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Chester CountyPRESS

www.chestercounty.com

Covering Avon Grove, Chadds Ford, Kennett Square, Oxford, & Unionville Areas

Volume 152, No. 32

INSIDE

60 Cents

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Oxford hits a high note Thousands enjoy the first Connective Art & Music Festival, which included a performance by Eve 6

Half Past Seven delivers triumphant set after winning the Battle of the Bands By Steven Hoffman Staff Writer

Education Guide special section

Photo courtesy of Moonloop Photography

Eve 6 headlined the first Connective Art & Music Festival.

By Steven Hoffman Staff Writer The colors of summer in Kennett Square...1B

Officers rally to support one of their own...3B

The Connective Festival brought thousands of people together to celebrate art and music in downtown Oxford last Saturday. The day-long debut event included music on three different stages, a gallery row of artists, numerous children’s activities, and plenty of food and family-friendly fun.

The festival was wellreceived by art enthusiasts like Jamie Corbett. Corbett was one of the artists who took part in the Clash of the Canvases competition where different artists completed a painting and festival attendees had the opportunity to vote for their favorite. “I think it’s an amazing event,” Corbett said as he took a break from his work. “Oxford is a great community.”

One of the goals of the festival was to create an interactive experience for people who attended the event. One illustration of this was the giant, three-sided interactive public art mural that was set up in the middle of Third Street so that people could use chalk to add their own personal touches to the artwork. Two of the people who contributed to the mural Continued on Page 3A

By John Chambless Staff Writer

Kimmel said she and her husband are moving out of the township, so she will no longer be eligible to serve on the board. “It’s with a sad heart that Calendar of Events......3B I tender my resignation,” Police Blotter.............3B Kimmel said. “My husband and I will be moving Classifieds..................4B to Thornbury Township in the near future. I did not anticipate this,” she said. “We’re excited, but sad to be leaving. We love this township, we love the school district, but we decided it was time for us to move. … If I could pick up the house and move it Photo by John Chambless here, I would,” Kimmel East Marlborough supervisor Christine Kimmel (cen- added, smiling. Board chairman Richard ter) has announced that she will be stepping down from her position, effective Sept. 11. Hannum, Jr., thanked

To Subscribe call 610.869.5553 © 2007 The Chester County Press

Continued on Page 3A

Photo by Steven Hoffman

Half Past Seven won the Battle of the Bands and earned the opportunity to open for Eve 6.

Kimmel announces departure from East Marlborough Supervisors

Board of Supervisors for three years, announced at the end of the board’s Aug. Christine Kimmel, who 6 meeting that she will be Opinion........................7A has served on the East resigning her position, as Obituaries...................2B Marlborough Township of Sept. 11.

INDEX

The four members of Half Past Seven had quite a day last Saturday, winning the Battle of the Bands competition in the afternoon and delivering a triumphant set on the main stage as the opening act for Connective Festival headliner Eve 6 at night. The crowd rewarded the hometown band—two of the members hail from Oxford—with a rousing ovation when they were

introduced by Monty “Moe Train” Wiradilaga, the master of ceremonies for the concert. Half Past Seven is comprised of lead vocalist Nick Lombardi, guitarist and backing vocalist Steve Lombardi, bassist Brandon Ford, and drummer Zach Smith. The Lombardi brothers, who grew up in Oxford, have been performing together for years. The rhythm section of Ford and Smith joined just a few months

Active transportation plan takes step forward By Richard L. Gaw Staff Writer The July 30 special meeting of the Council on Economic Development, a joint partnership between the Kennett Square Borough and Kennett Township to explore opportunities in their communities, saw the formal introduction of the Kennett Active Transportation Plan, a partnership between the township and the borough that aspires to create the region’s premier bicycle- and walk-friendly community. Developed in partnership with ALTA Planning + Design, a global company that provides solutions for making communities stronger, the plan has gone through two and a half years of development, a period that has included collecting data and processing public and private input. The plan is now synthesizing the information into a planned

strategy that, when implemented, will integrate both municipalities’ bicycle and trail networks, and promote alternative measures of transportation. The presentation was chaired by Stu Sirota, ALTA’s Northeast Regional Director, who said that the plan has focused its energies on nine key goals, which will include making crosswalk improvements; widening sidewalks; increasing the number of plantings; developing additional trails; creating gateway signage that indicates to motorists that they are entering bicycle and pedestrian zones; transforming under-served alleyways into social spots that draw pedestrians and bicyclists; developing bicycle boulevards that run parallel to main streets and roads; creating a network of trails that will connect Nixon and Pennock parks; and encouraging both municipalities to pass “Complete

Streets” ordinances that ensure that roadways undergoing upgrading are planned, designed, operated, and maintained to enable safe, convenient and comfortable travel and access for users of all ages and abilities regardless of their mode of transportation. Additional work on the study has included an online survey with 300 local residents – 82 percent of whom either live in the township or the borough -and an on-line map which has allowed residents to indicate where their active transportation preferences are, or would ideally be. “During our research, we found that there was a real groundswell of people and organizations in the borough and township who want opportunities for walking and bicycling,” Sirota said. “There has been a growing movement in active and alternative transportation – ride Continued on Page 2A

Kimmel for her service and wished her well. “Having the opportunity to work with you has been a real pleasure,” he said. “The fact that you are a real estate and land use attorney has given us an edge when we’re dealing with certain issues. We appreciate all of the time and effort you put into being a supervisor.” The board plans to discuss Kimmel’s replacement, and will appoint a new supervisor within 30 days of her Sept. 11 departure date. During the meeting, the board spent 45 minutes in a careful debate about trees that will be removed from

the former site of a Citgo gas station at 800-804 East Baltimore Pike. The abandoned, overgrown site, which is across from the Walmart store, has been a source of concern for the supervisors for several years. Attorney John Jaros, representing a client who is exploring the possibility of building a Landhope Farms store on the nine-acre parcel, said that there are eight trees being considered. Three of them do not meet the 36-inch diameter requirement to be classified as “specimen trees” for preservation under the township’s ordinances. Continued on Page 2A

Residents of Roseview development share concerns with Penn supervisors By Marcella PeyreFerry Staff Writer More than a dozen residents from the Roseview development were on hand at the Aug. 1 Penn Township Board of Supervisors meeting to complain about what they are calling “Roseview Creek.” After several recent heavy storms, water runoff has been creating its own channel between properties, missing storm drains and causing erosion. The township engineer cited grading issues between the upper and lower lots numbered 17 through 24, that do not match the original storm water design for the subdivision. Residents also complained that water coming off roofs that is

supposed to be directed into seepage beds in some cases is not piped, so it instead backs up in gutters and overflows them. The township engineer has been working with the developer to get grading issues corrected, but frustrated residents came to the meeting looking for a timeline and enforcement. Supervisor William O’Connell stated that there should be a dropoff date so that these issues will be completed by the end of August, at the latest. “We’re giving the contractor a timeline to work in. We don’t want this to drag on until Christmas,” O’Connell said. A big event coming up in the township is the Aug. 12 dedication of Continued on Page 3A


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Chester County Press

Local News East Marlborough...

is susceptible to the emerald ash borer that has decimated ash trees in the region. The arborist recommended a preemptive removal of the tree because it is likely to become infested. After debate, the developer agreed to preserve three trees on the site, including the ash tree, because it is still in a healthy condition. There is no site development plan yet, but the applicant was seeking direction on the removal

of the trees so that the plan could be developed. The developer said in addition to the Landhope Farms store, a medical office may be put on the site, as well as some other retail space. John Rosecrans, chairman of the township Historic Commission, explained the addition of 25 places to the Historic Resources List. The sites are primarily in the northwest corner of

the township, he said, and include both ruins of historic significance, and homes and barns that were left off of surveys done in the 1980s and 1990s. The properties include foundations of barns and homes that may date back to the 1700s, as well as homes and barns from around 1800 to 1935. The new additions also include tenant homes and outbuildings that were not included in surveys done

in the 1800s because they were not the primary residences of the landowners. Rosecrans said adding a property to the list “doesn’t mean we’re going to tell the homeowners what color they can paint their home,� but does insure that subsequent owners “can’t just come in and bulldoze a foundation or tear down a barn,� he said. A letter will be sent to the owners of the additional sites, inviting them to a

September meeting with the Historic Commission that will explain the purpose of the list. After that, there will be a formal motion to add them to the list of historic resources. For more information, and a list of upcoming meetings, visit www.eastmarlborough.org.

Developing an alternative transportation plan in the borough and the townContinued from Page 1A ship, Sirota said, will not sharing, walking, biking only be a health, environ– what we call ‘First- and mental and transportation Last-Mile’ solutions.� plus for the community,

but will be an economic advantage, as well. “Through our models we ran, we were able to quantify some real numbers,� he said. “It translates into real dollars for people’s

pocket books, for the common good and for government budgets.� The tenets of the alternate transportation plan – to create a community that is just as accessible by foot and bike as it is by motor vehicle -- are in keeping with national business trends, issued by decree – and en masse – by a younger workforce that is telling their employers that they want to work in a community that provides easy access to work, live and play, within a manageable distance from each other, and accessible by foot or by bike. “I am a firm believer in that geography is destiny, and we stand right in the middle of southern Chester County,� said Michael

Guttman, director of the township’s sustainable development office, who is also actively involved in helping to implement the Active Transportation Plan. “The township and the borough are the lynchpins for virtually every type of activity that’s going on [in this area], so to the extent that we get our own act together, we will draw in the other municipalities around us. “This notion of a network is way beyond the immediate network shared in the plan. We’re talking about a network that can connect us from Philadelphia down to Wilmington and Newark.� While the big- and small-picture schematics of the active transportation

plan are still in the talking stage, it comes at a time when both municipalities struggle to come up with solutions on how its residents can best navigate their way around the community. “What we’re really hearing is a presentation that urges us to be open to possibilities, and not come to the table with solutions already established,� Kennett Township Supervisor and Board Chairman Scudder Stevens said of Sirota’s presentation. “The questions hope to focus us as to what we should look at, and the answers encourage us to find them at a creative place. This discussion encourages that creative approach.� To learn more about the Kennett Active Transportation Plan, visit https://kennett. pa.us/DocumentCenter/ V i e w / 2 9 2 1 / 3 Kennett-ActiveTransportationPlan-002.

Continued from Page 1A

Of the five remaining, the developer asked to keep two – a Chinese chestnut tree and a cherry tree that are “in good shape,� according to a professional arborist. The other trees would be cut down. Supervisor Robert McKinstry objected to cutting down an ash tree that is presently in good shape, but

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To contact Staff Writer John Chambless, email jchambless@chestercounty.com.

To contact Staff Writer Richard L. Gaw, email rgaw@chestercounty.com.


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

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Local News Connective Festival... Continued from Page 1A

were Sam and Sophia. Sam added their initials to the mural, while Sophia added her creative touches to some of the flower pots that were included. “It’s a very cool idea,” Sam said of the interactive mural. “I think it attracted a lot more attention than anyone would have thought,” said Ed Rahme, the vice president of the Oxford Arts Alliance board. Rahme partnered with local artists Susan Melrath and Dan Meixell on designing the interactive public art mural. The Oxford Arts Alliance partnered with Oxford Mainstreet, Inc. on the planning of the Connective Festival, and organizers spent more than a year plotting out every detail Photos by Steven Hoffman of the event. The planning The Connective Festival provided an opportunity for showed—everything ran musicians like Jac Conner to showcase their talents. smoothly and there were a wide variety of activities and attractions for people of all ages. There were more than a dozen vendors selling their arts and crafts. Children could enjoy building their own musical instruments or balloon animals in the kids’ adventure area. There was also rock painting, watercolor, and face-painting activities. In the Brandywine Conservancy Art & Nature Experience, children had the opportunity to learn about different aspects of science while they also had fun. Steve Mohapp, an environmental educator with Stroud Water Research Center, said that one of the Continued on Page 4A

Dancing on Third Street.

Photo by Steven Hoffman

Half Past Seven features (left to right) Steve Lombardi on guitar, Zach Smith on drums, Brandon Ford on bass and Nick Lombardi on lead vocals.

Half Past Seven... Continued from Page 1A

ago, and since then Half Past Seven has been playing at venues throughout the tri-state area to improve their skills as a band. The were thrilled at winning the Battle of the Band competition at the inaugural Connective Festival. “The bands were all really good,” Nick Lombardi explained. Smith called the opportunity to serve as the opening act for Eve 6 “surreal.” “That’s a band that we grew up listening to,” Steve Lombardi added. Half Past Seven delivered a crowdpleasing eight-song set. They demonstrated an impressive versatility by mixing in some of the songs that they have written—“Other

Side of Me” and “Away from You”--with covers of everything from a rock anthem (Bon Jovi’s “Livin’ on a Prayer”) to a breezy pop song (Nsync’s “Bye, Bye, Bye”) to a heavy metal classic (Metallica’s “Enter Sandman”). They pumped up the Eve 6 crowd by performing an enthusiastic cover of Lit’s “My Own Worst Enemy.” Wiradilaga joined in on vocals for that song, much to the delight of the crowd. The members of Half Past Seven agreed that opening for Eve 6 was a great opportunity. The band released an EP in late 2017 that can be found online at Spotify, iTunes, Amazon, Google Play and many more online music retailers. The band is booking more shows, and winning Battle of the Band competitions will help with that effort. “We’re trying to reach as many people as possible,” Nick Lombardi said.

If you want to catch the band live, Half Past Seven has a show coming up at The Queen in Wilmington, Del. on Friday, Aug. 10. They will also be participating in the WMGK 102.9 FM Battle of the Bands on Thursday, Aug. 16. The band returns to Chester County with a show at the Hilltop Crab House in Toughkenamon on Friday, Aug 17. Half Past Seven will also be performing at Oxford’s next big community event, the First Friday Car Show, which is scheduled to take place on Sept. 7. For a complete list of Half Past Seven’s upcoming shows, visit the band’s Facebook page or the website at halfpast7band.com. To contact Staff Writer Steven Hoffman, email editor@chestercounty. com.

Full agenda for Kennett Square Borough Council includes sewer agreement discussion By Steven Hoffman Staff Writer Kennett Square Borough Council’s agenda on Monday night included everything from a presentation on a recently completed feasibility study to a series of HARB application approvals to a discussion about finalizing a new sewer agreement between the borough and neighboring Kennett Township. The feasibility study focused on potential sites for a new borough administration building and police station, including whether space for the borough administration offices and a police station could be incorporated into the plans for the parking garage expansion. The feasibility

Penn Township... Continued from Page 1A

a historical marker for Sunset Park. The dedication will take place at 4 p.m. at the marker site, at the original park entrance on Route 796. Following the dedication, Sunset Park Day will be held at the Penn Township Park (260 Lewis Rd., West Grove) from 5:30 to 8 p.m. There will be live performances by Maria Rose and Denny Elswick, followed by Danny Paisley and the Southern Grass. The event will also include a strolling magician, carnival games, a kid’s carousel and ferris wheel, food trucks and more.

study also looked at a number of different options for places where an administration building and police station could be located, primarily focusing on properties that the borough already owns. Kennett Square Borough officials will review the results of the feasibility study. Also at the Aug. 6 meeting, Kennett Square Borough Council briefly discussed a new sewer agreement with Kennett Township, but the issue was tabled until a later date. “We’ve been working with the township to revise the agreement for about a year,” borough manager Joseph Scalise explained to borough council. Scalise noted that Kennett Township is looking for

some increased sewer capacity to accommodate new residential and commercial connections, so it was a good time to revise the agreement, which was first established sometime around 1978 and has been updated periodically. Several council members had questions about the agreement, including whether Kennett Township might pay for some of the upgrades to the wastewater treatment system that are currently needed, so it was decided that the best course of action would be to table the matter for now. Council member Wayne Braffman, who serves on the borough’s Finance Committee, said that the committee recently reviewed a report about the current year’s budget at

the halfway point, and the borough’s expenditures are trending lower than what was budgeted and the revenues are coming in slightly higher than what was budgeted. Overall, Braffman said, the borough is about $40,000 ahead of what was budgeted when the revenues and expenses are combined. “We’re in pretty good shape at the halfway mark of the year,” Braffman said. Mary Hutchins, the executive director of Historic Kennett Square, informed borough council that the organization is going to be looking for people to fill four positions on the board of Historic Kennett Square for 2019. Braffman said that it would be nice if some of

Chester County PRESS SPECIAL SECTION CALENDAR

the new board members lived in Kennett Square Borough. The borough is going to spread the word about the upcoming vacancies on Historic Kennett Square’s board to help spread the word about them. Borough council voted unanimously to award a professional services contract to EDiS for work related to the proposed parking garage expansion project. Borough council approved the demolition of a building at 120 South Willow Street. The demolition of the building is necessary to make way for the new library that is going to be constructed. HARB applications for a fence at 217 South Willow Street and a sign at 116

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things that they were teaching youngsters was how to use live bugs in tests to scientifically determine the health of a creek that they had been in. “It’s really great to have the opportunity to get children interested in science and nature,” Mohapp said. Nearby, the Armstrong presents Kids Adventure was also filled with children like Isabella Thompson having fun throughout the day. Her father John, who serves on Oxford Borough Council, said that it was great to have so many different activities, including things for children to enjoy. “It’s amazing how this event has been put together,” he said. “OMI and the Arts Alliance did a phenomenal job. I don’t know how they could have done it better.” Another attraction along Locust Street was the Oxford Area Historical Association’s exhibit on “Music In Oxford’s Past.” Memorabilia from Sunset Park was featured. The artwork by young-

sters at the Lighthouse Youth Center was featured in the Oxford Arts Alliance gallery. The gallery has a strong following yearround, so there was a steady stream of visitors during the festival. Carlson Cultural Trust sponsored the gallery row of more than 20 artisans with sculptures, printmaking, fine arts, pottery, fiber art, jewelry and so much more. Some of the artisans did demonstrations of their work. Charlie Kain, for example, was doing a demonstration of spoon carving throughout the day. The Rising Sun, Md. resident said that spoon carving is fun because a project can be completed in a few hours, unlike some larger woodworking projects. As Kain carefully carved a spoon, he explained that it is a skill that takes a lot of patience and practice. He said that he enjoyed the festival, and interacting with all the people who would stop by and talk to the artists on gallery row. “It’s a great festival,” Kain said, “good food and beer, and I like all the different types of music.”

John King was the headliner on the country stage.

Not far from Kain was Dave Keefer and Brice Wonders, who were demonstrating how to spin wool. Keefer agreed with Kain’s assessment of the festival, saying that it was a great event. Wonders explained that Keefer was once his teacher in kindergarten, and years later Wonders asked him to teach him how to spin wool. “It’s very relaxing,” Wonders said. “Some people like to read, and this is my book. This is what relaxes me.” Wonders added that a lot of people at the festival were asking questions about how to spin wool. Many people enjoyed learning from the crafters and artisans along gallery row. Another important part of the festival was food and drink, and in addition to Oxford favorites like the Sawmill Grill, Wholly Grounds, Octoraro Hotel and Tavern, the Bog Turtle Brewery and La Sicilia, there was also more than a dozen food trucks that included offerings as varied as The Polish Connection, Natalie’s Fine Foods

Photos by Steven Hoffman

The Wallace Brothers perform on the main stage.

& Catering, and MnM Catering with barbecue and smoked meats. Music of all kinds was on display throughout the day. On the World Stage, which was sponsored by Lincoln University, there was a drum and dance ensemble, a performance by the Opa Band, and a mariachi performance. Jac Conner, a young musician, was assigned a great spot next to the Oxford Arts Alliance building to perform an impressive mix of classic rock songs, singer-

songwriter tunes, as well as a few original songs as people strolled by on Third Street. Conner, who counts Eric Clapton, Ed Sheeran, and Bob Dylan as a few of his musical influences, is about to enter the ninth grade at Oxford Area High School. He was excited for the opportunity to perform at the festival. “It’s awesome,” Conner said. “I’m very happy that they have this.” Tony Derrico, the director of education at the Oxford

Arts Alliance, has seen the music program expand greatly through the years. So seeing Oxford develop a vibrant musical community is heartening. “The Arts Alliance started with just a single class, so thinking about that, and now seeing all of this today, it’s really beyond my wildest dreams—this is a dream come true,” he said. Throughout the day, a series of local bands took part in a Battle of the Bands competition. Half Past Seven earned the right to

Courtesy photo Isabella Thompson enjoyed the activities in the Kids Jeanna Bissinger showcased her artwork along gal- Adventure tent. lery row.


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Maggie Creshkoff demonstrates how to work with clay to Gwendalyn Farmer.

Everyone had a good time at the festival.

part in staging such a large event. Maholmes, the president of the Oxford Area Chamber of Commerce board, said that his day began at 6:30 a.m. when he was part of the team helping to set up for the festival. He also volunteered at various places throughout the day. There were dozens of other people who helped all day long, too. “We couldn’t have done this without the volunteers,” Wenzka said. “And our volunteers did a great job of getting other people to volunteer. It really says a lot about this community to put on an event like this. There is a big sense of community tonight.” The business community played an important part in the planning and staging of the festival. Landhope Farms was the main sponsor for the event. Oxford Feed & Lumber presented the lineup of country music throughout the day. Oxford Plumbing and Heating was one of the busiHerr Foods was a major nesses that had a booth at the Connective Festival. sponsor, as was the Oxford Foundation. Numerous business owners in town helped out in a variety of ways. Some businesses, such as the Oxford Feed and Lumber and Oxford Plumbing and Heating, had booths set up at the festival. Sam and Sophia contributed to the interactive public Oxford Plumbing and art mural that was set up on Third Street. Heating is a third-generation business that has been serving the area since 1951. “I think it’s a great event,” said owner Ryan Moe Blues entertained the crowd on the local stage. Edgington. “We’re kind of behind the scenes, usually. But it’s great to be out here and to be able to see all the people. It’s great to interact with so many people.” Edgington, whose wife works at Oxford Mainstreet, Inc., even had a hand in designing the logo of the festival. He used his knowledge of graphic design to come up with a logo that features a fox and a finch. perform on the main stage to start the evening show by winning the Battle of the Bands. Better Ducks captured second place and Hour Glass took third place in the competition. Performances on the main stage that was set up at the bottom of Market Street near 4th Street included Blades of Grass, the DuPont Brothers, the Wallace Brothers, and John King. When the evening rolled around, Half Past Seven took the stage to serve as

the opening act for Eve 6, delivering a triumphant set (please see sidebar) to set the stage for the headliners. Monty “Moe Train” Wiradilaga introduced Oxford Borough mayor Lorraine Durnan Bell. “Look what this town did!” she said. “This is amazing! It has been an amazing day!” Bell thanked the volunteers who helped to make the Connective Festival an enjoyable event, and also thanked the police department, the fire department,

Jamie Corbett was one of the artists featured in the Clash of the Canvases.

the emergency responders, and the borough employees for all their hard work during the event. Finally, at 7:47 p.m., after a full day of activities leading up to the big moment, Eve 6 took the stage, promptly launching into the song, “Leech.” It was the start of a high-energy performance of such hits as “Inside Out” and “Here’s to the Night” that brought the festival to a conclusion. Brian Wenzka, the execu-

tive director of Oxford Mainstreet, Inc., said that it was great to see a diverse group of people coming together to enjoy art and music. “It’s been a great day,” Wenzka said. “The weather has been great. Every tent and every activity looked great. The kids’ activities that we had were busy all day. Everything worked as planned.” Volunteers like Eric Maholmes played a big

To contact Staff Writer Steven Hoffman, email editor@chestercounty.com.

Michelle Maenner and Steve Applegate served up the beer at one of the stands operated by the Bog Turtle Brewery.

Carl Winfrey was one of the artists featured in the Clash of the Canvases.

Ella was one of the children who enjoyed learning at the Art & Nature Experience.

The Opa Band performs on the World Stage.

“I made a few designs using their ideas. I take no credit at all,” Edgington said. According to interim police chief Scott Brown, the event took place without any major incidents. Everyone enjoyed themselves, and the atmosphere was very family-friendly. The borough police department was assisted for the event by the Chester County Sheriff’s Office. “This was very well-planned and wellcoordinated,” said Brown, who served on the Connective Festival Committee that led the effort to plan for the event. Not only did the Oxford Borough Police Department provide safety and security for the festival and the downtown area, they also provided coverage for the entire borough. “The entire police department was involved in one way or the other,” Brown said. Having the entire community come together to plan and stage an event that showcased Oxford was, in itself, a success. “This showed that we can do something like this event and the community will support it,” Maholmes said. Most of the social media posts immediately following the Connective Festival referenced how much fun it was for those who attended. There were also a lot of comments about people wanting the Connective Festival to become an annual event. While there has been no official announcement yet, Wenzka said, “After a little rest, we’ll regroup and plan for next year.”

Scott Gold II was one of the crafters demonstrating their work.

Fred Osborne was selected as the first-place finisher in the Clash of the Canvases competition.


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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Parkesburg couple Kennett Township amends commercial solicitation ordinance pleads guilty to hanging By Richard L. Gaw Staff Writer In an effort to avoid a legal fight with a nationally known pest control company that is challenging Kennett Township’s commercial solicitation curfew of 6 p.m., the township’s Board of Supervisors agreed to amend the ordinance, which now sets the curfew for doorto-door sales at 30 minutes after sunset, Monday through Saturday. The 3-0 vote was reached at the board’s Aug. 1 meeting. The vote comes on the heels of a presentation by township solicitor David Sander at the board’s July 18 meeting. Sander told the board that the company was threatening to bring a lawsuit against the township if the curfew times were not extended. Subsequently, township manager Lisa Moore contacted the township’s insurance carrier, which informed Moore that it would cover the township if the township is sued by the company. However, the insurance carrier told Moore that it would not cover the township if the township would not make a reasonable effort to come into compliance with the law. To support their argument, the company referred to a Supreme Court decision that declared a curfew of door-todoor commercial solicitation to be unconstitutional. “I personally feel that the whole process is unfortunate, because I think that having strangers coming up to your

door, particularly when it is twilight or after, is an opportunity for serious harm to occur – feelings of threat and vulnerability and acting out,” board chairman Scudder Stevens said. “If we forced this to go to federal court, and the probability of losing as a consequence, the expense to the township would be to no ultimate end. I’m satisfied with the legal advice we received, and I am satisfied with the advice we received from our insurance carrier, as to our liability and our exposure if we forced this to federal court. “I swallow my bile and bite my tongue, and vote for [the amendment].” The board also approved a $50 application fee – previously $35 -- that will be applied to every solicitor to obtain a license to conduct business in the township. The application and fee process will be conducted by the township’s police department. While the board’s decision extended solicitation curfews, the future of door-to-door sales in the township will also come with additional stopgap measures that may hold the line on solicitors. Solicitors are required to register with the Kennett Township Police Department, as well as undergo background checks, before receiving a 30-day pass to conduct business in the township. In addition, the township has the authority to create an address list of residents who choose to join a “No Solicitation” registry that will be made available to solicitors by

the police department. The addresses will remain on the list permanently, unless residents choose to opt out. The new curfew deadline does not apply to religious or political groups. “I think [the amendment] will be an improvement, and in some ways, we will end up in a better position than we were in before,” said supervisor Whitney Hoffman. In other township business, the board voted to accept an active transportation study, currently being developed by the township and the Kennett Borough and funded by a grant from the Department of Community and Economic Development. The study is exploring plans to build paths, bike lanes and sidewalks in the township and the borough. “There are a lot of decisions to be made, because we can’t just put up a sidewalk or a bike lane,” Moore said. “We need to really look at areas that are feasible.” The board also voted to adopt a 10-year memorandum of understanding between the township, Kennett Borough and Historic Kennett Square through June 30, 2021, that acknowledges that all three entities work collaboratively. During the meeting, the board addressed the news that Exelon Generation is exploring the possibility of moving out of its Kennett Square headquarters at 200 and 300 Exelon Way, where 700 employees work, once its lease expires in 2020. Should the move happen, it would leave the township

scrambling to recoup the loss of earned income tax that it currently receives from having Exelon in the township. “This is the nature of the world we live in,” Stevens said. “There is a continual movement in our economic base in our township, because we live in a transient community. We have continued to recognize that concern and have been anxiously addressing the question of economic development in the region, not just the township. “The fact is that things are going to change, and we’re going to continue to deal with it,” Stevens added. “If that means having to adjust [the township’s budget], then we will adjust the budget. We’re not hiding from this in any way, and we’re not living in a fool’s paradise that none of this will happen. We know that it has happened in the past and that it will continue to happen in the future. We just have to deal with it as we go along.” Hoffman said that while plans for additional residential, mixed-use growth in the township are potentially a good source of taxes in the future, “We’ve got to be able to make sure that we’re doing all we can to make a stable economic infrastructure in the township, and that we’re not just riding the roller coaster of everyone’s ups and downs,” she said. To contact Staff Writer Richard L. Gaw, email rgaw@chestercounty.com.

deaths of two dogs

On Aug. 6, the Pennsylvania SPCA announced that Elizabeth “Betty” and John Stoltzfus of Parkesburg have pled guilty to numerous charges surrounding the hanging deaths of two female dogs, a Bichon-type dog and a Golden Doodle-type dog, at their dog kennel. Elizabeth Stoltzfus pled guilty to Dog Law violations surrounding the deaths of the dogs, including a misdemeanor count of failure to keep the kennel in a sanitary and humane condition, and two misdemeanor counts of failure to notify the Bureau of Dog Law prior to euthanasia of any dog. Elizabeth Stoltzfus was sentenced to prohibition of animals for two years. Her husband, John Stoltzfus, pled guilty to killing the dogs under the animal cruelty law. His guilty pleas included two misdemeanor charges of willfully killing and/or torturing the dogs. He was sentenced to 10 years prohibition of animal ownership. The two dogs, who had brucellosis, were killed by hanging, after which their bodies were burned. Brucellosis is an infectious disease caused by bacteria which can be transmitted to humans through contact with infected animals. Brucellosis is treatable in both canines and humans, with a course of antibiotics. All remaining animals on the Stoltzfus property, two Golden Doodle type dogs, were surrendered to the Pennsylvania SPCA.

One of the two dogs rescued from the property and now in SPCA care.

The dogs were brought to the PSPCA’s Erie Avenue headquarters on Friday where they were evaluated medically and behaviorally and will be placed for adoption. In August of last year, the Pennsylvania SPCA’s Humane Law Enforcement Team received information from the Pennsylvania Bureau of Dog Law about the killing of the two female dogs. Based upon the findings of this investigation, animal cruelty charges were filed against both individuals. This case occurred weeks prior to the enactment of Libre’s Law, which would make acts such as this a felony. “This case involved especially heinous acts of animal cruelty, including the intentionally torturous deaths of two dogs,” said Nicole Wilson, director humane law enforcement at the Pennsylvania SPCA. “While we can never undo this damage, we can take some solace in knowing that this couple will not own animals for a very long time.”

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

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Chester County Press Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Opinion

Editorial

Letter to the Editor

If they do this, then we do that

Steps Oxford Borough Council should take to address residents’ concerns

Within the span of two days last week, two separate events occurred at the Kennett Township Building that at first glance, seemed to have little to do with each other. Upon more serious reflection however, the overlap of their importance brings light to, and may help prepare for, the impact of a crucial economic decision that is still several months away. On July 30, members of the Joint Economic Development initiative between Kennett Square Borough, Kennett Township and Historic Kennett Square gathered at a roundtable for a two-hour meeting. The meeting canvassed a wide spectrum of ideas and projects, under the guidelines of its Economic Development Study, a document that has hammered down an economic vision for the future of two municipalities who are linked together not just by a border but by a commonality of bold ideas. The stakeholders of these three entities were there in a full-throttled idea mode and accelerated by a common belief that the best decisions are those made for the common good of everyone, not just a few, and its evidence was never more apparent than during Economic Development Director Nate Echeverria’s presentation. It was a bullet-point display of forward movement that included schedules, phases, discussions and recommendations, a primer for action that enlists everyone as a stakeholder: elected officials, appointed officials and local residents. On August 1, about halfway through the Kennett Township Board of Supervisors’ meeting, an audience member referred to an article that he had recently read in the Philadelphia Business Journal, entitled “Exelon Generation Considers Moving Its Headquarters from Kennett Square.” The article stated that the company is considering the possibility of leaving Kennett Square, where it currently leases two buildings and employs 700 people at 200 and 300 Exelon Way. In a story that appeared in the July 25 edition of the Chester County Press, an official statement from the subsidiary, provided by David Tillman, director of nuclear communications, read: “As part of our cost saving efforts, Exelon Generation’s real estate and facilities team is currently exploring location options for our Kennett Square headquarters. While our lease doesn’t expire until late 2020, we are being proactive and expect to have a decision by the end of this year.” The audience member asked the supervisors and township manager Lisa Moore how they would compensate for lost money it receives earned income tax from those 700 employees, should the company decide to move when its lease expires in 2020. The audience member received no definitive answers, but a lot of concern. During the township’s 2018 budget presentation, unveiled and adopted at the Dec. 6 Board of Supervisors meeting, the board voted 3-0 to approve a 1.9 mills property tax increase for township residents to the tune of approximately $930 per household annually, that will be dedicated to a new emergency services fund that is expected to cost $1.5 million a year. At a series of township board meetings held this spring, a small but passionate cross-section of residents expressed their anger over the increase, and this newspaper published several editorials that articulated this anger. Should Exelon Generation leave Kennett Square, the easy solution for lost EIT money would be to raise taxes in the township, but doing so would create the next wave of a public relations disaster for the township’s lawmakers, who already serve a constituency made up of many who firmly believe that taxes and spending in the township are already way out of control. We believe that the best solution to compensating for this possible dilemma is not to do it by reactionary means, that is, after the last moving trucks should leave the Exelon Generation lot in 2020. Rather, a proposed migration of this kind must be inclusive of everyone who has a stake in the economic future of the entire Kennett community, and not just the decision makers at the township. That means working this issue into the agenda at the Oct. 29 Joint Economic Development’s community workshop, and asking the hard questions: How do we as a community appeal to Exelon Generation to remain as a viable economic presence in southern Chester County? If the company leaves, how to we incorporate the tenets of our Economic Development Study into the recruitment of new businesses and industries, and how can partnering agencies like the Route 1 Economic Development Initiative help us? In the event of the company’s departure, how can we leverage our current research in the future of indoor agriculture, as a way to position Exelon Way as a national – and potentially world-wide – hub for controlled environment agriculture? The July 30 meeting of the Joint Economic Development group, as well as the contents of its comprehensive economic plans, are proof positive that the Kennett community works best when it eschews borders and the minutiae of self interests. Now is the time for that working philosophy to put itself to the test again, and to succeed in finding the best possible solutions.

An open letter to Oxford Borough Council: As a taxpayer and resident of the Borough of Oxford for the past 20-plus years, along with being the prior Chair of the Borough’s Planning Commission and the Historic Commission, a member of the Oxford Area Historical Association, Borough Councilperson Emeritus, and one of the founding members and prior Chair of the Oxford Town Watch Association, I have been following the dialogue occurring between the citizens of the Borough and surrounding areas, and members of Borough Council, Oxford Mainstreet, Inc, and other “investors,” with a growing sense of dismay. Please do not misunderstand me: I am neither “for” or “against” the proposed parking garage project. I am “for” providing an active, safe, and thriving community for the residents without burdening those same residents with a tax rate so high as to make living in the Borough impossible to afford, especially for those living on low and/or fixed incomes. If the parking garage project will bring a positive change to the community, then I will support the project wholeheartedly. However, as time goes on and the dialogue progresses, I am witnessing very troubling aspects of the fundamental premise of this project that must be addressed by council before it is permitted to continue: First and foremost, I have been seeing the assertion that the proposed parking garage will bring prosperity to the borough by providing addi-

tional (and much needed) parking spaces for new businesses to open new shops in the Business District in order to bolster the borough’s tax base and local economy. So far, I have seen no valid evidence substantiating this claim. To me, this is typical of an appeal to the “If you build it, they will come” Argumentum ad Populum, or “Band Wagon” fallacy (“If enough people say it, then it must be true”). Does the Borough have on file, letters of commitment from those businesses saying they will open new locations within the Business Improvement District (BID) or within a reasonable walking distance, for example, five blocks, from the parking structure? Based upon recently collected data and direct visual observation, it appears that extant parking within the BID is only achieving an average sixty percent utilization on any given day, with the exception being the “First Friday” events. Once again, does the borough have any valid and documented observational or computational evidence which directly challenges this data? If computed, what arithmetic formulae and criteria were used to arrive at the borough’s conclusion(s)? Neither I, nor anyone I have spoken to, have seen any pro forma or any other projected cash flow analyses performed on the expected revenue to be generated from the finished parking garage. As I understand it, the price tag for this project keeps increasing, at times on a daily basis, depending upon whom one asks, which invariably leads

to an increase in the debt ceiling for this project. What contingencies are in place if the expected operating revenue is far less than projected and debt service falls into arrears? Will this shortfall be the responsibility of the business owners and other interests who are driving this project, or will it be placed squarely upon the already over-burdened shoulders of the residents of the Borough, who have recently been saddled with repaying forty-plus percent of a $27 million debt that was pathetically mismanaged by the Oxford Area Sewer Authority? When I became a member of Borough Council, I took an oath to “...perform [my] duties to the best of my ability.” Although I am no longer a member of council, no one to date has relieved me of that oath or responsibility. A portion of those duties, which are also duties prescribed upon you by the office which you currently hold, included making absolutely certain that residents’ tax dollars were spent frugally and not mismanaged. If a considerable number of residents are concerned about this proposed project, it is incumbent upon each member of council to listen, honestly evaluate without prejudice, bias, or outside influence and respond to those residents without resorting to using straw man arguments or argumentum ad bacculum. To those who are unfamiliar with informal logical fallacies: A straw man argument deflects from the original opposing argument while not offering a valid counter argument. “Where

were you when we were voting on this project?” is an example of a straw man argument. Argumentum ad bacculum literally translates to “To argue from the stick,” which is to argue from a position of force. “The residents don’t matter” is a phrase that was made by an ‘investor’ and overheard at the last council meeting. This is an example of arguing from a position of force; stating that, as an investor, they lay claim to more power than the average citizen, so their argument must be true and any assertions made by the residents must be false. A suggestion would be to compile the data requested above, along with other supporting documents, abbreviated plans, and additional information requested by others and have them available for public inspection before the Aug. 20 meeting, with copies posted on the borough’s web and Facebook pages and also be made into a permanent display at the Oxford Public Library, for all to examine and comment on before and during the meeting. This should allay the fears of some residents, including myself, that another fiasco like the OASA debacle will not happen with this project, due to sound, substantiated fiscal planning by Council. It would give the residents the reassurance that borough council’s efforts are and shall remain transparent. Thank you for your time and consideration of this matter. M. Walter “Butch” Saranetz

There is evidence that increasing open space lowers property taxes Letter to the Editor: I can assure your occasional front-page columnist (“The unknown cost of open space,” Chester County Press, August 1, 2018) that there is an extensive scholarly literature demonstrating that increasing open space lowers the property taxes of current residents relative to unrestricted development.

The logic in a state like Pennsylvania where the General Assembly has failed to meet its obligations to fund our public schools is straight forward: A 100-acre farm turned into 40 to 50 homes will impose far more in school costs than the property taxes the new residents will pay, raising the burden on existing homeowners. And the tax revenues from

poorly situated commercial development can be frittered away in increased public safety and infrastructure expenses. Of course, an effective open space preservation policy requires additional planning to ensure an adequate supply of parcels for affordable housing in our communities. Transferrable development rights, in-fill

zoning and other incentives for development in our rural and suburban centers can ensure that graduates of our public schools are able to contribute to our communities and the social security benefits of semiretired columnists. David R. Ross Associate Professor of Economics

Oxford Area Neighborhood Services Center receives grant from CCRES The Oxford Area Neighborhood Services Center recently received a grant of $3,000 from CCRES. Monies from this grant award will be utilized for one of the center’s most critical programs: food assistance. The Food Assistance Program provides sustenance to those most in need in the community. “This program makes such an incredible impact on the lives of people in our area,” said David Keller, new Executive Director of the Neighborhood Services Center. “We send our most heartfelt gratitude to the board and employees of CCRES for supporting this critical food program. It is because of local organizations such as CCRES that we are able to make a difference.” The Center’s Food Assistance Program provides different levels of

assistance: ongoing, emergency, and general. Ongoing assistance is provided to families and individuals on a monthly basis. Emergency assistance is provided to families and individuals on a one-time emergency basis. All participants must prequalify. General assistance is an informal program that includes turkey baskets at Thanksgiving and a program where local farmers drop-off extra produce during the growing season for anyone to stop by and pick up at the center. In 201617, the center provided 135,263 pounds of food to 430 households consisting of 1,392 unduplicated individuals. Since 1971, the Oxford Area Neighborhood Services Center has provided a centralized location where residents in the southern part of Chester County can access health and social services and find

help to meet their basic needs. The center’s mission is to empower all people to achieve health, wholeness, and stability in their lives. The delivery of basic needs services helps individuals and families address the obstacles they encounter when faced with situations of unemployment and under

employment, homelessness, health crises, substance abuse, and/or mental health issues that affect their ability to provide for themselves or their families. Clients represent all economic groups, all age groups, and all racial groups. The center serves thousands of people in need each year.

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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

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Section

B

Wednesday, August 8, 2018

Diverse artists reflect ‘The Colors of Summer’ By John Chambless Staff Writer “The Colors of Summer” is a good title for a show that’s all about vibrant hues, used in very different ways by a range of artists. The show, which opened last weekend at the Square Pear Gallery in Kennett Square, reflects the meticulous selection of works that has become the gallery’s hallmark. David Eldreth’s abstract fields of color paintings are featured in the front gallery space, and one of Lauren Litwa’s surreal, dreamlike paintings, “The Portal,” hangs behind the front desk, welcoming you to the show. Lidia Kohutiak will be a newcomer for Chester County art lovers, and her formal floral still lifes have a warm, glowing palette. Elsewhere, Ann GuideraMatey gets sunset colors that are so vivid you nearly need to shade your eyes. Her three marshland landscapes are wonderfully vivid and serene. Matiko Mamaladze’s work will be familiar, and she is represented here by some powerfully painted floral still lifes that have a rich texture and a not-too-arranged spontaneity that gives them a welcoming informality. Patricia Walkar’s floral

silk paintings are striking, with blooms bordered in sketchy lines that make the images look like X-rays of leaves, perhaps. They have a captivating energy to them. Her smaller abstracts show a different aspect to her work, but they are just as brightly colored. In the same gallery space are three watercolors of cactuses and blooms by Helen Springer. Kathryn Nosca is another surprise, and her small oil paintings of animals peeking out at the viewer through geometric portals are immediately captivating. The quizzical expressions are chaming, but it’s the microscopically detailed landscapes behind the animals that will beckon you closer. The grass, streams, clouds and hills are fascinating vistas unto themselves, and exquisitely painted. New to the gallery this month are shelves that will showcase ceramics or other small three-dimensional works on a regular basis. There’s a nice selection of painted pottery pieces by the late artist Mitch Lyons on display right now. To contact Staff Writer John Chambless, email jchambless@chestercounty. com.

‘Afterglow’ by Ann Guidera-Matey.

‘The Portal’ by Lauren Litwa.

‘Eventide Evocation’ by Kathryn Nosca.

‘Urn With Sunflowers’ by Lidia Kohutiak.

David Eldreth’s abstract paintings glow with summer warmth.

‘Girls and Peaches’ by Matiko Mamaladze.

‘Red Canna’ by Patricia Walkar.

‘Bird House’ by Matiko Mamaladze.

A selection of works by the late Mitch Lyons is featured in the show.


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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

KATHY BLAKE SHORE

EVELYN REITER BOYD

JOHN H. MCLIMANS, SR.

Kathy Blake Shore, 71, of West Grove, died on Aug. 3. Born in West Grove, she was a daughter of the late Marvin G. “Dutch” and the late Margaret O’Neill Blake. Kathy was a lifelong resident of West Grove. She attended Assumption BVM grade school, graduated from Bishop Shanahan in 1965, and attended Immaculata College. She was an accomplished musician and organist all her life. She played for almost every local church for all occasions, including Sunday services, weddings and funerals. She was a longtime faithful member of Assumption BVM Catholic Church in West Grove. She was a diehard Phillies fan, loved her cat Smokey McGee, her flowers and going out of her way to help others. She is survived by her longtime, faithful partner, Cheryl Sedlak of West Grove; one son, Jamie Shore (Suzanne) of Humble, Texas; one sister, Maureen Neff of West Chester; two brothers, Dorsey and Richard Blake, both of Kennett Square; five nieces and nephews; and four great-nieces and nephews. She was predeceased by her daughter Kelly in 1990. A visitation will be held from 9 to 10:30 a.m. Aug. 11 at Assumption BVM Catholic Church (300 State Rd., West Grove). Her memorial mass of Christian burial will follow at 11 a.m. Interment will be held privately. Contributions in her memory may be made to Liman House for Women, PO Box 1306, Wilmington, DE 19899. To view her online tribute and to share a memory with her family, visit www. bachmanfuneral.com.

Evelyn Reiter Boyd, 86, of Oxford, passed away on Aug. 1 at home. She was the wife of the late Samuel F. Boyd, Jr., with whom she shared 47 years of marriage. Born in Lancaster County, she was the daughter of the late Caldwell G. and Nina Mast Reiter. Evelyn was a graduate of Coatesville School of Nursing. She retired from Ware Presbyterian Village in Oxford. She was well known for her kindness, taking care of others, and her passion for gardening. Evelyn was much loved by her family and will be sorely missed. She is survived by five children, Shirley Boyd Lamkin, Larry Boyd (Linda), Dale Boyd (Kelli), Brian Boyd (Juli), and Louise Boyd; 10 grandchildren; 7 great-grandchildren; and many nieces and nephews. She was preceded in death by a daughter, Diane Boyd Farkas; sisters, Leona Smoker and Alma Woomert and Luella Byerly; a brother, Paul Reiter; and great-grandchild, Macayla J. Gault. A funeral was held Aug. 6. Interment was in Oxford Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to the Oxford Neighborhood Services Center, 35 North Third Street, Oxford, PA, 19363. Online condolences may be made at www. elcollinsfuneralhome.com.

John H. McLimans, Sr., 86, of Nottingham, passed away on Aug. 4 at Jenner’s Pond. He was the husband of Donna Blackburn McLimans, with whom he shared 26 years of marriage. Born in West Grove, he was the son of the late Solomon Pusey McLimans and the late Florence Myers McLimans. He was a self-employed truck driver, retiring in 2010. He enjoyed golfing, gardening, driving his truck, and being with his family and friends. In addition to his wife, he is survived by two sons, John H. McLimans, Jr., and his wife Shirley of West Grove, and William Scott McLimans and his wife Denise of West Grove; one daughter, Deborah L. Hampton of Avondale; two brothers, William P. McLimans of Oxford, and James L. McLimans of Kennett Square; one sister, Mary L. Moore of Oxford; 10 grandchildren; 21 great-grandchildren; and one great-great-grandson. He was predeceased by one brother, Robert McLimans; one son-in-law, Fred Hampton, Sr.; and one grandson, Fred Hampton, Jr. A visitation will be held from 10 a.m. to noon Aug. 8 at the Foulk & Grieco Funeral Home (200 Rose Hill Rd., West Grove). His funeral service will follow at noon. Burial will be in the New London Presbyterian Church Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, a contribution may be made to the West Grove Fire Company, P.O. Box 201, West Grove, PA; or to the Union Fire Company No.1, 315 Market Street, Oxford, PA 19363, Attn: Sharon Goldie. To view his online tribute and to share a memory with his family, visit www.griecocares.com.

Obituary submissions The Chester County Press publishes obituaries, free of charge, for those with a connection to southern Chester County. Obituaries appear on the Wednesday after they are received, space permitting. They also are

posted on www.chestercounty. com. Photos should be sent as .jpg attachments to the obituary text. To submit an obituary to the Chester County Press, email the information to: jchambless@ chestercounty.com.

MARGARET MARY STEEL Margaret Mary Steel, 97, of Kennett Square, passed away on July 30 at her residence. She was the wife of Herbert A. Steel, who passed away in 2006, and with whom she shared 65 years of marriage. Born in Pottsville, she was the daughter of the late James King and the late Anna Canfield King. She was a licensed practical nurse, working at Chatham Acres for 30 years. She enjoyed boating, going to the North East River, and being with her family and friends. Survivors include, one son, Herbert Steel and his wife Barbara of Kennett Square; two sisters, Nancy Ann King of Pottsville, and Joan Selinko of Pottsville; two grandchildren; and two great-grandchildren. A service was held Aug. 4. In memory of Mrs. Steel, a contribution may be made to the Kennett Square Missionary Baptist Church, 408 Bayard Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348; or to St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital, 501 St. Jude Place, Memphis, TN 38105. To view her online tribute or to share a memory with her family, visit www.griecocares.com.

ROBERT DAVID STARK Robert David Stark, 83, of Kennett Square, passed away on July 28 at the Christiana Hospital. Born in Kulpmont, Pa., he was the son of the late David Stark and the late Stella Jingeleski Stark. He was an elementary school teacher in the Avon Grove School District for 40 years, retiring in 1998. He also worked as an iron worker for 25 years and belonged to the local iron workers union. He served his country in the U.S. Army Infantry. He was a member of St. Patrick Church, the Knights of Columbus and the Kennett Area Senior Center. He enjoyed playing with his granddaughter, the outdoors, carpentry, helping others, and being with his family and friends. He is survived by one daughter, Deborah Ann DeMarie and her husband John of Dover, Del.; one brother, Kenneth Stark; and one granddaughter. He was predeceased by one daughter, Diane Lynn Stark; and his former wife, Teresa Sinshack Stark. A funeral was held Aug. 4. Burial was in St. Patrick’s Cemetery in Kennett Square. In lieu of flowers, a contribution may be made to St. Patrick Church, 205 Lafayette Street, Kennett Square, PA 19348. To view his online tribute and share a memory with his family, visit www.griecocares.com.

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Aug. 25 Buffet breakfast Oxford United Methodist Church (18 Addison St., Oxford) hosts a buffet breakfast for the public on Aug. 25 from 7 to 10 a.m. The menu includes buttermilk pancakes, French toast, scrambled eggs, sausage and bacon, roasted potatoes, and more. Tickets at the door are $7 for adults and $3 for ages 3 to 10. Proceeds benef it the church’s general fund. Call 610-932-9698 for more information. Through Aug. 29 Summer Fun series West Grove United Methodist Church (300 N. Guernsey Rd., West Grove) invites the community to the fourth year of Wednesday night “Summer Fun.” The weekly event continues through the summer, and runs from 6 to 8 p.m. There will be hot dogs, games, fellowship and a brief word from pastor Rev. Monica B. Guepet each week. All beverages will be

supplied. Families can bring snacks if they wish. The event is free. An assortment of games will be available Bring bikes, trikes, skateboards, scooters or rollerblades. Weather permitting, there will be a slip-n-slide. For more information, call 610-869-9334 or visit w w w. we s t g r ove u m c . org. Through Sept. 30 Summer music Landenberg United Methodist Church (205 Penn Green Rd., Landenberg) presents its summer series of music at Sunday services, including: vocalist Frank Joyce (Aug. 12); Fishcastle (Cyril Castor and Catherine Selin) (Aug. 19); vocalist/guitarist Steve Poorman (Aug. 26); flute ensemble (Sept. 2); vocalist Earline Perry (Sept. 9); vocal/guitar duo Connie and Val Schan (Sept. 16); vocalist/ instrumentalist Ken Tonge (Sept. 23); Rise Up Band (Sept. 30).


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Through Aug. 8 Anson B. Nixon Park concerts Anson B. Nixon Park (405 N. Walnut Road, Kennett Square) is hosting a series of free concerts this summer that are presented by the Kennett Flash. The schedule includes: Radio Free Honduras (Aug. 8, 7 p.m.). Visit www.kennettflash.org. Aug. 10 Jen Chapin in concert Jen Chapin returns to The Friends Folk Club on Aug. 10, with a concert at 7:30 p.m. at the St. Christopher’s Episcopal Church (116 Lancaster Pike, Oxford). Chapin is the daughter of the late singer-songwriter Harry Chapin. Attendees are asked to bring non-perishable food items which will be given to the local area food cupboards. There will be several food trucks on site at

5:30 p.m. Tickets are $15 and will be available at the door. Doors open at 7 p.m. For more information, call 610-869-8076. Aug. 12 Record Collectors Show Spooky Nook Sports Lanco (1901 Miller Rd., East Petersburg) hosts the Keystone Record Collectors Music Expo on Aug. 12 from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m. Dealers and collectors will be selling and buying records from all eras, CDs and music memorabilia. Admission is free. Call 610-932-7852 or visit www.recordcollectors.org. Aug. 18 ’Symphony Under the Stars’ The Kennett Symphony of Chester County presents “Symphony Under The Stars: A Midsummer Night’s Concert” at the Longwood Gardens Open Air Theatre on Aug. 18 at 7:30 p.m. The program

includes incidental music from Mendelssohn’s “Midsummer Night’s Dream,” classics such as Grieg’s Peer Gynt Suite No. 1 and favorites from Disney and Harry Potter. Single ticket prices are $45 in advance, $50 on the day of the concert (students are $10). Tickets include all-day admission to Longwood and a post-concert illuminated fountain show. Visit www.KennettSymphony.org or call 610-444-6363. Aug. 24 Bluegrass and Cajun concert The Oxford Fire Hall (315 Market St., Oxford) will be the site of Fiddlers Follies on Aug. 24 from 7:30 to 10:30 p.m. Performing will be Orpheus Supertones, playing old-time fiddle tunes; and The Penthouse Playboys, playing Cajun music. Tickets are $20 at the door,

and proceeds benefit the Orpheus Foundation (www. orpheusfoundation.org). BYOB. For more information, visit www.mudthumper.com. Aug. 29 Geneaology research workshop The Oxford Area Senior Center (12 E. Locust St., Oxford) will offer a genealogy research workshop with genealogist Kristine Parkes beginning on Aug. 29. The monthly class will help participants research family histories. The free classes will be held from 7 to 9 p.m., and are limited to 15 participants. For reservations, call 610-932-5244 or email oxsrctr@zoominternet. net. Through Sept. 30 Festival of Fountains Longwood Gardens (Route 1, Kennett Square) has daily

fountain shows, live music in the Beer Garden on weekends, Fireworks and Fountains shows on six nights, and an outdoor performing arts series, continuing through Sept. 30. General gardens admission, by timed ticket, is $23 for adults, $20 for seniors over 62, $12 for ages 5 to 18, free for children 4 and younger. Visit www. longwoodgardens.org for more information and tickets. Kennett Flash schedule The Kennett Flash (102 Sycamore Alley, Kennett Square) hosts regional and national artists. Tickets are available in advance at www. kennettflash.org, or at the door. Snacks and beverages are sold, or guests can BYOB. The schedule includes: Better Than Bacon improv comedy in a benefit for Family Promise (Aug. 9, 8 p.m., $16 and $20);

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

3B

Kansas tribute band Know Return (Aug. 17, 8 p.m., $18 and $22); Dave Matthews tribute band Crowded Streets (Aug. 18, 8 p.m., $20 and $25); Open Mic with Simon Godfrey (Aug. 19, 7 p.m., $4); “Films and Music at the Flash” with Romantic Warriors: A Progressive Music Saga (Aug. 26, 7 p.m., $10 and $25); Ronstadt Revue: A tribute to Linda Ronstadt (Sept. 14, 8 p.m., $24 and $28); Discipline with Valdez (Sept. 15, 8 p.m., $24 and $28). To submit items to the Calendar of Events, e-mail jchambless@chestercounty. com. There is no charge. Not every submission can be included. Items should be submitted at least two weeks before the event.

Officers support colleague battling cancer The weather, the Chester County Sheriff’s Office, police departments from one end of Pennsylvania to the other, and members of the public successfully collaborated on July 22 to stage a massive fundraiser. A convoy of nearly 150 motorcycles and a handful of law-enforcement vehicles pulled out of the Government Service Center in West Chester, committed to a singule goal: supporting Chester County Deputy Sheriff Jeff DiVito. The 17-year deputy has received a cancer diagnosis, prompting his colleagues to brainstorm about ways to assist

him. DiVito’s graduation from the Philadelphia Police Training Bureau’s motorcycle course last year – fulfilling a dream to join the Sheriff’s Office Wheels Unit – ultimately inspired the creation of Jeff’s Battle Ride. “Jeff has always been -- and remains -- a very valuable member of the Chester County Office of the Sheriff,” said Sheriff Carolyn Bunny Welsh. “He’s beloved by all, he’s highly respected, and highly regarded. We are with him all the way in this brave battle. And I’ll tell you: Jeff will battle and Jeff will win.” Participants paid $20 per bike to join the group, which

Deputy Jeff DiVito (left) expresses thanks to a crowd that includes Chester County Sheriff Carolyn Bunny Welsh, DiVito’s father David, and his brother, Dave.

enjoyed a scenic, circuitous journey from West Chester to Exton with assistance from the neighboring police departments. Many of the participants, such as officers from Philadelphia and Upper Darby, did some traveling before the event even began, but none more than three officers from the Pittsburgh Police Department. The Pittsburgh trio had driven to Chester County the night before. They said they had seen an online flyer about the event and wanted to help; the fact that they didn’t know DiVito didn’t matter. In contrast, many of the 29 riders from the Oxford Police Department have known DiVito for some time, a relationship that motivated Oxford Field Training Officer Chris Coverly and Officer Adam Weaver, a former deputy sheriff, to organize a T-shirt initiative. Coverly said they sold out their order of 80 shirts and ended up raising more than $2,000. “The community really responded well,” he said. Many of the people who purchased the shirts sported them at the Pour House, producing a flurry of additional requests. Coverly said he gave

the production information to DiVito’s brother Dave so he could make another order. “By the time I left around 2, it looked like he had a couple hundred names,” Coverly said. Despite dire predictions of bad weather, the storms held off until long after the cycles had arrived at the Pour House restaurant in Exton. The restaurant’s owner had agreed in advance to donate 15 percent of the afternoon’s proceeds to DiVito. Well over 100 people were on hand when the motorcade arrived, a number that continued to increase. The response prompted the restaurant to extend the promotion for the remainder of the day. In addition to those proceeds, deputy sheriffs, who set up a GoFundMe page at www.gofundme.com/

JeffDivitosBattle, conducted a 50-50 raffle and a silent auction to help defray DiVito’s medical costs. DiVito, who spent much of

the day amazed by the enormity of the outpouring, agreed. “I want to thank everyone from the bottom of my heart,” he said.

A convoy of nearly 150 motorcycles participates in Jeff’s Battle Ride.

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Opioids killed 59 county residents as of June 30

The opioid crisis continues to take lives in Chester County, local officials said last week. The Chester County Coroner’s Office has released data on deaths due to drug overdoses in Chester County for the year, as of June 30. A total of 59 people died of a drug overdose during the period, with 57 deaths determined to be accidental, and two due to suicide. Since the number of drug overdose deaths varies widely

from month to month, the Coroner’s Office said that it is not possible to accurately estimate a total for 2018 from these mid-year data. The demographic profile of those who died of a drug overdose so far in 2018 is similar to that for 2017, with the affected population remaining predominantly white men, ages 25 to 44. Toxicological testing continued to find synthetic opioids in most drug-related deaths. Illicit synthetic opioids

include fentanyl, fentanylrelated substances, and nonprescription synthetic opioids, with one or more of these substances documented in about 78 percent of the deaths so far this year. Heroin was present in 43 percent, and cocaine in 35 percent of deaths, often in combination with fentanyl. Data on drug overdose fatalities are reported to www.overdosefreepa.org, and detailed information is available there.

WOMAN ARRESTED FOR ASSAULTING OFFICER A Lincoln University woman was arrested following a high-speed pursuit on July 26, during which she allegedly assaulted a police officer. Police said the incident occurred at approximately 2:38 p.m. West Chester officers were dispatched to 413 S. Matlack Street to check the well-being of Emma L. Pascarella, 21. Pascaralla had reportedly told her boyfriend she was going to commit suicide. Pascarella fled in a vehicle when officers arrived. She refused to yield to the police

cars following her vehicle. Officers were eventually able to stop the vehicle, but Pascarella ran away. While being taken into custody, she struck an officer. She was charged with two counts of aggravated and simple assault, and one count of fleeing and eluding a police officer. TWO CHARGED AFTER THREATS Shawn B. Peek, Jr., 24, of Lincoln University, and James A. Baker, 18, of Oxford, were arrested by Southern Chester County Regional Police on July 7 and charged with simple assault, harassment, and criminal conspiracy. Police reported that at about 5:35 p.m., in the 100 block of Rocky Springs Road in New Garden Township, the two men were trying to fight the

boyfriend of a woman who called police. DUI AND ENDANGERMENT Stephen D. Brinton, 44, of Avondale, was arrested by Southern Chester County Regional Police on July 7 and charged with aggravated assault by vehicle while DUI, DUI, endangering the welfare of children, recklessly endangering another person, and related traffic offenses after a serious crash. The incident occurred at about 7:58 p.m. at the intersection of West Cypress Street and Scarlett Road in New Garden Township. According to witnesses, the 2015 Honda that Brinton was driving was traveling east on West Cypress Street, approaching the intersection with Scarlett Road, when it crashed.

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4B

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Chester County Press

Legals

LEGALS

HELP WANTED

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF Ann L. Young, late of London Grove Township, Chester County, Deceased. Letters Testamentary on the estate of the above named Ann L. Young having been granted to the undersigned, all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the said decedent are requested to make known the same and all persons indebted to the said decedent to make payment without delay to: Judith Y. Fincher, CoExecutrix, Ellen Y. Cross, Co-Executrix, Susan Y. Edwards, Co-Executrix, c/o Winifred Moran Sebastian, Esquire 208 E. Locust St., P.O. Box 381, Oxford, PA 19363 7p-25-3t

PUBLIC NOTICE

Notice is hereby given that the London Grove Township Board of Supervisors will conduct a hearing on Wednesday, August 22, 2018 at 7:00 p.m. to hear the Proposed Zoning Ordinance, any questions related to the Proposed Zoning Ordinance and any other business that comes before them. A copy of the summary and documents can be obtained at London Grove Township Building, 372 Rose Hill Road and the Chester County Press, 144 S. Jennersville Road, West Grove, PA 19390. The hearing will be held in the London Grove Township Building, 372 Rose Hill Road, West Grove, PA. The public is invited to attend. Kenneth Battin, Township Manager. 8p-1-2t

PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTICE is hereby given that, pursuant to the provisions of the PA Business Corporation Law of 1988, WILMINGTON STEEL PROCESSING CO., INC., a Delaware corporation with its principal office at 1565 Embreeville Road, PO Box 572, Unionville, PA 19375 and its registered office at 1565 Embreeville Road, PO Box 572, Unionville, PA 19375 will file a Statement of Withdrawal of Foreign Registration with the PA Department of State.

8p-8-1t

CORPORATION NOTICE

St. Monica’s All Abilities Ministry and Outreach Foundation has been incorporated under the provisions of the PA Nonprofit Corporation Law of 1988. Toscani & Lindros 899 Cassatt Road, Suite 320, Berwyn, PA 19312 8p-8-1t

NOTICE OF PETITION TO CHANGE NAME

IN THE COURT OF COMMON PLEAS CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA, PETITION FOR A CHANGE OF NAME, Docket No,2018-06232-NC. AND NOW, this18th day of June 2018, upon consideration of the Petition and upon motion of Michael Dowling to change his name to Michael Drelich , a hearing is hereby scheduled for : the 18th day of September, 2018, at 9:30 am in Courtroom # 7, Chester County Justice Center, 201 W. Market Street West Chester, Pennsylvania, when and where all persons interested may appear and show cause, if any, why the request of the said petitioners should not be granted. 8p-8-1t

FICTITIOUS NAME REGISTRATION

An application for registration of the fictitious name SB Painting, 761 Unionville Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348 has been filed in the Department of State at Harrisburg, PA, File Date 06/09/2018 pursuant to the Fictitious Names Act, Act 1982-295. The name and address of the person who is a party to the registration is Clee P Brun, 761 Unionville Road, Kennett Square, PA 19348. 8p-8-1t

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF Eileen M. Scanlon, late of East Goshen Township, Chester County, Deceased. Letters Testamen-

CLASSIFIEDS Help Wanted Experienced Class A CDL Holders: Dedicated Freight, Home Every Day. Oxford, PA Terminal. $1300 Weekly Min Guarantee. $5,000 Sign On Bonus* BCBS Health, Dental, Vision, 401K. Call 484-784-4628 Bruce Becker careers.firstfleetinc.com 54 workers needed for Martin’s Contractors and Landscaping, for fruit harvesting, from 08/14/18 to 12/31/18, workers will be paid $.78+ per quarter bag, but will be guaranteed $12.05 per hour, job location is in Biglerville, PA. This job opportunity is temporary, 36 hours per week guaranteeing at least “3/4” of the time offered, free housing is provided to workers who cannot reasonably return to their permanent residence at the end of the work day, transportation and subsistence expenses to the work site will be provided by the employer upon completion of the 50% of the

Nottingham Area Lawn Service and Landscaping Company. Possible year round work.

Call 610-467-1103, Leave a message. tary on the estate of the above named Eileen M. Scanlon having been granted to the undersigned, all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the said decedent are requested to make known the same and all persons indebted to the said decedent to make payment without delay to: Denise M Klose, Executrix, C/O Robert J. Breslin, Jr., Esq., Pappano and Breslin, 3305 Edgemont Ave., Brookhaven, PA 19015 or her attorney:Robert J. Breslin, Jr., Esq., Pappano and Breslin, 3305 Edgemont Ave., Brookhaven, PA 19015 7p-25-3tSheriff Sale

of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite 1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 17-8-462 Writ of Execution No. 2017-01543 DEBT $56,691.49

work contract, tools, equipment and supplies will be provided at no cost, Job order holding office is at 150 V Twin Drive Gettysburg, PA job order 12237900 Reit Lubricants Co. is interviewing for drivers. You must have a Class BCDL with ”X” Endorsement (Haz-Mat & Tanker) and current Medical Card to apply. Experience delivering any oil product is a definite + but will train the right candidate. Excellent pay and benefits. Email sthiersjr@reitlube.com or call 610-932-2200 and ask for Steve.

PROPERTY situate in the Franklin Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania

For Sale

SALE ADDRESS: 1833 New London Road, Landenberg, PA 19350

LIVE EDGE SLABS OF WOOD FOR CRAFTING AND BUILDING PROJECTS. Live edge slabs of timbers available in different sizes and wood types. Good for furniture, counters, benchs, bar tops and much more. Call Kevin at 484-6438122 for more information.

BLR# 72-5-34.1 IMPROVEMENTS thereon: residential dwelling PLAINTIFF: Wells Fargo Bank, N.A., s/b/m to Wells Fargo Home Mortgage, Inc. VS DEFENDANT: RUDY D. ARNOLD

PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: PHELAN HALLINAN DIAMOND & JONES, LLP, 215-563-7000 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and

place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite 1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 17-8-464 Writ of Execution No. 2016-11373 DEBT $188,559.17 ALL THAT CERTAIN lot or piece of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon erected, situate in East Nottingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, bounded and described according to a Plan of Locksley Glen, Section 1, Phase 1, made by Reagis, Inc., Engineers and Surveyors, dated 6/20/1998, last revised 3/19/1999 and recorded on 5/14/1999, as Plan #14921, as follows, to wit:

Oxford, PA 19363 PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: SHAPIRO & DeNARDO, LLC, 610-278-6800 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

BEING the same premises which Edward J. Deal, III and Marlene T. Deal, by Deed dated 6/30/2004 and recorded 8/16/2004 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds in and for the County of Chester as Instrument Number 10449228, granted and conveyed unto David Blisard and Lisa Blisard, in fee. PLAINTIFF: JPMorgan Chase Bank, National Association VS DEFENDANT: DAVID BLISARD and LISA BLISARD

SALE NO. 17-8-474 Writ of Execution No. 2014-00901 DEBT $548,645.62

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite 1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 17-8-472 Writ of Execution No. 2012-09196 DEBT $516,927.84 PROPERTY situate in the East Nottingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania BLR #69-3-161

BEGINNING at a point on the southeasterly side of Winston Way, the northwest corner of Lot #67 and the southwest corner of the about to be described lot; thence along Winston Way, north 48 degrees 02 minutes 50 seconds east, 90.00 feet to a point, a corner of Lot #65 on said Plan; thence along same, south 41 degrees 57 minutes 10 seconds east, 178.75 feet to a point, a corner of Lots #70 and #71; thence along Lot #70, south 48 degrees 02 minutes 50 seconds west; 90.00 feet to a point, a corner of Lot #60 and #67; thence along Lot #67, north 41 degrees 57 minutes 10 seconds west; thence along Lot #67, north 41 degrees 57 minutes 10 seconds west, 178.75 feet to the first mentioned point and place of beginning.

West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite 1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter.

IMPROVEMENTS thereon: residential dwelling PLAINTIFF: Bank of America, N.A. Successor by Merger to BAC Home Loans Servicing, L.P. f/k/a Countrywide Home Loans Servicing, L.P. VS DEFENDANT: MATTHEW J. GIBSON SALE ADDRESS: 329 Heron Drive, Lincoln University, PA 19352-1729 PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: PHELAN HALLINAN DIAMOND & JONES, LLP, 215-563-7000 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201

ALL THAT CERTAIN parcel of real estate in the Borough of Avondale, County of Chester, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point at the southwesterly extremity of the arc of a curve having a radius of 35 feet which connects the northeasterly line of State Highway (50 feet wide) Route Number 215, and which has a bearing of south 44 degrees 00 minutes east, with the southerly line of State Highway (60 feet wide) Route No. 131 at a point of reverse curve, said beginning point being distant 22 feet northwardly and radially from the center line of railroad of The Philadelphia, Baltimore and Washington Railroad Company, known as the Octorara Branch, Maryland Division; thence extending from said point the following 4 courses and distances to wit: (1) northeastwardly along said arc or connecting curve to the right having a radius of 35 feet the chord of said curve having a bearing of north 29 degrees 36 minutes east for a length of 67.15 feet to said point of reverse curve at the point of meeting with said southerly line of State Highway, Route No. 131; (2) eastwardly along said southerly line of the last mentioned highway on a curve to the left having a radius of 667.27 feet the chord of said curve having a bearing of south 89 degrees 12 minutes east for a length of 322.83 feet an arc length of 326.03 feet; (3) south 11 degrees 15 minutes west 153.11 feet and thence (4) westwardly on a line parallel with and distant 22 feet northwardly and radially from said center line of railroad on a curve to the right having arc radius of 1,888.08 feet the chord of said curve having a bearing of north 73 degrees 33 minutes west for a length of 340 feet an arc length of 342.42 feet to the place of beginning. BEING UPI No. 4-3-30 IMPROVEMENTS consisting of commercial structure. PLAINTIFF: PNC Bank, N.A. VS DEFENDANT: AVONDALE IQ CO., LLC SALE ADDRESS: 72 Baltimore Pike, Avondale, PA 19311 PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: KRISTEN WETZEL LADD, ESQ., 610-692-1371 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase

SALE ADDRESS: 117 Winston Way,

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610-467-1103


WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

5B

Chester County Press money must be paid at the time and place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite 1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 17-8-476 Writ of Execution No. 2017-02626 DEBT $232,224.76

TAX Parcel #56-04-0054.240 UPI No. 56-4-54-24 IMPROVEMENTS: a residential dwelling. PLAINTIFF: PNC Bank, National Association, Successor by Merger to National City Mortgage, a Division of National City Bank VS DEFENDANT: DAVID F. O’CONNOR a / k /a DAV I D O ’ C O N N O R a n d LISA ANN O’CONNOR a/k/a LISA O’CONNOR

beginning being south 02 degrees 06 minutes west 175 feet from an iron pin set in the South Street Line of Chestnut Street, 50 feet wide, measured, along the West Street line of Park Avenue;

SALE NO. 17-8-480 Writ of Execution No. 2010-14117 DEBT $216,188.77

THENCE along land of said school, north 06 degrees 09 minutes west 58.48 feet to a stake, a corner of Lot #57;

BLR# 61-6-404

ALL THAT CERTAIN, message, lot or piece of land situate on, in the Borough of Kennett Square, County of Chester, State of Pennsylvania, bounded and described, as follows, to wit:

THENCE along Lot #57 south 88 degrees 45 minutes east 145.84 feet to the first mentioned point and place of beginning.

PLAINTIFF: Lakeview Loan Servicing, LLC VS DEFENDANT: ANNA-CARIN BREWER

CONTAINING 7806.3 square feet of land, be the same more or less.

SALE ADDRESS: 246 Cherry Lane, Kennett Square, PA 19348-4709

BEING UPI Number 3-5-190

PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: PHELAN HALLINAN DIAMOND & JONES, LLP, 215-563-7000

SALE ADDRESS: 406 Township Road, Oxford, PA 19363 PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: KML LAW GROUP, P.C., 215-627-1322 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

PROPERTY situate in Township of Lower Oxford

West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite 1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter.

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201

ALL THAT CERTAIN lot of land, situated on the west side of Park Avenue (formerly Race Street) being Lot #56 South View Development in the Borough Kennett Square, County of Chester and the State of Pennsylvania being bounded and described according to a survey made by George E. Regester, Jr., Registered Surveyor, as follows; BEGINNING at a stake in the West Street Line of Park Avenue (formerly Race Street) as the same is now laid out 47 feet wide, and said point of

HELP WANTED Star® Roses and Plants is seeking to hire full-time Production Operators for our fields and greenhouses located at 25 Lewis Rd., West Grove, PA 19390. Production Operators are responsible for performing various field maintenance and greenhouse tasks related to propagation, in all weather conditions. Preparing fields for spring planting, watering, mulching and discarding plants, assisting in chemical applications and pulling materials for shipping, including loading trucks. High School Diploma or equivalent. This position requires operating various types of equipment, such as tractors, forklifts, front-end loader and other field equipment. Anyone interested in applying for this position should contact Rebecca Belanger Wednesdays and Fridays 8:30am-4pm at 25 Lewis Road, West Grove, PA 19390 or rbelanger@starrosesandplants.com or 610-345-5122

THENCE along the West Street line of Park Avenue, south 02 degrees 06 minutes west 55 feet to a stake; a corner of Lot #55; THENCE along Lot 55 north 88 degrees 45 minutes west 137.98 feet to a stake in a line of land of Kennett Consolidated School;

PARCEL No.: 3-5-190 BEING known as: 818 Park Avenue, Kennett Square, PA 19348 BEING the same property conveyed to Clarence Stevens who acquired title by virtue of a Deed from John B. Morton, dated March 30, 2007, recorded June 13, 2007, at Deed Book 7184, Page 1666, Chester County, Pennsylvania Records. PLAINTIFF: US Bank National Association, as Trustee for CMLTI 2007WFHE3 VS DEFENDANT: CLARENCE STEVENS SALE ADDRESS: 818 Park Avenue, Kennett Square, PA 19348 PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: MANLEY DEAS KOCHALSKI, LLC, 614-2205611 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite

1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 17-8-483 Writ of Execution No. 2017-00905 DEBT $242,645.89 PROPERTY situate in the East Marlborough Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania

IMPROVEMENTS thereon: residential dwelling

N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite 1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 17-8-490 Writ of Execution No. 2016-03344 DEBT $78,908.10 PROPERTY situate in Township of Franklin TAX Parcel #72-04L-0001 IMPROVEMENTS: a residential dwelling. PLAINTIFF: PNC Bank, National Association, Successor in Interest to National City Real Estate Services, LLC, Successor by Merger to National

City Mortgage, Inc., formerly known as National City Mortgage Co. VS DEFENDANT: CRAIG L. JACOBS SALE ADDRESS: 206 Fox Run Lane, Lincoln University, PA 19352 PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: KML LAW GROUP, P.C., 215-627-1322 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writ directed to Carolyn B. Welsh, Sheriff, will be sold at public sale, in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 West Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, announced on Thursday, August 17th, 2017 at 11AM prevailing time, the herein-described real estate. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file in her office located in the Chester County Justice Center, Office of the Sheriff, 201 West Market Street, Suite 1201, West Chester, Pennsylvania, a Schedule of Distribution on Monday, September 18th, 2017. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedule unless exceptions are filed hereto within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 17-8-510 Writ of Execution No. 2013-11801 DEBT $6,878.06 ALL THAT CERTAIN lot or piece of ground with the building and improvements thereon erected, hereditaments and appurtenances, situate in the Township of Penn, County of Chester and State of Pennsylvania. TAX Parcel No. 58-3-33.2 PROPERTY address: 78 Allsmeer Drive, Penn Township, Pennsylvania PLAINTIFF: Penn Township VS DEFENDANT: JAMES McANANY and SYLVIA McANANY SALE ADDRESS: 78 Allsmeer Drive, Penn Township, Pennsylvania PLAINTIFF ATTORNEY: DIANE M. BOEHRET, ESQ., 484-690-9300 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. 10% payment must be paid in cash, certified check or money order made payable to the purchaser or Sheriff of Chester Co. The final payment must be made payable to Sheriff of Chester Co. & is due twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 2PM. CAROLYN B. WELSH, SHERIFF 7p-26-3t

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6B

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

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WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

7B

Oxford Educational Foundation honors teachers, announces awards Continuing an annual tradition, the Oxford Educational Foundation (OEF) closed out another school year with its annual end-of-the-year breakfast. The event, co-sponsored by the OEF and Oxford Area Educational Association, is a celebration for Oxford Area School District staff and includes the presentation of both a volunteer award, and of the John Pittenger Building Grant. The OEF showed its appreciation for the more than 100 classroom volunteers, mentors, and

tutors who work within the Oxford Area School District. These volunteers gave more than 2,750 hours of their time to benefit the students of the district. Highlighting the event was the presentation of the Randy Sebastian Volunteer Person (RSVP) Award. Sebastian was a veteran, local lawyer and founding member of OEF, where he also served as a volunteer. Although Sebastian died in 1997, his legacy in the OEF continues through this award. This year, the honor

was presented to Dr. Larry Firment in recognition of his work guiding eight high school students to greater success in their studies of physics and chemistry. Dr. Firment’s academic background and career make him an excellent tutor. He earned his chemistry degree from Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) and his PhD in physical chemistry from University of California at Berkeley. During his 39-year career, he applied his knowledge to research, management

Courtesy photo

Larry Firment received the 2018 Randy Sebastian Volunteer Person Award. Pictured (from left) are Oxford Area School District superintendent David Woods, OEF executive director Dr. Ray Fischer, OEF volunteer coordinator Kim Lewin, Firment, and OEF president Steve Roberts.

and finance for the DuPont Company. Upon his retirement, he began tutoring Oxford students and forming friendships with other tutors. Another high point of the event was the presentation of the John C. Pittinger Grant. Pittinger was Pennsylvania Secretary of Education from 1972 to 1976, Rutgers University of Law School Dean from 1981 to 1986, and a founding member of the OEF, where he also served as president. The foundation honors his work and his memory by awarding

$5000 to the Oxford school whose grant request best exemplifies Pittinger’s and the OEF’s mission of enhancing the education of the students in the OASD. After going through a two-tier process, the grant was awarded this year to Nottingham Elementary School for their proposal “STEAM, a Science, Technology, Engineering, Arts, and Mathematics Collaborative Innovation Station.” By utilizing the grant monies from the OEF, students in grades three and

four will be able to gather and share ideas while using tools and equipment to design, tinker, build, create, and respond to STEAM challenges. As the OEF Board of Directors makes its plans for the upcoming 20182019 school year, volunteer opportunities are available for classroom volunteers, mentors, or tutors. Contact Dr. Ray Fischer, executive director; or Kim Lewin, volunteer coordinator at 610-932-7200 or email oxfordedfound@yahoo.com.

Tent Sale!

August 15th-18th

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Courtesy photo

Nottingham Elementary School received the 2018 John C. Pittenger Award. Pictured (from left) are Oxford Area School District superintendent David Woods, Nottingham Elementary School assistant principal Matt DeEmilio, Nottingham Elementary School principal Lisa Yingst-Pyle, OEF executive director Dr. Ray Fischer and OEF president Steve Roberts.

Huge $ 648 Selection!

429 548 Register for Mushroom Festival events $

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Registration is open for some of the Mushroom Festival’s big events, such as the Antique and Classic Car Show, the Mushroom Run and Fun Walk, or the CuteAs-A-Button (Mushroom) Baby Photo Contest, and the Community Parade. Many events offer discounts for preregistration and include admission wristbands. All applications and online registration links are found at the Mushroom Festival’s website, www. mushroomfestival.org. The 33rd Annual Mushroom Festival is scheduled Sept. 8 and 9 in Kennett Square. One way to enjoy the day at the festival is to volunteer for one of its half-day shifts. Volunteers receive T-shirts, free admission and parking passes. The volunteer process is online through Sign-Up Genius with a link on the festival website. Entries are being accepted for the Cute-as-aButton (Mushroom) Baby Photo Contest. The deadline is Aug. 31. Take a photo of your precious Button (6 to 15 months old), Crimini (15 to 24 months old) and/or Portabella (2 to 3 years old). There is online registration available or download the application form and mail it in. Festival attendees vote with their pocket change at the Cute-As-A-Button (Mushroom) booth near State and Meredith streets.

Commitment Foam or Symbolism

BOX The photo which collects can devour them quickly? SIZE MATTRESS SPRING BOX FINAL the mostSIZEfunds in each Enter the National Fried MATTRESS SPRING PRICE category is crowned this Mushroom TWIN Eating $368 ContestFREE TWIN $319 FREE $319 year’s cutest. All proceeds on Sept. 8 FULL at 3 p.m.$498 in theFREE FREE will be FULL donated $389 to the A. I. $389 Special Events Tent. There’s QUEEN $548 FREE DuPont QUEEN Children’s Hospital a $200 cash prize for the $429 FREE $429 KING $841 FREE through WSTW’s “Help amateur local eater (within 15 miles of Kennett Square) Our Kids” radiothon. Love fried breaded who eats the most. Register mushrooms? Think you online now.

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7 Piece $841 KING Dining Set

Sofa

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Tent Sale Hours: Wednesday, 8-5 • Thursday & Friday, 8-8 • Saturday: 9-3


8B

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, AUGUST 8, 2018

Profile for Ad Pro Inc.

Chester County Press 08-08-2018 Edition  

Chester County Press 08-08-2018 Edition