Page 1

The Periodical of the Black Business Initiative

DIME Inc. Also in this Issue • BBI AGM Overview • NSCC Trailblazers • More Successful Entrepreneurs Fall 2007 u Number 37

“A dynamic and vibrant Black presence within the Nova Scotia Business Community.”


Black to Business



Message from the Board of Directors

In this Issue

Cassandra Dorrington, Chair, Black Business Initiative 1

Message from the Chief Executive Officer

2

Youth on the Move

3

Ancient Hermit Drums

4

Sweet Spice

5

BBI Stats

6

7

9

11

Trailblazers Who’s Who at the NSCC

CULTURE BEAT

In the Search for Entrepreneurs

Taryn Della

Arm Candy Handbags

BBI’s Annual General Meeting

12

Cover Story

15

Business Forum

17

DIME Digital Signage Solutions

How Can Business Owners Retire

Steve’s Barbershop

18

A Multigenerational Business People & Businesses on the Move

19

Business Calendar

21

Ask the BBI

22

BBI 2008 Training Schedule

23

Business Is Jammin”

24

What is Cultural Tourism?

the mandate of the BBI. We are not in the business of developing black businesses, but we are in the business of developing, mentoring and supporting members of the Black community in the development and growth of successful businesses.

Paul Adams

Message from the Board

Che Kara Beals

Summer Youth Program

Regional Reports

Business Development

6

Central

10

Northern

21

Training & Business is Jammin’

23

I

f you have been watching the news, the US stock market continues to reflect the volatility of their economy, resulting in the US dollar taking a beating on the world market. With the strong linkage of the Canadian market to the US market there is some concern as to how Canada will fare in this matter. In particular, how will the Nova Scotia business economy fare? Early indications point towards a strong Canadian dollar which translates into continued confidence in the Canadian economy. This is great news for Canada and in particular for our Nova Scotian businesses. A strong and robust economy is one of the key success factors for the Black Business Initiative (BBI) client. A couple of years ago, at one of the BBI summits, I remember a statement that stayed with me long after the Summit ended. The speaker was very adamant that there is no such thing as Black businesses, there is just business and the color of business is green. This concept speaks to Black to Business is the official periodical of The Black Business Initiative and is published quarterly spring, summer, fall, and winter. Its goal is to support the BBI as it fosters a dynamic and vibrant Black presence within the Nova Scotia Business Community.

Mailed under Canada Post Publications Mail Sales Agreement no. 0040026687

Fall 2007

For Advertising Information, Rates, Submitting Stories, Notices or Community Events, or for More Information, call: 902-426-2224

In the development of a successful business, there are definitely key factors to consider, such as the strength on the business plan, the technical and managerial capacity of the business, and the financial capacity of the business, to name but a few. I am pleased to say that all these factors are supported by the BBI business model. The one factor which is seldom discussed but is fundamental to the success of the business is an assessment of the business owner/entrepreneur as it relates to the profile of the successful entrepreneur. For those of you considering taking that first step into starting your own business, consider the following list of traits of a successful entrepreneur. Do you have the key traits of an entrepreneur? 1) Problem Solver: As a business owner, you will be presented with many unique situations. It will be your job to quickly solve these problems. How do you rate as a problem solver? 2) Calculated Risk Taker: Starting your own business is inherently risky. While risk is inevitable, a successful business person is a good judge of acceptable risk levels, and continued on page 10> The Black Business Initiative 1575 Brunswick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2G1 Phone: 902-426-2224 Fax: 902-426-6530 Toll Free: 1-800-668-1010 E-Mail: bbi@bbi.ns.ca Web Site: www.bbi.ns.ca Published by: the Black Business Initiative Editor in Chief: Rustum Southwell Design & Layout: Design North Production by: Mirabliss Media Productions Cover Photograph: Paul Adams


Black to Business



Fall 2007

Message From The Chief Executive Officer

Peter Marsman

S. I. Rustum Southwell

I

f it seems like a long time since you got an update report, it’s because of the special 10th anniversary celebration issue of Black to Business magazine. Consequently, we have not had an opportunity to update you on the activities, operations and services of the Black Business Initiative (BBI) in the past six months. Back then seems like the good old days, because Starr Francis our first Executive Assistant left for a position with the Federal Department of Justice. She was an invaluable team member and made my job easier. In fact, as far back as May, when we were getting ready for the annual general meeting we were still fully engaged in moving our mandate forward. BBI’s Board has charged the staff with the number one priority to implement its growth strategy this year. As we continue to deliver on the various items of the composite structure simultaneously with the overall governance model, we have begun the process to re-brand BBI. This process is moving along at a reasonable pace, despite our meager resources. The investment fund and the consulting arm are already functional and performing very well. One of the good stories is the ramping up of the Business is Jammin’ (BIJ) charity. In April, Tracey Thomas, the BBI’s training director, accepted employment elsewhere and did not return to the BBI from maternity

leave. And, Julius Kanyamunyu, who was acting training director during Tracey’s absence, left the organization about the same time. It was then left to Bernard Elwin and an eclectic mix of BBI rookies to deliver the services of the training centre and the BIJ program. Based on the results at the end of summer they have far exceeded our expectations. There is much more detail about this in Bernard Elwin’s training report but I must commend him and Dorothy Fletcher, (Admin.), Annette Slawter (Admin.) and Beverly Parker (Admin) for the success they had at the training centre in the past six plus months. Their team and six young student coordinators delivered a very effective Business is Jammin’ program this summer. 2007 ended up being the most effective BIJ summer program ever. The overall quality of the six coordinators certainly was a big reason for the impact. Of course, the BBI did not do this without partnerships with Service Canada and the Black Employment Partnership Committees. It certainly helped to have an expanded crew, with three of the six coordinators returning for at least the second summer. 2007 ended up being the most effective BIJ summer program ever. The overall quality of the six coordinators certainly was a big reason for the impact.

Seeing this expanded role of the BIJ youth strategy is proof positive that we are making an impact in improving business skills in the Black community. Another example of this is the incorporation of ADEPA, a construction project management company wholly owned by the consulting arm

of the BBI. Early indications are that ADEPA will surpass budgeted sales. June 2007 is already four months behind us now; however, the energy and warmth at the annual general meeting can still be felt. On June 29, right before our eyes we were able to see the vision come to life in a dramatic and vibrant fashion. It really all began the day before, on Thursday night, when the investment fund, the Black Business Community Investment Fund Limited (BBCIFL), held its annual General Shareholders meeting. The fund – currently just short of $350,000 – has $300,000 invested in three companies. It is stable and well managed with leadership from Greg Browning, who is the Chair of the Board, and Gordon Doe, who is BBI’s Director of Business Development. Gordon is most likely one of the most knowledgeable persons in Nova Scotia when it comes to administration of Community Economic Development Investment Funds. The meeting went very well. The following morning we were back at it with an early start to a long day. The session was chaired by Joe Parris. The BBI Board of directors was joined by the BIJ Board, all staff, student coordinators, lifetime Board members and a few guests. First up was the BIJ meeting, quickly followed by the BBI’s meeting, then by an engaging lunch panel discussion, and finally Black Business Consulting (BBC) held its first Annual General Meeting. As if all of this activity was not enough to make one need a very long rest, we still had the evening gala to attend. And this year it was one for the ages. There were some 300 guests in attendance. Her Honour Mayann Francis Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia and the Honourable Peter MacKay, (currently Minister of Defence) then continued on page 21>


Black to Business

Fall 2007



Paul Adams

The Sky’s the Limit YOUTH ON for Che Kara Beals THE MOVE

Chad Lucas

When she’s not in the gym, she says she likes to do “girl things” – hanging out with friends, or taking part in groups like GEM, a mentorship program for girls. “You have a mentor and they help you out. It’s kind of like Big Sisters,” Beals says. But basketball takes up plenty of her spare time. She admits it can feel overwhelming sometimes as she has to keep herself in top shape. “It’s fun … when I’m not sore,” she says. “If I don’t play for a bit and then go back to it, then I get really sore.” But she says she’s always loved playing basketball with her friends, ever since she was little. “I grew up playing

C

ara Beals looks over her daughter’s many schedules, outlining all the times Che Kara Beals will be on a basketball court in the next few months. There are training sessions with the Atlantic Centre for Performance, Sundays at a regional development camp, practices at the Community YMCA, games in the University of King’s College fall league – and this is before the high-school season starts for the Grade 10 student at Citadel High. “Yeah, it keeps us pretty busy,” Cara Beals says. Che Kara, 15, is in demand as one of the top up-and-coming female basketball players in the province. She’s fresh off a second straight trip to the under-15 national championships, where she helped Nova Scotia capture a bronze medal for the second year in a row.

ball,” ... “We all used Beals was the youngest player on the team when she attended as a 14-yearold in 2006, but she played a key role on the squad this year that defeated powerhouse British Columbia 86-74 in the third-place game in August. “It was good because it was my second year,” says Beals. “I knew more what to expect. It seemed easier, and I knew more people on the team.” Playing on the provincial team has taken her across the country. Last year’s national championships were in Quebec, while this summer the team travelled to Vancouver. “It was a lot of fun because I’d never been there before,” Beals says. “And when we first got there we got lost, so we saw a lot of the city.” Basketball keeps her busy year-round, but things are especially hectic in the fall. Along with playing on teams she’s involved in the Centre for Performance, which brings together just a handful of the top players from around Nova Scotia and Atlantic Canada.

to fool around, and the Community Y told us we could play there once we reached Mini (age 10). Ever since then we’ve all just played, and keep going to the higher levels.” “I grew up playing ball,” she says. “We all used to fool around, and the Community Y told us we could play there once we reached Mini (age 10). Ever since then we’ve all just played, and keep going to the higher levels.” She has her eyes set on even higher levels, hoping to play university ball in the future. “I’m trying to get somewhere far,” she says. If she keeps working as hard as she does, the sky’s the limit for Che Kara Beals.


Black to Business

Fall 2007



Ancient Hermit Drums Shawn Smith, BBI

Carol Dobson source of these hides, local abattoirs are another. He knows of a spot where hunters dump the leftovers after a deer is cleaned and that is a source of deer hide. His customers come from all walks of life. They include African-Nova Scotian artist and curator David Woods, members of the local First Nations Community, and people from as far away as Alberta. “I sold two drums to Baptist ministers,” he says. “One was from the Meteghan/Clare area while the other was from southern New Brunswick.” Pat Jarvis, Ancient Hermit Drums

S

ince the dawn of time, the drum has called people from all cultures to a variety of actions. The sound of the drum can be primitive and soul searing, its beat can stir the blood, and its tone can be soft and gentle or as deep as a big bass drum. In September 2004, Pat Jarvis attended a drum circle and the beat he heard that night changed his life forever.

“I was an alcoholic and after that evening, I woke up and poured the bottle down the drain,” he says. “I fell in love with the drum. I was too poor to buy one but I was a wood carver and decided to make one. That led to another and another…” He looked at the drums his friend and mentor Kadijah had and figured out the lacing. He also had some knowledge of curing hides and brought that knowledge to the process.

His father owns a wood lot and many of the drums come from those trees. He uses local woods – pine, poplar, white birch, maple, beech, larch (hackmatack), cherry, and apple wood. Sometimes, a piece of wood with a hollow centre is brought to him by local loggers to fashion into a drum. It’s a spiritual experience to make a drum. He doesn’t know until he strips the bark from a piece of wood what is inside. When he does see the wood revealed, he can draw his inspiration from the grain, from the location of knots where branches may have broken off in the tree’s young years, and other features. “I had one drum that looked like it had eyes all around it. A woman came down to look at my drums and she had a dream a few nights earlier about eyes. She hadn’t even seen the drum yet.” The skin of the drum is made from different types of hides – bear, deer, cow, goat, and even porcupine and muskrat. Hunters are one

One drummer in Dartmouth has been playing one of Jarvis’ drums for the past eight months and he’s only three years old. “You have to start them young.”

Ancient Hermit Drums Ltd. Weymouth, Digby Co. Patrick Jarvis

902-837-7178

patrick@ancienthermitdrums.com www.ancienthermitdrums.com


Black to Business

Fall 2007



Sweet Spice Spicing up Metro Peter Marsman

Chad Lucas

Bruce serves up Jamaican staples like oxtail, curried goat and jerk chicken, along with a few more Canadian dishes such as fish and chips and burgers. He says one of the biggest challenges so far has been striking the right balance on the menu. He’d like to please fans of authentic – and spicy – Jamaican food without alienating those who might not be adventurous enough to try things like, say, goat’s head soup. “That’s the only thing I was worried about,” Bruce says. “You make a little bend, but don’t (compromise) too much. You can’t please everybody, I guess.”

Lajuane Bruce, Blair Payne & Dean Rogers - Sweet Spice

L

ajuane Bruce’s authentic Jamaican cooking comes with a recommendation from an authoritative source: his grandmother. Sure, one might think a family member would be obligated to praise his food, but listen to this stunning endorsement: “My grandmother came here when we first opened, she tasted the food and said, ‘Oh my God, you’re cooking’s better than mine!’” Bruce says with a laugh. “My father says that’s a real compliment.”

“For years (Rogers) always asked me to do this,” says Bruce, who immigrated to Canada from Jamaica as a teenager. “Finally I said, ‘All right, I’ll give it a shot.’”

The other challenge has been finding the right supplies, especially Jamaican drinks such as ginger beer. But he says he’s growing into the business side of the operation.

The small but sunny restaurant, with pictures of Jamaica and Bob Marley on the bright orange walls, has been building a steady customer base in its first year of operation. Bruce, who worked for Bin Doctor and did a string of odd jobs before Sweet Spice, said he’s been pleasantly surprised.

Customers in Halifax’s North End and “Dean thought it would take off, but I’m a little more cautious,” he says. beyond have backed up his grandmother’s assessment: Bruce knows how “I figure it’s better to come in with your expectations not so high. But to cook. it’s gone above my expectations. He may be a natural in the kitchen I thought it – he’s picked up most of his culinary might take eight skills from family members – but he months before admits his co-owner Dean Rogers people really had to pester him for years before he (started to come). finally agreed to join as a partner at Sweet Spice Restaurant, which opened But it seemed like in the first in February. two weeks … 2725 every day new Rogers had run an all-day breakfast customers were at the same Agricola Street location dropping in. It’s that now houses Sweet Spice, but he really grown.” wanted to offer Caribbean fare.

“The most rewarding part is the way people appreciate it, when you hear a customer saying, ‘You guys are doing good,’” Bruce says. With all his experience these past few months, he jokes he might – just maybe – be able to lay claim to the title of best cook in his whole family. “The things I’ve learned, I think I could give my mother a run for her money,” he laughs.

Sweet Spice Restaurant Lajuane Bruce

Agricola Street, Halifax

431-5500


Black to Business BUSINESS DEVELOPMENT

REPORT Gordon Doe

This past summer was a busy one for me on a number of fronts. Construction Strategy Implementing the recommendations of the BBI-sponsored Black Construction Sector survey report was our priority. To do so, we have incorporated ADEPA Management Inc. ADEPA will either support contractors to directly bid and manage projects or will operate as a general contractor on projects and then partner with Black contractors to successfully implement projects. This is a new model of engagement between BBI and our Black construction sector and we are already seeing positive response from the community. We are also currently conducting roundtable discussions in various communities to present this strategy and to prioritize specific training requests. We will then design implementation plans in partnership with institutions like the Nova Scotia Community College. Black Business Community Investment Fund During the summer things did not slow down with the Fund. We had our fourth annual general meeting (AGM) and we also made our fourth investment. This was a $50,000, two-year term investment in the Stone Gallery This investment brings to a total of $300,000, the invested capital of the Fund. With over 90% of our current portfolio invested, the fund is now playing an integral part in assisting Black businesses in Nova Scotia. We continue to look for your further support of our future offerings in order to increase our work in helping Black Black-owned businesses grow. Networking We had the opportunity to host a delegation from the Malawi government who were visiting Canada to learn about best practices in small business development initiatives. I also presented the BBI model to a Chinese government delegation that was here to learn about community economic development. I am also participating on a steering committee of the Nova Scotia Construction Association doing some research work to promote and sustain skilled labour and enable future growth in the industry. Last but not least, during this summer BBI was officially sworn in as a charter member of the Nova Scotia Come to Life brand. It is an acknowledgement of our contribution and commitment to spreading the excellent Nova Scotia brand everywhere we go and in all we do to help Black Businesses succeed.

Fall 2007



We’re looking for people With drive. *':068"/550803,'030/&0'5)& #&45."/"(&%$0.1"/*&4*/$"/"%"  5)&/0µ3&("/µ4*45)&1-"$&'03:06 0µ3FHBOµTJTTFFLJOHNPUJWBUFEJOEJWJEVBMTXIPBSFEFEJDBUFEUP IFMQJOHVTSFNBJO"UMBOUJD$BOBEBµTQSFNJFSBVUPNPUJWFOFFET QSPWJEFS8JUIPWFSUBMFOUFEFNQMPZFFTBDSPTTUIFQSPWJODF  0µ3FHBOµTJTDPNNJUUFEUPIJSJOHUIFCFTUBOESFUBJOJOHUIFCFTU *GZPVBSFQBTTJPOBUFBCPVUEFMJWFSJOHFYDFQUJPOBMDVTUPNFS TFSWJDF BOEDPNNJUUFEUPIJHIRVBMJUZTUBOEBSETUIFODPNF HSPXXJUIUIF0µ3FHBOµTUFBN"WBMJEESJWFSµTMJDFOTF TUSPOH PSHBOJ[BUJPOBMTLJMMT BOEUIFBCJMJUZUPESJWFBTUBOEBSETIJGU WFIJDMFJTBMTPSFRVJSFEJONPTUQPTJUJPOT 0µ3FHBOµTPGGFSTDPNQFUJUJWFTBMBSJFT  BOPVUTUBOEJOHCFOF¾UQBDLBHF BOE DPNQBOZ341NBUDIJOHQSPHSBN *GZPVBSFJOUFSFTUFEJOXPSLJOHGPSPVS BXBSEXJOOJOHUFBN WJTJUPVSXFCTJUFBU XXXPSFHBOTDPNGPSNPSFJOGPSNBUJPO PODVSSFOUFNQMPZNFOUPQQPSUVOJUJFT

WWW.oregans.com

BBI Stats The BBI has been involved with approximately 1402 clients over the past ten years • Loans

206

• Approved Equity Loans

11

• Approved Development Funds

50

• Withdrawals

34


Fall 2007

Black to Business



Trailblazers

5

Juanita Peters

Who’s Who and What’s New at the Nova Scotia Community College

NSCC/Kingstec Campus – Employee Services Advisor Born: Wolfville, Nova Scotia

H

er career at the college began on August 6, 1976. Charlotte States was enrolled in a oneyear stenography program; after graduating she learned that the school was looking to fill a position in the Student Services Division. She and a number of her colleagues were interviewed and the rest is history. She has now been with the college for 31 years. “I have served on a number of committees both at the campus level and college level including

a three-year term on the Board of Governors for NSCC. The most recent change in my department came over a year ago which has given me more hands-on responsibility for our campus employees. I enter all hires in the system, initiate benefits, casual pay, pay changes, i.e. increments, status changes, leave-reporting, etc. I help in the interview process, either sitting on the interview panels or working with the Academic Chairs/Managers in preparation for the interviews and submission of paperwork to Central Office. I also work closely with our Principal and as a member of the Management Team at our local campus, I enjoy and appreciate being an active participant of the decision-making process,” says States. “I believe what I do is rewarding because it is working with people. I am a people-person and enjoy meeting new people, and providing whatever support I can to help them have a positive experience in the work place.” She says if she were not working at NSCC, she would probably be working as a volunteer for the Nazarene Church in Volunteer Ministries around the world. She is a District Mission President for the Canada Atlantic District for the Church of the Nazarene. Charlotte States is married to Willard States. They have four children (Marcey, Josh, Courtney and Isaiah) ranging in ages from eight to 23. She is also the proud grandmother of 18-month-old Issac.

Archy Beals

Peter Marsman

Contributed

Charlotte States

NSCC/Dartmouth Waterfront Campus – NSCC AfricanCanadian Services Committee Born: Halifax, Nova Scotia

A

rchy Beals graduated from Dalhousie University in 1992 with a BA in political science. While at Dalhousie, he also took some courses in education and sociology. He says he decided to pursue this route because of hardships and struggles he went through in the public education system. I can remember in junior high being called to the Vice Principal’s office and being told that I should not pick academic courses for high school, that I


Black to Business

The role Archy Beals plays today at NSCC is one of recruitment, retention, advising and advocacy for African-Canadian students at seven campuses across the province. Since starting at the college 13 years ago he says there have been significant changes. For 10 of those years, he was the sole African- Canadian Student Coordinator for 13 campuses from Yarmouth to Sydney. Now, there are two additional coordinators – Sylvia Francis in the Annapolis Valley and TriCounty Area as well as Darren Desmond in Cape Breton. “I believe this is the start of the African Canadian Student Success Division within the College. The African-Canadian Transition program for African-Nova Scotians who do not have their grade 12 diploma is another new initiative at the college. Through the Nova Scotia Human Rights Commission, the college has trained 21 diversity trainers to deliver diversity sessions to all NSCC faculty and staff,” says Beals. Archy Beals is married to Caroletta Downey-Beals, and they have two daughters, nine-year-old Letteisha and five-year-old Kaya.

Jill Provoe Peter Marsman

should go the general route and pursue a trade at the Vocational School. I knew that I always wanted to go to university and that I would do whatever it took to get there. I was so distraught that I went to my guidance counsellor, Alma Johnston, and she told me to put my best foot forward and follow my dreams. It took me an extra year to finish high school, but I was overjoyed when I did.”



NSCC/Akerley Campus – Program Coordinator/African Canadian Transition Program Born: Glace Bay, Nova Scotia

J

ill Provoe says she came to the campus last year as coordinator of the new

African Canadian Transition Program, which is offered in partnership with the African Canadian Services Division of the Department of Education. It is a program offered to African Canadian adults wanting to pursue their high school diploma in an Africentric learning environment. In essence, program participants are given the opportunity to experience a total liberation of the African mind, body and soul,” she

Fall 2007 says. “I believe strongly in the value of Africentric educational programming because, overall, it promotes unity and community involvement. In the safety of our classroom, we critically analyze topics such as racism, power, privilege and politics, as we encourage students to strive for excellence in all they do. This position is a dream come true, and I feel blessed as I strive to inspire others to work hard and persevere through education.” Provoe is no stranger to challenges. Through Mount Saint Vincent University, she earned a Certificate in Business Administration, a Certificate in Marketing, Bachelor of Public Relations, a Master of Human Ecology (Family Studies), and a Master of Education (Educational Foundations). By age 25, she graduated with her second Master’s degree and was a single parent with three children under age five. “It was a difficult time, but I believe this experience has strengthened my character and motivation to be successful. It also helps me to build a connection with our students because I can relate to some of their challenges,” she says. Jill Provoe says if she is looking forward to continuing her work with the amazing participants and staff of the program. She says this is an exciting opportunity to focus on the needs of African Nova Scotians in education. She says it is time for change and, for these participants, the transformation starts here.


Black to Business

Fall 2007



Taryn Della

Shauntay Grant

Peter Marsman

poet, comedian, playwright

school students in their academic endeavours. Both Billie shows are quite different in structure, but the goal remains the same. “(Honouring) our ancestral strength and vision and beauty and brilliance in ways that are very vivid and involved and physical, so that we’re actually honouring the fact that we are able to do what we do today by making sure that we define our ancestry as brilliant and beautiful.”

“... I think that humour Taryn Della hosting the ANSMA Awards Show

I

t’s a hot summer afternoon in Halifax. About 50 people have packed

into the DANSpace on Grafton Street to witness the latest from Taryn Della: Billies Blues Revisited, a show that uses comedy, music and spoken word to chart both the beauty and pain of the Black experience. “On the count of three I want you all to give me one great big laugh, ok?” Della smiles reassuringly, facing rows of mostly Caucasian audience members. “Here we go: one… two… three!” The audience explodes into laughter, letting go their reservations in the process. “Healing and communicating through humour” Della calls it. “Connecting lives and stories and

events and history, and telling things through humour. And having people somehow let their guard down as they sit there.” Della is a Nova Scotian journalist, comic, workshop facilitator, and writer. She’s shared her talents at special events, corporate functions, and festival of all sorts. Della also works a lot with youth, particularly in Halifax’s north end community. She received support from the Centre for Entrepreneurship Education and Development (CEED)’s Youth Employability Project to provide employment opportunities for youth to learn entrepreneurship and life skills. “I define success as seeing our babies embrace their brilliance,” says Della. “(Seeing them) embrace their beauty and believe in their possibilities. “ Billies Blues Revisited is the follow-up to Della’s previous Atlantic Fringe Festival hit My Blues Are Like Billies. Like with many of her projects, proceeds from Revisited went towards supporting high

not only engages, but it brings people together.”

– Taryn Della

In illustrating this ancestral legacy, Billie’s Blues Revisited touches on some serious and painful topics – racism, lynching, misconceptions about Black youth... “I do what I can to just give a different version of the story,” says Della. “And I think that humour not only engages, but it brings people together.” And it’s through humour that Della has proved successful in broaching serious subjects, sparking dialogue between diverse communities, and ultimately bringing people together. “I’m from a background that tells me that if we don’t find a way to heal from whatever’s going on, we don’t move forward. We make the same mistakes over and over, and (the situation) may even get worse.” “Humour will help you to let it go.”


Black to Business

10

REGIONAL REPORT Central

Message from the Board of Directors continued from page 1

always minimizes their risk with alternate or contingent plans. Where do you fit on the risk continuum? 3) Change Enthusiast: A successful entrepreneur must be constantly assessing the business environment and be prepared to change as the business community changes. Inability to change may result in failure. What is your appetite for change? 4) Delegate Tasks: When you are starting a business it’s impossible to know how to do everything yourself. You must be comfortable in delegating when appropriate and running the parts of the business that you excel in. Acknowledgement of your skills and the value of your time are vital to your success as an entrepreneur. How do you feel giving up some control? 5) Handle Rejection Well: In the start-up and establishment of your business you are liable to run into opposition from friends, family, creditors, business associates, and soon to be ex-co-workers. Dealing with rejection is part of being an entrepreneur. As an entrepreneur, it is up to you to believe in your business and stick to it until you obtain the level of success you desire. Are you easily overwhelmed by rejection? Upon completing the self-assessment, how do you rate? Given the strength of the current business environment, your entrepreneurial profile, and the right business plan, you are destined for entrepreneurship and business success. It is important to understand that the continued strength in the economic climate supports and bolsters the work of BBI. At BBI, we recognize that our clients are at different stages in their growth. On a monthly basis, our Regional

Fall 2007

Business Development Managers meet with budding entrepreneurs who are on the verge of taking the leap and require one set of supports. There is also regular interaction with those who have made the decision to begin their own businesses, and who require a different set of supports that may include assistance and training in various aspects of business to achieve their goals. BBI continues to support the technical and business development of our client base either through our Training Centre or through referral to other training facilities and access to other business professionals. A third group are those business owners who have flourished through the first iteration of their business plan. It is this group who requires BBI’s assistance with their growth plans, additional financial planning or additional financial resources to fund their growth strategies. BBI offers technical resources through our consulting and referral network, and financial resources through the Community Economic Development Investment Fund (CEDIF) or other financial affiliates. As we move into the second decade of BBI operations, we are evolving to meet the multiple and changing needs of entrepreneurs. We would like to congratulate all those business owners who have taken the leap into the world of entrepreneurship and we welcome all the others who are poised to take the leap. Calling all entrepreneurs, your success is in your hands, let BBI help you to realize it.

Cassandra Dorrington, Chair

Evan Williams

Congratulations to Craig Martin owner and operator of the new Niko Video franchise in Amherst. The new concept of DVD rentals has opened on Albion Road. You purchase a rental card and use it like a bankcard, with no personnel to deal with. It never closes and the rentals start at only $1. Check it out at www.nikovdeo.com The summer began with preparations for BBI’s 11th AGM and Gala. Again, this event was a great success and was well attended. We are now in the process of planning for the 2008 Business Summit. In June, I was able to deliver our Entrepreneurship 101 workshop in Truro. I will be facilitating another Entrepreneurship 101 workshop in Amherst in the near future. For those of you thinking of finally starting or expanding your business in 2008, you should be talking to us now. I look forward to assist in increasing community and business development opportunities in the Black community. For more information or to book a regional visit please contact me at (902) 426-6692 or 1-800-668-1010 or by email at williams.evan@bbi.ns.ca.


Black to Business

Fall 2007

11

Arm Candy Handbags

Juanita Peters

Paul Adams

the sense that they come to your home with the product, except you get to take your purchase home with you. You can host a party and have a number of people come over to look at the supply, or you can order online. “We take anywhere from 100 to 150 purses with us to show and we’ll also bring accessories like bangles and sunglasses. People just love the experience. Try on a lot of purses and they are all in a reasonable price range,” says Arisa.

What makes a good purse? Well, they say, that is dependent on the woman. Some like Arisa and Jason Jackson of Arm Candy Handbags their purse to be big and bulky. Some like small purses, new shopping experisome like leather and others are into ence is in your reach canvas. It’s also about your personal wardrobe and style. Jason says his and Arisa and Jason wife Arisa loves purses so much he Jackson are ready to introduce knew there had to be a market out you to it. “It’s instant satisfacthere. So two years ago they thought about starting a business. They tion and one size fits all,” they first took the purses to family and say. friends. Then they introduced work colleagues to the idea and the rest is The Jacksons have created a busihistory. ness they thought would have them booked about four times a month. But already, they have at least four bookings every weekend. “We had no idea it would be this popular, now we are looking at hiring consultants to go out and help with the sales,” says Jason.

A

What are they selling? Purses. Big ones, small ones, exotic ones. You name it, they have it. The business is very much like Aloettte or Avon, in

Now they knew they were on to something, but how would they work this? They didn’t want to set up a new business and shop because they each have a full-time job. Jason works at the Royal Bank as an account manager and Arisa works for Big Brothers and Big Sisters. The home party scenario became a perfect fit for them. They say they also have contacts now in Ottawa and as far away as Calgary. “... People just love the experience. Try on a lot of purses and they are all in a reasonable price range,” says Arisa.

Currently the purses are also sold at The Beauty Centre, 45 Waverley Road in Dartmouth and the Jacksons are in conversations with a couple of other possible outlets as well. They say they are most interested in locations that have lots of female clients. Jason says there are five things a person needs to be successful: a good product, a dependable team, hard work, commitment, and follow-up service. Request a quote now!


Black to Business

Fall 2007

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Black Business Inititive’s

11th Annual General Meeting by: Angela Johnson Photography: Peter Marsman

T

he African Nova Scotian community was decked out in its finest again this year at the Black Business Initiative’s 11th Annual General Meeting Gala Dinner and Dance.

Business

The Hounourable Peter MacKay, Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency

The gala event was held in the Schooner Room of Casino Nova Scotia on Friday, June 29, 2007. Her Honour, the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia, Mayann E. Francis attended, and greetings were delivered by his Honour Peter MacKay, Minister of the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency, and dignitaries representing all levels of government. In addition to the requisite reports delivered from various staff and board members, four young ladies were celebrated for their excellence, and awards were given out in the now established categories of Entrepreneur of the Year and the Hector Jacques Award of Business Excellence.

Four young ladies were celebrated for their excellence KaSteva Benton, Kyiasha Benton, Sharon Smith & Mariah Cromwell

Her Honour, the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia, Mayann E. Francis arrives continued >


Barbara Miller Manning, President and CEO of IT Interactive Services, Inc., winner of the Hector Jacques Award of Business Excellence with Her Honour, the Lieutenant Governor of Nova Scotia, Mayann E. Francis

Entrepreneur of the Year This year’s honour was given to Darla Johnston of SLIC Laser Hair Removal Clinic in Sackville. Johnston incorporated her business in October 2002 and opened her doors on Valentine’s Day 2003. She says she was operating in the black by her second year, and has recently expanded her company, adding a second laser that will allow her to broaden her business. Johnston’s acceptance speech was one of the highlights of the evening.

Hector Jacques Award of Business Excellence Barbara Miller Manning, President and CEO of IT Interactive Services, Inc., accepted the Hector Jacques Award of Business Excellence for her achievements with her company. The former BBI board chair’s company recently secured a $2.08 million rebate from the province to increase the company’s staff. One of its subsidiaries, web search engine GenieKnows. com, was recently featured in a full page spread in The Chronicle-Herald. Manning and her husband John founded the business in 1999.

Former chair is toaste

Garnet Wright stepped down as Chair of the B was treated to a toast and video roast. The pro BBI CEO Rustum Southwell and Wright a la ‘s a small world’ using actors who displayed a st Wright worked at a local hamburger joint Sou Southwell caught little Garnet day-dreaming a was supposed to be working. It was a crowd p

Darla Johnston of SLIC Laser Hair Removal Clinic, the BBI Entreprenur of the Year 2007 Joe Paris presents Garnet Wright with a special gift.


nt

s

BBI’s Annual General Meeting Luncheon and Clinic

by: Gordon Doe

Dancing the night away After the food, reports, awards and video fun were done, those who remained danced the night away to the smooth Rhythm and Blues ballads of Muzz Marshall and her band. In between sets, DJ Mo Bounce, also known as Ivan Skeet, shook up the crowd with recent and ‘old skool’ hits.

Muzz Marshall and her band entertained all evening

sted and roasted

f the BBI board last year and in true BBI fashion The production traced the connection between a la ‘six-degrees-of-separation’ or as in ‘it’s ed a striking resemblance to the two gents. nt Southwell owned. In one scene, the younger ming about life after flipping burgers when he owd pleaser.

Panelists (l to r),Delvina Bernard, Wayn Hamilton, Carolann Wright Parks and Gordon Tynes.

There were lots to eat and learn at this year’s Board Clinic. As part of the Black Business Initiative’s (BBI’s) eleventh anniversary celebration, the BBI hosted a four-member panel who spoke passionately on the subject “A Vibrant Community”. There was representation from the provincial government departments of Education and Economic Development to discuss the state of our community. The panellists were Delvina Bernard, Executive Director, Council on African Canadian Education (CACE); Wayn Hamilton, CEO, Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs; Carolann Wright-Parks, Manager, Community Economic Development, Greater Halifax Partnership; and Gordon Tynes, Manager, ADEPA. The function kicked off with Rustum Southwell, BBI CEO, presenting a progress report on the ongoing work of the BBI’s sustainability strategy. He described the different entities that have been created to enable the BBI to become financially Rustum Southwell sustainable, thereby ensuring that the quality services BBI provides and the resulting growth in client business continues. Next, each panellist spoke briefly on their organization’s mandate, brief history, achievements, future opportunities and challenges. The audience had the opportunity to participate through a question and answer session. One of the key observations from the discussion was that as a community we are not engaging our youth in these kinds of debates and are at a great risk of losing them and their vital contribution. This is a scary situation since, to paraphrase Coach Carter, “the youth are a fraction of our present but 100% of our future”. Also, the need to effectively communicate what each organization is doing to ensure that our entire community is well informed is vital. To this end, Delvina Bernard elaborated on the work being done by CACE on the Africentric Learning Institute.


Black to Business

DIME

15 Chad Lucas Paul Adams, Photography

Fall 2007 Steven Morrison with an LCD Sign

digital signage solutions

Y

ou never know where inspiration will strike. For James Doucet, it came while staring at a giant Captain Morgan advertisement in downtown Halifax.

but I think at that point we weren’t really all that happy where we were,” Morrison says. In a way, Morrison has come full circle with DIME: he’d left a corporate position to work for the smaller online firm during the dot-com boom, but that company was swallowed up first by a competitor and then by an American chain. James Doucet, Keith Gordon, and Steven Morrison of Dynamic Integrated Marketing Enterprises (DIME) “We were out by the Argyle and I looked up and saw this billboard,” says Doucet. “I said, ‘You know, if we had a projector or something that could switch the ads on that, we could make a lot of money.’” What could have been a passing thought turned into a lucrative opportunity for Doucet and his partners, Steven Morrison and Keith Gordon. Four years later, they’re on the leading edge of the growing digital signage industry with their company, DIME Inc. DIME stands for Dynamic

Integrated Marketing Enterprises, and it’s been a dynamic process of change for the three friends and entrepreneurs. Morrison was working for an online contact lens retailer and Gordon was doing communications for a biotech firm in Montreal when Doucet convinced them to strike out with him on a new venture. Both Morrison and Gordon said it didn’t take much to bring them on board. “It was a risk for everybody,

“It went from a few guys like us in a room to a staff of 200,” Morrison says. “It was time to move on to something new and DIME was a great concept.” DIME produces everything from interactive displays to the type of LCD signs that are popping up everywhere from malls to Tim Hortons. The displays are becoming more and more prevalent, but when the three partners started it was difficult convincing companies to take on a new technology that was exotic and, at the time, expensive. “We started back before the digi-


Black to Business

products. Killam can use them not only for advertising but also relaying important messages to tenants, while Heritage Credit Union can use them to both post information and advertise services to people waiting in line.

cess, from helping clients develop their ideas to producing content and monitoring networks. That means one day they might be building a network, another studying market trends or demographics, another shooting video.

“We’re in a position now to figure out what works for which client,” Doucet says.

“We all do multiple things, and every day is different,” says Doucet. “That’s fun about it, for sure.”

“One of the nice things about what we do is we’re not just building Product X and if you don’t like Product X, go to someone else,” Morrison adds. “We try to build something that’s really in tune to what (our customers) do.” tal signage industry really had a name,” says Morrison. “It was quite a challenge. We were ahead of the curve a fair bit, but we knew eventually it was something that was going to be viable for everyone. It was a good time to (break in) because we were able to learn it before anyone else, and that’s why we’re the leaders in Atlantic Canada right now. We put in our lumps.”

DIME bills itself as an end-toend service provider, meaning they do everything from developing content for their clients’ displays to taking care of maintenance and regular updates. “It’s pretty much out of their hair,” Gordon says. “They tell us what they want to see on the screens and everything else is taken care of. So it simplifies their lives quite a bit.”

Morrison says DIME’s big break came about two years ago, when Aliant agreed to use their digital displays in its retail stores. Since then, they’ve also taken on large players such as Heritage Credit Union and Killam Properties.

Gordon says another big benefit to customers is they can control all of their branding and advertising from a central location, rather than depend on each branch to look after itself.

“(Aliant) immediately gave us credibility,” Morrison says. “We weren’t just three guys – the largest IT company in the area had sought us out for our expertise.” Doucet says the beauty of digital signs is their adaptability. For example, Aliant uses them as a sort of virtual sales rep, displaying information about their

Fall 2007

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“It allows companies to pretty much instantly update their promotional campaigns to all their outlets at once,” he said. “I think a lot of customers see the value in that instant communication.” The three men say one of the things they enjoy most about DIME is the variety it brings to their work day. Their company employs six people and they’re involved in every step of the pro-

And they figure they’ll only grow busier as digital signage continues to land in locations from outdoor billboards to grocery stores. Morrison said he thinks it will eventually eclipse most old forms of advertising. “There will come a time, I think, where you just won’t see postering and stuff like that anymore,” he says. “You can save a lot of trees by not having to replace posters. Yes, (digital signage) is a little harder on the environment to develop initially, but the renewable costs can be realized quite quickly.” As the market grows, expect DIME to stay on the leading edge.

DIME

Dynamic Integrated Marketing Enterprises

Steven Morrison Dartmouth, NS

454-5927 info@dimeinc.com www.dimeinc.com


Black to Business

e Business Forum

W

Fall 2007

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How Can Business Owners Retire? - With a Do-It-Yourself Pension Plan.

hen asked what the biggest challenge is in run-

ning their business, many business owners say it’s finding and retaining clients, and maintaining sufficient cash

flow. But too often, they put off one thing that they should be focused on – retirement planning. “Retirement planning is essential for business owners and selfemployed individuals at any age, especially if they won’t be receiving a traditional pension,” says Jim White, Regional President of Commercial Banking for RBC Royal Bank in Metro Halifax. “Business owners face an array of challenges that, in the short-term, seem more important,” he adds. “Creating a plan now will help them to achieve their retirement goals, whether that’s around the corner, or 20 years away.” RBC Royal Bank, which serves one in four small businesses across Canada, offers a number of practical tips to small business owners. First, it’s impossible to predict just how your retirement nest egg will grow. Things like the state of the markets and interest rates are out of your hands. But there is something important in your control – what you set aside, and when. The easiest savings strategy is to set up monthly contributions to your investments. There are

two big benefits. You won’t have the financial strain of having to assemble a large sum at any given time. And you’re able to invest consistently throughout the year, which means you can pick up more units or shares at times when the price of the investment is low. This is commonly known as dollar cost averaging. RRSPs offer two tax advantages – contributions are tax-deductible, and your returns are tax-deferred. When it comes time to make withdrawals, that RRSP money will be taxed at the same rate as any earned income or interest. “Ideally, you want to reduce your tax rate in retirement, and one strategy is to ensure that you have a component of non-registered investments that pays dividends, capital gains, or return of capital,” explains White. According to RBC, people who have a corporation and pay themselves a salary can set up an Individual Pension Plan (IPP) to increase their pension savings. “Basically, an IPP is a companysponsored defined benefit pension plan, with a membership of one,” says White.

contribution. There’s an expected rate for investment earnings within an IPP, currently 7.5% per year. If actual earnings are less, the company can contribute additional funds to top up the shortfall; this isn’t possible with an RRSP. Another option is an Insured Retirement Plan (IRP), which offers tax-free supplemental income through tax-exempt life insurance. “This makes sense if you’re at least 10-15 years from retirement, already making your maximum annual RRSP contributions, and in need of life insurance,” says White. “You also need good health, excess discretionary income, and an insurance need such as estate planning or business succession.” With an IRP, an individual buys universal life insurance. The annual deposits are invested, with tax-deferred growth. Upon retirement, you can assign the cash surrender value as collateral to a lender. In turn, the lender provides annual loans, and here’s the best part – the loans aren’t considered income for tax purposes. What happens when you die? The outstanding loans are repaid by the face value of the insurance, with the remainder available for your beneficiaries.

Who stands to benefit the most from an IPP? Individuals who are at least in their early 40s, and who earn over $100,000. In these circumstances, the maximum IPP contribution is usually higher than the RRSP limit.

“Entrepreneurs have varied choices for retirement planning,” adds White. “The key is getting the right financial advice, and giving yourself enough time to take advantage of all the options.”

For the company, IPP contributions are tax-deductible. If the owner has run their company for some time, he or she may be able to make a lump sum, catch-up

RBC Royal Bank is one of Canada’s largest banks. This article is part of a series of publications produced and distributed by RBC Royal Bank. Used by permission.


Black to Business

Fall 2007

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Steve’s Barbershop Evan Williams, BBI

A Multigenerational Business

Carol Dobson

“I got my training in Sydney, which was lots of fun. I came back here and worked in Bob’s Barber Shop in Amherst for a few years before I found the place here.” He had his eye on a large department store that was empty and for rent. The owner of the building was debating dividing it in two, but Martin talked with him about creating a miniature shopping centre, with smaller stores opening from a central hallway. That was how the subdivision of the building transpired and today, two decades later, the original tenant – Martin – is still there.

Steve Martin, the owner of Steve’s Barber Shop

P

rofessional motorcycle racer Ryan Lockhart travels all over the world but he comes home to Springhill, Nova Scotia, to get his hair cut. “His grandmother started bringing him in as a little lad and no one else but me has professionally cut his hair,” says Steve Martin, the owner of Steve’s Barber Shop. “He’ll be away for two or three months in Europe, other parts of Canada, or the States, and he’ll wait until he comes back. One time, in Florida, he went and got a set of clippers and tried to cut his hair himself and that was enough. He decided never to try that again.”

“People these days get their hair cut regularly so you don’t see the rushes,” he says. “Things are usually good at Christmas though, with good tips.”

Martin has been barbering for the past 23 years, 20 years in his own shop. He is a native of Springhill and spent a few years in Edmonton, Alberta, before coming back home.

His business is multigenerational and he’s now seeing the grandchildren of his original customers coming in. The shop is also a place where local politicians of both the

There have been changes in the flow of business in that time. When he first began, he found he had a rush at certain times of the year. Parents would bring their children in at the beginning of the summer for a close haircut. That would be the last he’d see of them until just before school started. That trend isn’t as prevalent today. He also doesn’t get the big rush just before Christmas that he used to have.

red (Guy Brown) and blue (Murray Scott) stripes go for their regular haircuts. His store is a gathering place, where stories are told and where a lot of networking takes place. The day he spoke to Black to Business, a customer came in and the talk in the chair centred around a truck he wanted to sell. As luck would have it, a customer a few weeks ago told Martin that he was looking for a new truck. He put those two pieces together and potentially connected the two. “Of course, in Springhill, we had the bumps in the ’50s,” he recalls. “One of the guys who was rescued mentioned he’d like a 7-Up. The Pepsi Company heard this and gave him a job in Ontario. He retired back here and was in getting his hair cut one day when he saw that another man in the shop was someone who’d been a good friend when they were in the mines. They’d lost track of each other. The guy who lived here didn’t realize he was back and because they met in the shop, they were able to become close friends again.”

Steve’s BarberShop Steve Martin 1 Elm Street Springhill, NS

902-690-0254


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Fall 2007

People & Businesses on the Move

YaNRo Howard Windsor, the acting head of the Halifax Regional School Board has created a new African Nova Scotian Advisory Committee. Members of the committee are Dr. Pemberton Cyrus, April HoweDiplock, Vivian Dixon, Angela Johnson, Jeremy Martell, Sherrolyn Riley, and RCMP Cpl. Craig Smith. The Hon. Mayann Francis was the special guest speaker at Marcus Garvey Days at the historic U.N.I.A. (Universal Negro Improvement Association) Cultural Museum in Glace Bay in August. Ms. Francis held her first Garden Party of her term as Lieutenant Governor at the Halifax Citadel National Historic Site of Canada in late June. Congratulations to Dr. Linda Carvery on her recent appointment as a Citizenship Judge. African Nova Scotia students will benefit from a $1.8 million investment in the Africentric Learning Institute and in the creation of an African Nova Scotian Education Foundation. The goal of this investment is to improve literacy and raise the overall achievement of black learners. Maneesha Rajora, a Grade 12 student from Halifax West High School is this year’s recipient of the $6000 Dr. P. Anthony Johnstone Memorial Entrance Scholarship.

This year’s Atlantic Film Festival featured “Little Black Schoolhouse”, “A Winter Tale”, and “Poor Boy’s Game” on its schedule. “Poor Boy’s Game finished the festival with a number of significant prizes. Congratulations to Geraldine Browning, one of the recipients of the 2007 Volunteer Award for Outstanding Contributions to Community-Based Literacy in Nova Scotia. She was honoured at this year’s International Literacy Day celebration on Friday, September 7 in Dartmouth. East Preston United Baptist Church celebrated its 165th anniversary in September with a number of special services, family events, and guest speakers and musicians including Elder Arthur Williams from Florida and Trynda Thomas as well as selections from a special anniversary mass choir. Former BBI staffer Tracey Thomas has accepted a one-year contract as the acting executive director of the Nova Scotia Association of Regional Development Authorities. Emmanuel Baptist Church celebrated its 162nd Anniversary Celebration during the weekend of August 24-6, using “Catch the Wave” as its theme. The SONAHHAR Canada Black Sports Awards second annual Black Ice Hockey and Sports Hall of Fame Conference was held in Dartmouth in August. Presentations included “The

Life of Willy O’Ree”, the lost history of the Coloured Hockey League of the Maritimes, and “The Black Ice Project & The Underground Railroad”. O’Ree was one of the speakers at the conference. Other special guest speakers included Percy Paris MLA and Cecil Wright. Halifax’s IT Interactive Services, a web-search advertising and softwaredevelopment company, is expanding its Halifax headquarters. The company received payroll rebate, set at a maximum $2,082,500, from Nova Scotia Business Inc. Over the next six years, the company plans to hire approximately 200 new workers. Congratulations to Dr. Josephine Etowa who recently earned her PhD and became a tenured professor of Nursing at Dalhousie University. Congratulations also to Sharon Davis Murdoch who received the Premier’s Award of Excellence for her work in diversity and inclusion. The 20th Annual Cst. Jonathan Skeete “Fun Run” was held on August 6th in Whitney Pier. Congratulations to Anthony Jackson, of Service Canada, who received the Public Service Award of Excellence for his commitment to setting up and maintaining the Persons with Disabilities Collaborative Partnership. As the coordinator of the program, Mr. Jackson has demonstrated a strong commitment to the successfully employing people with disabilities in this province.


Black to Business

Fall 2007

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People & Businesses on the Move continued... Dr. Molefi Kete Asante, the father of Africentricity, delivered a talk at the North Preston Recreation Centre on July 13. The Freedom Schooner Amistad made a Canada Day weekend visit to Halifax. From Nova Scotia, she was headed to England for the 200th anniversary of the Wilberforce Act and her journey will take her eventually to Sierra Leone. On her journey, she will be carrying a copy of the painting depicting the departure from Halifax in 1792 of the 15 vessels that travelled from this province to found Freetown, Sierra Leone. It depicts some of the 15 Halifax merchant vessels that left Halifax in January 1792, carrying roughly 1,000 Black Loyalists to Sierra Leone. Commemoration 2007: a week of events marking the 200th anniversary of the end of the slave trade and four centuries of Black Canadiana and heritage was held at Saint Mary’s University from June 25 – 30. The event featured lectures from scholars, viewings of the file “Sankofa”, a town hall meeting at the Black Cultural Centre, and the unveiling of the new statue at the North Branch Library. Eric Husbands Senior of Spryfield a.k.a. “the candle guy,” has created a business making new candles from recycled candle wax that he obtains primarily from area churches. He sells his creations during Christmas, Easter, and other major holidays at the South Centre Mall. The lives of two young people that ended too soon were commemorated in Dartmouth. A basketball court has been named in honour of Demetreous Beals, who drowned earlier this year while Roleika Drive has been named in honour of Roleika Downey who lost her battle with lupus in 2002. The first spelling bee organised by the

Regional Educators Association, held at Mount Saint Vincent University attracted 88 African-Nova Scotian students. It was won by 13-year-old John Beaton of New Glasgow. Congratulations to Veronica Marsman on her unanimous re-election as the president of The Canadian Association of Social Workers (CASW) On Thursday, July 12, the Black Loyalist Heritage Society hosted a workshop featuring the quilting techniques if the ladies of Gee’s Bend, and historical re-enactment and the launching of Our Ancestors Garden, quilts from the Black community. Michael Duck was the guest speaker at the 2007 Family Business Dinner sponsored by the Canadian Association of Family Enterprise, held at Dartmouth’s Golf and Country Club. Frank Dorrington was inducted into the Nova Scotia Sports Hall of Fame at the annual induction ceremony at Halifax’s World Trade and Convention Centre on October 19. He was a star of senior hockey in this province and Newfoundland in the 1950s and had both the distinction of being named the best ‘import’ player ever to come to Newfoundland and had his number, 17, retired, and commemorated in the Humber Memorial Gardens hockey arena in Corner Brook. Dennie Oliver, a Halifax native and star of the St. Francis Xavier team has been added to the roster of the Halifax Rainmen basketball team. The Rainmen opened their training camp in Bridgewater on August 25, in preparation for their inaugural season.

Canadian opera superstar Measha Bruggergosman wowed the audience at this year’s Royal Nova Scotia International Tattoo. She was featured in three segments – ‘A Night at the Opera’, a tribute to this year’s International Gathering of the Clans, and the grand finale, where she raised the roof singing “Ave Maria”. Ryan Williams, of East Preston, was named rookie of the year in the semipro Western Major Baseball League. He is a reliever with the Lethbridge (Alberta) Bulls and chalked up an impressive record this season. George “Budge” Byers, an outstanding boxer from Prince Edward Island was inducted into the PEI Sports Hall of Fame. Byers also played a significant role in the career of Nova Scotia’s George Dixon. Dr. Gaynor Watson Creed, Nova Scotia’s new medical health officer was the subject of a profile in the most recent edition of the Dalhousie Alumni News. The George Dixon Centre recently received a significant renovation of its grounds. Improvements include two new basketball courts, including one that can be flooded in the winter and used as a skating rink, a fountain, a wheelchair accessible playground, new pathways, and lighting. The 14th annual Tribute Ceremony honouring Canada’s first and only Black Battalion, “The #2 Construction Battalion C.E.F.” was held on July 7 in Pictou. The Victory Medal of the late Sapper Percy Fenton of Yarmouth was unveiled. The keynote speaker was Percy A. Paris, MLA WaverleyFall River- Beaver Bank.


Black to Business

REGIONAL REPORT NORTHERN

Message from the Chief Executive Officer continued from page 2

Minster of Foreign Affairs and Minister responsible for the Atlantic Canada Opportunities Agency (ACOA) regaled us by their attendance. We were moved to have these two public figures celebrate with us. Having her Honour Mayann Francis present the prestigious Hector Jacques Award of Business Excellence to her longtime friend Barbara Manning set the stage for a night of celebration. We seldom get a federal minister to join us, so we were extremely pleased that despite his busy schedule Peter Mackay was able to fit us into his calendar and bring the message on behalf of the federal government. It added to the elegance of the evening. Apart from the messages from other funding partners, delivered by Wayn Hamilton on behalf of the province and Rose Davidson on behalf of Service Canada, there were other recognitions, awards and celebrations. Carlo Simmons and Bruce Johnson were thanked for a combined 18 years of service on the Board of Directors and Garnet Wright was celebrated in a video tribute for his term as Board Chair. Later in the evening, Darla Johnston of SLIC Laser Hair Removal Clinic was named Entrepreneur of the Year.

It was only the second time the award was given out. A “crowning” moment of the gala came when we celebrated four youth for their entrepreneurial success. Kyiasha and KaSteva Benton aged 10 and 11, and Sharon Smith and Mariah Cromwell aged 5 and 7 received a standing ovation from the packed house for business success at a young age. Indeed we do help Black Business succeed. Now in October it seems like ages ago. With all the business networking, new companies and changes in operation we are ready to face the twelfth winter of our existence. We are without some good team members this year – Matthew Johnson is now at ACOA and as I mentioned earlier, Starr Francis left for a position with the federal Justice Department. Both will be missed. We promise to meet our challenge and help Black Business succeed. We will fulfill our mission. “Each generation out of relative obscurity must discover its mission. Fulfill or betray it.” – Franz Fanon

S.I. Rustum Southwell, CEO

Business Calendar Tuesday, November 20, 2007 Centre for Women in Business - Women’s Networking Night CASH FLOW– KEEPING MONEY IN YOUR POCKET 6:30 to 9:00 p.m Holiday Inn Express, 133 Kearney Lake Road, Halifax Cost : $10 members - $15 non-members Register/Info: 457-6449 or toll-free outside Metro: 1-888-776-9022 Thursday, December 6, 2007 BBI Christmas Social/Directory Launch Waterfront Warehouse, 1549 Lower Water Street, Halifax, NS 5:30 pm For info: 426-2224

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Tuesday, December 11, 2007 Centre for Women in Business - Women’s Networking Night PUTTING THE SPOTLIGHT ON ‘YOU’ 6:30 to 9:00 p.m. Holiday Inn Express,133 Kearney Lake Rd, Halifax $10 for members - $15 for non-members. Register/Info: 457-6449 or toll-free outside Metro: 1-888-776-9022 Thursday, February 8, 2007 Metro Halifax Business Awards The Westin Nova Scotian Hotel, 1181 Hollis St., Halifax, NS 5:00pm – 10:00pm Recognizing risk takers and the success of our thriving business community Black Tie For info: Leanne Andrecyk. Tel: 481-1226, leanne@halifaxchamber.com

Bernard Elwin

Over the last three months I have made it a priority to work at strengthening partnerships in the Northern region and to that end, have increased the frequency of my visits to the area. As a result I have met with a number of clients and potential clients in New Glasgow, Guysborough and Cape Breton. Key contacts and partnering organizations include Karen MacIver (African Nova Scotia Employment Centre), Donna Hochman (Antigonish Guysborough Black Development Association) and Chantel Reid-Demeter (Office of African Nova Scotian Affairs – Sydney). During the period under review a grant of $5,000 was disbursed to The Whitney Pier Youth Club. The BBI also assisted (through sponsorship) the Glace Bay Universal Negro Improvement Association with its Marcus Garvey Festival. Once again, the BIJ Summer Youth Program had a successful run. The program was facilitated by Ms. Robyn Lee Seale (BIJ Youth Coordinator). The coordinator ran a number of youth camps and programs in Whitney Pier and Glace Bay. We would like to convey our sincere thanks to Miss Seale for her hard work and for the professional manner in which she conducted her program. We wish her all the best in her future endeavours. Capacity building through education is a key aspect of BBI’s mandate. With this in mind it is imperative that we decentralise our Training Program beyond the Halifax/Dartmouth area and into areas such as Sydney, Yarmouth and Amherst. If you’ve identified relevant courses that could be held in your region please let us know. We would be quite happy to run courses in your area providing there’s ample demand. For more information or to arrange a regional visit, please contact me at (902) 426-8688 or 1-800668-1010 or by e-mail at: elwin. bernard@bbi.ns.ca


Black to Business

Ask the BBI Featured Expert: Evan Williams, Regional Business

Development Manager

What is Cultural Tourism?

C

ultural tourism is focused on a country or region’s culture. It generally focuses on traditional communities who have diverse customs, unique forms of art and distinct social practices, which distinguishes it from other types of communities. Cultural tourism includes tourism in urban areas, particularly historic or large cities and their cultural facilities such as museums and theatres. Cultural tourism can also include tourism in rural areas highlighting the traditions of indigenous cultural communities (i.e. festivals, rituals, and sites) and their values and lifestyle. Cultural tourism has become very popular throughout Europe and is becoming increasingly popular in the United States and Canada. Heritage institutions, governments and tourist operators around the country are increasingly recognizing Cultural Tourism as a

Fall 2007

22

legitimate component of tourism, capable of increasing tourist visits and revenue. Tourism is big business. In total, it generated an estimated $19.4 billion in revenue for all three levels of government in Canada in 2006, up from just over $15 billion in 2000. Nova Scotia saw 2.1 million visitors in 2006, bringing in an estimated $1.31 billion in revenues, up 1.7% from 2005. A challenge that cultural tourism brings is ensuring that it does not destroy the very heritage that attract visitors. Tourism is a competitive, fast changing, sophisticated industry that presents its own challenges. We may want to believe that funding for the protection, development and the spirit of social good drives preservation of heritage resources. The reality is that the promise of economic benefits through tourism development is what opens the wallets of investors from the public or private sector. Visitors spend money, which is then used to improve the heritage product. The improvements help to attract more visitors, greater expenditures and further enhancements. Managed properly, this cycle is great for heritage institutions and the economy as a whole.

L

Although, Nova Scotia has amazing sites such as the Halifax Citadel, the Fortress of Louisbourg, Fort Anne and the Alexander Graham Bell complex, among many others, you may not be aware of the influence of African Nova Scotians at many of these sites. In addition, there are many sites that have played and continue to play a major role in the development and cultural heritage of the province and the country. These include, Birchtown, Africville, Sand Hill, Glace Bay, Pictou, Jordantown, and so many others. To find out more about these sites and the history of peoples of African descent in this province, visit the Black Cultural Centre of Nova Scotia. The BBI is in the initial stages of a project designed to display to stakeholders the potential tourism and economic development opportunities associated with the historical African Nova Scotian influence in the province.

If you have any questions about the project please contact me at (902) 426-6692 or by email at: williams.evan@bbi.ns.ca.


Black to Business

Fall 2007

23

Black Business Initiative

2008 Training Schedule for Metro Courses:

Day

Date

Time

Creating a Winning Business Plan

Tuesday

Jan 8, 15, 22, 29

6-8pm

Marketing Your Business

Tuesday

Feb 5, 12, 19, 26

6-9pm

Website Design for Your Business

Tuesday

Mar 4, 11, 18, 25

6-9pm

Creating A Winning Business Plan

Tuesday

Apr 1, 8, 15, 22

6-9pm

Bookkeeping I

Tuesday

May 6, 13, 20, 27

6-9pm

Bookkeeping II

Tuesday

June 3, 10, 17, 24

6-9pm

Simply Accounting-Essentials of Computerised Bookkeeping

Tuesday

July 8, 15, 22, 29

6-9pm

Website Design for Your Business

Tuesday

Aug 5, 12, 19, 26

6-9pm

Microsoft Word I, II, III

Tuesday

Sept 9, 16, 23

6-9pm

Microsoft Excel I, II, III

Tuesday

Oct 7, 14, 21

6-9pm

Microsoft PowerPoint I, II

Tuesday

Nov 18, 25

6-9pm

Computer Basics I, II, III

Tuesday

Dec 2, 9, 16

6-9pm

Workshops:

Day

Date

Time

Entrepreneurship 101

Wednesday

Jan 16

2-4pm

Making Exceptional Customer Service Your Finest Asset

Wednesday

Jan 30

6-9pm

Canada’s Paper Money – Security Features & Detection Methods

Wednesday

Feb 13

6-9pm

Entrepreneurship 101

Wednesday

Feb 27

2-4pm

Understanding, Keeping and retaining Credit

Wednesday

Mar 12

6-9pm

Submitting to Revenue Canada

Wednesday

Mar 26

6-9pm

The Ins and Outs of Import/Export

Wednesday

Apr 16

6-9pm

Human Resource Management

Wednesday

Apr 30

6-9pm

The Art of Negotiations

Wednesday

May 14

6-9pm

Intellectual Property: Is your Business protected

Wednesday

May 28

6-9pm

Basic Communications

Wednesday

June 11

6-9pm

Entrepreneurship 101 (Sydney)

Wednesday

June 25

2-4pm

Entrepreneurship 101(Yarmouth)

Wednesday

July 16

2-4pm

Entrepreneurship 101 (Amherst)

Wednesday

July 30

2-4pm

Entrepreneurship 101(Guysborough)

Wednesday

Aug 13

2-4pm

Personal Financial Management

Wednesday

Aug 27

6-9pm

Website Marketing

Wednesday

Sept 10

6-9pm

Search Engine Marketing

Wednesday

Sept 24

6-9pm

Market Yourself: aspiring musicians, artists

Wednesday

Oct 15

6-9pm

Advanced Searching & Internet Tools

Wednesday

Oct 29

6-9pm

Personal Financial Management

Wednesday

Nov 12

6-9pm

Email & Instant Messaging

Wednesday

Nov 26

6-9pm

Franchising

Wednesday

Dec 03

6-9pm

Understanding Outlook

Wednesday

Dec 10

6-9pm

Course Fee: Clients - $20.00, Non Clients : $40.00 Workshop Fee: Clients and Non Clients : $5.00 Registration is open to everyone. To register for any session, please call 426-8683 Note: Course and Workshop delivery times are subject to change.

Training & Business is Jammin’

Report

Bernard Elwin This last quarter saw the successful implementation of the Business Is Jammin’ Society (BIJ) Summer Youth Program. The Society was able to secure financing for seven Youth Coordinator positions, through Service Canada’s “Canada Summer Jobs’ program. This was a significant improvement over the previous years. Of the seven youth selected for the positions one individual decided not to continue with the program. The remaining six individuals continued with the program and were successful in assisting the organization in running this important component of the Business is Jammin’ initiative. The Youth Coordinators employed for the 2007 BIJ Summer Youth Program were: Robyn-Lee Seale (Sydney), Jason Smith (Yarmouth), Leo Cromwell (Kentville), Kelsey Jones (Amherst), Collin Mansfield (Guysborough) and Shantia Upshaw (Metro). On behalf of the board and staff of the BIJ and the Black Business Initiative (BBI) we wish to thank Robyn-Lee, Jason, Kelsey, Leo, Collin and Shantia for their hard work and dedication. We wish them all the best for the future. A number of courses and workshops were held in the Metro area during the last quarter. These included: 1. Website Design for your Business 2. Bookkeeping Level I 3. Submitting to Revenue Canada 4. Personal Financial Management Of the 56 persons registered for these courses, 39 attended. This represents a completion rate of approximately 70 % and a marked improvement over previous figures. It is our desire to see further improvement in the completion rates and a parallel reduction in the attrition rates over the coming quarters. The Training Centre has been actively examining the possibility of introducing a broader range of courses and workshops in time for our next training period. Some of these courses will cover the important areas of Website Marketing, Marketing Yourself and Selling Online. We will also continue providing training in critical, though often overlooked, areas of Word, Excel and PowerPoint. The training centre endeavours to actively explore opportunities available through the various public sector organisations. Should you have course suggestions or would like any of the listed courses held in your area, please contact me at 426-8688 or email: elwin.bernard@bbi.ns.ca


Black to Business

24

Fall 2007

Summer Youth Program Bernard Elwin

Youth Coordinator Profiles

Standing (left to right): Shantia Upshaw, Kelsey Jones Sitting (left to right): Jason Smith, Collin Mansfield, Robin-Lee Seale, Leo Cromwell

T

he Business is Jammin’ Society continued the strategy of recruiting Youth Coordinators throughout the province. Coordinators were recruited from Yarmouth, Kentville, Guysborough, Sydney, Amhurst, Truro and MetroHalifax/Dartmouth. This year we were determined to reach a larger area and towards this end we sought to increase the number of Youth Coordinators. The number of coordinator positions increased from four, last year, to seven this year. The positions were financed through the Service Canada Summer Employment program. Jason Smith (Yarmouth), Leo Cromwell (Kentville), RobinLee Seale (Sydney), Kelsey Jones (Amhurst), Collin Mansfield (Guysborough) and Shantia Upshaw (Metro) ran successful programs in their respective communities. The individual chosen for the Truro area was unable to continue with the program. The coordinators conducted 28 workshops, camps and presentations within and on the outskirts of their designated areas. A total of 230 youth were impacted through the various activities organized by the coordinators.

Business Is Jammin’ Business is Jammin’ is a province-wide charitable initiative that focuses on motivating Black youth by stressing the importance of education and personal development in all its programs. We have redesigned our promotional flyer and instituted our newly designed donation card. We hope to re-energize our promotional efforts through these materials. BIJ’s goals are to deliver a comprehensive enterprise and entrepreneurship learning strategy and instil business skills that would offer long term benefits to young people. It is hoped that participants in the BIJ program will come away with an experience that will positively impact their future. Indeed, several of our youth have established their own businesses. While the majority have returned to school, it is hoped they will remain interested in business and establish their own businesses sometime in the future. The summer program would not be possible without assistance from Service Canada, Summer Employment Program and the Black Employment Resource Centres in Kentville (Robert French), Guysborough (Donna Hochman), Sydney (Karen Green MacIver), Amhurst (Elizabeth Cooke Sumbu) and Yarmouth (Randy Fells).

Shantia Upshaw is a Halifax native who has strong ties to the community and its youth. She has worked as a Summer Youth Coordinator at Cornwallis Street Baptist Church Day Camp and as a Personal Care Worker in the community. Shantia has done volunteer work for the Ward Five Community Centre, Needham Recreational Centre, Metro Turning Point, and Elizabeth Fry Society. She is currently working Saturdays for the African Women’s Association as a Program Coordinator for the youth of the community. Shantia is working towards a degree in Social Work at Dalhousie University that will aid her desire to continue working with young people. Colin Mansfield is from Guysborough and graduated from Guysborough Academy this year. He has been employment at various jobs in the community as well as doing volunteer work for the Sunnyville ball field, and Canada Day community events. Colin prides himself on his basketball achievements including Athlete of the Year and Most Valuable Player (MVP) for 2003. Colin will be attending Atlantic Transport School in New Brunswick where he is enrolled in the Heavy Equipment Operator’s Program. Jason Smith is a three-year veteran of the BIJ Program, running BIJ Business camps, presentations and work shops in Yarmouth, Shelburne and Weymouth. BBI’s BIJ program teaches young Black students entrepreneurial skills to help them achieve confidence, wellness and business awareness in the work force. Jason states he has learned many different skills but says continued >


Black to Business

Fall 2007

25

Business is Jammin’ Kids learn entrepreneurship skills by Carolyn Sloan / Annapolis County Spectator

he most enjoys working with youth and watching them grow into adults. Jason is a third year student pursuing a challenging career in Human Services at Nova Scotia’s Community College in Yarmouth. He hopes to work with child and youth services working in group homes and youth corrections facilities. Robyn Lee Seale is an active community member in North Sydney, Nova Scotia, where she has worked for two years as a Summer Youth Coordinator for BBI. Other employment includes a basketball referee and time keeper and Spirit of the Island employee. Robyn has volunteered as a Sunday school teacher, and at Mira Pines Bible Camp. She also perused her interest in theatre by being a member of the Church Players Dinner Theatre and The Irondale Ensemble Project. Robyn, who is enrolled for her third year at St. Thomas University in Fredericton, NB., is studying Philosophy. Leo Cromwell is a native of Nova Scotia’s Valley region making his home in Kentville. He has an interest in community development, stating that many social, economic, and environmental problems will need to be tackled by communities, not just individuals. “My job as Summer Youth Coordinator has opened my eyes to the importance of offering one’s service to the community in which one lives”, says Leo. “It is a privilege to know that I have had a positive influence in my community and with the youth.” Leo is majoring in physics and mathematics at Bishop University. His plans for the future are to learn as much as he can about any topic of interest to him and to develop his web design skills.

Business was Jammin’ at the Inglewood Community Hall, where a small group of students put their budding business skills to the test last week by opening and running their own cafe for the day. The business-for-a-day project was the final activity of a camp program that teaches kids about entrepreneurship and business, including skills such as networking, marketing, and calculating profit. The camp is offered through the non-profit Black Business Initiative to African Nova Scotian youth ages nine to 15. Participant Tevin Johnson is all smiles by the end of the day, having earned a little cash after putting in a day’s work. He and his fellow young entrepreneurs were responsible for buying supplies for the cafe, advertising, and serving guests. “We had to think up different businesses,” Tevin explains. “I thought of a cafe.” He adds that now he has taken the program, he’s more interested in starting his own business than ever before. “Actually, I’m thinking about it,” he says. College student and BBI youth coordinator Leo Cromwell has been facilitating the camps in the Valley area, one at the Gibson Woods Community Centre, just outside of Kentville, and the other at the Nova Scotia Community College campus in Lawrencetown. “As a youth coordinator for the BBI, it is my job to introduce African Nova Scotian youth to entrepreneurship as a viable career option, and to stress the importance of education,” he explains. “So we talk about their plans for the future and look at how furthering their education can help them achieve their goals.”

A group of youth put their business skills to the test by opening and running their own cafe for the day at the Inglewood Community Hall. From left to right, front to back: Jamika Johnson, Tevin Johnson, Jenika Brooks-Adams, and Channen Brooks-Adams. Carolyn Sloan

The camp is advertised through the schools as well as through networking one-on-one with youth. From Cromwell’s point of view, the program provides youth with insights and skills that will help carry them through life, whether or not they ever start their own business venture. “They get to see what is involved in planning, starting, and running their own business,” he explains. “They also see how important entrepreneurial traits, such as independence, resourcefulness, determination, discipline, when applied, can be very beneficial to their lives.” As a youth growing up in Inglewood, the experience of returning and working with young people within his own community has been a learning experience for Cromwell. “It is a privilege to know that I have had a positive influence in my community,” he says. “This job has opened my eyes to the importance of offering one’s service to the community in which [one] lives. I know that I have learned just as much from the youth, if not more, than they have learned from me.”


Scenarios

Return and Risk Profile for a $5,000 investment (50 shares)* Investor A

Investor B

Investor C

Tax Bracket

30.20%

38.67%

43.50%

Average Annual Income

29,590

59,180

93,000

RRSP Deferral

1,510

1,934

2,175

Equity Tax Credit for: 5 years

1,500

1,500

1,500

10 years

2,500

2,500

2,500

15 years

3,000

3,000

3,000

5 years

1,990

1,567

1,325

10 years

990

567

325

15 years

490

67

0

Capital at risk for:

*We assume a minimum investment of $5,000 for RRSP holdings due to service fees

Thank you for investing in us. For information on how the Fund works and to become an investor, call Gordon Doe at (902) 426-6985

Lynn Jones “Finally, I can contribute to a meaningful investment vehicle that allows me to help Black Business and our African Nova Scotian Community grow and prosper. The 30% immediate tax incentive affords me the opportunity to personally gain too!”

Tom Boyd “This is my fourth year investing in the Black Business Community Investment Fund Limited (BBCIFL). It increases the level of economic activity and prosperity within Black-owned Businesses. And a 30% tax credit is a considerable reduction in payable taxes. All Nova Scotians should consider seriously investing in the fund.”

Caution to Investor – This advertisement is not to be construed as an exempt offering to the public in Nova Scotia unless a simplified offering document relating thereto has been filed with and its use has not been objected to by the Nova Scotia Securities Commission. The offering is made by the simplified offering document only and copies thereof may be obtained from such sales agents and promoters as may lawfully offer these securities in Nova Scotia.


If undeliverable return to: The Black Business Initiative 1575 Brunswick Street, Halifax, Nova Scotia B3J 2G1 Publications Mail Agreement No.

Poste-publications

numĂŠro de convention

0040026687 0040026687

Black to Business – Issue 37 – Fall 2007  
Black to Business – Issue 37 – Fall 2007