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African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

MAY 2013 Vol. 1 No. 3

Magazine Celebra�ng the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

THE PUBLIC HEALTH RESPONSIBILITY DEAL Why helping to keep your customers in good shape can reap rewards

LIBERIA Finger Licking Food from the Land of Liberty

CELEBRITY TABLE TALK

Collins Archie-Pearce

cra�-master of Sierra Leonian cinema in the Diaspora


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LOCATION street scene, Banjul, The Gambia


CONTENTS MAY 2013 CUISINE OF THE NATIONS Finger Licking Food from the Land of Liberty LIBERIA

HEALTH & WELLNESS

United Kingdom goverment launches Responsibility Deal for Food sector

WINE & BEVERAGE REPORT ABC Of Opening Your Bottle Of Wine

CELEBRITY TABLE TALK Collins Archie-Pearce

at table with the master of cinema craft in the Diaspora

THE BIOGRAPHY OF FOOD

EGGPLANT...AUBERGINE


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

the monthly update

MAY 2013 Vol. 1 No. 3

Magazine Celebra�ng the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

Maggie

Joy

New flavours at African Cuisine Magazine This month we welcome two very talented contributors to share with us refreshing perspec�ves about the African foodie experience. From Blantyre, Malawi, Maggie Thindwa tells us about her culinary adventures in Liberia where she worked [and lived!] for a couple of years. It’s an engaging tale. And then from the bustling, eclec�c metropolis of Lagos, Joy Obinyan tells us about the allure of good African cuisine. As you read her, you are going to do one of two things: head to the kitchen or to the nearest African restaurant. She tells it as it tastes. Loyal to our mission, we will con�nue to be the place where those who love Africa’s food come for the best reports, comments, products and services on Africa’s food and drink. This edi�on is filled with other joyful stuff around African cuisine. And of course, our first cover profile: Collins Archie-Pearce, the quietly effec�ve, London-based Sierra Leonian actor and film African Cuisine Magazine

producer is an engaging subject.

The Responsibility Deal

The United Kingdom Department of Health [DoH] has asked us to partner with them to help promote their campaign for Responsible food prac�ce in the food sector. Inside the magazine, you will find a specially commissioned ar�cle by the DoH explaining how businesses in the African food and drink sector can sign up to the Responsibilty Deal. And make money doing so! Look around and enjoy and tell us what you think. But whatever happens - Enjoy ya belleful!

Michael O Banjo may one 2013

www.AfricanCuisineMagazine.com

h�ps://twi�er.com/african_cuisine


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

“The UAE imports more than 80 percent of its food, spending 25.5 billion UAE dirham (about R61.8bn) on food imports in 2010. Dubai has more than 13 500 food establishments and imports food from more than 150 countries,”

Food Ingredients Istanbul 2013 On 7-9 May 2013, Fi Istanbul will become the food ingredients powerhouse exhibi�on, joining together two of the largest economies, Europe and Asia, together with the Middle East and North Africa. Asia and Europe are amongst the largest economies in the world with Turkey bridging these advanced markets. With such a superb geographical loca�on, a rapidly expanding economy and being one of the largest countries in the world for agricultural produc�on, Turkey provides an essen�al placement for business development, innova�on and trade opportuni�es for the region. On the 7-9 May, Fi Istanbul will provide the only pla�orm for accessing this lucra�ve food ingredients market for both interna�onal and local exhibitors, as well as investors. Making the most of this sell-out event are many leading interna�onal market players such as Tate & Lyle, Roque�e, DSM, Univar, Barentz and Biospringer and leading Turkish exhibitors are such as Al�nmarka, Akdem and Maysa Gida. Also among the leading Turkish companies a�ending is Aromsa; specialists in flavours, with hallal cer�fied cocoa extracts and a recently launched powder flavour Camarome®, which not only gives food a longer shelf life but improves the stability of food products. Natasha Berrow, Brand Director,

Food ingredients Por�olio provides her insight: “Our aim is to establish events where our customers most need them. UBM is bringing together the food ingredients professionals, contribu�ng to the development of healthier foods in the region. Along with our experience, this will provide our customers with a unique opportunity to explore and further develop into this truly exci�ng market.” In addi�on, Fi Istanbul is supported by the Associa�on of Food Addi�ves and Ingredient Manufacturers (GIDAKAT), who are also working alongside the Turkish Health Ministry to improve food challenges by introducing innova�ve food ingredient solu�ons to Turkey. Fi Istanbul is part of the Food ingredients Por�olio strategy to extend the Food ingredients brand into new regions, offering exhibi�ng clients a pla�orm to engage with new customers and present their new business growth opportuni�es. With the key focus on business development, innova�on and trade, in a region with one of the fastest economic growth rates in the world, Fi Istanbul is the most costeffec�ve pla�orm to source new ingredients, grow market share and act as a stepping stone to this vastly untouched food industry. For food ingredient professionals, 6

NEWS

Fi Istanbul is a vital step to building business poten�al, sourcing food ingredient innova�ons and nurturing business networks. To visit Fi Istanbul logon to: h�p:// www.foodingredientsglobal.com/istanbul/home

Dubai needs food from Africa Skyscrapers and developments around the Dubai Marina area are seen from the Princess Tower in Dubai, United Arab Emirates.

There are about 234 South African companies doing business in Dubai, including construc�on firms Grinaker and Murray and Roberts. Photos: Bloomberg By Donwald Pressly Dubai, one of the seven emirates in the United Arab Emirates (UAE), has opened its doors to expand business rela�ons and trade with Africa, but it views South Africa as a perfect loca�on to source much of its food supply needs and to partner with local businesses to promote the agribusiness and hospitality sectors.


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

NEWS The Dubai Chamber of Commerce and Industry and the South African Business Council are also conduc�ng a campaign to promote business partnerships with South Africa. Journalists from South Africa were invited to visit what council president Richard Harris described as “an economic miracle” in the middle of the desert.

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

to turbo-charge industrial development. This model could also be replicated for the development of free zones for agricultural and agro-processing purposes in Africa, he said. Pressed on which countries in Africa would be suitable food sources, he said the test would be countries where water was in abundance and which were not

Richard Harris, the president of the South African Business Council. “The UAE imports more than 80 percent of its food, spending 25.5 billion UAE dirham (about R61.8bn) on food imports in 2010. Dubai has more than 13 500 food establishments and imports food from more than 150 countries,” he noted. South Africa was the 13th largest food source for Dubai.

Next month the Ruler of Dubai, the Prime Minister and vicepresident of the UAE, Sheikh Al Shirawi Mohammed believed there bin Rashid was a significant Al Makbusiness optoum, will portunity for be hos�ng African states the Africa – and South Global BusiAfrica in parness Forum, �cular – to tap a two-day into the massive summit poten�al to supfocusing on ply the UAE with doing busifoodstuffs. ness in and with Africa, The UAE imports more than 80 percent of its food, spending 25.5 billion Grinaker has which will also been part UAE dirham (about R61.8bn) on food imports in 2010 be a�ended of the building by repreof a concourse senta�ves of two major African spoilt by strife. He believed Dubai at the Dubai Al Maktoum Internaeconomic trade blocs, including investors would avoid countries �onal Airport. Common Market for Eastern and where there were clan clashes Southern Africa (Comesa) and trying to control agricultural land Saleh Abdullah Lootah, whose the SADC, both of which include or monopoly companies with family started the first Islamic South Africa. unfair concession arrangements bank in the Arab world, runs variin place. ous food related businesses. He Hisham Abdullah Al Shirawi, the said he was in talks with a South chairman of Economic Zones Chamber director-general HaAfrican firm, Khan’s Meat, to look World and a key par�cipant in mad Buamim said agri-business at a partnership to provide halaal a discussion on free economic remained the biggest employer foods to the South African marzones, believed that African states in Africa and had the poten�al ket. could tap into the Dubai model of to drive the con�nent’s develop(h�p://halalfocus.net/) special economic “or free” zones ment. 7


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

HEALTH & WELLNESS

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

THE PUBLIC HEALTH RESPONSIBILITY DEAL

Why helping to keep your customers in good shape can reap rewards The United Kingdom Department of Health is working hard to communicate its strategy for Responsible wellbeing and has asked African Cuisine Magazine to run this specially-comissioned article for our May 2013 edition aimed at reaching out to African food and drink establishments to join in the Responsibility Deal.

Rt Hon Jeremy Hunt MP Secretary of Staste for Health, UK

M

ost adults in England are overweight, eat more salt than is healthy - greatly increasing their risk of high blood pressure - and don’t eat enough fruit and vegetables, pu�ng the health of this country at major risk. It’s o�en referred to as a �cking �mebomb and has seen big increases in the numbers of people with diabetes, certain cancers, high blood pressure, heart disease, stroke, liver disease and osteoarthri�s.

longer the luxury or special treat it used to be but is now something a lot of us do on a regular basis. So what you’re offering on your menu, the ingredients you’re using in dishes and the way you’re cooking and other kitchen prac�ses does impact greatly on the health of your customers - on the health of your local community.

The fact is in the long term it does make sound business sense. If you have a local popula�on with high obesity levels and in poor The cost to the NHS is huge. health, chances are it will impact But what’s that got to do with nega�vely on the community’s businesses such as yours? prosperity, on your foot fall numbers coming through the One in six meals is now eaten door - and on your profit. It makes outside the home. Ea�ng out is no sense to play your part in keeping 8

your customers healthy and in shape if you want them to keep economically solvent and walking back through your door. And with the media increasingly obsessed with weight loss, healthier diets and cookery shows, many customers will undoubtedly become more health conscious. Offering healthier choices on your menu could well help you stay ahead of the curve - opening up new marke�ng opportuni�es, a�rac�ng new customers and helping to boost profit. So without affec�ng your profits what ac�ons can you take to help improve your customers’ diet. The Department of Health,


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

some of the pledges already taken up by organisations working with local authori�es, recently launched a set of �ps to support small and medium sized catering businesses, like yours, to make small, simple changes which make their foods healthier and make it easier for their customers to make healthier choices. For example, you can: - use a healthier oil, use lean meat, offer to grill or bake food or use low fat varie�es; - remove salt from tables or use less salt and salty ingredients; add or increase the amount of fruit and vegetables or use wholegrain carbohydrates; - think about your por�on sizes or make smaller por�ons available to everyone; and - use promo�ons / special offers to encourage customers to choose healthier op�ons. These �ps are part of the Government’s Public Health Responsibility Deal, a groundbreaking approach to improving the

na�on’s health. At a na�onal level over 500 companies have pledged to take some ac�on on food, as well as on alcohol, health at work and promo�ng physical ac�vity. And the Department is now keen, working with local authori�es, to encourage local businesses to take ac�on. Many of the big name catering chains on the high street are already doing these things for their customers - so when ea�ng out people will start to expect and prefer less salt in their foods, less fat and calories in their dishes and healthier op�ons on menus. Dr Susan Jebb, a nutri�on scien�st with the Medical Research Council and chair of the Responsibility Deal Food Network wants to encourage small restaurants and catering businesses to play their part: “I know the pressure that small business owners are under, but so many people eat in your establishments o�en on a regular basis, that it is vital that you think

about how you could make the food you offer healthier. Look at the list of �ps and think about which ones you could do right now. Perhaps over �me you might be able to make more changes towards a healthier menu for the benefit of all your customers.” Your local authority may run a healthier ea�ng scheme which you could sign up to. Alterna�vely, sign up to the na�onal Responsibility Deal. Signing up publicly demonstrates your commitment to helping your customers and local community be healthier. Local partners will receive a cer�ficate signed by the Secretary of State for Health and their name will be published on the Department for Health’s Responsibility Deal website. For more informa�on about the sort of �ps you could consider and how to sign up, go to: https://responsibilitydeal.dh.gov. uk/local-partners/

IS THIS RESPONSIBLE?

use promotions / special offers to encourage customers to choose healthier options

YES! 9


AAfrican frican CUICSINE UISINE All The Goodness of Africa All The Goodness of Africa

MagazineMagazine CelebratingCelebrating the Best of the Africa’Best s Food & Drink inFood the Diaspora of Africa’s & Drink in the Diaspora

The Biography of Food No.3 : Aubergine

E

ggplant or Aubergine, is a very low calorie vegetable and has healthy nutri�on profile; good news for weight watchers! The veggie is popularly known as aubergine in the western world.

Botanically, it belongs to Solanaceae family and named as Solanum melongena. This perennial plant is na�ve to Indian subcon�nent and now grown in many tropical and semitropical regions. Several varie�es of aubergines are grown all around the world. Depending on the cul�var type, they vary greatly in size, shape, and color. Generally, these veggies fall into two broad categories, either oval shaped, or thin and elongated. The plant reaches about 3-4 feet tall in quick �me and bears many bright fruits. Each fruit has smooth, glossy skin. Internally, it features off-white color pulp with numerous centrally arranged small, so� seeds. Fruits are generally harvested when they reach maturity but short of full stage ripeness. Health benefits of Eggplant (aubergine)

at the Ins�tute of Biology of São Paulo State University; Brazil suggested that eggplant is effec�ve to control high blood cholesterol. The peel or skin (deep blue/purple varie�es) of aubergine has significant amounts of phenolic flavonoid phyto-chemicals called anthocyanins. Scien�fic studies have shown that these an�-oxidants have poten�al health effects against cancer, aging, inflamma�on, and neurological diseases. Total an�oxidant strength measured in terms of oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) of aubergines is 993 µmol TE/100 g. At value 15; they are one of the low glycemic index (GI) vegetables. It contains good amounts of many essen�al B-complex groups of vitamins such as pantothenic acid (vitamin B5), pyridoxine (vitamin B6) and thiamin (vitamin B1), niacin (B3). These vitamins are essen�al in the sense that body requires them from external sources to replenish and required for fat, protein and carbohydrate metabolism. Further, this vegetable is an also good source of minerals like manganese, copper, iron and potassium. Manganese is used as a co-factor for the an�oxidant enzyme, superoxide dismutase. Potassium is an important intracellular electrolyte helps counter the hypertension effects of sodium.

Eggplant is very low in calories and fats but rich in soluble fiber content. 100 g provides just 24 calories but contributes about 9% of RDA (recommended daily allowance) of fiber. Research studies conducted

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Egg Plant Sauce (Garden Egg Sauce) by Feyisope at Afrolems I N G R E D I E N T S

African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

R E C I P E • Boil the egg plants in a pot of water for about 1020 minutes • Blend the tomatoes, peppers and onion and allow to boil for 30 minutes to drain the water. • Boil the egg plants for 20-25 in a small pot • Once the egg plants are boiled, put them in a bowl of cold water to cool them down • Peel off the skin from the egg plant ( at this point you’ll no�ce the skin is wrinkled so it is easier to peel off) • Once the skin is peeled off put in a small bowl and use a spoon to mash them up • In a large sauce pan, put about half a cup of red oil • Bleach the red oil under low heat. • Once the oil is heated up, dice in some onions and allow them to fry for about 5 minutes under medium heat. • Add the already boiled blended tomato and pepper, and fry it for 10-15 minutes • Add 2 cubes of Maggi and half a teaspoon of curry and salt. • Add the mashed up egg plant and allow to fry for an addi�onal 5-7 minutes • Let it simmer under low heat for 10 more minutes.

1. 3 Large Egg Plants (Aubergine) 2. A Bulb of onion 3. 4 tomatoes 4. 2 Large peppers 5. 3 Jamaican hot peppers 6. Curry 7. Salt 8. 2 cubes of Maggi 9. Red Oil

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African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

Maggie Thindwa

CUISINE OF THE NATIONS inLIBERIA,westafrica

Finger Licking Food from the Land of Liberty Liberia, officially the Republic of Liberia, is a country in West Africa bordered by Sierra Leone to its west, Guinea to its north and Côte d’Ivoire to its east. It covers an area of 111,369 km² and is home to about 3.7 million people.

l

iberians know what they want

rice. Home being Malawi, the spice and the mixture of all the relish in one bowl was different – but I loved it!

when it comes to food. You don’t mess with people when it comes to their food. The Liberian Breakfast, consists of Edo, Cassava, Plantain and a sauce. Oh and rice.

Being by the coast, Harper, Liberia is home to some seafood. In the first 6 months I was in Liberia, I had seafood almost every day. Did I say I loved it? Compared to other parts of the world it was rela�vely cheap. I had crabs, different varie�es of fish, it was amazing!

My West African hosts loved their Rice! Everyone ate rice! Which was different because in Malawi, rice is not really eaten by the masses, we are more into Maize Flour - Nsima. I came to Malawi, Southern Africa, a�er spending a year and 6 months (on and off) in West Africa. Recently the prices of maize flour went up in Malawi and let’s just say that if the elec�ons were held in the same month our incumbent would have lost. No-one stands in the way of Malawian and their Nsima. To accompany this very high, Liberian carb diet were some lovely yummy sauces and I loved them I loved it! I was sizzled by all the spicy food and amazed by how greens and meat were mixed in the same bowl. I would have cassava leaf/Potato Green (sauce), mixed with chicken, meat and some�mes fish all in one bowl – this was the relish for my

Now in Harper, they have what they called Palm Bu�er Sauce. I don’t know how they make this palm bu�er but they would use the palm bu�er seed and have an orange sauce with a bit of spice and chilli and this would accompany this seafood. I took a photo of some succulent dry rice …without any sauce and it was what it said on the �n – dry. Using the infamous west African Pepe (pepper), various other spices and unfortunately on this occaision I had it with some canned fish but it was lovely nonetheless. My only reserva�on of course was the fact that 4 to 5 people had to share the same bowl – it was truly a case of do as your hosts do. 12


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

Loved it a li�le less

consumed. Other wonders included what in Malawi we call Mbewa. Essen�ally it’s a wild rat! People in Malawi eat this but it was not to my taste.

Without watching my weight it would have been very easy to pile on the pounds and maybe also develop a case of blood pressure. With the help of Maggi Cube (very high salt content) and large quan��es of oil in food, I was giving my heart a run for its money.

Oh and the infamous “Deer”. The thing with the

deer is I had never actually seen its head so it could be anything really – we are back to our need of scien�fic names to bridge this cultural misunderstanding when it comes to labelling food. From the picture below what do you think it is? So many highs and not so highs however I will leave you with my ul�mate high.

As men�oned above, o�en the meat was mixed with greens in the sauces. I am a meat eater so this I didn’t mind. But a�er a while I started apprecia�ng why scien�sts use scien�fic names. Scien�fically a pig is called Sus scrofa domes�cus, a cow is Bos primigenius, a goat - Capra aegagrus hircus, a monkey is Catrol Vancliechin – you get the idea.

Plantain… Not Banana

Anyway what I found in Liberia is that names of things are used interchangeably and so some�mes you ask for a plum and you get a mango. So asides from the abovemen�oned domes�c animals, the pallet for meat is quite extended and at �mes confusing. Once I was given a very stringy tasting monkey in my cassava leaf sauce and personally I think our cousin the monkey is too close to home to be

Plantain is like a big banana that you cook! Yes Cook! It is not so prevalent in the Malawi, but it is a West African delicacy and I looove it! Before moving away from home, I had only ever had it once before, and since being introduced to West African cuisine, I can’t count the number of �mes that I have had it. It can be cooked in a stew, baked/ grilled, fried and even boiled. If I take a n y t h i n g away from my travels, it will be the blessing of fried Plantain – or Dodo as it’s known in some circles. And here’s how to make it: h t t p : / / w w w.y o u t u b e . c o m / w a t c h ? f e a t u r e = p l a y e r _ mbedded&v=N9dpPNP58Iw 13

[with thanks to allnigerianrecipes.com]


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

WINE & BEVERAGE REPORT

ABC

Of Opening Your Bottle Of Wine

H

by Michael O Banjo

OW DO YOU OPEN A BOTTLE OF WINE? This might seem a basic ques�on to a banal task but as many have found to their chagrin, ge�ng a drink safely from bo�le to glass is not as easy as it seems. And, let’s face it, opening a bo�le of plonk is not the same as ge�ng palm wine from a tree top or even taking the crown of a bo�le of beer. So, what is it that makes opening a bo�le of wine a special job? Well, it starts with the basic stuff. Where are you drinking? Who’s around? What’s the occasion? These ques�ons determine what you are drinking and what you have available to open it. Now, let’s pick red wine - on a boat party. The boat is rocking and everyone is geared up in summery whites. So, you need a controlled opening to prevent spilling the wine on your mother-in-laws crisp linen ou�it. Thus, the first rule is to always find a place to stand the bo�le. Next, what kind of bo�le are you opening? Is it corked bo�le or a screw top? Is it a s�ll, non-sparkling wine, sparkling or bubbly? With a screw top cap, your main concern should be risk of spillage whilst opening as it is easy to forget that wine stains don’t remove quickly and may ruin an otherwise enjoyable evening by drawing a�en�on to a very obvious stain, especially if it’s the celebrant’s ou�it. Not nice. The main cause of grief at par�es is what I call the Cockscrew ScrewUp. This is a very bad thing when it happens. Very bad. The old saying goes, there are many ways to skin a cat. Perhaps that is true but when it comes to removing a cork from a wine bo�le, there is only one way : The Sensible Way.

14

As I said earlier, there are key considera�ons in removing the cork from a wine bo�le. We already talked about the need to find a stable place on which to perform the act. This allows balance and control of the process. Spilling away an expensive bo�le of wine will destroy your social credibility permanently. But the other risk is about sparkling wines and high vola�lity sparkling wines like Champagne. High vola�lity? Oh yes. According to research, “the reason sparkling wine bo�les are thicker than regular wine bo�les is because they must withstand the pressure of the carbon-dioxide produced in the second fermenta�on which can reach 90 pounds per square inch.” Another view asserts that “the pressure in a champagne bo�le is typically between 70 and 90 pounds per square inch. That’s two to three �mes the pressure in your car’s tyres, about the same as in a double-decker bus tyre.” Now, with such forces trapped inside a bo�le, you must realise why accidents have happened at events where novices have mishandled the careful process of opening a corked bo�le of sparkling wine. First, get a good cockscrew. A good one will have robust finish and a strong grip. There a range of op�ons star�ng with the basic to electrically operated machines. I say keep it simple.


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

WINE & BEVERAGE REPORT I suppose by now you can open the red or white wine without accident. Now, the sparkling wines. Be careful. First, you do not use a cockscrew to open champagne. You’ll no�ce that the cork is different from the one that you find in regular bo�les of red and white wine. One of the main causes of mishaps with this type of wine is poor e�que�e. Correct wine e�que�e gives the host a range of rights and responsibili�es. Opening wine is thus a controlled process. It’s not right for a guest to go into the cellar, grab any bo�le he fancies and just open it! It is expected that at a party, the wine has been selected to be consumed in a par�cular order, depending on the menu of dishes and of course, the subject of celebra�on. If you bring a wine to the host, you are not supposed to open it yourself! You hand it over and explain its progeny to the host who will find a place for it in the day’s proceedings. Back to champagne. Remember its a pressurised liquid?

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

Don’t delegate fetching sparkling wines to children. Of course, they’ will shake it - deliberately or innocently. And, please, don’t bring out Champagne out of a box at the last minute to be opened instantly. That’s an abomina�on! It’s best opened chilled. Each of these oversights will lead to disappointment. The risk of serious injury is real and so you must never point the cork in the direc�on of anyone present. You don’t want to be marched off to jail for blinding the neighbour. Let’s stop here and take the wine opening discussion further next month. In the mean�me, please watch this video http://youtu.be/ oPHN95g9Ubs and let me know how you got on. Enjoy but drink responsibly.

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African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

16


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

THAT’S HOW TO DO IT Volunteers’ Cafetaria Olympic Park, Stratford, London July-August 2012

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African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

CELEBRITY TABLE TALK

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

with the craft-master of Sierra Leonian film in the Diaspora

Collins Archie-Pearce

T

he first �me you meet Collins Archie-Pearce, you find that he is very easily charming and relaxed. He has an expressive smile and a glint in the eye that catches the f a n c y,

restaurant veteran, Coco’s Bar. Proprietor, Eddie Isebor was on hand to welcome us to his patch and without much ado, our guest had ordered his favourite meal, Pounded Yam with Egusi Soup. The dish arrived piping hot and, along with other accompaniments, served as the culinary carousel around which Collins begun to talk about his favourite passion - cinema. Collins Archie-Pearce is a film producer, promoter, Stage director, Actor and script writer who has featured in several Nollywood movies in the UK, His latest movie appearance is

whichever of the sexes you are. But it is when you begin to speak with him that you realise that this guy is, actually, quite special. We met up in south London and headed up north to Finsbury Park where he played a generous host at the 31-year old African

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African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

...with TIME 100 Infuen�al Person Omotola JaladeEkeinde in “Shameful Deceit”, which was produced by the UK based Nollywood super star , PR Guru and of course the youngest Nigerian female producer in UK, Theodora Ibekwe. Apart from that, Collins plays guitar and is also a barber! And all these he does in addi�on to being a senior manager at Transport for London where he is a highly respected expert in the rudiments of modern transporta�on management. I asked Collins what drives him. With that infec�ous smile and an engaging manner, he opened his hands and said that life is to be lived. And if you have mul�lateral talents, they are God-given and you are meant to use them. He also believes that culture is at the centre of human existence and that stories are

central to interpre�ng human experience. Hence, his voracious script wri�ng and stagecra�. A devotee of African cinema, Collins has very strategically anchored his dreams for Sierra Leonian film on the success of Nollywood, Nigeria’s very well-known and prolific film industry. He has built up sound and enduring rela�onships with most of the important stars in Nollywood and the Nigerian entertainment industry as whole. His current film project, ‘Mr. Ibu in Sierra Leone’ features the famous Nollywood comic actor, John Okafor also known as Mr. Ibu. Collins and is crew are currently on loca�on in Sierra Leone shoo�ng this highly-an�cipated film. So, what’s next? Collins says he’ll con�nue making movies and wants to look to other parts of Africa, especially east

A 2013 WORKING TEAM Collins Archie-Pearce and John Okafor aka Mr Ibu at Country Lodge in Freetown, Sierra Leone, having dinner. They are there �o shoot a movie �tled “Ibu in Sierra Leone”. Collins happens to be Mr Ibu’s manager. 20


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

...with TuFace Idibia

...with UK-based Nigerian actor, Ken Smart

...hos�ng Basketmouth at home

...hos�ng Nollywod at home with wife Roslyn and daughter and southern Africa where he hopes to discover new talent. Our dinner with the impressive Collins Archie-Pearce had been so enjoyable that �me had sped past very quickly. And so, we stepped out into the night and

watched as Collins pa�ed his tummy as if to pay tribute to the delicious pounded Yam and Egusi soup. And Collis promised that next �me, it’ll be Goat meat peppersoup for starters, and Plaintain with fish for the main course. Yep. We’ll wait for that. END 21


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

with the craft-master of Sierra Leonian film in the Diaspora

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

Collins Archie-Pearce

Guitar man...

on stage at his best...

22

...a family portrait


HOW SAFE DO YOU FEEL IN YOUR LOCAL RESTAURANT?

WE REPORT ON THE GOOD, THE BAD, THE UGLY

African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

MAY 2013 Vol. 1 No. 3

Magazine Celebra�ng the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

African Cuisine Magazine

www.AfricanCuisineMagazine.com

African_Cuisine


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

FEED ME JOR

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

by Joy Obinyan

I love food.

Always have and always will. Every �me I come across a well cooked meal I just want to stop and have myself a taste. I won’t call myself a food connoisseur but I can appreciate a well prepared meal. My mother used to say that growing up I never joked around when it concerned food. Being around the kitchen was never a forced chore as I enjoyed spending long hours in the kitchen. The smells s�ll are comfor�ng and I some�mes feel the hairs on my hand stand up straight when I’m around good food. Just a week ago I had the great fortune to sample a range of soups over the space of a week from visi�ng some of my senior aun�es and brought great joy to the soul of my belle and nose. The rich aroma from the rich egusi soup tantalized my senses and tastes buds so much that I was full just from standing close the pot. I was mesmerized by the dance of total abandon performed by the stock fish, kpomo and beef in the pot. They beckoned to me and it was all I could do to resist the urge to reach into the pot and retrieve a dancer. Egusi soup with freshly pounded yam (hot), the combo melted easily in my mouth. This was food heaven. My next experience was with the Calabar soup edikakong. Vegetable soups are my absolute favorite cos it supports my weight loss a�empt (that is another story). For those not familiar with this soup, it is a combina�on of ugwu Egusi Soup and Pounded Yam - YouTube ► 8:10► 8:10 www.youtube.com/watch?v=rW96wEHKkQE Dec 20, 2010 - Uploaded by naijacooking For the full recipe: http://naijacooking. com/2010/12/19/egusi-soup

24

and water leaves. Striking the right blend and balance is always the tricky part. Not many people are blessed with the gi� of preparing this delicacy though. I have tried some concussions that were labeled edikakong and they were totally appalling and inedible. I recall the one that looked like a pot of weed swimming in colored water (Yuk). I tried the edikakong made in Cassia restaurant in Lagos and boy was I blown away. For a lack of a be�er descrip�on, it was like an orgasm in the mouth. I never knew food could taste and make you feel that good. It had a rich heady taste that spoke to every taste bud in my mouth. Wow. When I looked up from my plate, my colleagues were staring as I had abandoned my fine girl act and was using my hands and licking my fingers (See public falling of hand). Don’t get me started on their plantain porridge which I went back to try a�er seeing it ordered by a friend - OMG! Ripe plantain, �ny pieces of fish infused into vegetable (ugwu). I kept asking which was the main meal, was it the plantain, the fish or the vegetable cos everything blended into one amazing meal. I am told that my con�nuous love for food, especially those made with palm oil and starch, is working against my present a�empt to lose weight but hey, nothing can separate me from my love of food. Un�l they find a Slim Fast made of garri, yam, fish, kpomo, palm oil, beef and periwinkle I will s�ck to my naija meal and find an alterna�ve to losing the weight.


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

APRIL 2013 Vol. 1 No. 2

Magazine Celebra�ng the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Di-

BUSINESS REPORT The Business Of African Food In the Diaspora An Insight Into A Growing Behemoth

TRAVELLER’S KITCHThe Gambia: A Li�le is Never Too Much

DRINK & BEVERAGE REHave you been called to the African bar?

RECIPES

African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

MAY 2013 Vol. 1 No. 3

Magazine Celebra�ng the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

MARCH 2013

Magazine Celebra�ng the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Di-

The Rise and Rise of Fast Food in Afri-

An Unpalat-

THE RESPONSIBILITY DEAL Why helping to keep your customers in good shape can reap rewards

LIBERIA Finger Licking Food from the Land of Liberty

PROFILE

Collins Archie-Pearce

table manners with the master of Sierra Leonian cinema in the Diaspora

REPORTING ON IMPORTERS & EXPORTERS, MANUFACTURERS, CATERERS, RESTAURANTS, RETAILERS, REVIEWS AND COMMENTS AND EVERYTHING ELSE ABOUT AFRICAN FOOD AND DRINK IN THE DIASPORA

Introducing

African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebra�ng the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

MAKE YOUR MARK IN AFRICAN FOOD AND DRINK IN THE DIASPORa Adver�sing and Partnering Enquiries Email - africancuisinemagazine@gmail.com Call Michael Tel +447450972851 Call Meg Tel +447727655669

African Cuisine Magazine

www.AfricanCuisineMagazine.com

African_Cuisine


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

26


African TREASURES OF THE AFRICAN KITCHEN CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

salad bowl, the Gambia

27


who wears the crown?

African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

MAGAZINE

Celebra�ng the Best of African Cuisine in the Diaspora

RECOGNISING THE BEST, RAISING THE STANDARD

African Cuisine Magazine

www.AfricanCuisineMagazine.com

African_Cuisine


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

SUMMER’S

nearly

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

HERE...

F

or many of us in the Diaspora, the weather has been appalling. Yet there is hope the tide will turn for the better and the reluctant spring will slowly crawl into the blazing warmth of summer. Nevertheless, whet your appetite with the above images and rub your magic lamps to tease the finer weather out of its shell.

29


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

GR I P E Dafe Otite’s

Running the gauntlet of the school run:

I must have bashed at least 10 people (adults and kids alike) out of my “personal space” whilst taking the kids to school today. There is enough space on the pavement for two adults walking with a child each, and I prefer walking in a straight line to weaving le� and right dodging people. I know some people have no apprecia�on of other people’s personal space (you know the ones who will bump into you on a deserted street or stand so close that you can smell their breath whilst talking at you) and others reserve the right for you to make way for them. But I also reserve the right to try and walk in a straight line. #givemespace-jeez

150+ uses for Vinegar:

I bought a couple of bo�les of vinegar a�er reading a post on how washing your fruit and veg in them can make them last much longer. Strawberries and nectarines barely last a couple of days before going off (or going mouldy) and washing them in a mixture of vinegar and water (rinse off a�er) gets rid of the germs tat make them mouldy. I have also used it to give my windows a streak free clean for decades. Now I wondered what else it can be used for apart from on your chips of course and came up with 150+ uses from Readers Digest. At 48p for half a litre, what are you wai�ng for?

My favourite gardening tool

The ubiquitous cutlass. There is something therapeu�c about swinging a cutlass at an errant plant. Pruning rose bushes, cu�ng back tree branches. My neighbour cannot believe it v every �me I use it. No spring loaded secateurs unless absolutely necessary. I do however draw the line at cu�ng grass with it. That is in the past now, I have a lawn mower for that! 30

Essential Reading:

Two books by one author: Max Siollun. 1. Oil Poli�cs and Violence (out now in all good bookshops and websites including ebooks). I am reading this now and the detail is breathtaking. It answers a lot of ques�ons about why Nigeria is the way it is today. All the usual suspects are present and details coups and counter coups from 1966 to 1976.

2. Soldiers of Fortune: Not yet released (I have it on advance order) covers military rule between 1983 and 1993. Will make essen�al reading as well. An unbiased tale of Nigeria’s recent history devoid of propaganda, white washing and the personal opinions of the protagonists.

O�te Family Cookout coming up on Saturday the 25th of May 2013 (Bank Holiday Saturday - the first day of the half term break) at the earlier star�ng �me of 12 noon. Bring your bikes, scooters, skateboards, footballs, badminton sets and out door games, and I will take care of the weather lol!! Indoor and outdoor fun guaranteed


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

RESTAURANTS

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

AFRICAN VILLAGE RESTAURANT OPENS AMIDST COLOUR-SCHEME CONTROVERSY A new African restaurant opened in Baylely Lane, Coventry, England last month, April 2013. African Village has a unique facade - nted the building’s sandstone walls are painted black. Thirty-three year old businesswoman Safia Aguh, originally from Cameroon, runs African Village with her husband Simon opened the restaurant, in , two weeks ago complete with its trademark black walls and colourful orange signage. However, no sooner had it opened than it ran into controversy that its black walls and orange colour scheme was out of conformity with the tradi�onal features of the Catherdal district of Covenrtry around which area the restaurant is located. Aguh insists they consulted Coventry City Council’s planning department to seek perission. She says

because the building is not listed even though in a conserva�on area, they were free to do as they wished.. The council says that although no planning permission strictly speaking was required to paint the building, there was an agreement between the council and the landlord that, as the building is in a conserva�on area, any changes to the interior or exterior would need permission before going ahead. They are adamanat that the agreement has been broached. Aguh also said that members of the Coventry Society, a charity devoted to promo�ng and protec�ng the city’s landscape and heritage had also raised eyebrows at the colour scheme. Society chairman Keith Draper said: they were displeased about the colours as the area was a special one in the city.

31


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora

MARKET SCENE ONE - MILTON KEYNES, ENGLAND

MARKET SCENE TWO - IJEBU-ODE, NIGERIA

MARKET SCENE THREE, UPTON PARK, ENGLAND

32


African CUISINE All The Goodness of Africa

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Magazine Celebrating the Best of Africa’s Food & Drink in the Diaspora


Where Do you

RESTAURANT REVIEW

The first point of reference when African cuisine is discussed is often restaurants.

FRESH OUT OF AFRICA imports that make sense

STAY WITH THE TRADITION


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