Monday, Oct. 5, 2015

Page 1

MONDAY Â Â EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 27 No. 29

Middlebury, Vermont

X

Monday, October 5, 2015

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44 Pages

75¢

Falcons  back  from  the  brink Record  tally  of  peregrine  chicks  counted

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By  GAEN  MURPHREE ADDISON  COUNTY  â€”  Forty-­ ÂżYH \HDUV DJR D ORQH PDOH SHUHJULQH falcon  spotted  at  Mt.  Pisgah  above  Lake  Willoughby  was  the  last  wild  falcon  left  in  Vermont.  The  last.  The  entire  species  had  been  wiped  out Â

(technically  â€œextirpated,â€?  not  ex-­ tinct),  not  only  in  Vermont,  not  only  in  the  Northeast,  but  throughout  its  entire  range  east  of  the  Mississippi. This  year,  state  wildlife  biologists  reported  44  cliff-­nesting  pairs  pro-­ ducing  a  record  67  chicks  â€”  several Â

in  Addison  County.  â€œIt’s  tremendous  just  to  have  them  back,â€?  said  Sue  Staats,  a  biological  technician  with  the  National  Forest  Service  who  monitors  peregrines  in  the  Middlebury  and  Rochester  rang-­ er  districts. While  the  peregrine  population  is  (See  Falcons,  Page  16)

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Down the drain

Street stencil reminds us that waste goes to lake By  GAEN  MURPHREE BRISTOL  â€”  As  merrymakers  began  arriving  for  the  Bristol  Har-­ vest  Festival  on  Saturday,  Sept.  26,  a  group  of  14  volunteers  with  the  New  Haven  River  Anglers  Association  fanned  out  along  Bristol  streets  on  a  serious  mission.  In  groups  of  twos  and  threes  they  stopped  at  storm  drains  in  the  vil-­ lage  center,  laid  down  a  stencil,  and Â

painted  a  message  for  anyone  who  GHSRVLWV ZDVWH ² Ă€XLGV DQG VROLGV —  into  the  gutters: “Keep  It  Clean,  Drains  To  River.â€? The  stencils,  with  the  text  accom-­ panied  by  the  image  of  a  trout,  are  to  remind  Bristol  residents  to  protect  the  New  Haven  River,  as  it  drains  into  Otter  Creek  and  eventually  into  Lake  Champlain.  (See  Anglers,  Page  43)

New judge takes bench at Addison County Courthouse By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY  â€”  The  regu-­ lar  changing  of  the  guard  within  Vermont’s  local  courthouses  has  brought  a  new  presiding  judge  to  Addison  County  â€”  Samuel  Hoar  Jr.,  who  replaces  Judge  Robert  Mello,  who  has  been  transferred  to  Franklin  County Â

Superior  Court. Addison  County’s  new  judge  hopes  to  be  spending  the  next  two  years  in  Addison  County’s  courthouse,  and  he  does  not  mind  getting  a  change  of  scenery  on  a  regular  basis. “Overall,  I  favor  the  concept  of  (See  Judge  Hoar,  Page  14)


PAGE  2  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Granville  RIIHUV ÂżUVW response  WR 5W neighbors By  JOHN  FLOWERS GRANVILLE  â€”  The  tiny  Gran-­ ville  Fire  Department  is  taking  on  a  huge  responsibility  for  itself  and  two  neighboring  communities.  It  has  DJUHHG WR VSHDUKHDG ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH services  for  Granville,  Hancock  and  Rochester  in  the  wake  of  last  year’s  decision  by  White  River  Valley  Am-­ bulance  Inc.  (WRVA)  to  close  its  Route  100  branch. Closure  of  the  WRVA’s  local  am-­ bulance  garage,  next  to  Hancock  Building  Supply,  created  some  anxi-­ ety  within  the  three  Route  100  com-­ munities,  two  of  which  (Hancock  and  Granville)  are  located  in  Ad-­ dison  County.  Suddenly,  WRVA’s  closest  location  was  in  Bethel,  leav-­ ing  area  residents  wondering  how  long  it  might  take  them  to  receive  emergency  medical  care  for  a  stroke,  heart  attack  or  other  life  threatening  condition. “In  Granville,  there  are  times  you  have  to  wait  30  minutes  or  more  (for  an  ambulance),  which  seems  like  forever,â€?  said  Granville  Fire  Chief  Danial  Sargent.  â€œWe  have  had  situa-­ tions  where  all  of  WRVA’s  rigs  were  out  and  we’ve  had  to  call  Mad  River  Valley  Ambulance  Service.  That  can  take  an  hour.â€? Fortunately,  WRVA’s  departure  from  Hancock  â€”  something  the  or-­ ganization  decided  to  do  because  the  low  volume  of  Route  100-­area  calls  (See  Granville,  Page  42)

OUR

OTTER  CREEK  BREWING  in  Middlebury  is  poised  to  break  ground  on  a  new  8,000-­square-­foot  addition  to  its  Exchange  Street  facility  that  will  house  a  state-­of-­the-­art  brew  house.  The  expansion  will  allow  the  company  to  manufacture  more  than  2  million  cases  of  beer  annually.

Work  to  begin  on  new  brew  house By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY  â€”  Otter  Creek  Brewing  this  month  will  begin  con-­ struction  on  a  nearly  8,000-­square-­ foot  addition  at  its  Exchange  Street  headquarters  that  will  house  a  state-­ of-­the-­art,  fully  automated  120-­bar-­ rel  brew  house  that  is  expected  to  make  OCB  the  largest  brewery  (by  volume)  in  the  state. Gov.  Peter  Shumlin  and  OCB  founder  Lawrence  Miller  â€”  now  Vermont’s  chief  of  health  care  re-­ form  â€”  are  expected  to  be  among  the  statewide  dignitaries  present  on  Monday,  Oct.  5,  at  a  kick-­off  event  and  tour  of  the  brewing  company’s  ever  growing  facilities.  Indeed,  OCB  has  come  a  long  way  since  Miller  es-­ tablished  it  in  1991  as  a  one-­person  operation  in  a  small  rented  space  near  Middlebury’s  industrial  park. “We’re  very  excited,â€?  OCB  Presi-­ dent  and  CEO  Daniel  Fulham  said  in  an  interview  with  the  Independent.  â€œThere  is  a  lot  of  work  ahead  of  us,  but  we  are  excited  to  get  shovels  into  the  ground.â€?

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Once  installed,  the  new  brew  to  grab  a  beer  and  various  food  se-­ house  will  give  OCB  the  capacity  lections,  including  sandwiches  and  to  produce  more  than  200,000  bar-­ lunch  specials. rels  of  its  award-­winning  beer  each  Phase  III,  to  be  launched  in  2017  year,  up  from  the  current  65,000  at  the  earliest,  calls  for  growing  the  barrels  it  can  currently  manufacture.  company’s  warehousing  and  pack-­ Fulham  said  200,000  barrels  trans-­ aging  hall. lates  to  around  2  million  cases  of  All  of  this  growth  is  designed  to  beer.  Otter  Creek  Brewing  current-­ help  OCB  better  respond  to  what  ly  manufactures  has  been  a  steady  more  than  three  demand  for  its  dozen  varieties  of  Once installed, the products,  currently  beer  under  the  Ot-­ new brew house available  for  sale  ter  Creek  Brew-­ will give Otter Creek in  14  states  plus  ing,  Wolaver’s  and  Brewing the capacity the  District  of  Co-­ Shed  brands.  The  lumbia.  Fulham  company  currently  to produce more than anticipates  that  by  employs  around  60  200,000 barrels of the  end  of  this  year  full-­time  workers,  its award-winning business  will  have  according  to  Ful-­ beer each year, up grown  by  almost  ham,  who  expects  from the current 20  percent  in  2015. that  number  to  â€œWe  look  at  it  65,000 barrels ramp  up  in  the  near  as  part  of  an  or-­ future  after  the  it can currently ganic  growth  strat-­ new  brew  house  manufacture. egy,â€?  Fulham  said.  comes  on  line. “We  want  to  grow  This  is  just  the  deeper  in  the  foot-­ ÂżUVW LQ D WKUHH SKDVHG H[SDQVLRQ print  we  have,  but  when  you  are  renovation  plan  for  OCB’s  Middle-­ evaluating  new  markets,  one  of  the  bury  headquarters. key  points  is  being  able  to  supply.  Phase  II  will  involve  expansion  This  is  part  of  a  long-­term  plan.â€? of  the  company’s  retail,  restaurant  The  new  brew  house  will  be  and  pub  areas.  The  restaurant  and  equipped  with  specially  designed,  pub  have  become  an  increasingly  stainless  steel  brewing  vessels  made  popular  place  for  locals  and  visitors  in  Germany  by  BrauKon  â€”  a  world Â

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leader  in  the  manufacture  of  beer  making  equipment.  This  particular  project  and  the  two  phases  to  fol-­ low  represent  a  multi-­million-­dollar  investment  by  the  company  into  its  Middlebury  facilities. “Basically,  think  of  the  brew  team  â€”  instead  of  up  and  down  ladders  â€”  think  of  them  in  a  control  room  actually  watching  the  dosing  and  the  beer  move  through  the  brewing  cycle,â€?  Fulham  said  of  how  the  new  brew  house  technology  will  stream-­ line  OCB  operations. Otter  Creek  Brewing  will  contin-­ ue  to  maintain  and  operate  its  cur-­ rent  40-­barrel  brew  house,  using  it  to  process  smaller,  special  batches  and  to  ensure  additional  capacity,  Ful-­ ham  explained.  The  company  is  cur-­ rently  brewing  seven  days  per  week  with  its  current  brew  house,  but  Fulham  believes  OCB  will  be  able  WR SDUH EDFN WR D ÂżYH GD\ SHU ZHHN schedule  after  the  new  infrastructure  is  installed. “We’d  love  to  be  able  to  dial  it  back,  because  we  will  be  able  to  do  some  bigger  batches,â€?  he  said. Assuming  cooperative  weather  and  a  smooth  construction  schedule,  Fulham  believes  the  new  brew  house  will  be  operating  by  next  April.  Shumlin  is  pleased  to  see  the  growth  at  OCB. “This  is  just  wonderful  news  for  Otter  Creek,  Middlebury  and  Ver-­ mont,â€?  he  said  through  an  emailed  response  to  the  Addison  Indepen-­ dent.  â€œThe  microbrew  revolution  in  this  state  has  been  fascinating  to  watch  over  the  past  few  years.  It  has  led  to  the  expansion  of  jobs,  tour-­ ism,  downtown  development  and  worldwide  recognition  for  our  little  state.  â€œOtter  Creek  has  been  leading  that  revolution  since  the  beginning,  and  I  congratulate  them  on  taking  this  next  step.  â€œFor  the  town  of  Middlebury,  this  just  adds  to  the  economic  growth  we’ve  seen  in  the  town  in  general  DQG PRUH VSHFLÂżFDOO\ RQ ([FKDQJH Street.  It  seems  like  every  week  there  is  something  new  and  exciting  happening  on  Exchange  Street.  This  is  great  news  and  I  can’t  wait  for  the  kickoff.â€? Reporter  John  Flowers  is  at  johnf@addisonindependent.com.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  3

Chamber honors Ralson, Two Brothers for leadership Middlebury  Rotary  gets  award  for  good  works

NEW  HAVEN  â€”  With  cooling  change  Street.  WHPSHUDWXUHV DQG D ÂżUH UHG VXQVHW Ralston  has  been  an  active  board  outside  of  Tourterelle  Restaurant  member  for  the  Addison  County  Eco and  Inn’s  tented  pavilion,  the  Addi nomic  Development  Corporation  and  son  County  Chamber  of  Commerce  the  Vermont  Retailers  Association. recognized  Two  Brothers  Tavern,  In  the  words  of  his  employees,  Paul  Ralston  and  the  Middlebury  Ro Malcolm  said,  â€œPaul  Ralston  is  some tary  Club  with  its  top  awards  at  the  one  who  is  passionate  about  his  com organization’s  annual  meeting  last  munity  and  cares  about  his  neighbors’  Wednesday  evening.  happiness  and  their  success.  He  cares  Middlebury’s  Two  Brothers  Tav and  demonstrates  it  daily.  He  walks  ern  received  the  2015  Business  of  the  the  talk  and  is  the  voice  for  those  who  Year  Award,  which  recognizes  busi need  one.â€? nesses  that  have  grown,  while  pro The  Chamber’s  Community  viding  excellent  products  or  service  Achievement  Award  is  given  to  a  and  doing  well  by  their  employees  QRQ SURÂżW RUJDQL]DWLRQ WKDW SURYLGHV and  the  community.  D VLJQLÂżFDQW DQG VXVWDLQHG FRQWULEX 7ZR %URWKHUV 7DYHUQ LV D IDPLO\ tion  to  the  wellbeing  of  the  area.  This  run  business  that  opened  in  Middle year’s  award  was  presented  to  the  bury  in  2002,  and  is  â€œstrongly  sup Rotary  Club  of  Middlebury  and  ac portive  of  the  community,â€?  said  cepted  by  Geoff  Conrad,  club  presi RECOGNIZING  THE  AWARDS  recipients  at  last  Wednesday’s  Addison  County  Chamber  of  Commerce  An-­ award  presented  Brian  Carpenter,  last  dent  and  manager  of  the  Middlebury  year’s  award  winner.  Carpenter  noted  Inn,  and  Eric  Denu,  Rotary  District  nual  Meeting  were,  from  left  to  right,  Middlebury  Rotary  Past  President  Tim  Hollander;Íž  Rotary  District  Gov-­ the  restaurant  holds  special  dining  *RYHUQRU (OHFW DQG RZQHU RI &RXQ ernor-­Elect  Eric  Denu;Íž  Middlebury  Rotary  President  Geoff  Conrad;Íž  Sue  Hoxie,  president,  Addison  County  Chamber;Íž  Paul  Ralston,  Vermont  Coffee  Company;Íž  and  Megan  Brady  and  Holmes  Jacobs,  both  with  Two  QLJKWV WKDW EHQHÂżW ORFDO RUJDQL]DWLRQV tryside  Carpet  &  Paint.  The  Middle Brothers  Tavern.  Addison  Independent  photos and  also  hosts  special  fundraising  bury  Rotary  Club  is  one  of  32,000  events,  such  as  the  annual  Face  Off  clubs  throughout  the  world  with  GRHV LV LWV )ODJ 3URMHFW 7KH Ă€DJV \RX Against  Breast  Cancer  party,  Cock more  than  1.3  million  members.  tails  Curing  Cancer,  the  Adam  My Locally,  the  Rotary  has  worked  to  see  in  town  on  our  patriotic  holidays  ers  Memorial  Fundraiser,  and  Porter  support  youth  sports  programs,  spon are  from  the  efforts  of  Rotarians  and  Hospital  Auxiliary’s  Beat  Back  the  sored  student  exchanges,  and  backed  are  sponsored  by  individuals  and  Blues,  among  others.  They  lead  the  an  annual  speech  contest.  They  have  community  businesses.  charge  by  organizing  and  participat also  contributed  to  numerous  causes  ANNUAL  BUSINESS  MEETING At  the  chamber’s  annual  business  ing  in  community  events  such  as  the  and  organizations,  such  as:  Addison  meeting  the  board  and  members  of  Vermont  Chili  Festival,  and  their  County  Transit  Resources,  Town  weekly  trivia  and  open  mic  nights  Hall  Theater,  the  Regional  Ambu the  Chamber  recognized  Bonita  Be and  live  music  make  Two  Brothers  a  lance  Building,  Memorial  Sports  dard  of  Vermont  HoneyLights  in  true  community  meeting  place. Center,  Homeward  Bound  and  El Bristol,  Martin  Clark  of  Martin’s  The  Chamber’s  2015  Buster  Brush  derly  Services.  Its  members  and  the  Hardware  in  Bristol  and  Middle Citizen  of  the  Year  Award  went  to  organization  regularly  give  to  local  bury,  Sam  Cutting  IV  of  Dakin  Farm  Paul  Ralston,  owner  of  Vermont  QRQ SURÂżWV VXFK DV +23( &KDUWHU in  Ferrisburgh,  and  Steve  Misasi  of  Coffee  Company.  Ralson,  presented  House  Coalition,  Open  Door  Clinic,  Misasi  &  Company,  who  are  leaving  Nancy  Malcolm  told  the  crowd  of  the  Henry  Sheldon  Museum  and  the  chamber  board  after  serving  their  terms.  about  80  business  leaders,  exempli Meals  on  Wheels.  Those  attending  Wednesday’s  More than ÂżHV WKH FULWHULD IRU ZKLFK WKH DZDUG LV The  most  visible  service  project  meeting  also  voted  on  the  board  of  given  â€”  â€œa  history  of  getting  things  that  the  Middlebury  Rotary  Club  25 museums, GLUHFWRUV IRU WKH \HDU done  to  make  the  New  to  the  board  this  stores and galleries community  better  \HDU VHUYLQJ D RQH \HDU in  a  variety  of  ways,  turn downtown WHUP H[SLULQJ DW WKH with  no  intention  of  Middlebury into one annual  meeting  is  Judson  personal  reward  or  Hescock  of  Neuse,  Duprey  extraordinary recognition.â€? &  Putnam,  PC. Ralston  has  both  exhibit. Other  board  members  in started  businesses  clude:  Geoff  Conrad,  Mid and  helped  other  dlebury  Inn;Íž  Don  Devost,  businesses  reach  Addison  Advisors;Íž  David  new  levels.  Hailed  Donahue,  Middlebury  Col 2015 DATES as  an  entrepreneur  lege;Íž  Larry  Goetschius,  with  an  open  mind,  Â„ɎͲ Ζ ĐŁ sÍ…ËłĘ&#x; Î?Î? ĐŁ sÍ…ˌͲ Î?ÎŽ Addison  County  Home  he  is  not  only  the  Í…ʝ̰̝ͅ Î?Î’ ĐŁ Ă…Ę&#x;̢̝Ę&#x;ËŻĘŒĘ&#x;ĚŚ Î?Î? ĐŁ Â’Ę?̝˽ĘŒĘ&#x;ĚŚ Η Health  &  Hospice;Íž  Han owner  of  Vermont  nah  Manley,  Homeward  second Friday of the month Coffee  Company,  Bound;Íž  Michael  Norris,  and  is  the  former  Poulos  Insurance;Íž  Shawn  state  representative  2015 SPONSORS Oxford,  Bristol  Financial  for  Middlebury.  He  Services;Íž  Liza  Sacheli,  Î“Î? „ɎË?Ëł ĐŁ Ę—Ę—Ë?̰˽˳ b˳ʗĘ&#x;̢Ę&#x;˳ʗĘ&#x;˳̝ ĐŁ ËŻĘ&#x;ĚŚË?Ę?ÉŽËł OËŚÉŽĚťĘŒĚŚĘ&#x;ÉŽĘ— ĐŁ &ˌɎͲπ̰ is  currently  work Middlebury  College  Ma &ËŚĘ&#x;ËŻĘ&#x;˳̝Ë?ËłĘ&#x; ĐŁ -Ɏ˳ʚ˽̝̌˃ ¡Ę&#x;̝ͧĘ&#x;ĚŚ ĐŁ 5Ę—ĘťĘ&#x;ͧɎ̝Ę&#x;ĚŚ QÉŽËŚËŚĘ&#x;̌Ͳ ĐŁ QÉŽËŚĘ&#x;ĚŚË?Ę&#x; ¡̌˽ͤĘ&#x;˳Ɏ˳Ę?Ę&#x; ing  on  the  Middle haney  Center  for  the  Arts;Íž  YĘ&#x;˳̌Ͳ Ă…ËƒĘ&#x;ËŚĘ—˽˳ „̰ͅĘ&#x;Í…ËŻ ĐŁ Â’̝̝Ę&#x;ĚŚ &ĚŚĘ&#x;Ę&#x;Ë uË?ĚťĘ?˃Ę&#x;˳ͧɎ̌Ę&#x; Ψ 5ËŚĘ&#x;Ę?̝̌˽˳Ë?Ę?Ě° bury  EDI  develop Bill  Sayre,  representing  Â’̝̝Ę&#x;ĚŚ &ĚŚĘ&#x;Ę&#x;Ë Ă™Ě°Ę&#x;Ę— "Ë˝Ë˝Ë Ě° ĐŁ ¡Ëƒ˽̝˽¡ˌɎĘ?Ę&#x; QÉŽËŚËŚĘ&#x;̌Ͳ ĐŁ Ă…ÉŽĚŚÉŽËƒ ĂťĘ&#x;̰̰˽˳ Å̝ͅʗË?Ë˝ ment  committee,  is  Addison  County  Regional  Ă…ĚťĘ&#x;ͤĘ&#x;Ëł sÍ…̢Ë?ĚťĘ&#x;ĚŚ QÉŽËŚËŚĘ&#x;̌Ͳ ĐŁ øĘ&#x;̌˯˽˳̝ OË˝ËŚË ËŚË?ĘšĘ&#x; &Ę&#x;˳̝Ę&#x;ĚŚ pressing  the  Ver Planning  Commission;Íž  Ă…ͧĘ&#x;Ę&#x;Ěť &Ę&#x;Ę?Ë?ˌͲ ĐŁ øĘ&#x;̌˯˽˳̝π̰ Â’ͧ˳ ¡̌˽Ę—Í…Ę?̝̰ mont  Agency  of  Ɏ̝θ Grover  Usilton,  National  Ý˽˳Ę—Ę&#x;̌ˌɎ˳ʗ ÉŽĚŚĚťË?̰̝̰ Transportation  for  Ę— Ëł ÉŽ Ě° Bank  of  Middlebury;Íž  Wen ĚťË?˽˳ a  roundabout  at  ʝ ËŚË˝Ę?ÉŽ Ëł Ë? Ěť dy  Hirdler,  Key  Speakers  Ɏ ̢ Ë? Exchange  Street/ lk.com ÉŽĚŚĚťË?Ę? a ̢ Ęš Bureau,  r epresenting  B etter  W Ë˝ ĚŚ s t ÉŽ Route  7  intersec ÉŽËŚĘ&#x;˳ʗ Middlebury  Partnership;Íž  uryAr b tion  and  has  pressed  e l Ę— ĚťËƒĘ&#x; Ę? Ëł d Ë? O and  Rebecca  Woods,  Porter  the  need  locally  w.Mid w w Medical  Center. for  a  sidewalk  and  bike  path  along  Ex PAUL  RALSTON,  CITIZEN  OF  THE  YEAR

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PAGE  4  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

A D D IS ON Â Â INDE P E NDEN T

Editorial How  to  stop  the  madness In  the  wake  of  the  mass  shooting  at  Umpqua  Community  College  in  Oregon  last  week,  here  are  three  facts  that  should  shock  America  out  of  its  reluctance  to  take  action  on  gun  control:  an  average  of  92  gun-­related  deaths  in  America  every  day;Íž  since  1970,  more  Americans  have  died  from  guns  than  died  in  all  U.S.  wars  going  back  to  the  American  Revolution;Íž  more  preschoolers  are  shot  GHDG HDFK \HDU LQ WKDQ SROLFH RIÂżFHUV DUH LQ WKH OLQH RI GXW\ LQ 2013).  Imagine,  it’s  more  dangerous  to  be  a  preschooler  in  this  country  than  a  ODZ HQIRUFHPHQW RIÂżFHU How  can  that  be  so?  How  can  we  have  allowed  the  gun  lobby  to  have  such  a  strangle  hold  on  America’s  common  sense?  But  we  have  and  they  do.  One  problem,  cites  Nicholas  Kristof  of  The  New  York  Times,  is  that  the  gun  lobby  in  this  country  â€œhas  largely  blocked  research  on  making  guns  safer.  Between  1973  and  2012,  the  National  Institutes  of  Health  awarded  89  grants  for  the  study  of  rabies  and  212  for  cholera  â€”  and  RQO\ WKUHH IRU ÂżUHDUPV LQMXULHV ´ Âł'DQLHO :HEVWHU D SXEOLF KHDOWK H[SHUW DW -RKQV +RSNLQV 8QLYHUVLW\ ´ Kristof  continues,  â€œnotes  that  in  1999,  the  government  listed  the  gun  stores  that  had  sold  the  most  weapons  later  linked  to  crimes.  The  gun  store  at  the  top  of  the  list  was  so  embarrassed  that  it  voluntarily  took  measures  to  reduce  its  use  by  criminals  â€”  and  the  rate  at  which  new  guns  from  the  store  were  diverted  to  crime  dropped  77  percent.  â€œBut  in  2003  (under  President  George  W.  Bush),  Congress  barred  the  JRYHUQPHQW IURP SXEOLVKLQJ VXFK LQIRUPDWLRQ ´ :K\" %HFDXVH WKH JXQ OREE\ did  not  want  public  awareness  of  facts  to  prompt  sensible  gun  regulations.  Kristof  cites  the  polling  of  public  health  institutes  suggesting  there  are  ample  ways  to  improve  gun  safety,  including  majority  support  for:  universal  back-­ ground  checks,  tighter  regulation  of  gun  dealers  and  a  10-­year  prohibition  on  possessing  guns  for  anyone  convicted  of  domestic  violence,  assault  or  similar  RIIHQVHV ´ “We  should  also  be  investing  in  â€˜smart  gun’  technology,  such  as  weapons  WKDW ÂżUH RQO\ ZLWK D 3,1 RU ÂżQJHUSULQW :H VKRXOG DGRSW PLFUR VWDPSLQJ WKDW allows  a  bullet  casing  to  be  traced  back  to  a  particular  gun.  We  can  require  liability  insurance  for  guns,  as  we  do  for  cars  â€Ś  Right  now,  the  passivity  of  SROLWLFLDQV LV VLPSO\ HQDEOLQJ VKRRWHUV ´ And  just  who  are  those  supporting  the  gun  lobbyists?  According  to  the  Pew  Research  Center,  nearly  75  percent  of  Democrats  favor  some  form  of  gun  con-­ trol  regulations  (such  as  those  common-­sense  measures  noted  above),  while  71  percent  of  Republicans  say  gun  rights  trump  gun  control  limitations.  While  both  Democratic  presidential  candidates  Hillary  Clinton  and  Bernie  Sanders,  as  well  as  President  Obama,  say  the  madness  has  to  stop  and  some  gun  control  measures  should  be  found,  not  a  single  Republican  presidential  candidate  released  a  statement  following  the  Oregon  shootings  in  favor  of  gun  control  measures  or  doing  anything  to  change  the  status  quo.  Jeb  Bush,  in  particular,  was  singled  out  for  his  response  when  he  dismissed  reaction  to  the  latest  shoot-­ ing  with  the  comment,  â€œLook,  stuff  happens.  There’s  always  a  crisis,  and  the  LPSXOVH LV DOZD\V WR GR VRPHWKLQJ DQG LWÂśV QRW DOZD\V WKH ULJKW WKLQJ WR GR ´ Curbing  gun  violence  is  not  always  the  right  thing  to  do?  It’s  that  mentality,  and  the  warped  perspective  that  putting  more  guns  in  the  hands  of  Americans  will  make  us  safer,  that  has  led  to  the  tragedies  we,  as  a  nation,  witness  every  few  months. In  comments  following  the  shootings,  President  Obama  challenged  the  American  public  (after  giving  up  on  passing  laws  through  the  Republican-­ controlled  Congress)  to  take  action  by  voting  for  legislators  who  will  craft  new  laws:  â€œI’d  ask  the  American  people  to  think  about  how  they  can  get  our  government  to  change  these  laws,  and  to  save  lives,  and  to  let  young  people  grow  up.  And  that  will  require  a  change  of  politics  on  this  issue  ...  And  I  would  particularly  ask  America’s  gun  owners  â€”  who  are  using  those  guns  properly,  safely,  to  hunt,  for  sport,  for  protecting  their  families  â€”  to  think  about  whether  your  views  are  properly  being  represented  by  the  organization  that  suggests  it’s  speaking  for  you. “And  each  time  this  happens  I’m  going  to  bring  this  up.  Each  time  this  happens  I  am  going  to  say  that  we  can  actually  do  something  about  it,  but  we’re  going  to  have  to  change  our  laws.  And  this  is  not  something  I  can  do  by  myself.  I’ve  got  to  have  a  Congress  and  I’ve  got  to  have  state  legislatures  and  JRYHUQRUV ZKR DUH ZLOOLQJ WR ZRUN ZLWK PH RQ WKLV ´ —  Angelo  S.  Lynn

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Ducks  unlimited DUCKS  GATHER  NEAR  a  pond  on  Boundbrook  Farm  in  Ferrisburgh  last  week.  The  ducks  help  elimi-­ nate  weeds  that  grow  in  the  farm’s  rice  crop. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Letters to the Editor Long-­time  donor  receives  assistance  in  time  of  need  For  years  I  paid  it  forward  when  I  was  able  to  work.  I  grabbed  kids’  names  off  of  Christmas  trees  and  bought  them  everything  on  their  list  and  then  some,  I  paid  for  someone’s  coffee,  lunch,  groceries,  parts  for  their  car,  gas,  put  together  Thanksgiving  baskets,  donated  tons  of  dog  and  cat  food  to  the  shelters,  giving  people  rides  and  the  list  goes  on.  Even  with  very  little  I  have  now,  I’ve  always  tried  to  Pay  It  Forward  somehow,  but  today  I  was  surprised  when  a  total  stranger  Paid  It  Forward  to  me.

For  those  who  don’t  know  me  â€”  for  years  I  was  a  workaholic.  I  work  three  to  four  jobs  and  my  workweek  was  75-­80  plus  hours  a  week.  It’s  all  I  knew  and  I  was  happy  working  that  way,  but  I  put  my  body  through  hell  and  all  those  \HDUV RI ZRUNLQJ ÂżQDOO\ FDXJKW XS to  me.  I  was  forced  to  quit  working  my  hardcore  manual  jobs  or  ruin  my  body  even  more. , WULHG ÂżQGLQJ VRPHWKLQJ , FRXOG GR EXW DIWHU ÂżOOLQJ RXW MRE applications,  there  was  nothing.  I  was  repeatedly  told  I  was  a  li-­

ability  due  to  my  injuries.  I  had  no  choice  but  to  go  on  Social  Security  and  to  sign  up  for  food  stamps.  No,  not  everyone  who  gets  food  stamps  abuses  the  system  and  refuses  to  work.  Some  of  us  have  no  choice  because  we  no  longer  can.  (By  the  way,  I  paid  my  share  into  Social  Security  when  I  did  work.  I  had  more  hours  in  within  10  years  than  most  have  in  20). Reminder,  just  because  I’m  a  big  woman  with  a  nice  truck  doesn’t  mean  anything.  I  moved  for  being  (See  Letter,  Page  5)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  5

Green  energy,  views  can  coexist

Letter (Continued  from  Page  4) a  big  woman  and  I  worked  hard  for  all  I  have  until  I  no  longer  could,  so  just  because  you  can’t  see  my  injuries  doesn’t  mean  I’m  not  injured. At  any  rate,  I  thought  today  was  WKH ÂżUVW VR , ZHQW IRRG VKRS-­ SLQJ DW WKH 6KDZÂśV LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ It  wasn’t  until  I  tried  using  my  card  twice  and  it  was  denied  that  I  asked  the  cashier  if  today  was  WKH ÂżUVW DQG VKH VDLG Âł1R LWÂśV WKH 30th.â€? I  felt  lousy  as  well  as  embar-­ rassed  because  I  was  holding  ev-­ HU\RQH XS DQG P\ JURFHULHV KDG DOO UHDG\ EHHQ EDJJHG , DSRORJL]HG WR everyone  around  me  and  even  of-­ IHUHG WR SXW WKH LWHPV EDFN RQ WKH shelves  so  the  store  wouldn’t  have  to  when  the  woman  in  back  of  me  told  me  to  wait,  looked  at  my  gro-­ cery  total  and  told  me  she  had  it Â

and  to  take  my  groceries.  I  told  her  it  was  OK  that  I  could  wait  until  tomorrow  but  she  insisted.  I  asked  for  her  name  and  number  so  I  FRXOG UHSD\ KHU EXW VKH MXVW VPLOHG DQG VDLG Âł3D\ ,W )RUZDUG ´ I’ve  never  run  into  anyone  to  do  anything  like  that  for  me.  I  had  always  worked  for  everything  or  gone  without.  I  had  also  always  EHHQ WKH SHUVRQ WR 3D\ ,W )RUZDUG and  not  the  one  to  receive. 7R WKH SUHJQDQW EORQGH ZRPDQ ZKR 3DLG ,W )RUZDUG WR PH WRGD\ 7+$1. <28 ,W GRHVQÂśW KDYH WR be  much  nor  does  it  take  much  to  PDNH VRPHRQHÂśV GD\ RU KHOS WKHP out  so  to  everyone  out  there,  do  what  you  can  to  make  someone’s  GD\ RU KHOS VRPHRQH LQ QHHG RU ZKHQ WKH\ OHDVW H[SHFW LW DQG 3D\ ,W )RUZDUG Monica  L.  Schaner Brandon

Beyond the pastoral We  all  know  the  reaction  that  education,  many  of  us  go  back  to  SOD\V DFURVV WKH FRXQWHQDQFH RI what  we  have  known  and  lived,  those  who  visit  Vermont,  who  wit-­ what  worked  for  us  as  children  in  ness  its  beauty  on  a  tour  of  the  1950,  1970  or  1990.  We  go  back  leaves  and  leave  feeling  grateful  to  what  worked  for  us  as  a  basis  WKDW SODFHV OLNH WKLV VWLOO H[LVW /LNH for  what  our  schools  should  look  many  residents  that  have  lived  out-­ OLNH LQ SUHSDULQJ VWXGHQWV IRU OLYHV VLGH WKH *UHHQ 0RXQWDLQV , WRR that  are  increasingly  both  local  and  came  here  because  I  was  drawn  to  international.  Our  nostalgia  runs  WKH SDVWRUDO DQG WKH EXFROLF DQG GHHS DQG DULVHV RXW RI RXU RZQ FUDYHG D FRPPXQLW\ ULFK H[SHUL-­ XQLTXH H[SHULHQFH :KHWKHU LW EH ence  that  gave  real  meaning  to  life.  UHODWHG WR ZDONLQJ XSKLOO ERWK ZD\V There  is  not  a  day  that  goes  by  that  WR VFKRRO WKH LPSRUWDQFH RI KRPH-­ I  don’t  marvel  at  the  ZRUN RU WKH SXUSRVH RI ODQG DQG WKH SHRSOH DQG D SXEOLF VFKRRO HGXFD-­ the  seeming  balance  tion,  we  carry  our  own  they  make. H[SHULHQFH DQG XQGHU-­ <HW WKLV UHYHULH PXVW standing  forward  in  how  DW VRPH SRLQW HQG WR we  envision  the  work  of  OHDYH WKH SRHWLF YHUL-­ our  schools  today. similitude  to  move  As  we  move  educa-­ toward  a  settled  and  tion  forward  in  Ver-­ grounded  reality  that  mont,  I  believe  it  is  im-­ ERWK LQFRUSRUDWHV WKLV SHUDWLYH WKDW ZH FRPH romantic  vision  and  al-­ to  terms  with  this.  We  lows  for  a  healthy  dose  must  learn  to  be  increas-­ of  unfettered  realism.  LQJO\ FULWLFDO WR DQDO\]H <RX FDQ RQO\ JDZN IRU our  own  learned  con-­ so  long  before  you  start  FHSWLRQV RI WHDFKLQJ DQG WR FDWFK Ă€LHV learning  and  education-­ I’ve  found  that  our  al  systems,  to  be  able  to  LGHQWLW\ DV D VWDWH LV ÂżO-­ by Peter Burrows IXOÂżOO WKH PLVVLRQ ZHÂśYH tered  through  the  lens  set  forth  to  ensure  each  of  nostalgia,  and  is  reinforced  by  DQG HYHU\ VWXGHQW LQ 9HUPRQW ÂżQGV those  outside  of  Vermont  that  revel  success,  regardless  of  the  count-­ at  our  traditions.  It’s  what  we  are  less  challenges  that  many  of  our  confronting  in  our  work  to  im-­ students  face  to  be  ready  to  learn  SURYH WKH HFRQRP\ DQG DWWUDFW LQ-­ and  grow.  This  will  require  us,  as  vestment  growth,  where  we  look  a  state,  to  unearth  our  nostalgia,  WR ÂżQG WKDW SHUIHFW EDODQFH ZKHUH to  bear  out  what’s  essential  to  our  WKH FRQĂ€DWLRQ RI RXU H[SHULHQFHV core  beliefs  while  staying  focused  and  values  meet  our  need  to  grow  on  challenging  those  beliefs  to  WKH HFRQRP\ WR LPSURYH WKH OLYHV build  stronger  schools  for  all  of  our  of  all  of  our  residents.  It’s  what  we  students.  are  confronting  in  education,  in  our  If  we  can  remain  true  to  a  singu-­ ZRUN WR ÂżQG WKLV SRLQW RI EDODQFH lar  focus  on  student  achievement  We  are  in  the  midst  of  a  statewide  and  well-­being,  we’ll  be  on  the  inquiry  into  determining  how  our  right  track.  core  values  meet  with  our  vision  Peter  Burrows,  D.Ed.,  is  super-­ RI HGXFDWLRQDO V\VWHPV WKDW SURYLGH intendent  of  the  Addison  Central  UHDO HTXLWDEOH VXSSRUWV DQG SHUVRQ-­ Supervisory  Union  and  has  more  DOL]HG OHDUQLQJ H[SHULHQFHV than  two  decades  of  experience  in  If  asked  about  what  works  in  education.

On Point in Education

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SURSHUW\ YDOXHV RI KRPHV QHDU SRRUO\ VLWHG RU VFUHHQHG SURMHFWV LQ MHRSDUG\ ,W LV RQO\ QDWXUDO IRU SHRSOH WR ¿JKW WR SUHVHUYH WKH YDOXH RI ZKDW LV OLNHO\ their  largest  investment.  When  folks  who  want  solar-­at-­any-­cost  confront-­ HG WKH SRVLWLRQ RI SHRSOH ZKR IHOW WKHLU homes  were  being  threatened  by  solar,  the  battle  began,  and  unfortunately  our  legislators  did  next  to  nothing  in  the  VHVVLRQ WR FRUUHFW WKH SUREOHP How  were  things  allowed  to  get  like  WKLV" ,Q UHVSRQVH WR FOLPDWH FKDQJH DQG LWV UHODWLRQVKLS WR FDUERQ EDVHG VRXUF-­ HV RI HQHUJ\ 9HUPRQWHUV UHVSRQGHG (See  Climate  change,  Page  7)


PAGE  6  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Rutland  man  cited  for  Orwell  and  Shoreham  burglaries S H O R E H A M / O R W E L L  â€”  Vermont  State  Police  on  Wednesday,  Sept.  30,  cited  Matthew  Hinton,  25,  of  Rutland  for  burglary  and  possession  of  stolen  property  in  connection  with  three  break-­ins  reported  in  Orwell  and  Shoreham  the  previous  Monday. Police  said  Hinton  was  in  posses-­ VLRQ RI D VWROHQ Âż UHDUP DW WKH time  of  his  arrest  and  was  wanted  by  the  Vermont  Department  of  Corrections  on  an  outstanding  warrant  for  escape  from  furlough.  Hinton  was  lodged  on  that  warrant  and  held  on  $50,000  bail  pending  his  scheduled  arraignment  on  Oct.  26  in  Addison  Superior  Court,  criminal  division. Authorities  added  they  have Â

recovered  jewelry  from  at  least  one  of  the  burglaries.  Hinton  has  been  cooperative  and  further  arrests  related  to  this  case  are  pending,  according  to  state  police. State  police  reported  that  a  burglar  used  a  tool  to  gain  entry  to  four  residences  on  Brown  Road  and  North  Orwell  Road  in  Shoreham  and  on  Daigneault  Hill  Road  in  Orwell  on  Sept.  28.  Jewelry,  medi-­ FDWLRQ D Âż UHDUP DQG HOHFWURQLFV were  reported  stolen.  Anyone  with  information  on  this  case  is  asked  to  contact  VSP  at  (802)  388-­4919.  Information  can  also  be  submitted  anonymously  online  at  www.vtips.info  or  by  texting  â€œCRIMESâ€?  (274637)  to  Keyword:  VTIPS.

New Obituary Guidelines The  Addison  Independent  will  publish  paid  obituaries  and  free  notices  of  passing.  Paid  obituaries  will  be  published,  as  submitted,  on  the  date  of  the  family’s  choos-­ ing.  Free  notices  may  be  up  to  100  words  and  may  be  edited  by  our  news  department.  Photos  cost  $10 Â

per  photo.  Email  to  obits@addi-­ sonindependent.com.  by  11  a.m.  on  Wednesday  for  publication  in  the  Thursday  paper  and  11  a.m.  on  Friday  for  Monday’s  paper.  Email  obits@addisonindependent.com  or  call  802-­388-­4944  for  more  information.

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Memorials by

ADDISON COUNTY

Obituaries Timothy Curler, 51, Ferrisburgh

FERRISBURGH  â€”  Timothy  M.  Curler,  51,  of  Ferrisburgh  passed  away  peacefully  on  Sept.  27,  2015.  He  was  born  on  Aug.  24,  1964,  in  Burlington,  Vt.,  the  son  of  Ronald  H.  Curler  and  Linda  (Clark)  Stancil. Tim  graduated  from  Vergennes  Union  High  School.  Following  high  school,  he  was  employed  by  Engelberth  Construction  after  which  he  went  in  to  business  for  himself  for  a  number  of  years.  His  talent  for  carpentry  work  was  well  known  in  the  Addison  County  area.  He  was  also  employed  by  Basin  Harbor  Club. He  grew  up  on  Otter  Creek  and  later  moved  back  with  his  wife,  Tina  M.  (Warren)  Curler,  whom  he  married  on  Aug.  25,  1988.  He  loved  to  watch  the  sunrises  as  the  sun  rose  over  the  creek. To  know  Tim  was  to  love  him. Â

He  made  friends  wherever  he  went  and  those  friendships  were  ever  lasting.  He  loved  to  cook  and  was  famous  for  his  pig  roasts  and  barbecues.  Tim  knew  everyone,  and  everyone  knew  Tim.  He  will  always  be  remembered  as  every-­ one’s  big  teddy  bear. Tim  is  survived  by  his  wife;Íž  father;Íž  mother;Íž  and  brother,  Gregory  C.  Curler.  He  is  also  survived  by  nieces  and  nephews,  all  of  whom  learned  from  their  â€œUncle  Timâ€?;Íž  aunts  and  uncles;Íž  and  a  special  friend,  Suzanne  Johnson,  who  was  like  a  mother  to  Tim. He  was  recently  predeceased  by  his  stepfather,  David  O.  Stancil. A  celebration  of  Tim’s  life  will  be  held  at  the  Congregational  Church  in  Vergennes  on  Oct.  10,  2015,  at  11  a.m.  with  a  reception  to  follow  at  St.  Peter’s  Parish  Hall.  ¸

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TIMOTHY Â CURLER

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Bertha Chartrand, 88, formerly of Orwell SHELBURNE  â€”  Bertha  Rose  (Ethier)  Chartrand  passed  away  on  Sept.  28,  2015,  of  natural  causes. She  was  born  Oct.  13,  1926,  in  Clarenceville,  Quebec,  the  daughter  of  Wiolley  and  Rose  Alma  (Beaudin)  Ethier.  She  was  raised  on  her  fami-­ ly’s  dairy  farm  in  Orwell,  Vt.,  and  was  educated  in  the  Orwell  school  system.  In  September  1949,  she  married  Jules  Chartrand  in  Orwell,  eventually  moving  to  Shelburne  in  1956  where  they  raised  their  family.  She  was  a  longtime  member  of  St.  Catherine  of  Sienna  Parish  in  Shelburne.  Bertha  is  survived  by  her  four  children,  Shirley  (Michael)  Priest,  John  (Linda)  Chartrand,  David  (Deb  Lovejoy)  Chartrand,  and  Don  (Marion)  Chartrand;Íž  grandchildren,  Patrick,  Shelby,  Kristine  (Devin),  Dante  (Jessica),  Benjamin,  Laura,  Spencer  (Alicia),  Mindy  (Allen),  Dorilee  (Brett)  and  Lyman;Íž  and  four  great-­grandchildren,  Destiney, Â

Vivica,  Christopher  and  Aubrey.  Bertha  was  one  of  13  children  and  is  survived  by  her  siblings  Laura  Ethier,  Rene  (Marlene)  Ethier,  Rita  Chartrand  and  Roland  Ethier.  Other  family  members  include  Leo  Bertrand,  Cora  Ethier,  Eugene  (Doris)  Chartrand  and  many  nieces  and  nephews. She  was  predeceased  by  her  husband  in  2008,  and  her  siblings,  Aime  Ethier,  Anna  (John)  Hotte,  Annette  (Robert)  Wilbur,  Emery  Ethier,  Emile  (Eunice)  Ethier,  Flora  (Ovile)  Lussier,  Noella  Bertrand  and  Paul  Ethier.  Other  family  members  include  Herve  Chartrand,  Lucienne  Borthwick,  Thomas  Murray,  George  (Jean)  Chartrand,  Roland  Chartrand  and  Alice  Chartrand. Family  and  friends  are  invited  to  attend  calling  hours  on  Thursday,  Oct,  8,  2015  from  4  to  7  p.m.  at  Shelburne  Funeral  Chapel  of  Corbin  and  Palmer,  209  Falls  Road,  Shelburne. Â

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BERTHA  CHARTRAND A  Mass  of  Christian  burial  will  be  celebrated  on  Friday,  Oct.  9,  2015,  at  10:30  a.m.  at  St.  Catherine  of  Sienna  Parish,  72  Church  St.,  Shelburne.  A  private  burial  will  held  at  a  future  GDWH ¸

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Joan Kline memorial service MIDDLEBURY  â€”  A  memorial  Universalist  Society  in  Middlebury. In  lieu  of  large  arrangements,  service  for  Joan  S.  Kline  will  be  %ULQJ D Ă€ RZHU ² JDUGHQ ZLOG donations  are  welcome  to  CVUUS  held  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  at  1  p.m.  or  otherwise  â€”  for  a  memorial  or  Addison  County  Home  Health  at  the  Champlain  Valley  Unitarian  bouquet. DQG +RVSLFH ¸

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  7

Climate  change (Continued  from  Page  5) in  a  very  positive  way  by  adopting  a  schedule  for  replacing  fossil-­fuel  en-­ ergy  sources  with  renewable  energy.   In  their  desire  to  â€œdo  the  right  thingâ€?,  Vermonters  unwittingly  ceded  control  of  their  towns  and  esthetic  environ-­ ment  to  politicians  and  special  inter-­ ests  who  were  willing  to  ride  the  crest  of  citizens’  environmental  concern.   In  2011  when  the  Comprehensive  En-­ ergy  Plan  was  passed  and  included  the  goal  of  reaching  90  percent  renew-­ able  energy  by  2050,  it  seemed  like  a  good  thing.   But  by  2012  project  siting  problems  were  already  obvious,  and  â€œThe  Governor’s  Energy  Generation  Siting  Policy  Commissionâ€?  was  cre-­ ated.  The  results  of  that  commission’s  work  were  limited,  unimpressive,  and  not  adhered  to. Along  the  way,  our  government  in  Montpelier  seems  to  have  developed  a  preference  for  solar  over  wind  and  hydro.  Having  politicians  picking  winners  and  losers  in  technology  rare-­ ly  ends  well,  and  in  this  case  raises  the  question  of  why  there  is  an  emphasis  on  solar  when  we  live  in  a  state  with  limited  sunshine  (Vermont  has  2,295  hours  of  sunshine  annually,  2nd  low-­ est  of  any  state).     In  my  view,  much  of  our  situation  is  political.   We  have  a  number  of  instances  in  which  legislators  have  moved  into  positions  in  state  agencies.   In  2013  Governor  Shumlin  appointed  Margaret  Cheney  to  the  Public  Ser-­ vice  Board.   Ms.  Cheney  previously  was  the  Vice  Chair  of  the  House  Natu-­ ral  Resources  and  Energy  Committee  and  is  now  in  a  position  to  approve  projects  engendered  by  legislation  she  helped  write.   Ms.  Cheney  is  also  the  wife  of  Rep.  Peter  Welch,  who  is  pushing  in  Congress  for  the  renewal  of  solar  subsides.   In  addition,  industry  lobbyists  have  had  an  undue  negative  impact  on  policy. This  situation  is  best  represented  by  an  iron  triangle  involving  state  legisla-­ tors,  state  agencies,  industry  lobbyists  aligned  with  a  powerful  environmen-­ tal  lobby,  and  wealthy  investors  seek-­ ing  a  subsidized  rate  of  return.   The  iron  triangle  is  a  unique  relationship  between  the  bureaucracy,  the  legisla-­ ture,  and  lobbyists  that  results  in  the  PXWXDO EHQHÂżW RI DOO WKUHH RI WKHP ,W is  only  fair  to  acknowledge  that  many  of  the  people  working  in  our  state  bureaucracy  are  very  bright,  hard-­

working  and  decent  public  servants,  but  they  are  part  of  the  iron  triangle.   It  is  what  it  is. State  Legislature Representative  Tony  Klein,  Chair-­ man  of  the  Vermont  House  Commit-­ tee  on  Natural  Resource  and  Energy,  has  put  in  many  years  of  hard  work  on  energy  related  matters.   However  it  is  a  bit  troubling  that  as  early  as  2007  he  was  recognized  and  honored  by  Re-­ newable  Energy  Vermont  (REV),  the  solar  and  wind  industry  mouthpiece  and  key  lobbying  organization.   Mr.  Klein  is  primarily  responsible  for  the  creation  of  H.40  which  became  Act  56,  doubling  down  on  the  pro-­solar  policies  in  place  via  previous  legisla-­ tion.   In  spite  of  promises  Mr.  Klein  made  during  the  past  legislative  ses-­ sion,  his  committee  did  not  pass  a  bill  regarding  the  siting  and  screening  of  solar  projects.   Senator  Chris  Bray,  is  the  Chair  of  the  Senate  Committee  on  Natural  Re-­ sources  and  Energy.  His  committee  did  little  to  change  H.40  created  in  the  house,  but  in  March  of  this  year  he  did  initiate  a  joint  Senate-­House  public  hearing  on  renewable  energy  siting.   Unfortunately  the  voices  of  the  pub-­ lic  were  allowed  to  be  drowned  out  by  those  in  the  solar  industry.   Of  the  56  people  who  spoke  at  the  hearing,  twenty-­one  of  them  came  from  Sun-­ Common  alone.   Special  Interest  Groups REV  (Renewable  Energy  Ver-­ PRQW D QRQSURÂżW LV WKH UHQHZDEOHV industry  major  lobbying  entity.  It  is  a  huge  force  in  bending  state  energy  policy  in  its  favor.   Like  the  big-­to-­ bacco  lobbies,  REV  pushes  its  agenda  while  dismissing  negative  outcomes  to  the  community  at  large.  REV  has  a  seat  on  the  newly  formed  Solar  Siting  Task  Force  headed  by  Public  Service  Commissioner  Chris  Recchia. 93,5* WKH QRW IRU SURÂżW 9HUPRQW Public  Interest  Group,  is  the  state’s  largest  consumer  and  environmen-­ tal  organization.   VPIRG’s  approach  to  solar  energy  is  virtually  the  same  as  REV’s,  â€œsolar  everywhere  at  any  cost.â€?  VPIRG  is  headed  by  Paul  Burns  whose  wife,  Alyssa  Schuren  serves  as  Commissioner  of  the  Department  of  Environmental  Conservation  Agency  of  Natural  Resources.  VPIRG  is  where  SunCommon  was  born.   It  frequently  serves  as  the  training  ground  for  fu-­ ture  SunCommon  employees.  Duane Â

Peterson,  Co-­President  of  SunCom-­ mon,  is  a  Trustee  of  VPIRG.  Matthew  Rubin  is  also  a  Trustee  of  VPIRG,  and  he  serves  on  the  SunCommon  Board  of  Advisors  and  is  a  Board  Member  of  REV.  There  are  times  at  which  em-­ ployees  of  VPIRG  and  SunCommon  seem  indistinguishable.  It  would  be  wise  if  we  Vermonters  realize  the  dangers  of  special  interests  operating  in  Montpelier  and  hold  our  legislators  accountable  for  the  energy  policies  they  enable.  So  what  can  be Â

done  to  get  us  back  on  track  to  achieve  our  renewable  energy  goals  without  social  and  environmental  degrada-­ tion?  Here  are  a  few  ideas: ‡ &RPSHO HDFK PXQLFLSDOLW\ WR SUR-­ vide  an  amount  of  renewable  energy  in  proportion  with  its  population.   This  would  not  only  avoid  the  problems  of  overburdening  certain  towns,  but  it  would  also  be  in  better  alignment  with  the  state’s  goals  for  a  distributed  en-­ ergy  grid.   More  energy  would  be  pro-­ duced  close  to  where  it  is  consumed.

presents the

‡ ,I PXQLFLSDOLWLHV DUH PDGH UH-­ sponsible  for  providing  their  share  of  the  state’s  renewable  energy,  it  should  be  left  to  municipal  governments  to  create  siting  and  screening  regulations  they  deem  necessary  and  appropriate. ‡ ,I D municipality  wishes  to  pro-­ duce  more  renewable  energy  than  its  required  share,  it  should  be  remuner-­ ated  in  a  way  that  brings  additional  funds  into  the  town. ‡  Treat  the  application  approval  process  the  same  for  all  renewable  en-­ ergy  projects  over  50  kW. ‡ 7Ke  legislature  and  state  agencies  VKRXOG SHUIRUP DQ DQQXDO FRVW EHQHÂżW analysis  of  emerging  technologies,  such  as  HVDC  cabling.   High  Voltage  Direct  Current  cabling  could  bring  into  Vermont  400  MW  of  power  generated  by  wind  and  hydro  in  upstate  New  York  and  Canada  at  a  cost  about  half  RI ZKDW ZH SD\ IRU WKH PRVW HIÂżFLHQW VRODU HQHUJ\ ZKLOH VSDULQJ WKH GLVÂżJ-­ urement  of  4,000  acres  of  the  Vermont  landscape.   Â‡ ,Q Rrder  to  stop  the  current  solar  gold  rush,  we  should  consider  a  mora-­ torium  on  new  solar  installations  until  the  Solar  Siting  Task  Force  has  deliv-­ ered  its  recommendations  this  coming  January  and  until  the  legislature  pass-­ es  legislation  that  corrects  most  of  the  defects  in  our  existing  energy  policy.

2015 Garden Game

We still need pumpkins for our Game! If you have a big pumpkin in your garden, bring it in to the office to be measured. You could be a winner!

We  had  a  fun  visit  this  week  from  George  Leggett.  He  grew  this  â€œfranken-­veggieâ€?  in  his  garden  in  Bridport.  He  said  that  it  grew  from  a  mix  of  old  seeds  that  he  had  for  a  long  time  so  he’s  not  sure  what  it  is.  We  measured  it  as  23  inches  long  and  20  inches  around.  George  said  his  dog,  Max  helped  KLP Âż QG LW LQ WKH JDUGHQ

We  had  a  brand  new  player  to  our  Garden  Game  stop  by  last  week  and  we  were  excited  to  see  what  he  brought.  Chris  Hammond  came  in  with  a  kohlrabi  he  grew  in  his  garden  in  Middlebury.  He  says  the  ideal  size  for  kohlrabi  is  similar  to  an  apple.  The  one  he  brought  in  was  much  larger!  It  was  10.5  inches  long  and  13  inches  around.  Chris  said  he  wouldn’t  eat  his  one  since  WKH\ WHQG WR FKDQJH Ă€ DYRU ZKHQ WKH\ get  this  big.

CATEGORIES & FRONTRUNNERS s "EETS (circumference) Brad Clark, Addison 23�

s #AULImOWER (diameter) Kelley Mills, Pittsford 16.5�

s "ROCCOLI (diameter) Debbie Bagley, Salisbury 11.5�

s #UCUMBER (length x circumference) Anna Berg, Middlebury vX v

s #ABBAGE (circumference) Elise & Anika Heppell, Ripton 43.5�

s %GGPLANT (circumference x circumference) Gary MIller, Middlebury vX v

s #ANTALOUPE (circumference) Donna Bezanson, Weybridge 18�

s 'REEN "EAN (length) Kanyarat Menard, Shoreham 34�

s #ARROT (length x circumference) Gary Miller, Middlebury v X v

s /NION (circumference) Stan Bigelow, New Haven 14�

GARDEN GAME RULES

s 0OTATO (length x circumference) Marc Swenor, Lincoln v X v

Entries must be home grown in the greater Addison #OUNTY AREA s /NLY PRODUCE BROUGHT TO THE !DDISON )NDEPENDENT OFlCE BETWEEN -ON &RI AM PM WILL BE ELIGIBLE s 7EEKLY FRONT RUNNERS WILL BE LISTED IN THE h'ARDEN 'AMEv COLUMN UNTIL ANOTHER CONTESTANT PROVIDES A LARGER SAMPLE OF THAT PRODUCE CATEGORY 4HE LARGEST ENTRIES AS OF 4HURSDAY NOON DEADLINE WILL BE THE FRONT RUNNERS LISTED IN THAT -ONDAY S EDITION s /NE WINNER PER CATEGORY s *UDGE HAS lNAL WORD s &IRST PLACE WINNERS WILL BE ANNOUNCED AT SIGN OF lRST FROST

Halle  Forrest  made  it  in  just  in  time  last  week  to  enter  a  rutabaga  into  this  week’s  Garden  Game.  She  and  her  mom  stopped  by  to  show  us  two  rutabagas  that  came  from  their  neighbors  Ed  and  Eddie’s  garden  in  Lincoln.  The  larger  of  the  two  veggies  was  17.5  inches  around  and  will  take  over  as  our  frontrunner.  Halle’s  mom  Michelle  said  they  had  already  had  frost  in  Lincoln! s 0EPPER (circumference x circumference) Roger Scarborough, Leicester v X v s 0UMPKIN (circumference x circumference) s 2UTABAGA (circumference) Halle Michelle Forrest, Lincoln, v s 3UMMER 3QUASH (length x circumference) Donna Bezanson, Weybridge vX v s 3UNmOWER (diameter) Pam Thomas, Whiting v s 4OMATO (circumference) Brud Leedom, Sudbury v s 4URNIP (circumference) Katrin Shaw & Fernande Washburn, Benson v s :UCCHINI (length x circumference) Stan Bigelow, New Haven vX v

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONT’S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\ 97 ‡ ‡ ZZZ $GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW FRP


PAGE  8  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

communitycalendar

Behind  the  scenes  AWARD-­WINNING  DOCUMENTARY  â€œBecoming  Bulletproofâ€?  will  be  screened  at  Middle-­ EXU\ÂśV 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU RQ )ULGD\ 2FW DW S P 7KH Âż OP H[SORUHV WKH PDNLQJ RI DQ original  Western,  titled  â€œBulletproof,â€?  made  by  actors  with  and  without  disabilities  at  Zeno  Mountain  Farm.  Following  the  screening,  Zeno  Mountain  Farm’s  founders  will  host  a  Q&A.

Oct

5

MONDAY

Addison  County  Fair  &  Field  Days  annual  meeting  in  Weybridge.  Monday,  Oct.  5,  7:30  p.m.,  Weybridge  Congregational  Church.  Bring  your  comments,  suggestions  and  ideas.  All  are  welcome.  Refreshments  served.  Info:  545-­2557. “Ceremonyâ€?  screening  and  Q&A  in  Middlebury.  Monday,  Oct.  5,  7:30  p.m.,  Marquis  Theater.  Addison  County  resident  Sas  Carey’s  docu-­ mentary  about  the  mysterious  ways  of  the  shamans  in  northern  Mongolia.  Stay  late  for  a  Q&A  where  Carey  talks  about  her  many  trav-­ els  to  Mongolia  over  the  past  two  decades  and  DERXW 1RPDGLFDUH WKH QRQSURÂż W VKH IRXQGHG to  document  indigenous  Mongolian  culture  and  support  nomads’  health.  Info:  388-­1301  or  www.nomadicare.org.  Runs  Oct.  4-­8.

Oct

6

TUESDAY

Flu  vaccine  clinic  in  Vergennes.  Tuesday,  Oct.  6,  10  a.m.-­noon,  Armory  Lane.  Offered  by  Addison  County  Home  Health  and  Hospice.  Free  foot  care  clinic  offered  at  the  same  time.  Info:  802-­388-­7259  or  www.achhh.org. “Best  of  the  Festâ€?  narrative  drama  screenings  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,  Oct.  6,  7  p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  Three  top  narrative  dramas  from  the  recent  Middlebury  New  Filmmakers  Festival  will  be  screened:  two  shorts,  â€œMinimum  Wageâ€?  and  â€œStunned,â€?  and  a  feature,  â€œThe  Sound  and  the  Shadow.â€?  Tickets  $10,  available  at  the  THT  ER[ RIÂż FH ZZZ WRZQKDOOWKHDWHU RUJ or  at  the  door. “Ceremonyâ€?  screening  and  Q&A  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,  Oct.  6,  7:30  p.m.,  Marquis  Theater.  Addison  County  resident  Sas  Carey’s  docu-­ mentary  about  the  mysterious  ways  of  the  shamans  in  northern  Mongolia.  Stay  late  for  a  Q&A  where  Carey  talks  about  her  many  trav-­ els  to  Mongolia  over  the  past  two  decades  and  DERXW 1RPDGLFDUH WKH QRQSURÂż W VKH IRXQGHG to  document  indigenous  Mongolian  culture  and  support  nomads’  health.  Info:  388-­1301  or  www.nomadicare.org.  Runs  Oct.  4-­8.

Oct

7

WEDNESDAY

Flu  vaccine  clinic  in  Bridport.  Wednesday,  Oct.  7,  10  a.m.-­noon,  Bridport  Grange  Hall.  Offered  by  Addison  County  Home  Health  and  Hospice.  Free  foot  care  clinic  offered  at  the  same  time.  Info:  802-­388-­7259  or  www.achhh.org. Warren  Kimble  gallery  talk  in  Middlebury.  Wednesday,  Oct.  7,  noon,  Henry  Sheldon  Museum.  Vermont  artist  Warren  Kimble  talks  about  the  exhibit  â€œWarren  Kimble  All-­American  Artist:  An  Eclectic  Retrospective.â€?  Free  with  museum  admission.  Info:  802-­388-­2117  or  www.henrysheldonmuseum.org.  Campus  Tree  Tour  and  Planting  at  Middlebury  College.  Wednesday,  Oct.  7,  4:30-­6  p.m.,  meet  on  Franklin  Environmental  Center  front  porch.  Middlebury  horticulturalist  and  tree  expert  Tim Â

Parsons  leads  a  tour  of  the  campus,  ending  up  with  the  planting  of  three  oak  trees  at  Franklin  Environmental  Center  to  commemorate  50  years  of  environmental  education  and  leader-­ ship  at  the  college.  Hot  cider  and  donuts.  Be  prepared  to  get  a  little  dirty. “How  the  Brain  Categorizes  the  Worldâ€?  talk  in  Middlebury.  Wednesday,  Oct.  7,  7  p.m.,  Ilsley  Library.  Williams  College  professor  Dr.  Safa  Zaki  describes  how  the  human  brain  recognizes  and  categorizes  objects,  and  pres-­ ents  a  challenge  to  that  theory  from  studies  of  patients  with  amnesia.  A  Vermont  Humanities  Council  First  Wednesdays  event.  Info:  www.vermonthumanitiescouncil.org  or  802-­262-­2626. Pianist  Jeremy  Denk  in  concert  at  Middlebury  College.  Wednesday,  Oct.  7,  7:30  p.m.,  Mahaney  Center  for  the  Arts.  Denk’s  program  ranges  from  Bach  to  Beethoven  and  Joplin  to  Ives.  Tickets  $25/$20/$6.  Info:  www.middlebury.edu/arts  or  802-­443-­3168. “Ceremonyâ€?  screening  and  Q&A  in  Middlebury.  Wednesday,  Oct.  7,  7:30  p.m.,  Marquis  Theater.  Addison  County  resident  Sas  Carey’s  documentary  about  the  mysterious  ways  of  the  shamans  in  northern  Mongolia.  Stay  late  for  a  Q&A  where  Carey  talks  about  her  many  trav-­ els  to  Mongolia  over  the  past  two  decades  and  DERXW 1RPDGLFDUH WKH QRQSURÂż W VKH IRXQGHG to  document  indigenous  Mongolian  culture  and  support  nomads’  health.  Info:  388-­1301  or  www.nomadicare.org.  Runs  Oct.  4-­8. Celtic  music  jam  session  in  Middlebury.  Wednesday,  Oct.  7,  8-­10  p.m.,  51  Main.  A  monthly  opportunity  for  musicians  to  come  together  to  swap  Scottish,  Irish  and  Canadian  ¿ GGOH WXQHV 2SHQ WR DOO LQVWUXPHQWV DQG players  familiar  with  Celtic  sessions  and  jam  etiquette.  Listeners  welcome.  Event  happens  ¿ UVW :HGQHVGD\ RI HYHU\ PRQWK ,QIR PĂ€ R\G# middlebury.edu  or  203-­823-­8669.  Japanese  documentary  screening  at  Middlebury  College.  Wednesday,  Oct.  7,  8  p.m.,  Dana  Auditorium.  As  part  of  a  month-­long  Japanese  documentary  series,  the  Department  of  Japanese  Studies  will  present  â€œChildren  of  the  Woods.â€?  In  Japanese  with  English  subtitles.  Free. Â

Oct

8

THURSDAY

Flu  vaccine  clinic  in  Middlebury.  Thursday,  Oct.  8,  10  a.m.-­noon,  The  Commons,  Buttolph  Drive.  Offered  by  Addison  County  Home  Health  and  Hospice.  Free  foot  care  clinic  offered  at  the  same  time.  Info:  802-­388-­7259  or  www.achhh.org. Lap-­sit  story  time  for  babies  and  toddlers  in  Shoreham.  Thursday,  Oct.  8,  11  a.m.,  Platt  Memorial  Library.  For  children  ages  0-­3  with  caregiver.  Info:  897-­2647  or  www.plattlib.org. “Life  of  the  Mindâ€?  talk  at  Middlebury  College.  Thursday,  Oct.  8,  12:15  p.m.,  Abernethy  Room,  Axinn  Center.  Assistant  Professor  of  American  Studies  Holly  Allen  presents  â€œBad  Mothers  and  Monstrous  Sons:  Autistic  Adults,  Lifelong  Dependency  and  Sensationalized  Narratives  of  Care.â€? “Gardenâ€?  art  performance  at  Middlebury Â

BEGINNING SWING DANCE — Great fun & exercise too in a friendly, easy format. Classes held in the Community Room at EastView at Middlebury on Sundays Oct 11 – Nov 1, 5:30 – 6:30 pm. Partners not necessary. $40 per person for 4 week series. BEGINNING WALTZ — Anyone can learn this classic ballroom dance. Wow your friends with just a few easy to learn moves! Classes held in the Community Room at EastView at Middlebury on Sundays Nov 8 – Nov 22, 5:30 – 6:30 pm. Partners not necessary. $30 per person for 3 week series. OPEN DANCE after all classes from 6:30 – 7:30 pm. Open to the public! Please bring clean, dry soft soled shoes (smooth leather works best). Call Jim Condon for more information at 475-2349 or email jscondon@mac.com. College.  Thursday,  Oct.  8,  6:30  p.m.,  outside  Mead  Chapel.  Dancers  crisscross  colorful,  oversized  ribbons  to  alter  the  color,  density  and  time  signature  of  space  and  celebrate  the  passage  of  knowledge,  experience  and  hope  from  one  generation  to  another.  Also  on  Friday.  Free.  Info:  www.middlebury.edu/arts  or  802-­443-­3168. Maiden  Vermont  rehearsals  in  Salisbury.  Thursday,  Oct.  8,  7-­9:15  p.m.,  Salisbury  Community  School.  The  popular  four-­part  female  a  cappella  chorus  is  welcoming  new  singers  to  its  weekly  Thursday  night  rehearsals.  If  you  love  to  sing  close  harmonies,  this  may  be  the  perfect  group  for  you.  Info:  388-­1012. “Green  Jobs  Not  Jails:  Criminal  Justice  Ecologyâ€?  address  at  Middlebury  College.  Thursday,  Oct.  8,  7-­8:30  p.m.,  Mead  Chapel.  Van  Jones  delivers  the  keynote  address  of  the  college’s  â€œFifty  Years  of  Environmental  Education  &  Leadershipâ€?  celebration.  Jones  talks  about  how  to  shrink  the  prison  system  and  grow  the  green  economy.  Info:  go.middlebury. edu/enviro50. “Ceremonyâ€?  screening  and  Q&A  in  Middlebury.  Thursday,  Oct.  8,  7:30  p.m.,  Marquis  Theater.  Addison  County  resident  Sas  Carey’s  docu-­ mentary  about  the  mysterious  ways  of  the  shamans  in  northern  Mongolia.  Come  early  for  a  6:30  meet-­and-­greet  with  Carey.  Stay  late  for  a  Q&A  where  Carey  talks  about  her  many  trav-­ els  to  Mongolia  over  the  past  two  decades  and  DERXW 1RPDGLFDUH WKH QRQSURÂż W VKH IRXQGHG to  document  indigenous  Mongolian  culture  and  support  nomads’  health.  Info:  388-­1301  or  www.nomadicare.org.  â€œThe  Odd  Coupleâ€?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.  Thursday,  Oct.  8,  8  p.m.,  Vergennes  Opera  House.  Little  City  Players  present  Neil  Simon’s  classic  comedy.  Adults  $12,  seniors  and  students  $10.  Runs  Oct.  8-­11.  Info:  www. vergennesoperahouse.org.

Oct

9

FRIDAY

“Gardenâ€?  art  performance  at  Middlebury  College.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  noon  and  2  p.m.,  outside  Mead  Chapel.  Dancers  crisscross  colorful,  over-­ sized  ribbons  to  alter  the  color,  density  and  time  signature  of  space  and  celebrate  the  passage  of  knowledge,  experience  and  hope  from  one  generation  to  another.  Free.  Info:  www.middlebury.edu/arts  or  802-­443-­3168. “Environmental  Studies  at  50:  What’s  Nextâ€?  conversation  at  Middlebury  College.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  12:30-­2  p.m.,  Mead  Chapel.  Schumann  Distinguished  Scholar  Bill  McKibben  moder-­ ates.  Part  of  the  college’s  â€œFifty  Years  of  Environmental  Education  &  Leadershipâ€?  cele-­ bration.  Info:  go.middlebury.edu/enviro50. “Unslut:  The  Documentaryâ€?  on  screen  at  Middlebury  College.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  2  p.m.,  Axinn  232.  Stories  of  people  of  different  genders,  backgrounds  and  nationalities  who  have  experienced  sexual  shaming.  Q&A  with  ¿ OPPDNHU (PLO\ /LQGLQ IROORZV “Our  Environment,  Our  Futureâ€?  group  dialogue  at  Middlebury  College.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  4:30  p.m.,  Wilson  Hall,  McCullough  Student  Center.  Join  in  an  inclusive  group Â

dialogue  exploring  questions  that  matter  to  the  community,  the  nation  and  the  globe.  Part  of  the  college’s  â€œFifty  Years  of  Environmental  Education  &  Leadershipâ€?  celebration.  Info:  go.middlebury.edu/enviro50. Exhibit  opening  reception  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  5-­7  p.m.,  Vermont  Folklife  Center.  Celebrating  the  opening  of  â€œPortrait  of  a  Forest:  Men  and  Machine,â€?  which  docu-­ ments  today’s  forestry  industry  and  asks  what  it  means  to  be  stewards  of  a  working  forest.  Photos  by  George  Bellerose  of  Weybridge.  Exhibit  runs  through  the  end  of  the  year.  Info:  www.vermontfolklifecenter.org  or  388-­4964. Artist’s  reception  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  5-­7  p.m.,  Jackson  Gallery  at  Town  Hall  Theater.  Celebrating  an  exhibit  of  drawings,  paintings  and  wall  sculptures  by  Brandon  artist  Joan  Curtis.  Exhibit  runs  Oct.  2-­Nov.  7.  Info:  802-­382-­9222  or  www.townhalltheater.org. Opening  reception  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  5-­7  p.m.,  Edgewater  Gallery  at  Middlebury  Falls.  Celebrating  the  opening  of  â€œCATCHI,â€?  DQ H[KLELW RI Âż JXUH DQG VWLOO OLIH SDLQWLQJV E\ Catherine  Childs.  Exhibit  runs  through  October.  Info:  802-­458-­0098  or  edgewatergallery-­vt. com. Opening  reception  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  5-­7  p.m.,  Edgewater  Gallery  on  the  Green.  Celebrating  the  opening  of  â€œTJ  Cunningham:  Landscapes  &  Still  Lifes,â€?  which  runs  through  October.  Info:  802-­989-­7419  or  edgewatergal-­ lery-­vt.com. Dissipated  Eight  in  concert  in  Brandon.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  7  p.m.,  Brandon  Town  Hall.  Middlebury  College’s  premier  a  cappella  group.  Tickets  $6  adults,  seniors/students/active  military. “Becoming  Bulletproofâ€?  screening  and  discussion  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  7  p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  An  award-­winning  documentary  on  the  making  of  â€œBulletproof,â€?  an  original  Western  created  by  actors  with  and  without  disabilities  at  Zeno  Mountain  Farm.  A  Q&A  with  Zeno  Mountain  Farm’s  founders  follows.  Presented  by  Ripton’s  North  Brand  School.  Tickets  $5,  available  at  the  THT  box  RIÂż FH RU ZZZ WRZQKDOOWKHDWHU RUJ Info:  www.becomingbulletproof.com  or  www. zenomountainfarm.org. “The  Odd  Coupleâ€?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  8  p.m.,  Vergennes  Opera  House.  Little  City  Players  present  Neil  Simon’s  classic  comedy.  Adults  $12,  seniors  and  students  $10.  Runs  Oct.  8-­11.  Info:  www.vergennesoperahouse.org. Observatory  open  house  at  Middlebury  College.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  8-­9:30  p.m.,  Middlebury  College  Observatory,  McCardell  Bicentennial  Hall.  Come  see  stars,  star  clusters  and  nebu-­ lae  through  the  24-­inch  computer-­controlled  telescope  or  one  of  the  smaller  roof  telescopes.  Free.  Weather  permitting;Íž  call  443-­2266  after  S P WR FRQÂż UP ,QIR KWWS VLWHV PLGGOHEXU\ edu/observatory/.

Oct

10

SATURDAY

Monthly  wildlife  walk  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  8  a.m.,  Otter  View  Park  and  Hurd  Grassland.  A  monthly  OCAS-­MALT  event Â


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  9

communitycalendar

Vermont  view “A  CHILD’S  VIEWâ€?  by  TJ  Cunningham  is  part  of  an  October  exhibit  of  the  young  painter’s  landscapes  and  still  lifes  at  Edgewater  Gallery  on  the  Green  in  Middlebury.  An  opening  reception  for  the  exhibit  is  on  Friday,  Oct.  9,  from  5-­7  p.m.,  during  the  last  Middlebury  Arts  Walk  of  the  season. inviting  community  members  to  help  survey  birds  and  other  wildlife.  Meet  at  Otter  View  Park  parking  area,  corner  of  Weybridge  Street  and  Pulp  Mill  Bridge  Road.  Birders  of  all  ages  and  abilities  welcome.  Info:  388-­6019  or  388-­1007.  Family  pancake  breakfast  in  Brandon.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  8-­10  a.m.,  Brandon  Congregational  Church  Fellowship  Hall.  Regular  and  gluten-­free  pancakes,  bacon,  sausages,  juice,  fruit,  coffee  and  tea.  Free-­will  offering  taken.  Rummage  sale  in  Bristol.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  9  a.m.-­1  p.m.,  First  Baptist  Church  of  Bristol.  Linens,  clothes,  puzzles  and  books.  Items  $1  each  or  as  marked  from  9  a.m.-­noon,  and  $5  a  bag  from  noon-­1  p.m.  unless  marked.

Vermont  Tree  Stewards  Conference  in  Bristol.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  9  a.m.-­4  p.m.,  downtown  Bristol.  This  year’s  theme:  â€œHealthy  Trees,  â€œHealthy  Communities.â€?  Speakers  will  H[SORUH KRZ WUHHV EHQHÂż W 9HUPRQW FRPPXQL ties  and  ways  to  ensure  their  health  now  and  into  the  future.  Info:  http://bit.ly/1O63Vo9. Farmers’  market  harvest  fair  in  Brandon.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  10  a.m.-­4  p.m.,  Brandon  Central  Park.  Celebrate  the  end  of  the  farm-­ ers’  market  season.  Demonstrations,  craft  fair  and  more.  Info:  802-­273-­2655. Talk  on  Robert  Frost  in  Ripton.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  10  a.m.,  Ripton  Community  Church,  Route  125.  Dr.  Jonathan  Reichert  speaks  about  his  conversations  with  Frost  in  Ripton  Free.  Info:  riptonhistoricalsociety.org.  The  Ripton Â

MCTV  SCHEDULE  Channels  15  &  16 0&79 &KDQQHO 7XHVGD\ 2FW 4 a.m. Town Offices 5:45 a.m. UN Day of Peace 7:30 a.m. Boot Camp 8 a.m Congregational Church Service 9:30 a.m. Las Promesas de Dios 10 a.m. Selectboard (Sept. 22) 12:28 p.m. VTrans Airport Meeting 4:13 p.m. Traffic Calming 7:30 p.m. Selectboard :HGQHVGD\ 2FW 4 a.m. Public Affairs 7 a.m. Boot Camp 7:30 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 9 a.m. Lifelines 9:30 a.m. Eckankar 10 a.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 5 p.m. Boot Camp 5:30 p.m. Las Promesas de Dios 6 p.m. Community Bulletin Board 6:30 p.m. Public Affairs 9:30 p.m. Eckankar 10 p.m. Selectboard 7KXUVGD\ 2FW 4 a.m. Public Affairs 9 a.m. Boot Camp 9:30 a.m. Las Promesas de Dios 10 a.m. UN Day of Peace Noon Selectboard, Public Affairs 4:30 p.m. Boot Camp 5 p.m. Eckankar 5:30 p.m. Community Bulletin Board 6 p.m. Town Offices 8 p.m. Public Meetings, Public Affairs )ULGD\ 2FW 5 a.m. Boot Camp 5:20 a.m. Public Affairs 10 a.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 4 p.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 5:30 p.m. Community Bulletin Board 6 p.m. UN Day of Peace 9 p.m. Las Promesas De Dios 9:30 p.m. Public Meetings, Public Affairs 6DWXUGD\ 2FW 4 a.m. Public Affairs 8 a.m. Boot Camp

8:30 a.m. Eckankar 9 a.m. Las Promesas de Dios 9:30 a.m. Rep. Betty Nuovo 10 a.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 4 p.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 5:30 p.m. Boot Camp 6 p.m. Las Promesas de Dios 6:30 p.m. Community Bulletin Board 7 p.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 6XQGD\ 2FW 6 a.m. UN Day of Peace 8 a.m. Las Promesas de Dios 8:30 a.m. Eckankar 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:30 a.m. Boot Camp 11 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 12:30 p.m. Public Affairs 4 p.m. Congregational Church Service 5:30 p.m. Eckankar 6 p.m. Boot Camp 6:30 p.m. Community Bulletin Board 7 p.m. Catholic Mass 7:30 p.m. Public Affairs 8 p.m. Las Promesas de Dios 8:30 p.m. Public Affairs 0RQGD\ 2FW 5 a.m. Green Mountain Veterans for Peace 6 a.m. Boot Camp 6:30 a.m. Public Affairs 9 a.m. Lifelines 10 a.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 4 p.m. Congregational Church Service 5:30 p.m. Las Promesas de Dios 6 p.m. Boot Camp 7 p.m. Green Mountain Veterans for Peace 8 p.m. UN Day of Peace 10 p.m. Green Mountain Care Board 0(79 &KDQQHO 7XHVGD\ 2FW 5:30 a.m. Yoga 6 a.m. Bulletin Board 6:30 a.m. Yoga 7 a.m. Chronique Francophone 7:30 a.m. School Boards 1 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0

Historical  Society  will  hold  a  business  meet-­ LQJ DW D P SUHFHGLQJ WKLV WDON 2IÂż FHUV ZLOO be  elected  for  the  coming  year.  Anyone  inter-­ ested  in  joining  may  attend. Costume  blowout  sale  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  11  a.m.-­3  p.m.,  Route  7  South  opposite  Foster  Motors  (look  for  balloons  and  signs).  Get  ready  for  Halloween  with  vintage  hats,  shoes,  coats  and  more.  &DVK RQO\ 3URFHHGV EHQHÂż W WKH 0LGGOHEXU\ Community  Players’  Scholarship  Fund.  Info:  info@middleburcommunityplayers.org. Artist  demonstration  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  1-­3  p.m.,  Edgewater  Gallery  on  the  Green.  October  featured  artist  TJ  Cunningham  gives  a  live  painting  demonstration.  Info:  802-­989-­7419  or  edgewatergallery-­vt.com. Prize  bingo  in  Leicester.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  1  p.m.,  Senior  Center.  Hosted  by  the  Leicester  Historical  Society.  Refreshments  served. Roast  turkey  supper  in  Vergennes.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  5-­6:30  p.m.,  Vergennes  United  Methodist  Church.  Menu  includes  roast  WXUNH\ PDVKHG SRWDWRHV VWXIÂż QJ YHJHWDEOH rolls,  beverage  and  dessert,  served  buffet  style.  Adults  $9,  children  $5.  Takeout  avail-­ able.  Info:  877-­3150. Contra  dance  in  Cornwall.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  7-­9:30  p.m.,  Cornwall  Town  Hall.  Will  Mentor  calls  to  live  music  by  Red  Dog  Riley.  Cost:  $5  per  person.  Info:  462-­3722. Shady  Rill  in  concert  in  Lincoln.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  7:30  p.m.,  Burnham  Hall.  Part  of  the  2015-­2016  Burnham  Music  Series.  Patti  Casey  and  Tom  McKenzie  perform  as  Shady  Rill.  Doors  open  at  7  p.m.,  concert  at  7:30.  Admission  $8  adults,  free  for  kids  and  teens.  See  the  Burnham  Music  Series  Facebook  page  for  full  schedule  of  monthly  concerts.  Info:  388-­6863. The  Twangtown  Paramours  in  concert  in  Brandon.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  7:30  p.m., Â

Brandon  Music.  Acoustic  duo  MaryBeth  Zamer  and  Mike  T.  Lewis  present  a  hybrid  of  the  Nashville  and  Austin  music  scenes.  Tickets  $20.  Reservations  recommended:  802-­247-­4295  or  info@brandon-­music.net. “The  Odd  Coupleâ€?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  8  p.m.,  Vergennes  Opera  House.  Little  City  Players  present  Neil  Simon’s  classic  comedy.  Adults  $12,  seniors  and  students  $10.  Runs  Oct.  8-­11.  Info:  www. vergennesoperahouse.org.

LIVEMUSIC Eight  02  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  8:30-­10:30  p.m.,  51  Main. Rehab  Roadhouse  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  9,  9  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern. Cooper  &  LaVoie  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  8:30-­10:30  p.m.,  51  Main. The  Anthony  Santor  Jazz  Group  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  16,  8-­11  p.m.,  51  Main. Mango  Jam  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Oct.  17,  8:30  p.m.-­midnight,  The  Marquis. The  Doughboys  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Oct.  17,  8:30-­10:30  p.m.,  51  Main. Rick  Redington  &  The  Luv  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Oct.  24,  8:30-­10:30  p.m. Myra  Flynn  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Oct.  30,  8:30-­10:30  p.m.,  51  Main. Ivory  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Oct.  31,  9-­11  p.m.,  51  Main. See  a  full  listing  of Â

ONG OING EV EN T S in  the  Thursday  edition  of  the

Addison Independent and  on  the  Web  at

www.addisonindependent.com

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please see the MCTV website, www.middleburycommunitytv.org, for changes in the schedule; MCTV events, classes and news; and to view many programs online. Submit listings to the above address, or call 388-­3062.

1:30 p.m. Vermont Board of Education 4:30 p.m. StoryMatters 5 p.m. Growing Bright Futures 6 p.m. School Boards :HGQHVGD\ 2FW 4 a.m. Shark Tank Start-­up 5:30 a.m. Bulletin Board 6 a.m. StoryMatters 6:40 a.m. Yoga 7 a.m. Chronique Francophone 7:30 a.m. Middlebury Five-­0 8 a.m. Vermont Board of Education 11 a.m. School Boards 4:30 p.m. Growing Bright Futures 5 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0 5:30 p.m. Chronique Francophone 6 p.m. StoryMatters 7:35 p.m. Shark Tank Start-­up 9 p.m. School boards 7KXUVGD\ 2FW 4:30 a.m. Bulletin Board 5 a.m. Middlebury Five-­0 5:30 a.m. Yoga 6 a.m. Chronique Francophone 6:30 a.m. StoryMatters 7 a.m. School Boards 4:30 p.m. Chronique Francophone 5 p.m. Growing Bright Futures 6 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0 6:30 p.m. StoryMatters 7 p.m. Vermont Board of Education 11 p.m. Chronique Francophone 11:30 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0 )ULGD\ 2FW 5:30 a.m. Growing Bright Futures 6 a.m. Bulletin Board 6:30 a.m. Yoga 7 a.m. Middlebury Five-­0 8:30 a.m. Chronique Francophone 9 a.m. Vermont Board of Education Noon Middlebury Five-­0 12:30 p.m. StoryMatters 1 p.m. School Boards 6 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0 6:30 p.m. Chronique Francophone 7 p.m. StoryMatters 7:31 p.m. Shark Tank Start-­up

6DWXUGD\ 2FW 6 a.m. Yoga 6:20 a.m. Bulletin Board 6:30 a.m. Middlebury Five-­0 7 a.m. StoryMatters 7:32 a.m. Growing Bright Futures 8 a.m. Middlebury Five-­0 8:30 a.m. StoryMatters 9 a.m. Chronique Francophone 9:30 a.m. Shark Tank Start-­up 11 a.m. Vermont Board of Education 2 p.m. ID-­4 Board 5 p.m. StoryMatters 6:30 p.m. Growing Bright Futures 7 p.m. Shark Tank Start-­up 8:30 p.m. UD-­3 Board 10:30 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0 6XQGD\ 2FW 4 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 7 a.m. Yoga 7:30 a.m. Chronique Francophone 8 a.m. Bulletin Board 8:08 a.m. Shark Tank Start-­up 9:30 a.m. Middlebury Five-­0 10 a.m. StoryMatters 10:35 a.m. Shark Tank Start-­up Noon Film Festival Interviews 2 p.m. Vermont Board of Education 5 p.m Shark Tank Start-­up 6:30 p.m. Chronique Francophone 8 p.m. Growing Bright Futures 8:30 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0 0RQGD\ 2FW 6:10 a.m. Yoga 7 a.m. Growing Bright Futures 9:30 a.m. Yoga 10 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange Noon Middlebury Five-­0 12:30 p.m. StoryMatters 1 p.m. Vermont Board of Education 4 p.m. Chronique Francophone 4:30 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0 5 p.m. Yoga 5:30 p.m. Bulletin Board 7 p.m. ID-­4 School Board 10:30 p.m. Middlebury Five-­0


PAGE 10 — Addison Independent, Monday, October 5, 2015

Pianist Jeremy Denk to perform Bach, Beethoven Jeremy Denk, one of America’s tra, and performed Bach concertos most thought-­provoking, multifac-­ with Academy of St. Martin-­in-­ eted and compelling artists, will the-­Fields in London and on tour perform on Wednesday at 7:30 p.m. throughout the U.S. The New York Times calls Denk “a in Robison Hall (the former concert hall) at Middlebury College’s Mah-­ pianist you want to hear no matter what he performs, in whatever com-­ aney Center for the Arts. Denk is the winner of a 2013 bination — both for his penetrating MacArthur “Genius” Fellowship, the intellectual engagement with the music and for the gener-­ 2014 Avery Fisher Prize osity of his playing.” and Musical America’s Tickets are $25 for the 2014 Instrumentalist of general public. The Ma-­ the Year award. haney Center is located Denk is known for at 72 Porter Field Road his broad-­ranging rep-­ in Middlebury, just off ertoire, and his Mid-­ dlebury program is no by Greg Pahl Route 30 south (South Main Street). Free park-­ exception. He will per-­ ing is available curbside form western European on Route 30 or in the classical compositions by Bach and Beethoven, as well as Center for the Arts parking lot. For 19th-­ and 20th-­century American more information, or to purchase pieces by ragtime “king” Scott Jop-­ tickets, call 443-­6433, or go to mid-­ dlebury.edu/arts. lin and modernist Charles Ives. Denk’s illustrious musical career TWANGTOWN PARAMOURS The music of the Twangtown Par-­ has taken him all over the world. Last season, he launched a four-­ amours has been called “Sophisti-­ scenes. This acoustic duo, made season tenure as an Artistic Partner cated Americana,” and is a hybrid up of MaryBeth Zamer and Mike of the Saint Paul Chamber Orches-­ of the Nashville and Austin music T. Lewis, is known for their well-­ crafted and award-­winning songs, WRS QRWFK OHDG VLQJLQJ DQG ¿QH KDU-­ monies. They can be heard at Bran-­ don Music on Saturday at 7:30 p.m. With their third album on the way, the Twangtown Paramours are sure to see more praise and chart-­rank-­ ings for their efforts. Their sopho-­ more album reached No. 2 on the Folk DJ Chart, and radio stations in New York City and Chicago also listed the album among their very top albums of the year. In 2013, the Twangtown Par-­ amours were chosen — for a second WLPH ² WR EH ¿QDOLVWV LQ WKH SUHVWL-­ Guitar, Electric Bass, Drums gious Kerrville New Folk contest Beginner Piano (adults) and in 2012, the Twangers won the Michael Terry People’s Choice $ZDUG LQ WKH :LOGÀRZHU $UWV DQG All Ages Welcome Music Festival Songwriter Contest. 25 years of experience Their songs can be heard on over 70 Skill + Theory = Fun! Americana, folk and independent country radio stations worldwide. Concert tickets are $20. A pre-­ For more information email concert dinner is also available for Bob Levinson at songs212@gmail.com $20. Reservations are recommended

arts beat

&Entertainment

Dining

Jeremy Denk at Middlebury College for the show and required for dinner. Venue is BYOB. Call 247-­4295 or e-­mail info@brandon-­music.net for reservations or for more informa-­ tion. Brandon Music is located at 62 Country Club Road in Brandon. COMMUNITY SING-­ALONG Annie Patterson and Peter Blood will lead a sing-­along concert in

Music Lessons

802-877-2649

Margaret Roddy, “Oktobermusik”

Middlebury on Sunday at 7 p.m. in the Middlebury United Method-­ ist Church, 47 North Pleasant St. (Route 7). The history of social justice move-­ ments (civil rights, anti-­war, the en-­ vironment, labor, women’s move-­ ments and more) is bound to the songs of the people participating. Some have become the soundtrack of a generation. Many of us grew up with this music, and it was the song-­ book “Rise Up Singing,” created by Annie Patterson and Peter Blood, that gave us the words and chords. They have published a new volume, “Rise Again.” To celebrate the release of this treasury of songs they, joined by other artists, are touring the country with sing-­along concerts they call “Rise Again: The Tour.” Blood and Patterson will be joined by Magpie, Bill Harley and Charlie King for the Middlebury concert. This is a chance to sing together as a community — and buy a copy of the new book if you so desire — and celebrate this unique edition and addition to the (See Arts Beat, Page 11)

“The Sound and the Shadow” in “Best of the Fest”


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of October 5 LIBRA:  SEPTEMBER  23-­OCTOBER  23  Libra,  WDO MRXUQH\ ZLWK D ORYHG RQH 7DXUXV <RX QHYHU share  your  long-­term  goals  with  colleagues  and  you  NQRZ ZKDW H[DPLQLQJ \RXU HPRWLRQV ZLOO XQFRYHU PD\ ÂżQG VRPH XQH[SHFWHG DOOLHV 6XSSRUW FDQ RQO\ DQG \RX ZLOO JHW WR VSHQG TXDOLW\ WLPH WRJHWKHU KHOS \RXU HIIRUWV HYHQ IXUWKHU GEMINI:  MAY  22-­JUNE  21  Gemini,  you  can  SCORPIO:  OCTO-­ VWULNH XS D FRQYHUVDWLRQ BER  24-­NOVEMBER  with  just  about  anyone  this  6FRUSLR VHW SHUVRQDO ZHHN <RXU JLIW IRU JDE IHHOLQJV DVLGH ZKHQ GHDO-­ PDNHV \RX D IXQ SHUVRQ Happening  Now! LQJ ZLWK SURIHVVLRQDO WR KDYH DURXQG DQG D ZHO-­ PDWWHUV $OORZLQJ HPR-­ come  member  to  any  new  WLRQ WR JHW LQ WKH ZD\ RI JURXS your  goals  will  only  end  CANCER:  JUNE  22-­ XS DIIHFWLQJ \RX JULY  22  Cancer,  someone  SAGITTARIUS:  NO-­ PD\ FDWFK \RX RII JXDUG VEMBER  23-­DECEM-­ this  week  and  you  don’t  BER  21  Sagittarius,  this  KDYH \RXU JR WR SODQ LQ is  a  great  time  to  try  SODFH :RUU\ QRW DV \RX 16 Creek Rd, Middlebury VRPHWKLQJ QHZ :KHWKHU will  rebound  quickly  and  388-6054 LWÂśV D QHZ IRRG RU D QHZ ERXQFH EDFN LQ D ELJ ZD\ Mon. - Fri. 7:30 - 5:30, Sat. 8:00 - 3:00 H[SHULHQFH \RXÂśYH EHHQ LEO:  JULY  23-­AU-­ www.countrysidecarpetandpaint.com ORRNLQJ WR WU\ GLYH ULJKW GUST  23  Leo,  it  may  seem  LQ DQG HQMR\ WKH H[FLWH-­ OLNH HYHU\RQH LV KDQJLQJ PHQW RQ HYHU\ ZRUG \RX VD\ WKLV CAPRICORN:  DE-­ ZHHN 'RQÂśW ZRUU\ DERXW CEMBER  22-­JANU-­ SHUIRUPLQJ MXVW FRQWLQXH $5< &DSULFRUQ H[-­ WR GR ZKDW JUDYLWDWHV SHR-­ SHFW WR EH H[FLWHG E\ D SOH WRZDUG \RX EXGGLQJ UHODWLRQVKLS LQ VIRGO:  AUGUST  388-2800 WKH ZHHNV DKHDG 2SHQ 24-­SEPTEMBER  22  Vir-­ We love what we do!  XS WR IULHQGV RU IDP-­ go,  although  you’re  not  ily  members  so  you  can  D ELJ IDQ RI WKH VSRWOLJKW Great Hours! Plenty of Parking! VKDUH WKLV SRVLWLYH GHYHO-­ this  week  you  will  be  Friendly Service! RSPHQW ZLWK ORYHG RQHV asked  to  handle  a  situation  100% Satisfaction Guaranteed! AQUARIUS:  JANU-­ RQ FHQWHU VWDJH <RX MXVW ARY  21-­FEBRUARY  may  enjoy  the  situation,  so  Mon.-­Fri.  9-­5:30,  Sat.  9-­2  :DLWLQJ SDWLHQWO\ WKLV GRQÂśW IUHW DERXW LW Rte.  7  So.,  Middlebury week  will  not  get  the  ZZZ PLGGOHEXU\Ă€RUDODQGJLIWV FRP MRE GRQH $TXDULXV <RX FAMOUS PD\ KDYH WR EH PRUH BIRTHDAYS DVVHUWLYH WR JHW WKLQJV OCTOBER  4 GRQH 2WKHUV ZLOO XQGHU-­ $OLFLD 6LOYHUVWRQH VWDQG DQG SURYH KHOSIXO Actress  (39) PISCES:  FEBRUARY  OCTOBER  5 19-­MARCH  20  Pisces,  a  .DWH :LQVOHW SUREOHP DW ZRUN VHHPV Actress  (40) WRXJK WR FUDFN 7DNH \RXU OCTOBER  6 WLPH DQG WU\ D QHZ DS-­ 1DLO <DNXSRY SURDFK DQG \RX ZLOO EH Athlete  (22) KDSS\ ZLWK WKH UHVXOWV OCTOBER  7 ARIES:  MARCH  7RQL %UD[WRQ 21-­APRIL  20  Aries,  it  Singer  (48) may  be  challenging  to  OCTOBER  8 H[SUHVV \RXU WUXH IHHO-­ Matt  Damon,  Actor  (45) LQJV HVSHFLDOO\ ZKHQ %XCHANGE 3T s -IDDLEBURY 64 OCTOBER  9 \RX IHDU ZKDW RWKHUV PD\ 388-2221 s CACKLINHENS COM Tony  Shalhoub, WKLQN -XVW GR ZKDW IHHOV Actor  (62) FRPIRUWDEOH WR \RX OCTOBER  10 TAURUS:  APRIL  21-­MAY  21  Take  a  sentimen-­ 'DYLG /HH 5RWK 6LQJHU

FLOORING Â SALE

Shady  Rill  in  Lincoln

Arts  Beat  (Continued  from  Page  10) Âł*UHDW $PHULFDQ 6RQJERRN ´ Tickets  are  $20  adult,  $10  child,  IDPLO\ DQG IUHH IRU DQG \RXQJHU 7LFNHWV DUH EHLQJ VROG LQ DGYDQFH LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ 0DLQ 6WUHHW Stationery  and  Middlebury  Com-­ munity  Music  Center),  Bristol  (Re-­ F\FOHG 5HDGLQJ RI 9HUPRQW DQG Vergennes  (Sweet  Charity),  cash  or  FKHFN RQO\ RU RQOLQH DW ULVHXSVLQJ-­ LQJYWFRQFHUW FRP 5HPDLQLQJ WLFN-­ HWV LI DQ\ ZLOO EH VROG DW WKH GRRU $GYDQFH WLFNHW SXUFKDVH LV VWURQJO\ VXJJHVWHG 3URFHHGV IURP WKH FRQ-­ FHUW ZLOO EHQHÂżW WKH WKH /DNH &KDP-­ SODLQ &RPPLWWHH SHADY  RILL  IN  LINCOLN Patti  Casey  and  Tom  McKenzie  ZLOO EH SHUIRUPLQJ DV Âł6KDG\ 5LOO´ IRU WKH %XUQKDP 0XVLF 6HULHV DW Burnham  Hall  in  Lincoln,  on  Satur-­ GD\ DW S P Casey  is  an  award-­winning  song-­ writer,  and  McKenzie’s  banjo  and  YRLFH DUH D SHUIHFW FRPSOHPHQW DV WKH WZR RI WKHP ZHDYH WKHLU ZD\ WKURXJK WKH PDQ\ VW\OHV RI WUDGL-­ WLRQDOO\ EDVHG VRQJV DQG WXQHV 2YHU WKHLU SURIHVVLRQDO FDUHHUV ERWK &DVH\ DQG 0F.HQ]LH KDYH WUDYHOLQJ DOO ORZHU VWDWHV EULQJ-­ LQJ JUHDW WXQHV DQG SROLVKHG KDUPR-­ QLHV WR DSSUHFLDWLYH DXGLHQFHV 7KH\ entertain  with  banjo,  guitar,  ham-­ PHUHG GXOFLPHU Ă€XWH NH\ERDUG XNXOHOH VHDWHG FORJJLQJ DQG ÂżQH KXPRU (YHU\WKLQJ IURP )UHQFK &D-­ nadian  dance  tunes,  to  Tin  Pan  Al-­ ley,  to  old  time  country  to  their  own  LPSUHVVLYH RULJLQDOV DUH OLNHO\ WR EH RQ WKH PXVLFDO PHQX 7LFNHWV DUH IRU DGXOWV DQG IUHH IRU WHHQV DQG FKLOGUHQ 'RRUV RSHQ DW S P DQG WKH VKRZ EHJLQV DW 5HIUHVKPHQWV ZLOO EH VHUYHG

)RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ FDOO ‘BECOMING  BULLETPROOF’ The  North  Branch  School  will  KRVW WKH GRFXPHQWDU\ ÂżOP Âł%HFRP-­ LQJ %XOOHWSURRI´ DW S P RQ )ULGD\ at  the  Town  Hall  Theater  in  Middle-­ EXU\ Âł%HFRPLQJ %XOOHWSURRI´ GRFX-­ PHQWV WKH PDNLQJ RI DQ RULJLQDO :HVWHUQ ÂżOP FDOOHG Âł%XOOHWSURRI ´ WKDW IHDWXUHV DFWRUV ZLWK DQG ZLWK-­ RXW GLVDELOLWLHV ZKR PHHW HYHU\ \HDU at  Zeno  Mountain  Farm  (ZMF)  to  ZULWH SURGXFH DQG VWDU LQ RULJLQDO VKRUW ÂżOPV )RXQGHG E\ WZR EURWK-­ HUV DQG WKHLU ZLYHV =HQR 0RXQWDLQ )DUPÂśV SKLORVRSK\ LV WR FUHDWH D WUX-­ O\ LQFOXVLYH FRPPXQLW\ WKDW EXLOGV JHQXLQH IULHQGVKLSV WKDW WUDQVFHQGV VWLJPD DQG VWHUHRW\SHV A  question-­and-­answer  session  ZLWK WKH =0) IRXQGHUV IROORZV WKH VFUHHQLQJ $ UHFHSWLRQ ZLOO EH KHOG LQ WKH OREE\ RI WKH WKHDWHU DIWHU WKH HYHQW KRVWHG E\ 7RXUWHUHOOH 5HVWDX-­ UDQW DQG ,QQ 7LFNHWV DUH DQG FDQ EH SXU-­ FKDVHG DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH WRZQ-­ KDOOWKHDWHU RUJ RU E\ FDOOLQJ “OKTOBERMUSIKâ€?  AT  THT 7KH &KDPSODLQ 3KLOKDUPRQLF ZLOO SUHVHQW LWV )DOO &RQFHUW 6HULHV WLWOHG Âł2NWREHUPXVLN ´ DW S P RQ Sunday  at  the  Town  Hall  Theater  in  Middlebury  under  the  direction  RI JXHVW FRQGXFWRU DQG 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH SURIHVVRU /DUU\ +DPEHUOLQ Âł2NWREHUPXVLN´ IHDWXUHV WKUHH OXVK DQG PDVWHUIXO ZRUNV E\ FRP-­ SRVHUV IURP *HUPDQ VSHDNLQJ FRXQ-­ WULHV 7KH SURJUDP ZLOO RSHQ ZLWK 5LFKDUG :DJQHUÂśV ÂłDie  Meisters-­ ingerâ€? RYHUWXUH 0DUJDUHW 5RGG\ (See  Beat,  Page  13)

81 Knitting Days until Christmas!

Show Your Bounty

in  our  regular  agriculture  pages. Call  388-­4944  or  email  ads@addsionindependent  for  more  information.


PAGE  12  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

PUZZLES

Sponsored  by:

help keep the mind independent and active throughout life.

This  week’s  puzzle  is  rated Across

71.  Australian  one  cent

1. Â Monsoonal

72. Â Endorse

4.  The  bulk

73.  ___’easter

8.  First-­aid,  for  one

74.  One-­dish  meal

11. Â Wrong

75.  Pooch,  for  example

13. Â Guidelines

Easy 1

49. Â Inexpensive

11

50. Â Aces, Â e.g.

16

52.  â€œGet  the  picture?â€?

2

3

4 12

19

21

23

56.  Submarine  sandwich

24

17.  Turn  on

2.  Get  better

18.  Break  down

3. Â Svelte

19. Â Cadence

4.  Mr.’s  mate

21. Â Troubles

5. Â Defeated

23. Â Stain

6. Â Hit

26.  Neighbor  of  Wash.

7.  Overbearing  fear

27.  Washed-­out

8.  __-­high  boots

29. Â Achieves

9.  Agenda  point

34.  Wet  septet

10.  First-­rate

65

66

36. Â Formerly

12. Â Blueprint

70

71

38. Â Routine

14.  Lay  up

39. Â Contract

15.  Mice  predator

40.  Track  event

20. Â Kooky

43.  â€œThe  Sun  ___  Risesâ€?

22.  Sweat  particle

44.  Played  on  stage

24. Â 365 Â days

46.  Going  to  happen

25. Â Margin

47. Â Sped

27.  Type  of  acid

48.  Science  of  matter  and  energy

28.  Mortal  remains

54.  Everyday  article 55.  Flock  watcher 60.  Black  billiard  ball 65.  â€œ___  Only  Just  Begunâ€? 66.  Get  around 69.  Set  straight 70.  Acreage

32.  In  addition

57.  %DUU\PRUH ¿OP ´BB $IWHU´ 58.  Soup  or  fog

34 39

62.  Film  set  worker

44

63. Â Whopping

31

32

33

62

63

64

15

22

25

26

28

29

35

36

30

37

38

40

41

45

48

42

43

46 49

50

47 51

52

64.  Jamboree  shelter 53

67.  Frozen  liquid 68.  Morning  mist

55

56

57

73

5 1 9

2

8

7

1 2 8

6

37. Â Ancient

3

4 7

3

4 8

7 5

60 67

68

61 69 72

75

Sudoku

1

1

1

59

7

9

9

58

This  week’s  puzzle  solutions can  be  found  on  Page  43.

9 6

3

54

74

9 6

3 2

35. Â Per

45.  Good-­looker

27

61.  It  is

34.  Drama  on  TV

42.  Slangy  assent

10

59.  Word  of  warning

33. Â Lento

41.  Family  member

9

18

20

1.  Detective’s  query

31. Â Undulating

14

8

55.  White  bird

16.  Atlas  section

53.  â€œ___’s  the  one  for  meâ€?

7

17

Down

30. Â Skill

6

13

15.  Able  to  see  right  through

51. Â Unpleasant

5

9

Each Sudoku puzzle consists of a 9x9 grid that has been subdivided into nine smaller grids of 3x3 squares. To solve the puzzle each row, column and box must contain each of the numbers 1 to 9. Puzzles come in three grades: easy, medium and difficult. Level: Medium.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  13

Local woman’s film illuminates shamans’ mystery

Beat  (Continued  from  Page  11) principal  clarinetist,  will  solo  with  the  orchestra  in  Mozart’s  Clarinet  Concerto  K.  622.  The  orchestra  will  conclude  with  Brahms  Symphony  No.  2  in  D  major,  Op.  73. Tickets  are  $15  adults,  $10  seniors  and  $5  students,  available  online,  at  www.townhalltheater.org,  from  the  7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH 0RQGD\ 6DWXUGD\ QRRQ WR S P DW DQG DW the  door. ‘BEST  OF  THE  FEST’  FILMS  Back  by  popular  demand,  some  of  WKH DZDUG ZLQQLQJ ÂżOPV RI WKH 0LG dlebury  New  Filmmakers  Festival  will  screen  at  the  Town  Hall  Theater  this  Tuesday  at  7  p.m.  At  â€œBest  of  the  Fest  2,â€?  THT  will  screen  three  ¿QH QDUUDWLYH GUDPDV Âł0LQLPXP :DJH´ VKRUW Âł6WXQQHG´ VKRUW and  â€œThe  Sound  and  the  Shadowâ€?  IHDWXUH /OR\G .RPHVDU IHVWLYDO SURGXFHU ZLOO LQWURGXFH WKH ÂżOPV 7KLV LV D SHUIHFW FKDQFH IRU ÂżOP JRHUV WR VHH JUHDW ÂżOPV WKH\ PD\ have  missed  during  the  Middlebury  New  Filmmakers  Festival.  Tickets  are  $10  and  may  be  pur FKDVHG DW WRZQKDOOWKHDWHU RUJ DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH GDLO\ except  Sunday,  noon  to  5  p.m.)  and  at  the  door,  if  available. CORNWALL  CONTRA  DANCE The  monthly  Cornwall  Contra  Dance  will  take  place  at  the  Corn wall  Town  Hall  on  Saturday  from  7  WR S P This  month,  talented  caller  Will  Mentor  will  be  leading  the  dances.  The  music  will  be  provided  by  Ad dison  County’s  own  Red  Dog  Ri ley,  featuring  Don  Stratton,  Kristin  Bolton,  Andrew  Munkres,  Romy  Munkres  and  Dave  Guertin  play ing  lively  dance  tunes.  As  always,  all  dances  are  taught,  beginners  are  welcome,  and  no  partner  is  neces sary.

Admission  is  $5.  The  Cornwall  Town  Hall  is  located  on  Route  30  at  the  intersection  with  Route  74.  For  more  information,  call  Andrew  or  .ULVWLQ DW RU YLVLW IDFH book.com/CornwallContraDance. TWO  BROTHERS  TAVERN There  will  be  two  live  perfor mances  this  week  at  Two  Brothers  Tavern  in  Middlebury.  Join  Two  %URWKHUV HYHU\ :HGQHVGD\ DW S P for  the  Open  Mic,  an  evening  of  mu sic,  comedy,  or  anything  else,  alter nately  hosted  by  Mark  Sikora  and  Kai  Stanley.  Come  cheer  on  your  friends  or  let  loose  on  the  stage.  It’s  free  to  enter  and  there  is  no  cover  charge. Then,  on  Friday,  the  tavern  pres ents  an  encore  performance  by  Re KDE 5RDGKRXVH DW S P 5HKDE 5RDGKRXVH FRPELQHV WKH LQĂ€XHQF es  of  Bruce  Springsteen,  AC/DC,  Phish  and  the  Grateful  Dead  togeth er  into  a  sonic  stew  that  is  sure  to  satisfy  your  aural  palette.  There  is  a  $3  cover  charge.  For  more  informa WLRQ FDOO 7ZR %URWKHUV DW LIVE  MUSIC  AT  51  MAIN There  will  be  two  live  musical  events  this  week  at  Middlebury’s  51  0DLQ $W S P RQ )ULGD\ (LJKW WDNHV WR WKH VWDJH (LJKW LV D SRVW ERS FRQWHPSRUDU\ MD]] IXVLRQ group  with  a  particular  knack  for  LPSURYLVDWLRQDO ULVN WDNLQJ 7KHLU sound  has  been  described  as  a  mix  of  contemporary  jazz  with  a  decid HGO\ IUHVK IXVLRQ Ă€DYRU 7KHQ DW S P RQ )ULGD\ &RRSHU /D9RLH ZLOO UHWXUQ IRU an  encore  performance.  Cooper  &  /D9RLH SOD\ D JUHDW PL[ RI DFRXV tic  blues  and  folk  classics,  featuring  Bob  Recupero  on  guitar  and  Mark  /D9RLH RQ KDUPRQLFD All  ages,  no  cover.  For  additional  information  visit  www.go51main. FRP RU SKRQH

0,''/(%85< ² Âł&HUHPRQ\ ´ local  director  Sas  Carey’s  documen tary  about  the  mysterious  ways  of  the  shamans  in  northern  Mongolia,  will  be  shown  Sunday  through  Thursday,  2FW DW S P HDFK HYHQLQJ at  the  Marquis  Theater  in  Middle bury.  Carey  will  hold  a  Q&A  session  after  each  screening.  In  addition,  VKH ZLOO EH DYDLODEOH IRU D SUH VKRZ PHHW DQG JUHHW 6XQGD\ DQG 7KXUV GD\ DW S P LQ WKH FDIp “Ceremonyâ€?  revolves  around  a  VSHFLÂżF FHUHPRQ\ LQ WKH VWHSSHV Outside  the  viewer  sees  mists  with  reindeer  emerging,  smoke  coming  from   stovepipes  through  the  poles  of  the  Siberian  tipis  or  urts,  animals  grazing  on  the  steppe,  and  the  moon  in  a  clear  sky.  Inside  is  a  mysterious  ritual  as  a  shaman  slips  into  a  trance  around  midnight  when  the  stars  come  out.  The  master   shaman  beats  the  drum,  chants,  dances  and  takes  on  the  spirit.  He  then  motions  to  his  young  shaman  apprentice  to  begin  playing  a  mouth  harp.  The  viewer  wonders  if  the   ceremony  will  heal  a  young  boy  who  has  come  to  be  healed.  Many  shamans  were  interviewed Â

MONGOLIAN  SHAMAN  NERGUI  performs  an  outdoor  ritual  in  â€œCer-­ HPRQ\ ´ D GRFXPHQWDU\ E\ ORFDO ÂżOPPDNHU 6DV &DUH\ ,W LV VKRZLQJ DW 0LGGOHEXU\ÂśV 0DUTXLV 7KHDWHU 2FW

before  and  after  the  event,  and  as  the  ceremony  progresses,  the  main  sha man  and  others  give  commentaries  to  help  the  viewer.  â€œCeremonyâ€?  took  11  years  to  make.  Carey,  who  has  been  traveling  to  Mongolia  for  over  two  decades, Â

IRXQGHG WKH QRQSURÂżW RUJDQL]DWLRQ Nomadicare,  whose  mission  is  to  document  indigenous  Mongolian  culture  and   support  nomads’  health. For  more  information,  call  Carey  DW HPDLO VDV#QRPDGLFDUH org  or  visit  www.nomadicare.org.

DINE THE UNITED WAY United Way of Addison County P.O. Box 555 Middlebury, VT 05753

802.388.7189 www.UnitedWayAddisonCounty.org Join friends and family in celebrating and supporting United Way of Addison County by Dining the United Way. These generous Addison County Restaurants are teaming up with United Way to improve lives and our community. They will be donating a portion of their profits – on the dates listed – to the United Way.

OCTOBER - NOVEMBER 2015 Fridays Oct. 15-Nov. 25 every pot of tea Stone Leaf Teahouse In the Marble Works Middlebury • 458-0460

Oct. 18-24, all day Carol’s Hungry Mind CafÊ 24 Merchant’s Row Middlebury • 388-0101

Mondays Oct. 19-Nov. 23 eat in/take out Green Peppers 10 Washington Street Middlebury • 388-3164

Nov. 3-5, lunch & dinner The Storm CafÊ 3 Mill Street Middlebury • 388-1063

Nov. 15, Brunch 10AM-1PM Mary’s Restaurant/Inn at Baldwin Creek 1868 North 116 Road Bristol • 453-2432

Nov. 19 & 24, dinner Fire & Ice 26 Seymour Street Middlebury • 388-7166

Join us for some fun, great food, and support your local United Way. Twangtown  Paramours  at  Brandon  Music

For more information, please visit www.UnitedWayAddisonCounty.org


PAGE  14  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Costume

BLOW-OUT

Sale

n time en! i t s u J llowe a H r fo

One day only Saturday, Oct. 10 11 AM – 3 PM

Vintage clothing Hats – Shoes – Coats Single items & bargains by the bagful!

CASH only!

Route 7S opposite Foster Motors — Look for Balloons and Signs! Benefit for Middlebury Community Players’ Scholarship Fund info@middleburycommunityplayers.org

Judge  Hoar  â€œ(Becoming  a  judge)  is  not  some-­ (Continued  from  Page  1) rotation,â€?  Hoar  said.  â€œWith  the  lim-­ WKLQJ , UHDOO\ VWDUWHG WKLQNLQJ DERXW ited  resources  that  we  have  in  this  until  later  in  my  career,â€?  Hoar  ac-­ state  â€Ś  we  couldn’t  have  a  model  knowledged.  â€œIt  wasn’t  my  career  where  you  have  one  judge  who  goal,  ever.  But  I  think  in  my  heart  of  spent  all  of  his  of  her  time  in  Addi-­ hearts,  it’s  something  I  might  have  son  County  or  Burlington.  The  chief  always  wanted  to  do.â€? +H ÂżUVW GHYHORSHG judge  needs  to  have  DQ DIÂżQLW\ IRU WKH SUR-­ VRPH Ă€H[LELOLW\ LQ WKDW “When I come fession  while  clerking  respect.  for  federal  Judge  Bai-­ “There  is  some  ad-­ off the bench, ley  Aldrich  in  Boston. YDQWDJH RI EULQJLQJ I’ve got a few Âł+H ZDV D EULOOLDQW fresh  ideas  and  fresh  seconds to collect and  committed  jurist,â€?  perspective  into  differ-­ myself and then Hoar  recalled.  â€œIf  I  ent  courthouses,  and  not  letting  relation-­ I have paper that FRXOG EH KDOI WKH MXGJH WKDW KH ZDV , ZRXOG EH ships  get  either  too  I have to move. very  happy  with  my-­ There is not a cozy  or  too  stale.â€? self.â€? Hoar  graduated  single down After  a  long  and  from  Boston  Universi-­ minute in my satisfying  career  as  a  ty  Law  School  in  1985  day.â€? lawyer,  Hoar  applied  and  then  clerked  for  a  â€” Judge for  a  vacant  judgeship  year  for  the  U.S.  Court  Samuel Hoar Jr. within  the  Vermont  of  Appeals  in  Boston.  Superior  Court  system  He  moved  to  Vermont  LQ WDNLQJ D MRE ZLWK WKH %XU-­ early  last  year.  Gov.  Peter  Shumlin  OLQJWRQ ODZ ÂżUP RI 'LQVH .QDSS appointed  him  to  the  position  and  &  McAndrew  P.C.,  practicing  civil  KH ZDV VZRUQ LQ RQ 0DUFK OLWLJDWLRQ +H EHFDPH D SDUWQHU DW WKH Soon  after,  Judge  Hoar  received  his  ¿UP LQ +RDU LV SDVW SUHVLGHQW ÂżUVW DVVLJQPHQW ² DV RQH RI ZKDW of  the  Vermont  Bar  Association  and  ZHUH WKHQ VL[ MXGJHV LQ &KLWWHQGHQ the  Vermont  Bar  Foundation.  He  Superior  Court  at  the  Edward  J.  KDV DOVR VHUYHG DV D PHPEHU RI WKH Costello  Courthouse  in  Burlington,  Vermont  Supreme  Court  Civil  Rules  dealing  mainly  with  criminal  cases. All  of  a  sudden,  he  was  seeing  the  Advisory  Committee  and  its  Jury  legal  system  from  an  entirely  differ-­ Policy  Committee.

ent  perspective. “It’s  an  interesting  transition,â€?  Hoar  said  of  his  switch  from  arguing  EHIRUH D MXGJH WR KLPVHOI GRQQLQJ WKH EODFN UREH Âł,ÂśG OLNH WR WKLQN I  was  ready  for  it,  personally  and  professionally.  There’s  a  lot  more  WR EHLQJ D MXGJH WKDQ HYHQ WKH PRVW H[SHULHQFHG ODZ\HUV ZLOO DSSUHFLDWH There  is  a  quick  and  steep  learning  FXUYH EXW ORWV RI UHVRXUFHV DQG VXS-­ port  from  within  the  judiciary  and  ZLWKRXW WR FOLPE WKDW FXUYH ´ The  judge  wondered,  at  the  out-­ set,  whether  his  lawyering  instincts  ZRXOG LQĂ€XHQFH KLV FRPSRUWPHQW RQ WKH EHQFK Âł, ZRQGHUHG KRZ LW ZRXOG EH ZDWFKLQJ DQRWKHU ODZ\HU GR DQ H[-­ amination  and  wanting  to  jump  in  there  myself,â€?  Hoar  said.  â€œI  am  hap-­ S\ WR VD\ WKDW KDVQÂśW EHHQ DQ LVVXH Every  now  and  then,  I  think,  â€˜Hmm,  , PLJKW GR WKLV GLIIHUHQWO\ Âś EXW JHQ-­ HUDOO\ WKDW KDVQÂśW EHHQ WKH FRQFHUQ WKDW , WKRXJKW LW PLJKW EH ´ Vermont’s  limited  crop  of  Superi-­ or  Court  judges  are  rotated  amongst  WKH VWDWHÂśV FRXQWLHV RQ DQ DQQXDO EDVLV DQG VRPHWLPHV HYHU\ WZR years.  Hoar  was  pleased  to  learn  this  VXPPHU WKDW KLV QH[W VWRS ZRXOG EH the  Mahady  Courthouse  in  Middle-­ EXU\ As  the  presiding  judge  in  Addi-­ (See  The  bench,  Page  15)

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0,''/(%85< ² ,Q ODWH 2FWR-­ EHU WKH +DQQDIRUG &DUHHU &HQWHUÂśV Addison  Repertory  Theatre  program  ZLOO EH WRXULQJ HOHPHQWDU\ VFKRROV in  a  revival  of  the  historic  children’s  show.  The  children’s  show  is  a  re-­ telling  of  classic  children’s  stories  through  dramatic  movement.  The  VKRZ LV SHUIRUPHG E\ $ 5 7 VWX-­ GHQWV GUHVVHG LQ EODFN DWWLUH ZLWK minimal  props,  costumes  and  words. 'LUHFWHG E\ 6WHYH 6PDOO DQG SUR-­ GXFHG E\ 3HQHORSH :DGH WKLV \HDUÂśV VKRZ ZLOO EH FDOOHG Âł7KH (PSHURU WKH 0DJLF DQG WKH 'DQFH ´ D WKUHH SDUW SURGXFWLRQ EDVHG RQ FODVVLF DQG contemporary  stories:  â€œThe  Empty  Pot,â€?  â€œThe  Princess  and  the  Frogâ€?  and  â€œThe  Wind  Bears.â€? “The  Emperor,  the  Magic,  and  WKH 'DQFH´ SURYLGHV D IXQ ZRUOG RI imagination  for  children  of  all  ages  and  allows  for  them  to  feel  included  LQ DQG H[SRVHG WR WKH ZRUOG RI WKH-­ atrical  arts.  The  children’s  show  is  a  great  way  to  engage  students  in  the-­ DWHU DQG OHW WKHP OHDUQ DERXW WKH SHU-­ forming  arts  at  an  introductory  level.  â€œThe  Emperor,  the  Magic,  and  the  'DQFH´ WXQHV FKLOGUHQ LQ ZLWK ZRQ-­ derful  lessons  on  honesty,  integrity,  and  free-­spiritedness. For  more  information,  contact  Ad-­ GLVRQ 5HSHUWRU\ 7KHDWUH DW RU YLVLW WKH ZHEVLWH DW ZZZ addisonrepertorytheatre.org. Editor’s  note:  This  article  was  contributed  by  Tsering  Chophel,  grade  12.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  15

The  bench  (Continued  from  Page  14) are  bottlenecks,â€?  Hoar  said.  â€œThere  son  County,  Hoar  must  wear  sev-­ is  stuff  that  doesn’t  get  here  because  eral  judicial  hats.  He  is  the  presiding  of  schedule  time  in  court.â€? judge  for  civil,  criminal  and  family  Hoar  noted  Addison  County’s  court  matters.  He  also  hears  appeals  large  and  growing  number  of  juve-­ of  cases  from  the  county’s  probate  nile  cases,  a  trend  the  Addison  In-­ court. dependent  reported  in  an  in-­depth  â€œI’m  really  still  getting  familiar  story  last  May.  The  judge  noted  that  with  the  docket  and  how  it  runs,â€?  Addison  County  has  been  record-­ Hoar  said.  â€œSo  far,  the  workload  has  ing  the  third-­largest  juvenile  docket  been  manageable,  but  there  is  not  a  in  the  state,  behind  only  Chittenden  single  down  minute  in  my  day.  I  am  and  Franklin  counties. very  busy  in  the  courtroom,  and  then  The  number  of  CHINS  (Children  back  (in  my  chambers).â€? In  Need  of  Supervi-­ He  pointed  to  a  short  VLRQ SHWLWLRQV ÂżOHG DW wooden  stand  next  to  â€œWhat is really, the  Addison  County  the  door  of  his  cham-­ really scary is courthouse  alleging  bers  on  which  the  cases  abuse  or  neglect  of  a  it used to be it pile  up,  one  folder  after  child  has  increased  another,  waiting  for  his  was children by  62  percent  since  attention.  There’s  a  pile  in the 13-to-17 2010,  the  Independent  for  each  of  the  three  age range who reported.  Termination  court  divisions  over  were driving the of  parental  rights  peti-­ which  he  presides.  juvenile docket. tions  in  juvenile  cases  Some  of  the  paper-­ have  increased  by  21  work  involves  quick  It’s now zero to percent  locally  during  and  basic  decisions,  three. In that that  same  timeframe. VXFK DV FODULÂżFDWLRQ RI cohort, a superMembers  of  the  lo-­ a  procedural  question.  majority (of cal  judiciary  and  child  But  there  are  also  more  the cases) are advocates  agreed  the  complex  tasks,  such  as  surge  in  cases  â€”  in-­ parents with considering  requests  volving  neglected,  for  summary  judg-­ substance abuse abused  and  delinquent  ment  in  cases.  Those  problems.â€? children,  as  well  as  can  take  a  half  hour  or  â€” Judge WKRVH ZKR FRXUW RIÂż-­ more  to  consider. Samuel Hoar Jr. cials  deem  necessary  â€œWhen  I  come  off  to  remove  from  their  the  bench,  I’ve  got  a  homes  â€”  can  at  least  few  seconds  to  collect  myself  and  in  part  be  attributed  to  the  growing  then  I  have  paper  that  I  have  to  opiate  addiction  problem  in  the  state. move,â€?  he  said.  â€œWhat  is  really,  really  scary  is  it  But  the  judge  stressed  that  he  gets  used  to  be  it  was  children  in  the  13-­ help  from  three  sources  â€”  what  he  to-­17  age  range  who  were  driving  called  â€œan  incredible  court  staffâ€?  that  the  juvenile  docket,â€?  Hoar  said.  â€œIt’s  PDQDJHV WKH SDSHU Ă€RZ DQG NHHSV now  zero  to  three.  In  that  cohort,  a  him  on  task;Íž  a  law  clerk  who  assists  super-­majority  (of  the  cases)  are  par-­ him  three  days  per  week;Íž  and  a  sec-­ ents  with  substance  abuse  problems.  ond  judge,  John  Valente,  who  will  We  are  seeing  the  consequences  of  soon  complete  his  orientation  and  the  heroin  epidemic  that  the  gov-­ assist  Hoar  for  one  day  per  week. ernor  highlighted,  in  every  docket.  â€œI  manage  to  get  done  every  day  It  is  really  troubling  in  the  CHINS  what  is  put  in  front  of  me,  but  there  docket.â€?

The  judge  noted  that  state  authori-­ ties  are  given  a  timeline  of  one  year  in  which  to  achieve  the  goal  of  a  returning  a  foster  child  to  his  or  her  parents.  But  the  average  timeline  for  the  successful  recovery  of  a  person  addicted  to  drugs  is  approximately  14  months,  he  noted. “Those  two  timelines  don’t  work,â€?  Hoar  said. Attorneys,  defendants  and  judicial  staff  who  spend  a  lot  of  time  in  the  courtroom  have  an  opportunity  to  learn  the  style  of  a  presiding  judge.  Though  he  has  been  on  the  bench  for  but  a  short  while,  Judge  Hoar  exhib-­ its  an  unmistakable  demeanor  and  set  of  principles  in  his  handling  of  the  business  that  comes  before  him. “It  stems  from  an  understanding  of  30  years  of  working  in  the  judi-­ cial  system  that  this  is  a  system  that  can  be  profoundly  dehumanizing,  and  therefore,  much  of  what  I  do  is  driven  by  a  desire  to  humanize  the  process  as  much  as  possible,â€?  Hoar  said. With  that  in  mind,  Hoar  wel-­ comes  all  parties  when  they  come  into  the  courtroom,  and  wishes  them  a  â€œgood  dayâ€?  when  they  leave. “I  recognize  that  whenever  some-­ body  comes  in  and  is  sitting  in  front  of  a  guy  wearing  a  black  robe,  it  is  far  from  his  or  her  best  day,â€?  he  said.  â€œIt’s  also  about  encouraging  the  parties  in  cases  to  treat  each  other  with  dignity  and  respect,  and  to  work  collaboratively  as  human  beings  to  solve  what  are  profound  human  problems,  and  to  try  to  be  a  facilitator  as  much  as  I  am  a  â€˜de-­ cider.’â€? Addison  County  Superior  Court  acting  Clerk  Teri  Corsones  said  the  recent  transition  in  judges  at  the  courthouse  has  been  very  smooth. “We  were  thrilled  to  have  Judge  Mello  and  we  are  equally  as  thrilled  to  have  Judge  Hoar,â€?  Corsones  said.  â€œThey  are  both  so  dedicated Â

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to  the  law  and  so  professional  and  er  and  pleasurable.â€? respectful  to  staff,  litigants  and  the  Reporter  John  Flowers  is  at  public.  It  makes  our  jobs  much  easi-­ johnf@addisonindependent.com.


PAGE  16  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Falcons  (Continued  from  Page  1) peregrines  like  to  nest,  two  nesting  still  a  far  cry  from  the  350  pairs  the  SDLUV SURGXFHG D WRWDO RI ÂżYH FKLFNV Vermont  Center  for  Ecostudies  esti-­ this  season,  Buck  said.  mates  were  in  Vermont  in  the  1940s,  A  nesting  pair  returned  to  Mt.  Hor-­ the  peregrine’s  steady  increase  since  rid  in  Goshen,  but  the  nest  failed.  coming  off  the  federal  Endangered  And  at  Deer  Leap,  Rattlesnake  Point  Species  list  in  1999  and  the  Vermont  and  Snake  Mountain  state  biologists  Endangered  Species  List  in  2005  is  reported  what  are  called  â€œterritorial  considered  a  resounding  success,  pairsâ€?  â€”  a  pair  of  peregrines  who  albeit  one  tinged  with  cautious  op-­ come  to  a  site  to  evaluate  its  suit-­ timism. ability  and  work  toward  establishing  â€œHumans  have  admired  peregrine  territory  but  do  not  nest  and  raise  a  falcons  for  thousands  of  years,â€?  said  family.  Biologists  hope  that  these  John  Buck,  Nongame  Bird  Project  â€œterritorial  pairsâ€?  will  return  next  leader  at  the  Vermont  year  and  raise  chicks  Fish  and  Wildlife  De-­ successfully. partment.  â€œI  think  it  has  â€œEven though Peregrines  mate  for  to  do  with  the  speed  and  peregrine falcons life,  said  Buck,  and  can  agility  with  which  they  are not listed return  to  the  same  site  Ă€\ XS WR PSK any longer as for  up  to  20  years.  But  7KH\ÂśUH OLNH ÂżJKWHU MHWV WKHLU ³¿GHOLW\ ´ DV %XFN an endangered They’re  not  a  very  big  put  it,  is  as  much  to  the  bird  either,  so  seeing  species, one of site  as  to  each  other. something  of  that  size  the reasons that Nests  can  fail  or  terri-­ that’s  that  fast  and  that  they’re not listed torial  pairs  might  reject  skilled,  I  think  there’s  is that people a  site  for  a  variety  of  just  great  admiration  for  have taken reasons,  said  Margaret  individuals  that  can  ex-­ Fowle,  conservation  bi-­ really good care cel  like  that.â€? ologist  with  Audubon  Today’s  Vermont  per-­ of them. And we Vermont’s  Peregrine  egrines  are  descended  need to continue Falcon  Recovery  Pro-­ from  chicks  hand  raised  to take care of gram.  Fowle  has  been  on  cliff  sites  by  wildlife  them.â€? working  on  falcon  re-­ experts  from  1982  to  â€” John Buck covery  since  1997.  If  1987,  and  then  released  peregrines  choose  a  cliff  LQWR WKH ZLOG 7KH ÂżUVW with  a  ledge  too  acces-­ pair  of  falcons  returned  to  Vermont  sible  to  predators,  a  wily  raccoon  or  RQ WKHLU RZQ LQ 7KRVH ÂżUVW other  animal  can  sneak  down  and  hand-­reared  chicks  had  to  be  ob-­ eat  the  eggs  or  vulnerable  young  tained  from  falconry  enthusiasts.  chicks.  High  winds,  heavy  rains  and  These  efforts  brought  peregrines  extreme  cold  can  also  cause  a  nest  back  to  Vermont  â€”  on  a  wing  and  to  fail.  Peregrines  return  to  Vermont  a  prayer. in  March,  so  early  days  can  mean  ADDISON  COUNTY  CHICKS  rough  weather.  Because  peregrines  AND  PAIRS mate  for  life,  if  a  partner  dies  it  can  Each  spring  Fish  and  Wildlife  also  take  the  surviving  mate  a  while  closes  10  or  12  cliff  areas  around  WR ÂżQG VRPHRQH QHZ HLWKHU DW LWV ROG Vermont  to  protect  nesting  peregrine  nesting  site  or  at  a  new  one. falcons,  including  cliffs  at  Deer  But  among  the  greatest  threats  to  Leap  in  Bristol,  Rattlesnake  Point  in  peregrine  nesting  success  are  hu-­ Salisbury,  the  Great  Cliff  overlook  mans. at  Mt.  Horrid  in  Goshen  and  the  HUMAN  DISRUPTION overlook  south  of  the  pond  on  Snake  Every  year  Vermont  Fish  and  Mountain  in  Addison. Wildlife,  Green  Mountain  National  At  these  and  two  other  known  cliff  Forest,  Audubon  and  other  organiza-­ sites  around  Addison  County  where  tions  work  together  to  get  the  word Â

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out  about  leaving  peregrine  nesting  sites  undisturbed  and  these  same  agencies  and  organizations  work  together  to  post  signs  and  block  off  areas.  But  any  human  intrusion  can  drive  off  the  nesting  falcons  or  cause  a  nest  to  fail.  Peregrines  nest  on  ledges  on  high  cliff  sites,  where  the  inaccessibility  to  predators  protects  the  young  and  from  which  the  adults  can  spot  and  strike  prey  on  the  wing.  Peregrines  eat  other  birds,  which  they  take  in  Ă€LJKW &XULRXVO\ VRPH SHUHJULQHV choose  to  nest  on  bridges,  towers  and  high  spots  in  urban  areas,  seem-­ ingly  unbothered  by  the  noise  and  WUDIÂżF GRZQ EHORZ 2QH KLJKO\ VXF-­ cessful  Vermont  pair  nests  in  a  tower  DW 9HUPRQW <DQNHH 2WKHUV KDYH VXF-­ cessfully  used  road  cuts  and  quar-­ ries.  But  all  peregrines  â€”  whether  in  New  York  City  or  Vermont,  innova-­ tor  or  traditional  cliff  dweller  â€”  are  easily  disturbed  by  human  activity  near  the  nesting  site.  Two  of  the  Addison  County  sites  that  have  seen  the  lowest  rates  of  suc-­ cess  in  recent  years  â€”  Deer  Leap  in  Bristol  and  Rattlesnake  Point  above  Lake  Dunmore  â€”  are  also  popular  sites  for  hikers  and  other  outdoor  enthusiasts,  noted  Fowle.  Whereas  a  Deer  Leap  pair  consistently  hatched  one  to  three  chicks  a  year  from  2005  to  2009,  since  2010  only  two  chicks  have  hatched  at  that  site.  Rattlesnake  Point  â€”  where  nesting  pairs  have  produced  18  known  chicks  since  bi-­ ologists  started  keeping  records  in  1996  â€”  has  seen  no  chicks  for  the  SDVW ÂżYH \HDUV “Almost  every  time  I  go  up  that  way  I  see  somebody  on  the  cliff,â€?  said  Fowle  about  Rattlesnake  Point.  â€œWe’ve  worked  pretty  hard  to  make  sure  the  signs  are  visible.  And  the  sign  says  the  area  is  closed.  But  I Â

guess  people  think  they  can  go  up  there  and  they’re  not  going  to  bother  the  birds.  There’s  just  a  general  dis-­ regard  for  the  signage  at  that  particu-­ lar  site.â€? The  peregrines  show  up  at  Rattle-­ snake  Point  in  March  when  it’s  too  cold  and  icy  for  hikers,  said  the  NFS’s  Staats,  who’s  also  monitored  that  site  closely  for  the  past  several  years.  They  begin  to  establish  a  nest,  thinking  they’ve  found  a  spot  free  from  human  disturbance,  and  then  as  the  weather  warms  up  in  April  and  May  people  start  showing  up  and  the  birds  just  give  up  even  trying  to  es-­ tablish  a  nest. “It  doesn’t  take  much,â€?  said  Sta-­ DWV Âł2QFH SHRSOH VWDUW VKRZLQJ XS and  disrupting  them,  they  just  give  up.  But  by  then  it’s  too  late  in  the  season  for  them  to  claim  a  new  terri-­ tory  and  start  over.  They  need  to  get  WKHLU FKLFNV KDWFKHG DQG Ă€HGJHG E\ mid-­July.â€? Human  intrusion  can  cause  the  birds  to  leave  the  eggs  unincubated  for  too  long,  abandon  the  nest  and  the  eggs  entirely,  or  give  up  the  whole  commitment  to  nesting  for  that  year.  Peregrine  nesting  season  lasts  from  March  through  August. While  the  wildlife  experts  ex-­ press  enthusiasm  for  the  peregrines’  remarkable  recovery  in  Vermont,  they  additionally  express  the  need  to  continue  to  protect  their  recov-­ ery.  â€œFalcons  are  very,  very  sensitive  to  people  and  to  anything  really  that’s  near  their  nest,â€?  said  Buck.  â€œThey’re  very,  very  defensive.  And  even  though  they’re  not  listed  any  longer  as  an  endangered  species,  one  of  the  reasons  that  they’re  not  listed  is  that  people  have  taken  really  good  care  of  them.  And  we  need  to  contin-­ ue  to  take  care  of  them.  They  could Â

slip  backwards  if  we  are  careless.  It’s  important  that  in  these  favorite  hiking  areas  that  also  serve  as  good  falcon  nest  sites  that  we  just  respect  some  distance  and  avoid  the  falcons  until  they  are  done  nesting.â€? Buck  also  stressed  the  importance  of  maintaining  and  protecting  per-­ egrine  habitat  and  keeping  it  free  from  cell  towers,  wind  turbines  and  solar  panels.  FLYING  SOUTH For  the  67  chicks  around  Vermont  ZKR KDWFKHG DQG Ă€HGJHG WKLV SDVW summer  â€”  now  grown  into  young  adults  capable  of  living  on  their  own  ² LWÂśV WLPH DQ\ GD\ QRZ WR Ă€\ RII WR ÂżQG ZLQWHU KRPHV LQ )ORULGD &XED Nicaragua  and  other  sites  along  the  Gulf  states,  in  the  Caribbean,  in  Central  and  even  northern  South  America. “They  can’t  spend  all  winter  get-­ ting  ready  to  be  adults,â€?  said  Buck.  â€œIf  you’re  going  to  survive  in  the  wild,  you’ve  got  to  get  up  and  get  to  Cuba  by  November  or  so  if  you  want  to  have  any  chance  of  surviving  as  a  youngster.â€? Buck  encourages  Vermonters  to  get  out  and  look  for  peregrines  rid-­ ing  on  the  north  wind,  heading  to  winter  homes  down  south.  â€œSome  of  the  juveniles  will  prob-­ ably  hang  around  as  they  continue  WR OHDUQ WR Ă€\ DQG KXQW LQ DUHDV WKDW they’re  most  familiar  with,  but  gen-­ HUDOO\ LQ 6HSWHPEHU 2FWREHU WKH\ÂśUH on  their  way!â€?  said  Buck.  â€œThey’re  on  the  move.  And  right  about  now  if  you  hung  out  for  any  length  of  time  near  any  peak  along  the  Lake  Champlain  basin  on  a  gorgeous  day  that’s  got  some  north  breeze  to  it,  you’d  be  bound  to  see  peregrines  go  by.â€? Reporter  Gaen  Murphree  is  at  gaenm@addisonindependent.com.


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PAGE  18  â€”  +HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Play  rather  for  the  process  or  the  act  itself.  A  student  (Continued  from  Page  17) meaningful  ways  to  play  that  continue  to  push  the  merely  interested  in  good  grades  will  study  the  mind  and  body  to  develop  in  new  ways,  but  we  least  amount  possible  in  order  to  attain  the  grade  do  our  best  through  sporting  activities,  playing  they  desire,  but  this  is  not  play.  A  playful  student  with  children  or  animals,  pursuing  creative  studies  the  subject  because  they  love  the  subject  hobbies  like  painting  or  pottery  as  well  as  mind  and  the  grade  to  them  is  a  separate  matter. Have  you  ever  been  playing  with  Legos  puzzles  like  crosswords,  or  building  blocks  with  a  chess  and  video  games.  child  and  been  frustrated  However,  research  suggests  by  their  tendency  to  knock  that  engaging  in  regular  play  Wondering  whether  an  activ-­ allows  individuals  to  be  more  ity  you’re  engaged  in  can  be  your  project  down  and  try  expressive  and  creative  and  considered  â€œpure  playâ€?  or  even  something  different  before  you’re  done  completing  reduces  stress. “partial  playâ€??  If  you  answer  your  building?  Perhaps  it’s  So  what  is  play,  exactly? “yesâ€?  or  â€œmaybeâ€?  to  these  5  First  and  foremost,  play  questions  then  it’s  play.  If  you  because  that  child  is  engaging  in  a  more  playful  way,  simply  is  not  black  and  white.  An  answer  â€œno,â€?  then  it’s  some-­ enjoying  the  act  of  building  activity  (like  going  to  work  thing  else. with  blocks  and  not  focused  every  day,  even  if  you  enjoy  1.  Are  you  freely  engaging  your  job)  can  easily  fall  into  in  the  activity  with  an  ability  to  exclusively  on  the  goal  of  the  the  category  of  â€œpartial  play.â€? quit  whenever  you  would  like  ¿QLVKHG SURMHFW &KLOGUHQ DUH According  to  many  or  the  rules  change  in  a  way  that  much  better  at  staying  in  that  playful  state  than  are  adults,  psychologists  and  social  you  don’t  agree  with? who  are  more  used  to  goal-­ theorists,  play  is  an  act  that  is  2.  Would  you  continue  to  en-­ self-­chosen  and  self-­directed.  gage  in  the  task  at  hand  if  you  oriented  projects  with  known  JEN  AND  KADEN  Hamel  get  a  thrill  on  a  swing  in  Middlebury.  Play  helps  a  child  grow  Players  choose  to  engage  and  knew  that  you  would  receive  ends. “One  reason  why  play  is  mentally,  physically  and  socially. can  choose  to  disengage  at  the  same  pay,  the  same  approval  ,QGHSHQGHQW ÂżOH SKRWR 7UHQW &DPSEHOO any  time,  which  is  a  critical  and  the  same  sense  of  goodwill  such  an  ideal  state  of  mind  Players  choose  whether  they  are  in  the  game  designing  activities  that  encourage  older  distinction  between  playing  as  you  would  if  you  were  not  for  creativity  and  learning  is  because  the  mind  is  and  observing  the  rules  agreed  upon,  or  out  of  participants  of  ESI  programs  to  engage  in  and  other  forms  of  activity. doing  that  task?  focused  on  means,â€?  Gray  the  game,  taking  a  break  to  return  to  reality.  various  levels  of  play.  This  is  a  meaningful  3.  Are  you  acting  by  a  set  Let’s  pretend  you’re  in  a  game  of  stuck  in  the  â€œWe  absolutely  believe  that  having  fun,  claim  to  Peter  Gray,  a  of  rules  or  guidelines  that  you  writes.  â€œSince  the  ends  are  research  professor  at  Boston  have  either  made  up  to  guide  understood  as  secondary,  fear  mud  and  have  been  tagged  and  therefore  are  playing  games,  singing,  and  generally  pursuing  College  and  author  of  the  your  pursuit  or  have  agreed  to  of  failure  is  absent  and  players  â€œstuck  in  the  mudâ€?  and  unable  to  move  until  a  enjoyment  is  essential  at  every  stage  of  life,â€?  blog  â€œFreedom  to  Learn,â€?  accept  for  the  purpose  of  the  feel  free  to  incorporate  new  teammate  comes  to  free  you.  In  the  game  the  Corbett  says.  sources  of  information  and  to  players  agree  to  get  â€œstuckâ€?  and  freeze  in  place  â€œDepression  and  boredom  are  epidemic  where  he  explores  the  thesis  act? experiment  with  new  ways  of  each  time  they’re  tagged,  when  in  reality  they  among  American  elders,â€?  she  continues.  that  humans  come  into  the  4.  Is  your  activity  in  some  doing  things.â€? all  know  that  they  are  physically  free  to  move  Perhaps  due  to  a  loss  of  memory  or  physical  world  with  drives  to  play  way  outside  of  the  world  of  â€œre-­ While  play  is  by  nature  around.  If  a  player  deems  that  they  need  a  ability,  elders  struggle  at  generating  ways  to  and  explore.  Freedom,  Gray  ality,â€?  such  that  you  can  freely  argues,  is  a  key  expression  pursue  fantastical  explorations  free,  it  is  not  freeform,  â€œtime  outâ€?  to  use  the  bathroom,  they  simply  can  truly  engage  in  play.  â€œHere  at  Elderly  Services  we  strive  every  of  play  and  once  players  are  unbound  to  physical  or  â€œreal  says  Gray.  Instead,  it  has  declare  a  â€œtime  outâ€?  and  exit  their  position  of  structure,  or  rules,  which  being  â€œstuckâ€?  until  they  reenter  the  game. day  to  make  sure  that  our  participants  are  not  free  to  choose  whether  worldâ€?  limitations?  are  not  dictated  by  physical  Finally,  Gray  argues  that  play  involves  an  actively  pursuing  fun,  games,  music,  dance,  or  not  they  are  participating  5.  Are  you  engaging  in  a  way  it  transitions  from  play  to  that  your  mind  is  attentive  but  necessity  but  emanate  from  active  and  alert,  but  non-­stressed,  frame  of  mind.  laughter,  jokes  and  every  sort  of  late-­life  the  minds  of  the  players.  Players  must  be  attentive  and  observant  of  the  playing  possible,â€?  she  says.  obligation.  Players  who  try  to  not  stressed?  Rules  are  created  by  an  game  they  are  in  so  they  can  follow  the  rules  and  Whether  hosting  geriatric  tennis  coerce  or  bully  other  players  imagined  goal  or  expectation  VWUXFWXUHV GHÂżQHG ZLWKLQ EXW EHFDXVH SOD\ LV WRXUQDPHQWV FDUG JDPHV RU Ă€RZHU DUUDQJLQJ into  their  rules  or  games  will  watch  as  others  quit  the  game.  For  children,  the  from  the  players  and  followed  according  to  these  not  necessarily  done  in  accordance  with  habitat,  seminars,  Corbett  and  the  team  at  Elderly  lesson  becomes  how  to  cooperate  and  agree  on  SUHGHWHUPLQHG FULWHULD :KHQ SOD\ ÂżJKWLQJ IRU external  demands  or  biological  necessity,  the  Services  help  extend  the  capacity  to  play  compromises  so  that  enough  people  choose  to  example,  players  will  kick,  punch,  fall  down  and  mind  is  generally  free  of  pressures  and  anxieties  throughout  all  of  life.  roll  around  while  exercising  restraint  â€”  they  about  failure.  stay  in  the  game. “The  alert  but  unstressed  condition  of  the  *UD\ GHÂżQHV IRXU RWKHU NH\ FKDUDFWHULVWLFV RI don’t  use  full  force  and  aren’t  trying  to  actually  hurt  one  another.  They  will  call  on  stereotypes  playful  mind  is  precisely  the  condition  that  has  play. He  says  that  play  is  activity  in  which  means  and  learned  social  expectations  and  carry  out  a  been  shown  repeatedly,  in  many  psychological  experiments,  to  be  ideal  for  are  more  valued  than  ends.  People  do  not  engage  scene  according  to  observed  or  creativity  and  the  learning  of  in  play  merely  to  achieve  an  end  result,  but  learned  rules. Formal  games  such  as  â€œOne of the biggest new  skills,â€?  Gray  writes. basketball,  pool  or  chess  provide  takeaways I Activities  that  engage  examples  of  play  in  which  there  experienced after participants  in  play  are  DUH UXOHV WKDW DUH IRUPDOO\ GHÂżQHG spending time at therefore  the  most  successful  and  in  which  players  must  adopt  The Land was at  encouraging  creativity  and  the  rules  in  order  to  engage  in  exploration,  not  just  achieving  that play is not the  game  at  all.  Actions  within  a  set  end  goal.  On  the  contrary,  this  type  of  play  therefore  must  always pretty and when  we  assess  performance  follow  the  rules  agreed  upon  it’s not always based  on  the  end  result,  it  by  all  players  before  the  game  nice. Which is to actually  encourages  participants  was  begun,  otherwise  issues  of  say it’s not always to  focus  their  attention  more  cheating  and  deceit  arouse.  VSHFLÂżFDOO\ DQG QDUURZO\ RQ something that Gray  argues  that  â€œplay  achieving  that  goal  rather  than  draws  and  fascinates  the  player  is in my comfort the  creative  process  at  getting  precisely  because  it  is  structured  zone. But that there. by  rules  that  the  player  herself  doesn’t mean it’s This  is  important  not  just  or  himself  has  invented  or  not in the child’s with  respect  to  children  and  accepted.â€? how  to  encourage  the  creative  comfort zone.â€? While  not  always  easy  to  â€” Erin Davis thought  process,  but  for  creative  distinguish  clearly,  play  is  non-­ endeavors  at  any  phase  of  life.  literal  and  in  some  way  removed  Players  will  continue  to  expand  from  the  â€œreal  world.â€?  It  is  imaginative  and  and  develop  the  activity  so  that  it  continues  to  be  involves  fantastical  experiences  and  actions.  harder  and  more  challenging  for  them  to  play.  In  5XOHV ZLWKLQ D JDPH FDQ EH GHÂżQHG DQG the  process,  they  will  expand  their  capacities  and  unwavering  in  a  game  like  chess,  where  a  bishop  develop  further  as  long  as  they  are  still  having  A  YOUNG  CHILD,  with  the  help  of  a  par-­ can  only  move  in  diagonal  patterns,  while  in  fun.  3/$<7,0( +(/36 &+,/'5(1 JURZ DQG ent,  explores  the  limits  of  his  developmen-­ physical  reality  the  bishop  could  actually  be  Joanne  Corbett,  executive  director  at  Elderly  develop  in  very  healthy  ways. tal  ability  on  a  play  structure  in  Middlebury. moved  in  any  direction  or  pattern.  Services  Inc.  in  Middlebury,  is  constantly  ,QGHSHQGHQW ÂżOH SKRWR 7UHQW &DPSEHOO ,QGHSHQGHQW ÂżOH SKRWR 7UHQW &DPSEHOO

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+HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡ Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  19

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PAGE  20  â€”  +HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Study shows exercise reduces suicide attempts BURLINGTON  â€”  As  high  schools  across  protected  because  we  got  them  involved  in  an  the  country  continue  to  reduce  physical  after-­school  activity  or  in  a  physical  education  education,  recess  and  athletic  programs,  a  new  program  it’s  worth  it.â€? VWXG\ VKRZV WKDW UHJXODU H[HUFLVH VLJQLÂżFDQWO\ High  schools  cutting  physical  education  reduces  both  suicidal  thoughts  and  attempts  programs  nationwide among  students  who  are  bullied. The  release  of  Sibold’s  study  in  the  Journal  of  Using  data  from  the  CDC’s  National  Youth  the  American  Academy  of  Child  &  Adolescent  Risk  Behavior  Survey  of  13,583  high  school  3V\FKLDWU\ FRPHV DW D WLPH ZKHQ SHUFHQW students,  researchers  at  the  University  of  of  the  nation’s  school  administrators  have  cut  Vermont  found  that  being  physically  active  VLJQLÂżFDQW DPRXQWV RI WLPH IURP SK\VLFDO IRXU RU PRUH GD\V SHU ZHHN UHVXOWHG LQ D education,  arts  and  recess  so  that  more  time  percent  reduction  in  suicidal  ideation  and  could  be  devoted  to  reading  and  mathematics  attempts  in  bullied  students.  Nationwide  since  the  passage  of  No  Child  Left  Behind  in  QHDUO\ SHUFHQW RI VWXGHQWV UHSRUWHG EHLQJ DFFRUGLQJ WR D UHSRUW E\ WKH ,QVWLWXWH bullied  on  school  property. of  Medicine  of  the  National  Academies.  The  Previous  studies  have  shown  that  exercise  same  report  showed  that  the  percentage  of  has  positive  effects  on  various  mental  health  schools  offering  physical  education  daily  PHDVXUHV 7KLV LV WKH ÂżUVW KRZHYHU WR VKRZ D or  at  least  three  days  a  week  has  declined  link  between  physical  activity  and  a  reduction  GUDPDWLFDOO\ EHWZHHQ DQG in  suicidal  thoughts  and  attempts  Overall,  it  is  estimated  that  only  by  bullied  students,  who  are  also  â€œI was about  half  of  America’s  youth  at  increased  risk  for  poor  academic  surprised that meet  the  current  evidence-­based  performance,  low  self-­esteem,  it was that guideline  of  the  U.S.  Health  and  anxiety,  depression,  sadness  and  VLJQLĂ€FDQW Human  Services  Department  of  substance  abuse. DW OHDVW PLQXWHV RI YLJRURXV and that 2YHUDOO SHUFHQW RI VWXGHQWV positive or  moderate-­intensity  physical  in  the  study  reported  feeling  sad  HIIHFWV RI activity  daily.  In  its  biennial  survey  for  two  or  more  weeks  in  the  H[HUFLVH of  high  school  students  across  the  SUHYLRXV \HDU ZKLOH PRUH WKDQ extended to nation,  the  Center  for  Disease  percent  reported  suicidal  ideation  NLGV DFWXDOO\ Control  and  Prevention  reported  DQG SHUFHQW UHSRUWHG DFWXDO WU\LQJ WR KDUP that  nearly  half  said  they  had  no  suicidal  attempts  during  the  same  WKHPVHOYHV Âľ physical  education  classes  in  an  time  period.  Bullied  students  were  average  week. Âł -HUHP\ 6LEROG twice  as  likely  to  report  sadness,  â€œIt’s  scary  and  frustrating  that  and  three  times  as  likely  to  report  exercise  isn’t  more  ubiquitous  and  suicidal  ideation  or  attempt  when  compared  to  that  we  don’t  encourage  it  more  in  schools,â€?  peers  who  were  not  bullied.  Exercise  on  four  says  Sibold.  â€œInstead,  some  kids  are  put  on  or  more  days  per  week  was  also  associated  medication  and  told  â€˜good  luck.’  If  exercise  ZLWK VLJQLÂżFDQW UHGXFWLRQV LQ VDGQHVV reduces  sadness,  suicide  ideation,  and  suicide  ³, ZDV VXUSULVHG WKDW LW ZDV WKDW VLJQLÂżFDQW attempts,  then  why  in  the  world  are  we  cutting  and  that  positive  effects  of  exercise  extended  to  physical  education  programs  and  making  it  kids  actually  trying  to  harm  themselves,â€?  said  harder  for  students  to  make  athletic  teams  at  lead  author  Jeremy  Sibold,  associate  professor  such  a  critical  age?â€? and  chair  of  the  Department  Rehabilitation  Sibold  and  his  co-­authors,  Erika  Edwards,  and  Movement  Science.  â€œEven  if  one  kid  is  (See  Exercise,  Page  26)

Big  reach AUSTIN  RHEAUME  CLIMBS  a  play  structure  at  Middlebury’s  KidSpace  soon  after  it  opened  in  2014. ,QGHSHQGHQW ÂżOH SKRWR 7UHQW &DPSEHOO

More teens need to get cancer protection with the HPV vaccine BURLINGTON  â€”  More  Vermont  teens  are  getting  vaccinated  against  whooping  cough  and  meningococcal  disease  â€”  but  most  are  not  fully  vaccinated  against  human  papilloma  virus  infection,  which  can  cause  cancer  later  in  life.  Three  doses  of  the  HPV  vaccine  given  over  six  months  are  needed  for  a  person  to  be  fully  protected. According  to  the  latest  National  Immunization  Survey-­Teen,  HPV  vaccination  coverage  falls  short.  In  Vermont,  rates  of  HPV  vaccination  increased  just  slightly  for  girls  and  boys,  with  one  exception:  boys  age  13  to  17  who  received  the  second  dose  of  HPV  YDFFLQH URVH VLJQLÂżFDQWO\ IURP SHUFHQW LQ WR SHUFHQW LQ KLJKHU WKDQ WKH national  average  of  31  percent.  Thirty-­one  percent  of  teen  boys  in  Vermont  completed  the  vaccination  series  and  received  all  three  doses,  KLJKHU WKDQ WKH QDWLRQDO DYHUDJH RI SHUFHQW Teen  girls  who  received  three  doses  of  HPV  YDFFLQH URVH VOLJKWO\ IURP SHUFHQW LQ WR SHUFHQW LQ KLJKHU WKDQ WKH QDWLRQDO DYHUDJH RI SHUFHQW “The  HPV  vaccine  is  cancer  prevention,â€?  said  Christine  Finley,  immunization  program  manager  for  the  Vermont  Department  of  Health.  â€œHuman  papilloma  virus  is  a  very  common  infection  especially  among Â

teens  and  young  adults,  and  it’s  a  real  risk  DQG \HDUV ROG ´ for  cancer.  Because  the  vaccine  is  more  HPV  vaccine  protects  against  multiple  types  effective  when  given  at  a  younger  age,  it  is  of  cancer  caused  by  persistent  HPV  infection,  recommended  for  all  boys  and  girls  between  including  cancers  of  the  cervix,  vagina,  and Â

vulva  in  women,  the  penis  in  men,  and  the  anus  and  oropharynx  (back  of  the  throat,  base  of  the  tongue  and  tonsils)  in  both  men  and  ZRPHQ <HW KDOI RI WHHQ JLUOV DQG SHUFHQW RI teen  boys  in  Vermont  are  not  fully  vaccinated,  and  therefore  vulnerable  to  cancers  caused  by  HPV  infections.  The  Health  Department’s  Immunization  Program  has  partnered  with  the  Vermont  Child  Health  Improvement  Program  (VCHIP),  the  Vermont  chapter  of  the  American  Academy  of  Pediatrics  (AAP),  and  the  Hicks  Foundation  to  provide  information  to  parents  and  health  care  providers  about  the  importance  of  this  vaccine  for  cancer  prevention.  The  Vermont  Immunization  Registry  also  provides  detailed  quarterly  reports  to  health  care  provider  practices  on  their  HPV  immunization  rates.  7KH 1DWLRQDO ,PPXQL]DWLRQ 6XUYH\ Teen  is  conducted  each  year  by  the  Centers  for  Disease  Control  and  Prevention.  The  latest  report  was  released  on  July  31.  Overall  results  show  an  upward  trend  in  the  number  of  Vermont  teens  who  received  the  recommended  vaccines  HPV,  Tdap  (tetanus,  diphtheria,  SHUWXVVLV DQG PHQLQJRFRFFDO GLVHDVH LQ 7R ÂżQG RXW PRUH DERXW YDFFLQHV IRU WHHQV visit  www.healthvermont.gov  and  search  Immunizations  in  the  A  to  Z  guide. Â


+HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡ Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  21

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PAGE 22 — +HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ Addison Independent, Monday, October 5, 2015


+HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡ Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  23

Comprehensive Women’s Health Care "%%*40/ "440$*"5&4 */ 0#45&53*$4 "/% (:/&$0-0(: Focusing on optimal health throughout a woman’s life using modern practices to help you feel your best. Whatever your needs may be, you can trust our providers with your most sensitive concerns.

Anna Benvenuto, MD

UVM College of Medicine Member of American Association of Gynecological Laparoscopists

Katherine Wagner, MD, FACOG UVM College of Medicine

David Turner, MD

Dartmouth Medical School & Brown University School of Medicine

P O R T E R H O S P I TA L

IS PROUD TO ANNOUNCE 3D MAMMOGRAPHY Breast Cancer is the most common cancer among women, and 8 out of 9 women diagnosed with breast cancer have no family history.

Jodi Brown, DO

D.O. Midwestern Univ. Arizona College of Osteopathic Medicine

We collaborate with other clinicians – dieticians, physical therapists, psychotherapists, chiropractors – to address your health concerns in a holistic way.

OBSTETRICS   Optimal & individualized maternity care  t &BSMZ QSFHOBODZ BTTFTTNFOU DPNQSFIFOTJWF QSFOBUBM DBSF t 1SFHOBODZ UFTUJOH PCTUFUSJDBM VMUSBTPVOE t -BCPS TVQQPSU BOE EFMJWFSZ BU UIF GBNJMZ DFOUFSFE #JSUIJOH $FOUFS t 1PTU QBSUVN DBSF JODMVEJOH MBDUBUJPO TVQQPSU QPTU QBSUVN EFQSFTTJPO BOE GBNJMZ QMBOOJOH

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463(&3: State-of-the-art care and minimally invasive surgical techniques t -BQBSPTDPQZ GPS FOEPNFUSJPTJT PWBSJBO DZTUT TUFSJMJ[BUJPO t )ZTUFSFDUPNZ QFMWJD SFDPOTUSVDUJPO t Vulvar, vaginal and hymeneal procedures

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MAKE YOUR HOME SAFER FOR CHILDREN & PETS

Our new 3D Mammography Unit allows the Radiologist to see L@RRDR @MC CHRSNQSHNMR @RRNBH@SDC VHSG B@MBDQR RHFMHĹ°B@MSKX more clearly than conventional 2D mammography. 3D mammography detects 41% more invasive breast cancers and reduces false positives by UP TO 40%. This means one simple thing: early detection and improved accuracy.

“Women  age  40  and  older  should  have  a  mammogram  every  year  and  should  continue  to  do  so  for  as  long  as  they  are in  good  healthâ€?              â€“  American  Cancer  Society

FAQS

Q: How Does 3D technology work? A: By capturing multiple slices of the breast from several angles, creating a layered 3D image resulting in a more accurate diagnosis. Q: Is there additional compression? A: No additional compression is required. Q: Why do hospitals and doctors now recommend 3D mammography? A: This technology is clinically proven, and it’s the most accurate mammogram available. It is the biggest breakthrough in breast cancer detection in 30 years. Q: Will I be exposed to more radiation? A: Porter uses the lowest dose available for 3D mammography. Very little x-ray dose is used during the 3D mammography exam, just about the same as a standard 2D mammogram, @MC KNVDQ SG@M @ SQ@CHSHNM@K ŰKL L@LLNFQ@L The total patient dose is well within the FDA safety standards for mammography.

Call (802) 388-4757 for more info. or to schedule an appointment.

FREE CORDLESS LIFT SYSTEMS LIMITED  TIME  ONLY–  NOW  THROUGH  NOV.  30,  2015

UPGRADE  TO  CORDLESS  LIFT  AT  NO  EXTRA  CHARGE Cordless  Lift  is  a  desireable  safer  alternative  to  standard  cords  for  homes  with  children  and  pets,  and  contributes  to  a  seamless  clean  facade.  Offer  applies  to  Cellular,  Pleated,  Roman  and  Natural  Shades  as  well  as  Wood,  Faux  Wood,  and  Composite  Blinds.

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Porter Hospital Now Accepting Self-Requested Appointments for Screening Mammograms The Porter Hospital Radiology Department is now accepting “self-requesting appointmentsâ€? for screening mammograms from area women. Women may now call the Radiology Department directly at 388-4757 to schedule their screening mammogram. The Radiology Department representative will obtain from women who call the name of their primary care provider so that the results can be sent to the appropriate provider. The Radiology Department staff can also assist women who need to select a local primary care provider (if they do not currently have one) so that they can do so. It is our hope that the combination of this new scheduling option, combined VHSG NTQ MDVDRS RS@SD NE SGD @QS # L@LLNFQ@OGX TMHS VHKK AD RHFMHĹ°B@MS RSDOR forward to enhance these services for our community.

Porter Hospital’s new unit offers the lowest dose of radiation available in our region.


PAGE  24  â€”  +HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Welcoming New Patients Neshobe Family Medicine 61 Court Drive Brandon, VT 05733

Providing the highest quality care.

Providing Complete and Comprehensive Medical Care to People of all Ages Call for more information or to schedule an appointment (802) 247-3755

Premier  Oral  Surgery   â€“   Dental  Implants,  Wisdom  Teeth, Â

ĞŜƚĂů Ç†ĆšĆŒÄ‚Ä?Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ?Í• ŽŜÄž 'ĆŒÄ‚ĹŒĹ?ĹśĹ?Í• 'Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ?ǀĂů 'ĆŒÄ‚ĹŒĹ?ĹśĹ?Í• ĂŜĚ ^ĞĚĂĆ&#x;ŽŜ Neshobe welcomes

Thomas E. Beauregard, PA-C to our practice

William Barrett, MD

Carrie Wulfman, MD

Maria Cabri, ARPN

Scott M. Bowen

Charles R. Bowen

DMD, MD, MPH

DMD

Harvard School of Dental Medicine Harvard School of Public Health University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Harvard School of Dental Medicine Massachusetts General Hospital

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Addison Wellness, Inc. dba wells physical therapy

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+HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡ Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  25

Doctors now writing ‘Park Prescriptions’ WATERBURY  â€”  Following  doctor’s  orders  is  about  to  get  more  fun  thanks  to  a  new  initiative  announced  in  May  by  Gov.  Peter  Shumlin.  Under  the  new  â€œPark  Prescriptionâ€?  program,  physicians  around  the  state  will  prescribe  to  their  patients  time  outdoors  in  Vermont  State  Parks  as  a  way  to  promote  healthy  lifestyles  and  prevent  chronic  health  issues.   6L[WHHQ GRFWRUVÂś RIÂżFHV DURXQG 9HUPRQW will  issue  Park  Prescriptions,  which  will  entitle  patients  to  free  entry  at  any  Vermont  State  Park.  The  program  is  a  partnership  between  the  Vermont  State  Parks,  the  G o v e r n o r ’ s  Council  on  Physical  Fitness  and  Sports,  the  D e p a r t m e n t  of  Health,  and  physicians  across  Vermont. “We  all  know  that  the  one  of  the  best  ways  to  stay  healthy  is  to  stay  active,â€?  Gov.  Shumlin  said.  â€œLuckily  we  live  in  Vermont  and  SHUMLIN are  surrounded  by  natural  resources  that  make  staying  active  easy  and  fun.  So  listen  to  your  doctor  and  get  outside!â€? 7KH KHDOWK EHQHÂżWV RI SK\VLFDO DFWLYLW\ are  well  documented.  The  American  Heart  Association  suggests  at  least  150  minutes  per  week  of  moderate  exercise  to  help  prevent  heart  disease  and  stroke.  For  children,  outdoor  activity  is  especially  important.  According  to  the  National  Wildlife Â

STAYING  ACTIVE  KEEPS  us  healthy  and  prevents  chronic  health  issues,  so  doctors  are  prescribing  time  outdoors  in  Vemont  State  Parks  to  their  patiens. Photo  credit:  Metro  Services

Federation,  spending  time  outside  raises  levels  of  Vitamin  D,  helping  protect  children  from  future  bone  problems,  heart  disease,  diabetes,  and  other  health  issues.  According  to  the  Vermont  Department  of  Health,  in  2013  Vermont  high  school  students  with  60  minutes  of  physical  activity  on  all  of  the  past  seven  days  were  less  likely  to  be  obese  compared  to  the  state’s  average. “The  collective  support  of  Vermont  physicians  who  know  the  nearly  limitless  KHDOWK EHQHÂżWV RI LQFUHDVHG SK\VLFDO DFWLYLW\ especially  for  young  people,  will  only  add  to  our  reputation  as  one  of  the  healthiest  places Â

to  live  in  the  nation,  year  after  year,â€?  said  Health  Commissioner  Harry  Chen,  MD. Physicians  participating  in  the  Park  Prescription  program  include  David  Coddaire  in  Morrisville,  John  Leppman  in  Bellows  Falls,  Robert  Tortolani  in  Brattleboro,  Thomas  Curchin  in  Barre,  Harriet  Shea  in  Barre,  Paul  Laffal  in  Montpelier,  Barb  Frankowski  in  Burlington,  Alicia  Jacobs  in  Colchester,  and  Keith  Michl  in  Manchester  Center. “The  Park  Prescription  program  is  a  perfect  way  to  highlight  the  connection  between  outdoor  recreation  and  personal Â

health,â€?  said  Craig  Whipple,  Director  of  Vermont  State  Parks.  â€œSpending  time  outdoors,  connecting  with  nature  and  being  active  all  help  keep  us  strong  in  both  body  and  spirit.  And  state  parks  offer  the  ideal  settings  for  valuable  outdoor  time!â€? Vermont  consistently  ranks  among  one  of  the  nation’s  healthiest  states.  America’s  +HDOWK 5DQNLQJV ÂżQGV WKDW RYHUDOO 9HUPRQW is  the  second  healthiest  state  in  America.  And  the  2015  Seniors  Report  by  the  same  organization  recently  found  that  Vermont  is  now  the  healthiest  state  in  America  for  seniors.

Wellness Directory Azimuth Counseling & Therapeutic Services

Betsy Spannbauer Healing Touch Practitioner

Sally Sise

t Children t Adolescents

Katherine’s Retiring

t Adults t Parenting

Massage Therapist

Relief of:

s -IGRAINES s "ACK *OINT 0AIN s $EPRESSION !NXIETY Consider healing touch for most conditions BSHEALINGTOUCH AOL COM s www.crystalrosehealingcenter.com

ΠBMZW *ITIVKQVO

Π+ZIVQW[IKZIT <PMZIXa

Alison Hunt, LCMHC (802) 288-1001 Middlebury & Essex, VT

Vergennes, VT

877.3100

www.zerobalancing.com www.energyschool.com

See Alison’s profile on www.azimuthcounseling.org

It’s been a delight to work with all of you these past 20 years. I have enjoyed the opportunity to share Reflexology with you and I will miss the work. Thank you for letting me share my passion.

– Katherine


PAGE  26  â€”  +HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Stay on top of your fall allergies

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(BPT)  â€”  You  heard  all  about  the  worst  allergy  season  ever.  You  know  the  pollen  tsunami  swept  through  and  left  everyone  sneezing  and  wheezing  in  its  wake.  But  you  want  to  know  why  fall  is  here  and  you’re  still  miserable. “Although  spring,  summer  and  fall  have  different  sets  of  allergens  to  trip  up  allergy  and  asthma  sufferers,  they  can  cause  the  same  symptoms,â€?  says  allergist  Janna  Tuck,  M.D.,  Fellow  of  the  American  College  of  Allergy,  Asthma  and  Immunology  (ACAAI).  â€œThose  who  have  multiple  triggers  may  not  be  able  to  distinguish  between  what’s  causing  their  symptoms.  They  just  know  they’re  congested,  with  red  eyes  and  an  itchy  nose.â€? Ragweed  is  the  biggest  allergy  trigger  in  the  fall.  It  usually  starts  releasing  pollen  with  cool  nights  and  warm  days  in  August,  and  can  last  into  September  and  October.  And  the  majority  of  people  who  are  allergic  to  spring  plants  are  also  allergic  to  ragweed. So  what  can  you  do  to  manage  allergy  and  asthma  symptoms  in  the  fall?  Many  of  the  same  things  you  do  in  spring,  according  to  ACAAI. “The  most  important  reminder  is  to  start  taking  fall  allergy  medication  two  weeks  or  so  before  symptoms  usually  begin,â€?  says Â

Dr.  Tuck.  â€œYou  should  also  continue  your  PHGLFDWLRQ IRU WZR ZHHNV DIWHU WKH ÂżUVW IURVW Both  nasal  and  eye  symptoms  associated  with  ragweed  allergies  can  linger  after  pollen  is  no  longer  in  the  air.â€? Another  treatment  option  is  allergy  tablets,  available  for  grass  and  ragweed  pollens.  The  tablets  need  to  be  started  at  least  three  months  before  allergy  season  begins.  While  only  two  allergens  can  be  treated  with  this  method,  it  may  be  a  good  option  for  grass  and  ragweed  allergies  not  controlled  with  other  medications.  Talk  with  your  allergist  to  see  if  this  option  is  right  for  you.  If  not,  allergy  shots  are  a  tried  and  true  method  of  relief. What  else  can  you  do  about  fall  allergy  symptoms? 7KH ÂżUVW OLQH RI GHIHQVH LV WR DYRLG WULJJHUV After  spending  time  outdoors,  shower,  change  and  wash  your  clothes.  While  working  RXWGRRUV ZHDU D ÂżOWHU PDVN %H VXUH WR DOVR keep  your  car  and  home  windows  closed.  If  you  do  go  outside,  wear  a  hat  and  sunglasses  to  keep  pollen  out  of  your  eyes. If  you  suffer  from  any  seasonal  allergies,  \RXU EHVW EHW LV WR VHH D ERDUG FHUWLÂżHG allergist.  Allergists  are  trained  to  diagnose  and  treat  your  symptoms,  and  to  work  with  you  to  create  an  individual  action  plan.

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Excerise  (Continued  from  Page  20) research  assistant  professor  in  the  College  of  Engineering  and  Mathematical  Sciences,  Dianna  Murray-­Close,  associate  professor  in  psychology,  and  psychiatry  professor  James  J.  Hudziak,  who  has  published  extensively  on  the  positive  effects  of  exercise  on  mental  health  outcomes,  say  they  hope  their  paper  increases Â

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the  consideration  of  exercise  programs  as  part  of  the  public  health  approach  to  reduce  suicidal  behavior  in  all  adolescents. “Considering  the  often  catastrophic  and  long  lasting  consequences  of  bullying  in  school-­ aged  children,  novel,  accessible  interventions  for  victims  of  such  conduct  are  sorely  needed,â€?  they  conclude.


+HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ ‡ Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  27

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PAGE 28 — +HDOWK :HOO EHLQJ Addison Independent, Monday, October 5, 2015


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  29

MONDAY

SPORTS

02817 $%5$+$0 81,21 +LJK 6FKRRO MXQLRU +DQQDK :DKO FHQWHUV D SDVV GXULQJ )ULGD\¶V ORVV WR 0RXQW 0DQV¿HOG

Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Tiger  boys  soccer  wins  on  road Â

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$'',621 &2817< ² 0RXQW $EUDKDP HGJHG 9HU-­ JHQQHV WR KLJKOLJKW ORFDO KLJK VFKRRO ER\V¶ VRFFHU DFWLRQ ODWH ODVW ZHHN ,Q RWKHU JDPHV 0LG-­ GOHEXU\ ZRQ RQ WKH URDG EXW 2W-­ WHU 9DOOH\ GURSSHG D URDG FRQWHVW EAGLES,  1-­0 2Q )ULGD\ Charlie  Meyer  FRQYHUWHG D ¿UVW KDOI IHHG IURP  Caleb  Bonvouloir  DQG JRDOLH  Nick  Szczecinski VHYHQ VDYHV DQG WKH (DJOH GHIHQVH PDGH WKDW VWULNH VWDQG XS IRU D YLFWRU\ 7KH (DJOHV VQDSSHG D WKUHH JDPH ZLQOHVV VWUHDN D ORVV DQG WZR VFRUHOHVV WLHV DQG LPSURYHG WR 9HUJHQQHV IHOO WR GHVSLWH JRDOLH Antonio  Ruggiero’s QLQH VDYHV TIGERS  WIN $OVR RQ )ULGD\ WKH 7LJHUV EODQNHG KRVW 0LVVLVTXRL DV WKH (See  Soccer,  Page  30)

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Mount  $EH ¿HOG hockey  falls  to  MMU,  2-­0 By  ANDY  KIRKALDY BRISTOL  â€”  Two  high  school  ¿HOG KRFNH\ WHDPV WKDW KDG JHQHU-­ DWHG VRPH UHFHQW PRPHQWXP PHW DW 0RXQW $EUDKDP WKLV SDVW )ULGD\ DQG LW ZDV 0RXQW 0DQV¿HOG QRW WKH KRVW (DJOHV WKDW NHSW PRYLQJ IRU-­ ZDUG 7KH 'LYLVLRQ , &RXJDUV XVHG VSHHG DQG VROLG GHIHQVH WR VWUHWFK WKHLU XQEHDWHQ VWUHDN WR ¿YH JDPHV ZLWK D YLFWRU\ 7KH (D-­ JOHV ZKR KDG ZRQ WZR RI WKHLU SDVW WKUHH ² LQFOXGLQJ D ZLQ DW 0LG-­ GOHEXU\ WZR GD\V EHIRUH ² GURSSHG WR &RDFK 0DU\ 6WHWVRQ VDLG WR VXF-­ FHHG DJDLQVW 008 RQ )ULGD\ WKH (DJOHV QHHGHG WKH IRFXV DQG LQ-­ WHQVLW\ VKH EHOLHYHG WKH\ VKRZHG LQ VWUHWFKHV EXW QRW IRU WKH HQWLUH JDPH ³7KDW¶V ZK\ WKH JDPH LV PLQ-­ XWHV ORQJ DQG WKDW¶V ZKDW ZH QHHG WR NHHS LQ PLQG ´ 6WHWVRQ VDLG 7KH &RXJDUV PLJKW KDYH KDG D (See  Eagles,  Page  30)

Eagles,  Tigers  and  Otters  tally  victories TIGERS  BY  TWO 2Q )ULGD\ WKH 7LJHUV ERXQFHG EDFN WR GHIHDW YLVLWLQJ &ROFKHVWHU Makayla  Foster VFRUHG WZLFH DQG FHQWHU PLG Tajah  Marsden ZKR PLVVHG WKH 0RXQW $EH JDPH ZLWK DQ LOOQHVV WDOOLHG WKH RWKHU JRDO Lily  Smith DQG Lauren  Bartlett DGGHG DVVLVWV ZKLOH %LOO-­ LQJV DQG &KLFRLQH WHDPHG XS IRU WKUHH VDYHV DV WKH 7LJHUV VQDSSHG D VL[ JDPH VOLGH DQG LPSURYHG WR *RDOLHV $EE\ /DGG DQG 0DGL-­ VRQ 0DUWLQ FRPELQHG IRU VDYHV IRU WKH ZLQOHVV /DNHUV OTTERS 2Q 6DWXUGD\ 29 VWUHQJWKHQHG LWV KROG RQ VHFRQG SODFH LQ ' ,, E\ HGJLQJ WKHQ WKLUG SODFH :RRGVWRFN Alyssa  Falco VFRUHG WKH JRDO ODWH LQ WKH ¿UVW KDOI ZLWK DQ DV-­ VLVW IURP Maia  Edmunds *RDOLH Myliah  McDonough PDGH VDYHV LQ WKH VKXWRXW DQG GHIHQGHU Sophie  Bloomer PDGH D GHIHQVLYH VDYH DV 29 LPSURYHG WR

TIGER  SENIOR  TAJAH  Marsden  sweeps  around  two  Colchester  de-­ IHQGHUV ODVW )ULGD\ DIWHUQRRQ 0DUVGHQ WDOOLHG RQH JRDO LQ 0LGGOHEXU\¶V ZLQ Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

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PAGE  30  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Tigers  best  Hornets,  34-­27 Season  winning  streak  grows  to  6-­0  By  ANDY  KIRKALDY  0,''/(%85< ² ,W JRW XQ-­ comfortable  at  the  end,  but  the  Middlebury  Union  High  School  football  team  defeated  visiting  'LYLVLRQ , ULYDO (VVH[ RQ )ULGD\ WR LPSURYH WR WKLV IDOO and  move  the  program’s  winning  VWUHDN WR JDPHV 7KH 7LJHUV OHG E\ ZLWK WR JR EXW WKH +RUQHWV XVHG DQ LQWHUFHSWLRQ DQG DQ RQVLGH NLFN UH-­ covery  to  create  some  late  suspense  EHIRUH 7LJHU VHQLRU &KDVH 0HVVQHU LQWHUFHSWHG (VVH[ TXDUWHUEDFN (OL 'L*UDQGH DV WLPH H[SLUHG “We  thought  we  had  it  put  away,  DQG WKH\ MXVW NHSW ÂżJKWLQJ ´ VDLG 08+6 FRDFK 'HQQLV 6PLWK “That’s  a  great  team,  Essex,  they  MXVW NHHS ZRUNLQJ 7KH\ ZHUH ULJKW there  at  the  end,  and  it  was  a  little  FORVHU WKDQ , OLNHG LW ´ Essex  has  been  competitive  all  VHDVRQ EXW GURSSHG WR 7KH +RUQHWV DOVR VFRUHG RQ WKHLU ÂżUVW SRVVHVVLRQ WR WDNH D OHDG DW RI WKH ÂżUVW TXDUWHU PDUFKLQJ

\DUGV RQ HLJKW UXQQLQJ SOD\V /LDP &RXOWHU ZKR OHG WKH +RU-­ QHWV ZLWK FDUULHV IRU \DUGV capped  the  drive  with  an  11-­yard  burst.  The  Tigers,  meanwhile,  were  on  the  verge  of  going  nowhere  on  their  second  possession  after  punt-­ ing  into  a  strong  north  wind  in  their  ¿UVW GULYH $ SHQDOW\ RQ WKH NLFN UH-­ WXUQ SXW WKHP RQ WKHLU \DUG OLQH DQG WKH\ IDFHG WKLUG DQG 7KHQ FDPH D NH\ SOD\ LQ WKH JDPH 7KH 7LJHUV IDNHG D UXQ DQG TXDUWHUEDFN 2DNOH\ *RUGRQ IRXQG tight  end  Sawyer  Ryan  crossing  WKH ÂżHOG EHKLQG WKH (VVH[ VHFRQG-­ DU\ 5\DQ WRRN WKH EDOO LQ VWULGH and  outraced  the  Hornets  down  the  ULJKW VLGHOLQH IRU DQ \DUG WRXFK-­ GRZQ 7KH ÂżUVW RI IRXU *RUGRQ SRLQWV DIWHU PDGH LW Smith  said  just  not  punting  into  the  wind  from  the  end  zone  was  critical,  and  instead  the  score  was  tied.  â€œWe  were  in  a  big  hole,  and  not  only  a  hole,  but  the  wind  was  in  our  face,â€?  he  said. After  that  opening  drive,  the  Tigers  also  allowed  the  Hornets  RQO\ RQH PRUH ÂżUVW GRZQ XQWLO WKH fourth  quarter. Â

Âł'HIHQVLYHO\ ZH KDG WR PDNH some  adjustments,  but  once  we  VHWWOHG LQ , WKRXJKW ZH GLG SUHWW\ well,â€?  Smith  said. ,Q WKH VHFRQG TXDUWHU WKH 7LJHUV PRYHG \DUGV WR PDNH LW a  score  that  stood  at  the  half.  The  7LJHUV ZHUH IRUWXQDWH DV 1LFN &RH DQG 3DUNHU *URVV UHFRYHUHG IXP-­ EOHV RQ WKH PDUFK %LJ SOD\V ZHUH D \DUG FRPSOHWLRQ WR 0HVVQHU IRU D ÂżUVW GRZQ DW PLGÂżHOG DQG D \DUG 7UH\ .DXIPDQQ UXQ WR WKH (VVH[ )RXU SOD\V ODWHU -HUU\ Niemo  punched  it  in  from  the  1.  The  Tigers  dominated  the  third  TXDUWHU VFRULQJ WZLFH 7KH ÂżUVW FDPH DW RQ D \DUG .DXIPDQQ run  set  up  by  two  big  pass  plays,  RQH D \DUGHU WR 5\DQ IURP +RU-­ net  territory  â€”  Smith  noted  play-­ action  passes  were  effective  vs.  the  Hornet  defense  â€”  and  the  other  a  \DUG VLGHOLQH WRVV WR *URVV RXW RI WKH EDFNÂżHOG RQ IRXUWK DQG IURP WKH (VVH[ The  second  came  after  a  Hornet  SXQW 1LHPR EURNH D \DUG UXQ LQ WKH TXDUWHUÂśV ÂżQDO PLQXWH Held  to  seven  points  through  MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  senior  quarterback  Oakley  Gordon  WKUHH TXDUWHUV (VVH[ VFRUHG cuts  up  between  two  falling  Essex  defenders  Friday  night  in  Middlebury.  (See  Football,  Page  31) The  Tigers  won  the  game,  34-­27. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Soccer  (Continued  from  Page  29) 08+6 GHIHQVH KHOG WKH 7 %LUGV WR four  shots  on  goalie  Wilder  Perera.  Jonathon  Fitzcharles  and  Owen  Hammel  scored  the  goals,  and  Drew  Barnicle  had  in  an  assist  as  the  Tigers  won  for  the  third  time  in  four  outings  DQG LPSURYHG WR 6KDQH /DURFKH PDGH VHYHQ VDYHV IRU 098 OTTERS  FALL 2Q 6DWXUGD\ KRVW :RRGVWRFN LP-­ SURYHG WR E\ EHDWLQJ WKH 2WWHUV 29 PDQDJHG IRXU VKRWV RQ JRDO one  of  which  by  MacGregor  Shan-­ non  found  the  net.  The  Otters  dropped  WR

ScoreBOARD

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Field Hockey 9/30  Mt.  Abe  vs.  MUHS  ...........................2-­0 0W 0DQVÂżHOG YV 0W $EH  ................2-­0 08+6 YV &ROFKHVWHU  ......................3-­1 29 DW :RRGVWRFN  .............................1-­0 Football 10/2  MUHS  vs.  Essex  ..........................34-­27 10/2  OV  vs.  U-­32  .................................55-­14 %XUU %XUWRQ YV 0W $EH  ..............35-­8 Girls’ Soccer 0W $EH YV 5LFH  ...............................4-­1 10/1  MUHS  vs.  VUHS  .............................3-­1 10/2  Mt.  Abe  vs.  VUHS  ............................2-­1 10/3  MUHS  vs.  Missisquoi  .......................4-­0 Boys’ Soccer 10/2  MUHS  vs.  Missisquoi  .......................2-­0 :RRGVWRFN YV 29  ...........................6-­1 COLLEGE SPORTS Field Hockey 0LGG YV 6NLGPRUH  ..........................2-­1 0LGG YV &ROE\  ................................6-­2 0LGG YV 53,  ...................................6-­1 Men’s Soccer 0LGG YV &ROE\  ................................3-­0 Football 0LGG YV &ROE\  ..............................28-­9

02817 $%5$+$0 81,21 +LJK 6FKRRO VHQLRU 'DQLHOOH %DFKDQG FKDUJHV WRZDUG WKH 0RXQW 0DQV¿HOG JRDO Friday  afternoon  in  Bristol. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Eagles  (Continued  from  Page  29) VOLJKW HGJH LQ SOD\ RYHU WKH ÂżUVW minutes  of  the  game,  but  the  Eagles  gained  territory,  too.  Senior  center  PLGÂżHOGHU 'DQLHOOH %DFKDQG DQG VH-­ nior  Ashley  Turner  and  junior  Mar-­ JDUHW 0RRG\ RQ WKH PLGÂżHOG Ă€DQNV DOO ZRUNHG ZHOO WR GLVUXSW WKH &RX-­ gars  and  create  chances.  6HUYHV E\ %DFKDQG DQG 0RRG\ created  penalty  corners,  and  senior  GHIHQVLYH FHQWUDO PLGÂżHOGHU (O-­ lie  Gevry  created  an  anxious  mo-­ PHQW IRU WKH &RXJDUV ZLWK D GULYH

into  the  circle.  Turner  also  helped  the  defense  of  senior  Macey  Ross  and  sophomores  Emily  Aldrich  and  Robyn  Arena  by  carrying  the  ball  out  of  trouble. Stetson  said  her  defense  played  well,  and  is  becoming  a  team  strength.   â€œThe  whole  team  needed  to  be  strong  to  the  ball  today,  and  we  ZHUHQÂśW ´ 6WHWVRQ VDLG Âł%XW , GR WKLQN RXU GHIHQVH LV GHYHORSLQJ DQG Ă€H[LQJ LWV PXVFOHV DQG PDN-­ LQJ WKLQJV GLIÂżFXOW IRU RWKHU SHRSOH

They  had  a  nice  game  today.â€? 7KH &RXJDUV FDPH RQ VWURQJ DIWHU DQ 008 WLPHRXW DW %HIRUH KDOIWLPH (DJOH VHQLRU JRDOLH 'DQL-­ HOOH 0RUVH ÂżYH VDYHV VWRSSHG D Shannon  Springer  one-­timer  from  close  range,  came  out  to  cut  the  angle  down  on  Perry  Willett  at  the  right  post,  and  denied  a  Springer  bid  from  the  top  of  the  circle. 7KH &RXJDUV NHSW WKH KHDW RQ DI-­ WHU WKH EUHDN DQG HDUQHG D SHQDOW\ corner  two  minutes  in.  Morse  made  a  save  on  Maeve  Poleman,  but  the Â

Eagles  couldn’t  clear,  and  Springer  NQRFNHG LQ WKH UHERXQG DW $W 6SULQJHU VWUXFN DJDLQ this  time  one-­timing  a  Poleman  cross  from  the  right  side  into  the  lower  left  corner. The  Eagles  began  to  come  to  life  offensively  down  the  stretch,  but  found  it  hard  to  line  up  shots  against  WKH 008 GHIHQVH %DFKDQG FRQWLQ-­ XHG WR VWLFNKDQGOH HIIHFWLYHO\ 7XUQHU carried  the  ball  into  the  circle  twice,  Gevry  had  another  solid  serve,  for-­ ZDUG -DFNLH 5HLVV WKUHDWHQHG ZLWK PLQXWHV WR JR DQG 0RRG\ IRUFHG 008 JRDOLH -HVV 3HXUD WR PDNH KHU only  save  with  about  11  minutes  to  JR ZKHQ VKH ÂżUHG RQ WKH FDJH DIWHU winning  the  ball  in  a  scramble. %XW 6WHWVRQ VDLG VKH VDZ WRR OLWWOH RI WKDW DFWLRQ DJDLQVW WKH &RXJDUV “When  we  possess  and  execute  our  game  plan,  we’re  a  tough  team  WR EHDW ´ 6WHWVRQ VDLG Âł$QG , WKLQN today  we  just  never  got  in  a  rhythm  to  execute  our  game  plan.â€? On  the  other  hand,  she  also  re-­ called  the  strong  efforts  in  the  recent  ZLQV RYHU 08+6 DQG &KDPSODLQ Valley.  ³,I ZH GHFLGH WKDW ZH FRPH SUH-­ SDUHG PHQWDOO\ DQG SK\VLFDOO\ , WKLQN ZHÂśUH DEOH WR FRPSHWH ZLWK HY-­ ery  team  that  we  face,â€?  Stetson  said. And,  as  always,  the  Eagles  are  D 'LYLVLRQ ,, WHDP SOD\LQJ D ' , VFKHGXOH LQ WKH 0HWUR &RQIHUHQFH 7KHLU RQO\ ' ,, JDPH WKLV \HDU ZDV D KLJKO\ FRPSHWLWLYH ORVV DW 8 ² DQG WKH 5DLGHUV DUH DQG HDVLO\ LQ ÂżUVW SODFH LQ ' ,, Stetson  said  she  remains  opti-­ mistic  about  her  team’s  prospects  regardless  of  its  win-­loss  record  the  rest  of  the  way,  and  long  as  the  Eagles  remember  the  nature  of  their  schedule.  â€œThey  can’t  let  themselves  ZHDU GRZQ PHQWDOO\ ´ VKH VDLG Âł,W will  be  how  well  they  come  through  this.â€?


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  31

Otter  football  tops  Raiders ($67 02173(/,(5 ² 7KH 2W-­ ter  Valley  Union  High  School  foot-­ ball  team  on  Friday  knocked  off  a  challenger  for  the  Division  III  regu-­ lar  season  title  and  top  playoff  seed  by  defeating  previously  unbeaten  host  U-­32,  55-­14. 29 LPSURYHG WR ZLWK WZR more  games  left  before  the  playoffs,  ZKLOH WKH 5DLGHUV GURSSHG WR 7KH 2WWHUV ZLOO YLVLW ' ,, 0RXQW Abraham  (2-­4)  this  Saturday  and  KRVW ' ,,, ULYDO 0LOO 5LYHU under  temporary  lights  at  7  p.m.  on  6DWXUGD\ 2FW $JDLQVW WKH 5DLGHUV WKLV SDVW )UL-­ GD\ 29 TXDUWHUEDFN &DUVRQ /HDU\ ran  for  268  yards  and  six  touch-­ GRZQV DOO LQ WKH ¿UVW WKUHH TXDUWHUV to  help  lead  the  way.  Leary  found  the  end  zone  from  IRXU \DUGV RXW RQ 2WWHU 9DOOH\œV ¿UVW

drive  and  added  scoring  runs  of  1,  3,  10,  51  and  75  yards. Also  providing  touchdowns  for  29 ZHUH 7\VRQ &UDP RQ D \DUG kick  return  and  Brent  Nickerson  on  a  5-­yard  run.  8 VFRUHG WZLFH LQ WKH ÂżUVW KDOI Colby  Brochu,  who  rushed  for  119  yards,  picked  up  one  touchdown,  DQG TXDUWHUEDFN 0DWW *UHHQH ZKR threw  for  113  yards,  tossed  a  40-­ yard  TD  pass  to  Devin  Hanson.   Brochu’s  score  tied  the  game  a  7-­7,  but  Cram  returned  the  kickoff  WR JLYH 29 WKH OHDG IRU JRRG /HDU\ scored  his  second  touchdown  on  the  QH[W 29 SRVVHVVLRQ 7KH 5DLGHUV made  it  21-­14,  only  to  see  Leary’s  \DUG URPS SXVK 29ÂśV OHDG WR 29 OHG DW WKH KDOI RQ DQ-­ other  Leary  run,  and  added  20  points  in  the  second  half. Â

(DJOHV ZLQQLQJ VWUHDN HQGV %5,672/ ² 7KH XQGHIHDWHG %XUU &  Burton  Academy  football  team  on  Saturday  in  Bristol  snapped  the  0RXQW $EUDKDP 9HUJHQQHV VTXDGœV two-­game  winning  streak,  35-­8.  Although  the  Eagles  intercepted  standout  Bulldog  quarterback  Grif-­ ¿Q 6WDOFXS WKUHH WLPHV 6WDOFXS still  threw  for  three  scores  and  ran  IRU D IRXUWK DV %%$ KHOG RQWR ¿UVW place  in  Division  II  at  6-­0.  The  D-­II  Eagles  dropped  to  2-­4  and  will  host  another  undefeated  team  this  com-­ LQJ 6DWXUGD\ 2WWHU 9DOOH\ WKH ¿UVW place  team  in  D-­III.  Stalcup  tossed  touchdown  passes  WR 5D\ *RUPOH\ &RG\ 5REHUWV DQG Sean  Apps,  while  Kevin  Gormley  had  a  rushing  TD  for  the  Bulldogs,  who  led  at  the  half,  28-­0.  But  Eagle  coach  Lee  Hodsden  noted  the  35  points  were  the  second-­ fewest  BBA  has  scored  so  far  this  7,*(5 -81,25 75(< .DXIPDQQ ¿QGV VRPH UXQQLQJ URRP DJDLQVW (VVH[ ODVW )ULGD\ QLJKW 0LGGOHEXU\ ZRQ WKH JDPH ,QGHSHQGHQW SKRWR 7UHQW &DPSEHOO

Football  (Continued  from  Page  30) in  the  fourth.  Smith  said  it  was  a  combination  of  the  Hornets  refusal  to  quit  and  the  Tigers’  personnel  and  approach.  â€œWe  started  subbing  some  guys,  and  they  just  made  some  big  plays,â€?  Smith  said.  â€œAnd  we  just  got  kind  of  lackadaisical.â€? DiGrande  (eight  carries  for  65  yards)  also  began  to  run  more  ef-­ fectively  during  a  51-­yard  march  to  open  the  fourth  quarter  that  end-­ ed  with  Elliot  Boutin  scoring  on  fourth-­and-­goal  from  the  Tiger  2  at  6:19.  Gordon  blocked  the  extra  point,  and  it  was  28-­13.  Gordon  then  returned  the  kick-­ off  about  60  yards  to  the  Essex  26.  Four  plays  later  Gross  broke  sev-­ eral  tackles  to  score  on  an  18-­yard  run  on  fourth-­and-­two  to  make  it  34-­14  at  4:12. Next,  Essex  marched  60  yards  in  seven  plays  â€”  including  a  33-­ \DUG 'L*UDQGH UXQ DQG KLV ÂżUVW

two  completed  passes  of  the  night,  both  to  tight  end  Colby  Trudeau  â€”  to  score  again,  this  time  on  3-­yard  Boutin  run  at  1:55.  When  Liam  Smith  recovered  the  Essex  onside  kick,  the  game  looked  over.  But  Nick  Fagnant  intercepted  Gordon  and  raced  35  yards  to  the  Tiger  23.  A  17-­yard  screen  pass  moved  the  ball  to  the  5,  and  from  there  DiGrande  hit  Trudeau  in  the  end  zone,  and  it  was  34-­27.  Di-­ *UDQGH ÂżQLVKHG IRXU IRU SDVV-­ ing  for  40  yards.  And  this  time,  Boutin  recovered  the  onside  kick  for  Essex  this  time  DW PLGÂżHOG :LWK VHFRQGV to  go,  time  was  left  for  a  couple  plays. %XW WKH 7LJHUV GHĂ€HFWHG 'L-­ *UDQGHÂśV GRZQÂżHOG SDVV 0HVVQHU snared  the  ball  before  it  hit  the  turf,  ran  a  few  steps  and  took  a  knee  as  time  expired. In  all,  the  Tigers  outgained  the  Hornets,  358-­231.  Niemo  led  the Â

rushers  with  68  yards  in  three  at-­ tempts,  followed  by  Kaufmann,  50  yards  on  11  carries,  and  Gross,  45  yards  on  11  rushes.  Gordon  com-­ SOHWHG ÂżYH RI DWWHPSWV IRU yards.  Smith  found  things  to  like  after-­ ward.  â€œIt  seems  like  as  the  season’s  gone  on  we’re  executing  better  of-­ fensively  and  we  are  getting  the  big  plays,â€?  he  said.  â€œCertain  guys  are  stepping  up  and  taking  the  roles  of  the  guys  who  left  from  last  year.â€? Still,  he  would  like  to  see  some  other  players  improve  to  provide  more  depth,  and  mentioned  the  interior  running  game  didn’t  func-­ tion  as  well  as  he  would  have  liked  on  Friday.  â€œI’m  happy.  We’re  6-­0.  We’re  getting  better,â€?  he  said.  â€œWe’ve  still  got  room  for  improvement.â€? Andy  Kirkaldy  may  be  reached  at  andyk@addisonindependent.com.

season.  â€œThe  kids  played  hard  for  sure  and  gave  it  their  best  effort,â€?  Hodsden  said.  Hodsden  said  the  Eagles  were  also  able  to  move  the  ball,  but  mistakes  ended  a  few  long  drives.  He  cred-­ LWHG WKH (DJOH OLQH ² -RVK 5RVFRH -DFN (LVHQKRZHU 0DWW 0XOOLQ .\OH 3HDUVDOO %URF &ODUN DQG WLJKW HQG Bradley  Sturtevant  â€”  with  some  good  work.  Anthony  Warner,  Trevon  Smith  DQG -HE +RGVGHQ SLFNHG RII SDVVHV and  Hodsden  scored  on  a  41-­yard  run  in  the  fourth  quarter.  QB  Cole-­ PDQ 5XVVHOO WKHQ WKUHZ WKH WZR point  conversion  to  Devon  Kimball.  2YHUDOO 5XVVHOO FRPSOHWHG RI 28  passes  for  108  yards,  including  ¿YH FRPSOHWLRQV WR 6WXUWHYDQW IRU \DUGV 5\DQ 3DTXLQ OHG WKH EDOOFDUUL-­ ers  with  20  rushes  for  86  yards. Â

Tigers,  Eagles  win  in  girls’  soccer $'',621 &2817< ² 7KH 0LGGOHEXU\ DQG 0RXQW $EUDKDP union  high  school  girls’  soccer  teams  picked  up  local  rival  wins  over  Ver-­ gennes  in  local  games  late  last  week,  when  during  other  games  the  Eagles  and  Tigers  picked  up  road  victories.  MUHS  OVER  VUHS 2Q 7KXUVGD\ WKH 7LJHUV UDOOLHG SDVW the  visiting  Commodores,  3-­1.  After  D VFRUHOHVV ÂżUVW KDOI 98+6 IRUZDUG Felicia  Armell  took  advantage  of  an  08+6 PLVFXH IRXU PLQXWHV LQWR WKH second  half  to  break  in  alone  on  Tiger  second-­half  goalie  Riley  Fenster  and  put  the  Commodores  on  top.  Hannah  Buttolph  knotted  the  score  two  minutes  later  during  a  scramble  in  the  VUHS  box.  An-­ other  seven  minutes  later,  Kelsey  Smith  took  a  Payton  Buxton  feed  DW PLGÂżHOG DQG ZHQW LQWR WR PDNH LW 2-­1.  With  six  minutes  to  go,  Helen  Anderson  added  an  insurance  goal  from  Andi  Boe.  Fenster  and  Molly  Campbell  each  stopped  one  shot  IRU 08+6 DQG 98+6 JRDOLH Anya  Sonwaldt  made  seven  saves. EAGLES  WIN 2Q )ULGD\ WKH (DJOHV HGJHG WKH Commodores,  2-­1,  with  all  three  JRDOV FRPLQJ LQ WKH ÂżUVW KDOI Er-­

nesta  McIntosh’s  goal  in  the  32nd  minute  broke  a  1-­1  tie  and  held  up  as  WKH JDPH ZLQQHU (DUOLHU /\GLD 3LWWV KDG JLYHQ 0RXQW $EH D OHDG EXW Ciara  McClay  had  knotted  the  score  shortly  afterward.   Kamille  Snell  made  six  saves  for  as  the  Eagles  improved  to  4-­6.  Son-­ waldt  stopped  nine  shots  as  the  Com-­ modores  dropped  to  3-­6-­1. RICE  TOPS  EAGLES 2Q 7KXUVGD\ WKH (DJOHV VXUSULVHG 'LYLVLRQ , 5LFH RQ WKH URDG ZLWK JRDOV IURP 3LWWV 0F,QWRVK  Stacy  Sa-­ bourin  and $EE\ 0DQVÂżHOG.  Sarah  Boland  scored  for  the  4-­4  Green  .QLJKWV ZKR VXIIHUHG WKHLU ÂżUVW ORVV to  a  D-­II  side.  TIGERS  TIP  T-­BIRDS 2Q 6DWXUGD\ WKH 7LJHUV EODQNHG KRVW 0LVVLVTXRL 7KH 08+6 GHIHQVH GLG QRW DOORZ D VKRW on  either  Campbell  or  Fenster,  who  again  shared  time  in  net.  Hannah  Lawrence  scored  the  Tigers’  second  JRDO LQ WKH ÂżUVW KDOI DVVLVWHG E\ Kess  Moulton,  and  added  the  second  of  the  Tigers’  two  second-­half  goals,  with  an  assist  from  Smith.  Buttolph,  from  Boe,  and  Anderson  also  found  the  net  IRU 08+6 098 JRDOLH -HQQD %RX-­ dreau  made  19  saves.


PAGE  32  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUND

Addison County’s Humane Society MACK -­ 10  yrs,  Neutered  Male,  Chocolate  Lab  Mix.  Mack  is  a  loving  older  dog  who  was  surrendered  with  his  friend  Havrick  because  their  living  situation  was  unsafe.  He  is  used  to  family  life  and  has  lived  with  children  and  his  canine  companion  all  his  life  so  he  should  adapt  well  to  many  different  home  environments.  He  has  no  experience  with  cats  but  doesn’t  seem  to  mind  those  he  has  met  at  the  shelter. HAVRICK -­ 10  yrs,  Neutered  Male,  Chocolate  Lab  Mix,  Havrick  is  a  delightful  older  dog  who  was  surrendered  with  is  friend  Mack  because  their  living  situation  was  unsafe.  He  is  sweet,  shy,  and  gets  along  well  with  other  animals  and  kids.  He  has  not  lived  with  cats  before  but  seems  unfazed  by  them  at  the  shelter. Â

BOBBY SUE -­ 1  year,  Spayed  female,  DSH,  Black  with  White.   Bobby  Sue  is  a  very  sweet,  affectionate,  playful  gal.   She  is  very  curious,  and  her     kitten-­like  antics  with  have  you  in  hysterics!   If  you  are  looking  for  a  kitty  who  will  follow  you  around  and  keep  you  amused,  this  is  the  gal  for  you!

HOWIE -­  2  years,  Neutered  Male,  DSH,  Grey  with  White.  Howie  is  looking  for  a  barn  type  environment  where  he  can  enjoy  his  adventures  while  having  a  warm  place  to  sleep  and  relax.   He  is  used  to  living  inside,  but  longs  for  the  great  outdoors!   Howie  would  like  a  snuggly  bed  or  a  heated  area  to  keep  him  cozy  as  he  transitions  to  an  outdoor  lifestyle.

Pet Pages Keep pets away from pesticides (MS)  â€”  Homeowners  use  pesti-­ cides  in  their  yards  for  a  variety  of  reasons.  Some  utilize  pesticides  to  make  their  lawns  appear  lush  and  healthy,  while  others  must  use  pesti-­ cides  to  address  issues  like  insect  infestations. Applying  pesticides  is  often  frowned  upon  by  environmentalists,  but  it’s  not  just  Mother  Earth  who  can  suffer  from  the  use  of  pesti-­ cides.  If  your  family  pet  loves  to  get  outdoors  and  run  around  in  the  yard,  you  might  be  putting  your  four-­ legged  friend  in  danger  if  you’re  not  careful  when  applying  pesticides.  Exposure  to  pesticides  can  make  pets  sick  and,  in  some  instances,  prove  fatal.  But  pet  owners  can  reduce  that  ULVN VLJQLÂż FDQWO\ E\ DGKHULQJ WR WKH following  tips. *  Remove  pets  and  their  items  from  the  lawn  before  applying  pesti-­ cide.  It’s  a  no-­brainer  to  move  Fido  inside  before  applying  pesticide  to  your  lawn.  But  homeowners  should  also  scour  the  yard  for  toys,  bedding  and  feeding  dishes  and  move  them Â

Serving the Community Since 1940 “Cats are connoisseurs of comfort!� – James Herriot

MIDDLEBURY  â€”  Homeward  Bound,  Addison  County’s  Humane  Society,  has  a  â€œSupersize  Meâ€?  adop-­ tion  promotion  for  selected  cats  in  October.  From  Oct.  6-­31,  anyone  who  adopts  one  of  these  select  shel-­ ter  cats  will  have  the  cost  of  a  second  cat  with  an  equal  or  lesser  adoption  fee  waived. Homeward  Bound  Executive  Director  Jessica  Danyow  is  hoping  that  this  special  deal  will  sweeten  the  pot  for  many  would-­be  adopters  and  boost  adoptions.  â€œWe  always  have  a  wide  variety  of  cats  at  the  shelter. Â

KITTENS -­  Spayed  Females  and  Neutered  Males  â€“-­  of  all  colors  and  personalities!   All  kittens  adopted  from  Homeward  Bound  are  spayed/neutered,  have  received  their  initial  vaccinations,  and  have  been  seen  by  a  veterinarian.   Stop  by  and  meet  your  new  furry  friend. Â

Call or check our website. We may have a pet for you. ‡ ZZZ KRPHZDUGERXQGDQLPDOV RUJ %RDUGPDQ 6WUHHW 0LGGOHEXU\

0RVW SHRSOH FDQ Âż QG H[DFWO\ ZKDW they  are  looking  for  because  we  have  so  many  to  choose  from.  It’s  the  season  for  snuggling  and  we  hope  this  special  will  encourage  folks  to  take  an  extra  look  at  our  sweet  cats.â€? The  shelter  is  located  at  236  Boardman  St.  in  Middlebury  and  is  open  from  noon  to  5  p.m.,  Tuesday-­ Saturday,  with  staff  ready  to  assist  YLVLWRUV LQ Âż QGLQJ WKH SHUIHFW IHOLQH pair.  For  more  information  call  388-­1100  or  go  online  to  www. homewardboundanimals.org. PROFESSIONAL DOG GROOMING OVER 16 YEARS EXPERIENCE

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limits  to  pets.  If  you  have  a  pest  problem  in  your  home,  be  it  insects  or  rodents,  keep  any  areas  you  treat  with  chemical  products  off  limits  until  the  issue  has  been  successfully  resolved.  Even  if  pets  aren’t  in  the  room  during  or  after  application,  they  can  still  be  poisoned  if  they  eat  poisoned  insects  or  rodents.  This  is  called  secondary  poisoning,  and  pet  owners  concerned  about  their  pets  but  still  in  need  of  a  way  to  eradicate  pests  should  look  for  a  product  with  a  low  risk  for  secondary  poisoning.  *  Keep  bait  products  out  of  the  reach  of  your  pets.  Bait  products  are  often  effective  because  they’re  attractive  to  insects  or  rodents.  Unfortunately,  the  same  properties  that  attract  pests  might  also  attract  your  companion  animal.  When  using  bait  products  around  the  house,  be  sure  to  place  them  beyond  the  reach  of  your  pets.  If  you’re  using  bait  products  that  you  must  bury  outdoors,  keep  in  mind  that  dogs  and  maybe  even  cats  can  often  dig  these  products  up  rather  easily.  So  once  the  bait  is  planted,  make  the  area  off  limits  to  your  pets.

Homeward  Bound  to  offer  â€˜Supersize  Me’  adoptions 877-3371

REGGIE -­  6  years,  Neutered  Male,  DSH,  Grey.   Reggie  is  an  incredibly  sweet  and  affectionate  cat  who  loves  to  cuddle.   He  was  brought  to  Homeward  Bound  as  a  stray,  and  has  since  snuggled  his  way  into  all  of  our  hearts.

inside  or  into  the  garage  before  applying  a  pesticide.  Pet  health  could  be  at  risk  if  such  items  are  left  in  the  yard  and  get  even  a  drop  or  two  of  pesticide  on  them.  Therefore,  care-­ fully  scour  the  yard  for  your  pet’s  EHORQJLQJV UDNLQJ KLJK JUDVV WR Âż QG toys  or  bones  when  necessary,  before  applying  pesticides. *  Adhere  to  the  instructions  on  the  pesticide  label.  The  label  on  the  pesti-­ FLGH \RX FKRRVH VKRXOG KDYH VSHFLÂż F instructions  as  to  how  much  pesticide  you  should  apply  and  how  long  you  must  wait  before  allowing  anyone,  including  the  family  pet,  to  gain  access  to  the  treated  area.  If  you  let  your  pet  back  in  the  area  too  quickly,  the  animal  could  be  poisoned. *  Be  careful  inside,  too.  Chemical  products  are  not  only  used  to  treat  lawns.  If  you  need  to  use  a  chemi-­ cal  product  like  a  bug  bomb  indoors,  keep  pets  in  mind  before  application.  Remove  bedding,  feeding  dishes  DQG WR\V DQG FRYHU \RXU Âż VK WDQN to  prevent  liquid  and  vapors  from  getting  into  the  tank  and  threatening  WKH OLYHV RI \RXU Âż VK *  Keep  areas  treated  for  pests  off Â

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  33

Pet Pages Woofstock 2015

WALKERS  CLAD  IN  tie-­dyed  shirts,  and  dogs  sporting  red  bandannas  walk  across  Cross  St.  Bridge  downtown. Â

Paws  for  a  cause  THE  ANNUAL  â€œWOOFSTOCK:  Walk  for  the  Animalsâ€?  fundraiser  for  Homeward  Bound,  Addison  County’s  Humane  Society,  was  held  Saturday,  Sept.  19,  in  Middle-­ bury.  Nearly  100  walkers  regis-­ tered,  along  with  a  large  contin-­ gency  of  canine  companions,  for  the  2-­mile  walk  through  town.  The  event  concluded  with  a  celebra-­ tion  at  the  Memorial  Sports  Cen-­ ter,  complete  with  music,  a  photo  booth  and  cupcakes  made  by  Hannaford  Career  Center  culinary  students.  Over  $18,000  has  been  BETSY  KILLORIN  AND  her  dogs  sit  for  a  portrait  in  the  Woofstock  raised  to  date,  and  donations  are  photo  booth. still  being  accepted. Â

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PAGE  34  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

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Edgewater to exhibit local artist’s work MIDDLEBURY  â€”  For  the  month  of  October,  Edgewater  Gal-­ lery  on  the  Green  in  Middlebury  is  exhibiting  TJ  Cunningham’s  lat-­ est  body  of  work:  landscapes  and  still  lifes.  The  gallery  will  host  an  opening  reception  on  Friday,  Oct.  IURP S P GXULQJ WKH ÂżQDO Middlebury  Arts  Walk  of  2015.  Cunningham  will  be  back  in  the  gallery  on  Saturday,  Oct.  10,  from  1-­3  p.m.  for  a  live  painting  dem-­ onstration.  Cunningham,  a  New  Haven  na-­ tive,  has  been  painting  profession-­ DOO\ IRU WKH SDVW ÂżYH \HDUV )RU DQ artist  still  in  his  20s,  he  has  cre-­ ated  an  impressive  number  of  truly  stunning  pieces.  Adept  at  painting  landscapes  en  plein  air,  still  lifes  in  the  studio,  and  portraiture,  Cun-­

ningham  says  he  enjoys  â€œpainting  directly  from  life  far  more  than  painting  from  photographs.  â€Ś  My  JUHDWHVW IXOÂżOOPHQW FRPHV IURP creating  through  direct  observa-­ tion.â€? As  a  result,  the  work  he  creates  feels  life  like  to  the  viewer.  His  Vermont  scenes,  whether  of  a  place  familiar  to  the  viewer  or  not,  trans-­ port  one  into  that  space  effortless-­ ly.  It’s  no  wonder  this  young  talent  has  become  so  highly  collected  in  such  a  short  period  of  time. “The  number  of  things  that  I  ¿QG DHVWKHWLFDOO\ FRPSHOOLQJ KDV grown  very  broad.  Still,  an  authen-­ tic  portrayal  of  light  and  color  are  the  goals,  whether  the  subject  is  the  beautiful  variation  of  yellows  LQ D VXQĂ€RZHUÂśV SHWDOV RU JOHDP-­

LQJ UHĂ€HFWHG OLJKW RQ D UDLQ VRDNHG horse,â€?  Cunningham  says.  â€œThe  body  of  work  that  comprises  this  show  represents  many  of  my  favor-­ ite  motifs  in  the  Vermont  landscape  and  a  selection  of  still  life’s  that  I  completed  in  my  studio.  Every  time  I  paint  I  strive  to  create  some-­ thing  more  meaningful  than  all  proceeding  work.  This  show  is  the  culmination  of  the  over  200  paint-­ LQJV FUHDWHG LQ WKH ODVW ÂżYH \HDUV and  each  of  them  represents  all  that  I  have  learned.â€?  â€œTJ  Cunningham:  Landscapes  and  Still  Lifesâ€?  will  be  on  view  at  Edgewater  Gallery  on  the  Green  in  October.  For  more  information  call  802-­989-­7419,  email  zoe@ edgewatergallery-­vt.com  or  visit  edgewatergallery-­vt.com.

College  observatory  open  house  set  Oct.  9

WINTER STORAGE

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If  you  would  like  an  application,  please  call  802-­349-­4179  RU HPDLO ¿HOGGD\V#JPDYW QHW

MIDDLEBURY  â€”  The  Physics  Department  at  Middlebury  College  will  again  host  an  open  house  night  at  the  college  observatory  on  Friday  evening,  Oct.  9,  from  8  to  9:30  p.m.,  provided  the  skies  are  mostly  clear. The  observatory,  located  atop  Mc-­ Cardell  Bicentennial  Hall,  will  be  open  to  the  public  for  viewing  the Â

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heavens.  Visible  through  the  tele-­ scopes  will  be  a  number  of  interest-­ ing  stars,  star  clusters  and  nebulae.  There  is  no  set  program  for  the  open  house  nights;͞  the  public  is  invited  at  any  time  between  8  and  9:30  p.m. The  observatory  dome  houses  a  24-­inch  computer-­controlled  tele-­ scope.  Additional,  smaller  tele-­

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scopes  will  also  be  available  on  the  roof  deck  for  observing  the  night  sky. McCardell  Bicentennial  Hall  is  located  on  the  western  edge  of  the  college  campus.  Follow  state  Route  125  west  from  the  Middlebury  vil-­ lage  center,  through  the  campus.  Ap-­ proximately  0.1  mile  past  the  crest  of  the  hill,  turn  right  at  the  base  of  the  hill  onto  Bicentennial  Way,  which  leads  to  the  parking  lot.  Enter  the  building  and  take  the  elevators  to  the  WRS VHYHQWK Ă€RRU All  observatory  public  nights  are  free  and  open  to  the  public,  but  will  take  place  only  if  the  sky  is  at  least  mostly  clear.  If  the  weather  appears  uncertain,  visitors  may  call  the  ob-­ servatory  at  443-­2266  or  visit  the  observatory  website,  http://sites. middlebury.edu/observatory/,  after  6  p.m.  on  the  evening  of  the  open  house  for  a  status  report. Â

CONTACT GOV. SHUMLIN Governor Peter Shumlin 1-­800-­649-­6825 (Vt. only) 802-­828-­3333 109 State Street, Pavillion Montpelier, Vermont 05609-­0101 www.vermont.gov/governor


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  35

Best of Luck in the future to all Addison County Students! ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONT’S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\ 97 ‡ ‡ ZZZ $GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW FRP

Students of the Week from area High Schools Middlebury Union High School

Middlebury  Union  High  School  is  very  proud  to  recognize  Nicholas  Beauchamp  as  its  Student  of  the  Week.  Nick  lives  in  Middlebury  with  his  mother,  Leah,  and  sister,  Olivia,  a  WK JUDGHU DW 08+6 Nick  was  the  male  recipient  of  the  MUHS  Dorey  Cup  IRU IRU OHDGHUVKLS VSRUWVPDQVKLS DQG DWKOHWLFV Besides  the  cup,  Nick  earned  a  St.  Michael’s  College  Book  $ZDUG DQ ,GOH )UHH 97 $ZDUG DQG D VW &HQWXU\ $ZDUG LQ English.  He  also  was  selected  for  National  Honor  Society  and  Green  Mountain  Boys’  State.  Nick  presently  serves  as  a  student  representative  on  the  ACSU  School  Board,  and  he  is  an  MUHS  Peer  Leader. Cited  as  an  MUHS  Volunteer  of  the  Year  for  the  past  three  years,  Nick  has  provided  peer  mentoring  and  support  IRU ERWK WKH '&) DQG WKH &RXQVHOLQJ 6HUYLFH 'XULQJ WKH VXPPHUV RI 1LFN ZDV D YROXQWHHU FDPS counselor  at  a  Philadelphia  YMCA. 1LFN KDV EHHQ D IRXU \HDU PHPEHU RI WKH 08+6 0HQÂśV Nick  Beauchamp (QVHPEOH DQG KDV TXDOLÂż HG IRU WKH 97 'LVWULFW &KRLU HDFK M.U.H.S. \HDU VLQFH +H ZDV DOVR D 6WXGHQW &RXQFLO &ODVV 5HS DQG 7UHDVXUHU LQ $WKOHWLFDOO\ 1LFN KDV H[FHOOHG LQ IRRWEDOO ZUHVWOLQJ DQG Âż HOG HYHQWV LQ WUDFN $Q LQWHJUDO SOD\HU ZLWK WKH WZLFH DQG UHLJQLQJ ' , IRRWEDOO FKDPSLRQV 1LFN DOVR FDSWDLQHG WKH ZUHVWOLQJ WHDP WKH SDVW WZR VHDVRQV DQG TXDOLÂż HG IRU WKH 1HZ (QJODQGV LQ 2XWVLGH RI VFKRRO 1LFN HQMR\V KHDOWK DQG Âż WQHVV DFWLYLWLHV DQG -DSDQHVH VW\OHG 0DQJD DQG DQLPH FDUWRRQLQJ DQG DQLPDWLRQ 9DFDWLRQV IRU 1LFN XVXDOO\ PHDQ KDQGV RQ NLQGV RI ZRUN FRQVWUXFWLRQ landscaping,  house/pet  sitting.  1LFNÂśV GUHDP VWHSV ZRXOG OHDG Âż UVW WR WKH 8QLYHUVLW\ RI 3HQQV\OYDQLD WR VWXG\ HFRQRPLFV DQG SHUKDSV play  linebacker  for  the  Quakers.  He’d  then  move  on  to  Penn’s  renowned  Wharton  School  for  an  MBA.  -XVW DV LW GLG IRU 3KLODGHOSKLDÂśV QRZ EURQ]HG 5RFN\ %DOERD ÂłEXVLQHVV DV XVXDO´ PHDQV GHWHUPLQDWLRQ DQG KDUG ZRUN IRU RXU EHDX &KDPS 7KH\ KDYH VHUYHG WR SXW \RX ZHOO RQ \RXU ZD\ XS WKRVH VWHSV 1LFN We  wish  you  the  very  best  for  the  rest  of  your  run  to  the  top!

Middlebury  Students  of  the  Week  receive  a  free  pizza  from  Green  Peppers.

Vergennes Union High School

Vergennes  Union  High  School  is  pleased  to  recognize  -XOLD -RKQVRQ DV LWV 6WXGHQW RI WKH :HHN -XOLD OLYHV LQ Panton  with  her  mom,  Kimberly  Hart.  Her  dad  is  Bronson  -RKQVRQ IURP 0LOWRQ +HU ROGHU EURWKHU 'DYLG LV D 98+6 graduate. -XOLD KDV HDUQHG KLJK KRQRUV WKURXJK PXFK RI KLJK school.  She  earned  the  Excellence  in  Math  award  her  sophomore  year  and  took  AP  Language  and  AP  Literature  KHU MXQLRU \HDU 6KH UHFHLYHG 7KH 'XNH RI (GLQEXUJK award  at  the  Bronze  and  Gold  level,  which  is  the  world’s  OHDGLQJ \RXWK DFKLHYHPHQW DZDUG -XOLD LV DOVR WKH VHQLRU class  treasurer  and  was  chosen  to  represent  her  class  at  Girls’  State  this  past  summer. -XOLD KDV EHHQ D YDUVLW\ VRFFHU SOD\HU VLQFH QLQWK JUDGH and  this  year  she  is  the  captain  of  the  team.  She  has  helped  to  organize  our  annual  Peace  One  Day  celebration.  She  is  a  member  of  the  Gay  Straight  Alliance  and  student  FRXQFLO -XOLD KHOSHG SODQ WKH MXQLRU FODVV SURP 6KH KDV Julia  Johnson participated  in  many  oratorical  contests  for  the  Rotary  and  V.U.H.S. Lions  clubs.   -XOLD KDV YROXQWHHUHG KHOSLQJ PLGGOH VFKRRO JLUOV ZKR ZHUH VWUXJJOLQJ VRFLDOO\ HPRWLRQDOO\ RU academically.  She  volunteers  at  Homeward  Bound  and  is  also  a  math  tutor  at  the  DeGraaf  daycare.  In  JUDGHV DQG VKH YROXQWHHUHG WKURXJK WKH 0LVV 9HUPRQW 6FKRODUVKLS 2UJDQL]DWLRQ UDLVLQJ IXQGV IRU the  Children’s  Miracle  Network  Hospitals  and   traveling  to  the  Veterans  Hospital  during  Christmas  time.  -XOLD JLYHV WKLV SLHFH RI DGYLFH WR RWKHUV Âł7KURXJK DOO P\ FRPPXQLW\ VHUYLFH ZLWK SHRSOH RU HYHQ P\ time  spent  at  the  animal  shelter  I  have  learned  that  you  can  never  completely  know  what  someone  has  EHHQ WKURXJK *LYH SHRSOH WKH EHQHÂż W RI WKH GRXEW DQG EH WKDW VPLOH LQ WKHLU GD\ EHFDXVH VRPHWLPHV WKDW H[WUD NLQG JHVWXUH FDQ JR D ORQJ ZD\ ´ 6FLHQFH WHDFKHU 6DUDK 7KRPSVRQ VDLG Âł,W KDV EHHQ D JUHDW H[SHULHQFH ZRUNLQJ ZLWK -XOLD DV KHU WHDFKHU DQG DGYLVHU 6KH WDNHV IHHGEDFN LQ VWULGH DQG DOZD\V ZDQWV WR Âż QG WKH EHVW LQ SHRSOH DQG VLWXDWLRQV PDNLQJ KHU D PRGHO FODVVPDWH VWXGHQW &RQJUDWXODWLRQV -XOLD ´ )ROORZLQJ JUDGXDWLRQ IURP 98+6 -XOLD SODQV WR JHW KHU EDFKHORUÂśV GHJUHH LQ QXUVLQJ DQG WKHQ JHW KHU master’s  so  she  can  become  a  neonatal  nurse  practitioner.

Vergennes  Students  of  the  Week  receive  a  free  sandwich  and  drink  from  3  SQUARES.

Students of the week from all area high schools will receive a gift certificate from Vermont Book Shop. Students of the Week are chosen by school teachers and administration.

Warmest Congratulations,

Keep checking the Addison Independent for GREAT PHOTOS of local students!

Nick & Julia

Plumbing  &  Heating Â

125 Monkton Rd. Bristol, VT 453-2325

Congratulations, Nick & Julia 877-3118 Main St., Vergennes, VT

Fuel  Delivery

185 Exchange St., Middlebury, VT 388-4975

Barash  Mediation  Services

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Name  & NICK & Name

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Hard  work  and  determination  deserve  great  praise. Congratulations,  students!

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We’re proud to support all area students and want to say “Thanks� to those who volunteer with us!

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ation l u t a r g n Co

Congratulations Congratulations Taylor &Julia Casey Nick &

Telecommunications Sales and Service Data Cabling & Fiber Optics

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JACKMAN  FUELS,  INC. Serving  the  Champlain Valley  Since  1945 Congratulations  to

Nick  &  Julia

To volunteer call 388-­7044 or visit www.unitedwayaddisoncounty.org

205  Main  St.,  Vergennes 877-­2661


PAGE  36  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

SERVICES DIRECTORY DENTISTRY

APPLIANCE REPAIR

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  37

Moose  on  WKH PRYH

Middlebury  celebrates  National  Kale  Day

MONTPELIER  â€”  Drivers  need  to  be  alert  and  cautious  because  moose  are  on  the  move,  according  to  the  Vermont  Fish  &  Wildlife  Depart-­ ment. Moose  are  more  likely  to  be  cross-­ ing  roadways  at  this  time  of  year,  especially  after  dark  or  early  in  the  morning.  The  peak  of  their  breeding  VHDVRQ LV ODWH 6HSWHPEHU DQG WKH ÂżUVW two  weeks  of  October. “Seeing  a  moose  is  one  of  the  most  treasured  wildlife  memories  for  many  Vermonters,  an  experience  they  will  take  with  them  the  rest  of  their  lives,â€?  said  Vermont  Fish  &  Wildlife  Commissioner  Louis  Por-­ ter.  â€œWe  want  you  to  enjoy  seeing  them  from  a  distance.  But  keep  in  mind  that  moose  are  very  active  this  time  of  year,  and  they  will  be  cross-­ ing  highways  more  often.â€? Moose  are  a  threat  to  motorists,  but  there  are  measures  you  can  take  to  avoid  hitting  them,  according  to  Fish  &  Wildlife: ‡ $OZD\V EH DZDUH RI WKH GDQJHU —  moose  cross  the  road  randomly,  as  well  as  at  their  regular  crossings. ‡ ,QFUHDVH \RXU URDGVLGH DZDUH-­ ness  and  reduce  your  speed  when Â

MIDDLEBURY  â€”  When  Lisa  Bernardin,  Vermont  Brain  Bee  Co-­ ordinator,  learned  that  National  Kale  Day  was  Oct.  7,  she  decided  to  learn  more  about  this  day  celebrating  this  highly  nutritious  leafy  green  veg-­ etable.  $ \HDUO\ HYHQW ÂżUVW :HGQHVGD\ in  October),  National  Kale  Day  was  co-­founded  by  â€œ50  Shades  of  Kaleâ€?  authors  Drew  Ramsey  and  Jennifer  Iserof.  Healthy  eating  being  one  of  the  â€œhealthy  brain  habits,â€?  Bernardin  joined  the  effort  to  promote  getting  PRUH NDOH LQ HYHU\RQHÂśV GLHW 6KH said  she  as  acted,  in  a  very  informal  way,  as  the  Vermont  National  Kale  Day  representative,  contacting  sev-­ eral  food  coops  throughout  the  state  to  spread  the  word.  Locally,  Middlebury  Natural  Food  Coop  has  jumped  at  this  opportunity  to  help  get  this  â€œsuperfoodâ€?  out  to  everyone  by  celebrating  Kale  Day.  The  Middlebury  store  will  be  host-­ ing  demonstrations  and  offering  free Â

9(50217 ),6+ $1' :LOGOLIH RIÂżFLDOV ZDUQ GULYHUV WR EH DZDUH RI PRRVH FURVVLQJ URDGZD\V DW WKLV WLPH RI \HDU HVSHFLDOO\ DIWHU GDUN RU HDUO\ LQ WKH PRUQLQJ

you  see  MOOSE  CROSSING  signs  along  the  highway.  When  on  second-­ ary  roads,  the  recommended  speed  is  40  mph  or  less  in  these  moose  crossing  areas. ‡ 'ULYH GHIHQVLYHO\ DQG GRQÂśW overdrive  your  headlights.  Moose  are  more  active  at  night  and  early  PRUQLQJ DQG WKH\ DUH GLIÂżFXOW WR VHH because  of  their  dark  color.

‡ ,I \RX VHH D PRRVH DKHDG VORZ down  or  stop.  Trying  to  speed  past  them  before  they  move  can  be  a  seri-­ ous  mistake. Last  year,  65  moose  were  involved  in  collisions  with  motor  vehicles  or  trains  in  Vermont  (44  so  far  this  year).  Eighteen  people  have  died  in  motor  vehicle  collisions  with  moose  on  Vermont  highways  since  1985.

samples,  recipes  and  nutritional  in-­ formation  on  Wednesday.  Harriet  Milligan,  a  member  of  the  Middlebury  Union  High  School  Brain  Science  Club,  will  be  volun-­ teering  with  Bernardin  at  MNFC  between  3:30  and  5:30  p.m.,  sharing  WKHLU NQRZOHGJH DERXW WKH EHQHÂżWV RI DGGLQJ NDOH WR RQHÂśV GLHW Bernardin  also  reports  that  the  $GGLVRQ &HQWUDO 6XSHUYLVRU\ 8QLRQ school  district  has  also  jumped  on  the  bandwagon  and  has  requested  all  schools  participate  in  this  day  by  offering  kale  at  their  lunch  meals.  Mary  Hogan  Elementary  School  is  offering  Kale  Caesar  Salad  and  Kale  Chocolate  Chip  Cookies  on  Oct.  7. “We,  the  wellness  leaders  of  $&68 DUH HQFRXUDJLQJ VWDII DQG VWXGHQWV RI $&68 WR FHOHEUDWH WKH day  by  incorporating  kale  into  your  PHDOV ´ WKH $&68 OHDGHUV VDLG LQ DQ email. More  information  is  at  nationalka-­ leday.org.

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PAGE  38  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Addison Independent

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ADULT  ALL-­  RECOVERY  Group  Meeting  for  anyone  over  18  who  is  struggling  with  addiction  disorders.  Fridays,  3-­4  p.m.  at  the  Turning  Point  Center.  A  great  place  to  meet  with  your  peers  who  are  in  re-­ covery.  Bring  a  friend  in  recov-­ ery.  For  info  call  802-­388-­4249  or  802-­683-­5569  or  visit  www. turningpointaddisonvt.org.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  BRANDON  MEETINGS:  Monday,  Discussion  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.  Wednesday,  12  Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.  Friday,  12  Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.  All  held  at  the  St.  Thomas  Episcopal  Church,  RT  7  South.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  MIDDLEBURY  MEETINGS  MONDAY:  As  Bill  Sees  It  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Big  Book  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.  Both  held  at  The  Turning  Point  Center  in  The  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  MIDDLEBURY  MEETINGS  SUNDAY:  12  Step  Meeting  9:00-­10:00  AM  held  at  the  Middlebury  United  Methodist  Church  on  N.  Pleasant  Street.  Discussion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00  PM  held  at  The  Turning  Point  Center  in  The  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  MIDDLEBURY  MEETINGS  WEDNESDAY:  Big  Book  Meeting  7:15-­8:15  AM  is  held  at  the  Middlebury  Unit-­ ed  Methodist  Church  on  N.  Pleasant  Street.  Discussion  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM  at  The  Turning  Point  Center.  Women’s  Meeting  5:30-­6:30  PM,  St.  Stephen’s  Church.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  RIPTON  MEETINGS:  Mon-­ day,  As  Bill  Sees  It  Meet-­ ing  7:15-­8:15  AM.  Thursday,  Grapevine  Meeting  6:00-­7:00  PM.  Both  held  at  Ripton  Fire-­ house,  Dugway  Rd.

MAKING  RECOVERY  EAS-­ IER  (MRE).  Wednesdays,  5:30-­7:00  p.m.  at  the  Turn-­ ing  Point  Center.  This  will  be  a  facilitated  group  meeting  for  those  struggling  with  the  decision  to  attend  12-­step  programs.  It  will  be  limited  to  explaining  and  discussing  our  feelings  about  the  12-­step  programs  to  create  a  better  understanding  of  how  they  can  help  a  person  in  recovery  on  his/her  life’s  journey.  A  certificate  will  be  issued  at  the  end  of  all  the  sessions.  Please  bring  a  friend  in  recovery  who  is  also  contemplating  12-­step  programs.

AL-­ANON  FAMILY  GROUP  -­  For  families  and  friends  of  problem  drinkers.  Anony-­ mous,  confidential  and  free.  At  the  Turning  Point  Center  in  the  Marbleworks,  Middle-­ bury.  7:30-­8:30  PM  Friday  evenings.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  BRISTOL  MEETINGS:  Sun-­ day,  Discussion  Meeting  4:00-­5:00  PM.  Wednesday,  12  Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.  Friday,  Big  Book  Meeting,  6:00-­7:00  PM.  All  held  at  the  Howden  Hall,  19  West  Street.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  MIDDLEBURY  MEETINGS  AL-­ANON:  FOR  FAMILIES  FRIDAY:  Discussion  Meeting  and  friends  affected  by  some-­ Noon-­1:00  PM  at  The  Turning  one’s  drinking.  Members  Point  in  The  Marbleworks,  share  experience,  strength  Middlebury. and  hope  to  solve  common  problems.  Newcomers  wel-­ come.  Confidential.  St.  Ste-­ phen’s  Church  (use  front  side  door  and  go  to  basement)  in  Middlebury,  Sunday  nights  7:15-­8:15  pm.

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ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  MIDDLEBURY  MEETINGS  SATURDAY:  Discussion  Meeting  9:00-­10:00  AM  at  the  Middlebury  United  Methodist  Church.  Discussion  Meeting  10:00-­11:00  AM.  Women’s  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Be-­ ginners’  Meeting  6:30-­7:30  PM.  These  three  meetings  are  held  at  The  Turning  Point  Center  in  The  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

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ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  MIDDLEBURY  MEETINGS  THURSDAY:  Big  Book  Meet-­ ing  Noon-­1:00  PM  at  The  Turning  Point  Center  in  the  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.  Speaker  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM  at  St.  Stephen’s  Church,  Main  St.  (On  the  Green).

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  NEW  HAVEN  MEETINGS:  Monday,  Big  Book  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the  Congre-­ gational  Church,  New  Haven  Village  Green.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  NORTH  FERRISBURGH  ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  MEETINGS:  Sunday,  Daily  MIDDLEBURY  MEETINGS  Reflections  Meeting  6:00-­7:00  TUESDAYS:  12  Step  Meet-­ PM,  at  the  United  Methodist  ings;͞  Noon-­1:00  PM.  AND  Church,  Old  Hollow  Rd. 7:30-­8:30  PM.  Both  held  at  The  Turning  Point  Center  in  The  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

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ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS  VERGENNES  MEETINGS:  Sunday,  12  Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.  Friday,  Dis-­ cussion  Meeting  8:00-­9:00  PM.  Both  held  at  St.  Paul’s  Church,  Park  St.  Tuesday,  Discussion  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM,  at  the  Congregational  Church,  Water  St. ARE  YOU  BOTHERED  BY  SOMEONE’S  DRINKING?  Opening  Our  Hearts  Al-­Anon  Group  meets  each  Wednes-­ day  at  7:30pm  at  the  Turning  Point  Center  in  the  Marble-­ works  in  Middlebury.  Anony-­ mous  and  confidential,  we  share  our  experience,  strength  and  hope  to  solve  our  com-­ mon  problems.

FRP FODVVLÂż HGV Services

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Addison County Court Diversion and Community Justice Projects is looking for concerned, committed community members to make a difference in the lives of individuals convicted of serious offenses. Volunteers are fully trained and work in teams of 3-5 to support an offender who has been released from prison to successfully re-enter the community. They meet weekly to encourage the individual in his/her effort to repair relationships, manage everyday living and commit no further offenses. For more information about how to support ;GK9 k eakkagf lg ]f`Yf[] [geemfalq kY^]lq$ hd]Yk] [Ydd +00%/)01& Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r i s a c o l l a b o rat i o n b e t we e n RSV P a n d t h e Un i te d Way o f Addi s o n C o u n t y. P le a s e c a l l 388-7044 t o f i n d o u t mo re a b o u t t h e doze n s o f v o l u n te e r o pp o r t u n i t ie s t h at a re c u r re n t l y av a i l a ble .

Ailey  Bosworth,  of  Weybridge  is  a  vol-­ unteer  at  the  United  Way  of  Addison  County.  Her  responsibilities  have  ranged  from  raking  leaves  to  administrative  tasks.  Ailey  is  always  willing  to  give  a  helping  hand  where  she  is  needed.  She  was  enormously  helpful  at  Days  of  Caring  2015,  partaking  in  gardening  at  the  United  Way  and  helping  with  a  video  project.   She  has  also  volunteered  at  the  HOPE  Food  Shelf,  a  Homeward  Bound  Fundraiser,  and  the  Vermont  CROP  Hunger  Walk.  Ailey  says  she  likes  volunteering  because  â€œshe  enjoys  giving  to  others  and  making  a  positive  change  in  her  community.â€?    Ailey  brings  an  incredible  work  ethic  and  a  great  smile  to  all  of  the  work  that  she  does.  Thanks  Ailey!

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NA  MEETINGS  MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Mondays,  6pm,  held  at  The  Turning  Point  Center  located  in  The  Marble  Works. NA  MEETINGS  MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Sundays,  3:00  pm,  held  at  The  Turning  Point  Center  located  in  the  Marble  Works. NAR-­ANON-­  If  there  is  a  drug  problem  in  your  home  the  Nar-­Anon  Family  Group  may  be  able  to  help  you  solve  it.  Nar-­Anon  helps  the  family  of  the  user  attain  serenity  and  a  more  normal  home  life,  regardless  of  whether  or  not  he/she  has  stopped  using.  Anonymous  and  confidential.  THURSDAYS,  6-­7pm  at  The  Turning  Point  Center-­Marble  Works,  Middlebury,  VT.

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NA  MEETINGS  MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Fridays,  7:30pm,  held  at  The  Turning  Point  Center  located  in  the  Marble  Works.

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  39

Addison Independent

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OA  (OVEREATERS  ANONY-­ MOUS)  MEETS  on  Thurs-­ days  at  6  PM.  Located  at  the  Turning  Point  Center  of  Addison  County,  228  Maple  St.  Middlebury,  VT  (In  the  Marble  Works  Complex).

PROFESSIONAL  CLEAN-­ ER  has  openings  available  for  weekly,  bi-­weekly  and  monthly  cleaning.  Residen-­ tial,  commercial,  camps  and  construction  clean-­up.  Fully  insured.  Reasonable  rates.  Please  call  Stacy  for  free  estimate.  802-­465-­8451  or  802-­458-­7766.

CLEAN  TOUCH  GROUP  is  seeking  energetic  house-­ keepers.  Great  pay.  Apply  in  person  at  the  Courtyard  Marriott,  309  Court  Street,  Middlebury,  VT.

OPIATE  OVERDOSE  RES-­ CUE  KITS  are  distributed  on  Wednesdays  from  9  am  until  12  pm  at  the  Turning  Point  Center  of  Addison  County,  Middlebury,  VT.  A  short  training  is  required.   For  info  call  802-­388-­4249  or  802-­683-­5569  or  visit  www. turningpointaddisonvt.org. PARKINSONS  SUPPORT  GROUP  meets  on  the  last  Thursday  of  every  month  from  10  am  to  11:30  am.  We  meet  at  the  Mountain  Health  Center  in  Bristol.  For  info  call  APDA  at  888-­763-­3366  or  parkinsoninfo@uvmhealth. org.

PROFESSIONAL  PAINT-­ ING;Íž  interior/exterior,  resi-­ dential/commercial,  pressure  washing.  20  years’  experi-­ ence.  Best  prices.  Refer-­ ences.  802-­989-­5803.

Free FIRE  WOOD-­  first  come  first  serve.  Panton.  Call  for  information.  Denise  at  802-­598-­1375.

FREE  OLDER  MOBILE  HOME-­  needs  to  be  moved.  T E E N  A L L -­ R E C O V E RY  Perfect  for  farm  or  hunt-­ Group  Meeting  for  anyone  ing  camp.  Come  take  a  15-­18  years  old  who  is  strug-­ look.  Call  802-­352-­4600  or  gling  with  addiction  disor-­ 802-­377-­7645. ders.  Tuesdays,  6-­7  p.m.  at  the  Turning  Point  Center.  A  great  place  to  meet  with  your  H A N D  M A D E  M A P L E  peers  who  are  in  recovery.  a n d  p i n e  c o ff e e  t a b l e ,  For  info  call  802-­388-­4249  or  50Lx18x18  and  2  person  802-­683-­5569  or  visit  www. couch.  Both  good  condition.  802-­453-­7850. turningpointaddisonvt.org. UNIFORMED  SERVICES  ALL  RECOVERY  Support  Group  will  be  starting  at  the  Turning  Point  Center  of  Addison  County,  located  in  the  MarbleWorks  com-­ plex.  The  group  is  directed  toward  those  that  have  or  are  currently  involved  in  the  uniformed  services  such  as  Fire,  Police,  Veterance,  EMS,  Rescu,  ER  and  DOC.  This  is  a  facilitated  Peer  to  Peer  group  gathering  to  support  our  brothers  and  sisters  with  their  struggles.  Tuesdays  at  6  p.m.  Contact  Bill  Brim  802-­683-­5569  or  the  center  at  802-­388-­4249.

TRICYCLE-­  Adult  battery  powered  with  charger.  New  this  year.  802-­388-­3562.

SATURDAY,  OCT.  10  9  am-­4  pm.  206  Robert  Young  Road,  Starksboro.  Crow  bars  to  perfume,  ladies  size  12  clothes,  size  9  shoes.

Help  Wanted

CONSTRUCTION:  ADDI-­ TIONS,  RENOVATIONS,  new  construction,  drywall,  carpentry,  painting,  flooring,  roofing,  pressure  washing,  driveway  sealing.  All  aspects  of  construction,  also  property  maintenance.  Steven  Fifield  802-­989-­0009. PARTY  RENTALS;͞  CHI-­ NA,  flatware,  glassware,  linens.  Delivery  available.  802-­388-­4831.

BANKRUPTCY:  CALL  to  find  out  if  bankruptcy  can  help  you.  Kathleen  Walls,  Esq.  802-­388-­1156.

C&I  DRYWALL.  Hanging,  taping,  skim  coat  plas-­ tering.  Also  tile.  Call  Joe  802-­234-­5545  or  Justin  802-­234-­2190.

Snake Mountain Enterprises Looking for a Class A Truck Driver to join our team. We offer competitive wages and 401K. Call 802-545-2565 and leave a message.

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

ATTENTION STA/Bet-Cha Transit Inc.

Openings available for route drivers for the upcoming school year in Addison County and Charlotte. Work 2-4 hours a day. We provide training to qualified applicants. Eliminate childcare costs and collect unemployment during summer and holidays. Please contact Lori at 388-7800.

Patricia  A.  Hannaford  Regional  Technical  School  District Position:   Forestry  and  Natural  Resources  Teaching  Assistant      1.0  FTE  Position  School  Year Location:   Patricia  A.  Hannaford  Career  Center  â€“  Middlebury,  VT Responsibilities:   Provide  teaching  assistance  to  the  Forestry                                Instructor  and  provide  educational  support                               via  Student  Services. Requirements:   Â‡ Associates  Degree  or  60  credits  beyond  a  high  school  diploma. ‡ ([SHULHQFH LQ IRUHVWU\ RU KHDY\ HTXLSPHQW SUHIHUUHG ‡ ([SHULHQFH RU WUDLQLQJ ZRUNLQJ ZLWK KLJK VFKRRO DJH VWXGHQWV     preferred. Salary:  %DVHG XSRQ HGXFDWLRQ DQG H[SHULHQFH Closing  Date: 8QWLO Âż OOHG Starting  Date:  Immediately Interested  parties  should  send  a  letter  of  interest,  resume,  transcripts,  and  letters  of  reference  to: D.  Lynn  Coale,  Superintendent 51  Charles  Avenue Middlebury,  VT  05753 E.O.E.

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Garage  Sales

H I G H  P E R F O R M A N C E  HOME  BUILDER  seeks  skilled  craftsperson  (Addi-­ son/Chittenden  Counties).  Established  high  performance  home  builder  looking  for  full  time  craftsperson.  Competent  skills,  attention  to  detail,  and  a  commitment  to  the  goals  of  the  project  are  most  important  as  we  use  unique  building  envelopes  and  best  building  practices/design.  Tools  are  a  plus,  dependable  transporta-­ tion  required  and  the  ability  to  work  well  independently.  Please  reply  with  a  resume  and  a  note  about  your  spe-­ cific  interest  in  the  job.  Send  resumes  to:  Rudk1@aol.com.  No  calls.

Services

Help  Wanted

Regional  Director

ĚĚĹ?Ć?ŽŜ ŽƾŜƚLJ dĆŒÄ‚ĹśĆ?Ĺ?Ćš ZÄžĆ?ŽƾĆŒÄ?ÄžĆ? Ĺ?Ć? Ć?ĞĞŏĹ?ĹśĹ? Ä‚ ĹšĹ?Ĺ?ŚůLJ žŽĆ&#x; ǀĂƚĞĚ ĹŻÄžÄ‚ÄšÄžĆŒ ƚŽ Ä?Äž ƚŚĞ ZÄžĹ?Ĺ?ŽŜÄ‚ĹŻ Ĺ?ĆŒÄžÄ?ĆšĹ˝ĆŒ ĨŽĆŒ Ĺ?ĆšĆ? Ä?ŽžžƾŜĹ?ƚLJ ĆšĆŒÄ‚ĹśĆ?Ć‰Ĺ˝ĆŒĆšÄ‚Ć&#x; ŽŜ Ĺ˝Ć‰ÄžĆŒÄ‚Ć&#x; ŽŜĆ? Ä?Ä‚Ć?ĞĚ ŽƾĆš ŽĨ DĹ?ĚĚůĞÄ?ĆľĆŒÇ‡Í• sÄžĆŒžŽŜĆšÍ˜ dŚĞ Ĺ?ĚĞĂů Ä?ĂŜĚĹ?ĚĂƚĞ Ç Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻ Ä?Äž Ä‚ ĚLJŜĂžĹ?Ä? Ć?ÄžůĨͲĆ?ĆšÄ‚ĆŒĆšÄžĆŒ Ç Ĺ?ƚŚ Ä‚ ƉĂĆ?Ć?Ĺ?ŽŜ ĨŽĆŒ ĹľĹ?Ć?Ć?Ĺ?ŽŜͲÄ?Ä‚Ć?ĞĚ Ç Ĺ˝ĆŒĹŹ ĂŜĚ Ä?ŽžžƾŜĹ?ƚLJ Ä?ĆľĹ?ĹŻÄšĹ?ĹśĹ?͘ dĹšĹ?Ć? ĆŒŽůÄž ĆŒÄžĆ‰Ĺ˝ĆŒĆšĆ? ƚŽ ƚŚĞ džĞÄ?ĆľĆ&#x; ǀĞ Ĺ?ĆŒÄžÄ?ĆšĹ˝ĆŒ ĂŜĚ Ć‰ĆŒĹ˝Ç€Ĺ?ĚĞĆ? ĚĂĹ?ůLJ ĹŻÄžÄ‚ÄšÄžĆŒĆ?ĹšĹ?Ɖ ĨŽĆŒ Ć?ƚĂč ĂŜĚ Ç€ŽůƾŜĆšÄžÄžĆŒĆ? ƚŽ Ä‚Ä?ĹšĹ?ĞǀĞ ƚŚĞ Ĺ˝ĆŒĹ?Ä‚Ͳ ĹśĹ?njĂĆ&#x; ŽŜÍ›Ć? Ĺ?ŽĂůĆ?͘ dŚĞ ZÄžĹ?Ĺ?ŽŜÄ‚ĹŻ Ĺ?ĆŒÄžÄ?ĆšĹ˝ĆŒ Ç Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻ Ć?ĆľĆ‰ÄžĆŒÇ€Ĺ?Ć?Äž žƾůĆ&#x; ƉůĞ ÄšÄžĆ‰Ä‚ĆŒĆšĹľÄžĹśĆš ŚĞĂĚĆ? ĂŜĚ ŚĂǀĞ Ĺ˝Ç€ÄžĆŒÄ‚ĹŻĹŻ ĆŒÄžĆ?ƉŽŜĆ?Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?ƚLJ ĨŽĆŒ Ć?Ĺ?ƚĞͲÄ?Ä‚Ć?ĞĚ Ĺ˝Ć‰ÄžĆŒÄ‚Ć&#x; ŽŜĆ?Í• žĂĹ?ŜƚĞŜĂŜÄ?Ğ͕ Ć‰ĆŒĹ˝Ĺ?ĆŒÄ‚ĹľĆ?Í• ĆšĆŒÄ‚Ĺ?ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ? ĂŜĚ Ä?ŽžžƾŜĹ?ƚLJ ĆŒÄžĹŻÄ‚Ć&#x; ŽŜĆ?Í• Ä‚Ć? Ç ÄžĹŻĹŻ Ä‚Ć? Ć?Ä‚ĨĞƚLJ ĂŜĚ ĨÄ‚Ͳ Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?Ć&#x; ÄžĆ? žĂŜĂĹ?ÄžĹľÄžĹśĆšÍ˜ dŚĞ ZÄžĹ?Ĺ?ŽŜÄ‚ĹŻ Ĺ?ĆŒÄžÄ?ĆšĹ˝ĆŒ ƉŽĆ?Ĺ?Ć&#x; ŽŜ ĆŒÄžĆ‹ĆľĹ?ĆŒÄžĆ? Ć?ĆľĆ‰ÄžĆŒĹ?Ĺ˝ĆŒ Ĺ?ĹśĆšÄžĆŒĆ‰ÄžĆŒĆ?ŽŜÄ‚ĹŻ ĂŜĚ Ä?ŽžžƾŜĹ?Ä?Ä‚Ć&#x; ŽŜ Ć?ĹŹĹ?ĹŻĹŻĆ?Í• ƚŚĞ Ä‚Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?ƚLJ ƚŽ ƚŚĹ?Ŝŏ Ć?ĆšĆŒÄ‚ĆšÄžĹ?Ĺ?Ä?Ä‚ůͲ ůLJ ĂŜĚ Ä‚ĆŠ ĞŜĆ&#x; ŽŜ ƚŽ ĚĞƚĂĹ?ĹŻÍ˜ ĂŜĚĹ?ĚĂƚĞĆ? Ć?ĹšŽƾůÄš ŚĂǀĞ Ä‚Ćš ůĞĂĆ?Ćš ÄŽ ǀĞ ͞ϹͿ Ç‡ÄžÄ‚ĆŒĆ? Ĺ?Ĺś ƚŚĞ ÄŽ ĞůĚ ŽĨ žĂŜĂĹ?ÄžͲ žĞŜƚ͕ Ä‚ ĹľĹ?ĹśĹ?žƾž ŽĨ Ä‚ Ä‚Ä?ĹšÄžĹŻĹ˝ĆŒÍ›Ć? ÄžĹ?ĆŒÄžÄž Ĺ˝ĆŒ ĞƋƾĹ?ǀĂůĞŜƚ ÄžÇ†Ć‰ÄžĆŒĹ?ĞŜÄ?Ğ͕ ĂŜĚ Ć?ĆľĆ‰ÄžĆŒÇ€Ĺ?Ć?Ĺ˝ĆŒÇ‡ ÄžÇ†Ć‰ÄžĆŒĹ?ĞŜÄ?Ğ͘ dĆŒÄ‚ĹśĆ?Ĺ?Ćš ÄžÇ†Ć‰ÄžĆŒĹ?ĞŜÄ?Äž Ĺ?Ć? Ä‚ ƉůƾĆ? Ä?ƾƚ ŜŽĆš ĆŒÄžĆ‹ĆľĹ?ĆŒÄžÄšÍ˜ dZ ĹšĹ?Ĺ?ŚůLJ ǀĂůƾĞĆ? ĹŻÄžÄ‚ÄšÄžĆŒĆ? Ç ĹšĹ˝ Ä?Ä‚Ĺś Ä?Äž Ä?ŽƚŚ ƚĞĂž Ć‰ĹŻÄ‚Ç‡ÄžĆŒĆ? ĂŜĚ Ç Ĺ˝ĆŒĹŹ Ç ÄžĹŻĹŻ Ĺ?ĹśÄšÄžĆ‰ÄžĹśÄšÄžĹśĆšĹŻÇ‡Í˜ džÄ?ĞůůĞŜƚ Ä?ĞŜĞĎ ĆšĆ? Ĺ?ĹśÄ?ůƾĚĹ?ĹśĹ?Í— ŚĞĂůƚŚ Ĺ?ĹśĆ?ĆľĆŒÄ‚ĹśÄ?Ğ͕ ůŽŜĹ?ͲĆšÄžĆŒĹľ ÄšĹ?Ć?Ä‚Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?ƚLJ͕ Ç€Ĺ?Ć?Ĺ?ŽŜ ƉůĂŜ͕ ĆŒÄžĆ&#x; ĆŒÄžĹľÄžĹśĆš ƉůĂŜ͕ ǀĂÄ?Ä‚Ć&#x; ŽŜÍ• Ć?Ĺ?Ä?ĹŹ ĂŜĚ ƉĂĹ?Äš ĹšŽůĹ?ĚĂLJĆ?͘ dĹšĹ?Ć? Ĺ?Ć? Ä‚ ϰϏͲĹšŽƾĆŒÍŹÇ ÄžÄžĹŹ ƉŽĆ?Ĺ?Ć&#x; ŽŜ Ç Ĺ?ƚŚ Ĺ˝Ä?Ä?Ä‚Ć?Ĺ?ŽŜÄ‚ĹŻ ÄžÄ‚ĆŒĹŻÇ‡ žŽĆŒĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?ÍŹĹśĹ?Ĺ?ĹšĆšÍŹÇ ÄžÄžĹŹÄžĹśÄš žĞĞĆ&#x; ĹśĹ?Ć?͘ WĹ˝Ć?Ĺ?Ć&#x; ŽŜ ĆŒÄžĆ‹ĆľĹ?ĆŒÄžĆ? ĎŽĎ°ÍŹĎł ĂǀĂĹ?ĹŻÄ‚Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?ƚLJ Ĺ?Ĺś ÄžĹľÄžĆŒĹ?ĞŜÄ?LJ Ć?Ĺ?ƚƾĂĆ&#x; ŽŜĆ?͘ ^Ä‚ĹŻÄ‚ĆŒÇ‡ Ä?ŽžžÄžĹśĆ?ĆľĆŒÄ‚ĆšÄž Ç Ĺ?ƚŚ ÄžÇ†Ć‰ÄžĆŒĹ?ĞŜÄ?Ğ͘ ^ĞůĞÄ?ƚĞĚ Ä?ĂŜĚĹ?ĚĂƚĞ žƾĆ?Ćš ƉĂĆ?Ć? ĆŒÄžĆ‹ĆľĹ?ĆŒÄžÄš Ä?Ä‚Ä?ĹŹĹ?ĆŒŽƾŜÄš Ä?ŚĞÄ?ĹŹĆ? ĂŜĚ ĆŒĆľĹ?ÍŹ ĹŻÄ?ŽŚŽů ƚĞĆ?Ć&#x; ĹśĹ?͘ ŽŜĎ ÄšÄžĹśĆ&#x; Ä‚ĹŻĹ?ƚLJ Ĺ?Ć? Ä‚ žƾĆ?ĆšÍ˜ WůĞĂĆ?Äž Ć?ĆľÄ?ĹľĹ?Ćš ĆŒÄžĆ?ƾžÄž ĂŜĚ Ä?Ĺ˝Ç€ÄžĆŒ ůĞƊ ÄžĆŒ ƚŽ͗

,ƾžÄ‚Ĺś ZÄžĆ?ŽƾĆŒÄ?ÄžĆ? DĂŜĂĹ?ÄžĆŒ Addison  County  Transit  Resources ώϾϳ ĆŒÄžÄžĹŹ ZŽĂĚ DĹ?ĚĚůĞÄ?ĆľĆŒÇ‡Í• sÄžĆŒžŽŜĆš ϏϹϳϹϯ KĆŒ Ç€Ĺ?Ä‚ ĞžĂĹ?ĹŻ ƚŽ͗ Ć?ĹšÄ‚ĆŒĹ?ΛĂÄ?ĆšĆŒͲÇ€ĆšÍ˜Ĺ˝ĆŒĹ? EĹ˝ ƉŚŽŜÄž Ä?Ä‚ĹŻĹŻĆ?Í• ƉůĞĂĆ?Äž Íť dZ Ĺ?Ć? Ä‚Ĺś ÍŹ K ĹľĆ‰ĹŻĹ˝Ç‡ÄžĆŒ

 TOWN  OF  MIDDLEBURY Winter  Plowing  Relief  Drivers

The  Town  of  Middlebury,  Vermont  Highway  'HSDUWPHQW LV VHHNLQJ TXDOL¿ HG DSSOLFDQWV for  winter  plowing  relief  drivers  for  the  2015/2016  winter  season.  This  is  an  on  FDOO DV QHHGHG SRVLWLRQ EHJLQQLQJ LQ 'HFHPEHU DQG ODVWLQJ WKURXJK 0DUFK Work  hours  will  vary  with  need  and  may  LQFOXGH ZHHNGD\ ZHHNHQG KROLGD\ daytime,  evening  or  early  morning  as  needed  to  keep  the  roads  in  a  passable  FRQGLWLRQ 7KH LGHDO FDQGLGDWH ZLOO KDYH SORZLQJ DQG HTXLSPHQW H[SHULHQFH DQG D YDOLG &'/ &ODVV % /LFHQVH 3RVLWLRQ ZLOO report  to  the  Highway  Superintendent  and  WKH &UHZ OHDGHU $SSOLFDWLRQV DUH DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7RZQ 2I¿ FH ORFDWHG DW 0DLQ 6W Middlebury,  Vermont.

TOWN  OF  MIDDLEBURY Ä?Ä?ŽƾŜĆ&#x;ĹśĹ? ĹŻÄžĆŒĹŹ

  The  Town  of  Middlebury  seeks  friendly,  pleasant  candidates  with  outstanding  customer  service  Ć?ĹŹĹ?ĹŻĹŻĆ? ĨŽĆŒ ƚŚĞ ƉŽĆ?Ĺ?Ć&#x;ŽŜ ŽĨ Ä?Ä?ŽƾŜĆ&#x;ĹśĹ? ĹŻÄžĆŒĹŹÍ˜ <ĹśĹ˝Ç ĹŻÄžÄšĹ?Äž ŽĨ Ä?Ä‚Ć?Ĺ?Ä? Ä‚Ä?Ä?ŽƾŜĆ&#x;ĹśĹ? ĨƾŜÄ?Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ? Ç Ĺ?ƚŚ Ä‚ ĹľĹ?ĹśĹ?žƾž ŽĨ ĆšÇ Ĺ˝ Ç‡ÄžÄ‚ĆŒĆ?Í› Ć‰Ä‚Ç‡ĆŒŽůůÍ• ÍŹWÍ• ĂŜĚ Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻĹ?ĹśĹ? ÄžÇ†Ć‰ÄžĆŒĹ?ĞŜÄ?Ğ͘ Ć?Ć?Ĺ˝Ä?Ĺ?ĂƚĞ͛Ć? ÄžĹ?ĆŒÄžÄž Ĺ?Ĺś Ä?ĆľĆ?Ĺ?ŜĞĆ?Ć?Í• Ä‚Ä?Ä?ŽƾŜĆ&#x;ĹśĹ? Ĺ˝ĆŒ Ä‚ ĆŒÄžĹŻÄ‚ĆšÄžÄš ĎĞůĚ ĚĞĆ?Ĺ?ĆŒÄžÄšÍ• Ä?ƾƚ ŜŽĆš ĆŒÄžĆ‹ĆľĹ?ĆŒÄžÄšÍ˜ ŽžĆ‰ÄžĆ&#x;Ć&#x;ǀĞ Ç Ä‚Ĺ?Äž ĂŜĚ Ä?ŽžĆ‰ĆŒÄžĹšÄžĹśĆ?Ĺ?ǀĞ Ä?ĞŜĞĎƚ ƉĂÄ?ĹŹÄ‚Ĺ?Äž ŽčÄžĆŒÄžÄšÍ˜ ŽžĆ‰ĹŻÄžĆšÄž ĹŠĹ˝Ä? ĚĞĆ?Ä?ĆŒĹ?ƉĆ&#x;ŽŜ ĂŜĚ ĂƉƉůĹ?Ä?Ä‚Ć&#x;ŽŜ žĂLJ be  obtained  at  the  Municipal  Building,  on-­â€?line  Ä‚Ćš Ç Ç Ç Í˜ĆšĹ˝Ç ĹśĹ˝Ä¨ĹľĹ?ĚĚůĞÄ?ĆľĆŒÇ‡Í˜Ĺ˝ĆŒĹ? Ĺ˝ĆŒ Ä?LJ Ä?Ä‚ĹŻĹŻĹ?ĹśĹ? ϴϏώͲϯϴϴͲϴϭϏϏÍ• Ğdžƚ ĎŽĎŹĎŻÍ˜   Interested  candidates  should  forward  Ä‚ƉƉůĹ?Ä?Ä‚Ć&#x;ŽŜ ĂŜĚ Ä?Ĺ˝Ç€ÄžĆŒ ĹŻÄžĆŠÄžĆŒ ƚŽ͗ :Ä‚Ä?ƋƾĞůĹ?ŜĞ ^ƾůůĹ?ǀĂŜ Ä?Ä?ŽƾŜĆ&#x;ĹśĹ? ^ÄžĆŒÇ€Ĺ?Ä?ÄžĆ? DĂŜĂĹ?ÄžĆŒ DĹ?ĚĚůĞÄ?ĆľĆŒÇ‡ DƾŜĹ?Ä?Ĺ?ƉĂů ĆľĹ?ĹŻÄšĹ?ĹśĹ? Ͼϰ DÄ‚Ĺ?Ĺś ^ĆšĆŒÄžÄžĆš Íť DĹ?ĚĚůĞÄ?ĆľĆŒÇ‡Í• sd ϏϹϳϹϯ Ĺ˝ĆŒ Ç€Ĺ?Ä‚ ĞžĂĹ?ĹŻÍ— ĹŠĆ?ƾůůĹ?Ç€Ä‚ĹśÎ›ĆšĹ˝Ç ĹśĹ˝Ä¨ĹľĹ?ĚĚůĞÄ?ĆľĆŒÇ‡Í˜Ĺ˝ĆŒĹ?͘ dŚĞ ƉŽĆ?Ĺ?Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ç Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻ ĆŒÄžĹľÄ‚Ĺ?Ĺś ŽƉĞŜ ƾŜĆ&#x;ĹŻ ÄŽĹŻĹŻÄžÄšÍ˜ dĹ˝ ĞŜĆ?ĆľĆŒÄž Ä?ŽŜĆ?Ĺ?ÄšÄžĆŒÄ‚Ć&#x;ŽŜ ĨŽĆŒ ƚŚĹ?Ć? ƉŽĆ?Ĺ?Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ• Ĺ?ĹśĆšÄžĆŒÄžĆ?ƚĞĚ Ä?ĂŜĚĹ?ĚĂƚĞĆ? Ć?ĹšŽƾůÄš ĂƉƉůLJ Ĺ?žžÄžÄšĹ?Ä‚ĆšÄžĹŻÇ‡Í˜ K


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TRAINER

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Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

For Sale

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER artist has kinetic sculptures which need wiring assis-­ tance. $200 reserved for expenses. Beyond that, bar-­ tering. 802-­453-­6975.

MIDDLEBURY NATURAL FOODS CO-­OP is seeking full-­time staff for our Bulk Foods Department who thrive in a fast paced, customer focused work environment. Our ideal candidate enjoys physical work and a retail work environment. Visit our website www.middleburycoop.com for more information including our employment application and benefit offerings.

MR. MIKE’S COMMERCIAL Cleaning Service has open-­ ings for part to full time. Must be flexible, reliable, available to work nights a must, and able to pass background check. Self motivated, able to work independently. $500 sign on bonus. Email resume to: info@mrmikescleaning-­ servicevt.com. Application also available online www. mrmikescleaningservicevt. com. No phone calls please.

PRIVACY HEDGES-­ Fall blowout Sale. 6 foot Arbor-­ vitae (cedar) Regular: $129, now: $59. Beautiful, Nursery Grown. Free installation/Free delivery 518-­536-­1367 www. lowcosttrees.com. Limited supply.

INSTITCHES/GREEN MOUN-­ TAIN SIGNS is looking for a full or part time employee to help with all aspects of production and customer service. This is a daytime, weekday position, the hours can be somewhat flexible. Embroidery, screen printing and sign making. Willing to train the right person. You must be dependable and have good attention to detail. Must have a positive attitude, be willing to help in any area needed and able to be on your feet for most of the day. Basic computer skills a must. Knowledge of Corel Draw or Illustrator a plus. Please send resume and/or letter of interest with work experience to institches@madriver.net.

EMPLOYMENT CONSUL-­ TANT Wanted for Middlebury Office. Full time. This position will provide a progression of work-­based experience and job development. The right candidate will demonstrate initiative, diplomacy and sen-­ sitivity while dealing effectively with our consumers and the business community. For a full description of the position and to apply, please go to www.vabir.org and click on “Employment Opportunities.”

NEED A JOB? APPLY at PART TIME Office Assis-­ Middlebury Beef. 40 hours a tant for filing and organiz-­ week. Deli help and all around ing. steelbuildingsvermont. store work. Nights and week-­ co. Call for more information ends a must. Apply in person, 802-­352-­4266. East Middlebury, VT.

MIDDLEBURY UNION HIGH SCHOOL School Nurse Middlebury Union High School has a vacancy for a School Nurse who will be responsible for providing a comprehensive range of health services for an approximately 630-student 9-12 school. Knowledge of adolescent health issues, ability to be a team player, experience/ knowledge in a school setting is required. Current Vermont Nursing (RN) License and %KIRG] SJ )HYGEXMSR GIVXM½GEXMSR EW 7GLSSP Nurse are required. Apply by sending a letter of interest, resume, three current reference letters, complete transcripts and evidence of licensure to: Dr. Peter Burrows, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 Application Deadline: October 16, 2015 E.O.E.

School Age Assistants (Part time)

Come join the amazing After School Team at the Y! You will provide supervision and educational activities for children ranging in age from 5 to 14. You will engage and relate to both parents and children, overseeing children’s safety and wellbeing. Experience working with groups of school-­age children is required. The hours are 2:30 to 6:00pm Monday through Friday. We have openings Monday through Friday in: -­ Charlotte -­ Essex (Monday through Friday and Wednesday through Friday) -­ Founders in Essex (2 positions) -­ Huntington -­ Waterbury (2 positions) The Y is an equal opportunity employer and provider focusing on youth development, healthy living and social responsibility. If interested, please send a cover note, resumé and 3 references to hr@gbymca.org.

SAWMILLS FROM ONLY $4,397. Make and save mon-­ ey with your own bandmill, cut lumber any dimension. In stock, ready to ship. Free info/ DVD: www.NorwoodSawmills. PERMANENT POSITION-­ com, 1-­800-­578-­1363, ext. Full Charge Bookkeeper. 300N. Duties include all aspects for Accounts Receivable, Ac-­ counts Payable, and Payroll. THE BARREL MAN plastic This is a 30 hour work week. and metal barrels. Food grade Applicant must be proficient and regular grade. Dozens of with QuickBooks. Also must types. 802-­453-­4235. be customer service oriented. Please submit resume to Dar-­ win Pratt, Tri-­Town Water, P.O. Box 85, Bridport, VT 05734 or tritownwater@gmavt.net. ROUSE TIRE SALES in Middlebury and Williston, VT is looking to fill the follow-­ ing positions: Service Truck driver (commercial/ag/otr tires), Warehouse manager, Route/Delivery driver, Road Salesperson, Tire Technician (auto/light truck/commercial/ ag/otr). Must be able to work in a fast paced environment, be dependable, team oriented, have good work ethic, a valid driver’s license and have good customer service skills. Pre-­ vious experience preferred. Please send resume and prior employment references to: Rouse Tire Sales, Inc., Attn: Carolyn Rouse . P. O. Box 902, Middlebury, VT 05753. Applications also available at both locations. No phone calls.

WHISTLEPIG FARM is look-­ ing for a Distillery/Warehouse Charge Hand. Applicants must be able to compete physical tasks in a timely manner with minimal direction. Experience in operating and repairing ma-­ chinery a plus. Please provide a resume and references to info@whistlepigrye.com

TWIN MATTRESS $97. Full mattress, $145. Bob’s Furni-­ ture and Bedding, RT 7 South, Middlebury. 802-­388-­1300.

For Rent 1 BEDROOM LAKE DUN-­ MORE 1st floor apartment in 2-­story house. Washer/ dryer, stove, refrigerator. Lake access with dock and sun deck across road. $850/ month, includes heat, electric, snow plowing and yard main-­ tenance. No smoking or pets. Lease, references, deposit and credit check required. 802-­352-­6678. 1,800 SQ. FT. WAREHOUSE as is or renovate to suit. Creek Road, Middlebury. 802-­558-­6092. 2 BEDROOM, WINTER RENT-­ AL on Lake Dunmore. Avail-­ able 9/12/2015-­6/25/2016. Completely furnished, very modern year round house. Washer/dryer, satellite, in-­ ternet, energy efficient base-­ board heat, with frontage on Lake Dunmore. $1,000/month, plus utilities. Snow plowing and yard maintenance in-­ cluded. No pets or smoking, no exceptions. Credit and se-­ curity required. 802-­352-­6678.

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2,000 SQ. FT. PROFESSION-­ AL office space in Middlebury, multi-­room. Ground level, For Sale parking, handicap-­accessible. 2 0 0 9 C R A F T S M A N Available now. 802-­558-­6092. SNO-­BLOWER lawn tractor, 24HP, 42” mower. Electric BRANDON-­1 BEDROOM start, auto transmission. Hard-­ upstairs apartment. $650. ly used, 26.5 hours. $2,500 See photos on Craigslist. o.b.o. 802-­247-­6043. 802-­247-­0115. FLEETWOOD PROWLER 5th BRANDON-­5 BR, close to wheel camper. 1992. 26’. Very center of town. Large kitch-­ good condition. All appliances. en, 1 1/2 bath, laundry room, $2,500 o.b.o. 802-­453-­3504. fenced in yard, storage. Refer-­ ences, deposit. $1,200/month. MAXIM OUTDOOR WOOD 802-­989-­8399. PELLET Furnace by Cen-­ tral Boiler, features auto-­ matic power ignition. Heats Buy it! entire home and more. Call today. Boivin Farm Supply Sell it! 802-­475-­4007. Find it!

&KHFN WKH &ODVVL¿ HGV twice a week in the Addison Independent.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  41

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

BRANDON:  PARK  VILLAGE  is  now  accepting  applications  for  1,  2  and  3  bedroom  apart-­ ments.  Rents  starting  at  $700  includes  heat  and  trash.  No  pets.  Laundry  onsite.  Income  restrictions  apply.  Call  Summit  Property  Management  Group  at  802-­247-­0165  or  visit  our  website  www.summitpmg.com

BRISTOL-­BRAND  NEW  12  unit  apartment  building.  Close  to  village  center.  Ev-­ erything  included,  except  electric.  $1,400/month.  Avail-­ able  immediately.  Call  Stan  802-­355-­1926.

M I D D L E B U RY  1  B E D -­ ROOM  upstairs  apartment,  sunny,  quiet.  $750/month,  plus  deposit;͞  includes  some  utilities.  Non-­smoking.  Phone  802-­388-­0401.

BRISTOL,  54  WEST  STREET  rental:  duplex/kitchen,  LR,  DR,  office,  2  bedrooms  and  one  small  bathroom/shower.  Covered  front  porch,  large  yard/area  for  a  garden  and  off  street  parking.  Washer/ dryer  included.  No  smoking,  no  pets.  Tenant  pays  heat  and  electric.  $875/month,  rent  in-­ cludes  snow  removal  and  yard  maintenance.  First  month,  last  month  and  damage  deposit  required  upon  signing  the  lease.  Available  immediately.  Credit  check  and  references  required.  Call  Wallace  Re-­ alty  802-­453-­4670  or  email  Claire@WallaceRE.com.

DOWNTOWN  MIDDLEBURY;͞  3  BR  apartment  for  rent.  Walking  distance  to  college.  Available  June  1st.  Call  Baba  802-­373-­6456.

MIDDLEBURY  FURNISHED  APARTMENT.  Large  living  room,  kitchen,  bedroom  and  bath.  $795/month  with  all  utili-­ ties.  802-­458-­2581.

Wood  Heat

Real  Estate

Cars

Wanted

DRY  FIREWOOD;͞  cut,  split,  stacked  last  winter.  Hard  rock  maple.  $300/cord-­you  pick  up.  $375/cord-­delivered.  Smaller  quantities  available.  802-­453-­4235.

NEW  HAVEN-­  For  sale  by  owner.  Updated  3  BR,  2  1/2  bath  cape  cod.  1,998  s.f.,  with  2  car  garage  on  5  acres.  $289,900.  Call  for  appoint-­ ment.  802-­453-­6995.

2004  MERCURY  SABLE  LS  Wagon,  loaded,  leather,  CD,  traction  control,  Mach  au-­ dio  system,  3rd  seat,  good  tires,  new  inspection.  117,000  miles.  Asking  $3,200  o.b.o.  802-­352-­6678.

LOOKING  FOR  CLEAN  WASTE  OIL.  50  gallons  or  more.  Free  pick-­up.  802-­388-­4138.

TRUSTED  3RD  GEN.  VT  Antique  dealer  special-­ FIREWOOD-­  Clean,  dry  fire-­ izing  in  jewelry,  watches,  Att.  Farmers wood  available.  $250/cord,  silver,  art,  military,  an-­ SUVs delivery  included.  Call  Jason  tique  collectibles,  etc.  Visit  WHITNEY’S  CUSTOM  FARM  at  802-­989-­8180,  or  email  at  www.bittnerantiques.com  or  2005  HONDA  PILOT-­  AWD.  WORK.  Pond  agitating,  liquid  metcalfefirewood@gmail.com call  Brian  at  802-­272-­7527.  Runs  great,  180,000  miles.  manure  hauling,  drag  line  aer-­ Consulting/appraisal  services  $4,200  o.b.o.  802-­236-­3549. ating.  Call  for  price.  462-­2755,  available.  House  calls  made  John  Whitney. FIREWOOD,  MIXED  HARD-­ free  of  charge. WOOD.  Green  and  seasoned.  Cut,  split,  delivered.  Call  802-­282-­9110.

MIDDLEBURY-­3  BEDROOM  FOR  RENT-­  Bridport  Village,  APARTMENT.  Check  it  out  at:  2  bedroom  apartment.  $850/ http://66npleasantst.weebly. month,  includes  electric,  solar  com  and  click  on  the  Three  hot  water.  References,  de-­ bedroom  tab. posit.  802-­236-­8800.

M I D D M E N  F I R E W O O D  -­  WWW.MIDDMEN.COM  -­  1-­855-­MIDDMEN.  Affordable.  Convenient.  Reliable™  -­  Free  delivery  in  Weybridge,  Corn-­ wall  and  Middlebury.

MIDDLEBURY,  2  BEDROOM  apartment,  W+D  hook-­up,  ga-­ rage,  walking  distance  to  vil-­ lage.  First,  last,  deposit,  refer-­ ences,  1  year  lease.  No  smok-­ ing  or  pets.  802-­236-­6175.

MOUNTAIN  ROAD  FIRE-­ WOOD.  Wood  for  sale-­cut,  split  and  delivered.  Green,  ash,  beech,  hickory,  maple.  Call  802-­759-­2095.

We  currently  are  accepting  applications  for  one  or  two  bedroom  apartments.  These  units  are  subsidized  through  the  Department  of  HUD  Section  8  Rental  Assistance  Program  and  are  available  for  occupancy  by  elderly  and/or  hadicapped  persons.  Eligible  families  will  pay  30%  of  their  adjusted  income  for  rent.  For  more  information,  please  write  or  call  the  rental  management  agent.

BRISTOL  VILLAGE-­  One  room  efficiency  in  Victorian  home,  2nd  floor,  southern  exposure,  heated,  no  pets,  non-­smoking  property,  lease,  available  Sept  1,  $595/month.  802-­578-­6049.

Real-­Net Management, Inc. 28 Court Street Middlebury, VT 05753 802-­388-­4994

BUILDING  LOT,  DAISY  LANE,  East  Middlebury.  Town  water,  underground  telephone,  cable  and  elec-­ tric  service.  Good  perking  soil.  Regular  septic.  Site  ap-­ proved  for  4  bedroom  home.  Jack  Brown,  802-­388-­2502  or  802-­388-­7350.  Email:  brown-­ nov@together.net. M I D D L E B U RY;͞  I N D U S -­ TRIAL  PARK.  Available  2  acres,  lease  or  build  to  suit.  802-­558-­6092.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

It’s  against  the  law  to  discriminate  when  advertising  housing

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONT’S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\ 97 ‡ ‡ ZZZ $GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW FRP

Paquette  Self  Storage  (1) Addison  Northwest  Supervisory  Vergennes  (1) Union  (1) Weybridge  (1) Middlebury  (1)

ADDISON NORTHWEST SUPERVISORY UNION BOARD OF DIRECTORS’ MEETINGS The  following  schedule  of  the  Board  of  School  Directors’  meetings  is  announced  for  the  month  of  October,  2015. Friday,  October  2  7:30  AM  VUHS Facilities Committee    In  the  VUHS  Library Monday,  October  12  3:30  PM  VUHS Finance Committee $W WKH $1:68 2IÂżFH  4:30  PM  ANWSU Audit Committee $W WKH $1:68 2IÂżFH Tuesday,  October  13  6:00  PM  Act 46 Study Committee    In  the  VUHS  Library Tuesday,  October  20  6:00  PM  Act 46 Community Meeting    In  the  VUHS  Library Wednesday,  October  21  6:00  PM  Addison Central School Board Ferrisburgh Central School Board Vergennes Union Elementary School Board Vergennes Union High School Board    Regular  monthly  meeting  at  VUHS  7:30  PM  Addison Northwest Supervisory Union Board                 Regular  meeting  in  the  VUHS  Library The purpose of each meeting is to transact regular business, including a review of correspondence, reports, approval of bills, and any other business proper to be EURXJKW EHIRUH VDLG PHHWLQJV XQOHVV RWKHUZLVH VSHFLĂ€HG

NOTICE OF SELF-­STORAGE LIEN SALE PAQUETTE SELF STORAGE 57 1257+ ‡ 0,''/(%85< 97

And  it’s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you  might  think.  You  can’t  say  â€œno  childrenâ€?  or  â€œadults  only.â€?  There  is  lots  you  can’t  say.  The  federal  government  is  watching  for  such  discrimination.

Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

Northlands  Job  Corps  Ctr.  (1)

10/1, Â 5

Particularly  on  sites  like  Craigslist.

Let  us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities  of  the  Fair  Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the  right  side  of  the  nation’s  Fair  Housing  Law. Â

Addison  County  Fair  and  Field  Days  (1)

Real  Estate

Middlebury, Â VT

Available for Eligible Applicants

Public  notices  for  the  following  can  be  found  in  this  ADDISON  INDEPENDENT  on  Pages  41  and  42.

Whiting  (1)

THE  MEADOWS 2  Bedroom  Apartment

Public Notices Index

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ollege.  For  Rent  Close  to  c TMENT OM  APAR y,  newly  refurbished. O R D E B 1  000. ,  Middlebur Main  Street ,  includes  heat.  000-­0 th y $750/mon f  Middlebur ile  north  o sit.  000-­0000. TMENT, po ubbish,  1  m OM  APAR 1  BEDRO ludes  heat,  electric,  r  $595/month  plus  de ly, upstairs,  inc Available  immediate e .  d  referenc on  Route  7 e  Deposit  an om  MOBILE  h 50/mo.  plus  utilities. M O O R D E t.  $6 2  B .  Private  lo in  Salisbury -­0000. ired. 00 ences  requ required.  0 ONDO ent.  Refer NHOUSE/C arage  and  basem 000. W O T  M O 2  BEDRO mons,  Vergennes.  G eat.  No  pets.  000-­0  h om Country  C xcluding  utilities  and her,  e ely ellite,  was et pl $1,000/mo. om ,  c ternet,  sat y  energy ERN er  Hi-­speed  in OM,  MOD 2  BEDRO ke  Dunmore  house. 85’  lake  frontage.  V URXJK -XQH WK l,  678. La furnished  ed  porch,  drilled  wel QJ $XJXVW s  utilities.  802-­352-­6 UWL lu en dryer,  scre PRQWK UHQWDO VWD tiable.  $1,000/mo.  p go RU g.  Pets  ne HIÂżFLHQW ) on-­smokin 26,  2010.  N

Notice  is  hereby  given  that  the  contents  of  the  self-­storage  units  listed  below  will  be  sold  at  public  auction  by  sealed  bid.   This  sale  is  being  held  to  collect  unpaid  storage  unit  occupancy  fees,  charges  and  expenses  of  the  sale. The  entire  contents  of  each  self-­storage  unit  listed  below  will  be  sold,  with  the  proceeds  to  be  distributed  to  Paquette  Self  Storage  for  all  accrued  occupancy  fees  (rent  charges),  late  payment  fees,  sale  expenses,  and  all  other  expenses  in  relation  to  the  unit  and  its  sale. Contents  of  each  unit  may  be  viewed  on   Mon.,  Nov.  2,  2015   commencing  at  10AM.   Sealed  bids  are  to  be  submitted  on  the  entire  contents  of  each  self-­storage  unit.   Bids  will  be  opened  one  half  hour  after  the  last  unit  has  been  viewed  on  Mon.,  Nov.  2,  2015.   The  highest  bidder  on  the  storage  unit  must  remove  the  entire  contents  of  the  unit  within  KRXUV DIWHU QRWL¿FDWLRQ RI WKHLU VXFFHVVIXO ELG 3XUFKDVH PXVW EH PDGH LQ FDVK and  paid  in  advance  of  the  removal  of  the  contents  of  the  unit.   A  $50.00  cash  deposit  shall  be  made  and  will  be  refunded  if  the  unit  is  broom  cleaned.   Paquette  Self  Storage  reserves  the  right  to  accept  or  reject  bids. The  contents  of  the  following  tenants  self-­storage  units  will  be  included  in  this  sale: Casey  Larocque,  Unit  46 153  Rogers  Rd. Middlebury,  VT  05753

Alan  Irish,  Container  67 33  Birch  St. South  Burlington,  VT  05403

Tom  Duvell,  Trailer  152 142  Miacomet  Rd. Nantucket,  MA  02554

Michael  Malone,  Container  14 Richard  Hurteau,  Units  38  &  140 PO  Box  368 PO  Box  357 Middlebury,  VT  05753 Warren,  VT  05674

10/1, Â 5, Â 8, Â 12


PAGE  42  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

Granville  (Continued  from  Page  2) could  not  sustain  the  service  â€”  has  not  contributed  to  any  patient  fatali-­ ties  due  to  the  longer  ambulance  re-­ sponse  time  from  Bethel,  according  to  Sargent.  But  leaders  in  all  three  towns  don’t  want  to  tempt  fate,  so  they  have  signed  a  memorandum  of  understanding  calling  for  the  Gran-­ ville  Fire  Department  to  coordinate  ¿UVW UHVSRQVH VHUYLFHV IRU WKH FRP-­ munities. “We  really  need  to  pull  together,â€?  Sargent  said.

 +++++++++++++++  TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY

SPECIAL SELECTBOARD MEETING 78(6'$< 2FWREHU ‡ 3 0 /$5*( &21)(5(1&( 5220 0$,1 675((7

This  meeting  will  convene  immediately  after  the  Public  Meeting  to  be  held  by  the  Vermont  Agency  of  Transportation  on  the  Middlebury  6WDWH $LUSRUW LQ WKH *\P DW S P  AGENDA 7:00 &DOO WR 2UGHU $SSURYDO RI 0LQXWHV RI 6HSWHP EHU $SSURYDO RI $JHQGD &LWL]HQ &RPPHQWV >2SSRUWXQLW\ to  raise  or  address  issues  that  are  not  otherwise  included  on  this agenda] 7:10 5HYLHZ 3URSRVHG %LF\FOH 2U dinance 7:20 5HYLHZ 5HTXHVW WR $SSURYH 0RWLRQ IRU 7RZHU 5HSODFHPHQW RQ &KLSPDQ +LOO $ZDUG &RQWUDFW IRU 0HPRULDO 6SRUWV &HQWHU 3DUNLQJ /RW /LJKWLQJ Project 7:30 &RPPLWWHH 3URMHFW 5HSRUWV D 7UDIÂżF &DOPLQJ 0HHWLQJ RI 6HSWHPEHU E 3XEOLF 6DIHW\ &RPPLWWHH 0HHW LQJ RI 6HSWHPEHU &RQ VLGHU 3DUWLFLSDWLRQ LQ 9HUPRQW $OHUW Emergency  Messaging  Service F 7RZQ 2IÂżFHV 5HFUHDWLRQ )DFLOLWLHV %XLOGLQJ &RPPLWWHH 0HHW LQJ RI 6HSWHPEHU G 3ROLF\ 5HYLHZ &RPPLWWHH 0HHWLQJ RI 6HSWHPEHU H ,OVOH\ 3XEOLF /LEUDU\ %XLOGLQJ &RPPLWWHH 0HHWLQJ RI 6HSWHPEHU I 0DLQ 6WUHHW 0HUFKDQWV 5RZ 2YHUSDVV %ULGJH 5HSODFHPHQWV 3URMHFW /RFDO 0DQDJHPHQW 7HDP 0HHWLQJ RI 6HSWHPEHU J 3HUVRQQHO &RPPLWWHH 0HHWLQJ RI 6HSWHPEHU K (FRQRPLF 'HYHORSPHQW ,QLWLD WLYH (', 5HYLHZ &RPPLWWHH 0HHW LQJ RI 2FWREHU 8:00 5HYLHZ /HWWHU WR WKH 6WDWH RI Vermont,  Division  of  Property  Valu DWLRQ 5HYLHZ UHJDUGLQJ WKH WD[ status  of  two  dormitories  proposed  E\ 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH 8:10 1RPLQDWLRQ RI 7UXVWHHV WR WKH DM  Means  Memorial  Trust 8:15 $SSURYDO RI &KHFN :DUUDQWV 7RZQ 0DQDJHUÂśV 5HSRUW %RDUG 0HPEHU &RQFHUQV ([HFXWLYH 6HVVLRQ Âą ,I 1HHGHG Âą ([HFXWLYH 6HVVLRQ RQ 3HUVRQQHO Anticipated $FWLRQ RQ 0DWWHUV 'LVFXVVHG in  Executive  Session 8:35 $GMRXUQ *  Decision  Item    **  Possible  Decision If  you  need  special  accommodations  to  attend  this  meeting,  please  contact  the  7RZQ 0DQDJHUÂśV 2IÂżFH DW [ DV HDUO\ DV SRVVLEOH Additional  information  about  most  Agen da  items  is  available  on  the  Town’s  web VLWH ZZZ WRZQRIPLGGOHEXU\ RUJ RQ WKH 6HOHFWERDUG SDJH 10/5

Fortunately,  the  Granville  Fire  De-­ partment  is  well-­positioned  to  take  on  the  new  responsibility,  according  to  Sargent.  The  department  received  LWV ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH OLFHQVXUH IURP WKH state  of  Vermont  back  in  2010.  The  RXWÂżW KDV D UHVFXH YHKLFOH HTXLSSHG with  the  jaws  of  life,  backboards,  de-­ ÂżEULOODWRUV R[\JHQ WDQNV DQG RWKHU HPHUJHQF\ HTXLSPHQW DQG WRROV Sargent  said  his  force  currently  KDV IRXU PHPEHUV (07 FHUWLÂżHG WR GHOLYHU ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH VHUYLFHV DQG DQRWKHU ÂżYH DUH UHDG\ WR WDNH WKH test.  Granville  is  looking  for  volun-­ teers  in  Hancock  and  Rochester  to  DGG WR WKH ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH QHWZRUN +H VWUHVVHG WKDW WKH *UDQYLOOH ÂżUVW THE  GRANVILLE  FIRE  Department,  shown  at  a  Jaws  of  Life  training  exercise  this  past  July,  is  taking  re-­ responders’  job  is  simply  to  stabilize  VSRQVLELOLW\ IRU ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH HPHUJHQF\ PHGLFDO FDUH LQ *UDQYLOOH +DQFRFN DQG 5RFKHVWHU VLQFH D %HWKHO the  patient  until  an  ambulance  ar-­ DPEXODQFH VHUYLFH SXOOHG LWV VWDWLRQ IURP 5RXWH rives.  The  service  does  not  include  transportation  to  hospitals,  though  response  call,  with  the  proceeds  Vermont  State  Police’s  Rocking-­ Sargent  believes  such  an  amenity  could  be  added  sometime  in  the  future  depending  on  what  the  three  used  to  help  the  volunteers  main-­ ham  barracks. WDLQ WKHLU FHUWLÂżFDWLRQ DQG WR UHSODFH REMOTE  TOWNS communities  want. HTXLSPHQW ZKHQ QHHGHG Hancock’s  agreement  with  Gran-­ Granville  charges  its  Hancock  TOWN OF WHITING WRVA,  according  to  Sargent,  YLOOH H[WHQGV WKURXJK WKLV ÂżVFDO \HDU DQG 5RFKHVWHU SDUWQHUV SHU ÂżUVW NOTICE was  responding  to  a  combined  total  (until  June  30,  2016). Sawyer  Needham  Road  in  Whiting  of  around  120  calls  per  year  in  the  â€œThis  is  to  get  us  through  FY  will  be  under  construction  and  closed  three  Route  100  communities,  with  â€™16  to  see  how  this  plays  out,â€?  said  WR WUDIÂżF EHJLQQLQJ 6HSWHPEHU ADDISON COUNTY FAIR & through  October  7,  2015.  Please  use  an  the  majority  of  them  in  Rochester.  Hancock  Selectwoman  Monica  FIELD DAYS, INC.-­ NOTICE alternate  route. The  Granville  Fire  Department  is  Collins.  â€œ(Granville)  will  come  up  OF PUBLIC HEARING 9/17,  21,  24,  28,  10/1  &  10/5 QRZ WDNLQJ RQ ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH FKRUHV with  more  budget  numbers  to  see  All  residents  of  Addison  County  are  here-­ for  those  calls.  The  team  is  being  ZKDW WR GR QH[W \HDU ´ by  given  notice  of  the  annual  meeting  of  toned  out  via  911  calls  through  the  Sticking  with  Granville  might  TOWN OF WEYBRIDGE Addison  County  Fair  &  Field  Days,  Inc.,  to  become  a  long-­term  arrangement,  be  held  at  7:30  p.m.  on  Monday,  October  PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE +DQFRFN RIÂżFLDOV QRWHG 1HLWKHU 5,  2015  at  the  Weybridge  Congregational  The  Weybridge  Planning  Commission  volunteer  nor  private  ambulance  NORTHLANDS JOB CORPS Church,  in  Weybridge,  Vermont. will  hold  a  Public  Meeting  on  October  13,  companies  are  clamoring  to  set  up  DW SP DW WKH :H\EULGJH 7RZQ 2IÂżFH CENTER REQUEST FOR AGENDA located  at  1727  Quaker  Village  Road  for  1.  Welcome  and  Introduction  of  Board  QUOTES – CENTER VENDOR shop  in  the  Route  100  area. the  following  purpose:  To  review  application  â€œWe  really  don’t  have  many  op-­     Members SERVICES AND SUPPLIES #16-­15  submitted  by  Tim  &  Nancy  Spear  2.  Review  of  2015  Fair tions  because  of  our  remote  loca-­ The  Northlands  Job  Corps  Center  for  a  minor  subdivide  of  their  property  on  3.  Financial  Report tion,â€?  Collins  said.  â€œI  don’t  see  us  (NJCC)  and  Education  &  Training  Re-­ 640  Sheep  Farm  Road  into  3  residential  4.  Audience  Comments  and  Questions VWDUWLQJ RXU RZQ ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH ZH sources  (ETR);  located  at  100  A  Mac  parcels.  The  full  application  can  be  viewed  (OHFWLRQ RI %RDUG 0HPEHUV 2IÂżFHUV are  such  a  small  town.â€? Donough  Drive,  Vergennes,  VT  05491  DW WKH 7RZQ 2IÂżFH GXULQJ UHJXODU EXVLQHVV 6.  Refreshments  will  be  served. And  Collins  noted  that  local  resi-­ are  desirous  of  fully  Licensed,  Certi-­ hours.  Cara  N.  Mullin,  Business  Manager ÂżHG DQG ,QVXUHG 6HUYLFH DQG 6XSSO\ dents  in  rural  towns  are  increasing-­ 9/28                 Weybridge  Planning  Commission 9/28 Vendors  to  submit  a  bid  on  the  feder-­ ly  working  in  more  urban  centers,  ally  funded  project  mentioned  herein;  thereby  limiting  their  availability  and  if  successfully  awarded  the  subject  IRU FLYLF VHUYLFH RQ UHVFXH VTXDGV contract,  to  satisfactorily  provide  the  fol-­ CITY OF VERGENNES “There’s  less  of  a  volunteer  lowing  services  according  to  the  estab-­ PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE base,â€?  she  said. lished  criteria  contained  within  same.  All    Notice  is  hereby  given  to  the  residents  of  the  City  of  Vergennes,  owners  of  land  within  said  Robert  Meagher  is  a  Rochester  bidders  must  have  a  â€œDun  &  Bradstreetâ€?  city,  and  other  interested  persons  and  parties,  that  the  Vergennes  City  Council  will  hold  a  selectman  who  has  represented  his  (DUNS)  number  to  be  awarded  a  federal  public  hearing  on  Tuesday,  October  27,  2015  at  7  p.m.  in  the  Vergennes  Fire  Station  Meeting  FRPPXQLW\ÂśV LQWHUHVWV LQ WKH ÂżUVW contract  and  provide  documentation  of  Room  as  required  by  24  V.S.A.  §  4442.   The  purpose  of  the  public  hearing  is  for  the  City  response  debate.  He  said  he  and  such.  All  bidders  must  be  registered  in  Council  to  hear  and  receive  testimony  regarding  the  amendments  to  the  Vergennes  zoning  â€œSystem  for  Award  Managementâ€?  (SAM)  other  Rochester  residents  are  grate-­ and  subdivision  regulations  as  proposed  by  the  Vergennes  Planning  Commission.   A  copy  of  https://www.sam.gov/portal/public/SAM/  ful  to  Granville  for  taking  a  lead  in  WKH IXOO WH[W DQG DFFRPSDQ\LQJ PDS LV RQ ÂżOH LQ WKH &LW\ &OHUNÂśV RIÂżFH IRU SXEOLF H[DPLQDWLRQ before  being  awarded  a  federal  contract  WKH ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH VHUYLFH 0HDJKHU Statement of Purpose: and  provide  documentation  of  such.  also  hopes  to  see  Rochester  resi-­   The  purpose  of  amending  the  zoning  and  subdivision  regulations  is  to  bring  them  into  Contract  Year  begins  December  1,  2015  dents  step  forward  to  increase  Gran-­ FRQIRUPDQFH ZLWK WKH PXQLFLSDO GHYHORSPHQW SODQ WKDW ZDV DGRSWHG E\ WKH &LW\ DQG PDNH –  November  30,  2016.  Vendor  services  ville’s  stock  of  volunteers. other  minor  amendments. to  include:  Cafeteria  and  Culinary  Food,  Geographic Area Affected “We  want  to  support  (Granville)  'DLU\ %UHDG DQG 6XSSOLHV +RXUO\ %RLO-­ The  entire  area  of  the  City  of  Vergennes  is  affected. in  any  way  we  can,â€?  Meagher  said. HU 5HSDLU 6HUYLFHV +RXUO\ 3OXPELQJ Sections with Proposed Amendments Once  Granville  First  Response  5HSDLU 6HUYLFHV +RXUO\ (OHFWULFDO 5H-­ 6HFWLRQ 'HÂżQLWLRQV is  stocked  with  a  good  number  of  SDLU 6HUYLFHV :HOGLQJ 6XSSOLHV IRU 6WX-­ Section  202.  Development  Review  Board GHQW :HOGLQJ 7UDGH 6WXGHQW $FDGHPLF volunteers,  the  three  towns  can  look  Section  402.  Accessory  Dwelling  Units 8QLIRUPV DQG 6WXGHQW 7UDGH 8QLIRUPV at  attracting  an  ambulance  service  Section  405.  Home  Occupations *6$ -DQLWRULDO 6XSSOLHV &HQWHU -DQL-­ back  to  the  valley,  he  said. Section  502.  Development  Review  Board  Functions WRULDO 6XSSOLHV &HQWHU 2IÂżFH 6XSSOLHV Âł:H KDYH WKHVH HPEHUV RI D ÂżUH 6HFWLRQ 6SHFLDO 3DUNLQJ DQG /RDGLQJ 6SDFH 5HTXLUHPHQWV 6HFXULW\ 6HUYLFHV IRU 6WXGHQW 3D\UROO IRU ÂżUVW UHVSRQVH DQG ZH ZDQW WR 6HFWLRQ /RFDWLRQ DQG 'LPHQVLRQV RI 'ULYHZD\V +HDOWK DQG :HOOQHVV /LQHQ /DXQGU\ IDQ WKRVH Ă€DPHV ´ 0HDJKHU VDLG Section  1206.  Open  Storage  in  Residential  Districts 6HUYLFHV 3URSDQH *DV 'HOLYHU\ 3RLQW Reporter  John  Flowers  is  at  Section  1410.  Calculating  Coverage of  contact  for  these  services/supplies  johnf@addisonindependent.com. LV WKH 1-&& 3XUFKDVLQJ 'HSDUWPHQW Section  1506.  Camping  Trailers,  Travel  Trailers,  and  Motor  Homes Section  1601.  Establishment  of  Zoning  Districts Section  1602.  Zoning  Map Section  1603.  Agricultural  and  Rural  Residential  District  â€œAGRâ€? Section  1604.  Historic  Neighborhood  District Section  1609.  Central  Business  District  â€œCBDâ€? Section  1611.  Industrial  District  â€œINDâ€? Section  1612.  Public  District  â€œPUBâ€? Section  1613.  Northern  Gateway  District  â€œNGDâ€? 6HFWLRQ /RZ 'HQVLW\ 5HVLGHQWLDO 'LVWULFW

10-­5

7KH 3XUFKDVLQJ $JHQW FDQ EH UHDFKHG via  email  at:   frank.sheldon@etrky.com,  hannah.deming@etrky.com,  and  Cor-­ SRUDWH 6XSSRUW $VVLVWDQW SDWWL EDUWOXP# HWUN\ FRP 3OHDVH JR WR ZZZ IER JRY IRU PRUH LQGLYLGXDO ELG GHWDLOV ZKHQ Âż-­ nal  bids  are  due  and  bid  packages. “THIS IS A SUBCONTRACTING OPPORTUNITYâ€?

9/14, Â 17, Â 21, Â 24, Â 28, Â 10/1, Â 5, Â 8

CONTACT GOV. SHUMLIN Governor Peter Shumlin 9W RQO\ ‡ 109  State  Street,  Pavillion Montpelier,  Vermont  05609-­0101 www.vermont.gov/governor


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015  â€”  PAGE  43

Anglers  (Continued  from  Page  1) DERXW VWRUP GUDLQV According  to  NHRAA  conserva-­ :HDULQJ UHĂ€HFWLYH YHVWV KHIWLQJ tion  chair  Stever  Bartlett,  while  most  WUDIÂżF FRQHV DQG RIWHQ VWDQGLQJ SDUW-­ folks  understand  how  toxins  like  way  into  the  road  as  they  painted  the  gasoline,  motor  oil  stencils,  the  volunteers  or  antifreeze  could  were  able  to  strike  up  poison  a  stream  di-­ The Anglers some  conversations  rectly,  many  are  not  Association hopes with  passersby  and  aware  that  seemingly  the stencils will KDQG RXW OHDĂ€HWV harmless  clumps  of  Among  the  volun-­ dust,  leaves,  sticks  raise awareness teers  were  local  Boy  or  even  mowed  grass  that the very storm Scouts  Oliver  Cole,  FDQ ² LQ VXIÂżFLHQW drains folks walk DQG $QG\ .QLJKW amounts  â€”  make  or drive past every ERWK VWXGHQWV the  river  environ-­ day along Main, at  Mount  Abraham  ment  too  warm  or  too  Union  High  School. North and other GLUW\ IRU ÂżVK DQG DGG )RU .QLJKW VWHQFLO-­ to  the  phosphorus  or  streets in Bristol, ing  storm  drains  was  nitrogen  pollution  in  drain directly into a  way  to  participate  Lake  Champlain.  As  the New Haven in  community  service  Bristol  has  grown  in  River just down and  help  the  river.  population  density,  the hill behind “I  think  this  is  Bartlett  said,  seem-­ important  to  show  %2< 6&2876 $1'< .QLJKW OHIW DQG 2OLYHU &ROH DSSO\ SDLQW WR D ÂżVK VWHQFLO LQ IURQW RI D VWUHHW GUDLQ LQ ingly  innocuous  ac-­ downtown. people  that  it  drains  Bristol  on  Sept.  26.  Knight  and  Cole  volunteered  their  services  for  the  New  Haven  River  Anglers  Association,  tions  like  sweeping  into  the  river  because  which  is  trying  to  raise  awareness  that  what  goes  down  the  drain  ends  up  in  the  New  Haven  River. Photo  by  Stever  Bartlett grass  or  dust  into  storm  drains  can  whatever  goes  down  there  affects  the  have  a  harmful  impact. ÂżVKÂśV HFRV\VWHP DQG MXVW KRZ WKH\ Cole  added,  â€œIt’s  important  to  be  It’s  all  connected.  So  if  we  keep  it  clean  as  well.â€? Indeed,  the  EPA’s  most  recent  lim-­ live,â€?  he  said.  â€œAnd  I  thought  it’d  be  doing  this  so  we  don’t  harm  the  lo-­ clean  then  the  whole  ecosystem  â€”  Reporter  Gaen  Murphree  is  at  its  for  phosphorus  spilling  into  the  a  really  cool  opportunity.â€? cal  river,  the  lake,  even  Otter  Creek.  all  the  rivers  and  the  lake  â€”  will  be  gaenm@addisonindependent.com. lake  require  a  22.2  percent  reduction  in  run-­off  from  what  the  EPA  calls  â€œdeveloped  landâ€?  within  the  Otter  Creek  watershed.  That’s  a  22.2  per-­ cent  reduction,  throughout  most  of  Addison  County,  in  any  kind  of  run-­ off  from  roads,  both  paved  and  dirt,  SDUNLQJ ORWV URRIV VSRUWV ÂżHOGV HWF EQUAL HOUSING The  Anglers  Association  hopes   OPPORTUNITY the  stencils  will  raise  awareness  that  the  very  storm  drains  folks  walk  or  All real estate advertising in this newspa-­ drive  past  every  day  along  Main,  per is subject to the Federal Fair Housing North  and  other  streets  in  Bristol,  Act of 1968 as amended which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limita-­ drain  directly  into  the  New  Ha-­ tion or discrimination based on race, color, ven  River  just  down  the  hill  behind  religion, sex, handicap, familial status, na-­ 48 Mountain Terrace downtown. tional origin, sexual orientation, or persons Bristol, VT 05443 The  NHAA  sponsored  the  storm  receiving public assistance, or an intention 0( s FAX 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: to make any such preference, limitation or drain  stenciling  day  in  collabora-­ www.wallacere.com tion  with  the  town  of  Bristol  and  the  discrimination.â€? www.greenbuiltvermont.com This newspaper will not knowingly ac-­ Bristol  Conservation  Committee. any advertisement for real estate Bartlett  said  that  while  the  group  cept which is in violation of the law. Our readers tries  to  take  part  in  a  river  conser-­ are hereby informed that all dwellings ad-­ vation  project  at  least  twice  a  year,  vertised in this newspaper are available on he  had  been  wanting  the  Anglers  to  an equal opportunity basis. To complain of tackle  stenciling  the  storm  drains  for  discrimination, call HUD Toll-­free at 1-­800-­ Kelly Claire Tom 424-­8590. For the Washington, DC area some  time. Please  call  Kelly,  Claire,  or  Tom please call HUD at 426-­3500. Âł:KHQ , ÂżUVW PRYHG KHUH DERXW \HDUV DJR , ÂżVKHG WKH 1HZ +DYHQ river  a  lot  â€”  sometimes  right  from  South  Street  right  up  through  town  towards  Prayer  Rock  and  up  where  the  pizza  place  is.  From  the  river,  there’s  a  lot  of  areas  where  you  can  see  where  the  drainage  comes  out  and  even  pipes  right  to  the  side  of  the  bank.  And  I  thought,  â€˜Whoa,  where  Annual Fall Dairy/Feeder Consignment Sale are  those  coming  from?’  and  then  I  Wednesday, October 7th – 12 noon SHARP ÂżJXUHG RXW WKDW WKH\ ZHUH FRPLQJ directly  from  the  streets  in  Bristol.  at Addison County Commission Sales barns 6R IRU \HDUV ,ÂśYH DOZD\V ZDQWHG Rt. 125, East Middlebury VT to  put  signs  on  there  just  to  remind  *** ACCEPTING CONSIGNMENTS NOW! *** people  not  to  dump  any  toxic  wastes  CASH IN ON YOUR OVERSTOCK like  gasoline  or  antifreeze  or  motor  0WFS )FBE &YQFDUFE 5PQ )PMTUFJO t "SUJĂś DJBMMZ 4JSFE oil  but  also  to  keep  the  drain  clear  of  grass  clippings  and  leaves  and  things  'SFTI 4QSJOHJOH t 4IPSUCSFE t 3FBEZ UP #SFFE t 0QFO that  have  nitrogen  and  phosphorus  Heifers & Calves that  also  go  in  the  drain  and  end  BEEF & FEEDER FOLLOW DAIRY SALE up  right  in  the  river.  All  that  waste  For more info: 802-388-2661 or Vt Toll Free 800-339-COWS ends  up  in  Otter  Creek  and  eventu-­ T.G. Wisnowski – 802-989-1507 ally  Lake  Champlain,  and  as  a  larger  4BMF .BOBHFS 5 ( 8JTOPXTLJ t "VDUJPOFFS +PIO /PQ ecosystem  if  we  can  reduce  the  point  source,  even  a  little,  it  helps.â€? ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES In  the  course  of  that  Saturday  www.accscattle.com morning,  the  volunteers  stenciled Â

REAL ESTATE WALLACE REALTY

AUCTIONS ATTENTION FARMERS!!


PAGE  44  â€”  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  October  5,  2015

90-­year-­old  artist  displays  works

DANIELLE  GORI-­MONTANELLI’S  â€œA  Million  Pencils  Collar,â€?  made  of  hand-­carved  wool  felt,  was  chosen  to  represent  Vermont  in  a  virtual  art  gallery  created  by  American  Craft  Council.  One  piece  is  selected  from  each  state  and  the  District  of  Columbia  for  an  online  exhibition.

Middlebury  artist  to  show  in  national  craft  exhibition CHARLOTTE,  N.C.  â€”  Danielle  Gori-­Montanelli  of  Middlebury  has  been  chosen  to  represent  Vermont  in  $PHULFDQ &UDIW :HHNÂśV ÂżUVW YLUWXDO gallery  featuring  51  works  of  art  rep-­ resenting  one  celebrated  craft  artist  from  each  state  and  Washington,  D.C.  The  exhibition,  â€œMasterpiece  E-­xhibit  &  Sale,â€?  is  online  exclusively  and  will  run  through  Oct.  11  to  coincide  with  American  Craft  Week  (Friday,  Oct.  2-­Sunday,  Oct.  11).  The  gallery  can  be  found  at  www.acwgalleryshop.com. “When  I  start  a  piece,  I  have  only  a  basic  vision  in  my  mind,  more  about  what  the  work  feels  like  than  what  it  looks  like,â€?  Gori-­Montanelli  says.  â€œI  just  throw  myself  into  the  rich  warm  textures  and  colors  of  the  felt,  cutting  it  by  hand  or  with  custom-­made  dies,  and  watch  the  pieces  evolve  almost  by  themselves  as  I  start  building  up  the  layers.  I  enjoy  the  improvisational  nature  of  the  process,  toying  with  the  colors  and  forms  and  letting  the  work  just  happen.â€? Originally  a  successful  metalsmith,  Gori-­Montanelli,  after  having  two  children,  began  making  jewelry  with  felt  as  an  alternative  to  the  hazard-­ ous  materials  and  methods  involved  in  metalwork.  Born  in  Washington,  D.C.,  Gori-­Montanelli  graduated  from  Sarah  Lawrence  College  before  spending  a  decade  in  New  York  City  and  another  decade  in  Florence,  Italy.  She  has  exhibited  at  the  Museum  of  Art  and  Design’s  â€œLoot:  Mad  About  Jewelryâ€?  show  in  New  York  City,  the  Smithsonian  Craft  Show,  the  Phila-­ delphia  Museum  of  Art  Craft  Show,  American  Craft  Council  shows,  SOFA  in  New  York  and  Chicago,  and  the  Chelsea/Origins  show  in  London.  Her  work  is  in  galleries  throughout  the  U.S.,  such  as  The  Textile  Museum  in  Washington,  D.C.,  and  Mobilia  in  Cambridge,  Mass.,  as  well  as  in  gal-­ leries  in  Europe,  including  the  Lesley  Craze  Gallery  in  London. Diane  Sulg,  founder  of  American  Craft  Week  says,  â€œThe  idea  is  to  bring  master  works  of  craft  from  all  over  the  country  right  to  your  personal  computer,  phone  or  other  device.  We  invited  one  exceptional  artisan  from  each  state  to  submit  a  piece  especially  for  this  exhibit.  Made  from  a  variety  of Â

materials  â€”  glass,  sculpture,  jewelry,  FOD\ ZRRG PHWDO ÂżEHU ² WKH ZRUN represents  both  traditional  and  innova-­ tions  in  technology,  the  changes  in  the  craft  movement  and  the  individual  art-­ ists’  experience.â€? Visiting  the  site  is  akin  to  browsing  in  a  distinguished  gallery,  but  at  the  same  time  more  private,  and  personal.  Viewers  to  the  gallery  will  see  several  images  of  the  work,  the  title  and  price  and  an  artist’s  statement  and  biogra-­ phy.  Once  purchased,  items  are  gone  forever  â€”  these  are  all  one-­of-­a-­kind  pieces. American  Craft  Week  and  the  Masterpiece  E-­xhibit  are  designed  to  highlight  the  value,  innovations  and  traditions  of  American  made  craft  by  showcasing  the  wonderful  artisans  and  craft  made  in  America.  This  fall  during  American  Craft  Week,  Ameri-­ cans  in  all  50  states  will  be  celebrat-­ ing  the  art  of  handmade  craft  through  hundreds  of  diverse  events  in  galler-­ ies  and  artist  studios,  museums  and  schools,  as  well  as  at  fairs  and  festi-­ vals. A  portion  of  the  funds  raised  will  be  used  by  ACW  to  promote  craft  ar-­ tisans  in  America. Â

MIDDLEBURY  â€”  Edgewater  Gallery  at  Middlebury  Falls  cele-­ brates  nonagenarian  artist  Catherine  â€œCatchiâ€?  Childs  this  October,  with  DQ H[KLELW RI ÂżJXUHV DQG VWLOO OLIHV from  a  75-­year  painting  career.  The  internationally  exhibited  artist  dem-­ onstrates  her  broad  range  and  so-­ phisticated  aesthetic  in  this  collec-­ tion.  Edgewater  Gallery  will  host  an  opening  reception  on  Friday,  Oct.  IURP S P GXULQJ WKH ÂżQDO Middlebury  Arts  Walk  of  the  2015  season. “To  me,  painting  is  one  of  the  most  personalized  forms  of  self  expression,  and  sometimes  I  feel  as  if  I  am  creating  a  symphony  â€”  with  each  instrument  representing  a  color  in  the  spectrum,â€?  says  Childs.  â€œWhen  they  are  in  harmony,  beauti-­ ful  music  is  created  in  the  painting.  My  most  thrilling  moment  comes  when  my  brush  touches  the  canvas  IRU WKH ÂżUVW WLPH $W WKDW SRLQW DOO my  emotions  and  training  are  used  to  create  the  overall  mood  that  will  GRPLQDWH WKH ÂżQLVKHG ZRUN 0\ GH-­ sign,  brushwork  and  colors  all  blend  together  to  convey  the  mood,  feel-­ ing  and  emotional  tension  that  cre-­ ates  an  inner  excitement  and  deep  personal  involvement  in  each  cre-­ ation.â€? Listed  in  both  â€œWho’s  Who  in  American  Artâ€?  and  â€œWho’s  Who  of  American  Women,â€?  Childs  has  also  been  a  member  of  the  National  As-­ sociation  of  Women  Artists  for  over  50  years  and  served  as  its  president  for  four  years.  In  addition,  she  is  a  member  and  past  president  of  the  New  York  City  Society  of  Women  Artists  and  a  member  of  New  York  Artist’s  Equity.  Among  others,  her  paintings  are  in  the  public  and  pri-­

“THE  GARDEN  GATEâ€?  is  part  of  an  exhibit  of  paintings  by  Catherine  â€œCatchiâ€?  Childs  showing  in  October  at  Edgewater  Gallery  at  Middlebury  Falls.  An  opening  reception  is  on  Friday,  Oct.  9,  from  5-­7  p.m.  during  the  Middlebury  Arts  Walk.

vate  collections  of  the  Zimmerli  Art  Museum  at  Rutgers  University,  N.J.;Íž  Hofstra  University,  New  York;Íž  and  the  Rockefeller  family. The  exhibit,  titled  â€œCATCHI,â€? Â

will  be  on  view  at  Edgewater  Gal-­ lery  in  October.  For  more  informa-­ tion  call  802-­458-­0098,  email  zoe@ edgewatergallery-­vt.com  or  visit  edgewatergallery-­vt.com.

Grants  to  fund  Actors  Workshop  Oct.  performances MIDDLEBURY  â€”  Middlebury  Actors  Workshop  has  announced  that  it  received  two  grants  for  its  upcoming  production  of  the  Pulitzer  Prize-­  and  Obie  Award-­winning  play  â€œThe  Effect  of  Gamma  Rays  on  Man-­in-­the-­Moon  Marigoldsâ€?  by  Paul  Zindel. 7KH ÂżUVW LV D 3URMHFW *UDQW

from  the  Vermont  Arts  Council  and  the  National  Endowment  for  the  Arts. 7KH VHFRQG LV D JUDQW IURP the  Vermont  Arts  Endowment  Fund  of  the  Vermont  Community  Foundation.  Both  grants  are  vital  sources  of  sup-­ port  for  MAW,  and  make  it  possible  to  bring  high-­quality  theatrical  experi-­

ences  to  Addison  County,  drawing  on  the  best  talent  Vermont  has  to  offer. “The  Effect  of  Gamma  Rays  on  Man-­in-­the-­Moon  Marigoldsâ€?  opens  on  Friday,  Oct.  23,  and  plays  through  Friday,  Oct.  30,  at  Town  Hall  Theater  in  Middlebury.

Bristol,  VT  Homeowner  Recommends  Bristol  Electronics “Bristol  Electronics  makes  it  easy  for  you  to  go  solar.  From  the  detailed,  patient  explanations,  to  the  rebates,  estimates  and  permits,  Bristol  Electronics  takes  care  of  it  all.  I  obtained  several  quotes  from  various  companies  but  it  was  Bristol  Electronics  who  ultimately  won  my  business  with  their  friendly,  approachable  attitude  and  superior  knowledge  of  the  technology.  When  I  began  this  project  , ZDV XQHGXFDWHG DQG DSSUHKHQVLYH 1RZ , Âż QG P\VHOI HQFRXUDJLQJ my  friends  and  family  to  call  Bristol  Electronics  for  a  free  quote  and  explanation  because  I  truly  believe  in  their  product  and  company.  They  are  highly  skilled  and  professional  in  every  respect. Stephen  and  his  crew  encouraged  my  children’s  curiosity  and  made  learning  fun  for  them.  Little  things  like  making  handprints  in  the  cement  of  our  solar  system  sparked  talks  about  reducing  your  carbon  footprint  and  how  everyone  can  help,  even  children.  The  whole  experience  could  not  have  been  easier  or  better.  Seeing  the  power  meter  run  backwards  is  just  icing  on  the  cake..â€?                                           Heather  Shepard  â€“  Bristol               Â

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