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Chester CountyPRESS

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Covering Avon Grove, Chadds Ford, Kennett Square, Oxford, & Unionville Areas

Volume 154, No. 1

Wednesday, January 8, 2020

Early-morning fire causes severe damage to Sovana Bistro and Nicholas Anthony Salon and Day Spa By Richard L. Gaw Staff Writer

in the balance after an early-morning, two-alarm fire on Jan. 3 ripped through The future of two iconic Sovana Bistro and Nicholas Unionville institutions hang Anthony Salon and Day Spa

Photo by Richard L. Gaw

An early-morning fire blazed through Sovana Bistro and Nicholas Anthony Salon and Day Spa on Jan. 3, causing severe interior and exterior damage to both businesses. Taken from the interior of the salon, this photograph depicts the extent of the fire’s damage.

in the Willowdale Town Center, causing considerable interior and exterior damage. No injuries were reported. Crews from the Mo-ParLin and Longwood fire companies put out the blaze, which was determined to have started at about 2:19 a.m. Video images of the fire taken at its peak showed flames shooting from the roofs of both establishments, and it has been reported that between 75 and 100 firefighters were on the scene to put out the fire, which Chester County Fire Marshal John Weer said was contained about 40 minutes after it began. Continued on Page 2A

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Highest honors

Photo by Richard L. Gaw

On the occasion of his retirement on Jan. 2 after a 35-year career in law enforcement, Corporal John M. Gibson II of the Southern Chester County Regional Police Department received a Walk Out Ceremony at the regional police’s headquarters. Here, he is embraced by his daughter Kayla, a junior at Kennett High School. For the complete story, see Page 4A.

Supervisors sworn in on New Garden board By Richard L. Gaw Staff Writer

on Jan. 1, 2024. In other township appointments, Little will replace Allaband as board chairman in 2020; Loftus will serve as vice chairman; Vince Pompo will be retained as township solicitor and the township’s Sewer Authority solicitor; attorney Winifred Sebastian will be retained as the township’s Zoning Hearing Board solicitor; Spence Andress will continue to serve as the township’s director of planning and projects; and Lewis Gay will retain his post as the township’s director of finance and treasurer.

Kristie Brodowski and David Unger were sworn in as the newest members of the New Garden Township Board of Supervisors, in ceremonies held Jan. 6 Cpl. Gibson retires after before Magisterial Judge 35-year career...4A Matthew Seavey. Brodowski and Unger were elected to their sixyear posts in November, defeating Richard Ayotte and Randy Geouque, and became the first duo of Democrats ever elected to the board. They will join board members and Republicans Patrick Little and Michael Loftus, whose terms end on Jan. 1, 2022; To contact Staff Writer and Republican Steve Richard L. Gaw, email Allaband, whose term ends rgaw@chestercounty.com. Unionville girls lose close one to Great Valley...3B

Photo by Richard L. Gaw

Joined by her husband and daughter, Kristie Brodowski was sworn in on Jan. 6 by Magisterial Judge Matthew Seavey as one of two new members of the New Garden Township Board of Supervisors, joining fellow Democrat David Unger on the fiveperson board.

In Kennett Square, Russell selected as president Mercomes is selected of Oxford Borough Council Betsy Brewer Brantner At the reorganization were Ketcham, who will to lead borough council By Contributing Writer meeting that evening, Phil serve as vice president, and By Steven Hoffman Staff Writer

On Monday night, Kennett Square Borough Council’s first meeting of 2020 began with mayor Matt Fetick administrating the oath of office to the three newly County Commissioners elected council members— Mayra Zavala, Rosa Moore, take oath of office...2A and Doug Doerfler.

Doerfler is returning to council after serving a fouryear term, while Moore and Zavala are beginning their first terms on council. Once they were sworn in, Zavala, Moore, and Doerfler officially joined their colleagues on borough council—Ethan Cramer, Dr. Brenda Mercomes, Peter Continued on Page 3A

Not only is Oxford Borough Council now comprised by a majority of Democrats, the council is also comprised of more women than men—for the first time in Oxford Borough history. On Jan. 6, Peggy Ann Russell was elected to lead that historic council as its president.

Harris, who was recently appointed to serve as mayor, was sworn in by District Justice Scott Massey. Harris then called the meeting to order. First on the agenda was the election of a new council president. Russell was nominated for the position by Bob Ketcham and he was unanimously approved. Also unanimously approved

Amanda Birdwell, who will serve as president pro tempore. Bethany Atkinson was appointed as serve as the chair of the Vacancy Board. Council did have some discussion about the approval of a resolution of various borough contracts and appointments. Russell explained that she felt Continued on Page 5A

Will funnel additional $50K to Avondale Fire Department’s EMS unit

INDEX Opinion.......................7A Obituaries............2B & 6B Classifieds...........4B-5B Calendar of Events.....7B

© 2007 The Chester County Press

New Garden board passes $13.2 million 2020 budget By Richard L. Gaw Staff Writer The New Garden Township Board of Supervisors gave approval at the Dec. 30 meeting to the township’s 2020 budget, with expenditures and revenues earmarked at $13.2 million for the year,

and projected to be $5.43 million less than the 2019 budget. The additional funding for last year, reflected in the township’s capital fund, was used to pay for the construction of the new facility for the Southern Chester County Regional Police Department, which opened

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in September. Apart from the capital fund, several other funds saw either substantial increases or decreases for 2020. The township has budgeted $56,900 to its parks fund for 2020 – a large decrease from the $738,100 it invested in the fund in 2019, when it helped to fund Phase II of

the improvements to New Garden Township Park. In 2020, the airport fund will receive $1.12 million, an increase from the $787,400 it received in 2019; in contrast, the airport capital fund will receive $50,000 this year, a drop from 2020, when it received $140,000. The township is pro-

jected to work with a $6.4 million general fund, of which $2.1 million will go to the Southern Chester County Regional Police Department, and nearly $600,000 will be directed to highway and street maintenance and improvements. On the revenue side, the Continued on Page 3A

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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Chester County Press

Local News Chester County Commissioners take official oath of office New Board of Commissioners notes transition plans The three incoming members of Chester County’s Board of Commissioners, Marian Moskowitz, Josh Maxwell and Michelle Kichline, took their official oath of office on Jan. 2. The oath was administered by President Judge Jacqueline C. Cody. In anticipation of their official start on January 6, the Commissioners announced their plans to support and enhance the change in leadership, including the creation of a transition team that will ensure a seamless process, and that will encourage the review of County procedures and practices. West Chester University President Christopher Fiorentino will chair the transition team, and vice-

chair is David Thornburgh, president and CEO of the Committee of Seventy, the civic leadership organization that advances good government in the City of Philadelphia and across the Commonwealth of Pennsylvania. “This is an important time in the history of Chester County,” said Commissioner Marian Moskowitz. “Building on the good work that has been done, it is time for all of us to come together and move forward as we make Chester County even better. I know that this is common ground that all of us stand on proudly.” “Reinforcing our shared values is what makes Chester County one of the best counties to live in,” said Commissioner Josh

Maxwell. “We are dedicated to partnering and convening citizens from all corners of this County as we work to strengthen opportunity and inclusion.” “Chester County has rightfully earned a reputation for good government that provides tremendous programs and services to citizens,” said Commissioner Michelle Kichline. “Part of ‘good government’ is to review procedures and practices, see what works, and to be open to what can be improved upon. I look forward to working with my new colleagues in this process.” In addition to the three County Commissioners, the official swearing-in included recently elected row officers Deb Ryan as District

Fire...

scheduled to continue for as many as 10 days. Weer said although the fire is currently under investigation, it appears to have originated in the kitchen of the restaurant, and based on alterations and building design, he said the fire extended into the open attic area. Had the building been fitted with a sprinkler system, the damage from the fire would not have been as severe, Weer said, stating that there were not sprinkler system requirements required for businesses in

East Marlborough Township at the time the locations were built. “I am sure the insurance companies will be working with all of the business owners who were affected in trying to get these locations rebuilt, but until they get the engineers in there, no one knows for sure what timeline we’re taking about,” Weer said. “They will rebuild, but it may be a year before they come back and open.” Salon owner Anthony DiFrancesco said on the

Continued from Page 1A

Assistance was also provided by the Avondale, Christiana, Cochranville, Fame, First West Chester, Gap, Kennett, Quarryville, West Bradford, West Grove, and Union fire companies, and by the Southern Chester County Medic Unit and Good Fellowship ambulance service. In addition, representatives from Servpro of Oxford and Kennett Square provided fire and water clean up, which is

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Courtesy photo

Chester County’s new Board of Commissioners (left to right), Josh Maxwell, Marian Moskowitz and Michelle Kichline, sign their oaths at the official swearing-in ceremony on Jan. 2.

Attorney, Fredda Maddox Bookman as Prothonotary Magisterial District Judges as Sheriff, Chris Pielli as and Michele Vaughn as Martin Goch and James Recorder of Deeds, Debbie Register of Wills, as well as Kovaleski. scene that he was awakened at home by a safety alarm on his phone, indicating what he thought may have been a front-door break-in to the salon. He immediately rushed to his home computer’s safety camera, where he began to see severe plumes of smoke that were highly visible on the screen. While the two businesses will likely spend the next several months helping to manage the remediation from the fire and assessing their next steps, the loss of both businesses will be

Photo by Richard L. Gaw

Clean-up crews were on hand at both establishments to remove the damage caused by the fire.

a major blow not only to who have frequented both owners and employees, establishments for the past but to the local clientele several years. Known for its “farm-totable” cuisine and intimate atmosphere, Sovana Bistro became one of the region’s finest and most well-known restaurants and social hot spots in Chester County, earning high marks from several food critics, including Craig LaBan of the Philadelphia Inquirer. Under DiFrancesco and his staff, Nicholas Anthony earned a reputation as one of the finest salons of its kind in southeastern Pennsylvania, featuring a full array of hair care, extensions, facials, nail care and other salon services. While DiFrancesco was speaking with insurance adjustment officials and Servpro staff, a small group of his employees stood nearby, surveying the damage. “I don’t know what to say,” said Kelley Carbone, who has been at the salon for 18 of the 22 years it has been in business. “It’s just devastating for both the restaurant and us. We both have had so many years of being here.” To contact Staff Writer Richard L. Gaw, email rgaw@chestercounty.com.


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

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Chester County Press

Local News New Garden budget... Continued from Page 1A

township anticipates receiving $1.5 million in real estate taxes; $3.47 million in local taxes; $2.57 million in sewer fees; nearly $600,000 in state grants; and about $1 million in intrafund and interfund transfers. The township increased its contribution to the department’s fire support unit to $201,300 in 2020, up from a $195,400 contribution in 2019. Following a nearly one-hour long appeal by Shawn Carroll, chief of the Avondale Fire Company, the board voted 3-2 to contribute an additional $50,000 to the fire department’s EMS service – upping its proposed figure of $116,100 to $166,100. The number served as a half-way point compromise to the $215,704 the department was requesting from the township for its EMS service in 2020, but still falls short of what the department was seeking from a township that receives all of its EMS support from the Avondale Fire Department. Carroll said that the reason for the request for more funding from the township is due to a projected loss of $169,317 in 2019 in the departments’ EMS ledger, which has required the department to transfer $142,000 from its Ambulance Replacement Fund to cover EMS costs until January, leaving a total balance of $35,000. Carroll said that because the EMS service has seen a substantial drop in volunteerism, the department is having to fund paid staff to fill in the gaps left by a dwindling number of volunteers, in order to maintain a consistent level of service. Consequently, as the departments’ volunteer numbers drop, its payroll is going up. “If we don’t receive more funding, we will run that account dry, and the fire department will have to make the decision whether they want to step in and help the EMS division or limit our services,” Carroll said. “I’ve asked this question at the last budget meeting, and I ask this question again: With your contribution, what level of services do you want for fire and EMS? “With your [current] budget approval, we’re going to go under with EMS without additional support,” he told the supervisors. “We can’t sustain a $170,000 loss. It’s just not going to happen.” Board chairman Steve Allaband said that the township has had to transfer $905,000 as a cash transfer in order to balance its 2020 budget. “We’re bleeding, too,” Allaband told Carroll. “Part of why we’re bleeding more this year is because we’ve had so many capital improvements. We spent money here at the park. We purchased St. Anthony in

the Hills. We have grants, and grants require matches. We built the police station. We’re spending money. Fortunately, we have money to spend, but we’ve needed almost a million dollars to balance the budget, and that is not good news.” Although the $166,100 contribution to the Avondale Fire Department’s EMS division is far less than what was requested, it’s still a major jump from what the township has given in previous years. Beginning in 2010, the township funded EMS for $100,375; increased to $110,500 from 2015 to 2018; and rose to $112,700 in 2019. The sentiment expressed by audience members – many of whom are affiliated with the Avondale Fire Department – was that the supervisors need to better assess the overall value of an effective EMS service for their fellow residents. “I’m sure that if you were to survey the residents of New Garden Township and ask them ‘Would you prefer to have Saint Anthony in the Hills, or would you prefer to have an ambulance show up at your house when you really need it?’ you’re going to get people saying that they need an ambulance to show up at their house,” one audience member said. “So you as New Garden Township supervisors need to make a decision on what you value more and what service you will provide to the residents of your township. This is not the first time you have heard this, and this will not be the last time you will hear this.” Allaband was asked if the board has given any consideration to the idea of dedicating a portion of the expected $29.5 million the township is due to earn from the sale of its wastewater system to Aqua Pa., Inc. to the Avondale Fire Department, once the sale of the wastewater treatment facility is finally completed. “There has been some preliminary discussion as to how it will be invested and located,” he said. “With regards to the $29.5 million, we’re not there yet, so I’m not guaranteeing it, and over the past four or five years, we’ve incurred many legal fees and documentation, so it’s not going to be $29.5 million, but it will still be a very large windfall. “Yes, I believe that some of it should go back into the community,” he added. “I think that fire and ambulance would be a good place to start. I think that bridges and roads would be a good place, as well.” Two supervisors expressed great concern about the additional funding the township is giving the fire department for its EMS service. “Fifty thousand dollars is a lot of money to give someone when they’re having that much of an issue running their business,” said Michael Loftus, who

dialed into the meeting by telephone and suggested a six percent increase in funding. “I want to hear answers on how they’re going to improve it, creative answers on how they’re going to do their billing. “How forward of them to commit to ask for that. On the day of the budget meeting, they show up with their hand out, and I think it’s preposterous.” (It was immediately clarified that the 90 percent request in funding increase by the fire department was asked for in August.) “When you presented this budget, it didn’t give me a lot of confidence that you knew how to run a business,” Pat Little said. “You may be the greatest firemen in the world, but as far as knowing how you spend your money, I question that. I also have very little confidence that it’s not going to happen next year. “I’m going to agree to the $50,000, but very reluctantly,” Little added. “I am very skeptical of your ability to run this business and keep it at a level so that the same thing doesn’t happen next year.” “I work for a construction company that has revenues from $50,000,000 to $100,000,000 a year and I am second in command,” Carroll responded. “I know my numbers and I know the Avondale Fire Company, and we run as tight a ship there as possible.” Carroll said, and asked Little to provide specifics that support his argument. “Well, just look at the numbers,” Little said. “I don’t have confidence in your ability to run the business.” “But you’re not giving me any substance to your statement, Sir,” Carroll replied. “Name something of substance, or else you should not be talking like that.” Little then changed his vote to “No.” “They need to fix something, other than coming to us every year,” said Loftus, who also turned down the $50,000 increase. Allaband and supervisors Rich Ayotte and Randy Geouque voted in favor of the increase. In addition to the $50,000 increase, the board and Carroll agreed that the township will set up regular budget meetings with the fire department in 2020, in order to find other possible avenues of cost savings to the department. The board also discussed the possibility of enacting a dedicated township EMS and fire tax in the future. If a tax is eventually introduced, Allaband said that it would likely be agreed

House passes Lawrence bills to aid Pa. dairy farmers Two bills sponsored by Rep. John Lawrence (R-Chester/Lancaster) that would provide much-needed relief to Pennsylvania’s struggling dairy farmers received overwhelming bipartisan approval in the state House of Representatives. House Bill 1223 would establish Keystone Opportunity Dairy Zones (KODZ) to incentivize expanded dairy processing facilities in Pennsylvania. Modeled after the long-standing Keystone Opportunity Zone (KOZ) program, this legislation would benefit Pennsylvania dairy farmers by providing more markets for milk from Pennsylvania farms. The bill passed by a vote of 194-2. “I appreciate the bipartisan support these bills received in committee and on the House floor,” said Lawrence. “This legislation would encourage value-added dairy processing plants to locate here

in Pennsylvania, helping Pennsylvania dairy farmers to expand into new markets with dairy products that can be shipped throughout the country and around the world.” Under Lawrence’s bill, milk processing facilities that qualify for the KODZ would be required to invest private capital, create new jobs, and utilize primarily Pennsylvania milk from Pennsylvania farms. The House also unanimously approved House Bill 1224, which would give the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board (MMB) the ability to coordinate the collection and distribution of state-mandated milk premiums with the Department of Revenue, ensuring the premiums reach struggling dairy farmers. Premiums established by the MMB are built into the state-minimum retail price for milk and are to be used for the benefit of Pennsylvania’s dairy farmers, but currently many farmers question whether

they are receiving those benefits. “House Bill 1224 would improve accountability and transparency on how state-mandated milk premium dollars are collected and paid, and would ensure that dairy farmers receive those funds,” said Lawrence. “Pennsylvania’s family dairy farmers are struggling due to historically low prices and foreign competition. Taken together, these bills will positively impact every dairy farmer in Pennsylvania.” Both bills have received support from family dairy farmers across the state, the Pennsylvania Farm Bureau, the Pennsylvania Association of Milk Dealers, the Pennsylvania Association of Dairy Cooperatives, and the Pennsylvania Milk Marketing Board. The bills now move to the State Senate for consideration.

Mercomes...

president. She will serve in this role for the next two years. Moore and Myers were nominees for council vice president. Moore was approved as a vice president, also by a 4-3 margin. Next, council selected Doerfler to serve as the president pro tempore. In this role, Doerfler will preside over meetings if the president and vice president are both absent from a meeting. As Mercomes took the

president’s seat at the center of borough council’s table, she said, “Thank you very much. It’s quite an honor.” Several council members also commented during the course of the meeting that this is the most diverse group of council members in Kennett Square’s history.

Continued from Page 1A

Waterkotte, and LaToya Myers—for the reorganization meeting. The first order of business for the reorganization meeting was the selection of new officers for the next two years. Mercomes and Myers were the two nominees for president. After votes on both, council selected Mercomes, by a margin of 4-3, as the new council upon and determined by the board and the fire department. Otherwise, he said that it could be introduced as a township referendum. In finalizing the township’s 2020 budget, the board passed on two nonmandatory options that were presented to them in September, as part of Kennett Library’s capital campaign, that if enacted by the township would raise about 4.8 percent of the $15 million needed to build the new library. The options for New Garden were to institute a .3 mill real estate tax in the township for a period of three years, which would be added to the capital costs needed to fund the building of the library, at a rate of $58.98 a year per household; or make an annual contribution of $241,478 for the next three years to

the library’s capital campaign which, at the end of those three years, would amount to $724,433. Instead, the township will continue make an $81,000 contribution to the library in 2020, based on the passage of a library referendum in Nov. 2017 that created an annual dedicated tax of about $20 per household that is projected to generate an additional $80,000 in revenue to the library. The referendum read: “Do you favor increasing New Garden Township’s real estate property tax by 0.100 mills, the revenue from such increase to be used exclusively to fund the operation of the Kennett Library?” It went into effect in 2018. To contact Staff Writer Richard L. Gaw, email rgaw@chestercounty.com.

Chester County PRESS

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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Cpl. Gibson retires after 35-year career in policing By Richard L. Gaw Staff Writer

Photo by Richard L. Gaw

Corporal John M. Gibson II, left, of the Southern Chester County Regional Police Department, received a Walk Out ceremony on Jan. 2, upon his retirement from a 35-year career in law enforcement. Here, he is greeted by Officer Mario Raimato of the regional police department.

Corporal John M. Gibson II of the Southern Chester County Regional Police Department received an honor on Jan. 2 usually reserved for dignitaries and heads of state, as a gathering of his fellow officers, elected and appointed officials and representatives from local fire and EMS departments presented him with a Walk Out ceremony on the occasion of his retirement from a 35-year career in policing. Throughout his dignified four-decade tenure as an officer with both the New Garden Township

Police Department and the regional department, Gibson received numerous awards, including the nationally recognized American Police Hall of Fame Outstanding Commendation Award in 2004, the Clinical Save Commendation by the Chester County EMS in 2005, and the New Garden Police Department DUI Enforcement Award, Life Saving Award, the Chief Gerald W. Davis Officer of the Year Award and the Chester County FOP Heroism Award, all in 2014. In 2015, he received his second Clinical Save Commendation by the Chester County EMS, and

in 2017 he was promoted to the position of Corporal. Gibson was hired by the New Garden Police Department in 1985, and was sent to the Pennsylvania State Police Southeastern Municipal Police Academy, where he graduated as the recipient of the Top Shooter Revolver Marksman Award. From 1986 to 1988, Corporal Gibson worked full-time for the New Garden Township Police Department and part-time for the Kennett Borough Police Department. To contact Staff Writer Richard L. Gaw, email rgaw@chestercounty.com.

Crime Victims’ Center CEO joins board of Southern Chester County Chamber of Commerce The Crime Victims’ Center of Chester County Chief Executive Officer Christine Zaccarelli, Esq., has joined the Board of Directors of the Southern Chester County Chamber of Commerce (SCCCC). Founded in 1929 in Kennett Square, the Chamber has grown to nearly 500-member businesses consisting of influential business leaders and professionals, notfor-profits, institutions, legislative leaders, and more. Located in the former Dansko headquarters building in West Grove, the Chamber hosts more than 70 events and programs each year and offers a maximum

return on investment that extends beyond your business to the communities we all call home in the Southern Chester County region. “Hands-on engagement with businesses and community leaders is critical to our ability to do our best for victims of crime and to help shape the conversation around violence prevention,” explained Zaccarelli. “It is important to us that there is an open dialogue between nonprofit agencies and businesses operating in the region and I anticipate my time on the board can help facilitate these bridges.” According to Cheryl B.

Kuhn, Chamber President and CEO, “Nonprofits are a vibrant sector of our community and a key segment of the Chamber’s membership. Their inclusion in our leadership is by design and benefits the breadth of our philosophy and community at large.” The Crime Victims Center has a long history in Chester County, having celebrated 45 years of service in 2018. The organization provides support services and violence prevention programs throughout the southern end of the county, including “drop in” centers in Kennett Square and Oxford, as well as extensive

prevention programs in the Kennett Consolidated, Unionville-Chadds Ford and Oxford Area school districts. The organization partners closely with area police departments, Lincoln University and the United Way of Southern Chester County. All residents in the southern region of the county are provided free, comprehensive support services including two 24-hour victim hotlines and in-person support at medical, law enforcement and legal appointments. For more information about the organization and its services, please visit www.cvcofcc.org.

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

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Chester County Press

Local News Oxford Borough Council.. Continued from Page 1A

the new council members should have a six-month period to get to know the people they would be voting on. Both Hershey and Birdwell were concerned that this included borough manager Brian Hoover. “I don’t like shortening his contract to six months, since he is also the borough treasurer.” “Adopting the resolution tonight, approving various appointments and the borough manager would not keep council from shortening or lengthening the contracts after six months,” borough Solicitor Stacey Fuller explained to council. “However, approving it would approve an agreement to continue the borough manager’s employment as well as other appointments.” Council member Mary Higgins agreed that new

Photos by Betsy Brewer Brantner

Oxford Borough Mayor Phil Harris with the newly sworn-in council members Kathryn Cloyd, Mary Higgins, Dick Winchester, and Peggy Ann Russell.

Peggy Ann Russell was selected as the new council president in Oxford Borough.

council members should have time to look at the positions and the duties that were performed. “We have the fiduciary responsibility to see who we are saying yes or no to,” Higgins said. Council ultimately approved the res-

fully get more residents involved with the borough. The committees added were: Comprehensive Planning, Environment, Community Outreach, and Diversity and Inclusion. Russell thanked the outgoing council president Susan

olution 6 to 1, with Birdwell voting no. In other business, Council approved the advertising of the 2020 council and committee meetings. Council approved the reappointment of Michael Dean, Peter Slauch and Tyler Harold to

the Oxford Zoning Hearing Board. Reappointed to the HARB (Historical Architecture Review Board) were Carolyn Hess, Scott Moran and Townsend Moore. Council also added four more committees, to hope-

Lombardi for her leadership the past four years. In an interview after the meeting Lombardi said she wished the new council well and hoped they would continue to support those that had supported them over the past years.

Skate Club dedicates new Zamboni in memory of former player The Chester County Skate Club (CCSC) dedicated its new Zamboni in memory of Drew Wilkie, a former player. Drew passed away in a tragic accident in 2000. Through CCSC, his parents, Gordon and Carole Wilkie of Venice, Fla., set up the Wilkie Fund in his memory. The fund was initially created to offset the cost of membership for families who otherwise could not afford for their children to play. Since the fund’s inception, CCSC has not needed to use the money, while still managing to help

support players who require financial assistance. Late last spring, when a new Zamboni became a necessity, club manager Billy Dreisbach reached out to the Wilkie family to see if their funds could instead be used to purchase the costly equipment. They agreed. With current players and their families looking on, CCSC president Joe DiPierro, formally thanked the Wilkies for their generosity and continued support of the program. A replica decal of Wilkie’s jersey, with the number two that

Courtesy photos

The Chester County Skate Club recently dedicated its new Zamboni in memory of Drew Wilkie, a former player.

he wore, was emblazoned on the side of the Zamboni. This ensures that Drew’s CCSC legacy will live on. As the youngest of three boys in the Wilkie Family,

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Drew moved up the ranks at CCSC from Atoms to 18U. He was initially a shy player, but he transformed over time and became a leader on the ice and in the locker

room. He was hired to work at the rink, which included driving the Zamboni. “Drew was special. He touched the hearts of all he played with and the

many young kids he supervised while working there. His spirit carries on,” said Nick Basilio, former manager and past president of Chester County Skate Club.


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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Chester County Press

Local News Dinniman announces $30,000 in state funding for agricultural education programs Three Chester County organizations will receive more than $30,000 in state grant funding to support youth agricultural education programs, state Senator Andy Dinniman announced. “The science and technology of agriculture is constantly developing, and Chester County schools and programs are consistently at the forefront of these new projects,” Dinniman, who serves as Minority Chair of the Senate Education Committee, said. “Our region has a rich agricultural heritage and we must continue to support and invest in the resources needed to teach the next generation of its importance.” The funding, which comes through the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture’s Agriculture and Youth Grant Program, is as follows: ~ $7,500 for Chester County FFA to restore a Farmall tractor and build a log splitter using welding, mechanics, and other skills. ~ $6,900 for the Chester County Intermediate Unit for students to participate in the Animal and Veterinary Science program and for field trips

and career development activities. ~ $3,900 for the Octorara Area School District for the Ag Mechanics class to purchase and assemble a drone to learn about precision agriculture. ~ $12,500 for the Octorara Area School District to purchase equipment for the precision ag course. The program provides direct and matching grants to help fund eligible projects, programs and equipment purchases conducted or made by organizations composed mainly of youth and organized to promote development in agriculture, community leadership, vocational training, and peer fellowship. The Chester County grants come as part of a $500,000 total state awarded to 55 Agriculture and Youth Grant Program projects statewide. Of them, all except the $12,500 for the Octorara Area School District were direct grants. The Agriculture and Youth Grant Program come as part of the Pennsylvania Farm Bill, a series of investments in the agricultural development of the Commonwealth that Dinniman supported and voted for.

OAHS student musicians selected for PMEA festivals Four Oxford Area High School students were selected to perform at Pennsylvania Music Educators Association (PMEA) District 12 music festivals after a day of auditions at Immaculata University. Senior Miranda Nilan, daughter of Rosemarie and Tim Nilan, was selected to perform as second chair in the flute section of the District 12 Band at the Band Festival to be held from Feb. 13 to 15 at Radnor High School and the District 12 Orchestra at the Orchestra Festival to be held from Jan. 30 to Feb. 1 at Upper Darby High School. Miranda was also selected to perform at alto 2 with the District 12 Chorus at the Chorus Festival to be held from Jan. 16 to 18 at Sun Valley High School. Miranda has had a distinguished high school singing career. As a sophomore and junior she was selected for the district, regional and state PMEA Chorus Festivals. This past New Year’s Day, Miranda marched and played flute as one of 12 Oxford Area High School musicians who performed with the Cavalcade of Bands Honor Band in the Tournament of Roses Parade in Pasadena, California. She topped off her junior year by being selected to perform in the 300-member Mixed Chorus at the National Association

for Music Education AllNational Honors Ensemble event held on Nov. 9 and 10 in Orlando, Florida. Senior Elena Roe, daughter of Laurie and James Roe, and sophomore Virginia Bresler, daughter of Carey and Kevin Bresler, were also selected to perform with the District 12 Chorus at the Chorus Festival, Elena at soprano 1 and Virginia at soprano 2. In her junior year Elena was selected for the district and regional Chorus Festivals. Sophomore Emiliano Zetune, son of Kathleen and David Zetune, was selected to perform as fourth chair in the euphonium section at the Band Festival. All four students agreed that auditioning and performing at any of the PMEA festivals is both challenging and rewarding. Many of the festivals feature distinguished guest conductors and directors who are able to get the best out of each highly-talented musician. For the District 12 Band Festival, the guest conductor is Dr. Virginia Allen, founder and Artistic Director Emerita of the Philadelphia Wind Symphony. She is a conductor, music educator, arranger and consultant in Philadelphia and an adjunct faculty member at The Julliard School. “The festivals are challenging because you are singing or playing pieces

Courtesy photos

Oxford Area High School choral director Bridget Saltzburg, sophomore Virginia Bresler, seniors Elena Roe and Miranda Nilan, sophomore Emiliano Zetune and band director Dr. Erin Kaupilla are pictured from left to right. The four students were selected to perform at Pennsylvania Music Educators Association District 12 music festivals in January and February.

that are more complex than the music we perform in our school concerts,” said Miranda, who plans to major in music in college and to pursue a career teaching music. “But they are an amazing experience because every student there really loves music and performing and it’s great to be able to learn how to work together.” All four students will be involved in the high school’s spring musical production of “Once Upon a Mattress,” to be presented on March 5 and 6, with Miranda in the lead role of Princess Winnifred. Elena and Virginia, who have appeared in past musicals, will have featured roles and Emiliano will play in

the pit orchestra for the second year in a row. Band director Dr. Erin Kauppila, a past District 12 President, praised the students for their outstanding performances and for being among the best of approximately 800 musicians who auditioned for festival selections. “Each of them has shown me a tremendous work ethic,” Kauppila said. “Not only do they work hard in class, but they also work to improve their skills through private lessons. Our music program has amazing support from the school district and the Oxford community, and the success of our four students is a direct result of that support.”

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

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Chester County Press

Congress shall make no law respecting an establishment of religion, or prohibiting the free exercise thereof; or abridging the freedom of speech, or of the press; or the right of the people peaceably to assemble, and to petition the government for a redress of grievances.

Opinion Letter to the Editor

Editorial

Good luck to those who now have the responsibility of leading Chester County The three members of the Chester County Board of Commissioners—Michelle Kichline, Marian Moskowitz, and Josh Maxwell—have taken their oaths of office. It is now their responsibility to lead Chester County in this new year and new decade. In addition to the three County Commissioners, the county leadership team now includes Deb Ryan as District Attorney, Fredda Maddox as Sheriff, Chris Pielli as Recorder of Deeds, Debbie Bookman as Prothonotary and Michele Vaughn as Register of Wills. These county officials were elected in November because of their promises of new ideas and their pledges to bring not just good, but better, government to Chester County. They now have the benefit—and the challenge—of leading a county that consistently ranks among the very best in the state in a wide variety of areas. Chester County is the most educated county in Pennsylvania, and the local economy reflects that strength. Chester County has been recognized as one of the top 24 best-managed counties in the entire country. It has been ranked as a top-ten place to raise a family. It is also the healthiest county in Pennsylvania, a ranking that takes into account a variety of qualityof-life issues. The county has an award-winning open space program as well as an excellent comprehensive plan that has helped preserve the quality of life for residents. The county has consistently invested in the revitalization of downtowns like Kennett Square, West Grove, and Oxford. The lasting results of this investment can be seen in the improved streetscapes, the much-improved infrastructure, and the commercial growth in these downtowns. All this has been accomplished while keeping the county’s tax rate comparatively low. So the new leaders of the county now have the challenge, and the chance, to move Chester County forward. Even a team that’s in first place can improve its performance. The first-place team that gets complacent and stops trying to improve itself isn’t in first place for long. It’s a big responsibility for Maxwell, Kichline, Moskowitz, the row officers, and the many hundreds of county employees. Many challenges certainly lie ahead. We wish the new county officials the best of luck as they work to shape Chester County’s future.

Local municipalities should adopt resolution about asylum seekers Letter to the Editor: Asylum seekers march through hell to get to this country. We should welcome them with open arms and open hearts when they arrive. Are they not the epitome of the American Dream? Are they not the truest embodiment of our own history?

On Dec. 18, the West Chester Borough Council adopted a resolution informing President Trump that the Borough supports the placement of asylum seekers within the borough’s borders. This was not just a ‘feel good’ or partisan statement. It was a legal requirement of the federal government necessary to

move asylum seekers from temporary detention centers to permanent homes in our communities. I strongly urge every municipal governing body in Chester County, after it completes the reorganization activities this week, to do the same. It’s the right thing to do. It’s the moral thing to do.

It’s how we as a community take a stand against fear and hate and oppression. It’s how we let our neighbors know that this is how we preserve, protect and honor the values we share as Americans. Anton Andrew Candidate for State Representative in the 160th district

Emmons releases statement on Rep. Chrissy Houlahan’s support of impeachment John Emmons, a Republican candidate for Congress in Pennsylvania’s 6th Congressional District, released the following statement following Rep. Chrissy Houlahan’s announcement of her support of impeachment: “Once again, Chrissy Houlahan has revealed herself to be a rubber stamp for Nancy Pelosi’s partisan impeachment farce. Chrissy Houlahan ran as a so-called mod-

erate, spending millions on television bemoaning the ‘anger and partisanship’ in Washington. Now she’s not only part of the problem, backing a purely partisan impeachment driven by the angry left, she’s one of the leaders of the effort. “The Democrats have spent three years and millions of taxpayer dollars to investigate President Trump, making scurrilous accusations, trafficking

wild conspiracy theories, and leaking proven falsehoods to the media. They began pushing impeachment before he was even sworn into office. This must end. Congress needs to get back to work. “Chrissy Houlahan is now an integral part of the Washington swamp, beholden to the extremists and special interests who bankrolled her deceptive campaign. Chrissy Houlahan pulled a bait-

and-switch on voters in 2018. We won’t let her get away with it again in 2020. “In Congress, I will work hard to help reform our broken health care system, continue to cut taxes on families and small businesses, and seek out opportunities to reduce runaway federal spending. It’s time we had a Congressman who is in Washington to do the work of the people, not the bidding of Nancy Pelosi.”

Take time to recognize the courage, dedication, and sacrifice of law enforcement officers Letter to the Editor: The statistics are devastating: In 2019, more than 260 officers were shot in the line of duty, and more than 40 officers made the ultimate sacrifice — which is why on Jan. 9, the Fraternal Order of Police Pennsylvania State Lodge is encouraging you to take the time to say “Thank You” in honor of National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day.

Law enforcement officers are husbands, wives, sons, daughters, mothers and fathers. Every day, these individuals leave their homes and loved ones to uphold the oath they took to protect and serve their communities, not knowing what will happen during the course of their shift. In a time when officers are victims of the false narrative spread by some, we need to rally around our brave men and women in

uniform. Millions of people appreciate law enforcement, but it’s important use Jan. 9 to recognize their courage, dedication and sacrifice. On National Law Enforcement Appreciation Day, you can show your support for Pennsylvania’s law enforcement community by: changing your social media profile picture; sending a card of support; wearing blue clothing; or simply saying “thank you.” No sign of gratitude is too little.

Every day, we should thank our dedicated men and women, but I would ask that on Jan. 9, you take a few extra minutes out of your day to say “Thank You.” On behalf of all Pennsylvania law enforcement officers and their families, thank you for your support. Les Neri President, Fraternal Order of Police Pennsylvania State Lodge

Vision 2020: Impacting the community as a Chester County volunteer firefighter It’s that time of year again, when friends and family inquire about resolutions for the new year. Instead of tossing out the traditional notions about getting healthier or working harder, why not resolve to truly make a difference in your community by volunteering with your local

fire department? The need for volunteer firefighters has never been greater than it is today. About 70 percent of America’s firefighters are volunteers, according to the National Fire Protection Association. Many communities are struggling to maintain their

Chester County Press Randall S. Lieberman Publisher Steve Hoffman..................................Managing Editor Richard L. Gaw..................................Associate Editor Brenda Butt.........................................Office Manager Tricia Hoadley...........................................Art Director Alan E. Turn...............................Advertising Director Teri Turns................................Advertising Executive Helen E. Warren......................Advertising Executive Amy Lieberman.............Marketing/Public Relations The Chester County Press (USPS 416-500) is published every Wednesday by: AD PRO, Inc. 144 South Jennersville Rd, West Grove, PA 19390 Mailing Address: PO Box 150, Kelton, PA 19346 Telephone: (610) 869-5553 • FAX (610) 869-9628 E-mail (editor): editor@chestercounty.com HOURS: Monday- Friday 8 a.m. - 4 p.m., no weekend hours Annual Subscription Rate: $40.00 | Senior Citizen Rate - $30.00

NO REFUNDS AFTER RECEIPT OF SUBSCRIPTION PAYMENT Current and previous week's issues are &1.00 each. Older issues are $1.50 each. Periodicals postage paid at Oxford, PA 19363. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Chester County Press, P.O. Box 150, Kelton, PA 19346.

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volunteer fire department. The www.helpfightfire. com campaign is a countywide initiative devoted to growing the base of volunteer members for 55 fire companies throughout Chester County. The decline in emergency response volunteers in Chester County has reached a crisis level. New members are needed to help keep our communities safe in the new year and beyond. There are a number of ways to volunteer, and training and equipment are always free. Volunteer firefighters are trained to help protect property and lives in their communities. Training is provided in how to advance a hose line, perform search-and-rescue operations and position ladders strategically and safely. Volunteer firefighters must be 18 years old. Not 18 yet, but still want to help out? Junior firefighters gain experience by assisting full members, and receive the necessary training to become full volunteers once they turn 18. Becoming a junior firefighter is a great way to fulfill community service

hours. EMTs transport the sick and injured to hospitals. They respond to specialized calls like auto accidents, carbon monoxide alarms and other rescue situations. EMTs must be 18 years old. Fire police direct traffic and control crowds at the scene of emergencies, and provide general assistance to other emergency responders. If volunteering at an active emergency scene is not right for you, there are other opportunities at local fire departments that are vital to their operation. Administrative volunteers work behind the scenes to help keep the fire company operational. Duties can include teaching fire safety, assisting in fundraising events, helping with bookkeeping, website maintenance and recruitment and retention. “There is nothing quite like being a volunteer firefighter,” said Neil Vaughn, Recruitment and Retention Committee Chair for the Chester County Fire Chief’s Association. “You can help save lives and protect your community in times of crisis. And if

The need for volunteer firefighters has never been greater.

responding to an emergency scene isn’t right for you, there is plenty to do back at the station to help support the effort. There truly is a volunteer position for everyone.” Becoming a volunteer at

your Chester County fire station can save lives in 2020. What can be a meaningful resolution that that? Visit HelpFightFire.com to learn more. Volunteer today. Chester County lives depend on it.


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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020


Chester County Press

In the Spotlight

Section

B

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

New Year’s Eve Mushroom Drop revelers rock uptown Kennett Square By Chris Barber Contributing Writer Kathi Lafferty, the chairperson and founder of the annual Midnight in the Square New Year’s Eve celebration, has endured cold, wind and rain at the event in recent years. But this year – the seventh annual celebration -- conditions were perfect with fair, dark skies and mild temperatures. A casual look around found most visitors in light jackets or sweatshirts, and no one was huddling to find protection from the weather. “I thought it was great. Everybody I talked to thought it was great,” Lafferty said. “[Kennett Square Police Chief] Billy Holdsworth said there were no incidents.” The main event was advertised to start at 9 p.m., but people arrived as early as 7:30 p.m. at the closed off State Street to see the pre-ceremony festivities, including a light show and entertainment in

the central safety corral. Those who arrived early got to see KMC dancers, a bubble magician, a hoop dancer and an hour-long stream of live guitar music and songs from Rich Croce (the brother of the late Jim Croce), as well as the raising of the mushroom into place at 8:45 p.m. Gone were most of the funny hats and novelty glasses, but many celebrants were wearing newly created lighted mushroom hats designed for this occasion. The food truck, which provided hot beverages, light fare and desserts, reported brisk business to Lafferty, as did Kennett Brewing Company which was selling its fare in the Garage Youth and Community Center. At 9 p.m., the acts concluded, and music played from the band shell, which this year had been moved up closer to the middle of town than in previous years. People strolled the street and danced.

The crowd and excitement grew to its maximum until about 11:30 p.m., when several thousand people filled State Street. The crowd was huge, but appeared well-mannered and sober with lots of young kids braving the late hour to see the New Year arrive. Tom Lafferty, the event’s master of ceremonies, filled in the minutes before the drop by circulating with his microphone, interviewing visitors. At precisely 11:59 p.m., the mushroom started its descent with the exuberant crowd hugging and chanting along the final countdown to 2020: “Ten! Nine! Eight!...” At midnight, the joyous crowd celebrated, and the professionals from Bob’s Crane carefully guided the mushroom around the circumference of the corral so people could grab it for good luck. In a related event during the evening, Lafferty

Photo by Chris Barber

Crane owner Richard Nichols (in mushroom hat) receives the mushroom as it comes to the ground and guides it to onlookers for good luck.

pulled the names of two entrants of the mushroom drop raffle. The baskets

were valued at $2,200. The winners were the staff at the Kennett Senior

Center Used Book Store and local resident Eva Kelleher.

Photo by Chris Barber

Photo by Chris Barber

Photo by Chris Barber

Enthusiastic spectators cheer as the mushroom descends.

The Mushroom, having descended, hangs atop the cheering crowd shortly after midnight.

Dancers from KMC performed with vigor in the street early in the evening.

Photo by Jess Atkins-Barber

A dancer from Harmonia Circus performs a hula hoop dance in the square.

Photo by Richard Nichols

Bob’s Crane owner Richard Nichols took this partial photo of the assembled crowd from above shortly before the descent of the mushroom.

Photo by Chris Barber

Photo by Chris Barber

Photo by Jess Atkins Barber

This magician from Harmonia Circus performed amazing feats of motion with a floating red bubble.

A family in the crowd reaches with enthusiasm to touch the descended mushroom for good luck in the next year.

Guitarist and songwriter Rich Croce (brother of the late Jim Croce) entertains the crowd in the early hours of the celebration.


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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Chester County Press

Obituaries ROBERT F. CARROLL

Robert F. Carroll, 68, of Oxford, passed away on Dec. 27 at Twin Pines Nursing Home in West Grove. He was the husband of Nancy Klara Carroll, with whom he shared 43 years of marriage. Born in Darby, Pa. he was the son of the late Francis and Annette Acree Carroll. He enjoyed boating, fishing and crabbing on the Delaware and Chesapeake Bays. He is survived by his wife; one son, Andrew Carroll of Oxford; one daughter, Sandra Edinger (Matthew) of McKinney, TX; and twin granddaughters, Madelyn and Kathryn Edinger. He was preceded in death by a son, Robert Carroll, Jr. and a brother, Timothy Carroll. Services are private. Arrangements are being handled by the Edward L. Collins, Jr. Funeral Home, Inc., Oxford. Online condolences may be made at www.elcollinsfuneralhome.com.

William J. Turner

120 Doe Lane, Kennett Square, PA 19348

302-760-3190

wjt4th@outlook.com

OSTEN D. BRYANT

Osten Durant Bryant, a beloved father, grandfather, great-grandfather, uncle and friend, passed away on Dec. 18. He was 94. He spent the last two years living in Lincoln University, Pa. after selling the Delaware County bar he ran until he was 92. He purchased the establishment when he retired as an

executive chef. Osten is survived by three daughters, five grandchildren, one great-granddaughter and dozens of nieces and nephews. There will be no funeral service, as per his wishes. In lieu of flowers, Osten’s family requests donations in his name to the Oxford Area Senior Center at 12 E Locust St., Oxford, PA 19363. Online condolences can be made at Evan W. Smith Funeral Services.

TERESA B. MERRILL

Teresa B. Merrill, 80, of Philadelphia, passed away on Jan. 1, at Twin Pines Health Care Center, West Grove. She was the wife of the late Edward George Merrill. Born in Philadelphia, she was the daughter of the late Patrick Edward and Helen Casey McAteer. She was a member of St. Luke’s Church, Ocean City, Md. and active member of Good Shepherd Catholic Church, Philadelphia. Teresa was active in girl scouts. She is survived by six children, Teresa Merrill, Edward Merrill, Joseph Merrill, Annemarie Love, Elizabeth Merrill and Rita Martinenza; fifteen grandchildren; and fourteen great-grandchildren. She was preceded in death by two sons, James Merrill and Vincent Merrill and one sister, Mary Cosgrove. A memorial mass was celebrated on Jan. 7, 2020 at Sacred Heart Church in Oxford. Interment was in Holy Sepulchre Cemetery in Philadelphia. In lieu of flowers, donations in her memory may be made to Sacred Heart Church. Funeral arrangements are being handled by the Edward L. Collins, Jr. Funeral Home, Inc., Oxford. Online condolences may be made at www.elcollinsfuneralhome.com.

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Continued on Page 6B

RICHARD L. EBY

On Dec. 20, Richard Landis Eby, loving husband, father, brother, and grandfather, passed away at the age of 61 at Pocopson Home in West Chester. Richard was born in Philadelphia on Oct. 30, 1958 to Landis and Marjorie (Seeds) Eby. He received his bachelor of arts degree in political science from the University of Denver in 1981. Richard served in the United States Marine Corps as a First Lieutenant from 1982 to 1985 and was honorably discharged. He spent many years working in finance, and several years in the travel industry as well. In the summer of 1980, Richard met Beth Reeder while he was working as the waterfront director at a summer camp and Beth was a camp counselor, and six weeks later he proposed. On Aug. 29, 1981 they married, and during their 38 years of marriage they raised three children and welcomed three grandchildren. Richard was known best for his warmth and generosity. His smile could light up a room, and everyone who met him remarked on his sense of humor, which often involved teasing the people he liked best. Richard loved cooking and was always trying new recipes. His steaks were cooked to perfection, and his pumpkin cheesecake had no rival. He taught his children how to steam and crack their own lobster, and how to achieve the perfect sear when cooking fresh sea scallops. But even more than cooking, Richard loved to travel. He was always dreaming up new, exotic places to visit, and he loved nothing better than planning trips and exploring new places with Beth by his side. Together they traveled to places like Crater Lake, Glacier National Park, Hawaii, White Sands National Park, San Francisco and countless other places. He had a deep love of the beach as well, spending his childhood summers with family in Ship Bottom, NJ and then later taking his own family to Emerald Isle, NC every summer. You could always find him in a wide, straw-brimmed hat, sitting in his beach chair enjoying a good Tom Clancy book. Richard, especially in his younger years, loved playing sports, including everything from soccer to tennis. He chose to attend the University of Denver so that he could spend most of his time skiing. He was an ardent Eagles fan, and loved watching football. In fact, he loved football so much that even when the regular season was over he could be found watching replays of old football games just so he could have the sounds of a football game on in the background. He loved ice hockey too, and on more than one occasion took his kids to cheer on the Broad Street Bullies. What stands out the most, though, was Richard’s unconditional and immeasurable love he had for his family. Whether that meant surprising Beth on Christmas with more presents than she could count, or taking his daughter to an Eagles game, or tickling his grandchildren until they screamed, he loved his family with his whole heart. His family always knew, without any doubt, just how much he loved them and how much happiness they brought to him. Richard was preceded in death by his father Landis, and his mother, Marjorie. He is survived by his wife Beth, his daughter Jenny (Ben) Cowan, his daughter Erin, and his son Michael. He is also survived by his sister Billie (Bain) Kramer, and Richard’s three grandchildren Abby, Joshua, and Caleb Cowan. Funeral services will be held on Friday, Jan. 10 from 10:30 to 11:30 a.m. at the Christian Life Center at 125 Saginaw Road in New London Township. In lieu of flowers, the family requests that donations be made to the Muscular Dystrophy Association in memory of Richard.

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WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

3B

Late comeback propels Great Valley to a win over Unionville By Steven Hoffman Staff Writer When Unionville forward Emma Dempsey hit a threepointer with 7:17 left to play in the game against Great Valley last Thursday night, there was every chance that that shot—which gave the Indians a five-point lead— could have been a catalyst for the home team to close out a victory against a very good Ches-Mont League opponent. Instead, the Patriots did what good teams do— they rose up to meet the challenge. Rather than allowing Unionville to build momentum off Dempsey’s three-pointer, Great Valley pushed the ball up the court and Gracen Curley knocked down a three-pointer of her own. This was followed by a quick score on a floating jump shot by Emma DeRobertis. In less than one minute, Great Valley wiped out Unionville’s lead—and reclaimed the momentum. From that point on, Great Valley outscored the Indians by a margin of 13-9 to walk away with a hardfought 44-40 win. Tessa Liberatoscioli scored 9 of Great Valley’s points down the stretch, including some clutch free throws. The two teams were evenly matched throughout the game. Unionville and Great Valley were both slow to warm up offensively— they combined for just 11 points in the first quarter, but that had more to do with the fact that both teams were working hard defensively,

contesting passes and blocking shots, rather than a sign of weakness on offense. For Unionville, guard Casey Baughan turned in several nice, hustling plays that helped disrupt Great Valley’s efforts to set up a good shot. Unionville can always count on key contributions from Baughan, forward Lyndsey Barrett, and center Anna Iacocca, the three senior starters on the squad who also serve as the team’s captains. All three delivered during the game against Great Valley. It was a basket by Iacocca that gave her team an 8-5 lead early in the second quarter. A few minutes later, however, Curley hit a threepointer for Great Valley. Curley finished with a game-high 17 points. Great Valley built a seven-point lead in the second quarter, but the advantage was brief. Iacocca hit a jumper from the top of the key. Barrett then made a nice defensive play to prevent a shot. Lindsey Robbins made a nice move to the hoop for a basket late in the second quarter, and Baughan scored a basket with 20 seconds to play in the second quarter to trim Great Valley’s lead to 15-14 at the end of the second quarter. Unionville’s surge in the third quarter was boosted by Iacocca, who poured in baskets on consecutive trips down the floor. She finished the game with 10 points. Alexia Brown and Robbins gave the Indians good minutes off the bench.

Each one contributed big baskets in the third quarter. Robbins finished the game with 6 points. Unionville led by as many as 6 points—that lead came following a layup by Iacocca late in the third quarter—but every Unionville surge was met by a similar one by Great Valley. Similarly, every time it looked like Great Valley would pull away, Unionville answered back. The Indians led by a point with about four minutes to play when Dempsey hit a free throw. She finished the game with a team-high 14 points. But Liberatoscioli hit a free throw, contributed a lay-up, and then hit two more free throws to give Great Valley the lead while Unionville struggled to get off a good shot in the game’s final moments. With just under ten seconds to play, Dempsey drove to the basket and scored for Unionville, drawing a foul in the process. She hit the free throw, cutting the Great Valley lead to 44-40 with just 8.4 seconds to play. That was the last score of the game, however, as the Patriots sealed the victory. Unionville has games coming up against Kennett on Jan. 9 and Sun Valley on January 14. The Indians will have a chance to take on Great Valley again on Jan. 28. That game will be played at Great Valley. To contact Staff Writer Steven Hoffman, email editor@chestercounty.com.

Photo by Steven Hoffman

Emma Dempsey looks to make an inbounds pass to a teammate.

Photo by Steven Hoffman

Starting forward Anya Budow helped give Unionville an early lead.


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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Chester County Press

Legals

NOTICE OF PUBLIC MEETING

The Penn Township Planning Commission will hold a special meeting on Wed., January 22, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. in the Finnen Community Room at the Penn Township Municipal Building, 260 Lewis Road, West Grove, PA. Please refer any questions or requests to Caitlin Ianni, Township Secretary at 610-869-9620. Respectfully submitted, Karen Versuk, Penn Township Director of Operations 1p-8-1t

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF DOUGLAS E. PALMER, DECEASED. Late of the Borough of Oxford, Chester County, PA LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION on the above Estate have been granted to the undersigned, who request all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent to make known the same and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment without delay to MARCIA CALDWELL, ADMINISTRATRIX, 733 Conowingo Circle, Oxford, PA 19363, Or to her Attorney: ROBERT FREEDENBERG, SKARLATOS ZONARICH, 320 Market St., Ste. 600W, Harrisburg, PA 17101 1p-8-3t

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF FLOYD G. PALMER, DECEASED. Late of the Township of London Grove, Chester County, PA LETTERS of ADMINISTRATION D.B.N. on the above Estate have been granted to the undersigned, who request all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent to make known the same and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment without delay to MARCIA CALDWELL, ADMINISTRATRIX D.B.N., 733 Conowingo Circle, Oxford, PA 19363, Or to her Attorney: ROBERT FREEDENBERG SKARLATOS ZONARICH, 320 Market St., Ste. 600W, Harrisburg, PA 17101 1p-8-3t

PUBLIC NOTICE

REOPENING THE 2020 BUDGET FOR INSPECTION & ADOPTION: NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the 2020 Adopted Budget for London

Grove Township is being reopened and is available for public inspection at the London Grove Township Building during normal business hours (8:00 am – 4:30 pm) or online at www. londongrove.org. The London Grove Township Board of Supervisors will consider adoption of the final amended 2020 Budget at their public meeting on February 5, 2020 at 7:00 p.m. at the London Grove Township Building, 372 Rose Hill Road, West Grove, PA 19390. Ken Battin, Manager, London Grove Township 1p-8-1t

ESTATE NOTICE

ESTATE OF PHILLIP H. EASTBURN, DECEASED. Late of the Township of Franklin, Chester County, PA. LETTERS TESTAMENTARY on the above Estate have been granted to the undersigned, who request all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent to make known the same and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment without delay to JEFFREY P. EASTBURN, EXECUTOR, 107 Skyline Dr. Landenberg, PA 19350, Or to his Attorney: CHRISTOPHER E. FRANTZ, P.O. Box 557, Westtown, PA 19395 1p-8-3t

PUBLIC NOTICE

T-Mobile proposes to collocate antennas (tip heights 106’ &108’) on the water tank at 398 Southview Ave, Kennett Square, PA (20191484). Interested parties may contact Scott Horn (856-8091202) (1012 Industrial Dr., West Berlin, NJ 08091) with comments regarding potential effects on historic properties. 1p-8-1t

ESTATE NOTICE

Estate of Helen Marie Ruggieri Late of Kennett Square, Chester County PA, LETTERS TESTAMENTARY on the above Estate have been granted to the undersigned, who request all persons having claims or demands against the estate of the decedent to make known the same and all persons indebted to the decedent to make payment without delay to, Joseph Ruggieri, 1 Bridleshire Circle, Newark, DE 19711 Executor, or Attorney: Denise D. Nordheimer, Esq., 2001 Baynard Blvd, Wilmington, DE 19802

CLASSIFIEDS Help Wanted Senior Investment Analysts: Malvern, PA. Understand/execute all portfolio mgmt functions of ETFs. Understand tax implics of managing funds. Conduct analysis for portfolio mgmt of funds, incl performance, tracking error, distribs, & quant stats. Reqs MS in Finance, Math, or rltd, & 2 yrs exp providing fin’l analy-

sis for mgmt of funds &/or portfolios (or BS & 5 yrs exp). All qualifying exp must incl: PMA; OMS; using FactSet for Portfolio Analysis & Alpha Testing; using Bloomberg’s lookup & screening functions, trading workflow, & EMSX function; &, using multiple screening, portfolio, & comparison functions in Morningstar Direct. Resumes: B. Kavanaugh, Pacer Advisors, Inc., 500 Chesterfield Pkwy, Malvern, PA 19320

12p-24-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

not less than 1,500 square feet of living area exclusive of basements, garages, root cellars and the like.

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter.

2. No mobile home or mobile home type dwelling whether brought in on wheels or on a trailer in separate parts, shall be placed on the premises for dwelling purposes.

SALE NO. 20-1-10 Writ of Execution No. 2019-06502 DEBT $237,737.04

PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: RAS CITRON, LLC 855-225-6906

ALL THAT CERTAIN tract of land situate in West Nottingham Township, Chester County, Pennsylvania, bounded and described according to a final subdivision plan thereof prepared by Kenneth G. Crossan, Professional Land Surveyor, dated 05/26/1986, revised 07/28/1986 and recorded as Plan no. 6929 on the Office of the Recorder of Deeds of Chester County, as follows: BEGINNING at a point near the center line of Red Pump Road, known as T-304, a corner of land now or late of Norman Wolgin and Sylvan M. Cohen; thence along said Red Pump Road, South 28 degrees 54 minutes 00 seconds East 186.58 feet to a point; a corner of Lot No. 2 on said plan; thence along the same South 53 degrees 25 minutes 41 seconds West 514.10 feet to a point in line of other lands of Rose Chase Eshleman; thence along the same North 42 degrees 54 minutes 15 seconds West 131.09 feet to a point in line of land of aforesaid Wolgin and Cohen; thence along the same North 32 degrees 44 minutes 22 seconds East 130.00 feet, North 43 degrees 53 minutes 36 seconds East 99.37 feet and North 54 degrees 45 minutes 39 seconds East 333.94 feet to the point and place of beginning. BEING Lot No. 1 as shown on said Plan. CONTAINING 2.215 acres of land more or less. UNDER AND SUBJECT TO THE FOLLOWING DEED RESTRICTIONS 1. Any dwelling place on the premises shall be of a design that would provide

Tax Parcel # 68-5-3.3 PLANTIFF: DITECH FINANCIAL LLC VS DEFENDANT: E. WILHELMINA CLAY A/K/A ETHEL WILHELMINA CLAY, INDIVIDUALLY AND AS ADMINISTRATRIX OF THE ESTATE OF WALLACE H. CLAY A/K/A WALLACE HENRY CLAY SALE ADDRESS: 164 Red Pump Road, Nottingham, a/k/a Nottingham Township, PA 19362

N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 20-1-19 Writ of Execution No. 2019-01101 DEBT $34,186.26 ALL THAT CERTAIN lot of land, situate in East Marlborough Township, Chester County, Commonwealth of PA, bounded and described according to a Final Subdivision Plan of Fox Lee Manor, Section 1, made by George E.

Regester, Jr. and Sons, Inc., Registered Land Surveyors dated 4/1/1977 last revised 6/22/1977 and recorded in Chester County as Plan No. 1214 as follows, to wit: BEGINNING at a point of curve on the Southwesterly side of Fox Hunt Drive (50 feet wide) a corner of Lot No. 10 on said Plan; thence extending from said beginning point along the side of said road, on the arc of a circle curving to the left, having a radius of 180 feet, the arc distance of 37.03 feet to a point of reverse curve at the corner of lands designated as Future Right-of-Way; thence extending along said lands on the arc of a circle curving to the right, having a radius of 125 feet, the arc distance of 171.60 feet to a point of tangent; thence extending along same, South 3 degrees 34 minutes 56 seconds East, 46.06 feet to a point in line of lands now or late of J.B. Swayne; thence extending along said lands South 86 degrees 25 minutes 4 seconds West, 422.20 feet to a corner of Lot No. 10, aforesaid; thence extending along said lot, North 54 degrees 20 minutes 21 seconds East, 338.12 feet to the first mentioned point and place of beginning. BEING Lot No. 11 on said Plan. BEING UPI No. 61-5-16.74. CONTAINING 1.049 acres of land, more or less. BEING the same premises which GREGG B. GERSHON AND SUSAN A.GERSHON, HUSBAND AND WIFE, by Indenture bearing date AUGUST 4, 2000 and recorded AUGUST 22, 2000 in the Office of the Recorder of Deeds, in and for the County of CHESTER in RECORD BOOK 4805 page 1632 etc., granted and conveyed unto GREGG E. NEWSCHWANDER and JANE K. NEWSCHWANDER, HUSBAND AND WIFE, in fee. PLANTIFF: WELLS FARGO BANK, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION AS INDENTURE TRUSTEE FOR GMACM HOME EQUITY LOAN TRUST 2004-HE5 VS DEFENDANT: Linda Surdo & Peter Surdo SALE ADDRESS: 708 Fox Hunt Drive, Kennett Square, PA 19348 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: RAS CITRON, LLC 855-225-6906 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff

of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 20-1-20 Writ of Execution No. 2018-12265 DEBT $326,008.05 ALL THAT CERTAIN lot or parcel of land situated in the Kennett Township, County of Chester, Commonwealth of Pennsylvania, being more fully described in Deed dated November 23, 2009 and recorded in the Office of the Chester County Recorder of Deeds on December 4, 2009, in Deed Book Volume 7823 at Page 121 and Instrument # 10980205. UPI # 62-5-288 PLANTIFF: U.S. Bank Trust National Association, not in its individual capacity but solely as trustee for the RMAC Trust, Series 2016-CTT VS DEFENDANT: James C. Schwartz & Susan E. Schwartz SALE ADDRESS: 202 Balmoral Circle, Chadds Ford, PA 19317 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: HLADIK, ONORATO & FEDERMAN, LLP 215855-9521 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

Sheriff Sale of

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E

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

5B

Chester County Press

Legals

Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 20-1-35 Writ of Execution No. 2017-07528 DEBT $133,097.04 ALL THAT CERTAIN, MESSAGE, LOT OR PIECE OF LAND SITUATE ON, IN THE BOROUGH OF OXFORD, COUNTY OF CHESTER, STATE OF PENNSYLVANIA, BOUNDED AND DESCRIBED, AS FOLLOWS, TO WIT: All that certain lot or piece of ground with the buildings and improvements thereon erected situate on the North side of Market Street in the Borough of Oxford County of Chester and State of Pennsylvania known as and numbered as 635 Market Street, bounded and described as follows: Beginning at a stone on the south side of Market Street; formerly New London Road, a corner of land now or late of Martha Ann Russell deceased and running thence by said land North 2 degrees West 210 feet to a stake line of land of Thomas L. Davis; thence by land now or late of said Thomas L. Davis, South 66 degrees East 37 feet to a stake; thence by land now or late of Charles M. Steele, deceased, South 2 degrees East 210 feet to a corner in the South said of Market Street aforesaid and thence along said Street, North 88 degrees West 37 feet to the place of beginning. Containing 7,710 square feet of land, be the same more or less. BEING UPI NUMBER 6-5-155 BEING THE SAME PROPERTY CONVEYED TO ALEJANDRO FRANCO AND SARA J. FRANCO WHO ACQUIRED TITLE BY VIRTUE OF A DEED FROM DANIEL R. KOHLER AND KAREN M. KOHLER , DATED AUGUST 17, 2004, RECORDED AUGUST 27, 2004, AT BOOK 6265, PAGE 1123, CHESTER COUNTY, PENNSYLVANIA RECORDS. PLANTIFF: LSF11 Master Participation Trust VS DEFENDANT: Alejandro Franco & Sara J. Franco, AKA Sara J. Strommer SALE ADDRESS: 635 Market Street, Oxford, PA 19363 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: MANLEY DEAS KOCHALSKI LLC 614-220-5611 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 20-1-28 Writ of Execution

No. 2018-10858 DEBT $291,015.25

are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter.

Property situate in the EAST NOTTINGHAM TOWNSHIP, CHESTER County, Pennsylvania

SALE NO. 20-1-37 Writ of Execution No. 2019-05671 DEBT $227,072.92

BLR # 69-5-102 IMPROVEMENTS thereon: Residential Dwelling PLANTIFF: Santander Bank, N.A. f/k/a Sovereign Bank N.A. VS DEFENDANT: Francis Hildwine & Jeanette Hildwine SALE ADDRESS: 301 Anvil Road, Nottingham, PA 19362-9612 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: PHELAN HALLINAN DIAMOND & JONES, LLP 215-563-7000 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 20-1-36 Writ of Execution No. 2019-04736 DEBT $118,846.88 Property situate in the EAST NOTTINGHAM TOWNSHIP, CHESTER County, Pennsylvania BLR# 69-6-73.4 IMPROVEMENTS thereon: Residential Dwelling

SALE ADDRESS: 320 Mount Pleasant Road, Oxford, PA 19363-2806 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: PHELAN HALLINAN DIAMOND & JONES, LLP 215-563-7000 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions

IMPROVEMENTS thereon: Residential Dwelling

SOLD AS THE PROPERTY OF: DOROTHY N. CONNOLLY and FREDERICK P. MRAZ

BLR# 710100190000 IMPROVEMENTS thereon: Residential Dwelling PLANTIFF: New Residential Mortgage LLC VS DEFENDANT: William Showalter, Jr SALE ADDRESS: 2125 Newark Road, West Grove, PA 19390-9553 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: PHELAN HALLINAN DIAMOND & JONES, LLP 215-563-7000 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 20-1-38 Writ of Execution No. 2019-01906 DEBT $848,433.24 Property situate in the PENNSBURY TOWNSHIP, CHESTER County, Pennsylvania

IMPROVEMENTS thereon: Residential Dwelling PLANTIFF: Bank of America, N.A. VS DEFENDANT: Martin Eichelberger & Annemieke Eichelberger SALE ADDRESS: 2 Misty Meadow Drive, West Chester, PA 19382-7096 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: PHELAN HALLINAN DIAMOND & JONES, LLP 215-563- 7000 N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter. SALE NO. 20-1-39

SALE ADDRESS: 9 Woodchuck Way, Kennett Square, PA 19348

N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: KML LAW GROUP, P.C. 215-627-1322

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

PLANTIFF: M&T Bank VS DEFENDANT: Dorothy N. Mraz a/k/a Dorothy C. Mraz a/k/a Dorothy N. Connelly & Frederick P. Mraz

PROPERTY SITUATE IN KENNETT TOWNSHIP TAX PARCEL # 62-02J-0003

Property situate in NEW LONDON TOWNSHIP, CHESTER County, Pennsylvania

BLR# 64-1-17.1A PLANTIFF: Branch Banking and Trust Company s/b/m to Susquehanna Bank VS DEFENDANT: Hilma Campbell, in Her Capacity as Heir of Mark A. Campbell a/k/a Mark Campbell, Deceased Unknown Heirs, Successors, Assigns, and All Persons, Firms, or Associations Claiming Right, Title or Interest From or Under Mark A. Campbell a/k/a Mark Campbell, Deceased

Writ of Execution No. 2015-01455 DEBT $149,507.56

IMPROVEMENTS thereon: Residential Dwelling

N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

PLANTIFF: M&T Bank VS DEFENDANT: Dorothy N. Connolly & Frederick P. Mraz SALE ADDRESS: 9 Woodchuck Way Lot 9, Kennett Square, PA 19348 PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: KML LAW GROUP, P.C. 215-627-1322

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter.

Sheriff Sale of Real Estate

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter.

BLR # 62-4-144.1A IMPROVEMENTS thereon: Residential Dwelling

TAX PARCEL #ID # 63-04-0014.050 UPI # 63-4-14.5

SALE ADDRESS: 996 Baneswood Drive, Kennett Square, PA 19348-2549

SOLD AS THE PROPERTY OF: ROBERT F. OAKES

PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: PHELAN HALLINAN DIAMOND & JONES, LLP 215-563-7000

PLANTIFF: LOANCARE, LLC VS DEFENDANT: Robert F. Oakes

TAX PARCEL # 62-02J-0003 SALE ADDRESS: 1630 Lenni Drive, West Chester, PA 19382

SOLD AS THE PROPERTY OF: DOROTHY N. MRAZ A/K/A DOROTHY C. MRAZ A/K/A DOROTHY N. CONNOLLY and FREDERICK P. MRAZ

Property situate in the KENNETT TOWNSHIP, CHESTER County, Pennsylvania

PROPERTY SITUATE IN TOWNSHIP OF POCOPSON

IMPROVEMENTS thereon: Residential Dwelling

PROPERTY SITUATE IN KENNETT TOWNSHIP

SALE NO. 20-1-48 Writ of Execution No. 2019-06468 DEBT $622,423.05

PLANTIFF: U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee for Bear Stearns Asset Backed Securities I Trust 2005Ac3, Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2005-Ac3 VS DEFENDANT: Michael L. Moser & Susan T. Moser

SALE NO. 20-1-42 Writ of Execution No. 2017-11908 DEBT $154,741.17

SALE NO. 20-1-40 Writ of Execution No. 2015-06920 DEBT $135,576.05

By virtue of the within mentioned writs directed to Sheriff FREDDA L. MADDOX, the herein-described real estate will be sold at public sale in the Chester County Justice Center at 201 W Market Street, 3rd Floor, Room 3300, West Chester, Pennsylvania, as announced on Thursday, January 16th, 2020 at 11AM. Notice is given to all parties in interest and claimants that the Sheriff will file with the Prothonotary and in the Sheriff’s Office, both located in the Chester County Justice Center, 201 W Market Street, West Chester, Pennsylvania, Schedules of Distribution on Monday, February 17th, 2020. Distribution will be made in accordance with the Schedules unless exceptions are filed in the Sheriff’s Office within ten (10) days thereafter.

PLANTIFF ATTORNEY: KML LAW GROUP, P.C. 215-627-1322

N.B. Ten percent (10%) of the purchase money must be paid at the time and place of sale. Payment must be paid in cash, certified check, or money order made payable to the purchaser or “Sheriff of Chester County”. The balance must be made payable to “Sheriff of Chester County” within twenty-one (21) days from the date of sale by 4PM. FREDDA L. MADDOX, SHERIFF 12p-25-3t

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East Nottingham Township E. Nott. Municipal Bldg., Election Rd.

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London Grove Township SECCRA, Street Rd.

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SECCRA 610-869-2452

24 hours

Township Office 610-869-2138

24 hours

Township Office 610-932-8150

24 hours

Karen Versuk 610-869-9620

24 hours

Township Office 610-388-7323

24 hours

Township Office 610-793-2151

24 hours

Township Office 610-932-9233

24 hours

Township Office 610-932-4072

* Single Stream - aluminum beverage containers, metal food containers, clear, green, brown glass containers, plastic containers #1 - #7, newspaper, magazines, junk mail, phone books, catalogs, cereal boxes, office paper (bundled or in paper bags)

Single Stream*

For additional information please visit www.seccra.org


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CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Chester County Press

Obituaries

Continued from Page 2B

VIRGINIA P. SIMON Virginia P. Simon, formerly of Chadds Ford, passed away peacefully with her children at her side on Dec. 30 at Jenner’s Pond in West Grove after a decade-long struggle with dementia. She was 89. She was born on May 9, 1930 in Trenton, NJ. Ginny was a graduate of Lycoming College of Williamsport, Pa., where she met her future husband, Dick, while he was a freshman farmed out from Penn State University. Ginny and Dick honeymooned in Williamsburg, Va., which turned out to have a profound influence on their lives. After they were married, Ginny worked at a laboratory in State College, supporting Dick while he finished his studies after a stint in the Air Force. After Dick’s graduation, they moved to Wilmington, Del. where Ginny worked for DuPont at the Experimental Station. Ginny focused on her family as she became a new mother, returning to the workforce later in life as her children were leaving high school, so she could cross off a bucket- list item: a Cadillac Sedan Deville with a red leather interior. Ginny and Dick built their first dream home in north Wilmington in the late 1960s. The home was a replica of the James Anderson House of Williamsburg they fell in love with during their honeymoon. They built it again in Chadds Ford near Karver Lake, where they lived for 33 years before moving to Jenner’s Pond. Ginny and Dick were known for their elaborate annual Christmas parties, frequent big family dinners, and backyard cookouts. Ginny spent her early retirement years travelling throughout the United Kingdom with Dick, visiting or staying overnight in every castle they could find, and

sending everyone in the family a postcard every single day. Ginny also took up a virtual third career in counted cross-stitching which filled the time when she was not on the road. Every family member sports several framed pieces in their home and Ginny’s own home looked like an art gallery. Even St. Cornelius Church in Chadds Ford has her work on display. Ginny also loved reading Colin Dexter and Dick Francis novels, shopping at Talbots, watching football, and TV shows like “Dynasty, or “Murder She Wrote.” She especially loved doting on her grandkids and caring for Mark’s Labrador, Luke, and her own Cocker Spaniel, Dudley. During her later years, Ginny spent her time building the most impossible puzzles imaginable. Some were 1500 piece monstrosities that would test the patience of a saint. Ginny loved nothing better than sitting there for hours, studying the pictures and setting a few pieces in place, eventually wearing a divot in the rug under her favorite seat. She is survived by her son Mark (and Judy) Simon of West Chester and her daughter Alison (and Tom Kissel) Simon-Kissel of Ashburn, Va. She is pre-deceased by Richard, her husband of 64 years, and her sister, Alice Stevens of Trenton, NJ. She had three grandchildren and one great-grandchild. A visitation for family and friends will take place at Kuzo Funeral Home, 250 W State Street, Kennett Square, on Thursday, Jan. 9 from 6 to 8 p.m. Funeral services will be held at Ewing Church Cemetery and Mausoleum, 100 Scotch Road, Ewing, New Jersey, on Friday, Jan. 10 at 11 a.m. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in Ginny’s name can be sent to the Humane Society of the United States (www.humanesociety.org) or The American Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals (www. aspca.org).

Jan. 14 Life Line Screening Life Line Screening, a leading provider of community-based preventive health screenings will be in the community on Tuesday, Jan. 14 at the Oxford United Methodist Church (18 Addison Street, Oxford). There will be Ultrasound screenings to identify risk factors for cardiovascular disease including carotid artery (plaque buildup-a leading cause of stroke), abdominal aortic aneurysm (an enlargement or weak area in the main blood vessel that carries blood from the heart to the rest of the body), peripheral arterial disease (hardening of the arteries in the legs), a heart rhythm screening (an EKG to detect Atrial Fibrillation-irregular heartbeat) and an osteoporosis risk assessment for men and women. Being proactive about your health by knowing your risks helps you and your doctor address

problems early. There are three ways to register for this event and to receive a $10 discount. Please call toll-free 1-866-229-0469 or visit http://lifelinescreening.com/communitycircle or text the word circle to 797979. Jan. 25 Breakfast buffet The Oxford United Methodist Church (18 Addison Street, Oxford) will be holding a buffet breakfast on Saturday, Jan. 25 from 7 to 10 a.m. The buffet includes pancakes, French toast, scrambled eggs, fresh fruit, specialty breads, bacon, sausage, and oven-roasted potatoes. Tickets are $7 for adults and $3 for children between the ages of 3 and 10. Purchase tickets in advance at the church office or from Becky Kleinz, or purchase them at the door. All proceeds benefit the Oxford United Methodist Church general fund.

Celebrate Recovery kickoff event set for Jan. 15

Obituary submissions The Chester County Press publishes obituaries, free of charge, for those with a connection to southern Chester County. Obituaries appear on the Wednesday after they are received, space permitting. They also are posted on www.chestercounty. com. Photos should be sent as .jpg attachments to the obituary text. To submit an obituary to the Chester County Press, email the information to: editor@chestercounty.com.

Church Calendar

Are you or someone you know struggling with issues in life that are weighing you down? You are invited to give Celebrate Recovery a try at the 2020 Kickoff event at 6:15 p.m. on Wednesday, Jan. 15 at

the Christian Life Center located at 125 Saginaw Rd. in New London Township. Celebrate Recovery is a Christ-centered, 12-step recovery program for anyone struggling with hurt, pain or addiction of any

kind. Celebrate Recovery is a safe place to find community and freedom from the issues that are controlling our lives, as we meet together weekly for worship, comfort and encouragement.

FAMILY MEDICINE – TOWER HEALTH MEDICAL GROUP WELCOMES JAMES KNOX, JR., MD

Jennersville Hospital is pleased to announce the return of James Knox, Jr., MD to the Southern Chester County community. Effective Tuesday, December 3, Dr. Knox will begin seeing patients in his Oxford, PA office. He brings over three decades of experience in compassionate care, health education, wellness, and disease prevention to patients of all ages from newborns through older adults. Dr. Knox’s clinical interests also include sports medicine where he provides comprehensive care to athletes and physically active individuals. Learn more about Dr. Knox at towerhealth.org/physician-network. NOW ACCEPTING NEW PATIENTS Same day or next day appointments often available. Call 610-932-6386 to schedule an appointment today.

Family Medicine 29 N. Third Street Oxford, PA 19363

TowerHealth.org/MedicalGroup


WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

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Chester County Press

Calendar of Events Jan. 20 Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. CommUNITY Breakfast The Martin Luther King CommUNITY of the Greater Kennett Area will be hosting the 19th annual Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. CommUNITY Breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m. on Monday, Jan. 20. Doors at the Red Clay Room open at 7:30 a.m. The breakfast celebrates Dr. King’s legacy of love and service and inspires all to live out his dream in the Kennett Square community and throughout the world. The 2020 theme is Building a Beloved Community in the Face of Adversity. The keynote speaker is Dr. Harold D. Trulear, the national director of healing communities. Tickets are $25 and can be purchased online at www. MLKCommUNITY .org. For more information about tickets, call 610444-6020, ext. 108. Jan. 26 Chocolate Lovers Festival The Kennett Chocolate Lovers Festival will be held on Jan. 26 at Unionville High School. Dozens of bakers will be competing for prizes, and offering tastings of their creations at the event. Proceeds benefit the United Way of Southern Chester County. Tickets are on sale at www. K e n n e t t C h o c o l a t e . o rg . VIP ticket holders gain early entrance at noon. General admission opens at 1 p.m. Additional tasting tickets are available.

Feb. 6 Workshop on creating a digital media kit The Palette & The Page (120 East Main Street in Elkton, Md.) will be hosting a workshop with Meredith & Brandon Boas of GrungeMuffin Designs about creating a digital media kit on Thursday, Feb. 6 from 5 to 7 p.m. A digital media kit is a package of information that highlights you, your business, or your brand, and explains why other businesses, publishers, or creatives should work with you. In this workshop you will be shown media kit examples and learn how to create a digital media kit in Powerpoint. Students will use their laptops during the workshop and be given a mock media kit that can be used as a skeleton to build upon. Students are encouraged to come prepared with their digital logo, work samples, mission statement, and facts about their business or services to begin building their kit. Students will be given an outline with many ideas about what to include to continue work-

ing on their kits after the workshop. Grunge Muffin Designs is a multimedia design studio located in the heart of the tri-state area of Delaware, Maryland and Pennsylvania. For more information about this workshop and others at The Palette & The Page, visit www.paletteandpage.com or email patti@thepaletteandthepage.com.

more than 60 unique craft breweries, live music, and food trucks will take place Saturday, Feb. 29 from 12:30 to 4 p.m. Ticket price includes unlimited tastings of delicious craft beer. Food is pay-as-you- go (food is not included in the price of admission). More information, including how to purchase tickets, can be found at kennettwinterfest. com.

Feb. 7 The Harlem Wizards The world-famous Harlem Wizards basketball team will be bringing their fantastic, high-flying game to Unionville High School on Friday, Feb. 7 at 7 p.m. Come out to see a squad of Unionville-Chadds Ford all-stars competing against the Wizards. The doors open at 6 p.m. Tickets can be purchased at harlemwizards. com. The event is being hosted by the UnionvilleChadds Ford Education Foundation.

Kennett Flash schedule The Kennett Flash (102 Sycamore Alley, Kennett Square) hosts regional and national artists in its intimate venue. Tickets are available in advance at www.kennettflash.org, or at the door. Snacks and beverages are sold, or guests can BYOB. Upcoming shows include: The legendary psychedelic progressive rock act NEKTAR (Jan. 9, $35 advance tickets, $40 on day of show, and $60 VIP tickets that includes a pre-show meet-and-greet); Feb. 29 Fabio Mittino & Bert Lams Kennett Winterfest of California Guitar Trio Kennett Winterfest, fea- (Jan. 10, $23 advance turing winter brews from tickets and $28 tickets on

day of show, with special pricing for Kennett Flash members); 33 1/3 LIVE’s Killer Queen Experience, which reproduces each Queen track faithfully have two shows (Jan. 11) on the same evening. The first show is already sold out. The show is a 90-minute concert set of all your favorite Queen tracks spanning their extensive catalog and is guaranteed to satisfy even the biggest Queen fans. 33 1/3 Live’s Killer Queen Experience then presents “An Afternoon at the Opera!” (Jan. 12, $25 advance tickets and $30 on the day of the show, with tickets $15 for children 18 and under); Collin O’Meara: The Experience, an evening of standup comedy featuring a young, up-and-coming comic with special guests John Slack, Diego Panessa, and Al DeChino (Jan. 17, $15 advance tickets and $20 the day of the show); Western Centuries with Sarah Larsen of Hurricane Hoss (Jan. 18, $20 tickets); Open Mic Night with guest host Jimmy McFadden (Jan. 19 with signups starting at 6 p.m.); Hadley Presents Burnt Sugar the Arkestra Chamber (Jan. 24, free show with RSVP and a two-ticket limit for RSVP); The ACT Players present Broadway Moments (Jan. 25 and 26, $20 tickets for adults and $17 tickets for students and seniors) a show that will feature songs from some of Broadway’s most beloved shows; Stackabones with Apache Trails (Jan. 31, $14 advance tickets and $18 tickets on day of show);

Rust—A Tribute to Neil Young (Feb. 1, tickets $25 or $20 in advance); Solar Federation (a tribute to Rush) and Tarkus (a tribute to Emerson, Lake, and Palmer (Feb. 7, $20 tickets); Dave Mattock and Funktap (Feb. 8, $23 tickets or $18 in advance); Better Than Bacon Improv (Feb. 13, tickets $15 in advance and $20 on the day of the show) brings its award-winning interactive comedy to Kennett Square; Raymond the Amish Comic (Feb. 14, tickets are $22 or $17 for advance tickets); The Hoppin’ John Orchestra brings a preMardi Gras party (Feb. 15, $15 for advance tickets and $20 on the day of the show); John Németh, a top blues musician and modern soul singer (Feb. 20) comes to the Kennett Flash; Know Return, a tribute to Kansas, and Fooling Ourselves, a tribute to Styx (Feb. 21, tickets are $20 in advance and $25 on the day of the show); Sarah Borges & The Broken Singles (Feb. 22, $18 tickets); Hadley presents Films & Words-Linda Ronstadt: The Sound of My Voice (Feb. 23, free show with RSVP); Filo Betto, featuring members of Kategory 5 will appear with Juliana Danese (Feb. 28, $20 tickets in advance and $25 on the night of the show). To submit items to the Calendar of Events, e-mail editor@chestercounty. com. There is no charge. Not every submission can be included. Items should be submitted at least two weeks before the event.

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8B

CHESTER COUNTY PRESS

WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 8, 2020

Profile for Ad Pro Inc.

Chester County Press 01-08-2020 Edition  

Chester County Press 01-08-2020 Edition