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September-October issue 2019

Volume 3 issue no 5

Africa Surveyors The Leonardo: the tallest building in Africa

In this issue...... How technology is changing land surveying....pg 32

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Opinion: Setting architecture trends in Ghana ...pg 14

Things you need to know about quantity surveying....pg 38

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Africa Surveyors News l 2019

September-October issue l 2019


Contents Managing Editor

NEWS

PG 2-7

Francis David

Architects, developers cry foul over building approval delays

Editor-in-Chief Augustine Rang’ondi

Editor

NIQS unveils 5-storey office, seeks construction industry overhaul

GRAPHISOFT delivers award-winning ARCHICAD 23

Topcon introduces new technology advancements in inspection and Monitoring

Dorcas Kang’ereha

Writer

Violet Ambale Harriet Mkhaye Irene Joseph Innocent Momanyi

Architects should give up concrete say experts

Quantity Surveyors in Nigeria urged to uphold professional tenets

Sales Executives East Africa

Jimmy Mudasia Lydia Kamonya Caiser Momanyi Vincent Murono Sheila Ing’ayitsa

South Africa

Paul Nyakeri Sean Masangwanyi Lisa Brown Thembisa Ndlovu

Turkish mining firm to conduct aerial survey in Sudan, explore mines in Uzbekistan

Published by:

Nailex Africa Publishing P.O. Box 10109, 00100 Nairobi, Kenya.

Setting architecture trends in Ghana

FEATURES PG The Leonardo: Africa’s tallest building

Drone Guards: Securing high value assets, in Africa Airport Authority of India advocates BIM use for constructing new terminal at Guwahati International Airport

EVENTS PG 18-19

INDUSTRY REVIEW

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Regulations for the promotion and conduct of architectural competitions in Kenya

Rwanda to host Africa Drone Forum 2020

TECHNOLOGY

Nigeria

Emelda Njomboro Uche Maxwel

OPINION PG

European Aerial Survey Industry Association Launches at Intergeo 2019

PRODUCTS

PG

MicroSurvey introduces FieldGenius for Android

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How technology is changing land surveying

Pix4D: The Future of Drone Asset Inspection Software

INDUSTRY TIPS PG Things you need to know about quantity surveying

The Editor accepts letter and manuscripts for publication from readers all over the world. Include your name and address as a sign of good faith although you may request your name to be withheld from publication. We can reserve the right to edit any material submitted. Send your letters to: info@africaautomotivenews.com

Disclaimer:

Nailex Africa Publishing makes every effort to ensure the accuracy of the contents of its publications, but no warranty is made to such accuracy and no responsibility will be borne by the publisher for the consequences of actions based on information so published. Further, opinions expressed on interviews are not necessarily shared by Nailex Africa Publisher.

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News

Architects, developers cry foul over building approval delays affairs to a lack of good will to make sure the systems work as they should and lack of adequate human resources.“The construction e-permitting systems should not be hostage to political activities at the various county governments, the system should be run professionally and objectively with a plan for sustainability in the long run,” said Njendu. She said it was concerning that the frequency of technical meetings to discuss applications has The Architectural Association of Kenya (AAK) and the Kenya Developers Association (KPDA) have singled out Nairobi as the single biggest culprit

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rchitects and developers have blamed disruptions in the e-permitting system to inordinate delays in building approvals. While four counties (Nairobi, Mombasa, Kisumu and Kiambu) have automated approval systems, The Architectural Association of Kenya (AAK) and the Kenya Developers Association (KPDA) have singled out Nairobi as the single biggest culprit. “Nairobi County concerns us the most because of how many disruptions we’ve had this year,” said AAK President Mugure Njendu addressing members of the press. “The e-permitting system in a Nairobi County has been down recently, mostly in the end of July, whole of August and part of September, for close to two months. Earlier in the year, we experienced additional disruptions in Nairobi, Mombasa and Kisumu,” she said.

from Sh60.11 billion in a comparable period in 2018. These problems have been blamed for, among others, pushing up the cost of construction. “When it takes too long, it drives up the cost of doing business, and that cost, unfortunately ends up being passed on to the consumer. It makes a mockery, in the end, of the agenda of affordable housing,” said Anne Muchiri, a director with KPDA. The associations blamed the state of

These delays, the two associations say, affect revenue collection significantly with development approvals being the second leading revenue source for Nairobi. Njendu cited the Knight Frank Kenya Market Update report for the first half of 2019, which showed that the value of building plans approved in Nairobi County decreased to Sh48.54 billion in the first quarter of 2019, a 19.2% drop

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declined significantly in Nairobi.“The last technical meeting to the knowledge of the association was held 27th of June 2019. We are now in September. To date there are less than five meetings this year in comparison to previous years where meetings were held fortnightly,” she said. However, while Nairobi is in the eye of the storm, Mombasa lags not far behind. The AAK President gave the example of a member who submitted plans for a boundary wall whose approval is still pending, three months later.

Mugure Njendu, Architectural Association of Kenya (AAK) President

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NIQS unveils 5-storey office, seeks construction industry overhaul among others, which resulted in stunted growth of the Industry. He also noted that unclear delineation of professional functions among construction professions within the government was making massive corruption and incompetence to persist on projects with attendant negative consequences on the economy.

The NIQS president lamented the current practice in the construction industry where designers were also cost advisers, insisting that such a practice was not transparent and should be stopped if the nation truly wished to move forward

The Nigerian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (NIQS) has made a proposal for the establishment of the Construction Industry Development Board (CIDB) as a way to completely overhaul the nation’s construction industry. NIQS said the board would be comprised of experienced professionals in the construction industry to ensure the implementation of cross-cutting policies within the industry in Nigeria. The President of NIQS, Obafemi Onashile, made the submission in Abuja during the commissioning of the institute’s five-storey head office building located in Mabushi District, Abuja, as part of activities marking the institute’s 50th anniversary. Onashile said the construction industry in Nigeria faced challenges ranging from building collapse, injuries and deaths on construction sites, non-payment of contractors and consultants, housing deficit, high cost of construction, shortage of artisans,

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The NIQS president lamented the current practice in the construction industry where designers were also cost advisers, insisting that such a practice was not transparent and should be stopped if the nation truly wished to move forward. He said quantity surveyors should be mandated and allowed to undertake cost management of projects of all forms on behalf of government (be they refineries, roads and bridges, marine and harbour works, airport runways and terminal buildings), while engineers should be compelled to focus and deliver on designs and implementation of projects. The NIQS boss also said procurement and construction standards were being bastardised and were out of tune with international global standards and best practices. Shedding light on the journey so far, Onashile said NIQS recently signed reciprocity agreement with the Canadian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (CIQS) as part of strategic reforms that the institute was undergoing. He further said with the endorsement by international quantity survey institutions across the globe, NIQS was now at par with global standards and its members were now acceptable for employment anywhere in the world. The Chairman of the occasion, Gen. TY Danjuma (Rtd), while unveiling the NIQS head office building, applauded the institute for promoting professionalism in the construction industry. Activities that took place during the celebration included the presentation of the NIQS history book, as well as an anniversary dinner and awards ceremony.

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News

Architects should give up concrete say experts

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xperts and activists at the Architecture of Emergency climate summit in London have called upon architects to fight climate change by ditching concrete. “If you came here with the hope of one clear action for what you can do in the office tomorrow – stop it with the concrete,” said Maria Smith, founder of architecture studio Interrobang, who gave a keynote speech. “We don’t have to wait to solve every single problem in order to start something today.” Over 10 speakers took to the stage at the Barbican to give short presentations and join a panel discussion asking how the architecture industry can respond to climate change. Architecture Foundation Deputy Director and Dezeen columnist Phineas Harper said the summit was the “largest gathering of architects to discuss climate change in the UK”. Concrete a major carbon emissions culprit The four billion tonnes of cement produced each year for concrete construction accounts for eight per cent of the total global carbon dioxide emissions. “If we invented concrete today, nobody would think it was a good idea,” said Michael Ramage, an architectural engineer and University of Cambridge academic. “We’ve got this liquid and you need special trucks, and it takes two weeks to get hard. And it doesn’t even work if you don’t put steel in it,” he added, suggesting timber is a much more environmentally sound alternative. “We have an incredible industry that produces concrete and rebar. We don’t have that infrastructure for trees anymore.”

shouldn’t be considered sustainable argued Andrew Waugh, co-founder of Waugh Thistleton. “We have BREEAM and LEED that look to control or reduce the amount of carbon at construction puts into the atmosphere, but this is measured over a period of 50 years,” said Waugh. “If you build a building now it’s in 50 years time when the carbon is measured from that building,” he continued. “We don’t have 50 years.” Targets could be met with timber In order to meet the EU’s target of cutting emissions by 40% for 2030, even sustainably-rated concrete buildings are hindering progress. The only material that has a lower embodied energy level is timber, which locks in the carbon it transforms into oxygen as the plant grows.

“We don’t have 50 years” As concrete buildings can last a long time they can have low levels of embodied energy over their lifetimes.

Encouraging architects to switch to timber-framed buildings has rattled the cement and concrete industry, which has taken out adverts warning about the supposed dangers of timber buildings.

However, these buildings that release a large amount of carbon during the building process meaning that they

“We must be doing something right because, much like the tobacco industry in the 1980s and 1990s, Big Concrete is

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beginning to fight back,” added Waugh. Waugh Thistleton Architects has been pioneering housing developments built using cross-laminated timber frames, and experimenting with methods of high-rise timber construction. “We must fundamentally shift our model” Even with the housing crisis being faced by the UK, concrete should not be used as a short-term solution agreed Louise Wyman of Homes England. “We’ve got to move away from cement,” she said. Along with calls to end building with concrete, the summit speakers called for a radical overhaul of the systems that cause environmental damage while enriching the richest one per cent. “Incrementalism is dead,” said Greenpeace activist Danielle Paffard. “There’s no time for fannying around the edges.” “We must fundamentally shift our model for all relationships, from one of domination towards a model based on sharing on co-operation,” concluded Smith. “Substitution is not enough – we must think and act differently.”

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Quantity Surveyors in Nigeria urged to uphold professional tenets

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lhaji Murtala Aliyu, the President, Quantity Surveyors Registration Board of Nigeria (QSRBN), has called on Quantity Surveyors to uphold the tenets of the profession to promote the growth of the country. Aliyu made the call at the investiture ceremony of the 11th Chairman of FCT Chapter of the board and induction of Senate Members of Nigerian Institute of Quantity Surveyors (NIQS), on Sunday in Abuja. Aliyu, who was Chairman of the occasion, described Quantity Survey as a young profession when compared with others in the country. According to him, the profession in Nigeria will clock 50 years in July and can be seen as young as

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it is anywhere else in the world. “It is a special year for the NIQS and also special year for the FCT chapter of NIQS also known as (Unity chapter), which just clocked 25 years. “We have a lot of events lined up and NIQS will have to carry a lot of the weight of the programme for celebration

of the golden jubilee of the Institute. “We must always look at things from shared competence and professionalism to elect our leaders and we must carry this to all levels of our society, to achieve meaningful growth.”

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News

Turkish mining firm to conduct aerial survey in Sudan, explore mines in Uzbekistan

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urkey has launched two separate projects to search for mines in Uzbekistan and Sudan following the acquisition of mining licenses in both countries. While the General Directorate of Mineral Research and Exploration (MTA) has already begun operations in Uzbekistan, an aerial geophysical survey will be conducted in Sudan in November and December. Turkey, which obtained mining exploration licenses in Sudan and Uzbekistan following instructions issued by Energy and Natural Resources Minister Fatih DĂśnmez, has accelerated its activities in the target regions. Geophysical studies will be carried out in these countries to determine areas where mineral reserves are concentrated. The first study was launched in Uzbekistan as the MTA team and aircraft began doing

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measurements on Aug. 23. The planes will scan approximately 20,000 square kilometers at three licensed sites. The work is scheduled to be completed within 30 days, depending on technical and weather conditions. The aerial geophysical study in Sudan will be carried out in November and December due to local seasonal conditions. MTA’s two licensed areas are estimated to be scanned in a month with flights covering approximately 15,000 square kilometers. Activities in Uzbekistan and Sudan will provide Turkey with overseas mining experience. Thanks to its experience and recognition, similar demands from other countries may increase. Aerial geophysical studies, which play a key role in determining the potential of mines,

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are said to provide the fastest results in this regard. Aerial work is said to be 100 times shorter and 29 times cheaper, while Turkey is currently among the seven or eight countries that can carry out the whole process alone. Aerial geophysical studies will provide a clear view of the geology of the region and identify the reserve-intensive areas, thus narrowing the list of sites. Maps to be prepared using the data to be obtained will ensure pinpoint drilling. Meanwhile, aerial geophysical studies have begun with the integration of the necessary devices, sensors and equipment into two Cessna Grand Caravan EX aircraft. With this project, areas for radioactive raw materials and rare earth elements were identified and brought to the MTA in eight locations in a small part of a 1/100,000 sheet. So far, 920,000 square kilometers have been scanned.

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Airport Authority of India advocates BIM use for constructing new terminal at Guwahati International Airport

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ith a strong focus on innovation and use of advanced technology, Airport Authority of India (AAI) has identified BIM (Building Information Modeling) as the design and planning platform for construction of the New Integrated Terminal Building (NITB) of Lokpriya Gopinath Bordoloi International Airport in Guwahati. The new 90,000 Sqmts terminal, will have 64 check-in counters, 20 self-check-in desks, eight Immigration counters, eight custom counters, six arrival carousels, 10 escalators, 25 elevators, 16 self-baggage drop counters and 20 aircraft parking bays. Architecture Firm, Design Forum International (DFI) and AECOM, a premier, fully integrated global infrastructure firm have leveraged Autodesk BIM solution, Revit to design the NITB of the airport. Autodesk Revit will help to enhance collaboration of the entire project team– from design, fabrication, and construction to operations and maintenance – to make informed decisions from a common point of understanding. The cloud-based Collaboration for Revit service provides centralized access to Revit models, and let project team members at multiple sites co-author Revit models regardless of their physical location. This cloud-enabled work-sharing also let team members see each other’s work and communicate with one another in real time. DFI has taken inspiration from the mythological figure, Icarus to create the unique design of this new terminal, ensuring seamless and state of the art infrastructure for generations to come.

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DFI has designed the NITB with a 4-Star GRIHA rating parameter. The focus on sustainability was imbibed right at the design inception stage by inter-weaving the built form with the outdoor environment. The indoor forest is a physical manifestation of this approach –it is separated by a glass wall from the more massive outdoor forest, fitting into a groove with the terminal building and becoming an integral part of the overall built structure. The car park structures are designed to be covered with photovoltaic panels that generate almost 500 KW of solar energy. Shri A.K Pathak, Member Planning, Airport Authority of India (AAI) said, “Today, India is going through major infrastructural development and transformative projects which will be the key success drivers of this phenomenon. The aviation sector is growing at a rapid pace where modern airports are being planned across the country. We need modern technologies to fuel this growth and build the infrastructure of the future. Some of the best airports worldwide have used advanced technologies like BIM and we believe it’s the right time for India to adopt this industry best practice to realize the country’s vision in infrastructure development.”

Commenting on this development, Mr Sunil MK, Head of Architecture, Engineering and Construction (AEC) at Autodesk, India & SAARC said, “With the decision to use BIM on such a massive infrastructure project, Airport Authority of India is fueling a paradigm change in the future of construction. We, at Autodesk, are excited to be part of this project as the technology provider. Our cuttingedge BIM platform, will enable better design and construction efficiency, lower cost and less negative impact on the environment.” Anand Sharma, Partner, Design Forum International, said, “We conceptualized the design for the new terminal with an intent to enhance the experience and engagement of travelers. With the focus on contextual relevance, we infused the flavors of Assam in the overall design aesthetics. We firmly believe that after completion, this new terminal will set a high benchmark for various upcoming airport infrastructure projects in other parts of the country.” From design collaboration, documentation and reviews, to preconstruction, through quality, safety and operations, Autodesk BIM connects the people, data and workflows in construction projects. With hundreds of people working on the site each day, communication at scale is key. It will enable all the parties to review the master model, see each other’s concerns; clashing elements; inaccurate or missing design elements; and critical zones both for coordination and installation.

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Product

MicroSurvey introduces FieldGenius for Android

FieldGenius continues to be the world’s premier third-party, brand-neutral data collection software choice amongst surveyors FieldGenius continues to be the world’s premier thirdparty, brand-neutral data collection software choice amongst surveyors

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participate in the newly created MicroSurvey Technology Innovation Group (M.T.I.G). Contact your MicroSurvey representative for details on how you can help shape the future of FieldGenius.

icroSurvey Software Inc. is proud to announce the release of FieldGenius for Android version 1.0. This first release of our new multiplatform field software is built on the Android platform and supports most popular GNSS sensors on the market today. FieldGenius continues to be the world’s premier third-party, brand-neutral data collection software choice amongst surveyors. This new release builds on decades of innovation MicroSurvey has invested into the original FieldGenius software, providing users with an easy to use and intuitive mobile data collection software package for the next generation. We’ve added new dynamic data panels synchronized with the map views. This fresh user interface provides familiarity for existing FieldGenius users while offering new tools, simplified workflows and readily available data that surveyors require at the point of work to make informed decisions in the field. Designed for Surveyors around the globe “Surveyors, dealers, and distributors from every corner of the world have been demanding an Android based version of MicroSurvey FieldGenius for years.“ said Marc Veinotte, Global Sales and OEM

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Manager at MicroSurvey. “ This is the first release of our new multi-platform field data collection software that will provide a consistent user experience across a wide cross section of data collection devices. MicroSurvey continues its hardware neutrality strategy offering support for almost every brand of popular and upcoming GNSS receiver on the market today.” Early adopters of FieldGenius for Android will receive additional benefits and

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About MicroSurvey MicroSurvey, part of Hexagon, is a world leader in software development, providing market specific solutions and services for surveyors, engineers, public safety and mapping professionals. Specializing in the development of industry specific solutions since 1985, MicroSurvey produces mobile software for use with total stations and GPS, as well as a full complement of desktop solutions to increase efficiency and productivity in the office. From single user applications to country wide government implementations, MicroSurvey solutions are used around the globe for Land Surveying, Engineering, Mapping, Law Enforcement, Forensic and Accident Reconstruction.

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Product

GRAPHISOFT delivers award-winning ARCHICAD 23 The latest version of ARCHICAD delivers unprecedented software responsiveness, advanced modeling capabilities for prefabricated structures, and best-in-class multidisciplinary workflows

GRAPHISOFT, a Building Information Modeling software solution provider for architects and designers has announced the global rollout of ARCHICAD 23. The latest version of ARCHICAD delivers unprecedented software responsiveness, advanced modeling capabilities for prefabricated structures, and best-inclass multidisciplinary workflows. In particular, ARCHICAD 23 significantly improves the speed of the most essential daily processes such as software startup, file opening, working in multi-project environments and navigating between different views of the BIM project; the brand-new Opening, Column and Beam tools increase modeling accuracy and interoperability with engineering disciplines.

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Based on the introduction of ARCHICAD 23 in June and enthusiastic AEC industry feedback, ARCHICAD 23 has won the 2019 Architect’s Newspaper ‘Best of Products’ award in the Tech: Design Tools category as well as the 2019 AIA ‘Best of Show’ awards.

“Just finished working my way through the ARCHICAD 23 new features list and yes, I am impressed. In a way, the list of features is close to reading my ARCHICAD wish list,” said Kevin Lee, Associate Director (BIM), Tonkin Zulaikha Greer Architects.

“We are proud that ARCHICAD 23 has generated so much excitement among AEC technology analysts,” said Akos Pfemeter, Vice President for Global Marketing at GRAPHISOFT. “Their feedback helps us continue to do what we do: develop best-in-class software solutions for architects and designers. Even more so, we are thrilled with the enthusiastic endorsements from our customers!”

Effective today, the International, US, UK and Ireland, German, and Austrian localized packages are available for download on the official download site. Customers worldwide can contact local ARCHICAD resellers for specific language shipping dates for each of the 27 localized packages that will become available during the remainder of 2019.

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Topcon introduces new technology advancements in inspection and Monitoring new Delta Link version two provides communications support for Topcon autonomous construction and structural health monitoring in the field. Options include Ethernet, Wi-Fi, and a globally approved integrated cellular modem. The system manages each power source, maximizing system availability.

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opcon Positioning Group announces advancements in its inspection and monitoring portfolio designed to ensure longer term health of buildings and infrastructure assets. Among the improvements announced at INTERGEO 2019 include new flight planning software for the Topcon rotarywing UAV; mass data photogrammetry processing integration capabilities, as well as the release of Delta Link version two, the new command console for the Topcon construction and structural health monitoring system. “Inspection, assessment and monitoring (IAM) is a crucial cycle to ensure the integrity of building assets. Topcon IAM solutions help to keep assets in operation, providing intuitive tools for site engineers to perform inspection and if any concerns are detected, a monitoring program can be implemented. The integrated approach ensures maximum performance of the infrastructure assets in a safe environment for operators and the public,” said Ian Stilgoe, vice president GeoPositioning Europe, Topcon Positioning Group. New Intel Mission Control Software is designed to facilitate automated flight planning, managing missions, and data handling for the Topcon rotary-wing UAV offering. The software is designed to increase accuracy with advanced mapping features that allow site engineers performing aerial inspections to easily set

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“If concerns are discovered during inspection and analysis, operators can take advantage of the monitoring system to provide deeper understanding of the asset and improve safety,” said Stilgoe. “The system allows data from robotic total stations, GNSS receivers, leveling devices and a variety of geotechnical and structural sensors to monitor and ensure structural health.

project parameters and prepare missions using presets for 2D areas like polygons, corridors and city grids, as well as 3D structures like towers, buildings and facades.

“Advanced long-term structural health maintenance is becoming more and more critical due to an aging infrastructure, increasing population, growing urban environments and a need for more housing. Always one step ahead, Topcon is committed to delivering the innovations and integrated workflows, such as IAM, that transform the way we build and maintain infrastructure,” said Stilgoe.

UAV operators can also take advantage of new cloud-based photogrammetry processing, powered by Bentley ContextCapture, in the MAGNET Collage Web 2 service for publication, sharing, and analysis of data. The integration allows users who share and collaborate with scanning and mesh datasets to process and add UAV photos directly to the environment. The cloud-based approach is designed to ensure that stakeholders have direct access to UAV and inspection analysis of their assets without the need to install software or have a high-performance computer. The

About Topcon Positioning Group Topcon Positioning Group, always one step ahead in technology and customer benefits, is an industry leading designer, manufacturer and distributor of precision measurement and workflow solutions for the global construction, geospatial and agriculture markets. Topcon Positioning Group is headquartered in Livermore, California, U.S. (topconpositioning.com, LinkedIn, Twitter, Facebook). Its European head office is in Capelle a/d IJssel, the Netherlands. Topcon Corporation (topcon.com), founded in 1932, is traded on the Tokyo Stock Exchange (7732).

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Opinion

Nana Akua Birmeh, Founder and CEO ARCHXENUS

Setting architecture trends in Ghana one building at a time A graphic designer turned architect, she launched ArchXenus in 2011

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he founder of Ghana’s first womenled architecture firm, Nana Akua Birmeh, held onto this belief during the difficult first years of her venture. A graphic designer turned architect, she launched ArchXenus in 2011. Although there were many sceptics at the time, the firm grew along with the country’s economy. In 2017 ArchXenus designed 53 projects with a total budget of about $140 million. Like law firms and private attorneys, architecture firms are not allowed to advertise in Ghana, but Birmeh is happy for their buildings to speak for them, saying, “Isn’t a building a far bigger billboard than any other?” Nowadays ArchXenus is known not only for their designs but also for the company’s ‘child-friendly’ offices where it’s not unusual to see a toddler running down the passage with a nanny hot on their heels. (There is an on-site nursery and an area where older children can do their homework after school.) “The inclusive office is not a rejection of men. We are simply filling a gap. Having to care for your children while working is something women and men have to do,” Birmeh says.

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Ghana’s economic growth has slowed somewhat since 2017. “Business has generally been rough for everyone from the contractor to the supplier to the client,” Birmeh says. “It has affected clients’ ability to pay on time and the usual stream of clientele is no longer in a position to start or finish projects.” Therefore Birmeh has begun to look outside Ghana and to form longer-term relationships. “We now offer a package that goes beyond the basics and which builds a rapport with each client. They pay less, but we get more value and it’s consistent.” While breaking glass ceilings and winning awards like the 2018 Africa Women Innovation and Entrepreneurship Forum Award in the Creative Industry category, Birmeh has another aim: “We don’t have any architectural firm in Ghana that has outlived its founder. It is sad. I want ArchXenus to be different, to outlive me and the people working here. Our children’s children should be able to see a thriving company that was built on the hard work of their mothers’ mothers and fathers’ fathers.”

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Events

Rwanda to host African Drone Forum and Flying Competitions in February 2020

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he Government of Rwanda announced at the World Economic Forum in Cape Town today that it will host the African Drone Forum 2020 (ADF 2020) and its associated flying competitions in February 2020. The announcement also confirmed commitment from the World Bank and the World Economic Forum, along with UKAID/DfID, Danida, the Republic of Korea, the World Food Programme and UNICEF as partners, alongside a network of African grassroots drone organizations and NGOs. ADF 2020 follows the Lake Victoria Challenge Trial and Symposium, held in Mwanza, Tanzania in October 2018. The inaugural event brought together close to 300 participants from 23 countries and saw 34 flights from five different drone teams, prompting research into new use-cases for unmanned aerial systems in the region. “Increasing drone use in Africa can not only bring great benefits to business, agriculture and the health sector but quite

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literally save lives by taking deliveries off the roads and into the sky,” says Timothy Reuter, head of aerospace and drones at the World Economic Forum. The World Bank, a key partner in the ADF 2020, has recognized that transport and particularly cross-border connectivity is a key enabler to future economic growth, poverty reduction and shared prosperity in East Africa, and that drones can play a large role in this. “The African Drone Forum will open and test the minds of engineers, regulators, entrepreneurs, and investors. The flying competitions will promote new industries and services, harness data for delivery and resilience, create activity hubs and opportunities to leapfrog technologies, and develop skill sets for 21st century jobs in the region and beyond. This will promote the skies above Africa as a valuable resource and technologies to help build sustainable infrastructure,” says Riccardo Puliti, the Global Director of the World Bank’s Energy and Extractive Industries Global Practice and the Regional Director for the Infrastructure

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department in the Africa region. “We are excited to host the Africa Drone forum, a platform that will bring together policy makers, drones enthusiasts, experts and industry leaders to explore potential use-case applications for UAV technology on the African Continent. It’s an opportunity for Rwanda to share our experience in pioneering the use of Beyond Visual Line Of Sight (BVLOS) UAV operations, and the development of drone regulations,” says Hon. Paula Ingabire, Minister of ICT and Innovation, Rwanda. She continues: “These discussions will provide a framework for policies needed to enable the safe deployment of drone technologies. We welcome industry players looking to deploy innovative drone applications that respond to global challenges.”

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European Aerial Survey Industry Association Launches at Intergeo 2019 Intergeo will see the official introduction of the European Association of Aerial Surveying Industries (EAASI). Aerial survey companies, equipment manufacturers, software developers and service providers from within the aerial surveying industry in Europe are being invited to join the newly established association at a reception event being held at Intergeo in Stuttgart, Germany. The reception event takes place at 1600, Wednesday 18th September, on the COWI stand Hall 1, Stand D1.007. With Craft beer and snacks on offer, visitors to will be able to meet with members of the EAASI Board, network with other players and interested parties from the industry

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and learn more about the Association’s vision and ambitions. “Representing the European aerial surveying industry in all its facets we want to promote the use of aerial survey data through education, ensure the highest possible standards within the sector, increase the influence of the industry and serve as a platform for communication and cooperation to enact positive change,” commented Simon Musäus, President of EAASI. “We can only achieve these goals if we come together as an industry with unified objectives and a single voice.” Visitors to Intergeo are encouraged to attend the launch event which will

also see the presentation of the initial working groups being established by the Association. These include European Projects, Education, Standards and Certification and Air Traffic Control. Rachel Tidmarsh, Treasurer of EAASI, added, “We will also be using this introduction at Intergeo to announce the European Aerial Summit which will take place in Brussels on the 3rd – 5th December 2019. Incorporating a member and observer conference, working group sessions as well as the Association’s AGM, we expect this event to fill up fast so interested parties are encouraged to sign up as soon as possible.”

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Events Similar in concept to MAPPS (the national association of firms in the surveying, spatial data and geographic information systems fields) in the US, EAASI was incorporated in June, followed by the first Association Board meeting. In attendance were Simon Musäus, Senior Vice President, COWI and EAASI President, André Jadot, CEO of Eurosense and Vice President and Rachel Tidmarsh, Managing Director of Bluesky International and Treasurer together with Giovanni Banchini, President and CEO of CGR SPA, Aicke Damrau, Managing Director of GeoFly, Klaus Legat, Area Manager for Vermessung AVT and Florian Romanowski, President of OPEGIEKA. The European Association of Aerial Surveying Industries is an incorporated association without profitable goal registered in Brussels, Belgium. The objectives of the organisations are: Make users and potential users of GeoInformation aware of the benefits of aerial surveying; Achieve a high awareness of the strategic role that aerial survey data play in the framework of digitalization, information systems and virtual reality; Define, maintain and promote quality, safety, ethical and business requirements for the aerial surveying industry; Promote the use of international professional standards in the field of gathering geospatial data; Facilitate the networking and provide a platform for regular contacts, information exchange and cooperation between the members; Provide members with information about the developments of technological knowledge;

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Ensure that the common interests of members are represented in national and international committees which exert influence on the members; Advise and assist funding and executing agencies and organisations in matters concerning aerial surveying; Promote the generation of a sustainable market for Geo-Information using aerial surveying; Take all other actions as may be conducive to the attainment of the above objectives, such as concluding agreements, engaging personnel, hiring, leasing, buying and selling property. The Association is comprised of members and observers. Qualifying members must be: 1. Be based and create employment in any the following countries: Albania, Armenia, Austria, Azerbaijan, Belarus, Belgium, Bosnia & Herzegovina, Bulgaria, Croatia, Cyprus, Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Georgia, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Iceland, Ireland, Italy, Kosovo, Latvia,

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Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, Moldova, Montenegro, North Macedonia, Norway, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Russia, Serbia, Slovakia, Spain, Sweden, Switzerland, The Netherlands, Turkey, Ukraine, United Kingdom; 2. Be a privately owned commercial company. ‘Privately owned’ means that the majority of the shares (>50%) are in private hands. 3. Operate survey aircraft and equipment for aerial photography, mapping and/or Lidar purposes in one or more of the countries mentioned under point (1) 4. The member or member organisation shall fully support the goal and the objects of the Association. Any organisation that does not qualify to become a member of the Association may apply as an observer.

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Cover Feature The Sandton skyline-defining skyscraper, the Leonardo, is the tallest building in Africa. The R3billion project, developed by 75 on Maude, a Legacy Group and Nedbank partnership, has already surpassed the former stand-out in Sandton, The Michelangelo. At 233m with 55 floors, it also beats the 201m architectural height of the Carlton’s Centre, previously the tallest building in South Africa.

The Leonardo: Sandton skyscraper is the tallest building in Africa

Coined as the pinnacle of luxury living in Africa’s richest square mile the Leonardo is intended to symbolise a beacon of hope in a trying economic climate in South Africa. Only local contractors and labour were employed on the project with each individual leaving their own uniquely South African stamp on the building. According to Jamie Hendry, Director at Legacy Development Management, this allows the Leonardo to radiate its own soul. Each visitor will, therefore, have a unique emotional journey during their time at the Leonardo. Hendry said, “Whether you’re walking through the art-filled public spaces, absorbing the ultimate lifestyle experience on level seven or the magnificent unobstructed views with a drink at the sky bar, the Leonardo will create unforgettable memories for many generations of South Africans”.

Estimating and controlling the cost of developing tall buildings is no easy feat,” said South African Association of Quantity Surveyors (ASAQS) member, Steven Schneid from S.M. Schneid Quantity Surveyors.

The Legacy Group is known for its proud South African heritage and its investments in the country’s construction sector during times when others weren’t willing or able to take the same risks.

Features of the Leonardo The development includes two levels of public areas off the street linked by an escalator to an interactive lobby space which will be home to the reception area for the 230 apartments which rise up to the 41st level, penthouse suites with their own gardens and 7 500 m2 of sectional title offices. The building will also feature a landscaped gardens, restaurants, a bar, a crèche, a gym and a spa which will be

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linked by shuttle lifts directly into the parking garage. Legacy developments have bought 10 floors in the building where they plan to establish a luxury hotel in the future. Above the development floors there are eight penthouses and the Leonardo suite, reaching from the 49th to the 55th levels. In addition the building will also feature 1 900 m2 under-roof living space and 1 300 m2 of outdoor patios and gardens, with a 20 m lap pool and gym area.

Cost control for a skyline defining project “Estimating and controlling the cost of developing tall buildings is no easy feat,” said South African Association of Quantity Surveyors (ASAQS) member, Steven Schneid from S.M. Schneid Quantity Surveyors. “The initial capital cost estimate – which is vital in calculating the viability of the project at an early stage – could not be calculated based on data and information gathered from smaller projects. The nature of the development demanded detailed measurement on each specific floor. All calculations had to be done manually with more detail, fact-checking and number crunching than the team had ever encountered before,” said Schneid. The Quantity Surveying work started in 2015 with a number of amendments to the initial estimate. Schneid said, “We started by preparing mini bills of quantities for each aspect of work and sent these out for quotes. This enabled the team to remain agile in finalising a cost estimate that met the viability requirements of the project”. The client made it clear at the outset that he wanted a world-class building design that was flexible enough to accommodate future changes. The tendering and negotiation phase demanded a coming together of the project team, contractors and subcontractors to ensure that the client received the best value for money during a tough time in the South African construction sector. “Understanding what is important to a client allows a QS to scrutinise costs

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Cover Feature and replace specified products for equivalent options that are more cost-effective while not sacrificing on quality and standards,” said Schneid. “Steven has been outstanding in all cost control aspects of the project. He has given a huge effort to the project and we have developed a relationship built on mutual trust. We truly value his dedication and effort throughout the project,” said Hendry. Hendry, who is also a Quantity Surveyor, says that Quantity Surveyors and the ASAQS – an organisation dedicated to upholding and elevating the status of Quantity Surveyors – will continue to play an increasingly important role. “Poor economic conditions, combined with all the changes and challenges in the local built environment, means that developers are looking for credible figures, accountability and reliable cost management. Experienced Quantity Surveyors are well-versed to manage this function,” concluded Hendry.

The female architects behind The Leonardo-Africa’s tallest building Co-Arc International Architects director Catharine Atkins and architect Malika Walele are the leading women behind the project which features luxury residential apartments, offices, shopping stores, restaurants and lifestyle recreation areas. According to TimesLIVE writer Alex Patrick, “The thought of an allwoman architect team doesn’t sound groundbreaking until you consider only 21-percent of South Africa’s registered architectural professionals are women, according to the SA Institute of Architects in the Eastern Cape.” However, women architects must not only battle numbers but also harassment from the predominately male construction teams they work with every day. And the international community isn’t doing much better.

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According to the Architect’s Council of Europe, women make up only only 31% registered professionals, and only 20% of the US professionals are women, according to the National Associates Committee Report. Unfortunately, our women architects are battling a lot more than just minority numbers. Atkins, a founding partner of Co-Arc, with 23 years of experience under her belt, said her female architects battle harassment from the predominantly male construction teams they work with. Walele has worked at the site for the last two-and-a-half years. Despite her position on the team she’s had to stare down groups of men making inappropriate comments, turn down unwanted advances and shrug off sexism from some of the 2,000 workers at the site. “It can get to you and affect your work at times if you don’t deal with it. Being

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assertive and dealing with these incidents is crucial for women, as this behaviour is typical of all construction sites all around the world,” Walele said. Despite this Walele said she would encourage women to work in the industry. “I love being on site, and the growth trajectory is huge. So much more than being in an office. “I’d encourage any woman to do this. Unfortunately many women architects don’t believe they can, because it is so male dominated.” There may be one upside to the inappropriate attitudes of her colleagues. Walele has noticed a shift in attitude from the foremen and managers on site who’ve witnessed the behaviour towards her first hand. “It has opened their eyes and made them

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more sensitive and appreciative of the challenges women face, and may have a positive impact on the treatment of women on sites in future.” “Once men become aware, it is easier to deal with incidents, and to confront someone if you need to.” Atkins, the only woman among three male partners, said it has taken time for attitudes to shift outside the office. “Yes, over the years you move your way up and you make yourself heard, and you secure the right to lead, but it’s a constant push,” she said. So Atkins wanted to make a statement with her all woman team at The Leonardo. For Walele, the Co-Arc team “is proof that women can change cities and create buildings that will be the tallest in Africa. “I’ve never understood why architecture needs to be a male-dominated industry. Women are more than capable of doing this. It’s frustrating that more women in the industry aren’t doing it.”

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Feature

Drone Guards: Securing high value assets, in Africa With crime constantly on the rise, securing high value assets is a focus in every industry

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ssets form the most crucial part of a company’s balance sheet, which is why so much effort is put into extending their operational lives. Regular inspection, maintenance, and repair activities help in increasing the lifespan of assets, and prevent any operational hiccups.

Surveillance Security Services through its brand Drone Guards, and General Drone Services through its brands, Media Star and UAV Aerial Works, Nationally throughout South Africa. In 2020 the strategy is to enter the African Market.

The task of asset inspection requires a large skilled workforce to identify anomalies and raise alarms as required. However, many industries are facing the challenge of a fast-aging workforce, with next-to-none skilled replacements available.

Commercial use of the drone technology is now on the rise. In 2017, the global commercial drone market was worth EUR 3.1 billion, with some three million units shipped. By 2022, the market value could hit as much as EUR 12.6 bn, with over 15 m units shipped. This boom is the result of growing recreational, business and research use. It’s now common

UAV Aerial Works delivers Aerial

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Drone technology

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for real estate agents to take aerial footage of houses, for example, while conservationists use them to monitor wildlife. And who hasn’t contemplated the thought of a journey in an unmanned drone taxi? In general, drones are expected to become prominent in all use cases that meet the so-called 4D criteria: dull, dirty, distant, dangerous. This makes them a great fit in the field of asset inspection, mainly in the energy and transportation sectors.

High Resolution Thermal Cameras: Securing high value assets is a focus in every industry. With crime constantly on the rise, South African businesses have

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to be one step ahead of the criminals. High resolution thermal cameras are used for night aerial surveillance missions patrolling farms, commercial precincts, mines, construction sites etc. The real time thermal footage enables security teams on the ground to identify suspect activity and can be used to track individuals, alerting ground crews of exact whereabouts, even if the individuals are concealing themselves in high grass. These images can also be used for evidence in legal cases. Thermal imaging can be used to monitor assets such as solar cells and panels, where quality controls before installation and regular predictive maintenance inspections after the panel has been installed, are an efficient and cost effective solution. In fire-fighting, drones fitted with a thermal camera can show operators where the hotspots are, and allow them to see through smoke and in lower light conditions. The thermal camera can allow operators to monitor rescue crews ensuring operational safety. The drone can be equipped with a spotlight or a speaker to aid in the rescue process. Post fires, drones can aid in the critical work of assessing the damage, whether it be from a fire or a natural disaster.

some of the more accessible ones:

Object Counting

Very effective, and industry dependent, specific commercially available applications process data obtained through a drone flight. The data outputs can then be used in various ways to drive outcomes. Counting trees or livestock through the use of a drone, can save time and can be more accurate.

Inspection & Insurance

Drone mapping is a powerful new tool for inspection of assets, safely and easily capturing of high-resolution aerial view of a site in minutes. The applications in the insurance industry can be broken down into three main uses: 1) Underwriting, 2) Loss Adjusting 3) Annual Policy Renewals. Inspecting a new building or investigating an insurance claim, it is important to capture accurate data quickly. The underwriter or/or insurer can then easily analyse reconstructions of sites, make measurements and share comments to aid better and faster decisions.

Surveys from the Sky

By using drones for asset inspection, industries can save time, efforts, and costs, while delivering improved results. There are many applications where drones can be used. However, here are

The most common use drones in agriculture is mapping, surveying and crop variability detection. The aerial perspective that drones offer reduces the need to

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Agriculture

do row by row manual checks on crop health. Data from drone flights can be configured to show the number of crops, and some are even sophisticated enough to show a plant’s height. Software is also improving to allow aerial counting of livestock, which saves the farmer time and money. Maximize yields and reduce costs with drone data.

Africa Market “We believe it is not a matter of if industry-wide adoption will happen, but rather when,” said UAV Aerial Works’ MD, Bertus van Zyl. Moreover, there is no discussion where stakeholders don’t admit that drone technology in their industry is a must when it comes to managing their assets. The regulations are still making some drone services unaffordable for some businesses because of the human element required to legally and safely operate the drone system (In South Africa at least). Ultimately Unmanned Aerial Vehicles will become integrated with commercial airspace and fully autonomous drone operations will become commonplace. With the accessibility of drones and a combination of technologies, including object avoidance technology, computer vision, artificial intelligence amongst others, embracing drones in the management of companies’ assets will ensure competitive advantage.

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Industry Review

Regulations for the promotion and conduct of architectural competitions in Kenya

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hese regulations for the promotion and conduct of architectural competitions in Kenya have been prepared by the Board of Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors in Kenya. The objective is to facilitate and provide developers with a comprehensive framework for the selection of consultants by Public and Private sector developers. Selection of appropriate consultants for any scale of project is an involving exercise and our regulations shall be useful to make the process enjoyable, effective and also fair to all participants. Our regulations have been provided in two volumes illustrated here below. Volume 1: Regulations for the promotion

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and conduct of architectural competitions in Kenya. Volume 2: Standard request for architectural competition proposals. Definitions a. Board: refers to the Board of Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors of Kenya P. O. Box 4086600100 Nairobi. b. Architect: refers to a person fully registered by the Board of Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors in Kenya as an architect with an up to date subscription membership. c. Firm: refers to a partnership or limited liability firm of Architects or Quantity Surveyors incorporated under the laws of Kenya and registered by the Board of

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Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors of Kenya. d. Consortium: refers to an association of various professional building consulting firms to provide professional services as a single entity. They shall be bound by a memorandum of understanding and the Architectural and Quantity Surveying firms within the consortium shall have been registered by the Board. REGULATIONS FOR THE PROMOTION AND CONDUCT OF COMPETITIONS 1. INTRODUCTION These Regulations have been drawn up to ensure that architectural competitions are properly conducted and that the

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selection of designs shall be on merit alone and shall satisfy a promoter’s requirements. The Board of Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors Code of Professional Conduct does not allow registered persons to give unpaid services in competition with each other except through competitions organised within the framework of these Regulations or competitions approved by the International Union of Architects or other approved professional organizations. 2. RESPONSIBILITIES OF REGISTERED PERSONS Registered persons have the responsibility of ensuring that competitions they take part in are conducted within the approved framework of the Board. Even where they have been invited to submit proposals in designs or ideas form they are only allowed to take part in a competition where a jury has been properly constituted. Where competitions are subjected to agreed regulations these must be filed with the Board for approval at least 30 days before the competition is published. 3. OUTLINE OF PROCEDURE Once competition assessors are appointed their function is to prepare instructions to competitors. Invitations are issued by the promoter and competitors apply for particulars. Designs are submitted anonymously and the assessors adjudicate and report to the promoter, who undertakes to accept the decision and to appoint the winner as architect/consortium for the work.

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4. TYPES OF COMPETITION Type 1: Pre-qualification from expression of interest. This is normally the first stage of a twotier process where a limited number of firms are selected from an initial large pool to go into the competition proper. It shall involve submission of an expression of interest limited to information about the firm or consortium aimed at showing the abilities of the bidder. The criteria and methods used to prequalify should be clearly described in the TOR. No designs shall be undertaken. An independent assessor approved by the BOARD must be incorporated into the selecting committee. The BOARD must also approve the cost of purchasing the bidding document by interested firms/ consortiums. Type 2: Technical Proposal Competition This type of competition that involves submission of Technical proposals is required to select a consultant from a range of firms/consortiums who are assumed are all capable to provide suitable design solutions. No actual designs or financial proposals shall be undertaken for this type of competition. It shall involve preparation by shortlisted 3-7 firms or consortiums to submit Technical and Financial proposals to be assessed on a scoring criterion already published in the terms of reference. No designs shall be submitted. The technical proposals shall be evaluated before the opening of financial proposals. The firm that scores highest

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Industry Review overall shall be awarded the commission. Type 3: Limited Design Competition This shall be a limited competition where the promoter of the project invites 3-7 prequalified firms/consortiums. They shall provide a design proposal within specified limits, sufficient to explain the scheme as required and a financial proposal. All the competitors shall be paid a standard participation premium fees outlined in the Terms of preference. A panel of assessors shall evaluate the designs and the financial proposal to determine the winner. The results of the competition shall be published and copied to all the bidders. An appropriate honorarium award is recommended to all participants while the overall winner is appointed and invited to negotiate a contract. Type 4: Open Design Competition; This shall be a publicly advertised competition with no limitation to participation. However, detailed curriculum vitae shall be required. There shall be a detailed terms of reference indicating the format of presentation, number of drawing, a brief summary report and time frame. The purpose of this type of competition is to identify the

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most suitable design scheme. There shall be prize money for at least the top three winners with amounts specified in the Terms of Reference. It is recommended that a public exhibition of the works be organized by the promoters. The assessors shall submit the results and award recommended to the winner. The submitting team shall own copyright of the designs unless paid an honorarium by the promoter that should be clearly indicated in the terms of reference. The board shall approve all open design competitions in the first instance. Type 5: Quality based selection: This shall be selection through interviewing a shortlist of 3-7 prequalified firms/consultium. The interview date, venue, time and assessment criteria shall be outlined clearly in the invitation terms of Reference. The interviewing panel shall consist of at least three assessors. 5. ASSESSORS The names of the assessors must appear in the competition terms of reference and in any advertisement relating to the competition. For technical submissions there should be at least 3 assessors who shall undertake assessment independently.

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(a) Since the success of a competition will depend largely upon the experience and ability of the assessors, these appointments require the greatest care. There should not be more than one lay assessor to two technically qualified assessors. It is unusual for a single assessor to be appointed but if such is the case, he must be technically qualified and to be free to recommend that other assessors be appointed to act with him. (b) The Chairman of the Board of Registration in consultation with the promoters will nominate assessors for appointment by the promoters. Assessors should, in the main, be architects, engineers or quantity surveyors of acknowledged standing but may also include a layman or laymen, which will enable them to contribute their specialised knowledge to the preparation of the competition brief. For more prestigious competitions, where two assessors are to be appointed, it is recommended that at least one of the assessors be selected from overseas. 6. DUTIES OF ASSESSORS The jury of assessors shall appoint one of their number as chairman. The duties of the assessors are as follows: (a) To take the promoter’s instructions and ascertain his requirements. The assessors should undertake any investigation or research that may be necessary to produce the programme, setting out the promoter’s requirements in the form of clear and detailed instructions to the competitors. (b) To advise the promoter on the type of competition to be held, the time to be allowed for submission of proposals or designs and the premiums which should be offered. (c) To draw up the competition conditions and to convey in detail the promoter’s requirements to competitors in the form of terms of reference for their guidance, this must incorporate the clauses of these Regulations applicable to the particular competition. In this connection, special care must be taken to state clearly which conditions and instructions are binding to the extent that disregard thereof would involve disqualification, and which are for guidance only. (d) To answer questions submitted to the promoter within a limited time by

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competitors and to advise the promoter as to the method and form of sending out answers. In a two stage competition it is open to assessors to issue a further statement to guide competitors in the final stage. (e) To examine all the technical proposals and/or designs submitted by competitors; to determine whether they conform to the bidding conditions and instructions and to exclude those which do not. (f) To make their Award in strict accordance with the conditions. The Award should be in the form of a formal statement signed by all the assessors setting out the number of entries examined and the order and grading of each entry. The Award should be accompanied by a separate report to the promoter informing him of the quality of the designs submitted, of the merits of the preferred and commended schemes and other schemes of interest and, of any modifications which ought to be made to the winning scheme. (g) To convey to the Registrar Board of Architects and Quantity Surveyors a copy of their Award and Report at the same time as it is conveyed to the promoter. (h) To settle any dispute that may arise between the promoter and the winner as to the terms of his appointment by the promoter as architect for the project, before the signing of the contract of appointment. 7. ASSESSORS’ FEES Assessors should be paid for their work, payment to be as follows: (i) Where there is a jury of two or more technically qualified assessors, each assessor shall receive a personal fee equal to 20% of the value of the first premium, or such other fees as will have been agreed and approved by the Board of Registration. (ii) Where there is a single technically qualified assessor, his personal fee shall be 30% of the value of the first premium, or such other fees as will have been agreed and approved by the Board of Registration.

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and the premiums offered. Invitation notices should be published in the press and technical journals. (ii) Where a bid bond is required, it must be returnable to the competitor immediately after the publication of the assessor’s award or, in the event of an applicant declining to compete, on his returning to the promoter his copy of the conditions and all annexed documents not less than four weeks before the closing date for the submission of designs. 10. ELIGIBILITY TO COMPETE

(iii) In addition to the above fees the assessor shall be entitled to receive travelling and out-of-pocket expensesincurred in connection with the competition. 8. PREMIUMS AND HONORARIA (i) In the case of an open design competition, no fewer than three premiums should be offered. In a competition the first of these premiums represents a payment on account of fees payable to the winner when engaged as architect to carry out the project. (ii) In a limited design competition for a building project, each competitor in the second stage must receive either a premium or an honorarium. The total amount of the premiums or honoraria for all competitors should not exceed 1% of the cost of the project which is the ordinary outline proposal fee. 9. INVITATIONS (i) The promoter’s invitation to architects to compete must state clearly the nature of the project, the limits of cost where these are applicable, the name/s of the assessor’s, the latest date for applying for competition conditions, the definition of those eligible for entry, the amount of the deposit required, the latest date for the submission of questions, the latest time and date for the submission of designs,

The word “architect and quantity surveyor” means any person who, at the time of his application for the competition conditions and of submission of the competition entry is registered as an architect or quantity surveyor in Kenya by the Board of Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors. Where application is made by a firm, the name of the registered partners must be given. In this context a firm is defined as a partnership or limited liability company properly established for the purpose of architectural practice or an association for the purpose of entering the current competition provided that there is in existence a joint venture agreement for the purpose of carrying out the project in the event of the association winning the competition. 11. COMPETITION DOCUMENTS The promoter must issue to each competitor a printed copy of the conditions of the competition prepared by the assessors together with a site plan showing ground levels, position of services and all relevant information. 12. COMPETITORS’ QUESTIONS Competitors should normally be permitted to ask questions designed to clarify the instructions. Such questions must be sent in by a stated date, after which an explanatory memorandum

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Industry Review based on the questions submitted must be circulated quickly to all competitors, which then forms part of the instructions for the competition: this should clarify but not alter or modify the published conditions. Depending on the nature and size of the competition a minimum period of 2 weeks from the date of publication of the competition conditions should be allowed for the submission of the questions. The preparation of a general statement answering the questions should take no longer than the stated period allowed for the submission of questions. If unforeseen delays occur, a compensating extension of the final date for the submission of designs should automatically be made and notified at the beginning of the statement. 13. DRAWINGS AND REPORT REQUIRED

in an official envelope issued by the promoter with the instructions. The declaration must state that the design is the competitor’s or joint competitors’ own personal work, and that the drawings have been prepared in his or their own offices, and under his or their own supervision, and that he or they undertake/s to accept the assessor’s award. Each design and envelope on receipt must be given a serial number by the promoter but the envelope must not be opened until after the assessor’s award has been made. 15. DISQUALIFICATION

(i) The number, scale and the format of the required drawings must be distinctly set forth. The drawings must not be more in number or a larger scale than necessary to clearly explain the design, and such drawings should be uniform in size, number and mode of presentation. The drawings must be accompanied by a concise typewritten report describing the buildings, explaining their construction, finish and the materials proposed to be use, and giving such information as cannot be clearly shown on the drawings. Where required the report should include an estimate of the cost, based upon any recognised method of calculation which may be directed by the assessor’s. The number of submission sheets should not exceed 5A1 sheets unless agreed with the board.

A design shall be excluded from the competition for any of the following reasons: (i) If received after the latest time stated in the conditions

(ii) In design competitions, the assessor/s may permit or require the submission of perspective drawings, block models or photographs of block models, or explanatory diagrams in competitors’ reports. In all cases the preparation of elaborate drawings or presentation material is to be avoided. The Report should not exceed 25 pages.

(v) If a competitor shall disclose his identity or improperly attempt to influence the decision.

14. METHOD OF SUBMITTING DESIGNS No design may bear any logo or distinguishing mark of any kind but each design must be accompanied by a declaration by the competitor contained

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(ii) If, in the opinion of the assessors, it does not give substantially the accommodation asked for or does not comply with the brief.

be satisfied that there is some objection valid under these regulations to such appointment,in which case the author of the design placed second in order of merit shall be appointed, subject to a similar condition, and so on. It may also be desirable that some designs of merit which did not receive premiums should be commended. In selecting such designs, the assessors must be guided by the same considerations as in awarding premiums. The promoter must notify all competitors of the result of the competition before any public announcement is made. 17. EXHIBITION OF DESIGNS

(iii) If the competitors estimate substantially exceeds the cost limit stated in the instructions or if the assessors shall determine the probable cost will exceed such cost limit. (iv) If any of the conditions or instructions, other than those of a suggestive character, are disregarded.

16. AWARD It is the duty of the assessors to make an award, and the promoter and competitors must undertake to accept that award. Each assessor must bind himself to accept the jury’s Award even where this is on the basis of a majority decision. The promoter must undertake to pay the premiums and honoraria accordingly and to appoint the author of the design placed first as architect for the work, unless the assessors shall

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In the case of open design competitions all accepted designs and accompanying reports together with a copy of the assessors’ Award must be publicly exhibited for not less than six days. Notice of the time and place of exhibition must be given to all competitors and to the public. Nevertheless, where large numbers of entries have been received, selected numbers may be exhibited in relays for periods of six days, provided that the winning designs are exhibited throughout the whole period. In the case of limited design competitions, the designs may also be exhibited at the end of the competition at the discretion of the promoters. 18. COPYRIGHT The ownership of copyright in the work of all competitors will be in accordance with the Law of Copyright in Kenya. 19. RETURN OF DRAWINGS

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All drawings submitted except the design selected for execution must be returned carriage paid to the competitors within fourteen days of the close of the exhibition. 20. APPOINTMENT OF ARCHITECT OR CONSORTIUM (i) The author of the selected entry may be required to satisfy the assessors that he has the resources to carry out the work efficiently. If they are not satisfied that he possesses or can develop a suitable organization they may, at their discretion, after consultation with the author of the selected entry advise the promoter that a second architect or consortium should be appointed to collaborate with the author of the selected entry in carrying out the work, but without obligation on the promoters to pay any additional fees. The assessors will be prepared if necessary to assist the author of the selected entry and the second architect or consultium in agreeing a suitable apportionment of the fees which could otherwise be due to the former.

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21. ARCHITECT’S AND CONSORTIUM FEES 22. CONDITIONS OF ENGAGEMENT (i) The employment and carrying out the work shall be in accordance with the Conditions of Engagement published by the Board of Registration of Architects and Quantity Surveyors in Kenya and other legally constituted registration boards for building professionals. (ii) Where between the date of the issue of the competition conditions and the date of the award increases have occurred in the costs of labour and materials, the effect of such increases shall not prejudice the entry or estimate of the appointed architect or consultiums the cost limit shall be adjusted to take account of such increases. 23. MODIFICATION (i) The appointed architect may be required to modify this submission to meet any reasonable requirements of the promoter within the original brief without the payment of any extra fee, and the cost limit shall be adjusted to suit such modifications. The appointed architect shall be entitled to additional fees in accordance with the Conditions

of Engagement in respect of additional work resulting from any change in the promoter’s brief. (ii) If when tenders are received the lowest tender exceeds the appointed architect’s or competition estimate or the cost limit stated in the instructions as either or both may be varied under Regulation 22.02 the appointed architect shall be given the opportunity of submitting further proposals to achieve a reduction of the tender price, provided that such proposals do not radically alter the original design upon which tenders were invited. Any work incurred by the appointed architect in preparing and submitting such revised proposals shall not entitle any additional fee but no part of the competition premium shall be repayable to the promoter even if the finally modified tender price exceeds the cost limit originally stated. (iii) The Chairman of the Board of Registration shall have the power to waive or to vary any of these Regulations in circumstances where in his view the best interest of the client or the professional would justify that course.

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Technology

How technology is changing land surveying GPS (Global Positioning System) is the name given to the satellites owned and maintained by the United States Department of Defence. There are now satellites belonging to Russia called Glonass, Europe called Galileo, and China called Bei Dou. The term used for the use of GPS plus one or more of these other systems is called GNSS. Another technology that is now in use is LIDAR which enabled distances to be measured to any surface. This became an extra tool in total stations, then standalone terrestrial scanners, airborne scanners, and mobile scanners. Nowadays LIDAR is combined with Photographic or imaging techniques and complete 3 dimensional models can be created with real colours.

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he way we carry out Land surveying has been changing over the years thanks to emerging technologies that have made the profession much easier and efficient. ADVERTISEMENT

This technology has allowed timely completion of projects as well as enhancing cost efficiency,� says Dave Beattie Director of Autobuild Africa a survey equipment specialist based in South Africa.

A few years ago the only tools available to surveyors were; optical levels and theodolites (a precision instrument used for measuring angles both horizontally and vertically).

With drone technology a single survey can do what used to take an entire team of people to accomplish.While GPS is used in a wide variety of industries, land surveyors were some of the first to take advantage of the technology.

The use of electronics improved these tools such that levels could now read bar-code staves while theodolite angle reading became digital. Alignment lasers speeded up some levelling and alignment functions in construction.

However, the biggest challenge facing surveyors is keeping up with technology, and maintaining their relevance as many instruments are now so automatic that in some cases can be operated by untrained and unskilled operators, offers Mr Beattie. And as surveys become more detailed and advanced techniques such as 3D modeling become commonplace, how we store data will become absolutely important. It is therefore necessary to work with a service provider who offers an end-to-end data solution to ensure that stored data is secure and will be available when and

Electronic distance measurement technology was added to electronic theodolites to create total stations. “We are now seeing more sophisticated surveying that entails use of aerial vehicles such as drones to do mapping.

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where it’s needed. Another piece of technology that has changed the profession is robotic total stations. These remote control devices allow surveyors to measure angles, distances, and more without traveling to each point themselves. This can save time and money, and also cuts down on the amount of workers needed and the manual labor that the job typically requires. Although technology has cut down on the need for workers in some industries, land surveyors are still in high demand. Smart, capable people

who understand this technology and can use it to get the job done are always needed. demand. Smart, capable people who understand this technology and can use it to get the job done are always needed. “For many tasks, conventional surveying will still be needed. Even using the most advanced hi-tech equipment, trained surveyors are needed to ensure accuracy and standards are maintained,” notes Mr Beattie. “But new instruments combining photography, Lidar, robotics, inertial sensors, angle sensors, are fast changing how surveyors work.”

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Technology Commercial use of the technology is now on the rise. Analysis shows that in 2017, the global commercial drone market was worth EUR 3.1 billion, with some three million units shipped. Therefore, by 2022, the market value could hit as much as EUR 12.6 billion, with over 15 milllion units shipped. In general, drones are expected to become prominent in all use cases that meet the so-called 4D criteria: dull, dirty, distant, dangerous. This makes them a great fit in the field of asset inspection, mainly in the energy and transportation sectors.

Pix4D: The Future of Drone Asset Inspection Software When it comes to inspection, asset owners need to drive down costs, but often the demands on today’s networks mean that inspections need to be done faster and more often

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rones are revolutionizing many industries, but it is in the fields of asset management and data collection that we really see their benefits. When it comes to inspection, asset owners need to drive down costs, but often the demands on today’s networks mean that inspections need to be done faster and more often. Traditional drones have limitations and require a trained pilot and observer along with post-analysis of video footage or stills. Overall, the ability to accurately inspect assets at low cost and ensuring accurate data processing whilst safeguarding engineers is becoming vital on a regular basis , so what can be done in order to achieve this? Unmanned aerial vehicles (UAVs) can access hard-to-reach places faster, cheaper and with less risk than manual inspections, and potentially allow the asset to remain on line. It could be in

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the future drones will as well be able to carry out maintenance rather than just inspecting. According to Nikoleta Guetcheva, Head of Marketing at Pix4D, Drones are being used to inspect cell towers, wind or solar farms, power lines, oil and gas facilities, and buildings. They are rapidly changing the operations of entire industries, as they allow users to perform more reliable, faster and costefficient inspections, while reducing risk to personnel. Basically, drones allow faster and cheaper inspections, creating a safer work environment, and collect more accurate data. Pix4D has been used by mining companies to calculate volumes in existing mines and planning and exploring the future mines. Oil and gas companies are using Pix4D for corridor mapping for infrastructure monitoring.

Technology that is really taking shape

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But while the potential of UAV inspections is clear, it is worth considering, as with any new technology, the challenges they present. In addition, aviation authorities are still struggling to regulate drone use. But such challenges also present opportunity, and demonstrate that the sector can still be shaped by larger players. By adopting the technology now, companies will be able to work with the technology pioneers to overcome obstacles such as limited battery lives, assist in the formulation of regulations and secure a competitive edge by being the first to make savings from drone-backed asset maintenance.

Drone technology and mapping in Africa With success stories mounting, it’s likely that many more asset operators, from rail companies to grid operators and pipeline constructors will introduce drone inspection technology. So we believe now is the moment to get on board. “Africa has already adopted the technology. Now the challenge is to increase the usage, but there are legal issues with the regulations. Right now there is a real need for professional drone operators in Africa,” said Nikoleta Guetcheva. “As the technology (both hardware and software) becomes more affordable, more and more players (small business or large institutions) can invest in drones or software in order to digitize reality. Our objective of democratizing drone technology and mapping is being met,” she affirms.

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Industry Tips

Things you need to know about quantity surveying Quantity Surveyors make a huge contribution to the success of projects from one off houses right up to multi billion euro capital projects the world over

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ith the property market continuing to grow research highlights fantastic opportunities that exist as a construction professional for students who have an interest in the Science, Technology, Engineering and Maths (STEM) courses to go on and have very rewarding careers in the Built Environment. With this in mind we have put together ten reasons why a career in Quantity Surveying could be for you: 1) Quantity Surveyors don’t just exist Quantity Surveyors make a huge contribution to the success of projects from one off houses right up to multi billion euro capital projects the world over, their keen understanding of contract and project cost, right from the very initial sketch design proposal, ensures that Clients get the best possible end product for their budget (which sometimes means pointing out where there is ‘room to improve’ the efficiency of the Architects design).

both worlds. In either career path every day brings a new challenge and the job satisfaction that goes with being involved in a project right from its inception through to a happy client taking the building over on completion. 3) It pays well The Quantity Surveying profession affords graduates a career salary well above the average industrial wage (see average national wage for a Chartered Surveyor published by the SCSI) and comes with commensurate perks which vary depending on the employer but can include company cars, group pension schemes, performance based incentives etc. 4) You can travel almost anywhere in the

developed world The profession of Quantity Surveying is internationally recognised and is in demand the world over. Many of the larger consultancies and contractors you could find yourself working for in Ireland have offices in the UK, Europe, the Middle East and the Americas where it’s not uncommon for staff to transfer and make the most of the perks and life experience that come with travel (you can of course just join companies in these countries directly too). It commands a healthy salary comparative to the cost of living in every one of these countries allowing graduates to maintain the standard of living they might have become accustomed to in Ireland before leaving. This ability to travel also ensures that there is always work for these

2) It’s a profession of two halves Quantity surveyors can choose to specialise and work exclusively for clients or for contractors meaning those who aspire to a career with a good balance of office based work and / or construction site based work can avail of the best of

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construction professionals irrespective of the cycle of the economy in Ireland. 5) It’s a great career for both men and women Quantity Surveyors like Patricia Power of Room to Improve have done much to highlight how attractive a career in this profession can be not just to men (as is typically assumed for a career in construction) but to women too. Quantity Surveyors are professionals first and foremost and, particularly for those who work on the client side, bears much resemblance to the office based 9 – 5 career you might expect in other disciplines such as finance and business but with the added perk of working on physical projects with lasting and profound effect on the landscape of the country. 6) It offers great opportunities for career progression The organisation model employed by both contractors and consultants in Ireland provide a defined career path for every quantity surveyor affording those who wish to pursue it a route right from graduate level all the way to the board of directors of each of these companies. On the client side becoming an Associate or Director in a PQS office is a quite

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realistic ambition for graduates if they apply themselves to it, likewise with the contracting side albeit the positions to fill at managerial level are typically fewer between in these organisations. 7) You get to constantly explain what you do for a living There is still an air of mystery about what exactly a Quantity Surveyor does, some people think they stand on the roadside with those levels on tripods setting out the route for roadworks, others think they count bricks for a living. The truth is Quantity Surveyors are engaged to control the finances and contractual administration of Construction projects. This places them at the heart of the Design Team as a highly valued and integral part to the success of any project (who doesnt care about cost!). Its a varied and interesting career. 8) You can become a Chartered Professional Charterships aren’t unique to professions like Accountancy. Quantity Surveyors have their own highly valued professional accreditation. Courses in Quantity Surveying such as that offered by Waterford Institute of Technology provide graduates with access to the assessment of professional competence in the Society

of Chartered Surveyors Ireland. This organisation is seen as the acid test of professional practice and ability in Ireland and worldwide through its reciprocal membership of the Royal Institute of Chartered Surveyors in the UK (awarded a Royal Charter back in 1868). 9) It develops your people skills A huge part of the profession is the ability to communicate, negotiate and deal with other people. Your colleagues in the design team/contracting team, your peers and your client will all rely on your expertise to deliver value for money and to mitigate the chances of dispute. These interpersonal skills are taught in courses like that on offer at WIT and developed further as your career progresses in professional practice and is an invaluable life skill. 10) There are lots of jobs There were more than 300 vacancies for Quantity Surveyors listed in March 2017 on ‘Indeed.com’ alone. These positions vary from graduate surveyors right up to senior and managerial level positions (we’d invite you to research these offers for yourself on the leading recruitment websites for more insight on salary expectation and job perks).

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Africa Surveyors Sept-Oct issue 2019 digital  

Africa Surveyors is Africa’s premier source of quantity survey news on new trends and technology on the quantity survey industry. The bi-mo...

Africa Surveyors Sept-Oct issue 2019 digital  

Africa Surveyors is Africa’s premier source of quantity survey news on new trends and technology on the quantity survey industry. The bi-mo...

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