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MONDAY    EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 25 No. 36

Middlebury, Vermont

X

Monday, November 4, 2013

‘Shrek’ sets stage for family reunion Small dog, big message ‡%UXFH=HPDQKDVFRZULWWHQ DQDQWLEXOO\LQJERRNDERXWKLV GDFKVKXQG+REEHV6HH3DJH

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Three generations of Eddy clan join cast for popular musical By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY  —  Serena  Eddy-­ Guiles   has   used   the   stage   as   a   dra-­ matic   platform   on   which   to   share   her   creativity   in   dozens   of   theater   productions  throughout  high  school,   and   well   into   adulthood   with   the   Middlebury  Community  Players. All   those   past   performances   are   leading  up  to  what  Eddy-­Guiles  an-­ ticipates  could  be  the  most  memora-­ ble  role  in  her  life:  Sharing  the  stage  

with  three  generations  of  her  family   as   part   of   The   Company   at   Town   Hall  Theater’s  staging  of  “Shrek  the   Musical,â€?   which   opens   this   Thurs-­ day,  Nov.  7. Six   members   of   the   Eddy-­Guiles   clan   will   either   be   performing   on   stage,   directing   behind   the   scenes   or   making   music   for   what   will   be   WKH ÂżUVW RI PDQ\ SURGXFWLRQV WR EH staged   by   The   Company,   a   home-­ grown   professional   thespian   troupe  

that  will  be  based  at  the  Town  Hall   Theater. “Shrek   the   Musicalâ€?   is   based   on   the   Oscar-­winning   DreamWorks   ÂżOPIHDWXULQJWKHKXPRURXVDQGSRL-­ gnant  story  of  a  homely  ogre  (Shrek)   who   shows   up   to   rescue   a   feisty   princess   (Fiona).   The   cast   includes   a  talkative  donkey,  a  short-­tempered   villain,  and  more  than  a  dozen  other   IDLU\ WDOH PLVÂżWV DFFRUGLQJ WR WKH (See  Family,  Page  20)

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32 Pages

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Program offers hope for drivers who lose licenses By  JOHN  FLOWERS ADDISON   COUNTY   —   Having   one’s   driver’s   license   suspended   can   be   the   punish-­ ment   that   keeps   on   penalizing.   Not   having   access   to   a   vehicle   for   a   substantial   length   of   time   can   prevent   the   offender   from   getting   to   doctors’   appoint-­ ments,   to   family   events   and   (See  DLS,  Page  30)

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86'$VWDWHSURJUDPVEHQHÂżWORFDOIDUPV By  ZACH  DESPART SHOREHAM   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   As   anyone   in   Addison   County   knows,   farming   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   easy,   especially   for   farmers   who  are  new  to  the  business.  But  a   litany   of   USDA   programs   can   help  

farmers  get  on  their  feet.  In  total,  the   Rural   Development   division   of   the   USDA   pumps   $5   million-­$10   mil-­ lion   annually   into  Addison   County,   investing   in   farms,   businesses   and   communities,   according   to   Ted  

Brady,  state  director  of  the  Vermont   and  New  Hampshire  Rural  Develop-­ ment  program  of  the  USDA. The   owners   of   Champlain   Or-­ chards  in  Shoreham  have  used  these   programs   to   continually   increase  

and   improve   their   operations   and   grow  their  workforce  to  45  employ-­ ees.  Bill  Suhr,  who  runs  the  orchard   with  his  wife,  Andrea  Scott,  believes   government   programs   like   the   ones   (See  Farm  aid,  Page  7)


PAGE  2  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

5DGLRÂśV%UXFH +REEHVSXEOLVKWKHLUÂżUVWERRN 3RSXODUGXRÂżJKW DJDLQVWEXOO\LQJ By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Many   Ad-­ dison   County   residents   know   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hobbesâ&#x20AC;?   as   the   irrepressible   little   dachshund   who   has   joined   radio   personality  Bruce  Zeman  on  the  lo-­ cal  airwaves  for  the  past  three  years. Well,   Hobbes   is   now   expanding   his   nascent   media   empire   to   print.   With  his  owner  Bruce  Zeman  lend-­ ing  him  a  voice,  Hobbes  in  Novem-­ EHUZLOOVWDULQWKHÂżUVWRISRWHQWLDOO\ ÂżYHFKLOGUHQÂśVERRNVWKDWZLOOWHOOWKH story  of  his  rescue  from  an  abusive   home  and  hopefully  help  kids  avoid   and  overcome  similar  situations. Zeman   and   his   wife,   Tami,   have   been   working   on   the   new   book   for   around   two   years.   He   called   Tami   â&#x20AC;&#x153;an   amazing   writerâ&#x20AC;?   who   has   tried   KHUKDQGDWFKLOGUHQÂśVERRNVEHIRUH 7KH\DJUHHGWKDW+REEHVÂśVWRU\ZDV touching   and   could   be   inspirational   on  a  human  scale,  for  children  who   have  known  the  torment  of  bullying   and/or  domestic  violence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  way  I  had  seen  the  public  re-­ VSRQG WR +REEHVÂś VWRU\ , VDLG Âľ,ÂśOO GRVRPHUHVHDUFKDQGZHÂśOOVHHZKDW ZH FDQ FRPH XS ZLWKϫ =HPDQ UH-­ called.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  honestly,  the  book  kind   of  wrote  itself.â&#x20AC;? 7KDWÂśV EHFDXVH +REEHV KDV OHG D very  eventful  seven  years,  half  of  it   ÂżOOHGZLWKPHPRULHVKHZRXOGSURE-­ ably  just  as  soon  forget. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  had  a  really  bad  beginning,â&#x20AC;?   Zeman  said  of  his  beloved  sidekick,   who   had   been   terribly   abused   be-­ fore   being   rescued   by   the   Addison   County  Humane  Society  (ACHS)  in   November  2009. Zeman   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   whose   family   has   raised   dachshunds   for   50   years   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   was   invited   to   the   ACHS   Home-­ ward  Bound  Animal  Welfare  Center   in  Middlebury  to  take  a  look  at  the   then-­sad,  cowering  canine. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   had   been   beaten   almost   to   GHDWK´ =HPDQ VDLG Âł:KHQ , ÂżUVW met   him   â&#x20AC;Ś   I   was   shocked   at   how   bad  he  looked.â&#x20AC;? Zeman  had  previously  helped  care   for  dogs  in  New  Orleans  after  Hur-­ ricane   Katrina,   as   well   as   at   other   disaster  sites.  Hobbes  was  one  of  the   worst   examples   of   an   abused   dog   that  he  had  ever  seen. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing   could   really   prepare  

LOCAL  RADIO  PERSONALITY  Bruce  Zeman  has  co-­authored  a  book  about  his  beloved  dog,  Hobbes,  and   Hobbesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  rescue  from  an  abusive  home.  Zeman  hopes  the  book  will  be  helpful  to  children  who  are  victims  of   abuse  or  bullying. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

me   for   what   I   saw,â&#x20AC;?   Zeman   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   picked   him   up   out   of   the   crate   he   was   in   and   he   was   very   sticky.   I   pulled   my   hands   away,   and  it  was  blood,  where  he   had  apparently  been  thrown   against  the  wall.â&#x20AC;? Zeman   still   gets   choked   up   remembering   the   state   in   which   he   found   Hobbes.   He   was   determined   that   day   to   make  sure  the  dog  was  given  a   new  lease  on  life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   sent   a   photo   of   him   to   my   ZLIH ÂŤ DQG VKH VDLG Âľ:H FDQÂśW OHDYHKLPWKHUHϫ=HPDQVDLG6R they  decided  to  adopt  him. The  couple  took  Hobbes  in  for  a   trial  run  to  make  sure  the  dog  could   again   trust   in   humans.   Gradually,   Hobbes   came   out   of   his   shell   and   then   a   bond   formed   between   him   and  his  new  family. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   picked   him   up   and   I   looked   ULJKWLQWRKLVH\HVDQGVDLGÂľ1RRQH LV HYHU JRLQJ WR KXUW \RX DJDLQϫ Zeman  said. Hobbes   was   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   continues   to   be  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  somewhat  afraid  of  strangers.   But  he  has  overcome  a  lot  of  anxiety   in  a  short  period  of  time.

,W ZDVQÂśW ORQJ EH-­ fore   Zeman  started   sharing   sto-­ ries  about  his  new  dog  while  doing   his   show,   at   the   time   on   WVTK   92.1   FM   in   Middlebury.   Listeners   seemed  to  get  enjoyment  out  of  the   VWRULHV DQG LW ZDVQÂśW ORQJ EHIRUH Hobbes  accompanied  Zeman  to  the   station,   culminating   in   the   dachs-­ hund  getting  equal  billing  as  part  of   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wake-­up   Crew   with   Bruce   &   Hobbes,â&#x20AC;?  now  heard  on  Farm  Fresh   102.9  FM.

Hobbes   is   the   only   canine   in  Vermont  history  to  be  hon-­ ored  as  a  police  K-­9  in  three   communities,   Middlebury,   Vergennes   and   Bristol,   and   LV DOVR WKH ÂłRIÂżFLDO´ ÂżUH dog   of   the   New   Haven   Volunteer   Fire   Depart-­ ment.  Since  2009,  Zeman   and  Hobbes  have  helped   RYHU  DQLPDOV ÂżQG homes,   and   raised   over   $40,000  for  the  Home-­ ward  Bound  center. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   more   I   talked   about   him,   the   more   people   wanted   to   hear   his  story,â&#x20AC;?  Zeman  said. 2I FRXUVH WKHUHÂśV UHDOO\ QR EXVL-­ ness   model   for   a   man-­dog   radio   team,   so   Zeman   just   went   with   the   Ă&#x20AC;RZ+HUHIHUVWR+REEHVIUHTXHQWO\ during  the  show,  talking  about  their   adventures  and  his  antics. Âł,I \RX WKLQN DERXW LW LWÂśV DERXW UHODWLRQVKLSV´=HPDQVDLGÂł,WÂśVOLNH anything   else;Íž   husband   and   wife,   mom   and   dad.   It   is   a   relationship   WKDWÂśVXQEUHDNDEOH´ A  CAUTIONARY  TALE ,WÂśV D IRUPXOD WKDW KDV ZRUNHG

well,   as   the   duo   has   garnered   quite   the   fan   base   that   has   become   inter-­ HVWHGLQ+REEHVÂśQHDWQHZOLIHZKLOH remaining   cognizant   of   his   rough   start.   Indeed,   Zeman   has   wanted   WR SXEOLFL]H +REEHVÂś HVFDSH IURP abuse,   to   serve   as   a   cautionary   tale   with  a  happy  ending. Âł7R PH LWÂśV DQ DPD]LQJ VWRU\ RI what  one  person  can  do  if  you  care   enough  to  make  it  happen,â&#x20AC;?  Zeman   said. So   Bruce   and   Tami   got   to   work   on  that  story  in  2011.  They  were  as-­ sisted  along  the  way  by  a  number  of   people,  including  former  ACHS  Ex-­ ecutive  Director  Jackie  Rose. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   met   all   these   great   people   who  wanted  to  help  us,â&#x20AC;?  Zeman  said. The  authors  learned  that  it  would   EHVRPHZKDWWULFN\WRWXUQ+REEHVÂś story  into  a  book  for  kids  in  grades   kindergarten   through   8.   They   FRXOGQÂśWPDNHWKHERRNWRRJUDSKLF for   kindergartners,   and   needed   to   make   it   a   compelling   enough   read   for   young   teens.   The   book   is   illus-­ trated   by   California-­based   artist/il-­ lustrator  Shauna  Peterson. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   decided   to   come   up   with   a   happy   medium   that   told   the   story   IURP +REEHVÂś SHUVSHFWLYHDQGWKDW incorporated  our  perspective,  and  it   really  had  an  impact,â&#x20AC;?  Zeman  said. 7KH ÂżUVW SULQW RI  ERRNV LV scheduled   to   be   ready   by   Nov.   25,   according   to   Zeman.   They   will   be   available   at   local   bookstores   and   through   Web-­based   sources   such   as   Amazon.com   and   on   bruceand-­ hobbes.com.   Zeman   plans   to   read   from   the   book   at   schools   through-­ RXW9HUPRQW LQYLWLQJ VWDWH RIÂżFLDOV (such   as   Gov.   Peter   Shumlin)   and   community   leaders   to   join   him   in   imparting   the   broader,   related   mes-­ sage  of  stamping  out  animal  cruelty,   domestic  abuse  and  bullying. A   dollar   from   the   sale   of   each   book  will  be  donated  to  the  ACHS. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   message   is,   if   this   type   of   abuse Â�� is   happening   to   you,   tell   an   DGXOW´ =HPDQ VDLG RI WKH ERRNÂśV message.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  is  hope.  And  there   DUHDORWRIWKLQJVWKDWORYHFDQÂż[´ Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  3

Farm  bill  has  a  glimmer  of  hope By  ZACH  DESPART gram.  The  House  version  would  cut   WASHINGTON,   D.C.   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   A   co-­ $39  billion  from  SNAP.  Senate  lead-­ hort   of   legislators   met   in   the   capi-­ ers  and  the  White  House  have  thus   WRO:HGQHVGD\LQDQDWWHPSWWRÂżQG far  opposed  deep  cuts  to  the  SNAP   common  ground  on  a  new  farm  bill.   program. But   they   made   no   real   progress   to-­ ANOTHER  DEADLINE   ward  resolving  differences  between   LOOMS the   U.S.   Senate   and   House   over   According  to  its  legislative  calen-­ legislation   that   covers   a   range   of   dar,  the  Senate  has  39  working  days   programs   that   affect   dairy   farmers,   left  this  year.  While  Congress  works   those   who   get   food   assistance   and   to   make   up   business   postponed   by   other  Vermonters. the   16-­day   shutdown   in   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Congress   needs   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Farmers have October,   it   is   uncertain   pass   a   new   farm   bill   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   not forgotten if  a  new  farm  bill  will  be   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   getting   ridiculous,â&#x20AC;?   the dairy crisis passed  by  the  end  of  the   said   Jenny   Nelson,   the   year. of 2009 and agriculture  policy  advis-­ The   clock   is   ticking   er   to   Sen.   Bernie   Sand-­ they know that for   local   dairy   farmers.   ers,   I-­Vt.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dairy   farm-­ an insurance If   Congress   does   not   ers   have  had  no   support   program alone pass   a   new   dairy   pro-­ after   the   MILC   (milk   is not enough. gram   by   Dec.   31   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   be   price   support)   program   Without it   the   Dairy   Stabiliza-­ expired  Oct.  1.â&#x20AC;? tion  Act  as  part  of  a  new   The   conference   com-­ stabilization, farm   bill,   or   a   stand-­ mittee   consists   of   12   we will cost alone   piece   of   legisla-­ senators   and   29   repre-­ taxpayers tion   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the   government   sentatives.  Vermont  Sen.   hundreds of will   revert   to   a   1949   Patrick   Leahy,   a   Demo-­ millions of federal   statute,   the   last   crat,  is  the  only  member   time   a   permanent   farm   additional of   the   Vermont   delega-­ bill  was  passed.   tion  taking  part  in  the  ne-­ dollars and Because   farming   virtually gotiations. methods   were   much   A  conference  commit-­ guarantee OHVV HIÂżFLHQW WKHQ WKH tee   consists   of   members   another dairy government   would   pay   of   both   houses   of   Con-­ crisis.â&#x20AC;? about   double   for   milk   gress,   convened   for   the   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sen. Leahy than  it  did  under  the  last   purpose   of   reconciling   farm   bill.   In   theory,   the   two  different  versions  of   cost  of  milk  for  consum-­ the  same  bill.  In  this  case,  legislators   ers  would  skyrocket. ZLOO WU\ WR ÂżQG D FRPSURPLVH EH-­ The   previous   USDA   dairy   sup-­ tween  a  farm  bill  the  Senate  passed   port  program,  the  Milk  Income  Loss   in   June   and   a   version   the   House   Contract   (MILC),   compensated   passed  in  September. dairy   producers   when   milk   prices   The   farm   bill   sets   the   nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   fell  below  a  certain  level.  It  expired   food  and  nutrition  policy.  First  cre-­ at  the  end  of  September. ated  by  Congress  in  1933,  the  farm   Without   this   crucial   safety   net,   ELOOLVWUDGLWLRQDOO\SDVVHGHYHU\ÂżYH farmers   are   left   unprotected   from   years.   In   2012,   Congress   failed   to   volatile  market  swings.  In  2009,  the   pass  a  new  bill,  and  instead  voted  to   global  demand  for  milk  fell  by  just  5   extend   the   2008   bill   through   Sept.   percent,  and  milk  prices  dropped  by   30,  2013. nearly  50  percent. After  a  farm  bill  was  passed  in  the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Farmers   have   not   forgotten   the   Democrat-­controlled  Senate,  House   dairy  crisis  of  2009  and  they  know   Speaker  John  Boehner,  R-­Ohio,  did   that   an   insurance   program   alone   is   not  put  that  version  to  a  vote  in  his   not  enough,â&#x20AC;?  Leahy  said  to  his  col-­ chamber.   Instead,   the   Republican-­ leagues.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without   stabilization,   we   controlled  House  of  Representatives   will  cost  taxpayers  hundreds  of  mil-­ drafted   its   own   version   of   the   bill,   lions  of  additional  dollars  and  virtu-­ with  deep  cuts  to  Supplemental  Nu-­ ally  guarantee  another  dairy  crisis.â&#x20AC;? trition  Assistance  Program  (SNAP).   Rep.   Peter   Welch,   D-­Vt.,   said   a   It  was  passed  by  a  vote  of  217-­210,   new   farm   bill   is   within   reach,   and   with  no  Democrats  voting  in  favor.   that  Congress  is  capable  of  meeting   The   Senate   version   passed   66-­27,   the  Dec.  31  deadline.   JDUQHULQJVLJQLÂżFDQWELSDUWLVDQVXS-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   hope   is   that   the   new   farm   port.   bill  will  come  as  close  as  possible  to   Serving   since   1975,   Leahy   has   the  Senate  version,â&#x20AC;?  Welch  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   presided   over   the   passage   of   seven   came  close  to  passing  in  the  House   farm   bills.   The   Senateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   president   Agriculture  Committee.â&#x20AC;?   pro   tempore,   Leahy   is   the   most   se-­ Welch  said  he  believes  there  is  bi-­ nior  member  of  that  body. partisan   support   for   the   Senate   bill   In   his   opening   remarks   to   the   in  his  chamber.  For  the  House  to  ap-­ committee,  Leahy  stressed  that  this   prove  that  measure,  every  Democrat   legislation   sets   much   more   than   and   16   Republicans   would   need   to   farm  policy. vote  in  favor  of  the  bill. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  is  not  only  a  farm  bill;Íž  it  is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   challenge   Mr.   Boehner   has   a  trade  bill,  a  hunger  bill,  a  conser-­ is  to  rehabilitate  Congress  after  the   vation  bill,  a  reform  bill,  an  innova-­ spectacle   of   the   shutdown,â&#x20AC;?   Welch   WLRQELOODGHÂżFLWUHGXFWLRQELOODQG said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;That   may   provide   incentive   above  all,  a  job  creation  bill,â&#x20AC;?  Leahy   for   Republican   leadership   in   the   said. House  to  compromise.â&#x20AC;? According  to  projections,  the  Sen-­ :HOFK UHDIÂżUPHG KLV VXSSRUW ate  version  of  the  bill  would  cut  $24   for   the   Dairy   Stabilization  Act,   but   ELOOLRQ IURP WKH GHÂżFLW DQG DURXQG stopped  short  of  saying  he  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   $5-­6   billion   from   the   SNAP   pro-­ vote  for  the  bill  if  the  program  were  

stripped  from  it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   want   to   get   (the   Dairy   Stabili-­ zation  Act),   and   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   going   to   work   hard   to   get   it,â&#x20AC;?   Welch   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   if   we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  it,  the  question  becomes   what  is  the  best  alternative  safety  net   can  we  get?â&#x20AC;? SNAP  CUTS  TAKE  EFFECT As   of   this   past   June,   more   than   100,000   Vermonters   were   par-­ ticipating   in   the   SNAP   program,   accounting   for   16   percent   of   resi-­ dents   in   the   state.   According   to   research  by  the  USDA,  14  percent   of   Vermont   households   are   food   insecure,   meaning   they   cannot   af-­ IRUGWRIXOÂżOOWKHLUGDLO\QXWULWLRQDO need.   Welch   and   Nelson   said   they   be-­ lieve   cuts   to   the   SNAP   program   will  be  the  biggest  obstacle  for  the   conference  committee  to  surmount. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sen.  Sanders  will  not  support  a   farm  bill  that  makes  hunger  worse,â&#x20AC;?   Nelson  said. Already,   the   SNAP   program   has   become   another   casualty   of   Con-­ gressional  inaction.  A  $42.5  billion   LQFUHDVHLQ61$3EHQHÂżWVWKDWZDV authorized  in  2009  to  meet  growing   demand   for   the   program   expired   Nov.   1,   resulting   in   a   6   percent   decrease   for   recipients   across   the   board. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   vast   majority   of   SNAP   re-­ cipients  are  children  and  the  elderly   poor,â&#x20AC;?  Welch  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  still  deal-­ ing  with  the  effects  of  the  worst  re-­ cession  since  the  Great  Depression,   and  a  6  percent  cut  means  a  family   will  have  $30-­40  less  a  month.â&#x20AC;?

Makinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  it  snappy MARY  HOGAN  SIXTH-­GRADER  Talin  Teague  snaps  along  with  a   group  of  singers  performing  at  the  kickoff  of  the  schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  annual   read-­a-­thon   last   Thursday   afternoon.   Last   year   students   earned   more  than  $17,000  in  pledges  during  the  month-­long  read-­a-­thon. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

New  Haven,  VT  Homeowner   Recommends  Bristol  Electronics â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  looked  into  installing  a  solar  system  ten  to  twelve  years  ago.   I  wish  we  had  done  it  back  then.  The  payback  has  been  amazing.   Bristol   Electronics   is   such   a   friendly   company.   The   guys   are   great,  everyone  is  easy  to  work  with  and  so  professional.   :KHQ,EXLOGDQHZKRPHLQWKHIXWXUH,ZLOOGHÂżQLWHO\SODQRQ incorporating  solar  and  using  Bristol  Electronics.â&#x20AC;?                                                  Karen  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  New  Haven,  VT

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PAGE  4  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

A D DIS ON INDE P E NDEN T

Editorials 725,000  reasons  to  give â&#x20AC;&#x153;Together  we  can  make  a  difference.â&#x20AC;?  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  one  phrase  many  area  resi-­ dents  associate  with  the  United  Way  of  Addison  County.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Way  Addison  County  caresâ&#x20AC;?  is  another.   Both  are  apt  reminders  of  the  way  the  United  Way  works:  It  relies  on  a   large  group  of  volunteers  to  reach  out  and  help  people  in  need.  It  works  with   more  than  two-­dozen  agencies  in  Addison  County  to  be  sure  the  human  and   social  needs  of  people  in  the  county  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  go  unmet.   And  it  works  with  a  talented  board  of  directors  to  identify  the  most  press-­ ing  needs  each  year  and  to  channel  adequate  funds  to  those  groups.   But  none  of  it  works  without  your  help.  None  of  it  works  without  a  steady   Ă&#x20AC;RZRIGRQDWHGGROODUVWRÂżOOWKHFRIIHUVRIWKH8QLWHG:D\,WLVDWKHDUWWKH most  important  part  of  the  annual  effort. This   year   the   United  Way   of  Addison   Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   goal   is   $725,000.     It   is   a  challenging  goal,  leaders  say,  but  quickly  add  that  they  are  aiming  high   â&#x20AC;&#x153;because  aiming  lower  is  not  an  option,  and  because  needs  are  not  getting   smaller.â&#x20AC;?   7KDWVKRXOGEHREYLRXV)RUWKHSDVWÂżYH\HDUVVLQFHWKH*UHDW5HFHVVLRQ of  2007-­8,  state  and  federal  aid  has  been  cut  for  many  of  the  services  that   support  those  who  are  most  vulnerable  in  our  society.  From  children  who   need  a  stable  home  environment  and  three  healthy  meals,  to  the  unemployed   VWUXJJOLQJWRÂżQGZRUNDQGPDNHHQGVPHHWXQWLOWKH\ODQGDMREIXOÂżOOLQJ those  is  what  the  United  Way  is  all  about. For  those  who  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  realize  the  reach  of  the  United  Way  into  our  com-­ munities,  consider  that  the  organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  primary  focus  is  to  help  keep  our   communities  vital,  by: Â&#x2021; SURYLGLQJ VHUYLFHV WKDW KHOS UHGXFH KHDOWK FDUH FRVWV DQG LPSURYH WKH quality  of  life;Íž   Â&#x2021;VXSSRUWLQJV\VWHPVDQGVHUYLFHVWKDWSURPRWHÂżQDQFLDOVWDELOLW\ Â&#x2021;SXUVXLQJVXFFHVVIXOHGXFDWLRQDORXWFRPHV Â&#x2021;SURYLGLQJV\VWHPVDQGVHUYLFHVWKDWSURPRWHÂżQDQFLDOVWDELOLW\ Â&#x2021;LQYROYLQJFLWL]HQVZLWKDSDVVLRQIRUWKHFRPPRQJRRGWREHLQYROYHG Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  no  small  feat  and  every  contribution  makes  a  difference  in  the  or-­ ganizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ability  to  meet  those  ambitious  goals.   Todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  United  Way  is  also  more  sophisticated  than  ever  before.  In  just   one  of  the  hundreds  of  programs  it  helps  fund,  the  UWAC  helps  secure  the   ÂżQDQFLDOVWDELOLW\RIORZLQFRPHIDPLOLHVE\WHDFKLQJEDVLFÂżQDQFLDOOLWHUDF\ WRORZLQFRPHIDPLOLHVWKURXJKWKHÂł/HDUQLW.HHS,W*URZ,W´SURJUDP â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone   Wins!â&#x20AC;?   is   a   United   Way   sponsored   mentoring   program   that   SURPRWHVUHDGLQJSURÂżFLHQF\IRUWKLUGJUDGHUV²DQHGXFDWLRQDOEHQFKPDUN that  can  determine  success  or  failure  in  future  academics. And   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   the   tip   of   the   iceberg.   In   every   facet   of   our   community,   UWAC  is  there  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  involved.  That  is  why  they  need  your  help. Donate   today,   if   you   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   already,   through   a   one-­time   payment   or   through  a  payroll  deduction  program  at  your  work.  For  as  little  as  $1  or  $2   a  week,  you  can  truly  make  a  huge  difference.  For  more  about  this  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   campaign  see  unitedwayaddisoncounty.org. Angelo  S.  Lynn

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Man  of  the  people MARY+2*$1(/(0(17$5<6FKRRO3ULQFLSDO7RP%X]]HOOVLWVZLWKVRPHVWXGHQWVRQWKHJ\PĂ&#x20AC;RRU during  the  schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  read-­a-­thon  kickoff  last  Thursday. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Letters to the Editor Federal  spending  plan  is  not  akin  to  a  family  budget A  recent  letter  in  this  paper  from   Ron  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill  raised  a  number  of   common  misconceptions  about  how   the  federal  budget  works.  These   misconceptions  are  very  widely   held,  and  are  based  mostly  on  com-­ paring  the  federal  budget  to  a  fam-­ ily  or  business  budget.  In  reality,   the  two  have  very  little  in  common,   PDLQO\IRUWKHUHDVRQWKDWLQDÂżDW currency  system  the  federal  govern-­ ment  issues  the  currency  which  is   used  to  do  business.  Understanding   how  this  works  is  crucial  to  under-­ standing  monetary  policy. Mr.  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neill  states  that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the   government  has  no  money  of  its   own,  all  the  money  that  is  spent  by  

the  government  is  received  from  the   taxpayers.â&#x20AC;?  Again,  this  is  what  most   people  think,  but  the  exact  oppo-­ site  is  true.  Every  American  dollar   comes  originally  from  the  govern-­ ment:  The  government  printing  that   currency  and  spending  it  is  in  fact   the  prior  act  of  all  uses  of  the  Amer-­ ican  dollar.  Before  that  dollar  ends   up  in  the  hands  of  the  taxpayer,  the   government  must  print  that  dollar   and  spend  it.  Those  dollars  circulate   in  the  economy  and  a  percentage  is   returned  as  taxes  to  the  government   each  year. It  is  in  fact  critical  that  we  return   dollars  to  the  government  as  taxes   IRUWZRUHDVRQV7KHÂżUVWLVWKDWLID

currency-­issuing  government  stops   taking  its  money  back  in  taxes,  the   money  loses  the  backing  of  the   government,  which  is  what  gives   it  value  (it  has  no  inherent  value,   being  made  of  paper).  The  second   is  that  if  we  do  not  return  some   portion  of  currency  to  the  govern-­ ment  as  taxes,  the  government   would  need  to  print  more  and  more   paper  currency  to  buy  services.  This   ZRXOGFDXVHLQĂ&#x20AC;DWLRQ7RROLWWOH money  printing,  on  the  other  hand,   FDXVHVGHĂ&#x20AC;DWLRQ7KHJRYHUQPHQW must  in  fact  print  and  spend  just   the  correct  amount  of  currency  to   DFKLHYHWKHGHVLUHGDPRXQWRILQĂ&#x20AC;D-­ (See  Letter,  Page  5)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  —  PAGE  5

Hungry  families  are  facing  cuts

Letters to the Editor

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Letters

profits – on the dates listed – to the United Way.

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OCTOBER – NOVEMBER 2013 $XVWUDOLD KDYHVHHQWKHLQHYLWDEOH FRQWUDFWLRQVFDXVHGE\GHÀDWLRQ DQGEDQNVFODPSLQJGRZQRQOHQG-­ LQJ5HPHPEHUWKHSDSHUFXUUHQF\ 0867FRPHIURPWKHJRYHUQPHQW LIDQ\RQHFDQH[SODLQDGLIIHUHQW VRXUFHIRULW,ZRXOGOLNHWRKHDU LW ,IWKHJRYHUQPHQWGRHVQRWSULQW HQRXJKFXUUHQF\UHODWLYHWRWKH VFRSHRIWKHHFRQRP\WKHYDOXH RIWKHFXUUHQF\JRHVXS7KLVPD\ VRXQGJRRGEXWZKHQWKHYDOXH RIFXUUHQF\JRHVXSUHODWLYHWRWKH YDOXHRIJRRGVDQGVHUYLFHV GHÀD-­ WLRQ SHRSOHDQGEXVLQHVVHVKRDUG FDVKUDWKHUWKDQVSHQGLW3HRSOH KRDUGLQJFDVKUDWKHUWKDQVSHQGLQJ LWFDXVHVWKHHFRQRP\WRVORZ 7KHIHGHUDOEXGJHWRIDFXUUHQF\ LVVXLQJQDWLRQFDQQRWEHFRPSDUHG WRDIDPLO\EXGJHW)DPLOLHVGRQRW KDYHWKHDELOLW\WRSULQWFXUUHQF\ DQGEDFNLWXSDQGWKLVGLVWLQFWLRQ LVFUXFLDODQGRYHUZKHOPLQJ,WLV FHUWDLQO\DSSURSULDWHWRGLVFXVV ZKDWWKHJRYHUQPHQWVKRXOGVSHQG LWVPRQH\RQEXWWKDWFRQYHUVD-­ WLRQQHHGVWRWDNHSODFHZLWKDQ XQGHUVWDQGLQJRIKRZ¿DWFXUUHQF\ V\VWHPVZRUN Raph  Worrick Cornwall

Oct. 20 – Nov. 10 Jessica’s (Swift House Inn) 25 Stewart Lane Middlebury • 388-9925

Oct. 21 – 25 Carol’s Hungry Mind Café 24 Merchant’s Row Middlebury • 388-0101

Oct. 23 – 25 Morgan’s Tavern (Middlebury Inn) 14 Court Square Middlebury • 388-4961

Oct. 29 – Nov. 1 Daily Chocolate 7 Green Street #2 Vergennes • 877-0087

Nov. 4 – 7 Fire & Ice 26 Seymour Street Middlebury • 388-7166

Nov. 5 – 7 The Storm Café 3 Mill Street Middlebury • 388-1063

Nov. 6 Two Brothers 86 Main Street Middlebury • 388-0208

Nov. 11 Green Peppers 10 Washington Street Middlebury • 388-3164

Nov. 12 Mr. Ups 25 Bakery Lane Middlebury • 388-6724

Nov. 13 Noonie Deli 157 Maple Street Middlebury • 388-0014

Nov. 13 Bobcat Café 5 Main Street Bristol • 453-3311

Nov. 19 American Flatbread 137 Maple Street Middlebury • 388-3300

Nov. 20 - 27 Tourterelle 3629 Ethan Allen Hwy. New Haven • 453-6309

Join us for some fun, great food, and support your local United Way. For more information, please visit www.UnitedWayAddisonCounty.org


PAGE  6  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

Ripton  bible  talk  shows   rabbinical  perspective RIPTON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Rebecca   Kneale   Gould   will   deliver   the   Victor   E.   Reichert   Bible   Talk   at   the   Ripton   Community   Church   on   Sunday,   Nov.  10.  The  talk  begins  at  4  p.m.   with   refreshments   and   discussion   following.   Her   title   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheep,   Shepherds   and   Torah:   The   Pastoral   as   More   than   Metaphor.â&#x20AC;?   It   will   be   in   the   form   of   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;rabbinical   dialogueâ&#x20AC;?   which  is  the  way  Torah  is  tradition-­ ally  taught. Gould  is  the  author  of  numerous   essays  and  a  book  titled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;At  Home   in   Nature:   Modern   Homesteading   and  Spiritual  Practice  in  America.â&#x20AC;?   She  also  is  a  monthly  contributor  to   the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ways  of  Seeingâ&#x20AC;?  series  in  the   Addison  Independent. Rabbi   Reichert   was   a   long   time   summer   resident   of   Ripton   who  

took   great   pride   and   interest   in   the   historic   Methodist   Church   on   Route   125.   More   than   a   half-­ century  ago  he  began  the  tradition   of   gathering   his   friends   and   the   public  and  giving  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;little  talkâ&#x20AC;?  on   one   of   the   books   of   the   Bible   at   the  end  of  each  summer  to  support   the  ministries  of  the  Ripton  United   Methodist   Church,   where   he   was   named  â&#x20AC;&#x153;rabbi  in  residence.â&#x20AC;? Since  his  death  in  1990,  Havurah,   the  Jewish  congregation  in  Addison   County,   and   the   United   Methodist   Church   in   Ripton   have   honored   his   memory   by   continuing   the   talks  in  his  name.  Following  Rabbi   Reichertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   tradition,   the   donation   plate  will  be  passed  before  the  talk,   the  money  will  be  counted  and  the   amount   in   the   collection   will   be   announced  at  the  end.

Obituary Guidelines The Addison Independent considers obituaries community news and does not charge to print them, as long as they follow certain guidelines. These guidelines are published on our web site: addisonindependent.com. Families may opt for unedited SDLGRELWXDULHVZKLFKDUHGHVLJQDWHGZLWK´š¾DWWKHHQG

ADDISON COUNTY

Obituaries Carolyn Memoe, 74, Brandon

BRANDON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Carolyn   F.   Memoe,   74,   died   unexpectedly   on   Tuesday,   Oct.   29,   at   the   Rutland   Regional   Medical   Center.   She   was   born   on  Aug.   28,   1939,   in   Rutland,   the   daughter   of   Mary   and   Francis   Brown   of   Brandon.   She    gradu-­ ated   from   Brandon   High   School   and   received   her   bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree   IURP 6SULQJÂżHOG &ROOHJH LQ Massachusetts. Carolyn   married   her   childhood   sweetheart,   Chuck   Memoe,   on   August   10,    1963.   They   settled   in   Brandon   and   remained   residents   for   the   rest   of   her   life,   raising   their   three   daughters,   Betsy,   Jackie   and   Ginny.   Carolyn   was   a    physical   educator   and   assistant   principal   at   Brandon   Elementary   School    and   Neshobe   School   for   over   30   years.   She   and   Charles   celebrated   their   50-­year   wedding   anniversary   this   past  August. Carolyn   loved   gardening,   being   outdoors,   feeding   and   watching   the   birds,    cheering   for   the   Red   Sox   and   the   Patriots,   watching   NCAA   basketball,    traveling,  taking  care  of  

her   many   pets,   socializing   with   her   IULHQGVSOD\LQJFDQDVWDDQGJROÂżQJ She   was   active   in   St.   Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Catholic  Church  throughout  her  life   and    served   the   greater   community   as   she   volunteered   at   the   Brandon   Public    Library,   and   was   a   member   of   the   Neshobe   School   Board   and   Brandon  Town  Recreation  Board. Survivors   include   her   husband,   Chuck  Memoe  of  Brandon;Íž  her  chil-­ dren,   Betsy   Memoe   of   Manchester;Íž   Jackie  Parks  and  her  husband  Kevin   and  grandchildren  Maggie  and  Grace   of   Essex,   and   Ginny   Memoe   of   Burlington;Íž  her  brother  Tom  Brown   and   his   wife   Judy   of   Brandon;Íž   and   her   brother   William   Brown   and   his   wife  Shelley  residing  in  Idaho. Calling   hours   took   place   at   the   Miller   and   Ketcham   Funeral   Home   in   Brandon   on   Sunday,   Nov.   3,   from   1-­4   p.m.  A   Mass   was   held   on   Monday,  Nov.  4,  at  11  a.m.  at  Saint   Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Catholic   Church   on   Carver   Street   in   Brandon,   followed   by   a   reception   at   the   Brandon   Inn.   A   private   family   interment   followed   the   service   at   the   family   lot   in   St.  

!

CAROLYN  MEMOE Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Cemetery. ,Q OLHX RI Ă&#x20AC;RZHUV PHPRULDO contributions   may   be   made   to   the   church  bell  restoration  project  at  St.   Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Catholic   Church   and/or   the   $GGLVRQ&RXQW\+XPDQH6RFLHW\¸

"

George Mahoney Jr., 85, Brandon

OPEN  H OUSE  W EEKEND   ͠ǧÍ&#x2122;Í&#x2DC;th  

Stop  by  and  work-­â&#x20AC;?out  or  take  a  class  for  FREE! Hours  and  Classes: Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;ÇĄÍ&#x2122;Í&#x2122;Č&#x20AC;Í ÇŁÍ?Â&#x192;Â?ÇŚÍ&#x;ÇŁÍ&#x203A;Í&#x2DC;Â&#x2019;Â?Ǥ Č&#x2C6;Í?ÇŁÍ&#x2122;Í?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Í ÇŁÍ&#x203A;Í&#x2DC;Â&#x192;Â?ÇŚFitness  Interval  Training Č&#x2C6;ÍĄÇŁÍ&#x153;Í?Â&#x192;Â?ÇŚYoga Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2014;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;ÇĄÍ&#x2122;Í&#x2122;Č&#x20AC;ÍĄÇŁÍ Â&#x192;Â?ÇŚÍ&#x2122;Í&#x161;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Í&#x153;ÇŚÍ&#x17E;Â&#x2019;Â?Ǥ Č&#x2C6;Í ÇŚÍĄÂ&#x192;Â?ÇŚSPINNING Č&#x2C6;Í ÇŁÍ&#x161;Í?ÇŚÍĄÇŁÍ&#x161;Í?Â&#x192;Â?ÇŚStrength  Training Č&#x2C6;ÍĄÇŁÍ&#x203A;Í&#x2DC;ÇŚÍ&#x2122;Í&#x2DC;ÇŁÍ&#x203A;Í&#x2DC;Â&#x192;Â?ÇŚFitness  Interval  Training Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;ÇĄÍ&#x2122;Í&#x2122;Č&#x20AC;Í&#x2122;Í&#x2DC;ÇŁÍ Â&#x192;Â?ÇŚÍ&#x2122;Í&#x161;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Í&#x153;ÇŚÍ&#x17E;Â&#x2019;Â?Ǥ Č&#x2C6;ÍĄÇŚÍ&#x2122;Í&#x2DC;ZUMBA  at  Holley  Hall

Join  Bristol  Fitness  This  Weekend  and  receive  a   FREE  One  Month  

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BRANDON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   George   M.   Mahoney  Jr.,  85,  died  Tuesday,  Oct.   29,   2013,   at   the   Rutland   Regional   Medical   Center.   He   was   born  Aug.   31,   1928,   in   Brandon,   the   son   of   George   M.   and   Leola   (Andrus)   Mahoney  Sr. He   received   his   early   education   in  Brandon  schools  and  lived  in  the   area  all  of  his  life.  He  was  employed   in   occupations   that   included   truck   driver  for  Merrill  Transport,  grader   operator   for   the   towns   of   Brandon   as   well   as   Poultney,   logger   with   Mitchell   Brothers   and   driver   for   Carraraâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  a  job  from  which  he  was   forced  to  retire  in  1985  after  suffer-­ ing  a  stroke.   He   served   in   the   U.S.   Army   GXULQJWKH.RUHDQ&RQĂ&#x20AC;LFW+HZDV a  member  of  American  Legion  Post   55  in  Brandon  and  a  life  member  of   the  Veterans  of  Foreign  Wars. He   is   survived   by   three   sons,   George   M.   Mahoney   III   and   his   wife,   Cheryl,   of   Middletown   Springs,   Harold   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Paulâ&#x20AC;?   Mahoney   and   his   wife,   Heather,   of   Forest   Dale,   and   Michael   Mahoney   and   his   wife,   Lisa,   of   Brandon;Íž   two   daughters,  Jeanne  Bergeron  and  her   husband,   Real,   of   Forest   Dale   and   Judy  Snow  and  her  husband,  Wayne,  

of  Leicester;͞  three  brothers,  Edward   Mahoney,   Kenneth   Mahoney   and   Alvin  Mahoney;͞  two  sisters,  Agnes   Reed  and  Hazel  Gibeault;͞  20  grand-­ children;͞   several   great-­grandchil-­ dren;͞   and   many   nieces,   nephews   and  cousins.   He   was   predeceased   by   his   wife,   the   former   Ruth   LaRock,   in   2010;͞   a  son,  Steven  Mahoney;͞  two  broth-­ ers,   Arthur   Mahoney   and   Robert   Mahoney;͞   and   three   sisters,   Lillian   Martin,   Frances   Reed   and   Grace   5LYHUV*HRUJH¿QLVKHGRXWKLVOLIH living  happily  in  the  loving  care  of   his   daughter   Judy   and   her   husband   Wayne. A   service   in   celebration   of   his   life   will   be   held   Tuesday,   Nov.   5,   2013,   at   10   a.m.   in   the   Miller   and   Ketcham   Funeral   Home,   26   Franklin   St.,   Brandon.   Reverend   Robert  Bove,  pastor  of  the  Brandon   %DSWLVW &KXUFK ZLOO RI¿FLDWH $ reception  for  family  and  friends  will   follow  at  American  Legion  Post  55   in  Brandon. The   graveside   committal   and   burial   service   will   be   Friday,   Nov.   8,   2013,   at   10   a.m.   in   Pine   Hill   Cemetery  in  Brandon  with  Reverend   Bove  offering  the  committal  prayers.   Military  honors  will  be  accorded  at  

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GEORGE  MAHONEY that   time   by   members   of  American   Legion   Post   55,   Brandon   and   the   Vermont  Army  National  Guard. Friends   may   call   at   the   Miller   and   Ketcham   Funeral   Home   on   Monday,  Nov.  4,  2013  from  5-­8  p.m.   Memorial   contributions   may   be   made   to   the   Rutland   Area   Visiting   Nurse   Association   and   Hospice,   7   Albert   Cree   Drive,   Rutland,   VT   05701.

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  7

Farm  aid (Continued  from  Page  1) his   small   business   taps   can   pay   off   for  the  public  at  large. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   smart   state   investment   on   behalf   of   the   taxpayer   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   they   may   see  quite  the  return  on  investment,â&#x20AC;?   Suhr  said. Brady   pointed   out   that   success-­ ful  farming  businesses  also  keep  the   land  open. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   happy   Champlain ��  Or-­ chards  has  been  investing  in  and  im-­ proving   the   rural   landscape   in   Ver-­ mont,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. During   a   recent   tour   of   Addison   County   farms   sponsored   by   the   USDA   and   the   Vermont  Agency   of   Agriculture,   Suhr   showed   guests   how  his  small  business  operates  and   cataloged  the  improvements  he  and   Scott  have  made. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  got  assistance  from  the  Natu-­ ral   Resources   Conservation   Service   (a  division  of  the  USDA)  to  put  in  an   irrigation  system  as  well  as  a  waste-­ water  pump  station,  using  the  EQIP   program,â&#x20AC;?  Suhr  said.   EQIP,  or  the  Environmental  Qual-­ ity   Incentives   Program,   provides   ÂżQDQFLDODVVLVWDQFHIRUIDUPVWRLP-­ prove  their  conservation  practices. Champlain   Orchards   also   ben-­ HÂżWHG IURP D PXOWL\HDU IDUP ODERU housing  loan  that  helps  farmers  pro-­ vide   housing   for   workers.   Cham-­ plain   Orchards   borrowed   $220,000   for  40  years  with  1  percent  interest. Champlain   Orchards   is   planning   more   improvements   on   the   farm.   It   has   been   awarded   a   mini-­grant   of   several   thousand   dollars   to   build   greenhouses   to   extend   the   season   for  vegetable  crops.  The  Natural  Re-­ sources   Conservation   Service   gave   the  farm  loans  for  real  estate  and  in-­ frastructure  improvements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   a   large   warehouse   that   will  become  refrigerated  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  just   a   shell   now,â&#x20AC;?   Suhr   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   pro-­

cessing  room,  which  has  been  insu-­ lated  and  plumbed,  is  being  used.â&#x20AC;? The   17,000-­square-­foot   ware-­ house,  which  can  hold  86,000  bush-­ els,  will  be  renovated  in  two  to  three   years.  A  separate  processing  area  is   6,000  square  feet,  with  an  additional    VTXDUH IHHW RI RIÂżFH VSDFH The   entire   project   will   cost   in   the   neighborhood  of  $1  million. Âł,WÂśV D ODUJH ÂżQDQFLDO XQGHUWDN-­ ing,â&#x20AC;?  Suhr  said. An  additional  $75,000  grant  from   the  Working  Lands  Enterprise  Fund,   a  state  program  within  the  Vermont   Council   on   Rural   Development,   is   aiding  in  that. Champlain   Orchards   found   a   friend   in   John   Ryan,   director   of   Agency   of   Agricultureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Vermont   Agriculture   Development   Program.   Ryan,   through   an   initiative   funded   by   the   Vermont   Sustainable   Jobs   Fund,   was   able   to   take   the   orchard   on  as  a  client  and  help  the  farm  em-­ SOR\ PRUH HIÂżFLHQW DQG FRQVHUYD-­ tion-­minded   practices.   Ryan   visited   the   farm   every   few   weeks   to   meet   with   the   staff   to   talk   about   ways   to   improve. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  give  us  homework  to  work   on  between  meetings,â&#x20AC;?  Suhr  said. Suhr   described   the   relationship   between   the   Vermont   Agriculture   Development   Program   and   Cham-­ plain   Orchards   as   a   win-­win   in   which  his  business  gets  support  and   LQWXUQRWKHUDUHDEXVLQHVVHVEHQHÂżW as  well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  do  support  other  farms  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  we   sell  bulk  cider  to  other  farms  to  add   value,   and   we   buy   fruit   from   other   farms,â&#x20AC;?  Suhr  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  this  program   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  help  just  us.â&#x20AC;? Champlain   Orchards   produces   around  300,000  gallons  of  cider  an-­ nually,   and   is   seeking   to   increase   production  in  the  future. It  has  also  expanded  its  hard  cider  

BILL   SUHR,   CO-­OWNER   of   Champlain  Orchards  in  Shoreham,  gives  a  tour  of  his  orchard  and  facilities   during  a  recent  Addison  County  farm  tour  sponsored  by  the  USDA  and  the  State  Agency  of  Agriculture  late   last  moth. Independent  photo/Zach  Despart

production.   The   farm   recently   de-­ veloped  a  new  ice  cider  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  sweet,   naturally  concentrated  ice  cider  best   served   like   a   dessert   wine.   The   or-­ chard   recently   bought   an   18-­head   bottler   at   an   auction,   replacing   the   ÂżYHKHDG ERWWOHU WKDW GDWHG EDFN WR the  1950s.  In  theory,  this  will  enable   Champlain   Orchards   to   quadruple   hard  cider  production. Recently   the   orchard   has   also   in-­ corporated   high-­density   planting   of  its  trees,  a  concept  developed  by   Cornell  University  researchers.  This   practice,   where   trees   are   planted   three  feet  apart,  and  rows  are  12  feet   apart,  allows  apples  to  be  harvested   PRUHVDIHO\DQGHIÂżFLHQWO\DVZRUN-­ ers  do  not  have  to  continuously  scale   ladders,  Suhr  explained. This   dense   planting   operation   was  made  possible  through  a  Work-­

ing   Lands   Enterprise   Fund   grant.   Suhr  said  it  was  important  to  him  to   both  produce  and  bottle  his  product   in   Vermont,   instead   of   sending   his   apples  elsewhere  to  turn  them  into  a   value  added  product. Âł1RZZHFDQPRUHHIÂżFLHQWO\UXQ the   hard   cidery,   keep   food   in   Ver-­ mont   and   redistribute   it   economi-­ cally,â&#x20AC;?  Suhr  said.   Unlike  at  many  other  farms  in  the   state,  which  have  been  operated  for   generations  by  a  single  family,  Suhr   and  his  wife  got  into  farming  just  15   years  ago,  in  1998.  Instead  of  being   IRUFHGWRÂżJXUHRXWWKHLQVDQGRXWV

of  the  business  simply  on  their  own,   the  state  was  eager  to  lend  a  helping   hand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  sooner  a  young  business  can   HGXFDWH WKHPVHOYHV DQG EH SURÂżW-­ able,   the   better,â&#x20AC;?   Suhr   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why   ZRXOGZHZDLW\HDUVWRÂżJXUHWKH darn  thing  out?â&#x20AC;? While   many   USDA   programs   EHQHÂżWGDLU\SURJUDPV6XKUVDLGKH hopes   more   are   geared   toward   fruit   farmers  in  the  future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   grateful   for   things   like   funding  for  greenhouses,  but  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  ad-­ vocate  for  more  support  for  the  fruit   industry  in  the  future,â&#x20AC;?  Suhr  said.


PAGE  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

communitycalendar 7ZLVW 2œ :RRO 6SLQQLQJ *XLOG PHHWLQJ LQ Middlebury.   Thursday,   Nov.   7,   7-­9   p.m.,   American  Legion.  General  meeting  and  spinning.   Bring  your  projects,  knitting  needles  and/or  spin-­ ning  wheels.  Info:  453-­5960.   ³6KUHN´RQVWDJHLQ0LGGOHEXU\  Thursday,  Nov.  7,   7:30-­9:30  p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  The  Company,   a   new   resident   company   at  THT   specializing   in   PXVLFDOV SUHVHQWV ³6KUHN´ WKH PXVLFDO 1RY 7-­17,  starring  Leigh  Guptill  in  the  lead  role,  with   over  a  dozen  other  local  performers.  Tim  Guiles   is   the   director   and   musical   director.  Tickets   $23   adults,  $18  for  children  12  and  under,  for  sale  at   WKH 7+7 ER[ RI¿FH  RU ZZZWRZQKDOO-­ theater.org,  or  at  the  door,  if  available.  

Nov

8

Latin  jazz 7+($1'5,&6(9(5$1&(4XDUWHWFRPHVWR0DLQLQ0LGGOHEXU\RQ7KXUVGD\1RY IRUDQHYHQLQJRIKLJKO\VRSKLVWLFDWHGMD]]LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHGE\PHORGLHVDQGUK\WKPVIURP $IUR&XEDQ%UD]LOLDQDQGWUDGLWLRQDO/DWLQ$PHULFDQPXVLF7KHVKRZVWDUWVDWSP

Nov

5

TUESDAY

Foot  care  and  blood  pressure  clinic   in   Brandon.   Tuesday,   Nov.   5,   10   a.m.-­noon,   Forest   Dale   Senior   Center.   The   Rutland  Area   Visiting   Nurse  Association   &   Hospice  is  offering  blood  pressure  checks  for  $2   and  foot  care  for  $10.  Info:  802-­775-­0568.   +XPDQ WUDIÂżFNLQJ WDON DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Tuesday,   Nov.   5,   4:30-­6:30   p.m.,   Axinn   229.   Christina  Bain,  an  activist  and  former  director  of   the   Massachusetts   Commission   on   Sexual   and   'RPHVWLF9LROHQFHDGGUHVVHVKXPDQWUDIÂżFNLQJ LQWKH863DUWRI6WRS7UDIÂżFNÂśVÂł+XPDQV1RW for  Saleâ&#x20AC;?  fall  symposium,  Nov.  4-­8.   Âł%RUQ ,QWR %URWKHOV´ VFUHHQLQJ DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Tuesday,   Nov.   5,   7-­9   p.m.,   McCardell   Bicentennial  Hall,  Room  216.  Documentary  that   IROORZVWZRÂżOPPDNHUVDVWKH\JHWWRNQRZWKH children   of   the   prostitutes   working   in   the   red   light   district   of   Sonagchi,   Calcutta.   Part   of   Stop   7UDIÂżFNÂśVÂł+XPDQV1RWIRU6DOH´IDOOV\PSRVLXP Nov.  4-­8.  

Nov

6

WEDNESDAY

+XPDQ WUDIÂżFNLQJ WDON DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Wednesday,   Nov.   6,   4:30-­6:30   p.m.,   Hillcrest   103.   Rebecca  Kantar,  CEO  of  Minga,  speaks.  Minga   LVDQRQSURÂżWGHGLFDWHGWRFRPEDWLQJWKHJOREDO child  sex  trade  by  harnessing  the  power  of  teens.   3DUWRI6WRS7UDIÂżFNÂśVÂł+XPDQV1RWIRU6DOH´IDOO symposium,  Nov.  4-­8.   $UW RSHQLQJ LQ 0LGGOHEXU\   Wednesday,   Nov.   6,   5-­7  p.m.,  51  Main.  November  Artist  of  the  Month   Bob   Gold   shows   digital   multi-­media   prints   from   his  Vermont,  Urban  and  Eclectic  collections.  Live   music   by   rock   and   rastabilly   singer/songwriter   Rick  Redington.  Info:  www.go51main.com.   :LQWHU VSRUWV LQMXU\ SUHYHQWLRQ ZRUNVKRS LQ Middlebury.   Wednesday,   Nov.   6,   5:30-­7:30   p.m.,   Middlebury   Fitness.   Matt   Horne   of   Wells   Physical  Therapy  will  provide  some  background   on  anatomy,  explain  how  common  winter  sports   injuries  occur,  and  suggest  some  exercises  that   could  help  reduce  the  risk.  Sign  up  at  388-­3744.   Âł3D\LQJ IRU &ROOHJH´ SUHVHQWDWLRQ LQ %ULVWRO   Wednesday,  Nov.  6,  6-­8:30  p.m.,  Mount  Abraham   Union   High   School   cafeteria.   VSAC   offers   this   free  presentation  on  how  to  pay  for  college,  how   WRÂżQGDQGDSSO\IRUÂżQDQFLDODLGDQGPRUH2SHQ to  the  public.   Âł5HDGLQJ+HQU\-DPHV´OHFWXUHLQ0LGGOHEXU\   Wednesday,  Nov.  6,  7-­9  p.m.,  Ilsley  Library.  UVM   professor  Daniel  Fogel  considers  the  enormous   LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRIQRYHOLVW+HQU\-DPHVRQRXUFXOWXUH DQG KRZ WRGD\ÂśV UHDGHUV PLJKW DSSURDFK KLV work.  A  Vermont  Humanities  Council  event.  Free.  

Info:  388-­4095.   +LVWRULFDO VRFLHW\ PHHWLQJ LQ 6KRUHKDP   Wednesday,   Nov.   6,   7-­9   p.m.,   Shoreham   Elementary   School.   The   Shoreham   Historical   Society   will   hold   a   short   meeting   and   then   welcome  guest  speaker  Paul  Saenger,  captain  of   WKH&DULOORQZKRZLOOWDONDERXW/DUUDEHHœV3RLQW Refreshments  served.   ³7KH 3UDFWLFH RI WKH :LOG´ VFUHHQLQJ DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Wednesday,   Nov.   6,   7-­9   SP 'DQD $XGLWRULXP ³7KH 3UDFWLFH RI WKH :LOG$&RQYHUVDWLRQZLWK*DU\6Q\GHUDQG-LP +DUULVRQ´ 7KH PLQXWH ¿OP IROORZV 6Q\GHU D poet  and  naturalist,  and  Harrison,  a  novelist,  as   they  wander  along  trails  on  the  California  coast   DQG GHEDWH QXPHURXV WRSLFV 4  $ ZLWK ¿OP-­ PDNHU-RKQ+HDOH\DIWHUWKH¿OP)UHH 'RPHVWLF VH[ WUDI¿FNLQJ WDON DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Wednesday,   Nov.   6,   8-­10   p.m.,   &URVVURDGV &DIp 6WDF\ -HZHO /HZLV IRXQG RI ³:KR,V6WROHQ´ FUHDWLYH DUWV WURXSH DQG &(2 RI -HZHOO 3URGXFWLRQV VSHDNV /HZLV LV D VXUYLYRU RI GRPHVWLF VH[ WUDI¿FNLQJ DQG D SRZHUKRXVH in   the   movement   against   modern-­day   slavery.   3DUWRI6WRS7UDI¿FNœV³+XPDQV1RWIRU6DOH´IDOO symposium,  Nov.  4-­8.  

Nov

7

FRIDAY

%RRN UHOHDVH SDUW\ LQ 0LGGOHEXU\   Friday,   Nov.   8,   4-­5:30   p.m.,   Vermont   Book   Shop.   Charlotte   author   Megan   3ULFH VKDUHV KHU QHZHVW ERRN Âł0DLQH :LOG Adventures  of  Fish  &  Game  Wardens.â&#x20AC;?  Also  on   hand  will  be  retired  Maine  game  warden  Parker   Tripp,  some  of  whose  anecdotes  are  included  in   the  book.  Info:  388-­2061.   +XPDQ WUDIÂżFNLQJ WDON DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Friday,  Nov.  8,  4:30-­6:30  p.m.,  Axinn  229.  Melissa   Albanese   will   speak.   She   has   worked   as   the   communications  and  fundraising  adviser  for  the   NGO   ECPAT   Cambodia   (End   Child   Prostitution   $EXVHDQG7UDIÂżFNLQJLQ&DPERGLD 3DUWRI6WRS 7UDIÂżFNÂśVÂł+XPDQV1RWIRU6DOH´IDOOV\PSRVLXP Nov.  4-­8.   ([KLELW RSHQLQJ UHFHSWLRQ LQ %UDQGRQ   Friday,   Nov.   8,   5-­7   p.m.,   Brandon   Artists   Guild.   &HOHEUDWLQJWKHRSHQLQJRIÂł6PDOO7UHDVXUHV%LJ Impressions,â&#x20AC;?   an   exhibit   of   small-­scale   art   and   ÂżQH FUDIW E\ PHPEHUV RI WKH JXLOG 2Q H[KLELW WKURXJK -DQ  ,QIR  RU ZZZEUDQ-­ donartistsguild.org.   :RRGÂżUHG SL]]D VDOH LQ 5LSWRQ   Friday,   Nov.   8,   5-­7:30   p.m.,   Ripton   Elementary   School.   Wood-­ ÂżUHG LQFK SL]]DV PDGH RQ VLWH 'LQH LQ RU take  out.  Cost:  $12  cheese,  $15  pepperoni,  $17   harvest  special  (roasted  beets  and  winter  squash,   RQLRQ 9HUPRQW FKHYUH DQG KHUEV  3URFHHGV EHQHÂżW )ULHQGV RI 5LSWRQ 6FKRRO 3OHDVH SUH order  by  3  p.m.  on  Friday,  Nov.  8.  Info:  388-­2208   or  wleeds@addisoncentralsu.org.   'RQNH\EDVNHWEDOOIXQGUDLVHULQ%ULVWRO  Friday,   Nov.   8,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Mount   Abraham   Union   High  School  gym.  MAUHS  senior  boys  vs.  senior   girls.   A   Mount   Abe   PTO   fundraiser   to   support  

THURSDAY

Âł)LQDQFLQJ WKH :RUNLQJ Landscapeâ&#x20AC;?   conference   in   Middlebury.  Thursday,  Nov.  7,  8:30  a.m.-­ 4:30  p.m.,  Middlebury  American  Legion.  Addison   County   small-­business   owners   and   entrepre-­ neurs  are  invited  to  pitch  their  businesses  to  the   regional   capital   community.   Choose   workshops   for   early-­stage   or   established   businesses.   Info:   http://acornvt.org/fwl2013.   +XPDQWUDIÂżFNLQJV\PSRVLXPNH\QRWHDGGUHVV DW0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJH  Thursday,  Nov.  7,  4:30-­ 6:30  p.m.,  Dana  Auditorium.  E.  Benjamin  Skinner   LV WKH DXWKRU RI Âł$ &ULPH 6R 0RQVWURXV )DFH WR)DFHZLWK0RGHUQ'D\6ODYHU\´DQGWKHÂżUVW person   to   witness   negotiations   for   the   sale   of   human   beings   on   four   continents.   Part   of   Stop   7UDIÂżFNÂśVÂł+XPDQV1RWIRU6DOH´IDOOV\PSRVLXP Nov.  4-­8.   Âł3D\LQJIRU&ROOHJH´SUHVHQWDWLRQLQ0LGGOHEXU\   Thursday,  Nov.  7,  6:30-­8  p.m.,  Middlebury  Union   High   School   auditorium.   VSAC   offers   this   free   presentation   on   how   to   pay   for   college,   how   to   ÂżQGDQGDSSO\IRUÂżQDQFLDODLGDQGPRUH2SHQ to  the  public.   Âł9LWR$FFRQFL:D\6WDWLRQ´LOOXVWUDWHGOHFWXUHDW 0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJH  Thursday,  Nov.  7,  7-­9  p.m.,   Dana   Auditorium.   Cameron   Visiting   Artist   and   $UFKLWHFW 9LWR $FFRQFL GLVFXVVHV 0LGGOHEXU\ÂśV Âł:D\6WDWLRQ,´LQUHODWLRQWRKLVHVWDEOLVKPHQWRI the  Acconci  Studio  in  1988  and  to  recent  public,   private,  national  and  international  projects.  Free.   Info:  443-­3168.  

Another  manâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   treasure â&#x20AC;&#x153;ARRANGED   MARRIAGE,â&#x20AC;?   A   sculp-­ WXUH RI IRXQG PDWHULDOV E\ 'LFN :HLV LVSDUWRIÂł<RXU-XQN0\$UWÂśDJURXS H[KLELWRSHQLQJ1RYDWWKH&RPSDVV 0XVLF DQG$UWV &HQWHU LQ %UDQGRQ$Q DUWLVWVÂśUHFHSWLRQZLOOEHKHOG6DWXUGD\ 1RYDWWKH&0$&

student  enrichment  programs.  Baked  goods  and   Mount  Abe  apparel  for  sale.  Advance  tickets,  $7,   DW 0DUWLQÂśV +DUGZDUH RU WKH 0RXQW $EH VFKRRO RIÂżFH7LFNHWVDWWKHGRRU Âł6KUHN´ RQ VWDJH LQ 0LGGOHEXU\   Friday,   Nov.   8,   7:30-­9:30  p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  The  Company,   a   new   resident   company   at  THT   specializing   in   PXVLFDOV SUHVHQWV Âł6KUHN´ WKH PXVLFDO 1RY 7-­17,  starring  Leigh  Guptill  in  the  lead  role,  with   over  a  dozen  other  local  performers.  Tim  Guiles   is   the   director   and   musical   director.  Tickets   $23   adults,  $18  for  children  12  and  under,  for  sale  at   WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  RU ZZZWRZQKDOO-­ theater.org,  or  at  the  door,  if  available.   &ORVLQJFHUHPRQ\RIKXPDQWUDIÂżFNLQJV\PSR-­ VLXP DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Friday,   Nov.   8,   8-­10  p.m.,  Axinn  Abernethy  room.  An  a  cappella   FHUHPRQ\WRFORVHRXW6WRS7UDIÂżFNÂśVÂł+XPDQV Not  for  Saleâ&#x20AC;?  fall  symposium.   5RWDU\  'LQQHU 'DQFH DQG UDIĂ&#x20AC;H LQ Middlebury.  Friday,  Nov.  8,  8-­10  p.m.,  Middlebury   American  Legion.  Dance  the  night  away  to  music   by  the  Horse  Traders.  A  Middlebury  Rotary  Club   IXQGUDLVHU WR EHQHÂżW &DPS 7D.XP7D 0DNH A-­Wish   Foundation,   MVAA,   CSAC   and   other   ORFDO QRQSURÂżWV 7LFNHWV  HDFK DYDLODEOH DW Countryside  Carpet,  the  Middlebury  Inn,  Autumn   Gold,  or  at  the  door  or  from  any  Rotarian.  

Nov

9

SATURDAY

0DUVK PHDGRZ DQG JUDVV-­ ODQG ZLOGOLIH ZDON LQ 0LGGOHEXU\   Saturday,   Nov.   9,   8-­10   a.m.,   Otter   View   Park   and   Hurd   Grassland.   A   monthly   OCAS-­ MALT  event,  inviting  community  members  to  help   survey  birds  and  other  wildlife.  Meet  leader  Ron   Payne   at   Otter   View   Park   parking   area,   corner   of  Weybridge  Street  and  Pulp  Mill  Bridge  Road.   Shorter  and  longer  routes  possible.  Come  for  all   or  part  of  the  walk.  Beginning  birders  welcome.   Info:  388-­1007  or  388-­6829.   Ladies   Auxiliary   craft   fair   in   Bristol.   Saturday,   Nov.   9,   9   a.m.-­3   p.m.,   Bristol  American   Legion.   Info:  453-­3863.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toscaâ&#x20AC;?  live  in  HD  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Nov.   9,  12:55-­3:55  p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  The  Met   2SHUDEURDGFDVWVDOLYHSHUIRUPDQFHRI3XFFLQLÂśV famous  opera.  Starring  soprano  Patricia  Racette   and   tenor   Roberto   Alagna.   Tickets   $24/$10   VWXGHQWV DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH 382-­9222   or   www.townhalltheater.org,   or   at   the   door.   Âł$PRXU´ RQ VFUHHQ DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Saturday,   Nov.   9,   3-­5   p.m.,   Dana   Auditorium.   The   2013   winner   of   the   Oscar   for   Best   Foreign   /DQJXDJH )LOP Âł$PRXU´ H[DPLQHV WKH ERQG RI love  in  the  face  of  old  age.  In  French  with  English   VXEWLWOHV3DUWRIWKHFROOHJHÂśV,QWHUQDWLRQDO)LOP Series.  May  not  be  suitable  for  small  children.   Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   reception   in   Brandon.   Saturday,   Nov.   9,   5-­8  p.m.,  Compass  Music  and  Arts  Center.  CMAC   SUHVHQWVÂł<RXU-XQN0\$UW7KH7UDQVIRUPDWLRQ of   Found   Objects.â&#x20AC;?   Over   a   dozen   Vermont   and   1HZ <RUN DUWLVWV DUH UHSUHVHQWHG ([KLELW UXQV Nov.  8-­Dec.  15.  Info:  www.cmacvt.org.   /DVDJQD VXSSHU LQ 9HUJHQQHV   Saturday,   Nov.   9,   5-­6:30   p.m.,   Vergennes   United   Methodist   Church.   Lasagna,   green   beans,   salad,   Italian   bread,  dessert  and  beverage,  served  buffet  style.   Adults   $8,   children   $4.   Takeout   available.   Info:   877-­3150.   /D]\PDQÂśV OREVWHU DQG EDNHG KDP GLQQHU LQ 6KRUHKDP  Saturday,  Nov.  9,  5-­8  p.m.,  Shoreham   Congregational   Church.   Annual   event   with   two   seatings:   5   and   6:30   p.m.   Both   meals   include   baked  potato,  salad,  winter  squash,  homemade   rolls,  beverages  and  dessert.  Lobster  dinner  $20,   ham   dinner   $10.   Reserve   choice   of   entree   and   seating  preference  at  897-­2780.   Empty  Bowl  Dinner  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Nov.   9,  6-­8  p.m.,  Middlebury  United  Methodist  Church.   7ZHQW\VHFRQGDQQXDOIXQGUDLVHUWRÂżJKWKXQJHU at   the   local   level.   Sponsored   by   local   potters,   bakeries,  farms  and  orchards.  Tickets,  $25,  avail-­ able   at   the   Middlebury   Natural   Foods   Co-­op,   include   meal   and   handmade   bowl.   Proceeds   from  ticket  sales  go  to  local  food  shelves.   &RQWUD GDQFH LQ &RUQZDOO   Saturday,   Nov.   9,   7-­9:30  p.m.,  Cornwall  Town  Hall.  Brendan  Taaffe   calling  to  live  music  by  Red  Dog  Riley.  Cost  $5   per  person.  All  are  welcome.  Info:  462-­3722.   Âł6KUHN´RQVWDJHLQ0LGGOHEXU\  Saturday,  Nov.  9,   7:30-­9:30  p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  The  Company,  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  9

communitycalendar

a   new   resident   company   at   THT   specializing   in   musicals,   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shrek,â&#x20AC;?   the   musical,   Nov.   7-­17,   starring   Leigh   Guptill   in   the   lead   role,   with   over   a   dozen   other   local   performers.  Tim   Guiles   is   the   director   and   musical   director.   Tickets   $23   adults,  $18  for  children  12  and  under,  for  sale  at   WKH7+7ER[RIÂżFHRUZZZWRZQKDOOWKH-­ ater.org,  or  at  the  door,  if  available.   Big   Spike   Bluegrass   in   concert   in   Lincoln.   6DWXUGD\ 1RY   SP %XUQKDP +DOO 7UDGLWLRQDOEOXHJUDVVFRQFHUWSDUWRIWKH%XUQKDP Music  Series.  Tickets  $8  adults,  $3  for  seniors  and   FKLOGUHQDYDLODEOHDWWKHGRRU,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;Amourâ&#x20AC;?   on   screen   at   Middlebury   College.   6DWXUGD\ 1RY   SP 'DQD $XGLWRULXP 7KH  ZLQQHU RI WKH 2VFDU IRU %HVW )RUHLJQ /DQJXDJH )LOP Âł$PRXU´ H[DPLQHV WKH ERQG RI ORYHLQWKHIDFHRIROGDJH,Q)UHQFKZLWK(QJOLVK VXEWLWOHV 3DUW RI WKH FROOHJHÂśV ,QWHUQDWLRQDO )LOP Series.  May  not  be  suitable  for  small  children.  

Nov

10

SUNDAY

St.   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Parish   breakfast   in   Vergennes.6XQGD\1RYDP 6W 3HWHUÂśV 3DULVK +DOO (JJV KRWFDNHV )UHQFK WRDVW EDFRQ VDXVDJH DQG PRUH$GXOWV  VHQLRUV  NLGV   NLGV XQGHU  IUHH IDPLOLHVRIÂżYHRUPRUHUDIĂ&#x20AC;HIRUDIUHH EUHDNIDVW'RQÂśWIRUJHWWREULQJ\RXUUHWXUQDEOHVWR support  the  Youth  Ministry  bottle  drive.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shrekâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Middlebury.6XQGD\1RY 2-­4  p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  The  Company,  a  new   resident  company  at  THT  specializing  in  musicals,   presents  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shrek,â&#x20AC;?  the  musical,  Nov.  7-­17,  starring   Leigh   Guptill   in   the   lead   role,   with   over   a   dozen   other  local  performers.  Tim  Guiles  is  the  director   and  musical  director.  Tickets  $23  adults,  $18  for   children   12   and   under,   for   sale   at   the   THT   box   RIÂżFHRUZZZWRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJRUDW the  door,  if  available.   Holiday  decoration  demonstration  in  Middlebury.   6XQGD\ 1RY   SP +HQU\ 6KHOGRQ 0XVHXP /\QQH %RLH IRUPHU SUHVLGHQW RI WKH Middlebury   Garden   Club,   will   show   participants   how   to   create   three   types   of   holiday   decoration   XVLQJSULPDULO\QDWXUDOPDWHULDOVD7KDQNVJLYLQJ table   decoration,   a   holiday   topiary   and   a   winter   ZUHDWK &RVW   IRU PXVHXP PHPEHUV +DQGRXWV LQFOXGHG ,QIR DQG UHVHUYDWLRQV 388-­2117.   Singer   Pur   in   concert   at   Middlebury   College.   6XQGD\ 1RY   SP 0DKDQH\ &HQWHU IRU WKH$UWV7KLVLQWHUQDWLRQDOO\DFFODLPHGDFDSSHOOD HQVHPEOH SHUIRUPV D SURJUDP FDOOHG Âł)LHOGV RI *ROG9RFDO0XVLF7KURXJKWKH&HQWXULHV´7LFNHWV ,QIR

Nov

11

Nov

13

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hanekeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Endgame   in   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Amourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   lecture   at   Middlebury   College.   0RQGD\ 1RY   SP $[LQQ Center,  Room  232.  Presented  by  Garrett  Stewart,   WKH-DPHV2)UHHGPDQSURIHVVRURIOLWHUDWXUHDW the  University  of  Iowa  and  author  of  nine  books  on   WRSLFVUDQJLQJIURP9LFWRULDQOLWHUDWXUHDQGSDLQW-­ LQJ WR DUWJDOOHU\ LQVWDOODWLRQV DQG FLQHPD )UHH ,QIR

WEDNESDAY

GED   testing   in   Middlebury.   :HGQHVGD\1RYDPSP 9HUPRQW $GXOW /HDUQLQJ  %RDUGPDQ 6W3UHUHJLVWUDWLRQUHTXLUHG&DOOIRULQIR DQGWRUHJLVWHU)UHHWXWRULQJVHUYLFHVDYDLODEOH Sheldon   Museum   annual   meeting,   dinner   and   talk   LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ :HGQHVGD\ 1RY   SP 0LGGOHEXU\ ,QQ +LVWRULDQ $UWKXU % &RKQ ZLOO SUHVHQWÂł7KH:DURI7KH%LFHQWHQQLDORID )RUJRWWHQ :DU´ 3UHVHQWDWLRQ IROORZV WKH DQQXDO PHHWLQJDQGGLQQHU7LFNHWV$GYDQFHUHJLV-­ WUDWLRQUHTXLUHGE\1RY7LFNHWVDYDLODEOHDWWKH Sheldon  Museum  or  online  at  www.henrysheldon-­ PXVHXPRUJ,QIR Turkey   Bingo   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   Nov.   SP0LGGOHEXU\$PHULFDQ/HJLRQ6W %HUQDGHWWHÂśV DQQXDO 7XUNH\ %LQJR 4XLFNLHV DW SPIROORZHGDWE\UHJXODUSOD\JDPHV IRUWXUNH\VDQGFDVKSUL]HV)RUWKHEHQHÂżWRI6W Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  School  by  the  Knights  of  Columbus.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Alchemistry  pHun!â&#x20AC;?  chemistry  demonstrations   at   Middlebury   College.   Wednesday,   Nov.   13,   SP0F&DUGHOO%LFHQWHQQLDO+DOO7KH FROOHJHÂśV&KHPLVWU\DQG%LRFKHPLVWU\'HSDUWPHQW invites   the   community   to   an   exciting   demonstra-­ WLRQ RI FKHPLFDO H[SHULPHQWV $SSURSULDWH IRU FKLOGUHQ$GPLVVLRQLVIUHHEXWVHDWLQJLVOLPLWHG GRRUV FORVH ZKHQ URRP LV IXOO ,QIR MPD\HU# PLGGOHEXU\HGXRU Historical   society   meeting   in   Ferrisburgh.   :HGQHVGD\ 1RY   SP )HUULVEXUJK +LVWRULFDO6RFLHW\5RXWH(OLVH*X\HWWHGHWDLOV WKH HDUO\ ELUDFLDO KLVWRU\ RI 9HUPRQW IRFXVLQJ on   black   farming   communities   in   Hinesburg   and   +XQWLQJWRQ)UHH$OODUHZHOFRPH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cow  Power:  The  Filmâ&#x20AC;?  screening  at  Middlebury   College. :HGQHVGD\ 1RY   SP 'DQD $XGLWRULXP)UHHVFUHHQLQJDERXWWKHZRUOGÂśVRQO\ utility  offering  electricity  created  from  cow  manure.   7KH PLQXWH ÂżOP ZLOO EH IROORZHG E\ D 4 $ ZLWKGLUHFWRU$OOLVRQ*LOOHWWH0DULH$XGHWRI%OXH 6SUXFH )DUP LQ %ULGSRUW 'DYLG 'XQQ RI *UHHQ 0RXQWDLQ 3RZHU DQG -DFN %\UQH RI 0LGGOHEXU\ College.  

Nov

MONDAY

FIND US ON

Addison   County   Right   to   Life   meeting   in   Middlebury.  Monday,  Nov.  11,  7-­8  p.m.,  St.  Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   3DULVK+DOO0HHWLQJLQFOXGHVHOHFWLRQRIRIÂżFHUV 9LVLWRUVZHOFRPH,QIRRU/3DTXHWWH# aol.com.   Book  club  meeting  in  Bridport.  Monday,  Nov.  11,   SP&DUO1RUWRQ+LJKZD\'HSDUWPHQWFRQIHU-­ HQFHURRP'LVFXVVLQJÂł$7UHDFKHURXV3DUDGLVH´ E\ +HQQLQJ 0DQNHOO $OO LQWHUHVWHG UHDGHUV DUH ZHOFRPH,QIR

14

THURSDAY

Lecture   on   Grant   Wood   at   Middlebury   College.   Thursday,   Nov.     SP 0DKDQH\ &HQWHU IRU WKH $UWV $PHULFDQ DUW GHDOHU -DPHV 0DURQH\ gives   an   illustrated   lecture   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hiding   in   Plain   6LJKW'HFRGLQJWKH+RPRHURWLF,PDJHU\RI*UDQW :RRG´)UHH,QIR CSAC   annual   meeting   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   1RY   SP &6$& KHDGTXDUWHUV 

Love  endures (00$18(//(5,9$3/$<6$QQHLQÂł$PRXU´WKH2VFDUZLQQLQJÂżOPWKDWWDNHVDQ unvarnished  look  at  the  bonds  of  love  in  the  face  of  old  age.  It  will  be  screened,  in  French   with  English  subtitles,  at  Middlebury  Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Dana  Auditorium  on  Saturday,  Nov.  9,  at  3   and  8  p.m.   Catamount   Park.   The   Counseling   Service   of   $GGLVRQ &RXQW\ ZLOO KRQRU DJHQF\ VWDII DQG community  members  for  their  commitment  to  the   ZHOOEHLQJRI$GGLVRQ&RXQW\$OVR$O*REHLOOHZLOO SUHVHQW Âł*UHHQ 0RXQWDLQ &DUH %RDUG :K\ DUH ZHKHUHDQGZKHUHDUHZHJRLQJ"´,QIR H[WRUDNHQVHN#FVDFYWRUJ5693E\1RY 8.   Teen   movie   night   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   Nov.     SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ 7HHQV LQ JUDGHV  DUH LQYLWHG WR FRPH HQMR\ D FODVVLF ÂśV EORFNEXVWHU 3RSFRUQ DQG MXLFH SURYLGHG ,QIR  Otter   Creek   Audubon   annual   dinner   and   meet-­ ing  in  Middlebury.7KXUVGD\1RY SP$PHULFDQ/HJLRQ:LOVRQ5RDG6SHDNHU is   Mary   Holland,   noted   naturalist,   educator   and   author   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Naturally   Curious.â&#x20AC;?   Reservations   UHTXLUHGIRUGLQQHU1RIHHIRUWDONDWSP,QIR DQGUHVHUYDWLRQV2&$6PHPEHUVZLOO receive  invitations  by  mail.   Deer   management   presentation   in   New   Haven.   7KXUVGD\1RYSP1HZ+DYHQ7RZQ 2IÂżFHV$GDP0XUNRZVNLGHHUSURMHFWOHDGHUIRU 9HUPRQW)LVKDQG:LOGOLIHZLOOGLVFXVVZKLWHWDLOHG deer  biology,  ecology  and  management,  including   a   discussion   of   the   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   comprehensive   deer   management   evaluation   and   potential   manage-­ ment  alternatives.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shrekâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Middlebury.  Thursday,  Nov.  14,   SP7RZQ+DOO7KHDWHU7KH&RPSDQ\ a   new   resident   company   at   THT   specializing   in  

DOUGLAS ORCHARDS & CIDER MILL

musicals,   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Shrek,â&#x20AC;?   the   musical,   Nov.   7-­17,   starring   Leigh   Guptill   in   the   lead   role,   with   over   a   dozen   other   local   performers.  Tim   Guiles   is   the   director   and   musical   director.   Tickets   $23   adults,  $18  for  children  12  and  under,  for  sale  at   WKH7+7ER[RIÂżFHRUZZZWRZQKDOOWKH-­ ater.org,  or  at  the  door,  if  available.  

LIVEMUSIC Andric   Severance   Quartet   in   Middlebury.   7KXUVGD\1RYSP0DLQ Gumbo  YaYa  in  Middlebury.)ULGD\1RY SP0DLQ The  Vibratones  in  Middlebury.)ULGD\1RY SPDP7ZR%URWKHUV7DYHUQ The  Aerolites  in  Middlebury.6DWXUGD\1RY SPDP7ZR%URWKHUV7DYHUQ Abraxas:   The   Santana   Tribute   in   Middlebury.   )ULGD\1RYSP0DLQ Crazyhearse   in   Middlebury. )ULGD\ 1RY   SPDP7ZR%URWKHUV7DYHUQ

See  a  full  listing  of  

O N G O IN GE V E N T S in  the  Thursday  edition  of  the

Addison Independent and  on  the  Web  at

www.addisonindependent.com

St. Bernadetteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Annual Turkey Bingo

Wednesday, November 13th

at the American Legion in Middlebury, VT facebook.com/ addisonindependent twitter.com/addyindy

For breaking news & updates wherever you are! www.addisonindependent.com

FRESH   CIDER!

Buy  gifts  and  services     with  roots  in  our  community!

Quickies at 6:15pm Â&#x2021;

25 regular play for turkeys and cash prizes begins at 7pm

Hosted by the Knights of Columbus

Proceeds benefit St. Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s School.


Dining and Entertainment

PAGE  10  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

German vocal group to perform Sunday The  Middlebury  College  Perform-­ Since  then,  their  international  career   ing  Arts  Series  will  host  the  interna-­ has   included   numerous   television   tionally   acclaimed   vocal   ensemble   and   radio   appearances,   CD   record-­ Singer   Pur   for   an   afternoon   recital   ings,   invitations   to   major   festivals,   on   Sunday,   at   3   p.m.   in   the   concert   and  concerts  in  over  40  countries.  In   hall   at   the   Mahaney   Center   for   the   2013,   Singer   Pur   was   awarded   the   prestigious  Caecilia  Prize  (Belgium)   Arts.   The   a   cappella   recital   program,   and  the  Bavarian  State  Prize  for  Mu-­ sic  (Germany). titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fields   of   Gold:   Ivan   Hewett   of   BBC   Vocal   Music   through   Music   Magazine   noted,   the  Centuries,â&#x20AC;?  will  span   â&#x20AC;&#x153;What   seizes   the   ear   nearly   a   thousand   years   are   the   thick   weaves   of   of  music,  starting  in  the   counterpoint,   and   the   Middle  Ages  with  works   dense  and  dissonant  har-­ by   composer   Hildegard   monies.   To   make   this   von   Bingen;Íž   moving   on   to   the   Renaissance   with   BY GREG PAHL music   speak   the   singers   need  a  razor-­sharp  sense   music   by   Palestrina   and   Orlando  di  Lasso;Íž  then  on  to  the  Ro-­ of   pitch   and   a   focused,   pure   tone,   mantic   era   with   songs   by   Brahms   which  the  young  German  vocal  sex-­ DQG 6FKXPDQQ DQG ÂżQDOO\ DUULYLQJ tet,  Singer  Pur,  certainly  have.â&#x20AC;? Tickets  are  $20  for  the  general  pub-­ in  the  20th  century  with  works  by  Ir-­ ving  Berlin  and  Sting,  among  others. lic.  For  more  information,  call  443-­ Singer   Pur   is   renowned   as   the   6433   or   go   to   http://go.middlebury. worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   leading   German-­speaking   edu/arts. vocal  group.  The  group  was  founded   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SHREK,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  THE  MUSICAL Based   on   the   Oscar-­winning   LQ  E\ ÂżYH IRUPHU PHPEHUV RI Germanyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   famous   Regensburger   'UHDP:RUNV ÂżOP Âł6KUHN´ EULQJV Domspatzen   Cathedral   boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   choir.   the   hilarious   story   of   everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   A  fortunate  love  affair  brought  a  so-­ favorite   ogre   to   life   on   stage.   The   prano  into  their  ranks,  resulting  in  a   musical  will  appear  at  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   vocal   sextet   with   an   unusual   com-­ Town   Hall   Theater   for   nine   perfor-­ bination   of   voices   (a   soprano,   three   mances,   beginning   at   7:30   p.m.   on   Thursday.   It   is   a   production   of   The   tenors,  a  baritone,  and  a  bass).   6LQJHU 3XU ZRQ ÂżUVW SUL]H LQ WKH Company,   a   new   resident   company   1994   Deutscher   Musikwettbewerb,   at   THT   that   will   specialize   in   mu-­ Sunday.  There   will   be   more   perfor-­ and   the   1995   Grand   Prix   for   vo-­ sicals.   Additional   performances   mances  next  week. Shrek,   our   unlikely   hero,   and   his   cal   ensembles   at   the   international   will   be   at   7:30   p.m.   on   Friday   and   Tampere  Music  Festival  in  Finland.   Saturday,   with   a   2   p.m.   matinee   on   loyal  steed  Donkey  set  off  on  a  quest  

arts beat

SINGER  PUR to   rescue   the   beautiful   and   slightly   ÂżHU\3ULQFHVV)LRQD7KHYLOODLQKDV a  short  temper,  a  cookie  has  a  bad  at-­ titude,  and  over  a  dozen  other  fairy   WDOHPLVÂżWVDOOVLQJDQGGDQFHWRDQ effervescent  Broadway  score. The  Company  has  assembled  one   of   the   best   and   most   experienced   casts   ever   to   appear   on   the   THT   stage.   Shrek   is   played   by   local   ac-­ tor   Leigh   Guptill,   a   big   guy   with   a   soaring  voice  who  was  born  to  play   the   role.   Other   cast   members   in-­ clude  Kim  Anderson  (star  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funny   Girlâ&#x20AC;?),   Bill   Bickford   (star   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Music   Manâ&#x20AC;?),   and   Justin   Bouvier,   who   has   directed   and   acted   in   sev-­ eral   shows   at   THT.   Serene   Eddy   plays  the  Dragon,  with  Sarah  Stone,   Jessica  Allen,  Marshall  Eddy,  Lydia   Deppman   and   over   a   dozen   other   performers   bringing   the   musical   to   life.  Tim  Guiles  is  the  driving  force   behind  the  work,  serving  as  director   and  musical  director. Tickets   are   $23/$18   for   children   12   and   under.   Tickets   may   be   pur-­ chased  at  382-­9222,  townhalltheater. RUJDWWKH7+7ER[RIÂżFH GDLO\H[-­ cept  Sunday,  noon  to  5  p.m.)  and  at   the  door,  if  available. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;TOSCAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  LIVE  IN  HD  AT  THT A  pair  of  opera  superstars  will  be   on   the   big   screen   at   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Town   Hall   Theater   when   Pucciniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Toscaâ&#x20AC;?  is  broadcast  on  Saturday,  at   12:55  p.m. The   fast-­paced   operatic   thriller  

Photo  by  Markus  Amon

KDV VRPH RI 3XFFLQLÂśV ÂżQHVW DULDV and   most   dramatic   situations.   To-­ sca,  the  beautiful  diva,  is  pursued  by   WKHHYLORIÂżFHU6FDUSLDZKRGRHVQÂśW hesitate  to  arrest  and  torture  her  lov-­ er,   Cavaradossi,   until   Tosca   agrees   to  submit  to  Scarpiaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lecherous  de-­ mands.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   time   of   war,   passions   run  high,  and  violence  erupts  in  ex-­ pected  ways. Soprano   Patricia   Racette   is   the   ideal   Tosca.   Tenor   Roberto   Alagna   is  one  of  the  worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  preeminent  ten-­ ors. Tickets   are   $24/$10   students,   and  may  be  purchased  at  382-­9222,   townhalltheater.org,  at  the  THT  box   (See  Arts  Beat,  Page  11)

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;YOUR  JUNK,  MY  ARTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  —  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of November 4

BIG  SPIKE  BLUEGRASS

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A Salute to Veterans

The  Addison  Independent  honors  Veterans   with  stories  and  photos  in  the  

Veterans Day Issue Coming November 7th


PAGE  12  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

PUZZLES

Sponsored  by:

help keep the mind independent and active throughout life.

1

This  week’s  puzzle  is  rated

Easy

2

3

10

4 11

Across

58.  Jingled

19.  Appropriate

1.  Work

59.  They  are  set  by  the  Fed

24.  “The  __  Couple”

4.  ___  and  hers

60.  Mind

25.  Wimbledon  units

18

19

7.  Mega  rock  group

61.  Cheese  nibblers

26.  Confronts

10.  When

21

22

62.  Ogle

27.  Popular  soap

12.  Loaded

63.  Doom

28.  Done  with

13.  Posture  problem

64.  Checkers  color

29.  Dollar  bill  amounts

15.  ___  mortals

15

30.  Kind  of  table

31

6

12

13

16

17

23

35

33

34

36

37

Down

31.  Sweep  under  the  rug

17.  Not  relaxed

1.  Climbs  up

32.  Axles

38

39

18.  Cutest

2.  “Lohengrin,”  e.g.

33.  Tobacco  product

41

42

20.  Having  taken  food

3.  In  a  rut

34.  Garden  intruder

21.  Depressed

4.  Brought  on  board

39.  Way  back  when

27

28

29

47

48

49

22.  Common  conjunction

5.  Freezes

40.  Headlight  sends  it  out

50

23.  Roofs,  in  a  way

6.  Broken  into  pieces

43.  Bizarre

56

57

58

25.  Sun  spot?

7.  Refuses  to

44.  Worn  out

26.  Satiated

8.  Stockings

45.  Dollar  bills

59

60

61

27.  Drawing

9.  Forthright

46.  Put  up  with

62

63

30.  Midafternoon

11.  3UR¿W

47.  Way  up

33.  Riot

12.  Wet,  weatherwise

48.  Hereafter

34.  Surfers’  love

13.  __  on  it!  (hurry)

49.  Just  beat

35.  Knee-­slapper

14.  Some  are  green

50.  Big  plot

40 43

45

52

9

24

16.  Locale

51

8

14

26

32

44

7

20

25 30

5

46 53

54

55

64

51.  “Eat,  ___,  Love”  movie

54.  Glimpsed

52.  Appraise

55.  Shirt  part

36.  Diamonds,  slangily 37.  Neck-­and-­neck

9

38.  Reckons  up

8

5

7

39.  Got  mellower

4

8

40.  Chicago  players

8

41.  Agreed 42.  A  lot  of  fun

6

5

7

43.  Join

2

44.  It’s  in  a  jamb 46.  Caspian  is  one 47.  8UVXOD$QGUHVV¿OP

8 8 5

6

3

9 1 6

50.  Table  part 53.  Guessed 56.  One  doing  heavy  lifting 57.  Eye  drop

5 1

7 8

8

3

8 6

-1,*,- Ê-œ“iœ˜iÊ-«iVˆ> with great gifts from the Rainbow Room! ÇÓÊ>ˆ˜Ê-ÌÀiiÌ]ʈ``iLÕÀÞÊUÊÎnn‡ÈnΣÊUÊ"«i˜Ê ÛiÀÞÊ >Þ

7

4

8

2

This  week’s  puzzle  solutions can  be  found  on  Page  31.

Sudoku Each  Sudoku  puzzle  consists  of  a  9x9  grid  that  has  been   subdivided  into  nine  smaller  grids  of  3x3  squares.  To  solve  the   puzzle  each  row,  column  and  box  must  contain  each  of  the   numbers  1  to  9.  Puzzles  come  in  three  grades:  easy,  medium   DQGGLI¿FXOW Level:  Medium.    


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  13

Scientist to share how animal forms have evolved MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Award-­win-­ QLQJ VFLHQWLVW DXWKRU DQG HGXFDWRU 6HDQ%&DUUROOZLOOJLYHDRQHKRXU lecture  on  Thursday,  Nov.  14,  titled   Âł%UDYH *HQLXV $ 6FLHQWLVWÂśV -RXU-­ ney   from   the   French   Resistance   to   WKH1REHO3UL]H´7KHHYHQWWDUJHWHG WRDJHQHUDODXGLHQFHZLOOWDNHSODFH at   7:30   p.m.   in   Dana  Auditorium   at   0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJH Carroll,  vice  president  for  science   HGXFDWLRQ RI WKH +RZDUG +XJKHV Medical  Institute,  will  chronicle  the   DGYHQWXUHVRI-DFTXHV0RQRGDFR IRXQGHU RI PROHFXODU ELRORJ\ IURP the  dark  years  of  the  German  occu-­ SDWLRQRI3DULVWRWKHKHLJKWVRIWKH 1REHO3UL]HKLVIULHQGVKLSZLWKWKH JUHDW ZULWHU $OEHUW &DPXV DQG KLV HPHUJHQFH DV D SXEOLF ÂżJXUH DQG OHDGLQJYRLFHRIVFLHQFH7KHOHFWXUH ZLOOEHDV\QWKHVLVRIVFLHQFHKLVWRU\ and  literature.  Carroll  will  also  deal   ZLWK GHQLDOLVP RI WZR RI WKH ELJ-­ JHVW LGHDV LQ ELRORJ\ DV HIIHFWLYHO\ FRQIURQWHG E\ WKH OHDG FKDUDFWHU Monod. Carroll  will  also  lead  an  extended   Q&A-­style   seminar   on   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Endless   Forms   Most   Beautiful:   Evo   Devo   DQGD1HZ(YROXWLRQDU\6\QWKHVLV´ at   4:30   p.m.   in   Room   216   of   Mc-­

Deer  management talk  on  tap  Nov.  14 in  New  Haven

SEAN  B.  CARROLL &DUGHOO%LFHQWHQQLDO+DOO7KH¿HOG KDV OHDUQHG D JUHDW GHDO LQ WKH SDVW  \HDUV DERXW JHQHV DQG GHYHORS-­ PHQWWKDWEHDURQWKHXQGHUVWDQGLQJ of   how   animal   forms   evolve.   Dis-­ cussion   will   focus   on   how   science   FDQ QRZ LQWHJUDWH WKLV NQRZOHGJH RI GHYHORSPHQWDO JHQHWLFV LQWR DQ H[SDQGLQJ HYROXWLRQDU\ V\QWKHVLV Both   talks   are   free   and   open   to   the   SXEOLF Carroll  is  also  professor  of  molec-­ XODUELRORJ\DQGJHQHWLFVDWWKH8QL-­ versity  of  Wisconsin.  He  is  a  leader   LQ WKH ¿HOG RI HYROXWLRQDU\ GHYHO-­ RSPHQWDO ELRORJ\ RU ³HYRGHYR´ WKH VWXG\ RI WKH JHQHV WKDW FRQWURO

DQLPDO ERG\ SDWWHUQV DQG SOD\ PD-­ jor   roles   in   the   evolution   of   animal   diversity. Carroll   is   the   author   of   several   ERRNV LQFOXGLQJ Âł%UDYH *HQLXV A   Scientist,   A   Philosopher,   and   WKHLU 'DULQJ $GYHQWXUHV IURP WKH )UHQFK 5HVLVWDQFH WR WKH 1REHO 3UL]H´   Âł5HPDUNDEOH &UHD-­ tures:  Epic  Adventures  in  the  Search   IRU WKH 2ULJLQV RI 6SHFLHV´   ZKLFK ZDV D ÂżQDOLVW IRU WKH  1DWLRQDO%RRN$ZDUGIRUQRQÂżFWLRQ Âł7KH0DNLQJRIWKH)LWWHVW´   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Endless   Forms   Most   Beauti-­ IXO´  +HDOVRZULWHVDUHJXODU column  for  The  New  York  Times  Sci-­

ence  Times. His   honors   include   the   Benja-­ min   Franklin   Medal   in   Life   Sci-­ HQFHV   HOHFWLRQ WR WKH 1D-­ tional  Academy  of  Sciences  and  the   American  Academy  of  Arts  and  Sci-­ HQFHVWKH6WHSKHQ-D\*RXOG3UL]H IRU WKH DGYDQFHPHQW RI WKH SXEOLF XQGHUVWDQGLQJRIHYROXWLRQDQGWKH 'LVWLQJXLVKHG6HUYLFH$ZDUGRIWKH 1DWLRQDO $VVRFLDWLRQ RI %LRORJ\ Teachers. &DUUROOœV YLVLW LV VSRQVRUHG E\ 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH %LRORJ\ 'H-­ partment,   Academic   Enrichment   )XQGDQG+RZDUG+XJKHV0HGLFDO Institute.  

0 16

$ OUR BEST $ DEAL OF THE YEAR.

NEW  HAVEN  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  New  Haven   Conservation  Commission  will  host   a  presentation  with  Adam  Murkows-­ ki,   Vermont   Fish   and   Wildlife   deer   project  leader,  on  Thursday,  Nov.  14,   at   7   p.m.   at   the   New   Haven   Town   2IÂżFHV 0XUNRZVNL ZLOO WDON DERXW ZKLWHWDLOHG GHHU ELRORJ\ HFRORJ\ DQGPDQDJHPHQW The   Vermont   Fish   and   Wildlife   'HSDUWPHQW KDV HPEDUNHG XSRQ D FRPSUHKHQVLYH GHHU PDQDJHPHQW evaluation.   This   evaluation   of   cur-­ rent   and   potential   season   structures   DQG KDUYHVW UHJXODWLRQV PD\ UHVXOW LQFKDQJHVWR9HUPRQWÂśVFXUUHQWGHHU KXQWLQJVHDVRQVDQGUHJXODWLRQV Murkowski  will  discuss  the  evalu-­ DWLRQ DQG SRWHQWLDO PDQDJHPHQW DO-­ WHUQDWLYHV 7KLV PHHWLQJ ZLOO EH DQ RSSRUWXQLW\ WR KHDU DERXW WKH FRP-­ prehensive   evaluation   process   and   SURSRVHG DOWHUQDWLYH PDQDJHPHQW RSWLRQVDQGSURYLGHWKHSXEOLFZLWK the  opportunity  to  ask  questions. Murkowski   is   a   Wisconsin   na-­ WLYH DQG KROGV D EDFKHORUÂśV GHJUHH LQ ZLOGOLIH PDQDJHPHQW IURP WKH University   of   Wisconsin-­Stevens   3RLQWVDQGDPDVWHUÂśVGHJUHHLQIRU-­ est  resources  from  the  University  of   Arkansas-­Monticello.   Prior   to   com-­ LQJWR9HUPRQWKHZDVLQYROYHGZLWK deer   research   activities   in   Wiscon-­ sin,   Colorado,   Arkansas   and   North   Carolina.  He  resides  in  Rutland  and   VD\V KH HQMR\V KXQWLQJ ÂżVKLQJ DQG other  outdoor  activities.

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PAGE  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

READ. LEARN. GIVE.

Best of Luck in the future to all Addison County Students!

We reward each Student of the Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s achievement!

[]

www.vermontbookshop.com 38 MAIN ST Middlebury

802-388-2061

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

Students of the Week from area High Schools

Middlebury Union High School

Middlebury   Union   High   School   is   pleased   to   recognize   Jonah   Lefkoe  as  its  Student  of  the  Week.  Jonah  resides  in  Middlebury  with   KLVSDUHQWV.DUHQDQG7RGG/HINRHDQG\RXQJHUVLVWHU6RSKLHDQ HLJKWKJUDGHUDW0806 Jonah   has   achieved   High   Honors   at   MUHS   and   received   the   3UHVLGHQWLDO$ZDUGIRU$FDGHPLF([FHOOHQFHLQJUDGHVDQG+H has  completed  Advanced  Placement  (AP)  U.S.  History,  AP  Calculus   I  and  II,  and  AP  Biology.  He  received  the  AP  Scholar  Award  in  grade   &XUUHQWO\KHLVHQUROOHGLQ$3(QJOLVK$3:RUOG+LVWRU\DQG$3 Statistics,  as  well  as  Computer  Modeling  and  Simulation  at  Middlebury   College. Jonah  received  the  Harvard  Book  Award,  the  St.  Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  College   %RRN$ZDUGDQGWKH08+6&RPPXQLW\6HUYLFH$ZDUGLQJUDGH He   received   the   Student   Recognition   Breakfast  Award   for   chemistry   LQJUDGH+HHDUQHG+RQRUDEOH0HQWLRQIRUWKH$PHULFDQ/HJLRQ 'HSDUWPHQW $ZDUGV IRU VRFLDO VWXGLHV LQ JUDGHV  DQG  DQG IRU VFLHQFHLQJUDGH He   is   the   president   of   the   local   chapter   of   the   National   Honor   Society.   Jonah   was   selected   to   attend   Green   Mountain   Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   State   last  summer  and  as  an  alternate  to  Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Nation.  He  is  a  Peer  Leader   Coordinator  for  grade  9  students,  to  aid  in  the  successful  transition  to   high  school. Jonah  Lefkoe -RQDKKDVSOD\HGIRRWEDOOIRUWKH7LJHUVDOOIRXU\HDUVDQGDWWKH M.U.H.S. YDUVLW\OHYHOVLQFHJUDGH+HKDVDOVRFRPSHWHGRQWKHWUDFNDQG ÂżHOGWHDP -RQDKKDVEHHQDPHPEHURIWKH6WXGHQW6HQDWHLQJUDGHVDQGVHUYLQJDVLWVYLFHSUHVLGHQWIRUWKHSDVWWZR\HDUV +HKDVEHHQWKHSUHVLGHQWRIWKHFODVVRIIRUWKHSDVWWKUHH\HDUV-RQDKKDVSOD\HGWHQRUVD[RSKRQHIRUWKH&RQFHUW%DQG DOOIRXU\HDUVDQGZDVVHOHFWHGWRSOD\LQWKH*UHHQ0RXQWDLQ0XVLF)HVWLYDOLQJUDGHVDQG+HKDVDOVRSOD\HGÂżUVWFKDLU for  the  Jazz  Band  for  the  past  two  years. Jonah  has  been  the  student  coordinator  for  the  Brain  Science  Club  for  the  past  three  years.  He  has  participated  in  several   FRPPXQLW\VHUYLFHSURMHFWVDW08+6DQGRXWVLGHRIVFKRRO+HZDVD3HHU7XWRULQWKH08+6/HDUQLQJ/DEIRUDYDULHW\RI subjects  in  grade  9. Jonah  has  participated  in  community  neuroscience  education,  including  a  presentation  to  a  brain  injury  support  group.  During   WKHSDVWWZRVXPPHUVKHZDVDQLQWHUQDWWKH0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJHQHXURVFLHQFHODERUDWRU\,QJUDGHVDQGKHSOD\HG saxophone  with  the  Middlebury  Community  Wind  Ensemble.  He  has  been  active  with  the  Addison  County  Havurah. In  his  spare  time,  Jonah  enjoys  playing  the  ukulele,  snowboarding,  reading,  and  listening  to  music. -RQDKZLOODSSO\WRDIRXU\HDUUHVHDUFKXQLYHUVLW\WRPDMRULQQHXURVFLHQFH Congratulations,  Jonah,  on  all  your  accomplishments  and  service,  from  everyone  at  MUHS.  

Middlebury  Students  of  the  Week  receive  a  free  pizza  from  Green  Peppers.

Vergennes Union High School

Vergennes   Union   High   School   is   pleased   to   recognize   Jared   Birchmore   as   its   Student   of   the   Week.   Jared   lives   in   :HVW $GGLVRQ ZLWK KLV PRP DQG GDG 7LPRWK\ DQG 9DOHULH %LUFKPRUH-DUHGKDVWZRROGHUEURWKHUV7\OHUDQG.\OHZKR JUDGXDWHGIURP9HUPRQW7HFKQLFDO&ROOHJH+LVVLVWHU0RQLFD is  a  sophomore  at  Champlain  College,  and  his  younger  brother,   Jacob,  is  a  sophomore  at  VUHS. Jared   has   been   an   honors   and   high   honors   student   since   freshman   year.   He   is   currently   the   president   of   the   senior   class.  He  attended  Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  State  at  Lyndon  State  College,  and   WKLVSDVWVXPPHUKHDWWHQGHGDWZRZHHNVXPPHUSURJUDPDW Rensselaer   Polytechnic   Institute   for   Architecture,   after   being   awarded  the  Rensselaer  Medal  as  a  junior.   Jared  is  an  active  member  of  Vergennes  Union  High  School   community.  He  tutored  other  students  during  his  freshman  and   sophomore  years.  He  has  loved  playing  soccer  at  VUHS,  and   KDVDOVREHHQDPHPEHURI6WXGHQW&RXQFLODQG0DWK7HDP Outside  of  school  Jared  has  worked  as  a  lifeguard  at  the  Sam   )LVKPDQ3RROLQ9HUJHQQHV'XULQJWKH$SULOEUHDN-DUHG Jared  Birchmore HQMR\HG EHLQJ SDUW RI D GD\ FKXUFK PLVVLRQ WULS WR 1RUWK V.U.H.S. Carolina.   Both   of   these   experiences   made   Jared   realize   that   hard  work  pays  off,  and  it  has  shown  him  the  incredible  impact   that  giving  back  to  a  community  can  have.  Also,  Jared  has  been  a  member  of  the  Addison  United  soccer  team. -DUHGVDLGWKLVDERXWKLVWLPHDW9HUJHQQHV8QLRQ+LJK6FKRROÂł7KURXJKP\KLJKVFKRROFDUHHU,KDYHOHDUQHG that  hard  work  and  dedication  pays  off,  and  I  have  also  recognized  the  importance  of  friendship.  If  I  could  say   anything  to  the  students  of  VUHS,  I  would  encourage  them  to  study  hard,  but  never  forget  to  appreciate  your   friends,  and  have  some  fun,  because  you  are  still  kids!â&#x20AC;? Matt  DeBlois,  the  French  teacher,  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jared  is  a  trustworthy,  articulate  and  inquisitive  student  who  infuses   humor  with  candor.  Jared  challenges  himself  in  all  endeavors.â&#x20AC;? )ROORZLQJJUDGXDWLRQIURP98+6-DUHGLVJRLQJWRSXUVXHDFDUHHULQDUFKLWHFWXUH7KLVÂżHOGKDVLQWHUHVWHG him  since  he  was  young,  and  he  is  looking  forward  to  the  ability  to  express  his  creativity  through  an  architecture   program. 7KHIDFXOW\VWDIIDQGVWXGHQWVRI98+6ZLVK-DUHG%LUFKPRUHWKHYHU\EHVWLQWKHIXWXUH

Vergennes  Students  of  the  Week  receive  a  free  sandwich  and  drink  from  3  SQUARES.

Students of the week from all area high schools will receive a gift certificate from Vermont Book Shop. Students of the Week are chosen by school teachers and administration. Congratulations on a great kick start for your future!

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to support all area students and want to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanksâ&#x20AC;? to those who volunteer with us!

Prepare for black beltâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; prepare for life. TaeKwon Do classes, Self defense classes, Birthday parties & After school programs.

To volunteer call 388-­7044 or visit www.unitedwayaddisoncounty.org

377-0476 tkdkicks101@yahoo.com

Barash  Mediation  Services 3KRHEH%DUDVK )DPLO\'LYRUFH0HGLDWLRQÂ&#x2021;)DFLOLWDWLRQ &RQĂ&#x20AC;LFW0DQDJHPHQW7UDLQLQJV

lations

Congratu Name  & JONAH & Name JARED

32%R[%0DLQ6WÂ&#x2021;%ULVWRO97 Â&#x2021;SKRHEH#EDUDVKPHGLDWLRQFRP www.barashmediation.com

VERGENNES

REDEMPTION CENTER Congratulations Students! &RPSOHWH'HOLÂ&#x2021;6QDFNVÂ&#x2021;%HYHUDJHV

877-­6768 0DLQ6WUHHW9HUJHQQHV

FERRISBURGH

BAKE SHOP & DELI Celebrating 10 Years

Warmest Congratulations,

Jonah & Jared

Congratulations Congratulations Taylor & Jared Casey Jonah & Two locations to help serve you better...

Plumbing  &  Heating  

125 Monkton Rd. Bristol, VT 453-2325

Fuel  /Oil  Delivery

185 Exchange St., Middlebury, VT 388-4975

859 Route 7 South Middlebury 802-388-9500

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Telecommunications Sales and Service Data Cabling & Fiber Optic Solutions

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Great Job Students! 5 6 R287( OUTE  7  S287+ OUTHÂ&#x2021; 5RXWH6RXWKÂ&#x2021; 0)Â&#x2021;6 $7 AT  0)Â&#x2021;66

Congratulations, Name Jonah & & Name! Jared 877-3118 Main St., Vergennes, VT


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  15

Fish  &  Wildlife  it  taking  input  on  deer  management VERMONT   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  White-­tailed   deer   hunting   is   an   integral   part   of   Ver-­ montâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   heritage.  The  Vermont   Con-­ stitution  has  guaranteed  the  right  to   KXQW DQG ÂżVK VLQFH  QHDUO\  \HDUV EHIRUH other  states  adopted  simi-­ lar   provisions.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   even   a   white-­tailed   deer   RQWKHVWDWHĂ&#x20AC;DJ Many   Vermonters   spend   a   tremendous   amount   of   time   in   the   ZRRGV KXQWLQJ HDFK IDOO QRW RQO\ EHFDXVH WKH\ ORYH WKH WUDGLWLRQ EXW EHFDXVH WKH\ UHO\ RQ WKH YHQL-­ son  to  help  feed  their  families.  These   KXQWHUV DUH NQRZOHGJHDEOH DERXW deer,  have  a  vested  interest  in  sound   GHHUPDQDJHPHQWSUDFWLFHVDQGDUH important  partners  with  the  Vermont   )LVK :LOGOLIH'HSDUWPHQWIRUERWK management  and  regulation. 7KH GHSDUWPHQW UHFHQWO\ EHJDQ D two-­year  Comprehensive  Deer  Man-­ DJHPHQW5HYLHZ3URFHVVWRH[DPLQH seasons,  regulations,  methods  of  har-­ YHVWDQGWKHVFLHQFHDQGELRORJ\RI Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  deer  herd.  Vermont  hunt-­ HUVDUHDFULWLFDOSDUWRIWKLVSURFHVV SURYLGLQJJXLGDQFHRQGHHUPDQDJH-­ PHQWWKURXJKDQXQSUHFHGHQWHGDQG ZLGHO\ SXEOLFL]HG HIIRUW WKDW KDV LQFOXGHG RQOLQH VXUYH\V HLJKW SXE-­ OLF KHDULQJV DQG WKH RSSRUWXQLW\ WR serve  on  one  of  three  regional  work-­ ing  groups.  The  working  groups  are   FXUUHQWO\ZRUNLQJWRDQDO\]HSXEOLF LQSXW DQG VFLHQWLÂżF GDWD LQ RUGHU WR SURYLGH IHHGEDFN DQG VXJJHVWLRQV   $QG WKDWÂśV DOO EHIRUH QRUPDO UHJX-­ ODWLRQVSURFHHGLQJVHYHQJHWXQGHU-­ way. 7KLV SURFHVV KDV EHHQ JXLGHG E\ WKH )LVK  :LOGOLIH %RDUG DQ LQ-­ dependent   group   of   sportsmen   and   ZRPHQ DSSRLQWHG E\ WKH JRYHUQRU who   make   regulations   on   hunting   DQG ÂżVKLQJ 7KH ERDUG UHJXODUO\ UHOLHV RQ WKH GHSDUWPHQWÂśV UHVHDUFK DQG UHFRPPHQGDWLRQV LQ WKHLU GHFL-­ VLRQVEXWWKH\DOVROLVWHQFORVHO\WR KXQWHUV 7KH ERDUG ZLOO ZHLJK WKH ZRUNLQJ JURXSVÂś IHHGEDFN LQ PDN-­ LQJ IXWXUH UHJXODWLRQV SDUWLFXODUO\ WKH SXEOLF LQSXW WKH\ KDYH JDWKHUHG DQG WKH PDQDJHPHQW UHFRPPHQGD-­ WLRQVWKH\ZLOOSURYLGHEDVHGRQWKH ELRORJLFDOGDWDWKH\UHYLHZ In  addition  to  the  survey  of  2,100   9HUPRQWHUV FRPSOHWHG HDUOLHU WKLV past   year,   the   department   will   also   FRQGXFW D SKRQH VXUYH\ WR FRPSOH-­ PHQW RWKHU IRUPV RI SXEOLF LQSXW

Wedding Invitations The Addison Announcements Independent

Business Cards

More than Hand Stamps just your newspaper

on the Web

And  it  has  maintained  a  page  on  its   ZHEVLWH RXWOLQLQJ WKH VWHSV RI WKH UHYLHZ SURFHVV ZLWK FRQWDFW LQIRU-­ mation   for   Vermonters   who   wish   WR VXEPLW ZULWWHQ FRP-­ PHQWV 7KH ZHEVLWH DOVR SURYLGHV DFFHVV WR LQ-­ formation   on   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   GHHU KHUG FROOHFWHG HY-­ HU\ \HDU IURP ELRORJLFDO FKHFNVWDWLRQVDQGKXQW-­ er  self-­reports. The   Fish   &   Wildlife   Department   gathers   a   tremendous   amount   of   information   on   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   GHHU KHUG %LRORJLVWV DW FKHFN VWDWLRQV HDFK IDOO H[DPLQH WKH DJH VH[DQGKHDOWKRIHDFKGHHUFKHFNHG in.  The  department  makes  all  of  these   GDWDDYDLODEOHWRWKHSXEOLFWKURXJK ELJJDPHUHSRUWVSXEOLVKHGDQQXDO-­ ly,  and  maintains  a  10-­year  manage-­ PHQWSODQDOORIZKLFKFDQEHIRXQG at  YWÂżVKDQGZLOGOLIHFRP.  These  data  

During  this  ongo-­ PDGHDQ\UHFRPPHQGDWLRQVRQGHHU are   also   presented   LQJ UHYLHZ SURFHVV management.  It  has  simply  provided   WR WKH ERDUG DQG WR The public hearings management   VFLHQWLÂżFGDWDWRWKHZRUNLQJJURXSV WKH SXEOLF DW DQQXDO will continue through all   options   are   on   the   WRWKH)LVK :LOGOLIH%RDUGDQGWR deer   hearings   in   or-­ 2014 and all are WDEOHWKDWZLOODOORZ PHPEHUVRIWKHSXEOLFGXULQJKHDU-­ der   to   inform   the   open to local news the   deer   population   ings  and  informational  meetings.   SXEOLF DQG PDLQWDLQ media. One meeting WRUHPDLQLQEDODQFH 7KHUH DUH VWLOO D VHULHV RI SXEOLF WUDQVSDUHQF\ was televised and ZLWK LWV KDELWDW PHHWLQJVDSXEOLFFRPPHQWSHULRG 7KH SXEOLF KHDU-­ 0DQDJHPHQW GHFL-­ DQG DW OHDVW WKUHH DGGLWLRQDO ERDUG LQJV ZLOO FRQWLQXH streamed live on VLRQV ZLOO EH EDVHG PHHWLQJVEHIRUHWKLVSURFHVVLVFRP-­ through   2014   and   the Internet and RQWKHEHVWDYDLODEOH SOHWH &RQFOXVLRQV DQG UHFRPPHQ-­ DOODUHRSHQWRORFDO future hearings VFLHQFH IRU PHHWLQJ dations  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  happen  until  after  ev-­ news   media.   One   are planned to be PDQDJHPHQW REMHF-­ HU\9HUPRQWHUKDVDFKDQFHWRZHLJK meeting   was   tele-­ televised as well. WLYHV EDODQFHG ZLWK in  on  deer  management.  Stay  tuned   vised   and   streamed   the   wishes   of   Ver-­ to  help  the  department  manage  Ver-­ live   on   the   Internet   montâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  deer  herd  for  Vermont  fami-­ and   future   hearings   are   planned   to   montâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  deer  hunters. Importantly,   the   department   has   OLHVWRHQMR\QRZDQGLQVHDVRQVWR EHWHOHYLVHGDVZHOO 7KLV OHYHO RI SXEOLF LQSXW LV UDUH QRW \HW GUDZQ DQ\ FRQFOXVLRQV QRU FRPH DPRQJVWDWHZLOGOLIHDJHQFLHVZKHUH GHHUPDQDJHPHQWGHFLVLRQVDUHW\SL-­ FDOO\PDGHLQWHUQDOO\DQGHYHQPRUH H[WHQVLYHWKDQWKHGHSDUWPHQWÂśVQRU-­ PDOSURWRFROIRUVROLFLWLQJSXEOLFLQ-­ Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x17E;Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC; SXW WR UHYLHZ DQG PDNH FKDQJHV WR deer  management. CONGRESS IN YOUR COMMUNITY

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5LĂ&#x20AC;HKXQWHUVUHPLQGHGRI later  start  to  deer  season VERMONT  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  Vermont  Fish   &  Wildlife  Department  is  reminding   deer   hunters   that   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   youth,   ULĂ&#x20AC;H DQG PX]]OHORDGHU VHDVRQV IDOO on   relatively   late   dates   this   year.   Youth   weekend   is   Nov.   9-­10   and   ULĂ&#x20AC;HVHDVRQEHJLQVRQ1RY%RWK VHDVRQVDUHEHJLQQLQJRQHZHHNHQG ODWHUWKDQQRUPDO0X]]OHORDGHUVHD-­ VRQEHJLQVRQ'HF 9HUPRQWÂśV 1RYHPEHU ULĂ&#x20AC;H GHHU hunting   and   youth   weekend   dates   DUHVHWE\ODZDQGUHYROYHDURXQG Thanksgiving.   Due   to   the   late   date   for   Thanksgiving   this   year,   WKHVHGHHUVHDVRQVEHJLQODWHUWKDQ usual.  Nearly  two  weeks  will  have   HODSVHG EHWZHHQ WKH FORVH RI DU-­

FKHU\ VHDVRQ DQG \RXWK ZHHNHQG this  year.  Normally  the  gap  is  less   than  one  week. Âł:H KDYH UHFHLYHG FDOOV IURP KXQWHUVZKRDUHFRQIXVHGDERXWWKH dates,â&#x20AC;?   said   Col.   David   LeCours,   KHDGRIODZHQIRUFHPHQWIRUWKH)LVK &   Wildlife   Department.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hunters   VKRXOGEHVXUHWKH\KDYHWKHFRUUHFW GDWHEHIRUHKHDGLQJRXW7KH)LVK  :LOGOLIH 'HSDUWPHQW FDOHQGDU WKH ODZGLJHVWDQGWKHGHSDUWPHQWZHE-­ VLWHDOOFRQWDLQWKHFRUUHFWGDWHVDQG ZH HQFRXUDJH KXQWHUV WR UHIHUHQFH these  materials.â&#x20AC;? The   Vermont   Fish   &   Wildlife   ZHEVLWH LV ZZZYWÂżVKDQGZLOGOLIH FRP.

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PAGE  16  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

SPORTS MONDAY

THE  MOUNT  ABRAHAM  Union  High  School  boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  soccer  team  celebrates  after  winning  the  Division  II  state  championship  Saturday.  The  Eagles  beat  Green  Mountain  Valley,  1-­0.

Photo  by  Ben  Kaufmann

Eagle  boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  soccer  wraps  up  a  dream  season   Defeats  GMV,  1-­0, for  third  D-­II  crown By  ANDY  KIRKALDY RANDOLPH   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Mount   Abraham  Union  High  School  boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   soccer  team  completed  the  most  suc-­ cessful  season  in  program  history  on   Saturday  in  Randolph,  when  the  top-­ seeded  Eagles  defeated  No.  3  Green   Mountain  Valley,   1-­0,   for   the   Divi-­ sion  II  title.   In   addition   to   winning   the   pro-­ gramâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  third  D-­II  crown  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  oth-­ ers   came   in   2004   and   1982   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the   (DJOHVDOVRÂżQLVKHGDWHFOLSV-­ ing   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   previous   record   for   victories  by  three. But   all   season   what   the   Eagles   have   talked   about   after   wins   was   their  chemistry,  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  they   believe  allowed  them  to  accomplish   those  milestones.   Junior  Whit   Lower   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   one   mem-­ ber  of  a  defensive  unit  that  allowed   just  one  goal  in  four  playoff  games   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  responded  after  Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  shut-­ out  to  a  question  of  what  lay  behind  

the  Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  success. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   the   closest-­knit   group   of   guys   that   has   ever   been.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   always  there  for  each  other,  and  we   work   hard,â&#x20AC;?   Lower   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   can   see   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Brotherhoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   on   the   back   of   our  shirts,  and  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  taken  us   here.â&#x20AC;? Coach  Mike  Corey  gave  credit  to   his   co-­captains,   seniors   Cale   Thy-­ gesen  and  Sawyer  Kamman,  and  the   rest  of  the  Eagle  veterans  for  helping   build  that  bond. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   felt   everybody   was   equal   in  importance  and  treated  them  that   way,â&#x20AC;?  Corey  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  really  does  boil   down  to  leadership.â&#x20AC;? Of   course,   the   Eagles   also   have   talent.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coach   has   been   telling   us   that   this  is  the  best  team  he  has  had  here,   and   that   feels   really   good,â&#x20AC;?   Lower   said. But   maybe   it   was   chemistry   that   gave   the   Eagles   the   resilience   they   needed   against   9-­3-­2   Green   Mount   Valley,   a   team   that   lost   only   to   Mount  Abe   this   fall.   With   15   min-­ XWHV OHIW LQ WKH ÂżUVW KDOI 7K\JHVHQ

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   by   consensus   the   Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   best   player  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  pulled  up  lame  and  left  the   game.   Midway   through   the   second   KDOI VHQLRU VWDUWLQJ Ă&#x20AC;DQN PLGÂżHOGHU Rider  MacCrellish  had  to  leave  after   a  hard  Gumby  foul. Because   of   Thygesenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   role   di-­ recting   the   offense   and   striking   all   of  the  Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  direct  kicks,  his  were   HVSHFLDOO\ELJFOHDWVWRÂżOO %XWÂżOOWKHPWKH(DJOHVGLG&RUH\ inserted   sophomore   Charlie   Meyer   at  left  back  and  moved  junior  Theo   :HDYHU WR FHQWUDO PLGÂżHOG DQG VH-­ nior   center   middie   Aiden   White-­ Pifer   accepted   more   responsibility   for  ball  distribution  and  took  all  the   restarts. All  three  performed  well.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  were  a  couple  of  guys  who   were   given   permission   to   do   what   they  are  capable  of,â&#x20AC;?  Corey  said.   Lower   said   the   Eagles   kept   faith   when  their  teammates  went  down. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Those  were  huge  losses.  But  we   knew  if  we  kept  our  heads  together   â&#x20AC;Ś  we  could  do  it,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Corey  noted  Thygesen,  typically  a   YRFDO OHDGHU RQ WKH ÂżHOG PDGH KLV

presence  felt  from  the  bench  and  at   halftime,  when  the  score  stood  at  0-­0   and   the   Eagles   gathered   as   a   team   without  their  coaches.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   could   hear   him   saying   loudly,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;You  can  do  this,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Corey  said. By   then,   the   Eagles   had   weath-­ ered  an  early  Gumby  storm.  GMVS   came   out   strong,   especially   in   the   ÂżUVW  PLQXWHV DQG SUHVVXUHG WKH Eagles   short-­passing   game;Íž   they   RXWVKRW0RXQW$EHLQWKHÂżUVWKDOI  (DJOH VHQLRU JRDOLH ,UD )LVKHU PDGH WKUHH RI KLV ÂżYH VDYHV LQ WKH ÂżUVWKDOIDQGGLGZHOOWRSXQFKDZD\ a  Gumby  corner  kick.   Lower,   fellow   junior   center   de-­ fender   Gus   Catlin,   senior   Calvin   Joos   on   the   right   side,   and   Weaver   and   Meyer   on   the   left   made   sound   defensive  plays,  stepped  up  to  break   up   other   threats,   and   backed   each   other  up. Corey   said   his   defense   had   mo-­ ments   of   inconsistency   in   midsea-­ son,   but   developed   into   a   strength   down  the  stretch.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Earlier  in  the  season  I  think  there   ZDVDOLWWOHELWRIHEEDQGĂ&#x20AC;RZ´&R-­

rey  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  their  level  of  con-­ centration   at   the   end   grew   tremen-­ dously.â&#x20AC;? Still,  the  Eagles  were  fortunate  in   the  halfâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  39th  minute  when  Gumby   Brendan  Toddâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  well  struck  15-­yard   volley  sailed  just  high. Corey   switched   the   Eagle   align-­ ment   for   the   second   half,   moving   Weaver  to  striker  along  with  senior   Ethan   White   and   adding   Catlin   to   WKH PLGÂżHOG LQ DQ DWWHPSW WR UHHV-­ tablish   ball   possession.   The   Eagles   began  to  carry  more  play,  and  in  the   eighth  minute  drew  a  foul  about  40   \DUGVRXWRQWKHOHIWVLGHRIWKHÂżHOG White-­Pifer   lofted   it   toward   the   near  post.  Just  before  Gumby  goalie   Max   Stamler   could   get   to   the   ball,   Eagle   sophomore   middie   Jackie   Gorton,   cutting   in   from   the   right,   shouldered  the  ball  inside  the  post  to   give  the  Eagles  the  lead.   The  Eagles  then  went  back  to  the   more   defensive   posture,   but   con-­ tinued   to   generate   chances.   Kam-­ PDQIURPWKHOHIWĂ&#x20AC;DQNMXVWPLVVHG White   on   a   cross,   and   Stamler   (See  Soccer,  Page  18)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  17

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PAGE  18  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

MUHS  football  trounces  Hartford WRUHDFKVWDWHÂżQDOWKLV6DWXUGD\ By  ANDY  KIRKALDY MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   No.   1   Middlebury   Union   High   School   football  team  will  play  No.  2  South   Burlington  on  Saturday  for  the  Divi-­ sion  I  title,  and  a  win  for  the  Tigers   ZRXOGJLYHWKHPWKHLUÂżUVWWLWOHVLQFH they  upset  Hartford,  3-­0,  in  2002. *DPH WLPH IRU 6DWXUGD\ÂśV ÂżQDO between   the   10-­0   Tigers   and   9-­1   Rebels   at   Rutland   High   School   is   5  p.m. To  reach  that  game,  the  Tigers  on   this   past   Friday   had   to   defeat   visit-­ ing  Hartford,  the  three-­time  defend-­ LQJ FKDPSLRQ DQG ZLQQHU RI ÂżYH of  the  past  six  D-­I  crowns.  But  this   time  the  Hurricanes  were  the  No.  4   VHHG HQWHUHG WKH VHPLÂżQDO ZLWK D 6-­2   record,   and   had   already   lost   to   the  Tigers  this  fall,  23-­0. The   Tigers   were   prepared,   shut-­ ting  down  Hartfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  power  running   game   and   moving   the   ball   consis-­ tently   in   a   28-­6   victory.   Hartfordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only  score  and  75  of  its  237  yards  of   offense  came  after  MUHS  had  taken   a  28-­0  lead  and  Coach  Dennis  Smith   KDGSXOOHGKLVÂżUVWVWULQJGHIHQVH Tiger  senior  linebacker  Josh  Stea-­ rns,   who   made   two   tackles   to   end   a   Hartford   scoring   threat   with   the   score  21-­0  late  in  the  third,  said  the   Tiger  coaches  had  spent  hours  in  the   video  room  to  prepare  their  team  to   face  the  Hurricanes. $QGWKH7LJHUVZHUHÂżUHGXSWRGR the  rest,  Stearns  said,  including  stop-­ ping   Hartford   on   fourth-­and-­three   from  the  Tiger  8  in  the  second  quar-­ ter,  when  Sam  Smith  dragged  down   Dylan  Rice  a  yard  short  to  protect  a   7-­0  lead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   key   was   just   getting   our   UHDGV DQG ÂżQGLQJ WKH EDOO MXVW swarming   that   ballcarrier,â&#x20AC;?   Stearns   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  just  took  it  to  them  every  

play.â&#x20AC;? Stearns  added  the  Tigers  had  plenty   of  motivation:  Many  of  them  were  on   WKHÂżHOGIRURQHVLGHGSOD\RIIORVVHV to  Hartford  in  2011  and  2012. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   means   a   whole   lot   to   us.   They   knocked   us   out   the   last   two   years,  and  we  just  came  out  ready  to   play,â&#x20AC;?  Stearns  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  did  what  we   needed  to  do.â&#x20AC;? The   Tigers   took   the   lead   on   their   second  possession,  after  a  short  punt   set  them  up  on  the  Hurricane  41.  Af-­ ter   quarterback  Austin   Robinson   hit   Connor  Quinn  for  12  yards  on  third   down   to   keep   the   drive   alive   and   UDQIRUDQRWKHUÂżUVWGRZQKHIRXQG &XOOHQ+DWKDZD\LQWKHOHIWĂ&#x20AC;DWDQG Hathaway   raced   untouched   for   the   VFRUH7KHÂżUVWRIIRXU6WHDUQVH[WUD SRLQWVPDGHLWDWRIWKHÂżUVW After   the   Tigers   and   Smith   stopped   Hartford   on   the   MUHS   6,   they   moved   to   the   47   and   punted.   Hartford  fumbled  the  punt,  and  Bob-­ by   Ritter   recovered   at   the   Hartford   15.  Smith  then  fumbled  at  the  Hur-­ ricane  6  on  the  next  play  and  Hart-­ ford  recovered,  but  could  not  move   the  ball. 7KH ÂżHOG SRVLWLRQ SDLG RII ZKHQ the  Tigers  took  over  on  the  Hartford   34  and  scored  in  two  plays,  a  19-­yard   Robinson  run  and  an  11-­yard  Hatha-­ way  scamper  to  the  right  side  at  2:55.   That  14-­0  score  held  at  the  half. Hartford   went   nowhere   to   open   the   second   half,   and   the   Tigers   moved  44  yards  to  make  it  21-­0.  Af-­ ter   a   Robinson   run   and   a   facemask   penalty,  two  bursts  by  fullback  Jake   Trautwein  pushed  the  ball  to  the  20,   and   from   there   Hathaway   scored   again,   running   wide   right   and   cut-­ ting  back  across  the  middle. Hartford   then   drove   to   the   Tiger   16,   but   a   bad   snap   and   two   tackles  

for   losses,   one   by   Stearns,   moved   the  ball  back  22  yards.  Hartford  tried   a   screen   pass   to   John   Bielecki;Íž   it   gained  10  yards,  but  Stearns  blew  it   up  there  by  bowling  over  two  block-­ ers  and  Bielecki  with  one  move. Two   possessions   later,   Quinn   picked  off  a  pass  thrown  by  Hartford   QB   Greg   Shinn   as   Trautwein   was   leveling   him.   Quinn   returned   it   23   yards  to  the  Hartford  27,  and  a  play   later  Smith  bolted  25  yards  to  make   it  28-­0  at  7:21  of  the  fourth. Hartford   then   capped   a   75-­yard   GULYH ZLWK D ÂżYH\DUG SDVV IURP Shinn  to  Rice. The   Tigers   gained   295   yards.   Trautwein   (nine   rushes,   92   yards)   and   Robinson   (10   for   76)   led   the   way   as   MUHS   rushed   39   times   for    \DUGV 5RELQVRQ ÂżQLVKHG WZR for  four  for  32  yards. Coach   Smith   said   the  Tigers   mix   in   enough   passing   with   inside   and   outside  running  to  keep  other  teams   off   balance,   and   that   they   have   worked  hard  to  execute  well. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   a   group   of   kids   that   â&#x20AC;Ś   believe  in  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  doing.  And  I   think   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   just   gotten   better   and   better   as   they   year   has   gone   on,â&#x20AC;?   Smith   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Plus   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   added   things  to  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  doing  just   WRVSUHDGWKHÂżHOGRXWPRUH7HDPV have  to  defend  us  all  over  the  place.â&#x20AC;? Defensively  on  Friday,  Smith  said   the  Tigers  played  hard  and  followed   the  game  plan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   kids   just   played   fundamen-­ tal,â&#x20AC;?   Smith   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   kids   are   just   believing   in   the   defense   and   their   reads.â&#x20AC;?     Next   up   are   the   Rebels,   who   the   Tigers   topped   on   Oct.   11,   42-­20,   despite  256  rushing  yards  from  tail-­ back  Tanner  Contois. That   game   featured   912   yards  

Soccer   (Continued  from  Page  16) saved  a  Kamman  header  on  another   White-­Pifer  free  kick.  Senior  Turner   Brett   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   he,   senior   Lucas   Calzini   and  sophomore  Dylan  Weaver  took   WXUQV ÂżOOLQJ LQ IRU 0DF&UHOOLVK ² DOVRÂżUHGMXVWZLGHOHIWDQG6WDPOHU ÂżYHVDYHV VWRSSHGD:KLWHELGRQ a  counterattack. Down   the   stretch,   GMVS   had   several  corner  kicks  and  restarts,  but   the   Eagles   kept   clearing   them   out.   With  0:08  to  go,  GMVS  had  one  last   restart  that  Lower  headed  away,  and   the  Eagles  started  hugging  and  high-­ ÂżYLQJWKHLUIDQV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   waiting   for   this   for   so   long,â&#x20AC;?   Lower   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   we   were  in  7th-­  and  8th-­grade  we  were   talking  about  this  year.â&#x20AC;? And   Corey   will   be   talking   about   this  season  for  many  years  to  come,   and  not  just  because  of  the  wins.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  has  been,  regardless  of  17-­ 1,  the  most  enjoyable  season  I  have   had  in  31  years  of  coaching,â&#x20AC;?  Corey   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   call   each   other   broth-­ EAGLE  ETHAN  WHITE  breaks  up  a  Green  Mountain  Valley  play  dur-­ ers.   They   really   do   believe   they   LQJ6DWXUGD\ÂśV'LYLVLRQ,,VWDWHFKDPSLRQVKLSJDPHLQ5DQGROSK0RXQW have   that   special   bond   with   each   $EUDKDPZRQWKHJDPH Photo  by  Ben  Kaufmann other.â&#x20AC;?

MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  quarterback  Austin  Robinson  ran   IRU\DUGVGXULQJ)ULGD\¶V'LYLVLRQ,VHPL¿QDOJDPHDJDLQVW+DUWIRUG The  Tigers  won  the  game  and  will  play  for  the  state  title  on  Saturday  in   5XWODQG Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

of   offense   between   the   two   team,   slightly   more   from   the   Tigers,   who   were   sparked   by   Trautweinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   223   yards.   They   also   intercepted   three   passes   and   forced   a   Contois   goal-­ line  fumble. Stearns   and   Smith   acknowledged   handling  Contois  would  be  critical. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  make  plays,  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  make  mis-­

takes,   and   contain   Contois   for   as   much  as  you  can,â&#x20AC;?  Smith  said. Stearns  said  the  Tigers  were  excit-­ ed  to  defeat  Hartford,  but  they  have   not   forgotten   their   week-­to-­week   mantra. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   best   feeling   right   now,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   another   week,  another  job  to  take  care  of.â&#x20AC;?

Schedule Score BOARD

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Football D-­I Final At Rutland High Football 11/9  #1  MUHS  vs.  #2  S.  Burlington    ..  5  p.m. D-­I COLLEGE SPORTS 11/1  #1  MUHS  vs.  #4  Hartford    ..............28-­6 Field Hockey D-­III NESCAC Final Four at Amherst 11/1  #1  Woodstock  vs.  #5  OV  ...............35-­0 11/9  Midd.  vs.  Amherst    ...................  11  a.m. Field Hockey 11/9  Tufts  vs.  Bowdoin    .................  1:30  p.m. D-­II Playoffs 11/10    ...................................................  Final 10/30  #3  Mt.  Abe  vs.  #7  Harwood    ..........1-­0 Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer 11/2  #3  Mt.  Abe  vs.  #1  Rice  (Final)    .........2-­1     NESCAC Final Four at Midd. Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Soccer 11/9  Midd.  vs.  Tufts    .........................  11  a.m. D-­II Final 11/9  Trinity  vs.  Williams    ...............  1:30  p.m. 11/2  #1  Mt.  Abe  vs.  #3  GMVS  ................  1-­0 11/10    ...................................................  Final Football COLLEGE SPORTS 11/9  Midd.  at  Tufts    .....................  12:30  p.m. Field Hockey Volleyball 1(6&$&4XDUWHUĂ&#x20AC;QDO NESCAC Championship 11/2  Midd.  vs.  Colby    ...............................3-­0   11/8-­10    ......................................  at  Williams Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer Spectators   are   advised   to   consult   school   10/30  Midd.  vs.  Plymouth    ......................  4-­0 websites  for  the  latest  schedule  updates.   1(6&$&4XDUWHUĂ&#x20AC;QDO 11/2  Williams  vs.  Midd.    ...........................3-­2   HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer 1(6&$&4XDUWHUĂ&#x20AC;QDO 11/2  Midd.  vs.  Colby    ...............................3-­0   Football 11/2  Midd.  vs.  Hamilton  .......................40-­13

Check  out  our  website  for   more  sports  photos  at DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  —  PAGE  19

Food,  farm,  forest  businesses  invited  to  learn  &  network MIDDLEBURY   —   Small   busi-­ local   food   artisans,   but   also   prod-­ ness  owners  and  entrepreneurs  asso-­ uct   demonstrations.   Small   business   ciated  with  Vermont’s   owners   with   proto-­ working   lands   will   “It’s really exciting types   can   receive   di-­ gather   with   capital   to see young rect   feedback   from   and   service   providers   entrepreneurs attendees  that  may  in-­ in   Addison   County   pitch their ideas form   decisions   about   on   Thursday,   Nov.   7,   marketing,   develop-­ for   the   third   annual   and launch ment   and   production   Financing   the   Work-­ business that of  new  products. ing   Landscape   Con-­ are going to “We   are   truly   ex-­ ference.   The   annual   create jobs. This cited   to   again   be   business   symposium,   conference is bringing   people   from   which   is   produced   our   investment   and   about supporting by   Addison   County   services   communities   Economic   Develop-­ the innovators, together   with   local   ment  Corp.  (ACEDC)   the risk-takers innovators   to   focus   and   Addison   County   who start on   the   important   is-­ Relocalization   Net-­ something that VXHV RI ¿QDQFLQJ DQG work   (ACORN)   and   PD\EHQHÀW growing   businesses   features   entrepreneur   that   are   part   of   Ver-­ pitches   and   expert   everyone.” mont’s   working   land-­ IHHGEDFN RQ VSHFL¿F — Jonathan Corcoran scape,”   said   Robin   growth   challenges,   Scheu,   executive   di-­ begins   at   8:30   a.m.   at   the   Middle-­ rector  of  ACEDC.  “Attendees  learn   bury  American  Legion. a  lot  from  the  presentations  and  also   Attendees   can �� register   online   at   from  engaging  with  others  through-­ http://acornvt.org/fwl2013.  The  con-­ ference  fee  is  $30  ($20  for  students),   and   includes   a   local   foods   lunch   prepared   by   student   chefs   from   the   Patricia  A.  Hannaford  Career  Center. The   post-­event   networking   hour   features  not  only  drinks  and  appetiz-­ ers  from  craft  beverage  makers  and  

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out  the  day,”  she  said. “The   working   landscape   is   a   great   opportunity   to   begin   to   mo-­ bilize   local   capital   and   revitalize   the   economy   from   the   ground   up,”   said   Jonathan   Corcoran,   president   of   ACORN.   He   added,   “It’s   really   exciting  to  see  young  entrepreneurs   pitch  their  ideas  and  launch  business   that   are   going   to   create   jobs.   This   conference   is   about   supporting   the   innovators,  the  risk-­takers  who  start   VRPHWKLQJ WKDW PD\ EHQH¿W HYHU\-­ one.” A  highlight  of  the  conference  will   again  be  the  Entrepreneur  Showcase,   which  is  an  opportunity  for  startups   and  new  ventures  to  hone  their  “el-­ evator   pitch.”   Four   local   entrepre-­ neurs  will  make  their  best  3-­minute   pitch  to  a  panel  of  experts  from  the   investment  community. Three   local   entrepreneurs   will   participate   in   this   year’s   Challenge   Presentation,  an  opportunity  to  high-­ OLJKWDVSHFL¿FLVVXHWKH\DUHIDFLQJ in   their   businesses.   A   panel   of   ex-­

Additionally,   participants   can   choose  one  of  two  workshop  tracks:   Early  Stage  or  Established  Business.   Additional   information   is   avail-­ able   online   at   http://acornvt.org/ fwl2013.

Bristol Electronics 453-­2500

MCTV  SCHEDULE  Channels  15  &  16 MCTV  Channel  15 Tuesday, Nov. 5   4  a.m.    Public  Affairs   6:30  a.m.   The  Hub  with  Jamie  Gaucher   8  a.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   4:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board  SP 7RZQ2I¿FHV0HHWLQJ   7  p.m.   Selectboard  10:30  p.m.   The  Hub  with  Jamie     Gaucher/Public  Affairs Wednesday, Nov. 6  DP 7RZQ2I¿FHV0HHWLQJ  DP7RZQ2I¿FHV0HHWLQJ   7:30  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church     Service/Public  Affairs  DP 6HOHFWERDUG7RZQ2I¿FHV0HHWLQJ   3:30  p.m.   Mid  East  Digest   4:30  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   5  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios     6  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   6:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   7  p.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   9  p.m.   Selectboard Thursday, Nov. 7   4  a.m.   Public  Affairs    DP 7RZQ2I¿FHV0HHWLQJ  11:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   Noon   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   4:30  p.m.   The  Hub  with  Jamie  Gaucher   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   DRB   7:30  p.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs  SP 7RZQ2I¿FHV0HHWLQJ3XEOLF$IIDLUV

perts   —   business   owners,   investors   and   business   advisers   —   will   then   ask  questions  and  provide  construc-­ tive  feedback  for  action  steps  to  ef-­ fectively   address   the   challenge   and   to  move  the  business  forward.  

  Friday, Nov. 8   4  a.m.   Public  Affairs   4:30  a.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board/Public  Affairs   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios  DP 6HOHFWERDUG7RZQ2I¿FHV     Meeting/Public  Affairs   3:30  p.m.   Vermont  Media  Exchange  (VMX)   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board/VMX   7  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   7:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs   Midnight   Mid  East  Digest/VMX Saturday, Nov. 9   4  a.m.   Public  Affairs   6:30  a.m.   DRB   8:05  a.m.   Yoga   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo  DP 6HOHFWERDUG7RZQ2I¿FHV0HHWLQJ   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   Yoga   6:30  p.m.   From  the  VMX  SP 7RZQ2I¿FHV0HHWLQJ Sunday, Nov. 10   4  a.m.   Public  Affairs   6  a.m.   Yoga   7  a.m.   Words  of  Peace   7:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   8  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   8:30  a.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   9  a.m.   Catholic  Mass   11  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service  12:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please  see  the  MCTV  website,  www.middleburycommunitytv.org,  for  changes  in  the  schedule;  MCTV  events,   classes  and  news;  and  to  view  many  programs  online.  Submit  listings  to  the  above  address,  or  call  388-­3062.

  5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board/Public  Affairs   6:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   Catholic  Mass   7:30  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   8  p.m.   Yoga/Public  Affairs Monday, Nov. 11   4  a.m.   Public  Affairs     8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   From  the  VMX/Public  Affairs   10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Meetings/Public  Affairs   3:30  p.m.   Yoga   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   7  p.m.   DRB/Public  Meetings METV Channel 16 Tuesday, Nov. 5   4:30  a.m.   VMX   8  a.m.   First  Wednesdays  DP :HOFRPHWR'LYHUVL¿HG2FFXSDWLRQV   10  a.m.   ACSU  Board  12:01  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   2:30  p.m.   From  the  College  SP :HOFRPHWR'LYHUVL¿HG2FFXSDWLRQV   6  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   10  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Wednesday, Nov. 6   4:30  a.m.   VMX   8  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   Noon   UD-­3  Board   2:15  p.m.   VMX   4  p.m.   First  Wednesdays   5:30  p.m.   ACSU  Board   6:58  p.m.   Education:  Join  the  Conversation   7:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­O

  8  p.m.   Eugene  Onegin  10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­O Thursday, Nov. 7   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­O   6:30  a.m.   First  Wednesdays   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education     Noon   From  the  College   2:30  p.m.   School  Boards   9  p.m.   First  Wednesdays  10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­O Friday/Saturday, Nov. 8/9   7  a.m.   For  the  Animals  DP :HOFRPHWR'LYHUVL¿HG2FFXSDWLRQV   8  a.m.   School  Boards   3:30  p.m.   VMX   5  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­O  SP :HOFRPHWR'LYHUVL¿HG2FFXSDWLRQV   6  p.m.   First  Wednesdays   7:03  p.m.   Storytelling,  Arts  and  Performance Sunday, Nov. 10  DP :HOFRPHWR'LYHUVL¿HG2FFXSDWLRQV   6:15  a.m.   VMX   9  a.m.   ACSU  Board   Noon   Middlebury  Five-­O  12:30  p.m.   For  the  Animals   1  p.m.   Eugene  Onegin   5  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­O   6  p.m.   First  Wednesdays   7:30  p.m.   Storytelling,  Arts  and  Performance   10  p.m.   VMX  Monday, Nov. 11   5  a.m.   VMX   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education   1  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   4  p.m.   First  Wednesdays   7  p.m.   ID-­4  Board,  State  Board  of  Education


PAGE  20  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

Family (Continued  from  Page  1) play  narrative.       “It’s   so   much   fun   to   see,”   Eddy-­ Guiles,  who  will  play  a  dragon  and   is  working  on  costuming,  said  of  the   on-­stage  family  reunion. The   senior-­most   member   of   the   clan   needs   little   introduction.   Mar-­ shall   Eddy,   74,   has   been   a   beloved   art   teacher   at   Middlebury   Union   High  School  for  more  than  four  de-­ cades.  He  more  than  knows  his  way   around  a  stage,  having  been  a  direc-­ tor   of   the   MUHS   senior   play   and   a   veteran   actor   in   local   community   theater  offerings  such  as  “Guys  and   Dolls,”   “Fiddler   on   the   Roof,”   “Pi-­ rates  of  Penzance”  and  “Oliver.”  He   has  also  lent  his  baritone  pipes  as  a   soloist  with  the  Vermont  Symphony   Orchestra.  If  that  weren’t  enough,  he   also   founded   a   student   mime   group   at   MUHS   that   had   a   nice,   12-­year   run. “He   was   my   favorite   teacher,”   Eddy-­Guiles  said  of  her  dad.  “There   are  so  many  people  who  come  up  to   me  on  the  street  and  say  things  like,   ‘Your   father   saved   my   daughter’s   life;;   she   didn’t   know   where   to   turn   and   he   gave   her   purpose.’   (My   fa-­ ther)  makes  everyone  feel  important   and  successful.” Marshall  Eddy  had  grown  increas-­ ingly  content  in  recent  years  to  enjoy   theater  from  the  audience  seats. “Frankly,  I  never  thought  I  would   be   in   another   musical,”   he   said.   “And  I  knew  I  didn’t  want  to  do  any   more  leads.” But   Eddy   started   to   soften   his   stance   following   some   gentle   prod-­ ding   from   Tim   Guiles,   Serena’s   husband,   who   is   The   Company’s   stage   director,   musical   director   and   THREE  GENERATIONS  OF  the  Eddy  family  will  take  to  the  Town  Hall  Theater  stage  together  on  Nov.  7  for   orchestra   conductor   for   “Shrek   the   the  opening  of  “Shrek  the  Musical.”  Pictured  are,  clockwise  from  top  left,  Marshall  Eddy,  son  Stan,  grandson   Musical.” Max  Moulton,  son-­in-­law  Tim  Guiles,  granddaughter  Kess  Moulton  and  daughter  Serena  Eddy-­Guiles. “Tim  started  dangling  this  role  (of   Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

“Papa  Ogre”),  saying  ‘There’s  a  re-­ ally   good   part   there   for   some   older   JX\ , KRSH ZH FDQ ¿QG WKH ULJKW guy,’”  Eddy  said  with  a  smile.  “They   kind  of  started  to  work  on  me.” Tim  Guiles   must   have  been  quite   convincing,  as  Marshall  Eddy  agreed   to   take   on   not   only   “Papa   Ogre,”   but   also   the   roles   of   “Papa   Bear,”   a   guard,   a   knight,   a   villager   and   a   bishop.   Several   actors   involved   in   the  “Shrek”  production  are  taking  on   multiple  roles. ³,¶P DFWXDOO\ ¿QGLQJ WKDW WKLV D challenge   I’ve   never   faced   before,”   he  noted  of  the  different  singing  har-­ monies,   rapid   costume   changes   and   other   tasks   that   go   along   with   the   “Shrek”  production.  It’s  a  challenge   Eddy   confessed   he   would   not   have   taken  on  had  there  not  been  so  many   other   family   members   involved   in   the  production. That   family   angle   also   sold   Stan   Eddy,  Serena’s  brother,  on  becoming   involved  in  “Shrek.” Stan   Eddy   had   not   done   any   the-­ ater   work   since   he   was   a   senior   at   MUHS  a  few  decades  ago. “I  was  all  set  to  enjoy  the  rest  of   the  family  in  the  play,”  he  said  mat-­ ter-­of-­factly. But   Stan,   like   his   dad,   had   his   breaking   point.   His   came   when   he   was  offered  the  role  of  Pinocchio. “I   thought   of   my   seven-­year-­old   and  how  thrilling  it  would  be  for  him   to   see   me   on   stage   as   Pinocchio,”   said   Stan   Eddy,   the   self-­proclaimed   family  “goofball”  who  fabricated  his   own  articulating  nose  for  the  perfor-­ mance. “It   was   a   once-­in-­a-­lifetime   op-­ portunity  to  perform  with  three  gen-­ erations   of   the   family,”   Stan   Eddy   added. From  there,  it  wasn’t  tough  at  all   to   convince   a   few   members   of   the   third   (and   youngest)   generation   of   the  family  to  join  the  fold. Kess   Moulton,   Serena’s   14-­year-­ old   daughter,   signed   on   to   play   the   young  “Fiona”  as  well  as  one  of  the   Three   Blind   Mice   and   one   of   the   Three  Little  Pigs. “It  is  so  much  fun  to  have  so  many   parts,”  Kess  said.  “It’s  great  to  have   so  much  to  do.” Her   brother,   17-­year-­old   Max   Moulton,  will  also  be  juggling  a  lot   of   different   assignments,   albeit   in   the   orchestra   pit.   The   musical   vir-­ tuoso   will   play   a   whopping   six   in-­ struments,   including   the   baritone,   tenor   and   soprano   saxophones;;   the   FODULQHWDEDVVFODULQHWDQGWKHÀXWH “When  you  watch  him  play,  it’s  an   athletic   event,”   Tim   Guiles   said   of   the  young  Moulton,  a  member  of  the   much  acclaimed  MUHS  Jazz  Band. Max   Moulton   had   an   interest   in   acting,   but   that   gradually   took   a   backseat   to   academics,   sports   and   music. “The  pit  orchestra  is  less  of  a  time   commitment,”  he  said  with  a  smile. “Shrek   the   Musical”   will   be   per-­ formed   on   Nov.   7,   8,   9,   14,   15   and   16  at  7:30  p.m.,  with  2  p.m.  matinees   set   for   Nov.   10,   16   and   17.   Tickets   are  $23  for  adults,  $18  for  children. Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  21

Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Market  indoors  for  season MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  With  the  cold   weather   approaching,   Middlebury   Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Market   will   once   again   move   indoors   at   the   Mary   Hogan   Elementary   School   gymnasium.   Hours   are   9:30   a.m.   to   1   p.m.   on   Saturdays   through   December,   and   again  March  through  April. Though   many   home   gardeners   are   putting   their   vegetable   gardens   to   bed   now,   local   farmers   are   still   harvesting   a   wide   variety   of   vege-­ tables  and  plan  to  continue  through   December   and   beyond.   Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   PDUNHW VKRSSHUV ZLOO ÂżQG JUHHQV root   veggies   and   squash,   eggs,   cheese,  meats,  fresh  breads,  pastries,   granola,   prepared   foods,   maple   syrup,  and  more. The  market  is  also  a  great  place  to  

¿QG KROLGD\ JLIWV DQG FUDIWV PDGH and  sold  by  local  artisans.  With    space   available ��to  sit  and  chat,  people  can   come   enjoy   locally   roasted   coffee   or  a  freshly  baked  treat  with  friends   and   neighbors.  The   annual   Holiday   Market  is  planned  for  Dec.  7,  also  at   the  school. Centrally   located   just   off   Route   7,   adjacent   to   Buttolph   Acres   and   local  shopping  centers,  Mary  Hogan   School  is  a  convenient  place  for  the  

indoor  market  with  plenty  of  parking   IRUFXVWRPHUV7R¿QGRXWPRUHDQG to  keep  up  with  new  developments,   friend   the   market   on   Facebook   at   facebook/middleburyfarmersmarket   or   visit   middleburyfarmersmarket. org. There   are   a   select   number   of   spaces   available   for   producers   and   crafters   who   would   like   to   vend.   Email   sybeckwith@shoreham.net   for  information.

Author to show kids steps for book creation

Trunk  or  treat TWO  MASKED  TRICK-­OR-­TREATERS  pause  for  a  photo  op  dur-­ ing  Leicester  Central  Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Trunk  or  Treatâ&#x20AC;?  event  on  Halloween   night.   Friends   of   Leicester   Central   School   representatives   say   in   spite   of   the   rainy   weather   nearly   100   children   attended   the   event   in  the  school  parking  lot,  where  adults  handed  out  candy  from  the   trunks  of  their  decorated  cars.  

MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   As   part   of   its   annual   read-­a-­thon,   Mary   Hogan   School   will   host   Vermont   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   book   author   Natalie   Kinsey-­Warnock   on   Thursday,   Nov.   7,   at   6   p.m.   in   the   school   library. Kinsey-­Warnock   will   show   the   process   of   creating   a   book,   from   the   writing   through   the   illustra-­ tions   to   the   finished   product.   She   will   show   several   slides   of   her   home  in  Vermont  and  the  animals   she  has  rescued. Explaining   that   many   of   her   stories   are   drawn   from   her   own   experiences,   Kinsey-­Warnock   will  encourage  students  to  explore   stories   from   their   own   lives.   She   will   talk   about   various   ways   the   students  can  uncover  family  stories   and  use  them  in  their  writing.

Look What Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re Doing Now!

SolarSheatÂŽ_ Solar Space Heating Â&#x2021;6DYHRQWKHKLJKFRVWRIKHDWLQJRLO QDWXUDOJDVRUHOHFWULFLW\ Â&#x2021;5HGXFH\RXUFDUERQIRRWSULQW Â&#x2021;6ROXWLRQVIRUDOOVL]HVRIURRPVKRPHV DQGEXVLQHVVHV Â&#x2021;5HDFKHVWHPSHUDWXUHVXSWRÂ&#x192;)

6QRZ%RZO 6HDVRQ3DVV  5DWHV IRU 6DOHH[SDQGHGWKURXJK1RYHPEHU Early Adult $410 Alumni 365 Student 300 Junior 240 Child and 70+ 105 Sr. Citizen 300

After Nov. $500 455 365 280 145 365

MID-­WEEK  PASS  $245   This  pass  is  valid  on  weekdays  from  the  beginning  of  the  season  until  3/1/14,   excluding  the  weeks  of  12/27/13-­  1/1/14  and  2/17/13-­  2/21/14.    From  3/1/14   to  the  end  of  the  season,  the  pass  is  valid  7  days  a  week.  On  any  weekend   day  or  holiday,  mid-­week  pass  holders  can  purchase  an  all  day  ticket  for  the   half  day  rate.

MIDD  STUDENT*  $175 FAC/STAFF HDFKRIWKH¿UVWWZR *  Valid  Midd  card  required  for  Middlebury  College  faculty/staff  passes   DQGPXVWEHEHQH¿WVHOLJLEOH

Â&#x2021;6HOISRZHUHGÂąQRHOHFWULFDOKRRNXSUHTXLUHG Â&#x2021;7KHUPRVWDWLFDOO\FRQWUROOHG

A  CHILD  is  under  6  years  old.  A  JUNIOR  is  6  years  old  through  6th  grade.   A  STUDENT  is  7th  grade  through  college.  A  SENIOR CITIZEN  is  62-­69. Order  your  pass  online  at  www.middleburysnowbowl.com  or  by  mail.  Form   available  on  the  website.  Forms  of  payment  accepted  are  cash,  check,  VISA   or  Mastercard.  Credit  card  purchases  can  be  made  by  calling  802-­443-­5125   or  online  at  www.middleburysnowbowl.com.  If  you  have  questions  concerning   this  sale  please  call  802-­443-­7669  or  email  snowbowl@middlebury.edu.  


PAGE  22  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

Champlain Valley Small Animal

MOBILE CLINIC Randall Ross, VMD

e h t W f o e e t k e P Hi, my name is Cricket.

On-site Diagnostics Wellness Exams - Vaccines Lyme & Heartworm Testing Flea & Tick Products Home Euthanasia

 s 6ERMONTMOBILEVETCOM

Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m a Gordon setter... If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to include your pet as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pet of the Weekâ&#x20AC;? simply include your petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, gender, approximate age (if you know it), along with comments about the petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite activities, your favorite activity with the pet, what the pet enjoys eating, and any particular

stories or incidents you might like to share concerning your pet. Send the photo and story to the Addison Independent, Pet Page, 58 Maple St., Middlebury, Vt., 05753, or email a high-resolution jpeg to news@ addisonindependent.com.

and would like to know when youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re going to give me the treat that must be coming because you asked me to do lie down for this photo â&#x20AC;&#x201D; canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t you tell from the picture that Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m concentrating on reminding you that I EXPECT a treat, so where is it? I just turned 12 years old and am spending much more time lying around than those many early years when I couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t stop moving. And I

didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really like to meet new people or dogs â&#x20AC;&#x201D; a doctor called me â&#x20AC;&#x153;predictably unpredictable.â&#x20AC;? But all seems cool now, I only get excited when my friends come (who, of course, instantly give me a treat) to visit. Even though my legs donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t always work just right now, life is good! Susie Leonard New Haven

PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUNDâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Addison Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Humane Society What  a  pretty  gal!  Just  look  at  those  gorgeous  green   eyes.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  Bananas,  one  of  the  many  sweet  and  friendly   felines   here   at   the   shelter.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   petite   and   have   the   cutest  little  pink  nose.  I  love  to  get  attention  and  I  love   to  play!  I  would  make  a  great  mouser!   Since   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   at   the   shelter,   the   staff   has   really   taken   right   to   me.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   simply   fun   and   friendly   and   would  make  someone  a  great  little  companion,  happily   welcoming   you   home   each   and   every   day.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   such   a   great   personality   and   would   easily   get   along   with   other   feline   friends,   canine   companions   and   people  of  all  ages.    Come  meet  me  today  and  see  what  a  neat  gal  I  am!  

What  a  pretty  gal,  right?  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  Willow,  a  young  medium   mix  dog  who  is  full  of  love  and  energy.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   super   sweet   and   very,   very   smart.   I   love   to   go   for   walks   and   I   love   to   play.   I   bond   very   closely   with   my  person  and  can  be  anxious  if  left  alone  too  long.  I   have  done  well  with  the  other  dogs  here  at  the  shelter   and  would  do  well  with  a  canine  companion  in  my  new   home.   I  am  very  pretty  and  loving  and  loyal  and  would  love   WRÂżQGP\IRUHYHUKRPH,ÂśGEHDJUHDWKLNLQJEXGG\

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  23

%UDQGRQXQGHUSUHVVXUHWRORFDWHQHZRIÂżFHVSDFH Insurance  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   pay  for  all  repairs By  LEE  J.  KAHRS BRANDON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Two   years,   two   months  and  numerous  mistakes  have   landed  the  town  of  Brandon  back  to   VTXDUHRQHZLWKRXWRIÂżFHVSDFHDQG QRZDGHDGOLQHWRÂżQGVRPHIDVW The   long-­overdue   renovation   of   WKH WRZQ RIÂżFHV RQ &HQWHU 6WUHHW ground   to   a   halt   last   week   after   WKH 9HUPRQW /HDJXH RI &LWLHV DQG Towns   settled   the   townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   claim   on   WKHEXLOGLQJDWDPXFKORZHUSD\RXW WKDQDQWLFLSDWHG 6HOHFWERDUG &KDLU 'HYRQ )XOOHU DQQRXQFHG DW DQ 2FW  PHHWLQJ that   he   and   Town   Manager   Robin   Bennett  met  with  builders  from  the   0F.HUQRQ *URXS ZKLFK KDG FRQ-­ tracted   to   do   the   renovation,   to   go   over  the  numbers  based  on  the  insur-­ DQFHVHWWOHPHQW â&#x20AC;&#x153;McKernon  retracted  their  bid,  so   DW WKLV SRLQW ZHÂśUH EDFN WR VTXDUH RQH´)XOOHUVDLGÂł:HKDYHOHVVWKDQ KDOIRIZKDWWKHLQLWLDOELGZDVIRU´ 7KH WRZQ KDV EHHQ RSHUDWLQJ RXW RI WKH %UDQGRQ )LUH 6WDWLRQ VLQFH D Ă&#x20AC;RRG FDXVHG E\ 7URSLFDO 6WRUP ,UHQH VZHSW WKURXJK WKH GRZQWRZQ RQ $XJ   $OWKRXJK WKH WRZQRIÂżFHEXLOGLQJZDVĂ&#x20AC;RRGHGDQ LQVSHFWLRQ UHYHDOHG PLQLPDO GDP-­ DJHWRWKHERQHVRIWKHVWUXFWXUH 5HJDUGOHVV SDUWLWLRQV DQG ZDOOV ZHUH VWULSSHG RXW RI WKH EXLOGLQJ URXJKO\ VL[ PRQWKV DIWHU WKH Ă&#x20AC;RRG and  the  town  saw  the  situation  as  an  

RSSRUWXQLW\IRUDORQJRYHUGXHUHQR-­ adding  that  it  was  made  to  ensure  that   YDWLRQWRWKH\HDUROGEXLOGLQJ WKHGHSDUWPHQWÂłFDQVHUYHDQGSURWHFW Now,   that   move   has   cost   the   town   WKHSHRSOHRI%UDQGRQ´ the   ability   to   move   back   into   the   Based  on  the  imminent  deadline  to   building,  as  the  insurance  claim  was   YDFDWH WKH ÂżUH VWDWLRQ FRXSOHG ZLWK QRWQHDUO\HQRXJKWRGRWKHMRE the   undersized   insurance   settlement,   EVICTION  NOTICE )XOOHU RIIHUHG WKUHH RSWLRQV IRU WKH $QGLQDSHUIHFWVWRUPRIREVWDFOHV town   to   take   regarding   the   town   of-­ WKHÂżUHGHSDUWPHQWLVVXHGDOHWWHUWR ÂżFHV WKH WRZQ GDWHG 2FW Â&#x2021;7DNH WKH PRQH\ GHPDQGLQJWKDWWKH â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think the town the   town   received,   WRZQYDFDWHWKHÂżUHVWD-­ URXJKO\DQG WLRQ RQ RU EHIRUH 'HF RIĂ&#x20AC;FHGHPROLWLRQ use  as  much  volunteer   ZDVDPLVWDNH  ODERU DV SRVVLEOH WR Âł0DQ\ SURPLVHV ZLWKRXWDGRXEW renovate   the   town   of-­ have   been   made   about   ÂżFHV WR ZKHUH WKH RI-­ DQGQRZWKH a   time   frame   â&#x20AC;Ś   and   ÂżFLDOV FDQ PRYH EDFN to  date  we  are  still  at  a   ERDUGDQG LQWRWKHEXLOGLQJ YLUWXDO VWDQGVWLOO´ )LUH the new town Â&#x2021;9DFDWH WKH WRZQ &KLHI 5RPDQ :GRZL-­ PDQDJHUZLOO RIÂżFHEXLOGLQJSHUPD-­ DNZURWH QHQWO\DQGÂżQGDQRWKHU :GRZLDN FLWHG WKH KDYHWRĂ&#x20AC;JXUH EXLOGLQJ RU VSDFH WR ongoing  inconvenience   RXWKRZWRPRYH OHDVH ORQJWHUP SRV-­ RIORVWFODVVURRPVSDFH IRUZDUGÂľ VLEO\ZLWKDQRSWLRQWR IRU ÂżUHÂżJKWHUV LQ WKH â&#x20AC;&#x201D;6HOHFWERDUG&KDLU EX\ building,  who  must  use   Â&#x2021;/HDVH DQRWKHU 'HYRQ)XOOHU the  truck  bays  for  regu-­ building  and  go  to  the   ODUWUDLQLQJLQ&35DQG voters   in   March   to   RWKHU FHUWLÂżFDWLRQ VNLOOV +H DOVR UH-­ bond  for  the  money  needed  to  reno-­ TXHVWHGÂłMXVWDQGHTXLWDEOHFRPSHQ-­ YDWH WKH ROG WRZQ RIÂżFH EXLOGLQJ VDWLRQEHPDGHWRWKHÂżUHGLVWULFWIRU ZKLFKZRXOGFRVWURXJKO\ DGGHGH[SHQVHVDQGORVWUHYHQXHWKDW Bennett  said  she  would  check,  but   KDYHEHHQLQFXUUHGE\WKHÂżUHGLVWULFW she   believes   the   town   can   use   the   DVDUHVXOWRIWKHWRZQRIÂżFHVEHLQJ  LQVXUDQFH PRQH\ DQ\ ZD\ KRXVHGDWWKHÂżUHVWDWLRQ´ LWVHHVÂżW)XOOHUVDLGWKHWRZQZRXOG 7KH ÂżUH FKLHI KDV DOVR UHTXHVWHG XVH WKH VHWWOHPHQW PRQH\ WR SD\ IRU WKDWWKHWRZQUHWXUQWKHÂżUHVWDWLRQWR WKH OHDVH RQ DQRWKHU VSDFH VR QR the  condition  it  was  before  the  town   money  would  come  out  of  the  general   PRYHGLQ IXQG â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  decision  is  one  that  has  been   The   selectboard   unanimously   au-­ GLIÂżFXOW WR PDNH´ :GRZLDN ZURWH thorized   Bennett   to   look   for   a   new  

UHQWDOVSDFHIRUWRZQRIÂżFHVWDIIDQG WRLQFOXGHWKHSRVVLELOLW\RIWKH%UDQ-­ GRQ7RZQ+DOO7KHERDUGLVKRSLQJ that  can  be  done  by  the  boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  next   VFKHGXOHG PHHWLQJ RQ 1RY  DW  SP 7KH WRZQ RZQV WKH WRZQ KDOO outright,  and  the  newly  renovated  and   now   heated   lower   level   could   house   WRZQVWDIIDWQRFRVWWRWKHWRZQ But  Kathy  Rausenberger,  treasurer   IRUWKH)ULHQGVRIWKH%UDQGRQ7RZQ Hall,   reminded   the   board   that   vari-­ RXV SDUWLHV DQG JURXSV KDYH UHQWHG WKHVSDFHIRUWKHFRPLQJZHHNVIRU DFWLYLWLHVLQFOXGLQJDZHGGLQJUHFHS-­ tion,   a   state   water   meeting,   and   the   annual   Moonlight   Madness   holiday   VKRSSLQJHYHQWLQ'HFHPEHU PAST  IS  PROLOGUE :KDW UHDOO\ VWDQGV RXW LQ WKH %UDQGRQ 7RZQ 2IÂżFH VDJD DUH WKH PLVWDNHVPDGHOHDGLQJXSWRWKHFXU-­ UHQWFULVLV,WFDPHWROLJKWDWWKH2FW  VHOHFWERDUG PHHWLQJ WKDW IRUPHU town  manager  Keith  Arlund  did  not   HYHQÂżOHDFODLPZLWK9/&7RQWKH SURSHUW\ XQWLO 2FWREHU  ²  PRQWKVDIWHUWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRG²ZKLFKGH-­ layed  the  insurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  evaluation  of  the   FODLP1RZLWVHHPVWKDWWKHFOHDU-­ LQJRXWRIWKHWRZQRIÂżFHVSDFHLQ-­ FUHDVHGWKHUHQRYDWLRQSULFHWDJ 1HLJKERULQJSURSHUW\RZQHUV-LP DQG 1DQF\ /HDU\ KDYH EHHQ SUHVV-­ ing  the  board  for  answers  as  to  why   WKHVH PLVVWHSV ZHUH DOORZHG DQG ZKRLVUHVSRQVLEOH â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  not  for  the  demolition  done  in   )HEUXDU\FRXOGWKHWRZQKDYH PRYHGEDFNLQWRWKHWRZQRIÂżFHV"´ -LP /HDU\ DVNHG )XOOHU DW WKLV SDVW

0RQGD\ÂśVPHHWLQJ Âł<HV´)XOOHUVDLGÂł,GRQÂśWVHHDQ\ UHDVRQZK\QRW´ 6HOHFWZRPDQ 0DULD $PPDWXQD said   she   has   been   researching   what   OHGXSWRWKHGHPROLWLRQ6KHQRWHGLQ WKH VHOHFWERDUG PLQXWHV GXULQJ )HE-­ UXDU\  WKDW$UOXQG VDLG LW ÂłZDV DJRRGWLPHWRXSGDWHWKHEXLOGLQJ´ 6KHDOVRGLVFRYHUHGDSXUFKDVHRUGHU IRUVLJQHGE\$UOXQGDQGDX-­ thorizing   the   demolition   at   the   town   RIÂżFH EXLOGLQJ 1RUPDOO\ WKH WRZQ manager  is  only  authorized  to  sign  off   RQSXUFKDVHRUGHUVXSWRDQG PXVW KDYH VHOHFWERDUG DSSURYDO IRU SXUFKDVHV DERYH $PPDWXQD said  she  was  still  trying  to  determine   WKHIDFWVDURXQGWKDWSXUFKDVHRUGHU ,W ZDV WKHQVHOHFWERDUG &KDLU Richard  Baker  who  orchestrated  the   GHPROLWLRQ LQVLGH WKH WRZQ RIÂżFH building,  but  he  contends  the  board   ZDVIXOO\DZDUHRIWKHSURFHVV 5HJDUGOHVV )XOOHU DFNQRZOHGJHG WKDWPLVWDNHVZHUHPDGH Âł, WKLQN WKH WRZQ RIÂżFH GHPROL-­ tion  was  a  mistake  without  a  doubt,   and  now  the  board  and  the  new  town   PDQDJHUZLOOKDYHWRÂżJXUHRXWKRZ WR PRYH IRUZDUG´ )XOOHU VDLG Âł, was  on  that  board  and  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know   how  to  hold  accountable  who  made   WKDWGHFLVLRQ:HZRXOGQÂśWEHLQWKLV SUHGLFDPHQWDWDOO LIWKHGHPROLWLRQ KDGQRWKDSSHQHG :HKDGPDQDJH-­ PHQW WKDW ZDV QRW RQ WKH EDOO :H ZHQW DERYH DQG EH\RQG WR ÂżQG D WRZQ PDQDJHU ZKR FDQ GR WKH MRE I  wish  we  could  go  back  in  time,  but   ZHFDQÂśW´

Vergennes  pipeline  petition  is  ready By  ANDY  KIRKALDY 9(5*(11(6 ² 9HUJHQQHV RI-­ ÂżFLDOV DQG D UHVLGHQW ZKR LV SHWL-­ tioning   against   the   city   councilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   VXSSRUW RI WKH SURSRVHG 9HUPRQW *DV6\VWHPVSLSHOLQHH[WHQVLRQODVW week  again  mutually  agreed  to  de-­ OD\DFFHSWLQJKLVSHWLWLRQ That   delay   is   intended   to   make   VXUHYRWLQJRQWKHSHWLWLRQFDQRF-­ FXU RQ WKH VDPH GD\ DV D SODQQHG 9HUJHQQHV 8QLRQ +LJK 6FKRRO ERQGYRWH Balloting   on   both   measures   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   WKH SHWLWLRQ RQ ZKHWKHU UHVLGHQWV VKRXOG UHYHUVH DOGHUPHQÂśV SLSHOLQH endorsement   and   whether  Addison   1RUWKZHVW 6XSHUYLVRU\ 8QLRQ YRW-­ HUV VKRXOG EDFN D  PLOOLRQ ERQGWRIXQGPDMRUUHSDLUVDQGXS-­ JUDGHVDW98+6²LVQRZSODQQHG IRU'HF $OGHUPHQDQGJDVOLQHSHWLWLRQHU -HII0DUJROLVZKRKDYHFRRSHUDWHG LQ WKH SURFHVV LQ UHFHQW ZHHNV RQ SHWLWLRQ ZRUGLQJ DQG WLPLQJ ZLOO PHHW DW &LW\ +DOO RQ 7XHVGD\ DW  SPWRDOORZWKHFRXQFLOWRIRUPDO-­ O\DFFHSW0DUJROLVÂśSHWLWLRQ %HFDXVH SHWLWLRQV LPSRVH VWULFW timetables   on   towns   once   they   are   KDQGHG LQ 0DUJROLV DQG FLW\ RIÂż-­ FLDOVDJUHHGWRSRVWSRQHDSODQQHG 2FWPHHWLQJXQWLOWKLV7XHVGD\ $FFHSWLQJ WKH SHWLWLRQ WKLV ZHHN ZLOODOORZDYRWHRQLWRQ'HF FLW\RIÂżFLDOVVDLG 0DUJROLVÂś SHWLWLRQ VLJQHG E\ DERXW  UHVLGHQWV PRUH WKDQ

WKH  UHTXLUHG PLQLPXP UHDGV Âł6KDOO WKH YRWHUV VXSSRUW WKH &LW\ &RXQFLO WR HQFRXUDJH WKH 9HUPRQW 3XEOLF6HUYLFH%RDUGWRDOORZ9HU-­ PRQW *DV 6\VWHPV ,QF WR H[SDQG its   transmission   and   distribution   systems   to   serve   the   residents   and   businesses  of  Vergennes?â&#x20AC;?   $WWKH2FWFLW\FRXQFLOPHHW-­ LQJ+DZOH\VDLGRIÂżFLDOVDQG0DU-­ JROLV DJUHHG RQ QHXWUDO SHWLWLRQ language   that   would   be   easily   un-­ GHUVWRRGE\YRWHUV Âł,WÂśV FOHDU´ +DZOH\ VDLG ³¾<HVÂś PHDQV JDV WR 9HUJHQQHV DQG Âľ1RÂś PHDQVQRJDV´ 0DUJROLV ÂżUVW FDPH EHIRUH WKH FRXQFLO RQ 6HSW  DQG WROG DO-­ GHUPHQ KH RSSRVHV WKH QDWXUDO JDV SLSHOLQH H[WHQVLRQ RQ HQYLURQPHQ-­ tal   grounds   and   favors   alternative,   renewable   energy   sources   that   he   said   could   be   shunted   aside   if   the   SLSHOLQHJRHVIRUZDUG 7KH SLSHOLQH H[WHQVLRQ DFFRUG-­ LQJWR9HUPRQW*DVFRXOGSURYLGH city   residents   as   well   as   others   in   WKH FRXQW\ ZLWK D FKHDSHU KRPH heating  alternative,  and  could  save   FRXQW\EXVLQHVVHVRQHQHUJ\FRVWV &RXQFLO VXSSRUW IRU WKH SLSHOLQH came   in   the   form   of   a   letter   back-­ LQJ 9HUPRQW *DVÂśV DSSOLFDWLRQ WR WKH 9HUPRQW 3XEOLF 6HUYLFH %RDUG 36% VHHNLQJWRXVHDUHVHUYHIXQG WR SD\ IRU LWV SLSHOLQH H[WHQVLRQ IURP &KLWWHQGHQ &RXQW\ 7KH 36% will  ultimately  rule  on  whether  the   H[WHQVLRQZLOOPRYHIRUZDUG

7KH98+6ERDUGZDVVHWWRPHHW DW  DP RQ 0RQGD\ WR VLJQ D ZDUQLQJ IRU D 'HF  YRWH RQ WKH PLOOLRQERQG VUHS  BOND  DETAILS 7KDWERQGZRXOGSD\IRUDFRP-­ SOHWHUHEXLOGRIWKHVFKRROÂśVNLWFKHQ and   cafeteria;Íž   a   new   heating   and   ventilation   system   for   the   audito-­ ULXPSOXVVDIHUOLJKWLQJVRXQGDQG ULJJLQJHTXLSPHQWDQGFOHDQLQJIRU WKDWVSDFHWKDWRIÂżFLDOVVD\ZLOOUH-­ turn   it   to   functioning   status;Íž   new   middle   school   gym   bleachers;Íž   and   VLWHZRUNWKDWZLOOVWRSZDWHUIURP LQÂżOWUDWLQJ WKH IRXQGDWLRQ SOXV VLGHZDONUHSDLUSDUNLQJORWSDYLQJ QHZ KDQGLFDS DQG JXHVW SDUNLQJ DQGDVDIHUWUDIÂżFĂ&#x20AC;RZ 98+6 ERDUG PHPEHUV DOVR GH-­ FLGHG ODVW ZHHN WR UROO D  ORDQ WR SD\ IRU DQ RQJRLQJ URRI-­ LQJSURMHFWLQWRWKHERQGUDLVLQJLW IURP ZKDW KDG EHHQ DURXQG  PLOOLRQ %\ GRLQJ VR WKH\ FKDQJHG SD\-­ PHQWV RQ WKDW  ORDQ WR  \HDUV UDWKHU WKDQ ÂżYH \HDUV DQG ZLOOREWDLQDORZHULQWHUHVWUDWH 2IÂżFLDOVVDLGWKHGHFLVLRQZRXOG VDYH DERXW  D \HDU LQ WKH ÂżUVW ÂżYH \HDUV DQG WKH SD\PHQWV RQDQGWKHWD[LPSDFWRIWKHODUJHU ERQG ZRXOG EH OHVV WKDQ WKH VHSD-­ UDWH SD\PHQWV RQ WKH ORDQ DQG D PLOOLRQERQG Andy  Kirkaldy  may  be  reached  at   andyk@addisonindependent.com.

REACH THE COUNTY, PLACE YOUR AD HERE. CALL 388-4944


PAGE  24  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  25

CSAC  annual  meetingâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  topic  will  be  health  care  reform MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   chair   of   the   Green   Mountain   Care   Board   will  discuss  the  state  of  health  care   reform   at   the   annual   meeting   of   the   Counseling   Service   of  Addison   County   on   Nov.   14.   The   meeting   will  be  held  at  CSACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  headquarters   at  109  Catamount  Park  off  Exchange   Street.   It   begins   with   registration   and   hors   dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres   at   5   p.m.   to   be   followed  by  a  program  from  5:30  to  

7  p.m. Al  Gobeille,  a  Shelburne  business-­ PDQ DQG FKDLU RI WKH ÂżYHPHPEHU board   created   by   the   Legislature   to   control   the   growing   cost   of   health   care  in  Vermont,  will  present  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Green   Mountain  Care  Board:  Why  are  we   here   and   where   are   we   going?â&#x20AC;?   In   addition,   CSAC   will   honor   agency   staff   and   community   members   for   their  commitment  to  the  well-­being  

of  Addison  County. Awards  and  recipients  include  the   Master  Guide  Award  to  Al  Gobeille   and  Megan  Mayo,  Intensive  School   Supports   Program   Coordinator;͞   the   Holly   Clook   Award   to   Jeff   Ladd,   community   integration   specialist,   Community   Associates;͞   the   Wilton   W.   Covey   Community   Award   to   Paige  Ackerson-­Kiely,  John  Graham   Shelter;͞   the   William   J.   Lippert  

$GYRFDF\ $ZDUG WR ,DLQ +RHĂ&#x20AC;H 'LYHUVLÂżHG 2FFXSDWLRQV SURJUDP and   the   Wilton   W.   Covey   Staff   Award  to  Annie  Schrader,  advanced   practice  nurse,  CSAC. A  32-­by-­58-­inch  panel  commem-­ orating   the   200th   anniversary   of   the  construction  of  89  Main  St.,  the   home   of   the   counseling   serviceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   adult   clinical   programs,   will   also   be   unveiled.   Known   as   the   Phelps  

House,   89   Main   St.   was   the   home-­ stead  of  S.S.  Phelps  and  his  son,  E.J.   Phelps,  two  of  the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  and  coun-­ tryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   most   distinguished   lawyers   in   the  19th  century. The   annual   meeting   is   open   to   all   community   members.   For   more   information   call   Ann   Kensek   at   388-­0302,   ext.   442,   or   email   akensek@csac-­vt.org.   RSVPs   are   requested  by  Nov.  8.

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U-­Haul Box  Dealer

NEW   HAVEN SELF  STORAGE

Now  owned  by  Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Auto  &  Towing 2877  ETHAN  ALLEN  HWY.  (RT.7) 1(:+$9(197Â&#x2021;  

Middlebury,  VT

Call  for  a  FREE  on-­site  evaluation

RENT-A-SPOUSE

Climate  Control   Coming  Soon!  

SIDING

STORAGE

VINYL  SIDING &  ROOFING We  also  do SDLQWLQJ

Al  LeMay :LQGRZVÂ&#x2021;'RRUV 5HSDLUV 3UHVVXUH:DVKLQJ ,QVXUHGa1R-RE7RR6PDOO

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STAMPS

WEDDING

Self    Inking  &  Hand  Stamps

Stop in to the Addison Independent office in the Marble Works to view a wonderful selection of

ROOFING

roofing Michael Doran

MADE TO ORDER

As  seen  at  Addison  County  Field  Days!

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Phone (802) 537-3555

 

                             Available  at  the    

                           Addison  Independent in  the  Marble  Works,  Middlebury

388-4944

Wedding Invitations for Your Special Day!

388-4944

     For  more  info  call      


PAGE  26  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

AL-­ANON:   FOR   FAMILIES   and  friends  affected  by  some-­ oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drinking.   Members   share   experience,   strength   and   hope   to   solve   common   problems.   Newcomers   wel-­ come.   Confidential.   St.   Ste-­ phenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church  (use  front  side   door  and  go  to  second  floor)   in  Middlebury,  Sunday  nights   7:15-­8:15pm.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   SATURDAY:   Discussion   Meeting  9:00-­10:00  AM  at  the   Middlebury  United  Methodist   Church.   Discussion   Meeting   10:00-­11:00   AM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Be-­ ginners   Meeting   6:30-­7:30   PM.   These   three   meetings   are  held  at  the  Turning  Point   ALATEEN:   FOR   YOUNG   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   PEOPLE   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   af-­ Middlebury. fected   by   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drink-­ ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   ing.   Members   share   experi-­ MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   ence,  strength,  hope  to  solve   THURSDAY:  Big  Book  Meet-­ common   problems.   Meets   ing   Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   Wednesdays   7:15-­8:15pm   Turning   Point   Center   in   the   downstairs   in   Turning   Point   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.   Center   of   Addison   County   Speaker   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   in   Middlebury   Marbleworks.   PM  at  St.  Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,   (Al-­Anon   meets   at   same   Main  St.(On  the  Green). time  nearby  at  St.  Stephens   Church. ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   FRIDAY:  Discussion  Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   Turn-­ ing  Point  in  the  Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Services The Volunteer Center, a collaboration of RSVP and the United Way of Addison County, posts dozens of volunteer opportunities on the Web. Go to www. unitedwayaddisoncounty .org/VolunteerDonate and click on VOLUNTEER NOW!

Services

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   WEDNESDAY:   Big   Book   Meeting   7:15-­8:15   AM   is   held  at  the  Middlebury  United   Methodist  Church  on  N.  Pleas-­ ant  Street.  Discussion  Meet-­ ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting  5:30-­6:30  PM.  Both   held   at   The   Turning   Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   SUNDAY:   12   Step   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   held   at   the   Middlebury  United  Methodist   Church  on  N.  Pleasant  Street.   Discussion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00   PM  held  at  the  Turning  Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   BRISTOL  MEETINGS:  Sun-­ day,   Discussion   Meeting   4:00-­5:00   PM.   Wednesday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.  Friday,  Big  Book  Meeting,   6:00-­7:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   Federated  Church,  Church  St.

BRAIN   INJURY   SUPPORT   GROUP:   Survivors,   family   members  and  care  givers  are   invited  to  share  their  experi-­ ence   in   a   safe,   secure   and   confidential   environment.   Meets   monthly   on   the   sec-­ ond   Tuesday   from   6:00pm   to   8:00pm   at   the   Hannaford   Career   Center,   Room   208   (second   floor,   an   elevator   is   available)  in  Middlebury.  For   more  information,  contact  Lisa   Bernardin  802-­388-­2720.

THE  HELENBACH  CANCER   Support  Group  is  an  indepen-­ dent   group   of   people   who   are   dealing   with,   have   dealt   with,   and   who   know   people   with  cancer.  We  meet  on  an   irregularly   regular   basis   (if   there  is  a  need,  we  meet!)  at   the  Mary  Johnson  Child  Care   Center  on  Water  St.  in  Middle-­ bury.  Good  home-­made  treats   are   always   available   and   all   meetings  are  free.  Our  theme   song   has   been   Bill   Witherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lean  on  Me,  when  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not   strong,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  your  friend,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   help  you  carry  on..for  it  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be  long,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;til  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  gonna  need,   somebody  to  lean  on.â&#x20AC;?  Come   be  a  leaner,  be  a  supporter,  be   part  of  something  that  gives   strength  by  sharing  love.  Call   802-­388-­6107  with  questions.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   NEW   HAVEN   MEETINGS:   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Monday,   Big   Book   Meeting   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the  Congre-­ TUESDAY:   11th   Step   Meet-­ gational  Church,  New  Haven   ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  ALTEEN   Village  Green. Group.  Both  held  at  Turning   Point,   228   Maple   Street.   12   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Step  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.   RIPTON   MEETINGS:   Mon-­ 12   Step   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   day,   As   Bill   Sees   It   Meet-­ PM.  Both  held  at  the  Turning   ing  7:15-­8:15  AM.  Thursday,   Point   Center   in   the   Marble-­ Grapevine  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   PM.  Both  held  at  Ripton  Fire-­ works,  Middlebury. house,  Dugway  Rd. ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MONDAY:   As   Bill   Sees   It   BRANDON   MEETINGS:   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM.   Big   Monday,  Discussion  Meeting   Book  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.   7:30-­8:30   PM.   Wednesday,   Both  held  at  the  Turning  Point   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   PM.  Friday,  12  Step  Meeting   7:00-­8:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   Middlebury. St.  Thomas  Episcopal  Church,   RT  7  South.

Services

Community Lunch Volunteers

Every week, a delicious lunch is made available to our community members gf Egf\Yq Yl Kl Kl]h`]fk [`mj[`! and Tuesday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thursday (at the Charter @gmk]!&Ngdmfl]]jkYj]f]]\]\Z]lo]]f 10:30am and 12:45pm to prepare the food, serve guests, and clean up after l`]e]Yd&Hd]Yk][Ydd+00%/(,a^qgmYj] afl]j]kl]\af`]dhaf_gml&

L o c a l age n c ie s c a n p o s t t h e i r v o l u n te e r ne e d s w i t h Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r by c a l l i ng RSV P at 388-7044.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   VERGENNES   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.   Friday,   Dis-­ cussion   Meeting   8:00-­9:00   PM.   Both   held   at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church,   Park   St.   Tuesday,   Discussion  Meeting  7:00-­8:00   PM,   at   the   Congregational   Church,  Water  St. ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   NORTH   FERRISBURGH   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   Daily   Reflections  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   PM,  at  the  United  Methodist   Church,  Old  Hollow  Rd.

Services

RATES

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Name: Address: Phone:

NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Fridays,  7:30pm,  held   at   the   Turning   Point   Center   located  in  the  Marble  Works.

Services CHAIN  SAW  CHAINS  sharp-­ ened.  Call  802-­759-­2095.

Services

Services

DEVELOPMENTAL   HOME   PROVIDER  for  live-­in  client  or   respite  care.  36  years  experi-­ ence.  State  background  check   completed.  State  Agency  and   past  client  family  references   provided.   Call   Doreen   at   802-­247-­4409.

Recreation  for  the  Town  of  Middlebury,  led   an  intrepid  crew  of  volunteers  from  Country   Home  Products  during  the  most  recent  Days   of   Caring.     Terri,   who   moved   to   Middle-­ bury  8  months  ago,  has  many  improvement   projects   planned   at   Parks   and   Recreation,   and   was   very   pleased   with   the   work   that   was   accomplished:     â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   CHP   crew   did   a   great   job   clearing   the   interpretive   trail   be-­ tween  the  Mary  Hogan  School  and  the  Rec   Park.     Many   hands   made   light   work   and   we  enjoyed  the  fact  that  we  were  creating  a   safe  place  for  the  kids  to  explore,  play  and   learn.â&#x20AC;?    Thank  you  so  much,  Terri,  for  par-­ ticipating  in  United  Wayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Days  of  Caring!  

D E A D L I N E S Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

CATEGORIES

Work Wanted Public Meetings** For Sale Help Wanted For Rent Want to Rent Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals

Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost & Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities

Spotlight with large



$2

Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted

** No charge for these ads

CONSTRUCTION:   ADDI-­ TIONS,   RENOVATIONS,   new   construction,   drywall,   carpentry,   painting,   flooring,   roofing,   pressure   washing,   driveway  sealing.  All  aspects   of  construction,  also  property   maintenance.   Steven   Fifield   802-­989-­0009.



Terri   Arnold,   Director   of   Parks   and  

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM Â&#x2021; Â&#x201E;SHUZRUGÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPSHUDG Â&#x2021; LQWHUQHWOLVWLQJIRUXSWRLVVXHVÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPLQVHUWLRQV

NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:   Mondays,   6pm,   held   at   the   Turning   Point   Center   located  in  the  Marbleworks.

METICULOUS   RESIDEN-­ TIAL   CLEANING   Servic-­ es.   12   years   experience.   Fully   insured.   Call   Leigh.   802-­282-­1903.

ADDISON INDEPENDENT P.O. Box 31, Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  27

Addison Independent

Help  Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS Services

Help  Wanted



DEVELOPMENTAL   HOME   PROVIDER  for  charming  73   year   old   woman   with   devel-­ opmental   disability.   Should   be  familiar  with  the  needs  of   older   adults   and   be   able   to   offer   caring   companionship.   Temporary   ramp   and   some   funding   for   renovations   are   available  to  meet  her  need  for   an  accessible  home.  She  en-­ joys  music,  community  events,   especially   holidays!   Goal   is   to   be   part   of   a   family,   not   a   resident  in  a  community  care   home  setting.  Annual  tax-­free   stipend  of  over  $25,000,  room   &  board  payment  of  $8,300,   plus  respite  budget.  Call  Sha-­ ron  Tierra  at  Community  As-­ sociates  388-­4021.

NEED  HELP  CLEANING  your   home?   I   would   love   to   help.   Looking  for  weekly  or  biweekly   homes.  Personal  service  and   references  available.  Please   call  802-­349-­3135  and  let  me   help  you. PERSONAL   CAREGIVER  /   ASSISTANT   I   specialize   in   care  for  Alzheimerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  patients.   I   can   help   with   a   variety   of   tasks:  large  /  small  animal  care,   light  office  work,  grocery  shop-­ ping,  errands,  nanny  care.  Ex-­ cellent  references.  Call  Kathy   802-­349-­7779. PORTABLE  SAW  MILL.  Saw-­ ing  of  your  logs  and  timbers.   802-­989-­9170.



PART   TIME   HELP   need-­ ed   taking   care   of   gentle-­ man   in   wheel   chair.   Please   call   for   more   information.   802-­771-­7153.

Help  Wanted

PRIVATE   CARE   GIVING   Services.   20   years   experi-­ RINGERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   HOME   CARE   is   ence.  References.  Call  Leigh.   looking  for  dependable,  car-­ ing  and  motivated  care  givers   802-­282-­1903. to   join   our   family.   We   have   RETIRED   DAD   SEEKING   night  shift  and  weekend  hours   part  time  work  /  odd  jobs.  Have   available.   On-­sight   training   dependable   car   and   pickup   given.  To  apply  please  email   truck.   Will   do   any   type   of   resume  to  ringerhomecare@ deliveries,   errands,   etc.   Will   gmail.com  . check   on   houses   while   you   are  away.  Also  will  check  on   senior  citizens.  Call  with  your   needs.  802-­453-­4235.

NOW HIRING

JP  Carrara  &  Sons  is  looking  for:

EXPERIENCED CRANE OPERATOR

LOST:   CASIO   CAMERA,   black  and �� silver,  small  digital   camera.  Perhaps  lost  at  Dead   Creek   Festival,   or   viewing   area  on  October  5.  Reward.   Contact  Jill  802-­985-­5038.

Help  Wanted BANKRUPTCY:  CALL  to  find   out   if   bankruptcy   can   help   you.   Kathleen   Walls,   Esq.   802-­388-­1156.

Mountain  Health  Family  Dentistry Join  our  new  dental  practice  in  Bristol,  VT! Be  part  of  an  enthu-­ siastic   team   providing   top   quality   care   to   your   local   community.     At   Mountain   Health   Family   Dentistry,   our   goal   is   to   provide   high   quality   and  evidence  based  dental  care,  ranging  from  emergency  treatment  to   long-­term   prevention.     Help   us   grow   and   become   the   place   to   go   for   dental  care  for  the  whole  community,  regardless  of  insurance  status  or   ability  to  pay.   6HHNLQJHQWKXVLDVWLFDQGH[SHULHQFHGRI¿FHPDQDJHUIRUKRXUVSHU   week.  Responsibilities  include  front  desk,  scheduling,  billing,  payroll,   ¿QDQFLDO SODQQLQJ RI¿FH SROLF\ GHYHORSPHQW DQG LPSOHPHQWDWLRQ  Long-­term  responsibilities  will  include  direct  supervision  of  additional   IURQWRI¿FHVWDIIDVZHJURZ7UDLQLQJDQGVRPHKRXUVZLOOEHJLQ 'HFHPEHUVW5HJXODUKRXUVFKHGXOHEHJLQVLQ-DQXDU\

7UDLQLQJIRUWKHVHQH[WWZRSRVLWLRQVZLOOEHJLQLQPLG'HFHPEHU 5HJXODUVFKHGXOHVRIWKUHHGD\VSHUZHHNEHJLQLQ-DQXDU\$GGLWLRQDO hours  and  full-­time  schedules  are  possible  as  the  practice  grows.  

Applications  can  be  printed  from  our   website  &  emailed  to  info@jpcarrara.com, faxed  to  802-­388-­9010  or  returned  in   person  at  2464 Case St., Middlebury, VT

A  friendly  and  family-­oriented  hygienist  on  the  team  will  be  central  to   our  success.  Prevention  and  evidence  based  focus  a  must.  

No  phone  calls,  please.

Buy! Sell! Find! Check the Classifieds twice a week in the

Addison Independent.



FOUND:   GRAY   CAT   with   white   markings.   Found   on   Lake   Street   in   Bridport.   Call   Barb  at  802-­758-­2238.

Help  Wanted

Individuals  applying  for  this  position  must   be  able  to  work  well  in  a  fast-­paced, challenging  environment.

Free

Lost/Found

Help  Wanted

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SNOW  PLOWING  AND  sand-­ ing   services.   802-­352-­1034,   802-­349-­5457.

FREE  HOUSE  CATS!  Many   to  choose  from.  Spayed  and   Neutered.  Good  homes  only.   Call  802-­388-­1410.  1683  Dog   Team  Rd.,  New  Haven.

Help  Wanted

Maintenance  Clerk Vermont  Hard  Cider  Company,  LLC,  located  in  Middlebury,  VT  is  the   leading  hard  cider  producer  in  the  United  States,  which  includes  the   nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  number  one  selling  cider  -­  Woodchuck  Hard  Cider.    We  are   growing  again  and  looking  for  an  organized,  energetic  Maintenance   Clerk  to  join  our  team.  

Responsibilities  include:   The  Maintenance  Clerk  is  responsible  for  ensuring  accurate,  up-­to   date   records   of   maintenance   department   projects,   project   history,   purchase   orders   and   tracking   deliveries   of   parts,   and   inventory   transactions.  Additional  responsibilities  include: ¡â&#x2C6;&#x2122;  Conduct  periodic  inventory  audits ¡â&#x2C6;&#x2122;  Work  w/management  team  to  order  parts  &  equipment  as  needed ¡â&#x2C6;&#x2122;  Assist  with  maintaining  outside  vendor  relationships ¡â&#x2C6;&#x2122;  Maintain  a  clean,  organized  stock  room  &  other  related  work  areas ¡â&#x2C6;&#x2122;  Complete  work  assignments  in  a  timely,  accurate  and        thorough  manner   ¡â&#x2C6;&#x2122;  Maintain  a  high  level  of  customer  service  and  friendly  atmosphere ¡â&#x2C6;&#x2122;  Organize  storeroom(s)  and  shipping/  receiving  areas   ¡â&#x2C6;&#x2122;  Maintain  records  in  computerized  maintenance  system

Requirements  include: 4XDOL¿FDWLRQV LQFOXGH D +LJK 6FKRRO 'LSORPD SOXV WZR \HDUV RI experience   coordinating   transactions   in   a   manufacturing   or   parts   supply   environment.     Intermediate   computer   skills   are   required.     Experience  in  a  production  maintenance  department  is  helpful  as  is   basic  mechanical  aptitude  and  previous  experience  with  inventory   systems. Vermont+DUG&LGHU&RPSDQ\SURYLGHVDVWURQJWRWDOFRPSHQVDWLRQ package,  including  insurance  coverages,  401(k)  plan  and  paid  time   off.    Come  join  our  team!      EOE Please  apply  online  at  www.woodchuck.com  

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Dental  Assistant $IULHQGO\DQGHQWKXVLDVWLFFHUWLÂżHGGHQWDODVVLVWDQWZLOOEHFUXFLDO to   complementing   the   team   and   providing   optimal   service   to   our   patients.   Cross   training   for   all   staff   will   be   provided.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   looking   for   a   great   team  that  will  be  enthusiastic  about  lending  a  hand  wherever  and  when-­ HYHULWÂśVQHHGHG+HDOWKEHQHÂżWVDQGUHWLUHPHQWFRQWULEXWLRQVLQFOXGHG Salary  commensurate  with  experience.    Send  resume  and  cover  letter   to:  PRXQWDLQKHDOWKIDPLO\GHQWLVWU\#JPDLOFRP


PAGE  28  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

EVENT   SECURITY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  U NI-­ FORM  SECURITY  positions.   Part  time.  All  shifts  available   throughout   the   state   of   Ver-­ mont.   Must   be   18   years   of   age  and  have  a  high  school   diploma  /  GED.   We   will   train   you  for  an  exciting  new  career   in   security.   Must   be   able   to   work  with  public  in  a  positive   friendly  manor.  Apply  online:   www.gmcsvt.com  /  e mploy-­ ment/  .

FIRE   AND   ICE   RESTAU-­ RANT  is  seeking  experienced   waitstaff,   hosts   and   bussers   (bussing   staff   does   not   re-­ quire   previous   experience).   Apply  in  person  at  26  Seymour   Street,   Middlebury.   Must   be   reliable,   punctual   and   be   a   team   player   for   fast   paced   restaurant.  Always  accepting   applications  for  the  right  people   in  all  departments.  Do  not  call   the  restaurant.

VERMONT  SOAP  IS  looking   for  the  right  people  to  add  to   our   team   of   full   time,   hon-­ est,   hard-­working,   friendly,   long-­term   employees.   Must   be  good  with  numbers,  have   good  computer  skills,  and  be   able  to  lift  50  pound  boxes.  Will   train.  Please  email  resume  to   Hilde@vermontsoap.com  .

MIDDLEBURY UNION HIGH SCHOOL Junior Varsity Dance Coach

Middlebury Union High School is seeking a Junior Varsity Dance Coach. The applicant must have a strong knowledge of dance coaching principles with previous coaching experience preferred. Must possess strong organizational skills and the ability to communicate and relate to student athletes. Apply by sending a letter of interest and resume to: Sean Farrell, Activities Director Middlebury Union High School 73 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 E.O.E 4SWMXMSRSTIRYRXMP½PPIH

CLASSIFIED ADS/ CIRCULATION MANAGER for a growing newspaper This position is ideal for an energetic go-getter who wants to develop their marketing and communication skills. Tasks include continuing to grow paid digital and print circulation, developing classified promotions and helping to manage a busy office environment. Must have proper computer skills, excellent phone and customer service skills with a good attention to detail and accuracy. Room for creativity, integration with new digital models and engagement with a fast-paced, motivated team.

Full-time position with benefits. Send resume and cover letter to Angelo Lynn, publisher, at angelo@addisonindependent.com ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

For  Sale

DENTAL   OFFICE   MANAG-­ ER.   New   dental   practice   in   Bristol   seeking   enthusiastic   and  experienced  office  man-­ ager.   32   hours  /  week.   Begin   part   time   December   1,   full   schedule   when   the   practice   opens   in   January.   Respon-­ sibilities   include   front   desk,   scheduling,   billing,   payroll,   financial  planning,  office  policy   development  and  implemen-­ tation.  Dental  assistant  cross   training  provided.  Long-­term   responsibilities   will   include   direct  supervision  of  additional   front  office  staff  as  we  grow.   Health   benefits,   retirement   contributions  included.  Salary   commensurate   with   experi-­ ence.  Send  resume  and  cover   letter  to:  mountainhealthfami-­ lydentistry@gmail.com  .

OVERNIGHT  AWAKE  SHEL-­ TER  STAFF:  overnight  awake   shelter   staff   for   a   seasonal   cold  weather  community  shel-­ ter   in   Middlebury   Vermont.   The  shelter  opens  November   15-­March   31,   2014   on   the   coldest   nights   of   the   year,   determined   by   state   criteria.   Shelter  hours  are  8pm-­8am,   Monday-­Sunday.   Overnight   staff  will  commit  to  overnights   on   an   on   call   basis.   Posi-­ tion  pays  $10.  per  hour  when   shelter  is  in  operation;  stipend   for   the   nights   the   shelter   is   not  open.  Send  resume  and   letter   of   interest   to:   HOPE,   Warming  Shelter,  PO  Box  165,   Middlebury  VT  05753.

HUMAN   RESOURCE   AS-­ SISTANT:   Middlebury   Natu-­ ral   Foods   Co-­op   seeks   part   time  Human  Resource  Assis-­ tant.  Ideal  candidate  has  HR   knowledge   and   experience,   in   addition   to   strong   admin-­ istrative   and   computer   skills.   Must   be   detail   oriented   with   superior  communication  skills.   Complete  application  online  at   www.middleburycoop.com   or   in  our  store  at  9  Washington   Street  in  Middlebury.

THE  BARREL  MAN:  55  gal-­ lon  Plastic  and  Metal  barrels.   Several  types:  55  gallon  rain   barrels   with   faucets,   Food   grade  with  removable  locking   covers,  plastic  food  grade  with   spin-­on  covers  (pickle  barrels).   Also,   275   gallon   food   grade   totes   $125   each.   55   gallon   sand  /  salt  barrels  with  PT  legs.   $50  each.  Delivery  available.   802-­453-­4235.

DENTAL   HYGIENIST.   New   dental  practice  in  Bristol  seeks   a  friendly  and  family  oriented   hygienist   to   join   our   team.   Three  days  /  week  to  start,  with   the   possibility   of   additional   days   as   the   practice   grows.   Prevention   and   evidence   based  focus  a  must.  Training   in   mid-­December,   with   full   schedule  beginning  in  Janu-­ ary.   Responsibilities   include   direct   patient   care,   as   well   as   cross   training   with   office   maintenance   and   front   desk   operations.  Local  anesthesia   certificate   required.   Health   benefits,  retirement  contribu-­ tions   included.   Salary   com-­ mensurate   with   experience.   Send  resume  and  cover  letter   to:  mountainhealthfamilyden-­ tistry@gmail.com  . LOOKING  FOR  LOVING  LNA   or   equivalent   to   care   for   se-­ niors  in  a  home  atmosphere.   The  position  we  are  looking  for   is  a  permanent  11pm  to  7am   shifts  or  per-­diems  to  fill  in  on   other   shifts.   Holistically   we   incorporate   organic   nutrition,   integrative   medicine   and   a   wide  variety  of  fun  activities.  If   you  are  a  team  player  and  reli-­ able,  please  send  your  resume   to  info@livingwellvt.org  .

For  Rent

DENTAL   ASSISTANT.   New   dental  practice  in  Bristol  seek-­ ing  a  friendly  and  enthusiastic   certified  dental  assistant.  Three   days  /  week   to   start,   with   the   possibility   of   additional   days   as  the  practice  grows.  Train-­ ing  in  mid-­December,  with  full   schedule   beginning   in   Janu-­ ary.   Responsibilities   include   direct   patient   care,   as   well   as   cross   training   with   office   maintenance   and   front   desk   operations.  Health  benefits,  re-­ tirement  contributions  included.   Salary   commensurate   with   experience.  Send  resume  and   cover  letter  to:  mountainhealth-­ familydentistry@gmail.com  . SHARED  LIVING  PROVIDER   Local  Middlebury  man  in  early   30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  with  Aspergerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Syndrome   seeks   a   support   person   to   share   a   home   with   in   town.   Best   match   can   provide   pa-­ tience,   a   consistent   routine   and  support  a  gluten-­free  diet.   He  is  looking  to  increase  his   independence.   His   interests   include  computers,  NPR,  clas-­ sical   music,   movies,   science   fiction,   and   snow   shoeing.   Generous  annual  tax-­free  sti-­ pend  of  $28,000,  room  &  board   and  respite  budgets.  Contact   Kim   McCarty   at   Community   Associates  at  388-­4021.

For  Rent

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  against  the  law   to  discriminate  when   advertising  housing   related  activities. Particularly  on  sites  like  Craigslist. And  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you  might   think.  You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no  childrenâ&#x20AC;?  or  â&#x20AC;&#x153;adults  only.â&#x20AC;?   There  is  lots  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say.  The  federal  government   is  watching  for  such  discrimination. Let  us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities  of  the  Fair   Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the  right  side  of  the   nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Fair  Housing  Law.   Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

STAFFED  LIVING:  Residen-­ tial   Instructors   sought   for   a   home  in  Middlebury,  support-­ ing  a  woman  in  her  30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  with   mild  developmental  disability.   Most  important  skills  are  flex-­ ible  thinking  and  the  ability  to   maintain  personal  boundaries.   Support   needed   in   learning   emotional   regulation,   gain-­ ing  home  management  skills,   building  friendships,  develop-­ ing  interests  outside  home  and   improving  communication.  36   hours  includes  one  overnight,   43   hours   includes   two   over-­ nights,  3  days  off  a  week.  Com-­ prehensive   benefit   package   including  on-­site  gym  member-­ ship.  Respond  to  CSAC  HR,   89   Main   Street,   Middlebury,   VT  05753,  802-­388-­6751,  ext.   425,  or  visit  www.csac-­vt.org  .

For  Sale

For  Rent 2  BEDROOM  HOUSE,  com-­ pletely  furnished  for  8  month   winter  rental  on  Lake  Dunmore.   Very  energy  efficient,  washer   and  dryer,  85â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  of  frontage,  no   pets,  no  smoking.  $  900  /  mo.   plus  utilities.  802-­352-­6678. 2000   SQUARE   FEET   Pro-­ fessional   office   space   in   Middlebury,   multi-­room.   Ground  level,  parking,  handi-­ capped-­accessible.  Available   now.  802-­558-­6092. 5000   SQUARE   FEET   MAN-­ UFACTURING   space   avail-­ able   in   Middlebury   industrial   park.   Call   for   information,   802-­349-­8544. BRANDON   DELUXE   DU-­ PLEX   in   the   Village.   3   level   living.   2   bedrooms.   Washer  /   dryer,  deck,  yard.  $1100  /  month   includes  heat.  802-­989-­8124.

250   GALLON   FUEL   tank.   BRANDON  SELF  STORAGE;   all   sizes   available,   includ-­ 802-­453-­3870. ing   climate   controlled.   Low   ALL  NATURAL  GRASS  and   prices,   worth   the   drive.   Call   corn  fed  beef.  $2.50  per  pound,   802-­247-­6525. hanging  weight.  518-­569-­0957. BRANDON,  NOW  RENTING  1   ATLANTA   STOVE   WORKS   &  2  bedroom  affordable  apart-­ free-­standing   cast   iron   ments  at  Park  Village.  Rents   fireplace.   Make   an   offer.   starting  at  $691  /  mo.  Some  utili-­ 802-­349-­6579. ties   included.   Great   location,   COLEMAN   POWER   MATE   beautiful   setting,   30   minutes   Generator:  5000  Watt,  electric   to  Rutland,  5  minutes  to  down-­ start.  Everything  works.  $175.   town   Brandon,   easy   access   to  Route  7.  Pets  allowed  with   802-­948-­2252. deposit.  Call  Chantel  for  more   info  802-­247-­0165.



BRIDPORT   HOUSE   FOR   RENT:   800   sq.   ft.   Pond   and   woods  view.  new  carpet,  new   paint,   clean   and   bright.   1   large   bedroom,   living   room.   Large  kitchen  and  dining  area,   W/D   hookup.   3   bay   garage   /   workshop.   Plowing,   lawn   care  and  heat  included.  $1100   KITCHEN   /   DINING   ROOM   /  month.  Available   now.   Call   table   with   2   leaves   and   802-­989-­1439,  802-­758-­2184   7   chairs.   Seats   6-­8.   $200.   or  email  at  finnerty64@hotmail. 802-­877-­3394. com  . PRIME   GRASS-­FED   Beef.   BRIDPORT  VILLAGE;  TWO   Hanging  whole  or  half.  $2.20   bedroom   second   floor   apart-­ per  pound.  Call  802-­623-­6152. ment.   Private   driveway  /  en-­ ROCKING   CHAIR,   EXCEL-­ trance.   Includes   heat,   elec-­ LENT  condition.  Special  order   tric,  water,  snow  removal  and   from   Woodware,   Middlebury.   washer  /  dryer   hook-­ups.   No   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Kennedy  Rockerâ&#x20AC;?  exclu-­ smoking.   $850  /  month   plus   sively   manufactured   by   P&P   deposit.  Call  349-­7552. Chair  Company  for  President   BRIDPORT:  3  BEDROOM,  2   John  F.  Kennedy.  Purchased   bath   ranch   house,   attached   for  $319.93  in  January  2012,   double  garage  built  2007.  Ap-­ asking  price  is  $275.  OBO.  If   pliances   included.   Efficient   interested,  call  802-­388-­6823   gas  furnace,  other  extras.  No   or  802-­989-­6622. smoking  /  pets.   $1250.   First,   last,  security  required.  1  year   lease.   References  /  credit   re-­ port.  Available   December   1.   802-­758-­2369,   cggile@juno. com  802-­345-­2541. FRIGIDAIRE   ELECTRIC   STACKING   Washer  /  D ryer   laundry   center.   Excellent,   working  condition  and  clean.   Offering  for  a  bargain  at  $600   OBO  for  the  pair.  Call  Christy   at  802-­349-­4778.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  29

Addison Independent

Real  Estate

CLASSIFIEDS For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

BRISTOL   2   BEDROOM   1   Bath   efficient   gas   heat   and   new  windows.  Excellent  con-­ dition.   Water   and   sewer   in-­ cluded.  No  pets  or  smoking.   $850  /  month.  802-­453-­4670.

MIDDLEBURY;   EFFICIEN-­ CY  APARTMENT.  Bedroom,   kitchen,   bath.   Heat,   wa-­ ter,   trash   pickup   included.   $625  /  mo.   Security   deposit.   802-­388-­1917.

STORAGE  SPACES,  11â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;.   Large   overhead   doors,   ex-­ tra   high   ceilings.   Will   ac-­ commodate   large   campers,   boats   or   lots   of   stuff.   Call   802-­388-­8394.

BRIDPORT;   1   BEDROOM,   bath   and   4-­room   apartment   with  porch  /  lawn.  Washer  /  dry-­ er,  heat  /  hot  water  included.  No   smoking,  no  pets.  References.   $775  /  month  plus  security  de-­ posit.  Only  living  unit  in  build-­ ing.   For   more   information,   Charlie  802-­758-­2218.

MIDDLEBURY   COMMER-­ CIALLY  ZONED  House  with   maximum   exposure   and   access   to   Rt.   7   and   Foote   Street.  Great  way  to  build  your   clientele.   Spacious   parking.   Handicap  accessible.  Please   call  Darcy  at  802-­388-­9599.

VERGENNES   3BR:   washer   /  dryer   hookup.   $900  /  month.   Pets  negotiable.  On  Monkton   Rd.   across   from   Vergennes   Variety.   240-­281-­1508   or   email   ocopom.ninja.turtle@ gmail.com  Available  Novem-­ ber  1.  Must  pass  background   check.

BRISTOL   OFFICE   SPACE:   Located   in   the   Old   High   School   building   by   the   town   green,  310  sf.,  high  ceilings,   nice  natural  light,  wood  floors,   ceiling  fan,  wainscoting.  Per-­ fect  home  for  a  small  office.   $380  /  month   includes   heat   and  electricity.  Fitness  center,   yoga  studio,  non-­profits  and   alternative  health  practitioners   call  this  complex  home,  plus   five  new  office  suites  coming   this  fall.  Lease  required.  Call   802-­453-­4065.

M I D D L E B U RY   H O U S E   SHARE.   Furnished,   W/D,   WIFI.   Utilities   included.   No   smoking  or  pets.  References.   First,   last   and   $300   security   deposit.  Credit  check.  $550  /   mo.  6  month  to  1  year  lease.   802-­989-­3097.

BRISTOL   VILLAGE   2   or   3   bedroom  apartment,  first  and   second   floor.   Walking   dis-­ tance  to  downtown,  schools.   $1250  plus  utilities.  No  pets.   453-­7034. BRISTOL,  SINGLE  CAR  ga-­ rage  at  28  North  Street.  Great   for  extra  car,  boat  or  storage.   1  year  lease  required.  $100  /   mo.  802-­453-­4065. BRISTOL;  NICE  3  bedroom,   2   bath   house.   Private   loca-­ tion   on   Route   116.   Close   to   Middlebury.   $1500  /  mo.   Call   802-­388-­7218.



MIDDLEBURY,  FURNISHED   APARTMENT.   Large   living   CHARMING,  COMPLETELY   room,  kitchen,  bedroom,  bath.   REMODELED,   large   2   bed-­ $795  /  mo.  All  utilities  included.   room   apartment,   Brandon.   802-­388-­4251. Many   luxuries,   1-­1/2   baths,   MONKTON  POND  2  Bedroom   enclosed  porch,  walk-­in  clos-­ 2   bath.   $1375  /  month   plus   ets,  laundry  hook-­up,  storage,   utilities.  First,  last  and  security.   desirable  parking.  $930.  heat   Credit   check   and   reference   included.  802-­377-­3640. check  required.  Avail.  Nov.  1.   CORNWALL   EFFICIENCY   Karla  802-­377-­7445. APARTMENT  clean  and  quiet.   ORWELL;   1   BEDROOM   $650  includes  all.  989-­8124. apartment.  First,  last,  security.   FERRISBURGH   /   VER-­ No   pets,   no   smoking.   Quiet   GENNES   4   BEDROOM   2   family   environment.   $525  /   bath  cozy  cape  on  10  private   mo.  Evenings  802-­948-­2349. acres.  Lots  of  sunlight.  Great   RIPTON   TWO   BEDROOM   room   with   wood   stove.   Big   apartment.  $550  /  month  plus   closets,   large   open   kitchen.   utilities.  No  pets.  No  smoking.   Finished   basement.   7   miles   Call  802-­382-­8567. East   of   Vergennes.   Walk   to   Lake   Champlain.   Karla   SALISBURY;   2   BEDROOM   802-­377-­7445. bottom   floor   apartment.  Ac-­ cess  to  beach  and  seasonal   LOVELY  3  BEDROOM  house   pools.  No  pets.  Heat,  electric   in  South  Lincoln.  Open  floor   included.   $875  /  mo.   Refer-­ space,  newly  renovated.  Fur-­ ences.  First,  last,  deposit  with   nishing  optional.  Nice  yard.  No   lease.  802-­352-­4501. pets  or  smoking.  References   and  security  deposit.  $1100  /   SELF   STORAGE,   8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   mo.  Call  802-­388-­7218. units.   Your   lock   and   key,   $50  /  m onth.   Middlebury,   MIDDLEBURY  1  BEDROOM   802-­558-­6092. apartment.  Totally  renovated.   Third   floor.   Center   of   town.   STORAGE  SPACE  FOR  boat   $900  /  mo.   includes   electric,   or   trailer,   etc.   $8   per   linear   water,   heat,   washer,   dryer,   foot.  802-­453-­3870. parking.  802-­349-­8544.

LEICESTER   6.8   ACRES,   $59,000.   Very   nice   building   site   surveyed,   septic   design   included.   Ready   to   build   on,   with   all   permits.   Own-­ er   financing.   Call   Wayne   802-­257-­7076. MIDDLEBURY;   INDUS -­ TRIAL   PARK.   Available   2   acres,  lease  or  build  to  suit.   802-­558-­6092.

Att.  Farmers 21   HOLSTEIN   HEIFERS,   bred   AI,   due   December   to   February.  802-­483-­2963.

FOR   SALE   300+   Cert.   or-­ ganic   4x4   wrapped   round   bales.  Cut  June  and  July.  $45   per  bale  (or  $40  for  all  300).   Contact   Wilfred   Lamoureux   VERGENNES;   273   MAIN   802-­349-­8879. S t r e e t ,   a v a i l a b l e   n o w.   Renovated,   large,   sunny   2   HAY  FOR  SALE:  First  cut  $3   bedroom.   Full   bath,   porch,   /  square  bale.  First  cut  round   hookups.  Heat  and  hot  water   bales  $30.  Mike  Quinn,  end  of   included.   $890  /  month.   Call   South  Munger  Street,  Middle-­ bury.  802-­388-­7828. only  8am-­8pm.  802-­349-­8405. HAY   FOR   SALE:   First   a n d   s e c o n d   c u t .   C a l l   802-­352-­4686. Wood  Heat HAY   FOR   SALE:   Small   square   bales.   First   cut   and   mulch.   Delivery   avail-­ ADDISON   COUNTY   FIRE-­ a b l e .   C a l l   f o r   p r i c i n g .   WOOD:   Custom   Firewood   802-­453-­4481,  802-­349-­9281,   Sizes   now   available.   Mixed   or  802-­989-­1004. hardwoods  cut,  split  and  de-­ livered  to  your  specifications.   HORSE  BOARDING  AVAIL-­ For   honest,   reliable   service   ABLE:   $250   per   month.   Go   to   www.cookesstable.com   call  802-­238-­7748. for  more  info.  802-­349-­3135. CENTRAL   BOILER   MAXIM   Outdoor  wood  pellet  furnace   NEW   HOLLAND   T1530-­   provides  safe,  clean,  efficient   250TL   Loader,   200   hours.   heat.   Features   automatic   Winco   PTO   Generator.   Call   power   ignition.   Boivin   Farm   802-­247-­6735. Supply.  Call  802-­236-­2389. WHITNEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  CUSTOM  FARM  



FIREWOOD.   DRY,   CUT,   WORK.  Pond  agitating,  liquid   split.   $190  /  cord.   You   truck.   manure  hauling,  mouldboard   plowing.  462-­2755,  John  Whit-­ 802-­247-­6061. ney FIREWOOD;   CUT,   SPLIT   and  delivered.  Green  or  sea-­ soned.   Call   Tom   Shepard,   Cars 802-­453-­4285. FIREWOOD;  CUT,  SPLIT  and   1980  CHECKER  MARATHON   delivered.  Call  for  information.   TAXI.   Private   use   only.   V-­8,   73211   original   miles.   Com-­ 247-­9782. pletely   rebuilt   transmission   FOR   SALE:   GARRISON   and   starter.   Runs   great.   Two   Woodstove.   Perfect   for   Ready   for   restoration.   Huge   kitchen   or   deer   camp.   In-­ price   reduction,   $3600   firm.   cludes   6â&#x20AC;?   stove   pipe.   $450.   802-­352-­6678. Home   802-­388-­3331.   Cell   802-­377-­5427.

Trucks MIXED  HARDWOOD,  PAR-­ TIALLY   seasoned.   Cut,   1997   DODGE   1500   pickup   split,   delivered.   $175  /  cord.   4x4,  V-­8.  Outstanding  condi-­ Please   leave   message,   tion.  $2700.  388-­2528. 802-­282-­9110. MOUNTAIN   ROAD   FIRE-­ WOOD.  Green  and  dry  avail-­ able.  Oak,  ash,  maple,  beech.   Order  now  and  save  for  next   season.  Cut,  split  and  deliv-­ ered.  Call  802-­759-­2095. TREE   &   BRUSH   REMOV-­ AL.   Also,   Green   and   Dry   firewood   for   sale.   Call   for   pricing.   802-­388-­8348   or   802-­989-­9893.

Real  Estate   Wanted WANTED:   TO   PURCHASE   from   owner,   open   land,   2   to   100  acres.  802-­558-­6092.



2001  DODGE  DAKOTA  Sport   4x4,  V8,  5-­speed,  191k  miles.   Inspected,  excellent  mechani-­ cal   condition.   New   battery.   $2250.  802-­349-­7413.

Wanted USED  OIL  WANTED:  Mikes   Auto  1  and  2,  small  amounts,   drop   off   with   us.   50   gallons   +   we   will   pick   up   locally.   802-­388-­4138.

Public Notices Index Public  notices  for  the  following  can  be  found  in  this     ADDISON  INDEPENDENT  on  Pages  29  &  30.

Bristol  (1) Ferrisburgh  (2) Middlebury  (1) Ripton  (1) Shoreham  (1) Vermont  Housing  and  Conservation   Board  (1) TOWN OF FERRISBURGH PUBLIC NOTICE

    The   Town   of   Ferrisburgh   has   a   current   vacancy   on   the   SelectBoard.   Please   submit  a  letter  of  interest  to  the  Ferrisburgh   SelectBoard  by  Tuesday,  November  19th,  at   4:00  pm.    This  appointment  will  extend  until   the   next   election   in   March,   2014.     Letters   of  interest  may  be  dropped  off  at  the  Town   &OHUNœV RI¿FH RU PDLOHG WR 32 %R[  )HUULVEXUJK97 11/4

The  Public  Notices  and   Real  Estate  sections  appear   every  Mon.  &  Thurs.  in  the Addison Independent TOWN OF RIPTON PROPERTY TAXES

Reminder:   Property   taxes   are   due   7KXUVGD\1RYHPEHU7RZQ2I¿FH hours   are:   Mon   2pm-­6pm   and   Tue,   Wed,   Thu  9am-­1pm.  In  addition,  the  Ripton  Town   2I¿FH ZLOO EH RSHQ 6DWXUGD\ 1RYHPEHU 2   from   9:00am   to   noon   and   Thursday,   November   7   from   3:00pm   to   6:00pm   for   WKH FROOHFWLRQ RI WD[ SD\PHQWV 3D\PHQWV PDLOHGDQGSRVWPDUNHG1RYHPEHU DUHWLPHO\7KDQN\RX 10/28 6DOO\+R\OHU7UHDVXUHU

TOWN OF FERRISBURGH ADVERTISEMENT AND NOTICE OF SALE 32 V. S. A. SECTION 5253

The   resident   and   nonresident   owners,   lien   holders   and   mortgagees   of   lands   in   the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh  in  the  County  of   $GGLVRQDUHKHUHE\QRWLÂżHGWKDWWKHWD[HV DVVHVVHGE\VXFKWRZQIRUWKHWD[\HDUV 2011/12   &   2012/13   remain,   either   in   whole  or  in  part,  unpaid  on  the  following   described  property  in  such  town,  to  wit;   Being   all   and   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Lisa   M   Clayton,   by   Quit   Claim   Deed   of   Gary   Clayton-­ Hall   dated  April   15,   1996,   and   recorded   in   Book   84,   Page   76   of   the   Ferrisburgh   Land   Records.   Said   real   estate   being   situated   at   214   High   Meadows   Road   in   the   Town   of   Ferrisburgh,   County   of   Addison  and  State  of  Vermont. For   a   more   complete   description   visit   WKH7RZQ&OHUNÂśV2IÂżFH$QGSXUVXDQWWR 32  V.S.A.  5253  and  5257  so  much  of  such   property  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at   WKH7RZQ&OHUNÂśV2IÂżFHDSXEOLFSODFHLQ such  town,  on  the  30th  day  of  November   2013   at   11   0â&#x20AC;&#x2122;clock   in   the   forenoon,   as   VKDOOEHUHTXLVLWHWRGLVFKDUJHVXFKWD[HV with  costs,  unless  previously  paid.  Dated  at  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont,  this  8th   day  of  October  2013. &KHVWHU+DZNLQV&ROOHFWRURI7RZQ7D[HV Town  of  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont 10/21

SHOREHAM PLANNING COMMISSION ZONING REGULATIONS NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING The  Shoreham  Planning  Commission  will  hold  a  public  hearing  November  21,  2013  at   7:00  P.M.  at  the  Elementary  School  gym  in  Shoreham,  Vermont,  on  the  proposed  2013   Shoreham  Zoning  Regulations.  This  hearing  is  being  held  pursuant  to  24  V.S.A.  4441.  This   notice  is  issued  pursuant  to  24  V.S.A.  4444(b). STATEMENT  OF  PURPOSE  AND  AREAS  OF  TOWN  AFFECTED The  Zoning  Regulations  implement  and  enforce  the  Shoreham  Town  Plan.  In  certain   cases,   these   proposed   regulations   change   the   boundaries   of   some   zoning   districts   in   6KRUHKDP DQG WKH\ PDNH VLJQL¿FDQW FKDQJHV WR WKH SHUPLWWHG DQG FRQGLWLRQDO XVHV allowed  in  all  districts.  All  areas  within  the  Town  of  Shoreham  are  affected.  Topic  areas   for  discussion  include: PROPOSED ZONING REGULATIONS ARTICLE  I.  AUTHORITY,  PURPOSE  &  APPLICABILITY  .................... 1 ARTICLE  II.  ZONING  DISTRICTS  &  DISTRICT  STANDARDS  ........... 5 ARTICLE  III.  GENERAL  STANDARDS  .............................................. 15 ARTICLE  IV.  SPECIFIC  USE  STANDARDS  ...................................... 23 ARTICLE  V.  CONDITIONAL  USE  REVIEW  ....................................... 31 ARTICLE  VI.  PLANNED  UNIT  DEVELOPMENTS  (PUD)  ................. 37 ARTICLE  VII.  ADMINISTRATION  &  ENFORCEMENT  ...................... 41 ARTICLE  VIII.  DEFINITIONS............................................................. 49 MAPS    ................................................................................................ 59 The  Proposed  Zoning  RegulationsDUHDYDLODEOHDWWKH7RZQ&OHUNœV2I¿FH6KRUHKDP 9HUPRQWGXULQJWKH2I¿FHœVQRUPDORSHUDWLQJKRXUV For  further  information  please  call  the  Vice-­Chair  of  the  Planning  Commission  at  (802)   897-­2441  or  the  Town  Clerk  ,at  (802)  897-­5481. BY:  Robert  Fisher,  Vice-­Chair  Shoreham  Planning  Commission


PAGE  30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

DLS (Continued  from  Page  1) WKHLU OLFHQVH EDFN WR SXW WRJHWKHU â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  ironically  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  to  a  job  to  earn  the   an  agreement  to  help  them  pay  their   PRQH\ WR SD\ RII ÂżQHV LQ RUGHU WR ÂżQHV´VDLG7RP6FDQORQYLFHSUHVL-­ KDYHWKHGULYHUÂśVOLFHQVHUHLQVWDWHG GHQW RI WKH ERDUG RI WKH $GGLVRQ 5HDOL]LQJ WKDW FRQXQGUXP FRXQ-­ &RXQW\ &RXUW 'LYHUVLRQ DQG &RP-­ WLHV WKURXJKRXW WKH VWDWH DUH QRZ PXQLW\-XVWLFH3URMHFWV RIIHULQJ D QHZ SURJUDP ,W ZDV GXULQJ 0D\ RI WKDW FDQ JHW GULYLQJ â&#x20AC;&#x153;This WKDWWKH/HJLVODWXUH ZLWKVXVSHQGHGOLFHQVH DQG *RY 3HWHU 6KXP-­ (program) UHIHUUHG WR E\ SROLFH DV OLQ DSSURYHG D QHZ ODZ Âł'/6´ RIIHQGHUV EDFN gives people FUHDWLQJ WKH &LYLO '/6 RQWKHURDGPRUHTXLFNO\ hope.â&#x20AC;? 'LYHUVLRQ 3URJUDP ,W WKDQ HYHU EHIRUH ,WÂśV â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Willa Farrell ZDV WKH RXWJURZWK RI FDOOHG WKH &LYLO '/6 WKHUHVHDUFKGRQHE\WKH 'LYHUVLRQ 3URJUDP DQG LW RIIHUV 1RQYLROHQW 0LVGHPHDQRU 5HYLHZ HOLJLEOH RIIHQGHUV WKH RSSRUWXQLW\ &RPPLWWHHZKLFKKDGEHHQFKDUJHG WROHJDOO\GULYHDIWHUZRUNLQJRXWD ZLWK ORRNLQJ DW ZD\V WR UHGXFH SD\PHQWVFKHGXOHIRUUHODWHGÂżQHV FULPLQDO UHFLGLYLVP DQG WR SURSRVH Âł7KLV ZDV RXU FRQFHUQ ² WKHUH DOWHUQDWLYHVWRLQFDUFHUDWLRQIRUQRQ KDV WR EH D EHWWHU ZD\ RI GHDOLQJ YLROHQWPLVGHPHDQRURIIHQVHV6WDWH ZLWK WKHVH SHRSOH WR KHOS WKHP JHW RIÂżFLDOVLGHQWLÂżHGFLYLODQGFULPLQDO

+++++++++++++++ TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY

REGULAR SELECT BOARD MEETING 7XHV1RYHPEHUÂ&#x2021;30 LARGE  CONFERENCE  ROOM TOWN  OFFICES  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  94  MAIN  STREET

Agenda 7:00  1.  Call  to  Order   2.  *Approval  of  Minutes  of  October       22,  2013  Selectboard  Meeting   3.  *Approval  of  Agenda   4.  Citizen  Comments   [Opportunity  to  raise  or  address       issues  that  are  not  otherwise       included  on  this  agenda] 7:10    5.  *Town  Clerk  Ann  Webster  re:       Approval  to  enter  into  contract  with       Cott  Systems  to  include  Property       Transfer  Tax  Return  records  in  the       Town  Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2DC;s  on-­line  data  base. 7:15    6.  *Town  of  Middlebury  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Middlebury   College  Agreement  for  Exchange  of     a  Portion  of  the  Town-­owned  Eco-­     nomic  Development  Initiative  Parcel       for  the  Lazarus  Property 7:25  7.  **Main  Street  &  Merchants  Row       Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Replace     ments  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Bi  Weekly  Report 7:30  8.  *Public  Hearing  on  Amendment       to  Work  in  the  Right-­of-­Way       Ordinance  &  Board  Action  on       proposed  Amendment 7:40    9.  **Policy  Considerations  D&RQĂ&#x20AC;LFWRI,QWHUHVW3ROLF\Âą   Subcommittee  for  Review  &  Revi-­     sion  of  Policy  E&RQÂżGHQWLDO,QIRUPDWLRQ3ROLF\Âą   Subcommittee  for  Development  of       Policy  F3ROLF\RQ)XQGLQJIRU1RQSURÂżW   Groups 8:00  10.  *Act  on  Town  of  Middlebury-­     Middlebury  College  Municipal  Build     ing  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Recreation  Facilities  Term  Sheet 8:15  11.  *Approval  of  Check  Warrants   12.  Town  Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Report   13.  Board  Member  Concerns   14.  *Executive  Session  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  If  Necessary   15.  **Action  on  Matters  Discussed  in       Executive  Session 8:30 16.  *Adjourn *Decision  Item      **  Possible  Decision  Item If   you   need   special   accommodations   to   attend   this   meeting,   please   contact   WKH 7RZQ 0DQDJHUÂśV 2IÂżFH DW  x-­202   as   early   as   possible.       Additional   information   about   most   Agenda   items   is   available   on   the   Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   website,   ZZZPLGGOHEXU\JRYRIÂżFHFRP,   on   the   Selectboard  page. 11/4

Have  an  opinion?  Email  your  letters  to:   news@addisonindependent.com

LQJ XS DV D SURPLVLQJ VROXWLRQ DF-­ SURJUDP DWWHQGDQFH RFFDVLRQDOO\ FRUGLQJWR6FDQORQ RIIHUHGLQH[FKDQJHIRUÂżQHDQGIHH ,Q RUGHU WR EH HOLJLEOH IRU WKH UHGXFWLRQV SURJUDP RIIHQGHUV PXVW KDYH PHW 3HRSOHZKRVXFFHVVIXOO\FRPSOHWH WKHLUXQGHUO\LQJVXVSHQVLRQUHTXLUH-­ the   program   not   only   get   their   li-­ PHQWVVXFKDVVHUYLQJRXWDVXVSHQ-­ FHQVHVUHLQVWDWHGEXWWKHLUSDVWFLYLO VLRQ SHULRG UHTXLUHG E\ YLRODWLRQV ZLOO QRW EH DFFXPXODWLRQ RI SRLQWV FRXQWHGWRZDUGPRUHVH-­ RQ WKHLU OLFHQVH 7KHVH In order to ULRXV FULPLQDO FKDUJHV DUHIRONVZKRVHOLFHQVHV be eligible for 7KRVH ZKR IDLO WR IRO-­ KDYHEHHQVXVSHQGHGIRU the program, ORZ WKURXJK ZLWK WKH LQIUDFWLRQV OLNH FDUHOHVV offenders must FRQWUDFW ZLOO VHH WKHLU DQG QHJOLJHQW GULYLQJ OLFHQVHDJDLQVXVSHQGHG VSHHGLQJ DQG RWKHU PLV-­ have met their :LOOD )DUUHOO LV GLUHF-­ underlying GHPHDQRUV WRU RI WKH &RXUW 'LYHU-­ 3HRSOH ZKRVH OLFHQVH suspension VLRQ 2IÂżFH RI WKH 9HU-­ VXVSHQVLRQLVFULPLQDOLQ requirements, PRQW $WWRUQH\ *HQHUDO QDWXUHRULVWKHUHVXOWRI such as 6KH VDLG PRUH WKDQ  GULYLQJ XQGHU WKH LQĂ&#x20AC;X-­ '/6 RIIHQGHUV KDYH serving out a HQFHRURWKHUVHULRXVRI-­ UHJDLQHG WKHLU OLFHQVHV suspension IHQVHDUHQRWHOLJLEOH WKURXJK WKH QHZ GLYHU-­ $GGLVRQ&RXQW\&RXUW period VLRQ SURJUDP VLQFH LW 'LYHUVLRQKDVDVWDIISHU-­ required by ZDV UROOHG RXW HDUOLHU VRQ %ULDQQD 'HVDXWHO accumulation WKLV\HDU ZKRZRUNVZLWK'/6RI-­ of points on VERMONT HOUSING AND CONSERVATION BOARD Âł7KLV SURJUDP JLYHV IHQGHUV$GGLVRQ&RXQW\ SHRSOH KRSH´ )DUUHOO NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING RIIHQGHUV ZDQWLQJ WR their license. VDLGDGGLQJLWDOVRKHOSV The  Vermont  Housing  and  Conservation  Board  (VHCB)  is  seeking  public  comment  on   DFFHVV WKH &LYLO '/6 a   proposed   amendment   to   the   conservation   easement   encumbering   the   former   Farr/ people   navigate   a   ju-­ 'LYHUVLRQ 3URJUDP PHHW ZLWK 'H-­ GLFLDO V\VWHP WKDW FDQ RWKHUZLVH EH Hornbeck  East  Farm  on  Old  Sawmill  Road  in  Orwell,  Vermont  currently  owned  by  Josh   and  Janelle  Lucas.  The  proposed  amendment  would: VDXWHOWRGLVFXVVWKHUHDVRQVIRUWKHLU GLIÂżFXOW DQGRU LQWLPLGDWLQJ IRU D 1)   Add  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;sole  discretionâ&#x20AC;?  farm  labor  housing  (FLH)  clause  to  the  easement  which   OLFHQVHVXVSHQVLRQWKHLUSHUVRQDOÂż-­ QHZFRPHU would  allow  for  the  easement  holders  to  consider  requests  for  additional  labor   QDQFHV WKH VWHSV QHHGHG WR JHW WKH 6FDQORQ ZRXOG OLNH WR VHH PRUH housing  capacity  with  a  high  threshold  for  approval.   GULYHUÂśV OLFHQVH UHLQVWDWHG DQG KRZ $GGLVRQ&RXQW\'/6RIIHQGHUVWDNH 2)   Add  the  Option  to  Purchase  at  Agricultural  Value  (OPAV)  which  serves  to  keep  the   WRSD\RIIDVVRFLDWHGÂżQHVDQGIHHV DGYDQWDJH RI WKH SURJUDP ZKLFK farm  affordable  by  placing  additional  restrictions  on  future  sales  of  the  property.   7KRVH ZKR WDNH SDUW LQ WKH SUR-­ KDV WKXV IDU VHUYHG RQO\ D KDQGIXO 3)   Designate   a   clayplain   forest/riparian   forest   Special   Treatment   Area   (STA)   on   JUDP SD\ MXVW  LQ IHHV XS IURQW 7KH$GGLVRQ&RXQW\&RXUWKRXVHVR Âą10.5  acres  adjacent  to  the  Lemon  Fair  River.   DFFRUGLQJ WR 6FDQORQ ZKR SODFHG IDU WKLV \HDU KDV SURFHVVHG  '/6 4)   Expand  the  existing  Farmstead  Complex  to  9.5  acres  for  future  farm  infrastructure   WKH WRWDO IHH D FOLHQW ZRXOG SD\ DW FDVHVXQUHODWHGWRGULYLQJXQGHUWKH expansion. Adding  the  potential  for  additional  farm  labor  housing  on  a  conserved  farm  is  considered   7KDWPRQH\LVXVHGWRGHIUD\ LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHDFFRUGLQJWRVWDWLVWLFVSUR-­ a  major  amendment  under  VHCBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Interim  Policy  on  Amending  Conservation  Easements   WKH FRVWV RI DGPLQLVWHULQJ WKH SUR-­ YLGHGE\FRXQW\&OHUN-R/D0DUFKH (a   complete   description   of   VHCBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   easement   amendment   policy   is   available   at   www. JUDP7KHFRVWFDQVWLOOEHDEDUJDLQ 6FDQORQ QRWHG PDQ\ FRXQW\ UHVL-­ vhcb.org.)  VHCB  is  required  to  conduct  a  public  hearing  to  seek  public  comment  on  the   WRRIIHQGHUVPRVWRIZKRPDUHORRN-­ GHQWV GRQÂśW OLYH QHDU SXEOLF WUDQV-­ proposed  major  amendment.  VHCB  will  also  accept  written  comment  until  November  22,   LQJ DW D IRXUÂżJXUH ÂżQDQFLDO PRXQ-­ SRUWDWLRQ DQG WKHUHIRUH GHSHQG RQ 2013  at  58  East  State  Street,  Montpelier,  VT  05602  or  info@vhcb.org.   WDLQ WR FOLPE WRZDUG JHWWLQJ WKHLU WKHLU FDUV WR UXQ LPSRUWDQW HUUDQGV The  public  hearing  is  scheduled  at  the  Orwell  Village  School  Library,  494  Main  Street,   GULYHUÂśVOLFHQVHEDFN$QGWKHQHJR-­ DQGFRPPXWHWRZRUN7KH'/6'L-­ Orwell,  Vermont  on  November  14,  2013  at  7  PM.  The  Conservation  Issues  Committee  of   WLDWHG SD\PHQW VFKHGXOH FDQ UHVXOW YHUVLRQ3URJUDPDOORZVRIIHQGHUVWR VHCBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Board  will  consider  the  proposed  amendment  at  their  duly  warned  meeting  on   LQDUHGXFWLRQRIÂżQHVDQGIHHVZLWK GULYHDVORQJDVWKH\ZRUNRXW²DQG December  2,  2013  and  the  general  public  is  welcome  to  attend. 11/4 FRPPXQLW\ VHUYLFH RU HGXFDWLRQDO VWLFNWR²DSODQWRSD\WKHLUGHEWWR VRFLHW\ Âł*HWWLQJ SHRSOH ZKR DUH HOLJLEOH TOWN OF BRISTOL WRGULYHEDFNGULYLQJDJDLQLVDJRRG ADVERTISEMENT AND NOTICE OF TAX SALE â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 32 V.S.A. § 5253 WKLQJRQFHWKH\KDYH VDWLVÂżHG WKHLU The  resident  and  nonresident  owners,  lien  holders  and  mortgagees  of  lands  in  the  Town  of  Bristol  in  the  County  of  Addison   VXVSHQVLRQ SHULRG´ VDLG $GGLVRQ DUHKHUHE\QRWLÂżHGWKDWWKHWD[HVDVVHVVHGE\VXFKWRZQIRUWKH\HDUVWKURXJK-XQHUHPDLQHLWKHULQZKROHRULQSDUWXQSDLG &RXQW\6WDWHÂśV$WWRUQH\'DYLG)HQ-­ RQWKHIROORZLQJGHVFULEHGODQGVLQVXFKWRZQWRZLW VWHU Parcel 1%HLQJDOODQGWKHVDPHODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVFRQYH\HGE\WKHIROORZLQJGHHGV Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   :DUUDQW\'HHGIURP$OIUHG.)DUUDQG(ODLQH0)DUUWR*UHJRU\&)DUUDQG(OL]DEHWK0'Âś$YLJQRQGDWHG-XO\DQG johnf@addisonindependent.com. UHFRUGHGLQ9ROXPHDW3DJHRIWKH%ULVWRO/DQG5HFRUGV '/6DVDVLJQLÂżFDQWFRVWGULYHUIRU WKHMXGLFLDOV\VWHPDVRIWKHVSULQJ RI  DSSUR[LPDWHO\  RI 9HUPRQWÂśVWRWDORIOLFHQVHG GULYHUV RUSHUFHQW ZHUHVHUYLQJ GULYLQJVXVSHQVLRQV 6FDQORQ QRWHG $GGLVRQ &RXQW\ &RXUW 'LYHUVLRQ GHDOV ZLWK PDQ\ IRONV ZKRVH LQIUDFWLRQV LQFOXGH '/6V$QGRIIHQGHUVLQPRVWFDVHV KDYH WR FRPH XS ZLWK PRUH WKDQ  WR UHVROYH UHODWHG ÂżQHV DQG VDWLVI\ DXWR LQVXUDQFH UHTXLUHPHQWV LQRUGHUWRDJDLQEHFOHDUHGIRUGULY-­ ing   by   the   Vermont   Department   of   0RWRU9HKLFOHV Âł2XU ERDUG WKRXJKW WKLV LV D VH-­ ULRXV SUREOHP LQ WKH VWDWH DQG WKDW VRPHWKLQJVKRXOGEHGRQHWRDOOHYL-­ DWHLW´6FDQORQVDLG 7KH &LYLO '/6 3URJUDP LV VKDS-­

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  31

Over 31 years of personalized, comfortable care in a high-tech dental office!

1FUFS+)PQQFS %%4t"EBN&'BTPMJ %.% #SJBO%$PMMJOT %%4 t.PTU*OTVSBODF8FMDPNFt&NFSHFODJFT8FMDPNF t/FX1BUJFOUT8FMDPNF 133&YDIBOHF4USFFU 4VJUFt.JEEMFCVSZ (802) 388-3553

www.middleburydentalvt.com Contact Your Congressman

Contact Your U.S. Senators Sen. Patrick Leahy 1-­800-­642-­3193

433 Russell Senate Office Bldg. Washington, D.C. 20510 senator_leahy@leahy.senate.gov

Sen. Bernie Sanders 1-­800-­339-­9834

Rep. Peter Welch 1-­888-­605-­7270

SRC-­2 United States Senate Washington, D.C. 20510 www.sanders.senate.gov

STEVE  COSTELLO,  AN  assistant  editor  of  the  Addison  Independent  in  the  early  1990s  and  current  vice   president  of  generation  and  energy  innovation  at  Green  Mountain  Power,  accepts  the  Rutland  Regional   Chamber  of  Commerceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  2013  Business  Person  of  the  Year  award.  The  chamber  cited  Costelloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  exten-­ sive  involvement  in  the  community  and  the  successful  business  development  he  has  shepherded  for  the   Rutland  region  on  behalf  of  GMP,  including  an  increase  in  solar-­generated  power.  Shown  at  the  Oct.  29   awards  ceremony  are,  from  left,  Rutland  Chamber  CEO  Tom  Donahue,  Lt.  Gov.  Phil  Scott,  Steve  Costello,   Steveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  wife  Jane,  Rutland  Chamber  President  Marleen  Cenate  and  Rutland  City  Mayor  Chris  Louras.

School News Nathan  North  of  Vergennes  and   Ashley  Mattison  of  Whiting  have   received   scholarships   at   Clarkson   University   for   the   2013-­2014   academic  year.   North,   a   junior   majoring   in   mechanical   engineering,   received   the   Class   of   1963   Endowed   Scholarship   and   the   Elwyn   J.   Rodee  Endowed  Scholarship. Mattison,   a   senior   majoring   in   biology,  received  the  Ellen  Herrick   Endowed  Scholarship. Laura   Dam,   a   junior   at   St.   Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   College,   is   studying   abroad   in   Copenhagen,   Denmark,   at   Danish   Institute   for   Study   Abroad  for  the  fall  2013  semester.   Dam,   a   psychology   major,   gradu-­ ated   from   Vergennes   Union   High   School. She   is   the   daughter   of   Bernard   and  Valerie  Dam  of  Vergennes.  

Check  out  the   Real  Estate  &  Auctions   sections  every  Mon.  &   Thurs.  in  the

www.welch.house.gov

November 4 Puzzle Solutions

Mover  and  shaker

ADDISON COUNTY

1404 Longworth House Office Building Washington, D.C. 20515

Real Estate EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

WALLACE REALTY 48 Mountain Terrace Bristol, VT 05443 0(    s FAX 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: www.wallacere.com www.greenbuiltvermont.com

Kelly

Claire

Tom

Please  call  Kelly,  Claire,  or  Tom

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 as amended which makes it illegal to advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or persons receiv-­ ing public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.â&#x20AC;? This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina-­ tion, call HUD Toll-­free at 1-­800-­424-­8590. For the Washington, DC area please call HUD at 426-­3500.

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PAGE  32  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  November  4,  2013

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Nov 4 2013