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JUNE 2019 A SPECIAL END-OF-PROJECT ISSUE

THE

REAP

PROJECT

“Restoring, EMPOWERING, and PROTECTING LIVELIHOODS

for the Future Generations...


Table of Contents

Table of Contents ------------------------------------------ 2 Introduction: Looking Back ------------------------------ 3 Message from ADRA & World Renew ---------------- 4-5 Words from the Mayors and Selected Partners --- 6-7 Project Demographics and Key Achievements ----- 8-9 Community Empowerment: Women & Men Transformed! MACC’s Big Brother -------------------------------- 10 PBAL Snack Bar -------------------------------------- 10 Kay Ann’s Solar Sari-Sari Store ------------------ 11 Lady Advocate for Natural Farming ----------- 12 More Women in Action ---------------------------- 12 From Weaving to Baking ------------------------- 13 Livelihood Restored and Thriving -------------- 14 Organic Farming ------------------------------------ 14 CoMSCA and the Power of Saving Sewing Her Way to Success ---------------------- 15 Doubling Their Income ---------------------------- 15 DRR & CRM Equipping for Protection -------------------------- 16 ICS Training with OCD ----------------------------- 16 When the Impossible Becomes Possible ----- 17 Market Oriented Approach Training is Empowering --------------------------- 18 Activity Highlights ---------------------------------- 19 Special Feature: for the Future Generations... ------ 20-21 Staff Reflection World Renew ----------------------------------------- 22-23 ADRA ---------------------------------------------------- 24-25 REAP Project’s CBOs and Their MSMEs ---------------- 26-27 Back Cover: A Final Prayer

FUNDED BY:

THE

REAP

PROJECT

“Restoring, EMPOWERING, and PROTECTING LIVELIHOODS

EDITORIAL BOARD Analynn Bruce Sherry Leonard Kenneth Kim Grace Wiebe Tom Pignon Jeff Cosico Nan Cho Cho Thel MAGAZINE PRODUCTION STAFF EDITOR|WRITER|LAYOUT|DESIGN Aimee Grace Tapeceria CONTENT EDITOR Karl Mark Morta Nan Cho Cho Thel CONTRIBUTORS Karl Mark Morta Travis Climacosa Kyrie Taganap Garee Austen Recto Jeff Cosico Vernoica Nola Cruz Elsa Are Madan Punzalan Cesar Castro The REAP Project Staff LOGISTICS Sherwin Pairat Melvin Lapura PUBLISHER Hometown Printing Press Door 2, G.Building, MV Hechanova, Jaro, Iloilo City 5000 TeleFax No.: (033) 329-1885

IMPLEMENTED BY: AND

The REAP Project is funded by Global Affairs Canada and implemented by the Adventist Development and Relief Agency (ADRA) and World Renew in the Municipalities of Ajuy, Concepcion, and Estancia in the Province of Iloilo, Philippines for four years, from August 2015 to June 2019.

Special Feature: For the Future Generations... This child is holding a Darag chicken which will be the key to his future. His aunt, Nanay Glenda, attended numerous seminars from the REAP Project and her life has changed greatly due to it. Read her story in pg. 21.

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Introduction

Looking back...

Vision is always 20/20 on hindsight.

It is at the end of the journey that one has the privilege (and sometimes curse) to look back and see the path that was tread. Through tired eyes, we try to catch a glimpse of where we began, only to realize we have come further than we thought. But, as many of our own experiences have taught us, getting to the top of that mountain, graduating from that degree, or in REAP’s case successfully finishing a 4-year community livelihood development project and bringing it to a close, may bring a feeling of fulfillment of a job well done but coming with it is the revelation of just how much there is left to do. In 2013... When Typhoon Haiyan (local name Yolanda) hit Central Philippines in 2013, it was declared to be the strongest typhoon to make landfall. It devastated the whole area and left the inhabitants with no choice but to try and bring back the pieces of their lives that were uprooted and torn apart by the monster storm. On the other side of the world, the Canadian Government knew that significant help was going to be needed in the Philippines for the next few years. In addition to GAC’s and theRoyal Canadian Air Force’s response during the emergency phase, GAC also pursued recovery and reconstruction assistance for women, girls, men and boys affected by Typhoon Haiyan. A call for proposals was launched for projects that would align with GAC’s priority areas and the PRRP (Philippine Reconstruction and Recovery Program).

Restoring, Empowering, and Protecting Livelihoods When the call for proposals from GAC was announced, ADRA and World Renew already had people in the region providing food, shelter and initial livelihood recovery during the Emergency and Recovery Stages. The Canadian branches of ADRA and World Renew were a part of the CCA (Canadian Churches in Action). Both capitalized on this connection by forming a consortium with the objective of formulating a project proposal to submit to GAC. Two other CCA members, the Presbyterian World Service and Development (PWS&D) and Canadian Lutheran World Relief (CLWR) also provided financial support to this consortium initiative. An assessment team was sent to northern Iloilo where both organizations had already been conducting emergency response. They then developed a project proposal that focused on not only restoring both major and alternative livelihoods through gender-responsive trainings and enterprise development, but also recognized the need to include Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and Coastal Resource Management (CRM) into the trainings. This strategic package of assistance would increase the resilience and sustainability of the community in the face of unpredictable natural disasters and depletion of marine life. All these would contribute to ensuring the improvement and sustainability of the affected populations’ economic well-being for years to come. GAC granted approval to the consortium initiative, and the project became known as the REAP (Restoring, Empowering, and Protecting Livelihoods) Project which was implemented by both ADRA and World Renew in northern Iloilo, specifically in the municipalities of Ajuy, Concepcion, and Estancia from August 2015 to June 2019.

“Life goes on... so does basketball.” Brgy. 101 in Tacloban City, November 2013 Photo and article by: Aimee Grace Tapeceria

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Messages from Typhoon Haiyan holds the distinction of being one of the most powerful typhoons ever recorded. Its devastation spurred the world into action. But after families’ most pressing needs were met through various relief efforts, they still faced the long road to recovery because their main livelihoods were greatly affected. That is where the REAP Project came in. After the immediate emergency relief work was done, the REAP team stepped in to assist families down the road to recovery with the aim of helping them in developing sustainable livelihoods and at the same time decreasing their vulnerability when the next typhoon hits.

the storm. It is truly rewarding to know that these families are now enjoying a better quality of life with greater opportunities than they had before. It was the main goal of the REAP Project to “Improve the economic well-being of the women and men affected by Typhoon Haiyan”, and we are proud to say that the team has successfully achieved it. We thank God for the success of REAP, for all our donors and the people behind this success, especially our field staff and partners.

The REAP project was organized around Community Based Organizations (CBOs). Through these groups, targeted project participants learned about sustainable livelihoods, acquired practical business skills, and gained access to savings and loans for which many of them were previously ineligible. We are grateful that ADRA, through the REAP project, was able to help families not only to recover what they have lost, but to become even stronger than they were before

I am excited to share with you this special magazine highlighting the impact of ADRA and World Renew’s work in northern Iloilo through the REAP – Restoring, Empowering And Protecting Livelihoods – Project. The Adventist Development & Relief Agency (ADRA) is the global humanitarian organization of the Seventh-day Adventist Church and we work to assist those affected by disasters and improve social development for vulnerable communities with families living in poverty.

Steve Matthews, Executive Director ADRA Canada

Analynn Bruce Development Program Director ADRA Canada

you read their stories and hear about their lives, you will see families and individuals with changed lives and the ability to live their lives as God intended. I’d like to express my appreciation to the REAP Project team for their hard work and dedication in making this project a success. Their collaboration and partnership the government, the community, and other stakeholders, both in Canada and the Philippines has made this all possible and helped these communities thrive.

That is what we do but our purpose – our reason why – is in serving humanity so that all may live as God intended. We believe that all people were created by God to thrive and we strive for a world in which people may live life as God intended. We want people to have lives filled abundantly with justice, compassion and love. The REAP Project speaks right to the heart of ADRA. Through restoring, empowering and protecting livelihoods we are addressing many of the root causes of vulnerability and exclusion. All too often it has been this vulnerability and exclusion felt by these families of Iloilo that has prevented them from thriving and living their life as God intended. As

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Tom Pignon, Country Director ADRA Philippines


Messages from The efforts of many people are required for the success of World Renew’s Disaster Response work. Such was the case with our work in response to Super Typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda). The damage was extensive and widespread. In partnership with affected communities with dignified individuals who are all made in the image of God, we worked together successfully. Our incredible journey together culminated with the Global Affairs Canada co-funded “Restoring, Empowering, and Protecting Livelihoods,” (REAP) Project. This project lasted almost four years and involved beneficiaries from farming and fishing households, community-based organizations, and local government agencies on the island of Panay in the Municipalities of Ajuy, Estancia, and Concepcion in northern Iloilo Province. Gender-responsive development activities involving model farms, entrepreneurial training, improved production and training from academia and technical institutions, expansion of local community savings groups, and value-chain analysis are some of the project’s major achievements. Together with the communities involved, we

The best and lasting reward that we cherish most in our work is to see transformed lives. Working with typhoon affected people, and seeing how their lives were changed from having almost nothing to what they have now make us humbled and blessed. From an attitude of hopelessness to an excitement of what will happen. From disgruntled individuals and families to a community where care and concern are now practiced. Women who once considered as “plain housewives” now have their own enterprise, higher self-esteem, and contribute to the family’s income. These are just a few of the REAP Project achievements that we witnessed. Another good thing that touched us is the staff transformation. To be an instrument where the people that you worked with testify that their time working on the REAP Project made them better people too. They have also seen the change in themselves. Their skills and knowledge were not the only things that were enhanced but also their attitude. Their experience working with those who are less fortunate motivated them to go the extra mile. Difficulties and challenges were conquered because of their faith, believing that something good is going to happen and lo and behold, change happens! Salute and hat’s off to all leaders, donors, LGU partners,

reached the goal of restoring, empowering, and protecting the livelihoods of some of the poorest and most vulnerable of those affected by Typhoon Haiyan. We thank God for the opportunity to serve with so many good people from government, academia and communities. Blessings friends!

Kenneth Kim, Director Disaster Response World Renew

Grace Weibe Senior Project Manager World Renew

CBO leaders and members, partners from the academe, fellow NGO workers and all the REAP Project team members, we have made their lives better, we let them smile again and we did it together! As you scan the pages of this magazine, read their stories and see the beautiful pictures of transformation, be blessed because you are part of it, one way or another. Let us all rejoice on what we have accomplished together. Thank you for being our partner. With you in facilitating and advocating for a better world for the next generation.

Jeff Cosico, Program Manager World Renew

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Words from the Mayors

The severe devastation brought by Super Typhoon Yolanda to the fishing and farming communities in Northern Iloilo highlighted the importance of fostering a culture of resilience and sustainability among our communities.

With our commitment towards helping our constituents recover from the typhoon’s aftermath and work towards the improvement of their socio-economic conditions, we in the Municipal Government of Ajuy are beyond grateful to be a part of the REAP Project which has been helping our communities get back on their feet for the last five years. The REAP Project has provided our people with opportunities to better provide for their families through savings generation and sustainable livelihoods such as organic lettuce production, sewing and dressmaking, and seaweed cultivation, among others. It has not only enabled our communities to effectively prepare for natural calamities but also capacitated them into withstanding disruptions and changing conditions as well as achieving a stable, comfortable, and secure life for themselves and for their families. On behalf of my fellow Ajuynons, I would like to express my commendation to the stakeholders’ invaluable contributions in making this project a success and in helping us build a more resilient Municipality of Ajuy. With the realization of this project, I am certain that we have made a significant leap towards achieving sustainable development and economic stability for our people. I hope that, together, we will remain steadfast in our commitment towards building a progressive society and a better future.

Ajuy Mayor Jett Rojas

Mabuhay!

As we commemorate the 5th year of Typhoon Haiyan, the Municipality of Concepcion has nearly completed our rehabilitation and recovery process. The REAP Project assisted this process because you provided training and assets to help empower people to restore their livelihood. You also helped organize capacity building seminars that focused on disaster risk reduction and coastal resource management to ensure the sustainability of these livelihoods that are being restored to the people. The success of these livelihood programs will help build strong and resilient communities which will address poverty as the main factor of the vulnerability of the community. With the REAP Project coming to a close, the municipality is left with the responsibility of ensuring the sustainability of these projects and programs that will be left behind in the community. With all the support that you have given us, building our capacity so that we can preserve the gains that has been established, we are positive that we can continue these programs. I would like to express my deepest gratitude and heart-felt thanks to the REAP Project for all these blessings that God has given us through you. This great relationship that we have developed show that we are true partners when it comes to building community resiliency, and congratulations on a job well done.

Concepcion Mayor Milliard Villanueva

Best Regards,

The REAP Project has become an initiator of change in the lives of Estanciahanon. It is undeniable that Typhoon Yolanda (Haiyan) left us in hopelessness and desperation but the REAP Project became the beacon of hope to our municipality, especially to Brgys. Gogo, San Roque, Loguingot, and Daculan. The interventions taken were executed with a warmth and openness that both challenged and empowered us. The REAP Project shared business strategies and technologies that we hope will become part of our good practices and ultimately a part of our tradition in building communities and rebuilding lives. Verbosity cannot give justice to the emotion that people experience when they are given the opportunity to upgrade standard of living and it has been gratifying for us to see the results. We are grateful that we have been able to witness the GIFT of HOPE and restoration of our FAITH in HUMANITY that the REAP Project has brought to our town. “SALAMAT” is the only thing that Estanciahanons can say to express our gratitude for the new life you have given us.

Estancia Mayor Rene Cordero 6 The REAP Project Magazine

For the continuous service of the humanity.


Words Selected Partners

“None of us, including me, ever do great things. But we can all do small things, with great love, and together we can do something wonderful.” – Mother Teresa “The REAP Project have been a very good partner to us. We have conducted different programs like gender sensitive trainings, and capacity enhancement of the technology in producing sea weed. It’s very easy working with this team because of their coordination. Our partnership with them was very smooth, they are well-equipped and aware of the different concerns of the public. Thank you REAP Project, we hope that we can partner again in the future.” -Luda Bila-ong, Local Economic Development and Investment Promotion Center (LEDIP) Provincial Government of Iloilo “After typhoon Haiyan we were able to setup and re-organize our extension program. The REAP Project was a very excellent partner, we have the same objectives and goal to address those highly affected by the typhoon. All the basic ingredients of partnership is with REAP team, in terms of sharing resources, providing manpower, dedication and flexibility of the team in implementing the project. They are always ready to serve even with obstacles. I thank the REAP Project for always being there and for supporting the sustainable development programs.” – Noeni S. Nepomuceno, Director of University Extension & Development Center Western Visayas State University (WVSU) . The work of giving hope to hundreds of families in Estancia, Concepcion, and Ajuy, in northern Iloilo is no doubt, a supernatural act. Aside from the immediate aid for daily needs, the promotion of various livelihood projects was one of the major undertakings that brought forth the economic survival of the community. It was also a means towards development of values and the spirituality of community service. This is what the REAP Project set out to do and through God’s grace and their strategic planning and execution, they were able to succeed in this endeavor. Various small business enterprises that focused on organic agriculture, cultivation of high value vegetables, animal raising, food processing, trading, mat weaving and others were established in the different Community Based Organizations (CBOs). The provision of basic equipment and tools to help set up these enterprises were a great investment in the realization of the projects, and as the new entrepreneurs perfect the quality of their products, they also strengthen their capacity to avail of other forms of assistance that the REAP Project provides and collaborate with other institutions. This has empowered them to analyze problems, formulate alternative solutions and propose ways to improve their business operations. Each milestone achieved gives them a good sense of accomplishment and the encouragement to do even more. I believe this has led them to focus on productivity, making them become more resilient in the long run. To the REAP Project, I salute your full efforts. Because of you, a better future in the horizon is evident. We also thank God for the opportunity to participate in this undertaking. More power and congratulations to all! - Emeliza C. Lozada, Dean of School of Technology Universiety of the Philippines - Visayas

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Vulnerability & Exclusion

Vulnerability took its root in low productivity due to higher exposure to risks, low capacity (skills and resources) to respond to disaster and also, lack of opportunity to alternate livelihood due to minimal, if not lack of access to productive livelihood support. Exclusion took place when the fishing and farming sectors had no control on agri-fisheries market price due to minimal knowledge about the market and the unbalanced power relation between money lenders and borrowers (indebtedness). Exclusion became visible when coastal fishing communities were not included in local economic development planning. Vulnerability and exclusion are intertwined, lack of resources (vulnerability) leads to lack of power (no voice & exclusion). Likewise, exclusion leads them to a more vulnerable situation.

The REAP Project’s aim was to EMPOWER marginalized women and men in order for them to participate in SUSTAINABLE and RESILIENT economic activities.

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INCREASED participation of 2,157 WOMEN AND 1,180 MEN affected by Typhoon Haiyan in Iloilo in sustained and resilient economic activities.


the REAP Project Demographics: Duration: 24th Aug 2015 to 31st Sept 2019 Budget: CAN $ 5,681,781 Beneficiaries: 53,000 community members 3,112 CBO members 280 LGU members Coverage Areas: 3 Municipalities (Ajuy, Concepcion, & Estancia) # of Barangays: 28 # of CBO: 55

Key Achievements

3,337 4,174 22 3,135 52 84 36 4,265 3 31 31 3 3 29 1 3 3 3 2

Women and men affected by Typhoon Haiyan participate in sustained and resilient economic activities Women and men trained in fishing, farming, and alternative livelihood.

Agri-fisheries model farm established in the 3 municipalities Women and men provided with livelihood inputs

CBOs eligible for loans and business development services (BDS) from Micro Financial Institutions or other financing institutions MSMEs have improved their access to financial and business development services (BDS) MSMEs with Business Continuity Plans Women and men are active in a community-managed savings and credit

LGUs adoption of Community-Managed Savings and Credit Ordinances supporting gender-sensitive livelihoods DRRM Plans at the municipal and barangay levels

DRR simulation drills conducted Municipalities with Coastal Resource Management Plans Barangays with Coastal Habitat Management Action Plans

Functional fish landing facility managed by the LGU and Fisherfolk Associations MDRRM Offices with Infocast System (EWS) in partnership with SMART Communication Inc. LGUs with Market Information Support System Established

In a span of 4 years.... Shifting the paradigm from consumption-focus to market-focus, especially for the vulnerable and excluded fishing and farming communities, required the REAP Project to provide sound and appropriate technologies, and needed both passion and commitment from the CBO partners. When the appreciation of these assets and virtues had taken root within CBOs, the REAP Project staff witnessed an increase in their capacity and an improvement in operations. They then were able to gain better access to different services and were be able to participate in the social, economic, as well as the political arena and support their LGUs in creating a suitable environment for livelihood growth.

It was a long process, but in the four years that the REAP Project was being implemented, the project staff witnessed a noticeable decrease in the vulnerability and exclusion of the communities they came in contact with.

Municipalities with Local Economic Development Plans

Municipalities working on the completion of their Comprehensive Land Use Plan (CLUP)

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Introduction

Community Empowerment: Women and Men Transformed!

The REAP Project focuses on community empowerment with a gender lens through capacity building in: - fishing, - farming, and - alternative livelihoods. It promotes climate adaptive and resilient fishing farming technologies using gender-responsive, market-oriented approach. Inputs from the project (whether it be in cash or production assets) are provided to individual CBO members in order for them to put their newly acquired livelihood knowledge into action. This component contributes to an increase household income.

MACC’s Big Brother Pastor Eliseo Abunda Jr., a humble pastor, who has been residing in Barangay Mangorocoro, Ajuy for most of his life, has seen their barangay not only recover but also improve after typhoon Haiyan (Yolanda) destroyed many of their homes and livelihood. Before the REAP Project arrived in 2015, Pastor Abunda led in the founding of the Sariling Sikap Savings Group (SSSG) where they came up with an idea to give P25 per week, as mandatory share and savings, which can be used should emergencies and calamities come again. When the REAP Project arrived and shared that they wanted to empower local CBOs for the development of the community, SSSG agreed to become one of the partners. The REAP Project provided trainings, seminars, equipment, and business start-up capital for the CBOs, teaching them alternative ways to earn profit. They were also taught book keeping, record keeping, and strategies in delegation of work.

Two years went by and members gradually increased from 37 to 60, and on April 2017, SSSG was formally registered as a COOP in the Cooperative Development Authority of the Philippines (CDA), with their official name changing to Mangorocoro Ajuy Credit Cooperative (MACC). “It was the right opportunity, the right time and right place. The REAP Project helped us grow exponentially. You became MACC’s bigger brother which was a catalyst for the development and further improvement of this community” Mr. Elisio Abunda shares. “The trainings and seminars given by the REAP Project led to a more unified barangay. You offered us the opportunity to better ourselves and think outside of the box. I thank the REAP Project all the staff for their time and effort!” Now MACC is still growing in numbers and is currently with 80 active members.

PBAL Snack Bar In 2015, a group of 21 women in Punta Buri Ajuy, Iloilo started a savings group for the sole purpose of savings and to support their disaster risk reduction plans for their families. Partnering with the REAP Project within the same year, they named their group Punta Buri ADRA Livelihood Association (PBAL) and after two years, they were eligible to start a Micro Small Medium Enterprise (MSME). In December 2017, the savings group decided to start a snack bar, a group business, because their individual businesses and the savings initiative can’t

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Kay Ann’s Solar Sari-sari Store improve their income to augment the family’s basic needs. But this was not all she was able to do. After the initial expansion which she received after her training, the REAP Project field staff noticed that she was able to manage her store and finances very well. After she paid back her loan from the CoMSCA, she decided to apply for another expansion grant which the REAP Project was offering, which was only available to those individuals whose record were as stellar as hers.

people are always looking for is ice and cold drinks. A freezer will also increase shelf life of the fish that are caught and fruits that are harvested, which is a big help to our community.” She is estimating that she will be able to pay back her sister-in-law and aunt within 5 months. Kay Ann says that her participation in the REAP Project has not just improved her family’s monthly income, but made her grow as a person and developed her self-confidence, thus quality of their life.

To apply for this, she needed to write a business proposal with the total cost of the expansion grant, and a counterpart from her is required.

Kay Ann Serioza, a wife and a mother of three children, is one of those CBO members who made the most out of the interventions of the REAP Project. The trainings she attended enabled her to better manage her sari-sari store especially that the project provided additional commodities in expanding her store. Her membership to a community-managed saving and credit association (CoMSCA) provided her an opportunity to save and access affordable credit with ease. Through CoMSCA, she availed a loan to purchase an engine for their fishing boat. This further helped them

Kay Ann lives in the Brgy. Polopiña, Concepcion, an island barangay where there is no electricity, so storing fresh produce is a challenge and selling ice cold drinks is not an option because a freezer needs electricity to run. Kay Ann’s business proposal included a Solar Generator and Freezer, a kit which amounted to more than P100,000. This required her to find P50,000 as her counter-part, which she was able to do by using the P25,000 that she earned from her store sales, and P30,000 from her sister-in-law and aunt. “I thought if we have the solar, our income will drastically increase because of the freezer. Here in the island, what

fully support the cost of their living. Leah Mae Braganza along with other members of PBAL started to build their “Snack Bar” in the island of Punta Buri. They finished their shack and started operating on January 8, 2018. They serve different dishes and meals from 5 a.m to 7 p.m, selling it to students and to locals looking for a full meal. The snack bar also offers catering services. PBAL members take shifts to facilitate the store, while others just put and display their products there to be sold. “Members now have more time with their families while still earning money.” Leah Braganza said.

PBAL’s snack bar. “Women are strong; handling things are easier and given that we are very vocal it really helps the group’s transparency.” She added. PBAL consists of all women members.

Anna Rose Barroba, a 60-year old mother, is also another member of PBAL group. She has a child that she supports through the income coming from the

“We hope that we can still expand our group businesses not just for our family but also for our customers as well. As women we need to have perseverance. There is no time to slack around and be lazy” PBAL members concluded.

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Lady Advocate for Natural Farming

A busy wife attending the needs of their children, Eunace Barbo, 50 years old and resides in Barangay Nino, Concepcion, Iloilo, considered herself as a full time housewife. Married to a Pastor whose income comes from church offering, Eunace was able to manage the P500 family income per week. With three teenagers in school, she is amazed how God is helping them to survive. “After typhoon Yolanda, I observed that most women in our barangay were not economically productive. They were mostly doing nothing except housework. This happened almost every day. It seems that everyone just accepted that harsh reality.” After five years, Eunace is now a full time farmer who advocates for the use of natural farming methods. She received from the REAP Project a series of trainings and visited successful farms to gain more knowledge and skills on

diversified and natural farming.

A visit to her farm will allow you to see processed natural farm inputs and concoctions being displayed and used. Goats roaming around, vegetables growing, quail with their eggs ready to be picked-up, chickens and hogs make some noise to get our attention. A farm that uses organic inputs and practice environment-friendly methodologies that earns an average of P1,500 per week. “I am now a certified organic farmer, NC II holder, and I am so happy for this achievement,” shared by Eunace as she showed to us her certificate from the government’s accreditation agency, TESDA. “There are lots of changes now in our small village. Women are now using their time in more productive ways. A six-woman group ventured into banana

processing as their enterprise. Another group is in ice cream production. One of the significant changes that I observed in our barangay is the women’s participation in savings. We are thankful with this savings and credit program called CoMSCA. We can now save and borrow money without leaving our community. The best part of it is that all earnings will still be divided among us. Eunace is also invited now to conduct training on Concoction preparation and natural farming methods. Her concoction products are being sold both in their community and in the town proper of Concepcion. “God is really wonderful. I prayed for change and He answered it beyond my wildest expectations, thank you also to the REAP Project staff. God used you to become a channel of blessing to us.

More Women in Action! When the women of Sitio Kasantulan, Macalbang, Concepcion learned that they are not gaining much profit from raising hogs, they ventured into meat processing. REAP, with the help of experts from the University of the Philippines Visayas, assisted the women’s group to undergo a series of training on meat processing. REAP provided processing equipment and tools to them. Now, they are thankful not just because they gained new skills but they are earning more from their meat-based processed products than just selling their live pigs to middlemen.

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Jenny Alerta from Macalbang, Concepcion is a member of their barangay women’s association. She received a gilt (mature pig) from REAP and after six months, her gilt gave birth to 12 healthy piglets. Jenny and all who received livestock from REAP underwent a series of trainings where they were trained how to formulate feeds using indigenous resources, how to detect and manage common livestock diseases. She is now excited knowing that her gilt and the new piglets will support her family to meet their needs. The Department of Agriculture, Livestock Bureau, serve as the resource persons on the said training.


From Weaving to Baking! It was two o’clock in the morning and the people of Sitio Tagbak, Plandico, Concepcion, were still asleep except for the six mothers. With a small flashlight, each of these mothers traverses the rocky and slope foot trail going to their newly constructed “bakery” where these mothers started preparing their bread. “We need to start very early because at five o’clock in the morning, people will start asking for hot bread. Going here from our house is difficult especially during rainy season, it is slippery but I got used to it now”, shared by Cleofe Tasoy, one of the six. Cleofe and five more mothers in this community started their own pie and bread business. Before Typhoon Yolanda, they were weaving mats as additional income to their husband’s income, who are mostly fishermen.

Typhoon Haiyan destroyed their boats, fishing gears, houses, and even raw materials that they used for mat weaving. “It was so difficult, we already thought that we cannot recover due but we are thankful that the REAP Project provided our husbands with boats and fishing gears and taught us different livelihood activities”. “I am thankful that through the REAP Project we were given the opportunity to be trained with baking skills that can provide additional income for our families. They also provided us with productive assets like oven and dough mixer. We were also taught with the good manufacturing practices”, Cleofe continued as she helped pack their freshly baked “pandesal” (small bread which is a favorite breakfast of the Filipinos).

“We were dependent on moneylenders when emergencies occurred. We were forced to pay higher interest and sometimes, interest were even deducted in advance from our loans. Now that we have our own Community-Managed Savings and Credit Association (CoMSCA), we can meet our financial needs easily, it is accessible and we do not need to go to the town. What I like best in CoMSCA is that all gained from lending our money to our members will be divided among us. Thank you for sharing to us this methodology. Our lives are better now, we have our own savings and we also have access to credit when we need it.” Cleofe Tasoy, member of CoMSCA in Sitio Tagbak, Plandico, Concepcion

I

As the sun began to rise, customers began to arrive. Cleofe started to clean their utensils while the rest of the group catered to their customers. When asked about their future plans, they share their dream of bringing their bread to neighboring islands and be known as the producer of the best “pandesal” in town. These are empowered women who have reduced their families’ vulnerability to unrealiable income, which is seasonal. They have banded together to create this enterprise and make a difference. “My income gradually increased. When we first divided our income, I was so happy to receive P1,038. That is so special because I was able to help my husband earn more income and meet our family needs.”

“I studied four years in high school but was not able to get a certificate because I got pregnant few months before our graduation. But, am so happy that on my training for local veterinarian with REAP that lasted for few days, I got a certificate.”

Sheila Jean Are - a trained local veterinarian from Plandico, Concepcion is now helping the community people monitor the health conditions of their livestock and other animals in their community. The Department of Agriculture (DA) is thankful for REAP in identifying and teaching local leaders as their partners for livestock raising. They also commit to give more support to Sheila Jean and other trained local veterinarians so that they are better equipped doing their “new hobby”.

The REAP Project Magazine 13


CoMSCA: The Power of Livelihood Restored and Thriving Savings

Mr. Leandro Bonito, a 48-year-old man is a resident of Barangay Nipa, Concepcion, Iloilo. Through fishing, he is supporting his wife Sharon and their five children for their living. ‘It’s hard to recover from a great loss after Yolanda’, said Mr. Leandro.

He worried because of the damages not only to his house but to his boat as well. He did not know what to do during those times. He had a boat, the only boat he used in fishing and it was partially damaged. He needed to repair it before he could use it again. In the meantime, he was fishing using a hook and line. During peak season, he earned around P3,500 a week and around P1,500 during the off season. He was glad when he heard that the REAP Project was helping the CBOs by providing

boats, engines, and nets for fisherfolks. He participated in the training and learned about the importance of fishery laws, marine protected areas (MPA), authorized fishing gears, and mangroves and coral reefs.

He received 1 unit of Loncin Engine 7HP. He replaced his old engine and decided to engage in ‘pangiming’ which was designed for “lagaw” fish. His income grew and he started to save for his second fishing boat. He made another boat for his eldest son who got married so that he could have an income also. Mr. Bonito is very thankful to the REAP Project for the help that he and other members of the CBO received. “This is a great help for us to recover and I will always take good care of the things entrusted to me by the REAP project.”

Organic Farming

“Tatay” Fredo Laglag is a farmer. He has always been a farmer. He is the type of person who can’t sit quietly at home watching TV. He needs to be out walking among his plants, breathing in the fresh air, or else he wouldn’t be satisfied with his day. When the REAP Project came, it was soon after typhoon Yolanda destroyed everything he had. Tatay Fredo was able to receive new equipment, like hose, power sprays, and big drums to store water. When the livelihood officer asked him if he was open to trying organic fertilizers instead of the usual chemicals, he willingly agreed.

His discovery that organic farming was actually profitable made him happy.

14 The REAP Project Magazine

He now develops his own fertilizers by practicing vermiculture, taking care of worms so that they could take care of the plants. Tatay Fredo is thankful to the REAP Project for approaching him about organic farming. Because this is more helpful to the environment, and is less dangerous to his grandkids who are always playing in the gardens.

The Community-Managed Savings and Credits Association (CoMSCA) program. It was introduced to make their lives and livelihood more resilient with primary rationale to instill a habit of savings in the community in a very acceptable, adaptable, accessible, and affordable manner. CoMSCA was used not only for start-up capital for livelihood but also for: - emergency needs - education & - health

Together with CoMSCA savings, provision of livelihood inputs helped the CBOs and their members to restore and even increase their productive assets.

COMMUNITY MANAGED SAVINGS and CREDIT (CoMSCA) SAVINGS Financial Report Year 2

3,443,706.00

Year 3

12,230,428.00

Year 4

15,467,375.00

Total

31,141,509.00 LOANS

Year 2

3,466,333.00

Year 3

15,821,991.00

Year 4

16,945,681.62

Total

36,234,005.62

4,265 men and women are active members of the CoMSCA groups


Sewing Her Way to Success

Even with electricity and the availability of products and equipment, 37-year old Mary Grace Rojas had a hard time earning salary. Profits were never enough to feed and care for her five children, and she had to switch different jobs just to make ends meet.

Mary Grace lives in Sitio Banban, Barangay Tambaliza, one of many island “barangays” (village) in Concepcion, Iloilo, which is quite far from the mainland. Locals here are often economically marginalized, impoverished people due to lack of sustainability on their jobs because of natural causes. Mary Grace comes with her husband to getting crabs and fish, managing a small convenience store, as well as repairing worn out shirts and pants. These earned her less than 1,400 php ($20) per month depending on the demands of customers. Typhoon Haiyan came and destroyed everything, including their boat, the small convenience store they owned, and her old sewing machine. Without outside work, she was unable to cover living costs and education fees for her children. When the REAP Project came and offered alternative livelihood trainings for Mary Grace’s CBO, she and other Haiyan victims were able to get access to cost-shared inputs which they used to

acquire new equipment to improve their businesses. Additional trainings were given which helped Mary Grace improve her skills in not just sewing, but business management, and bookkeeping. She reapplied to their CoMSCA to buy a new automated sewing machine, equipment to repair the boat her husband has been using to fish, and a small capital to get her small convenience store up and running again. Mary Grace is now the business manager of the Mom’s Tailoring, which was set up by her and 3 friends, who all attended trainings and got access to the cost shared inputs which they used to buy their own sewing machines. The REAP Project saw that they were doing well, and suggested that they come together and form a business, which allowed them to access more productive livelihood assets worth nearly P100,000. “I thank the REAP Project, If you hadn’t come, I would have not improved my sewing, and increased my income. You’ve given us a chance to avail loans through cost-shared Inputs and CoMSCA to improve our lives long-term wise. You also gave us an opportunity to attend different training courses that enabled us to establish better lives for our families.”

Doubling Their Income

Chona Ungsod is a 45-year old mother of three, living in Pantalan Nabaye with her husband and kids. She collects little clams to sell them at the wet market while her husband is a motorcycle driver who makes a living in transporting people on an everyday basis. She strives hard to sustain her family through a poverty-stricken life. Making sure that they be provided with shelter, food and clothing was a persistent challenge. Chona usually earns P150 per day but it depends on how many little clams she can collect while her husband earns P200 to P250 per day, also depending on how many people would rent him for a ride. Their family is one of around 30% of families in the Philippines who are in the class-E (Extremely Poor) socioeconomic class. “Life was really hard back then. We had limited resources and unstable source of income. The payment for the rented motorcycle that my husband uses in business, daily expenses, cost of education of my children and medical needs were too much for us to handle.” Chona shares. All of that changed when Chona applied for a CoMSCA loan. The funds helped her and her family change the course of their lives. They can now afford the basic necessities in life. By the help of CoMSCA they have bought their own motorcycle to be used in business, support their children’s education, medicine and food. CoMSCA boosted their livelihood and income from P250 per dayto P500 per day. “I thank the REAP Project for all the support and for all the help they provided, especially CoMSCA. Without it, I wouldn’t have provided and supported my family.”

The REAP Project Magazine 15


DRR & CRM As to protect the people’s lives and their livelihood, the REAP Project also provided technical assistance in: - Disaster Risk Reduction (DRR) and - Coastal Resource Management (CRM). The REAP Project assisted the LGUs in the development and implementation of DRR and CRM plans. Moreover, assistance was given to targeted CBOs, barangays, and municipalities in their - economic development plan and - municipal comprehensive land use plan. Important livelihood-resilient resolutions and ordinances is another area of work the REAP Project supported. The REAP Project believes that protection mechanism is critical during and after restoring livelihood productive assets.

Hence, targeted communities are empowered, not just to restore but also to protect their lives and livelihoods.

16 The REAP Project Magazine

Equipping for Protection

The Municipal Disaster Risk Reduction and Management Office (MDRRMO) in Ajuy, Iloilo was established in response to calamities and disasters. As Ajuy can experience 10-15 typhoons a year, the MDRRMO’s goal is to reduce and ultimately prevent casualties from occurring. Preparing the community of what can happen in case of an upcoming calamity. The REAP Project recognized this need and provided manpower as well as coordination to help the MDRRMOs in their capacity building activities such as: trainings, seminars, tree plantings, and climate change adaptation to provide information about future hazards and to organize quick response teams in each barangay. Through the REAP Project, MDRRMOs of Ajuy, Concepcion, and Estancia were able to acquire the “Smart Infocast” from Smart Telecomm. This is a program that allows the Local Government Unit (LGU) to disseminate information through text messaging every individual who resides within their municipality with a touch of a button. They were also provided a 3-way handheld radios and Early-Warning System (EWS) to prevent, preempt and limit the casualties in case disasters occur. “I believe that our job is to empower people through technical advices that are strategic and efficient at the same time. Our partnership with the REAP

CAPTION: with the DRRMOs (Above) Kyrie Taganap with Ramon Caesar Rojas of Ajuy (Below) Dyna Gumban with Engr. Jhon Rey Asturias of Concepcion

Project has strengthened our programs and for that I thank you.” Mr. Rojas said. In partnership with ADRA and other NGOs the MDRRMO published and provided printed materials for the community to further educate them through pointers and tips about DRR preparedness. ADRA also serves as a manpower in providing strategic trainings, seminars and team buildings.

ICS Training with the OCD

The REAP Project helped the MDRRMOs of the 3 municipalities coordinate with the Regional Office for Civil Defense (OCD) to organize one final program. The Basic Incident Command System (ICS) Training lasted for 3 days and was organized in partnership with Association of Municipal Planning and Development Coordinators of

Iloilo (AMPPDCI), Inc. and conducted by Director Jose Roberto R. Nunez of the Office of the Civil Defense (OCD) Region VI. It was attended by department heads of the LGUs and selected MDRRMO staff. This training directly involves decision makers because these are the people which will need to be activated should an emergency happen to that particular municipality.


When the Impossible Becomes Possible Rylene Toquero is a busy lady. She is a Barangay Official, the Vice Chairperson of the Municipal Fisheries and Aquatic Resources Management Council (MFARMC), and a member of the Punta Buri ADRA Livelihood Association (PBAL) by day and a deputized Law Enforcer for fish farming by night in Punta Buri, Ajuy. “Before the REAP Project came, we did not see the importance of maintaining the marine life. We had the MFARMC in name only because it was part of our compliance with the policy. Rylene was part of the group that was able to visit Surigao. They saw how that municipality enforced their marine laws and maintained the cleanliness of their coastal areas. “I thought it was impossible to clean our beaches because people didn’t care much about it. But when I saw how Surigao was doing it, it gave me courage to try it in Punta Buri.” So in 2017, the MFARMC was reactivated, and as a community, they began to clean up their marine areas.

Little did they know that the Zoological Society of London (ZSL) was conducting studies around the Philippines, and they discovered that Punta Buri has a big potential to become a Marine Protected Area (MPA). It was approved in 2018. “Our MPA is really protected. We have a management council that involves the community, through consultation, and everyone agreed to help, because they realized that we needed to protect our source of livelihood. We hope we can be an example to other island barangays around this area, and show that it is possible for unity to be achieved when it comes to protecting our marine life.” The REAP Project is leaving a legacy in Punta Buri. It is here that the wholistic picture of what kind of change the REAP Project was trying to achieve in a community can be seen. Punta Buri has three CBOs, and not only were their members empowered and their livelihoods restored, but because of their commitment to DRR and CRM, they are preserving their homes and livelihoods for generations to come.

The REAP Project Magazine 17


Market Oriented Approach The REAP Project used market-oriented approach services such as: - product development - financings and - business development services (BDS) in a form of training, workshops, exposure visits and study tours. The project also invested in: - coordination - networking - linkages and - partnership with both private and public sectors both local up to national level as to provide best services and technology to targeted CBOs.

This component contributes to improve access of CBOs/MSMEs to financing, BDS and market opportunities.

Training is Empowering No training, no livelihood inputs! This is an agreement we have with the community partners. To some, training is a waste of time. “We already know our livelihoods and what we need are inputs and not training. Besides, other NGOs just gave us inputs before without training, so why spend money for training? Why not just convert the funds for training to more inputs?” These are some of our challenges as we encouraged the people to try to see the value of the knowledge imparted by the training. Initial months were difficult. Aside from the questions raised above, many of them prioritized fishing or going to their farms instead of attending training. But since they needed to replace their lost assets, many of them were “forced” to join the training. After training, they testified that they have learned a lot and seen the importance of such training. “I am a fisherman for years but it is only now that I understand that corals are not rocks but living things and important part of fish habitat, we need to protect them.” “Raising pigs is costly but now through this training, we were taught how to prepare feeds using indigenous materials, how to have an odorless pigpen and how to recognize different hog diseases and how to treat them. I am more confident now

18 The REAP Project Magazine

that I can earn more money by raising pigs, thank you for this training.” “Having a sari-sari store for years helped me support my family but REAP taught us basic entrepreneurship. This training helped me compute basic profit and loss. I am more deliberate now in keeping records.” “As farmers, we usually expect to harvest more without minding the effect of commercial fertilizers in our land. REAP taught us natural farming and the importance of being aware of the condition of our environment. We need to consider restoring our land for our children’s future, thank you for waking us up through sustainable agriculture training.” The different trainings that the REAP Project conducted were in partnership with different stakeholders. LGUs and Department of Agriculture are as involved when we were working with their farmers and fisher folks. The expertise of the academe in natural livestock raising, seaweeds and oyster production, like Central Philippine University (CPU) and Northern Iloilo Poly- technic State College (NIPSC) were also contacted. Local NGO, like MASIPAG (Magsasaka at Siyentipiko para sa Pag-unlad ng Agrikultura) became a partner in organic and natural farming. Training is time consuming to some but to those who attended, it was an opportunity for them to learn new things and be reminded of what they already knew.


Activity Highlights

Environment-friendly Methods

Increasing fisherfolks’ income while protecting their main source through climate adoptive techniques

Market Information Support System

Established to disseminate information on agricultural products on a regular basis to farmers, traders and consumers.

Baking & Food Processing of Agri-based Products

Women and their agri-based products that are sold within and outside their communities.

Quail Egg Production

Promoting the technology that contributes to adequately meeting market demands.

CoMSCA Share-Out

Farm Produce

Some members received up to P30,000 each as their one year savings for various purposes such as education, health, emergencies and additional capital.

Linking products and produce of CBO members to viable market.

Market Matching Expanding the reach of CBO products to the Negros Island and Manila.

Municipal Ordinance No. 2018-04

Food Processing Enhancement NC II in Food Processing ensures that CBO conform to industry standards.

Organic Agriculture Production

Providing entrepreneurs, especially start-ups, a way to introduce their products to viable market as declared in the ordinance, that, every 4th of February as Entrepreneurial Week.

Enhanced NCII holders’ knowledge and skills in organic farming, thus, they can be tapped by the Office of the Municipal Agriculture.

Welding Training

Protection & Prevention Measure

NCII Certification provides job opportunity to out-of-school children of CBO members.

Giving lifetime NCD vaccine to Darag native chicken. Proper protection assures higher production.

The REAP Project Magazine 19


20 The REAP Project Magazine


Special Feature

For the Future Generation...

If there was a star pupil that could be chosen for the whole REAP Project, “Nanay” (mother) Glenda Ballentes Basa would be it.

gives off strong fumes due to the excrements of the birds, her cages didn’t smell like that, and her flock was a lot healtier.

She is single, with an adopted daughter that just graduated from college. She lives in her house with her mother and nephew.

She grew her flock, until she was able to access the Expansion Package under the REAP Project open only to those who have been able to successfully turn a profit with the initial cost shared Inputs. Her expansion was approved on August 2018 which was worth P60,000 which included an egg incubator worth P35,000, so she can ensure that each egg will be able to hatch.

She is the head of her CBO, and when the REAP Project first came to her community, she was one of the first ones who took them up on their offer of free trainings, and today, she is an entrepreneur whose main operation is raising Darag (native to Panay Island) Chicken, and selling them. Back in 2016, Nanay Glenda was first interested in rice retailing, so that was the class that she took. After taking the seminar and availing of the CostShared Input worth P9,000, she bought 9 sacks of rice with it. But the turnover of her inventory was so slow, that she grew impatient and decided to pivot her business. Instead of rice retailing, she would go instead into raising Darag Chicken. She attended the training given by West Visayas State University on August 2016, and was given a family unit of chickens (1 rooster and 5 hens) to raise, which she did successfully and it even multiplied. She was feeding it organic feeds and allowing them to roam around. And unlike normal poultry farms that really

She again availed another mini-expansion worth P23,000 which was the last thing she needed before going on full steam. As of the first week of June 2019, her gross sales have already amounted to more than P160,000. This included what she earned in the last 2 weeks of May where she was able to earn around P70,000 when she successfully sold 300 chickens to a big supplier in Iloilo City. The supplier was looking for 500 heads which Nanay Glenda could have easily provided, but this time she was looking out for her fellow Darag Chicken raisers. She told the supplier to also get from the others, so that they would all have additional income. The total sales amounted to P130,000, with the P60,000 going to the other Darag raisers, who are all recipients of the REAP Project.

Because she was so successful in her endeavor, when the REAP Project decided to form the Northern Iloilo Native Chicken Association (NINCPA) to unify and better monitor all of the REAP Darag Raisers, she was voted as its founding chairperson. It was also recommended that she applies to be a member of the Iloilo Darag Raisers and Breeders Association so that NINCPA will have a direct link to the market. The only way from here is up. Before the REAP Project came, she earned around P3,000 to P4,000 a month. Right now, she can earn P10,000 at the minimum when she has no sales, but when she does, her income can go up to P16,000 a month. Her daugher may have already graduated, but having this additional funds now enable her to help her community and CBO more. “The benefits I got was not only financial, but also personal. My personality improved because I was forced to face my customers and give a sales talk, which they prepared us to do during the seminars. Nanay Glenda is not the norm. She is not part of the average. But her success gives her community encouragement and motivation to also strive to gain the same success that she got.

The REAP Project Magazine 21


REAP taught me the importance of savings. While facilitating training to community leaders, I myself learned the importance of financial management. - Nerissa Ibaya, Development Facilitator

Facilitating a process where several groups of women transformed from plain housewives to entrepreneurs is one of the significant changes I saw. These women are now producers of bread, pastries, banana chips while some are now processing meat products. - Cesar “Tibot” Castro, Tech Adviser - Marketing I was so happy that the ordinance we crafted in the Barangay was approved by the municipal council. An ordinance that will educate the people about sustainable enterprises. - Armon Múñez, Development Facilitator I cried when I saw that the projects we implemented created an impact to all CBOs we assisted, a product of our teamwork and each one’s sacrifices. - Risa Simbaya, Development Facilitator 22 The REAP Project Magazine

I did not join a company but a family. A team that treats everyone fairly and with respect. A team that is willing to extend a helping hand to those who are weak. - John Albert Baria, MEAL Assistant

The most significant change I have experienced was when our assisted CBOs got their certificate of accreditation from the Municipal LGU. They were not recognized before but now they are part of the local development council. - Arlo Dave Olarte, Development Facilitator


Staff Reflection I have undergone a heart’s surgery and I am thankful to my REAP family for staying with me, their support and prayers will forever be remembered. -Flora Mae Ferraris, Finance Manager.

The beautiful experience I have is that we were able to influence the community people to make or create their own change. I believe that I cannot influence everybody but thankfully, I was able to influence some. I was deeply touched when partners appreciated our works and how their lives were transformed along the way. - Veronica “Nikki “ Nola Cruz, MEAL Coordinator My most fulfilling experience is when I saw community partners implementing natural farming systems: model farms with concoctions production, vegetables production using non commercial inputs and livestock living in an odorless pen. It is also encouraging to see fisher folks taking care of their marine protected areas. - Elsa Are, Technical Advisor on Farming and Fishery The REAP project did not only give the community people additional

income but it enhanced their camaraderie. The sense of community was rekindled.- Madan Punsalan, Development Facilitator I learned the importance of savings. I was so thankful to REAP that I was able to participate in CoMSCA and I was so surprised when I got my share when we had our shareout. May Heart Mestidio, Bookkeeper

REAP prepared me to establish my own business. Now that I am no longer with REAP, I am happy that I am now a practicing entrepreneur and I am what I am now because of what I have learned during my three years working with REAP. - Mary Grace Jorbina, Development Facilitator The REAP Project Magazine 23


“It was a privilege to work with people in the community and being with them as they made the changes needed to improve their lives socially, economically and spiritually. There is a feeling of fulfillment as community worker that you were a channel of change in their lives, that you were a part of their success. In every work that we do we should always have passion and determination to achieve goals we have set. As saying goes: “Don’t expect to see change if you don’t make one.” - Shiela Marie V. Florendo, Livelihood Officer It’s a very challenging yet rewarding experience. We’ve been through a lot of hardship and difficulties during the implementation stage. They say “Nothing is perfect, and thus this project”. What’s interesting is that our individual differences made it way better, we were able to showcase our limitless talents and skills. We might have failed at some point but what’s important is we learned, and grew as individuals. We will be forever grateful to the REAP Project for giving us this once in a lifetime opportunity. Thank you so much. - Jessie Balasote, Procurement Officer My journey as NGO worker started with ADRA last 2014 (Typhoon Haiyan Early Recovery Program). I was trained as a Community Based Disaster Risk Reduction and Management (CBDRRM) Facilitator. I learned a lot from that experience, and it is one of the reasons why I came to work with the REAP Project. This kind of work enhances my knowledge and capabilities in dealing with partners and other stakeholders. I get a chance to work with different people especially in my own hometown (Ajuy), and I’m very thankful for the opportunity to be a part of the REAP family. Despite some challenges, working with the REAP Team has been very fulfilling and will play a big role in for my future endeavors. God Bless - Dyna Gumban, DRR and CRM Officer In the last 2 years here in REAP I’ve learned many things. I’ve learned to save because of CoMSCA. I’ve learned to 24 The REAP Project Magazine

Adventist Development and Rel

be strong when facing the community especially when you want to teach and encourage them to also stand own. I’ve learned to be patient, especially when dealing with difficult people. I’ve learned to focus my mind on the good things and be a positive thinker. Working in the community has also taught me to be humble and to solve problems. Thank you to REAP, for you helped me learn more about myself.- Rosana Cornel, Credit and Savings Officer

Happiness and fulfillment, the journey in advocating Disaster Risk Reduction and Coastal Marine Conservation. Having in mind that these initiatives lead towards community resilience and equitable management of resources. It pushes us to do more and give our best for the common good of the people and making difference one step at a time. - Kyrie Eleison A. Taganap, DRR Officer At the beginning, I was really struggling because I felt that it was impossible to introduce CoMSCA to the people, because they are too used to receiving aid. Help only comes one way. But CoMSCA will require them get from their own

pockets to contribute into it. But with prayers and commitment, we suddenly saw our numbers grow from having only 1 group to 159! There were times I almost quit because trying to achieve behavioral change especially when money is involved, seems too difficult to achieve. But I was determined to see the results. And I am satisfied that not only I was able to teach them to save, but I, myself, has learned to save too. - Laarni Rendon Salcedo, Credit and Savings Officer As we immersed ourselves in the community, we did not only provide our beneficiaries with what our deliverables indicated, but we gave a bit of ourselves. Because in doing so, in spending our time and showing them our values and perspectives, we are not only helping them create sustainable livelihoods for themselves, but also instilling lasting values for life. -Karl Mark C. Morta, Livelihood Officer “Being part of REAP gave me the opportunity to serve more. It was not only sharing what I have learned in organizational development to the community but


Staff Reflection will help themselves to have a better sustainable future. For REAP, money speaks one language. If you save me today, I will save you tomorrow. - Garee Austen G. Recto, Savings and Credit Department Head

REAP takes one step at a time. When we are sure that we are on the right road there is no need to plan our journey too far ahead. No need to burden ourselves with doubts and fears as to the obstacles that may bar our progress. We cannot take more than one step at a time. - Ronald Genise, BDS Specialist My 2-year journey with ADRA in the REAP Livelihood Project is an experience I will remember and bring with me as I continue my journey in the development sector. It has been an absolute privilege to work alongside a committed and dedicated team in community development and building back better the lives of those financial management. We do not affected by Typhoon Yolanda through just help develop the community, but sustainable and resilient livelihood. It also we develop ourselves. has been a joy and fulfillment working - Sherwin Pairat, with communities and stakeholders Finance Officer witnessing the change on how we serve, becoming good stewards with Filipinos work better as a community. the opportunities that God blessed us REAP utilizes this Filipino value of com- with. munity to come and work together to - Jannyn Celeste San Luis, help themselves. It is also the intent of M & E Officer Savings and Credit Unit- teaching them towards financial independence that

lief Agency - REAP Team also the opportunity of sharing the knowledge of Him that would enrich their lives in this lifetime and for the world to come.” - Ivy Capilitan-Morta, Livelihood Officer As being part of the REAP Project, I’ve learned important things that helped not only the communities we served but also myself. Supporting them (the CBOs) enhanced my understanding, knowledge, & skills

REAP is meant to contribute to improved economic well-being of marginalized fishing and farming communities affected by Haiyan. I’m proud to say that REAP has contributed more than economic improvement. Now, there are more job opportunities and other livelihood options available, especially for women, as they increased their knowledge and skills as well as their network and linkages. What impresses me most is to see the change in their behavior, the way they think and see things, more values and also improvement in personality. Women are showing higher self-esteem, and their husbands are happily sharing in their domestic chores, affording the ladies time to engage in economic activities. Community Development is not an easy task. Technical expertise plays a certain role, however, real change requires some other important ingredients other than technicalities. Passion, commitment, patience, diligence, humility, and ability to learn are equally important and if built on the foundation of love, we are indeed Change Agents. Nothing is greater than love. Love will lead you to learn and know more about the community you Nan Cho Cho Thel REAP Project Manager serve. In the last 4 years, we have learned to love our communities, and got to know their dynamics, and THAT is the secret of the REAP Project’s success. The REAP Project Magazine 25


CONTACT INFORMATION

# of MSME

# of CBO

CBO NAME

MSME

TYPE OF PRODUCTS OR SERVICES

NAME

CONTACT #

1

1

BOLA

Squid Processing

Squid Crunchies

Benny Biñas

09501418775

2

2

DAFA

Quail Egg production

Naturally-grown quail eggs

Roberto Bensurto

09463072617

3

3

DASEGA

Seaweeds Processing

Seaweeds Piaya

Johan Gallardo

09461787077

DASEGA

Siklob Fishing

Fish Catch

Johan Gallardo

09461787077

DASFA

Vegetable production

Naturally-grown vegetables

Ligaya Diaz/ Bernard Villanueva

09108964775

6

DASFA

Mushroom Production

Naturally-Grown Mushrooms

Saldy Bullos

09106128376

7

DASFA

Quail Egg production

Naturally-grown quail eggs

Bernard Villanueva

09108964775

Dried Fish Processing

Danggit Dried Fish, Danggit Polvoron, Danggit Cookies

Molina Dela Cruz

09285809541

4 5

4

8

5

DFUKA

9

6

Gogo KALIPI

Feed Milling

Customized Feeds

Regine Mosqueda

09101233115

10

Gogo KALIPI

Siopao processing

Siopao

Rebecca Dela Cruz

09101233115

11

Gogo KALIPI

Duck Egg Production

Naturally-grown duck eggs

Elanie Mosqueda

09101233115

Golden Harvest

Fish processing

Fish Nuggets, Chorizo

Cheurma Pastor

09465643992

Golden Harvest

Milkfish Production

Naturally-grown Milkfish/Tilapia

Emily Cornelia

09287461576

Meat processing

Pork Chorizo, Pork Siomai, Pork Embutido

Nemia Aguilar

09466205450

12

7

13 14

8

KAFA KAFA

Mobile rice mill

Rice milling

Antonio Aricaya

09386005341

16

9

KUMALO

Fishing supply

Fishing gears

Rizalino Panes

09073687783

17

10

LOFA

Banana processing

Banana Chips

Ernie Rios/ Wilma Magbanua

15

09187085907

18

LOFA

Feed Milling

Customized Feeds

Jeffryl Gabayeron

09076069185

19

LOFA

Mobile rice mill

Rice milling

Jeffryl Gabayeron

09076069185

20

11

Loguingot KALIPI

Squid Processing

Squid crunchies

Lilibeth Bohol

09302375371

21

12

LOSFA

Squid Processing

Squid crunchies

Rovelyn Retirado

09073803835

22

13

LOWA

Food processing ingredients Supply

Food processing ingredients

Wilma Magbanua

09187085907

23

LOWA

Food Processing

Polvoron

Wilma Magbanua

09187085907

24

14

MAFA

Vermiculture Production

Vermicast & ANC

Nestor Retirado/ Nilo Panes

09123265672

25

15

Mat Weavers

Squid Processing

Squid crunchies

Rona Alasa/Cleofe Tasoy

09758562376

26

Mat Weavers

Mini-Bakery

Buko pie, assorted bread

Dioscora Apitong/ Cleofe Tasoy

09758562376

27

Mat Weavers

Delivery Service

Delivery service

Dioscora Apitong/ Cleofe Tasoy

09758562376

28

16

MWA

Siopao processing

Pork, chicken, squash siopao

Michelle Valeriano

09128675392

29

17

NIFFA

Ice cream production

Ice cream

Eunace Barbo

09478514676

30

18

NISFFA

Quail Egg production

Naturally-grown quail eggs

Remy Navarro

09097509253

31

19

NIWA

Mini-Bakery

Buko pie, assorted bread

Mildred Alasa

09070426320

32

20

NWA

Banana processing

Banana Chips

Jovelyn Dela Cruz

09956672601

33

21

POA

Oyster Production

Naturally-grown oyster

Antonio Peregil Jr.

09071095928

34

22

San Roque KALIPI

Meat processing

Pork Chorizo, Pork Shomai,

Jelita Arciga

09509447639

San Roque KALIPI

Siopao Production

Siopao

Rosavilla Aguilar

09302903146

SANROFA

Mobile rice mill

Rice milling

Pablo Golingay Jr.

09197243130

37

SANROFA

Banana processing

Banana Chips/Pinasugbo

Ninfa Espinosa

09486429041

38

SANROFA

Vegetable production

Naturally-grown vegetables

Ninfa Espinosa

09486429041

SANROSFA

Crab culture

Naturally-grown crabs

Gilbert Tingson

09480228683

SANROSFA

Sow-Litter Production

Naturally-grown swine

Roquillo Oro

09197885365

Pork Embutido 35 36

39

23

24

40 41

25

TAFAS

Trading Center

rice storage service

Dema Maderaje

09955155632

42

26

TAWAS

Delivery Service

Delivery service

Eden Bernal

09489888388

43

TAWAS

Banana processing

Banana Chips

Mildred Destua

09467408242

44

TAWAS

Mushroom Production

Naturally- Grown Mushrooms

Eden Bernal

09489888388

45

27

EWYFFF (Federation)

Trading Post

Locally-produced products

Bernard Villanueva/ Federico Panganiban

09108964775/ 09077984332

46

28

KAC (Federation)

Trading Post

Locally-produced products

Antonio Peregil Jr./ Angela Nobles

09071095928/ 09199770531

26 The REAP Project Magazine


# of MSME

# of CBO

CBO NAME

47

CBOs and their MSMEs CONTACT INFORMATION

MSME

TYPE OF PRODUCTS OR SERVICES

NAME

CONTACT #

29

Bay-ang Fisherfolks Association

Merchandizing

fishing supplies

Lilibeth Bananban

(0975)908 7151

48

30

Pedada Womens Association

Community Store

groceries/goods

Cheryl Castisllion

(0918) 735 1577

49

31

Pedada Fisherfolks Association

Seaweed production

seaweed

Elmer Babiera

(091) 567 97348/ (0948)032 3979

50

32

Luca CoMSCA

Trading

Rice & palay

Jocelyn Ochida

(0909) 3580190

51

33

Luca Small Coconut Association

Food Processing

buko pie

Vergie PateĂąo

(0967)576 3743

52

34

Luca Fisherfolks

Fish Vending/ Brokering

Fish

Rannie Gayutayan

(0928)810 6447

53

35

Culasi Fashion Maker

Tailoring

school uniforms and others

Lanie Diansen

(0912)458 7513

54

36

Tamarora

Catering Services

food

Rosemarie Buenvista

(0918)751 5189/ (0930)134 8719

55 56

37

57 58

Danao ADCOM

Bakery

bread making

Glenda Basa

(0918)402 3923

Danao ADCOM

Darag Production

native chicken - Darag

Glenda Basa

(0918)402 3923

native chicken - Darag

Leon Chiquito/ Glenda Basa

(0918)402 3923

Culasi Fisherfolks 38

Darag Production

Culasi Fisherfolks

Vegetable production

vegetables

Fredo Laglag

(0909)144 9603

59

Culasi Fisherfolks

Fruits Processing Business

dehydrated fruits & vegetables

Glenda Basa

(0918)402 3923

60

BRADSCOM

Darag Production

native chicken - Darag

Leynnie Furog

(0975)554 3909

BRADSCOM

Micro-financing

savings and loaning

Frederick Dorado

(0928)225 5972

62

MACC

Merchandizing

goods/groceries

Eliseo Abunda Jr.

(0907)673 1278

63

MACC

Lettuce Production

Lettuce

Eliseo Abunda Jr.

(0907)6731278

MACC

Darag Production

native chicken - Darag

Eliseo Abunda Jr.

(0907)673 1278

65

MACC

Feed Milling

Feeds for livestock

Eliseo Abunda Jr.

(0907)673 1278

66

41

Mangorocoro Fisherfolks Association (USWAG)

Merchandizing

fishing supplies

Leny Fernandes

(0917)494 2969

67

42

Pantalan Nabaye Fisherfolks Association

Fish processing

fish (dried,smoked, etc)

Jason Sanchez

(0909)155 5830

68

43

Silagon Fish Vending

Merchandizing

groceries/goods

Joenard Apitong

(0907)673 1278

69

44

Silagon Fisherfolks Association

Merchandizing

fishing supplies

Joenard Apitong

(0907)673 1278

70

45

Punta Buri C&C

Fish processing

fish (dried,smoked, etc), ice and ice candy

Yhanita Bancayan

(0910)123 2280

71

46

Punta Buri GK

Fish Brokering

fish, ice and ice candy

Bobbet Aligan

(0930)215 8890

Punti Buri PBAL

PB PBAL Snack Bar

snacks bar, ice&ice canday, frozen foods

Lheamae Braganza

(0909)899 2232

Tagubanhan BATTAFA

Merchandizing

fishing supplies

Darlyn Joy Amante

(0907)220 4805

Tagubanhan BATTAFA

Catering Services

food

Rovelyn Caspilo

(0921)886 3738

61

64

72

39

40

47

73 48 74 75

49

Dungon Womens Association

Catering Services

food

Rowena Demate

(0946)565 9822

76

50

Maliog-liog Womens Association

Merchandizing

feeds for livestock, goods

Riza Olivar

(0905)405 8749/ (0912)146 1208

77

51

Botlog Womens Association

Community Store

groceries/goods

Marycar Cabir

(0950) 431 7453

Poblacion Fisherfolks Assn.

Fish processing

Fish Drying

Rosemarie Gordon

(0999)924 8916

Poblacion Fisherfolks Assn.

Beauty Salon

beauty culture

Rosemarie Gordon

(0999)924 8916

53

YTAMPO

Merchandizing

fishing supplies

Charlie Exchaure

(0935)930 9028

54

Tambaliza Womens Association

Tailoring

school uniforms and others

Mary Grace Roxas

(0910)614 9069

SILOSFA

Seaweed Processing

seaweed

Alberto Aspero, Suseth Enolva

(0919)903 4223/ (0912) 413 6841

SILOSFA

Seaweed production

seaweed

Dandy Cortes/ Alberto Aspero

(0975)392 0481

BRADSCOM+ LUCA

Massage Clinic

massage

Ruel Sempiano

(0928)842 7581

78 79 80 81 82

52

55

83 84

56

Sunrise over the coast of Concepcion in Nothern Iloilo Photo by: Aimee Grace Tapeceria

The REAP Project Magazine 27


Final prayer from the REAP Project Team for the MSMEs and CBOs of Ajuy, Concepcion, and Estancia...

May the road rise to meet you, may the wind be at your back may the sun shine warm upon your face, the rain fall softly upon your fields and until we meet again, may God hold in the palm of His hands. - Irish Blessing

THANK YOU TO OUR PARTNERS

INSCHOOL.ADRA.ORG/PETITION

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Profile for ADRA Philippines

The REAP Project - A Special End-of-Project Issue  

The REAP Project - Restoring, Empowering, and Protecting Livelihoods. The REAP Project is funded by Global Affairs Canada and implemented...

The REAP Project - A Special End-of-Project Issue  

The REAP Project - Restoring, Empowering, and Protecting Livelihoods. The REAP Project is funded by Global Affairs Canada and implemented...

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