for the longterm survival of Africa University. For many, a bequest offers an opportunity to make a more substantial charitable gift than would be possible during one’s lifetime. As you make your estate plans, consider leaving a gift to Africa University in your will. If you already have included Africa University in your estate plans, please let us know so we may welcome you to the Richard E. “Dick” Reeves Legacy Society. Usahwira –This word in the Shona language means “a beautiful friendship.” Encourage your local church to become a partner with Africa University by supporting one student at the university for four years. The cost to support one student annually is $5,400. Local churches may provide full or partial scholarships. Endowment Fund –Give to the Africa University Endowment Fund (World Service Special Gift #03-01-88). The interest income from the endowment is used to provide scholarships for our students. Africa University is supported by congregations and individuals across The United Methodist Church. Let’s work together to continue the transformation of lives and of Africa. For more information, please contact: Africa University Development Office P.O. Box 340007 Nashville, TN 37203-0007 (615) 340-7438 (phone) (615) 340-7290 (fax) audevoffice@gbhem.org www.support-africauniversity.org

3


• Africa University Fund: Living beyond the Dream DVD (86000508) • Africa University Fund Brochure (86000407) Order these and other resources from United Methodist Communications by calling toll-free (888) 346-3862. Hours: Monday - Thursday, 7:30 a.m. - 5 p.m., Central Friday, 7:30 a.m. - 2:30 p.m.

2

Pamela Crosby The mainstay of Africa University’s support in South Carolina is the local church. In the mountains, midlands and Low Country of the state, United Methodist congregations have opened their hearts to this far-flung ministry. Whether worshipping in large or small churches or in rural or urban settings, congregants are finding parallels to their own stories in the stories of African communities and of the young men and women who enroll at Africa University. By faithfully remitting 100% of their share of the Africa University Fund apportionment, making second-mile gifts in the form of scholarships or helping to build facilities, the contributions of local churches

—Philip Brooks is a freelance writer living in Nashville, Tenn.

Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly

Bishop Leontine Turpeau Current Kelly, 92, trailblazer, spiritual mother, champion for women of color in leadership and gift to The United Methodist Church, died June 28. The first African-American woman elected to the United Methodist episcopacy in 1984, Kelly ministered extensively within and beyond the church. To the Africa University family, Kelly was a wise, beloved friend. The first African-American woman to preside at a General

Conference, she officiated when the body unanimously passed legislation authorizing the founding of Africa University. Although illness prevented her from attending the 1991 groundbreaking ceremony, Kelly defied her doctor’s orders and attended Africa University’s first graduation ceremony in December 1994. In 2000, she invited family and friends to celebrate her 80th birthday with “gifts that will enable more young people to attend Africa University.” An endowed scholarship in her name has allowed a succession of future leaders to enroll at Africa University. Kelly is survived by two sons, Gloster B. and John David Current, and two daughters, Angella Current Felder and Pamela Lynne Kelly. Angella Current Felder followed her mother’s example by giving leadership to Africa

University and women of color. Current Felder retired as director of the United Methodist Office of Loans and Scholarships, Board of Higher Education and Ministry, in 2010. Current Felder is also the author of the Africa University story, The School of Dreams in the Valley of Hope. Contributions to Africa University in Kelly’s honor may be sent to The Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly Endowed Scholarship Fund, Africa University Development Office, P. O. Box 340007, Nashville, TN 372030007; (615) 340-7438; www.support-africauniversity.org. Funeral services were held July 5 at Jones Memorial United Methodist Church in San Francisco, where her daughterin-law, the Rev. Stacy Current, is the senior pastor. —Compiled from various Web sites

Andra Stevens

Honor your friends or family by sponsoring an Africa University student in their name.

Mike DuBose

Learn more about how you can put your faith into action by contacting the Africa University Development Office at (615) 340-7438, audevoffice@gbhem.org or www.support-africauniversity.org.

Africa University apportionment receipts from local churches provide the basics necessary to operate the university, such as utilities, equipment and faculty salaries.

choir as student coordinator. “I organized many activities, preparing the choir for last year’s graduation day, and the World Methodist Council event in Durban, South Africa. “I did not only study how to lead,” Omadjela continued, “but I (also) had time to practice. My bishop heard about all my responsibilities at Africa University. That is why he decided to give me a job in the church.” Earning a Ph.D. is Omadjela’s dream. His goal? To teach at Africa University. “From Africa University, I … have seen love in action,” he said. “I promise to serve the church which gave me a scholarship. I am really a changed person after going to Africa University.”

Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly Dies at 92

For more information, visit www.umcgiving.org or www.infoserv.umc.org.

Encourage your local church to set a 100 percent apportionmentremittance goal! Sending a portion of your goal each month makes it easier to reach full remittance by year’s end.

bishops in the Democratic Republic of the Congo from three to four. Thirteen annual conferences within the Congo Central Conference have a current aggregate membership of 2.3 million. “We are determined to show a difference in everything we do here,” Omadjela said. He credits Africa University with shaping him to become a leader. “What was good,” he explained, “is I was learning how to lead; meanwhile, I was leading. In intensive English, I was the class representative in a class of 96 students from five countries.” He organized an intensive English-language church service. He also worked as a sub-warden (residence assistant) for master’s students and led the Africa University

Andra Stevens

Philip Brooks After honing his leadership skills at Africa University, Pierre T. Omadjela Pierre T. Omadjela received a hard-to-refuse invitation from his bishop. In September 2011, Bishop David K. Yemba appointed Omadjela director of communications and development for the Central Congo Area. Graduating in June 2012, he was completing his last semester of master of business administration studies. Today Omadjela works in one of United Methodism’s flourishing areas, a fact confirmed by 2012 General Conference delegates, who increased the number of

Order a family of resources to help tell the story of the Africa University Fund apportionment:

Visit Africa University’s website at www.africau.edu.

U.S.–Zimbabwe Connection Offers Hope

Central Congo Communicator Thanks AU

Give Faithfully. Give Hope.

make teaching, research and learning possible. Along the coast between Charleston and Myrtle Beach is Murrell’s Inlet, where the Rev. Dr. B. Mike Alexander is senior pastor at Belin (pronounced Blain) Memorial UMC. Planted in 1925, Belin UMC served the whole community, including the descendants of the African slaves who had worked in the rice paddies of area plantations. The 2,200member congregation has a history of transformational partnerships that goes back generations and continues today through its steadfast support of AU.

Connected to family in Zimbabwe and Africa “We are God’s people and we have always supported the

higher education of young people,” says Alexander. “We are happy to pay our apportionment for Africa University and, as a pastor, I’m proud to serve a church that takes pride in paying apportionments in full. The members understand that we are a family connected to family and that means connected to family in Zimbabwe and Africa. “For us,” continues Alexander, “…if there is any hope for the future of the world, if barriers are ever going to be broken down between Republicans and Democrats, between Christians and Muslims, if there is any hope of coming together at all, it is with the young people who will come after us. The hope for Africa and for the world is in the young people who are getting an education at Africa University.” In supporting Africa University, South Carolina is developing leaders for all places, ministries and future opportunities on the continent and across the globe. More and more, United Methodists in South Carolina and beyond are coming to understand that Africa University is not only a project the church invests in, but that the institution is an integral part of the church’s growth, intellect, history and progress. With a reported 3.4 million members and rapid growth in Africa, the hope and future of The United Methodist Church is intricately connected to partnership on the African continent. It is that connection that keeps giving hope to the university, to The United Methodist Church and to the world. —Crosby is a freelance writer and former Africa University Fund account executive based in Nashville, Tenn.

How You Can Help Africa University continues to be the evidence of faith, hope and belief in the visions of dreamers. We are counting on you! Your church’s 100 percent apportionment remittance means 100 percent support of Africa University’s operational budget. Consider these additional ways of helping the university to educate new leaders for the nations of Africa: Planned Gifts –Planned gifts are the foundation for the longterm survival of Africa University. For many, a bequest offers an opportunity to make a more substantial charitable gift than would be possible during one’s lifetime. As you make your estate plans, consider leaving a gift to Africa University in your will. If you already have included Africa University in your estate plans, please let us know so we may welcome you to the Richard E. “Dick” Reeves Legacy Society. Usahwira –This word in the Shona language means “a beautiful friendship.” Encourage your local church to become a partner with Africa University by supporting one student at the university for four years. The cost to support one student annually is $5,400. Local churches may provide full or partial scholarships. Endowment Fund –Give to the Africa University Endowment Fund (World Service Special Gift #03-01-88). The interest income from the endowment is used to provide scholarships for our students. Africa University is supported by congregations and individuals across The United Methodist Church. Let’s work together to continue the transformation of lives and of Africa. For more information, please contact: Africa University Development Office P.O. Box 340007 Nashville, TN 37203-0007 (615) 340-7438 (phone) (615) 340-7290 (fax) audevoffice@gbhem.org www.support-africauniversity.org

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Fall 2012

In this issue:

In West Michigan, AU Story Inspires Uncommon Generosity

Andra Stevens West Michigan Conference gift of $500,000 to build a welcome center at AU inspired an anonymous donor to match the contribution, increasing the gift to $1 million.

Central Congo Communicator Thanks AU Philip Brooks ‘I was learning how to lead; meanwhile, I was leading. … I am really a changed person after going to Africa University.’− Pierre T. Omadjela

Bishop Leontine T. C. Kelly Dies at 92

Compiled from various websites First African-American woman elected to the United Methodist episcopacy leaves a rich legacy of leadership.

U.S.–Zimbabwe Connection Offers Hope Pamela Crosby Steadfast support of Africa University illustrates South Carolina congregation’s ‘transformational partnerships.’

The World Is Her Parish

Elaine Jenkins The Rev. Dr. Martha Orphe expresses her love for Africa by investing in Africa University.

Pittsburgh in 2004. She arranged for the AU choir to perform in concert in the district. She also hosted the choir members in her home for a fabulous meal prepared by her parents, who traveled from Louisiana to do so. “It was one of the high points of my parents’ lives to meet those young, vibrant, engaging students from Africa University,” Orphe reflected. “The meeting was especially poignant for my dad because he had traced his roots to Ghana through DNA testing,” she continued. In 2010, Orphe was formally inducted into the Richard E. “Dick” Reeves Legacy Society because she has included Africa University in her estate plans. Orphe said, “I love Mother Africa, and I want to invest in her future. I firmly believe that the most effective way to do so is by investing in the higher education of Africa’s young women and men. Africa University is the perfect institution to allow me to do so.” Orphe’s dream for Africa University is that one day it will become the premiere university for all of Africa and produce the next generation of African leaders. The late Dr. Nancy M. Carruth inducts the Rev. Dr. Martha Orphe into the Richard E. “Dick” Reeves Legacy Society, September 2010.

—Elaine Jenkins, Africa University Development Office

Martha Marie Orphe’s ministry has taken her to every continent but Antarctica. She has visited 21 countries to date and has visited Africa University at least four times that she can recall. Orphe is the youngest of six children born to Joseph and Dolores Orphe. She and her siblings were reared in St. Martinville, La. She graduated with honors from St. Martinville Senior High School in 1977; she earned her bachelor of arts degree in religion and computer science from Clark College (Atlanta) in 1982; her master of divinity degree from Vanderbilt University (Nashville, Tenn.) in 1985; and her doctor of ministry degree from Wesley Theological Seminary (Washington, D.C.) in 1993. Orphe was ordained a deacon in the Louisiana Annual Conference in

1984 and an elder in the Western Pennsylvania Annual Conference in 1987. She served for more than 21 years in Western Pennsylvania, including seven years as district superintendent of the Pittsburgh District. In 2006, Orphe re-turned home to Louisiana to serve as the Conference Mission Zone director to supervise the rebuilding of 50 churches and communities in New Orleans and west Louisiana that were severely impacted by hurricanes Katrina and Rita. In the midst of her new ministry, grieved the death of her beloved mother, who died one week after Hurricane Katrina, and her beloved sister, who died two weeks after Hurricane Rita. Orphe currently serves as senior pastor of First Street Peck Wesley United Methodist Church and Williams Ross United Methodist Church located in New Orleans. Orphe has been actively engaged with Africa University since its inception in 1988. She has raised awareness, made friends and raised funds for the new university. Orphe was district superintendent when the General Conference of The United Methodist Church was held in

600412/50M

The World Is Her Parish

Celebrating the Connection between Africa University and United Methodist Congregations 100 Percent Support

Thank you for supporting Africa University through your 100 percent remittance of the Africa University Fund apportionment in 2011. Jurisdiction Total Support and Annual Conferences with 100 percent or more in 2011 (includes 2010 performance)

102% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 118.36% 102.86% 99.29% 100% 100% 100% 100% 151.51% 110.50%

2010 North Central Jurisdiction Dakotas East Ohio Illinois Great Rivers Iowa Minnesota Northern Illinois West Michigan West Ohio Wisconsin

100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 100% 133% 112.46% 110.34% 100%

2011

Northeastern Jurisdiction Baltimore-Washington Greater New Jersey New England New York Susquehanna Peninsula-Delaware Upper New York West Virginia Western Pennsylvania

100% 100% 100% 100% 99% 100% 100% 113.58% 114% 100.06% 110.87%

South Central Jurisdiction Central Texas 100% Louisiana 100.01% 100.04% North Texas 100.50% 100% Oklahoma Indian Missionary 100.05% 100% Southeastern Jurisdiction Florida Holston Kentucky North Carolina North Georgia Red Bird Missionary

100.02% 100%

100%

Western Jurisdiction Alaska United Methodist Desert Southwest

As Africa University celebrates 20 years of realized dreams, we look forward to your full support in 2012.

• Africa University is located in Old Mutare, Zimbabwe, and is the first fully accredited United Methodist–related educational institution on the African continent, established by action of the General Conference. • Africa University offers bachelor’s and master’s degree programs in six faculties of learning: agriculture and natural resources, education, health sciences, humanities and social sciences, management and administration and theology. The Institute of Peace, Leadership and Governance offers postgraduate diplomas and master’s programs.

Andra Stevens

all sectors, communities can make positive strides.” The West Michigan effort invests in Africa University’s ministry by providing affordable on-campus housing for visiting faculty, mission teams, clergy, youth and others who gather for seminars on topics ranging from food security to peacebuilding in Africa. “What is compelling is what the building is to be used for and how it fits into a ministry that is about strengthening reconciliation, nurturing leadership and shaping a new, more positive future,” said the Rev. Dr. Laurie Haller, the former Grand Rapids District superintendent, who served on the General Board of Higher Education and Ministry (GBHEM). Launched in June 2010, the campaign sent speakers out to share the Africa University story in pulpits and at other gatherings across the conference. Eric Mulanda, a theology student from the Democratic Republic of the Congo, itinerated in West Michigan and made presentations via Skype from Zimbabwe. Clergy and lay members of the conference visited the campus and returned to speak with knowledge and passion about the university. “You have to seize the moment, and this was that moment,” said Edwardson, who described the response of

Fall 2012

—Story by Andra Stevens, director of communications in the Africa University Development Office

individual donors as “just incredible.” Haller credits the success of the campaign to the deeply rooted mission culture among United Methodists in Michigan. The Grand Rapids District raised the majority of the funds, and the other five districts each pledged $20,000. Haller notes that the involvement of West Michigan’s district superintendents played a crucial role in the outcome. “There is a story to tell,” said Haller. “Africa University is a ministry that encompasses the four focus areas of our church. The Ubuntu Center project brought the whole conference together in mission in a way that we have not seen previously. Africa University isn’t just a name to us. It’s a ministry in which we have invested.” Going forward, Edwardson sees tremendous scope for growing West Michigan’s engagement with Africa University. “There is a huge opportunity to partner with West Michigan churches and educational institutions to further the success of Africa University on the continent,” said Edwardson.

In West Michigan, AU Story Inspires Uncommon Generosity

The Rev. Dr. Laurie Haller and the West Michigan delegation worked with AU staff to develop the Welcome Center plans in 2010.

Andra Stevens In June, United Methodist congregations in the West Michigan Conference surpassed their goal of $500,000 to build the Ubuntu Welcome/Gathering Center at Africa University. In an area that is just emerging from a decade of economic decline, United Methodists stretched themselves in giving. A layperson’s gift of $5,000, made from the floor of the annual conference event, took the campaign over its goal six months earlier than expected. An anonymous donor matched the conference’s $500,000, making $1 million available for the building and for equipment and furnishings. “West Michigan is making a statement of positive recognition of what Africa University has accomplished in its first 20 years of existence,” said Ed Edwardson, the campaign co-chair. “It speaks to our belief that Africa University truly can be a leader in transforming all of Africa. By providing ethical leadership for


AfricaUniversityToday Fall 2012 issue