Page 1

MONDAY   EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 26 No. 14

Up-to-date & old school ‡7KH-$&.4XDUWHWZLOOEH DPRQJWKHJURXSVSHUIRUPLQJ FRQWHPSRUDU\FKDPEHUPXVLF 6HH$UWV%HDWRQ3DJH

Middlebury, Vermont

X

Monday, June 9, 2014

Races  shaping  up  as   ¿OLQJGHDGOLQHQHDUV By  JOHN  FLOWERS ADDISON   COUNTY   —   The   2014  election  picture  will  become   a   lot   clearer   after   Thursday,   June   12,   the   deadline   by   which   candi-­ GDWHV PXVW ¿OH QRPLQDWLRQ SDSHUV

WR UXQ IRU VWDWHZLGH RI¿FH DV ZHOO as  for   the   Vermont   House,   Senate   and  a  variety  of  county  positions. 7KH ¿OLQJ GHDGOLQH DSSOLHV WR candidates   seeking   a   spot   on   the   (See  Candidates,  Page  21)

X

40 Pages

75¢

Cornwall  site  hosts  event   to  honor  and  help  veterans By  JOHN  FLOWERS CORNWALL   —   Morrie   Jones   was  hanging  out  with  a  bunch  of   friends  several  months  ago,  won-­ dering  if  there  would  be  a  parade   for   Vermont’s   returning   military  

veterans. “We  decided   we   were   tired   of   waiting  for  the  parade  and  decid-­ ed   we   would   have   it   ourselves,�   Jones  said. (See  Jamboree,  Page  20)

Lincoln teachers call it a career ‡'RQQD:RRGDQG$OLFH /HHGVZKRKDYHIRU\HDUVRUJDQL]HGWKHDQQXDOVFKRROSOD\ DUHUHWLULQJ6HH3DJH

Weekend softball showdowns ‡29YLVLWHG0RXQW$EHDQG 98+6KRVWHG)DLU+DYHQSOXV 29EDVHEDOODQG7LJHUER\V¡OD[ SOD\HG6HH3DJHV

Stormâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a-­cominâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; A/21(/<:,1'0,//VWDQGVRYHUDIHUWLOHÂżHOGLQ$GGLVRQODVWZHHNZKLOHVWRUPFORXGVWKUHDWHQLQWKHGLVWDQFH

,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO

History teacher leaving pupils thinking about now Enriching schools DFURVVĂ&#x20AC;YHGHFDGHV Â&#x2021;5HWLULQJ)HUULVEXUJKHGXFDWRU/LQGD7KXUEHUKDVDORQJ UHFRUGRIKHOSLQJFKLOGUHQ OHDUQ6HH3DJH

By  ZACH  DESPART BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Posters  line  the  walls   of   Rick   Desordaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   classroom.   They   were   made   by   the   Mount  Abraham   Union  High  School  history  teacherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   students,  and  explain  key  terms  and   ÂżJXUHVIURPWKH9LHWQDP:DU²WKH Tet   Offensive,   Lyndon   B.   Johnson,   the  Silent  Majority,  Kent  State. For   the   students,   these   people,   places   and   events   mark   a   distant   time   in   the   past,   decades   before   they   were   born.   But   when   Desorda   was   their   age,   events   from   halfway   DURXQG WKH ZRUOG ÂżJXUHG JUHDWO\ LQ his  future.

The  Bristol  native  graduated  from   Mount  Abraham  Union  High  School   in  1971,  during  the  waning  years  of   the  Vietnam  War.  He  then  registered   for  the  Selective  Service  System,  as   required  by  law. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By   the   June   of   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;71   I   turned   18,   and  by  September  I  was  involved  in   a  draft  lottery,â&#x20AC;?  Desorda  recalled  last   week.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   now   had   a   real   interest   in   what  was  going  on.â&#x20AC;? Ultimately,  Desorda  was  not  draft-­ ed.  He  earned  a  bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree  at   02817$%5$+$081,21+LJK6FKRROKLVWRU\WHDFKHU5LFN'HVRUGD Johnson  State  College  and  complet-­ LV UHWLULQJ DIWHU  \HDUV DW WKH VFKRRO 'HVRUGD LV DOVR D 0RXQW$EH ed   his   graduate   studies   at   Castleton   JUDGXDWH ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO (See  Desorda,  Page  32)


PAGE  2  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

ANwSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Thurber to retire after 30 years Ferrisburgh teacher has seen big changes By  ANDY  KIRKALDY VERGENNES  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  It  was  more  than   50   years   ago   when   Ferrisburgh   Cen-­ tral  School  challenge  and  technology   WHDFKHU /LQGD 7KXUEHU ÂżUVW VWRRG LQ front  of  a  class  and  taught. At   that   point,   Thurber,   65,   who   will   retire   at   the   end   the   week   after   a   three-­decade   Addison   Central   Su-­ pervisory   Union   career,   was   a   fresh-­ man  at  her  hometown  high  school  in   Doylestown,  Pa.   Her  teacher,  probably  already  sens-­ ing  where  Thurberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  path  would  lead   her,   asked   Thurber   if   she   wanted   to   take  over  for  a  while.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  ninth  grade  I  had  the  opportuni-­ ty  to  teach  a  high  school  class.  One  of   my  teachers  gave  me  that  opportunity,   and  I  really  loved  it,â&#x20AC;?  Thurber  said. But  Thurber  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  really  need  that   push  to  pursue  teaching  as  a  career. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   never   even   considered   anything   else,  and  I  still  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,â&#x20AC;?  she  said  in   an  interview  last  week.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  love  being   with  the  kids.â&#x20AC;? Thurberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   job,   mostly   fulltime   at   FERRISBURGH  CENTRAL  SCHOOL  challenge  teacher  Linda  Thurber  is  retiring  after  serving  three  decades   Ferrisburgh   Central   since   1994   but   in  the  Addison  Northwest  Supervisory  Union. Independent  photo/Andy  Kirkaldy cut   to   an   80   percent   level   in   recent   years,   has   been   split   50-­50   between   running   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   challenge   pro-­ ence.  Four  years  later,  they  were  wed.   Then  she  became  active  as  a  volunteer   gramming   and   learning   code,â&#x20AC;?   she   gram  and  acting  as  its  technology  co-­ His  name  is  Richard  Thurber.  Forty-­ at  Addison  Central  School  and  served   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybody   was   introduced   to   ordinator.  That  half  of  her  job  includes   ÂżYH \HDUV ODWHU WKH\ DUH VWLOO PDUULHG as   its   Parent-­Teacher   Organization   it,  but  some  kids  really  took  off  on  it,   weekly   sessions   with   each   of   the   and   co-­own   the   Nor-­Dic   Farm   on   president.   so  they  come  and  work  independently   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  classes  as  well  as  supporting   the  Panton-­Addison  line,  as  well  as  a   In  1983,  the  ANwSU  board,  aware   with  me.â&#x20AC;? and   teaching   its   staff   small   trucking   com-­ of  her  background  and  seeing  her  ef-­ The   concrete   nature   of   program-­ members. pany.   forts   at   ACS,   recruited   Thurber   and   ming  appeals  to  the  students,  Thurber   Principal   JoAnn   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It just feels Thurber   laughed   another   woman   with   an   educational   said. Taft-­Blakely   said   she   so good when and  admitted  none  of   background,  Jane  Krasnow,  to  evalu-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   majority   of   kids   love   it,   be-­ KDVIXOÂżOOHGERWKUROHV you see them that  exactly  went  ac-­ ate  the  possibility  of  enrichment  pro-­ cause   it   feels   real   to   them,   and   they   well   and   cited   her   cording  to  her  initial   grams  at  the  union  schools. can  visualize  how  you  can  use  it  later   technology  expertise.   realizing learning plan.   Thurber   said   she   enjoyed   the   pro-­ on  in  life,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   highly   re-­ something new â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   was   the   one,   cess,  with  one  exception  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  long  and   As  well  as  individuals  working  in-­ spected   by   the   staff,â&#x20AC;?   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t scary, and apparently.   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   in   her   view   unnecessary   state   test   to   dependently,  Thurber  also  offers  regu-­ Taft-­Blakely   said.   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s OK not to get it know   that   at   the   evaluate   whether   young   pupils   were   lar   group   units   in   a   variety   of   disci-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   go   to   her   and   say,   time,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;One   gifted.   plines,  in  the  past  up  to  four  a  year,  but   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hey,  Linda,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  and  she   ULJKWWKHĂ&#x20AC;UVWWLPH thing   I   was   sure   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   became   very   clear   to   us   we   now  three.  This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  have  included   can   usually   help   me   When I used to was   that   I   would   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   need   the   test   focuses  on  Japan  and   through  it.â&#x20AC;? architecture,   for   ex-­ teach reading and never   marry   a   farm-­ to   pick   out   who   was   But   working   with   er   and   that   I   would   interested   and   who   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She could really ample. the   students   has   been   I saw kids all of a never   move   to   Ver-­ was   not.   I   mean,   it   bring out the best In  all,  she  estimates   Thurberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   passion,   sudden get it, you mont.â&#x20AC;? FRQÂżUPHG ZKDW ZH she  works  with  up  to   LQNLGV6KHNQHZ a   quarter   of   the   FCS   the   principal   said.   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t be paid for But   she   did,   hap-­ observed.   So   we   just   Taft-­Blakely   praised   WKDWÂľ pily,   and   completed   started  going  into  the   when to push, students   in   her   chal-­ Thurberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   patience,   her   teaching   degree   schools   and   giving   lenge  program  during   when to ease up â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Linda Thurber understanding,   and   at   the   University   of   enrichment   pieces,â&#x20AC;?   and when to push each   school   year,   as   ability   to   work   suc-­ Vermont   in   1970.   Thurber  said. well   as   seeing   all   of   cessfully  with  students  with  all  variet-­ She   found   work   at   Mary   Hogan   El-­ She   described   that   IXUWKHUÂľ them  in  her  computer   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Principal ODE 7KXUEHU ÂżQGV ies  of  learning  speeds  and  abilities. ementary  School  in  Middlebury  and  a   program   as   small   JoAnn Taft-Blakely the  two  roles  overlap   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  could  really  bring  out  the  best   niche  in  its  history.   and   experimental,   in  kids,â&#x20AC;?  Taft-­Blakely  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  knew   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mary   Hogan   actually   hired   me.   I   and   Thurber   worked   well,  and  FCS  hopes   when   to   push,   when   to   ease   up   and   was  her  last  hire,â&#x20AC;?  Thurber  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;That   part-­time   as   an   AN-­ WRÂżQGRQHSHUVRQWR when  to  push  further.â&#x20AC;? was  my  claim  to  fame.â&#x20AC;? wSU  consultant  until  1985,  when  she   handle  both.   And  she  cited  Thurberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  work  ethic,   Family   soon   trumped   career.   The   became  an  employee  and  offered  en-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   works   out   well   having   the   en-­ for  example,  in  teaching  the  potential   Thurbers  have  four  daughters,  two  of   richment  at  all  three  union  elementary   richment  person  in  the  building  longer   downside   of   modern   technology   and   whom  teach  locally  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Sara  Thurber,   schools   and   at   the   Vergennes   Union   because  the  two  mesh  pretty  nicely,â&#x20AC;?   social  media. who  works  at  Bridport  Central  School,   High  School  middle  school.  Then  Ver-­ Thurber  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  reads  every  email  that  our  5th-­   and  Elizabeth  LeBeau,  the  choral  mu-­ gennes  Union  Elementary  and  Ferris-­ The  program  is  not  just  for  the  ex-­ and  6th-­graders  put  out  so  she  knows   sic  teacher  at  Middlebury  Union  mid-­ burgh  Central  schools  hired  her,  and  in   ceptional   and   gifted,   she   stressed.   they   are   doing   the   right   thing,â&#x20AC;?  Taft-­ dle   and   high   schools.   Karen  Thurber   1994  FCS  lured  her  fulltime  by  adding   Sometimes,   teachers   and   she   agree   Blakely  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  way  above  and   owns   her   own   business   in   Loudon,   in  the  technology  piece. students   need   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;get   them   to   love   beyond  the  call  of  duty,  but  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  just   N.H.,  and  Megan  Sergi  lives  in  Bev-­ Before  then,  she  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  itiner-­ coming   to   class   and   realizing   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   who  she  is.â&#x20AC;? HUO\0DVVDQGLVDÂżQDQFHPDQDJHU ant,  basically.â&#x20AC;? just  so  much  to  learn,â&#x20AC;?  Thurber  said.   VERMONT  CONNECTION for  a  company  in  nearby  Gloucester. FERRISBURGH  CENTRAL â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   have   to   love   learning.   They   Coincidence   and   love   brought   Thurber  mostly  stepped  away  from   Since  then,  computers  have  played   have   to   love   coming   to   school,â&#x20AC;?   she   Thurber  to  Vermont.  When  she  was  a   work   outside   the   home   except   for   a   a  large  part  in  her  challenge  program,   said,  adding,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  a  tra-­ senior  in  high  school,  she  met  a  fresh-­ semester   stint   at   a   Christian   school,   in   part   because   programming   goes   ditional   gifted   program.   We   have   an   man   at   the   local   agricultural   college   although  she  later  traded  her  expertise   hand-­in-­hand  with  math.   enrichment  program.â&#x20AC;? who   was   studying   agricultural   sci-­ for   tuition   at   a   Vergennes   preschool.   (See  Thurber,  Page  3) â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  have  quite  a  few  kids  doing  pro-­

Pipeline  hearing  set   for  June  12   at  MUHS By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  Ver-­ mont   Public   Service   Board   ZLOO KROG LWV VHFRQG DQG ÂżQDO hearing  on  the  proposed  Phase   II  of  the  Addison  Rutland  Nat-­ ural   Gas   Project   on   Thursday,   June   12,   beginning   at   7   p.m.   at  the  Middlebury  Union  High   School  auditorium. The   June   12   hearing   fol-­ lows   an   initial   public   gather-­ ing   held   in   Shoreham   on   May   7.  A  majority  of  the  dozens  of   people  who  spoke  at  that  hear-­ ing   urged   the   PSB   to   deny   a   &HUWLÂżFDWH RI 3XEOLF *RRG WR Vermont   Gas   Systems   to   put   in  a  pipeline  that  would  funnel   natural   gas   from   Middlebury,   through   Cornwall   and   Shore-­ ham,   under   Lake   Champlain   to   the   International   Paper   mill   in  Ticonderoga,  N.Y.  The  pipe-­ line   plan   has   generated   much   opposition   from   environmen-­ talists  and  homeowners  whose   property  would  be  affected  by   the  project. Opponents   have   raised   con-­ cerns   about   the   potential   dan-­ ger   to   neighborhoods   should   there   be   a   pipeline   leak   or   explosion.  They   have   also   ob-­ jected  to  the  notion  that  at  least   some   of   the   Canadian   natural   JDV WKDW ZRXOG Ă&#x20AC;RZ WKURXJK the  conduit  will  have  been  pro-­ cured   using   hydraulic   fractur-­ ing,  a  technique  through  which   high-­pressure  water  and  chem-­ icals   are   used   to   extract   pock-­ ets  of  gas  from  underground. The   Shoreham   hearing   also   drew   some   supporters   of   the   project,   some   of   them   repre-­ senting   International   Paper   workers,   as   well   as   economic   GHYHORSPHQW RIÂżFLDOV IURP the  Moriah,  N.Y.,  and  Ticond-­ eroga,  N.Y.,  communities,  who   argued   the   pipeline   would   be   key   in   preserving   and   grow-­ ing  jobs  in  the  region.  Rutland   EXVLQHVV RZQHUV DQG RIÂżFLDOV have   made   the   same   argu-­ ment,   as   the   Phase   II   project   would   generate   revenues   to   enable  Vermont   Gas   to   extend   the   pipeline   more   quickly   to   Rutland   County.   International   Paper  would  pay  the  estimated   $70  million  costs  of  the  Phase   II  pipeline. Along   with   IP,   the   Phase   II   pipeline  would  also  offer  natu-­ ral  gas  service  to  a  few  of  the   more   densely   populated   areas   of  Cornwall  and  Shoreham. The   PSB   has   already   ap-­ proved  Vermont  Gasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Phase  I   pipeline   that   will   extend   from   Colchester  to  Middlebury. Reporter  John  Flowers  is  at   johnf@addisonindependent. com.


Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  —  PAGE  3

Vt. Soap building damaged in June 4 blaze Investigators unsure   RQFDXVHRIWKH¿UH By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY  —  State  and  local   ¿UH RI¿FLDOV UHPDLQ XQFHUWDLQ DV WR ZKDWWULJJHUHGD:HGQHVGD\HYHQLQJ EOD]H WKDW GLG VXEVWDQWLDO GDPDJH WR WKHSURGXFWLRQDUHDDW9HUPRQW6RDS DW([FKDQJH6WLQ0LGGOHEXU\ 'DYLG 6KDZ DVVLVWDQW FKLHI RI WKH 0LGGOHEXU\)LUH'HSDUWPHQWVDLGKH DQG RWKHU ¿UH¿JKWHUV ZHUH UHWXUQLQJ IURPDFDOOLQWKH6WRQHJDWH'ULYHDUHD DWDURXQGSPRQ-XQHZKHQWKH\ UHFHLYHGUHSRUWVRIVPRNHHPDQDWLQJ IURPWKH9HUPRQW6RDSEXLOGLQJ :KHQ ¿UH¿JKWHUV DUULYHG WKH\ FRXOG VHH ÀDPHV H[LWLQJ WKURXJK D FORVHG RYHUKHDG JDUDJH GRRU DW WKH VWUXFWXUH )LUH¿JKWHUV IRUFHG WKHLU ZD\ LQ DQG SURFHHGHG WR EDWWOH WKH EOD]HZKLFKWKH\H[WLQJXLVKHGZLWK-­ LQ DURXQG  PLQXWHV DFFRUGLQJ WR 6KDZ $SSUR[LPDWHO\  ¿UH¿JKWHUV SDUWLFLSDWHGRQWKHFDOOZKLFKLQFOXG-­ HG SDUWLFLSDWLRQ IURP WKH 1HZ +D-­ YHQDQG:H\EULGJH¿UHGHSDUWPHQWV 0HPEHUV RI WKH &RUQZDOO )LUH 'H-­ SDUWPHQWSURYLGHGVWDWLRQFRYHUDJH 'DPDJH DFFRUGLQJ WR 6KDZ ZDV FRQ¿QHG WR D VHJPHQW RI WKH VRDS SURGXFWLRQ DUHD ZLWKLQ WKH PHWDO EXLOGLQJ 6KDZ DQG VWDWH ¿UH PDUVKDOV LQ-­ VSHFWHGWKHVFHQHRQ7KXUVGD\PRUQ-­ LQJ DQG ZHUH XQDEOH WR FRQFOXVLYHO\ GHWHUPLQH KRZ WKH ¿UH VWDUWHG 7KH

9(5021762$3:25.6&(2/DUU\3OHVDQWFHQWHUWDONVZLWK¿UHLQYHVWLJDWRUVWKHPRUQLQJDIWHUD¿UHEXUQHGWKURXJKWKHSURGXFWLRQDUHDRI KLV([FKDQJH6WUHHWEXVLQHVVODVW:HGQHVGD\QLJKW3OHVDQWLVFRQ¿GHQWKHSURGXFWLRQIDFLOLW\DQGVWRUHZLOOUHRSHQVRRQ ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO

EOD]HRULJLQDWHGLQWKHQRUWKFRUQHURI WKHSURGXFWLRQDUHDZKHUHWKHUHZDV VRPH VKHOYLQJ D ¿OLQJ FDELQHW DQG PXVLFDOHTXLSPHQWRI¿FLDOVVDLG 9HUPRQW 6RDS IRXQGHU DQG &(2 /DUU\3OHVDQWDQGVRPHRIKLVZRUN-­ HUV ZHUH RQVLWH 7KXUVGD\ WR VFRSH RXW WKH GDPDJH DQG JHW D VHQVH RI ZKHQ WKH EXVLQHVV PLJKW EH DEOH WR UHRSHQ

³7KLVLVQRWWDNLQJXVGRZQ´3OH-­ VDQW VDLG UHVROXWHO\ DV KH VXUYH\HG WKHGDPDJH³%HVWFDVHVFHQDULRZH VKLSVRPHVRDSLQVRPHVPRN\VKLS-­ SLQJ FDUWRQV DQG WKH VPHOO  JRHV DZD\DIWHUZHVKLSWKHPRXW:RUVW FDVHVFHQDULRZHKDYHDGLVDVWHU´ 3OHVDQW VDLG KH KRSHV 9HUPRQW 6RDS DQG LWV  HPSOR\HHV FDQ EH EDFN LQ EXVLQHVV ³VRRQ´ RQFH DQ\

GDPDJHGHTXLSPHQWLVUHSODFHG 6KDZVDLGKHVXVSHFWVLWPLJKWEH D ZKLOH EHIRUH LW ZLOO EH EXVLQHVV DVXVXDODV9HUPRQW6RDS+HVDLG VPRNHPDGHLWVZD\WKURXJKRXWWKH EXLOGLQJZKLFKLQSODFHVZDVVXE-­ MHFWHG WR LQWHQVH WHPSHUDWXUHV LQ H[FHVV RI  GHJUHHV 7KH VWUXF-­ WXUHZLOOSUREDEO\UHTXLUHVRPHPD-­ MRU HOHFWULFDO V\VWHP UHSDLUV DORQJ

ZLWKFRUUHFWLRQRIRWKHULVVXHVWKDW PD\ RQO\ EHFRPH DSSDUHQW RQFH HTXLSPHQW DQG RWKHU PDWHULDO DUH VKLIWHG ZLWKLQ WKH EXLOGLQJ 6KDZ QRWHG ³,WZLOOWDNHWLPH´KHVDLG ,W KDV DOUHDG\ EHHQ YHU\ D EXV\ \HDU IRU WKH 0LGGOHEXU\ ¿UH¿JKW-­ HUVZKRKDGUHVSRQGHGWRFDOOV DVRI7KXUVGD\

Thurber 0DVVDFKXVHWWV QRW , VDLG ,¶P PLVVLQJ RXW RQ WKH (Continued  from  Page  2) ³,KDGGHEDWHGDERXWWHDFKLQJORQ-­ NLGVZKRDUHQRWORFDO´7KXUEHUVDLG 7KXUEHU GHVFULEHG ZKDW VKH KDV JHUEXWZKHQ,KDGP\WKJUDQG-­ ³$QG,IHHOOLNHWKDW¶VPD\EHDQLP-­ WULHGWRDFFRPSOLVKLQDQXWVKHOO ³, WKLQN LW¶V LPSRUWDQW IRU NLGV WR FKLOGDQG¿YHDUHORFDODQG¿YHDUH SRUWDQWMRE´ KDYHDVDIHSODFHWRPDNHPLVWDNHVRU EHUHDOO\VPDUW´VKHVDLG $QGVKHGHVFULEHGZKDWVKHVHHVDV Join the Mary Hogan School Community KHUJUHDWHVWUHZDUGFLWLQJIRUH[DP-­ SOHRQHVWXGHQWZKRUHFHQWO\OHDUQHG Thursday, June 12, at 12:00 noon WKH YDOXH RI SODQQLQJ WR DFFRPSOLVK to say farewell to former KLVFUHDWLYHYLVLRQ ³:KHQ , VDZ WKH OLJKWV JR RQ , principal Bonnie Bourne WROGHYHU\ERG\DERXWLWLQWKHVFKRRO who leaves Mary Hogan at the end of the ,W MXVW IHHOV VR JRRG ZKHQ \RX VHH WKHP UHDOL]LQJ OHDUQLQJ VRPHWKLQJ school year after 27 years at Mary Hogan. QHZLVQ¶WVFDU\DQGLW¶V2.QRWWRJHW LW ULJKW WKH ¿UVW WLPH´7KXUEHU VDLG We will “Ring the Bell” for Bonnie ³:KHQ,XVHGWRWHDFKUHDGLQJDQG, 12 times at 12:00 noon VDZ NLGV DOO RI D VXGGHQ JHW LW \RX FDQ¶WEHSDLGIRUWKDW´ to express our appreciation 7DIW%ODNHO\ VXVSHFWV7KXUEHU KDV for her years of service. HQMR\HGWKDWUHZDUGUHSHDWHGO\ ³6KH¶VSUREDEO\VHHQDORWRIOLJKW Bring your own bag lunch if you like. EXOEV JR RII LQ KHU \HDUV LQ )HUULV-­ (Mary Hogan kids will be enjoying their EXUJK´WKHSULQFLSDOVDLG %XW DV PXFK DV VKH KDV HQMR\HG annual school-wide picnic.) KHU VWXGHQWV DQG FROOHDJXHV RWK-­ We’ll provide a small treat for dessert! HU UHZDUGV DQG DQRWKHU UROH DZDLW 7KXUEHU 7KRVH IRXU GDXJKWHUV KDYH Call 388-4421 with questions. JLYHQ7KXUEHUJUDQGFKLOGUHQKDOI RIZKRPDUHLQ1HZ+DPSVKLUHDQG

RICK CAMPEAU MASTER COLOR/STYLIST

“Getting to know you, what you are looking for and finding the perfect style for you is just as important as the technique.”

RICK is coming to

JULY 1st Rick looks forward to seeing old

388.0007

friends and greeting new ones!

First time clients with Rick – always 20% OFF


PAGE  4  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

A DDIS ON   INDE P E NDEN T

Guest Editorial

Make  your  bed  perfectly,   and  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  ring  that  bell You   may   never   look   at   an   unmade   bed   the   same   upon   reading   the   com-­ mencement  address  delivered  by  Naval  Adm.  William  H.  McRaven  to  Univer-­ sity  of  Texas  graduates.   It  was  part  of  his  forced  routine  36  years  ago  when  he  left  college  for  basic   SEAL  training  in  Coronado,  Calif.  The  beds  had  to  be  made  perfectly.  Every   morning.  The  lesson  being  that  even  tough  guys  make  their  beds  and  that  if   you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  â&#x20AC;&#x153;get  the  little  things  right,  you  will  never  do  the  big  things  right.â&#x20AC;? Changing  the  world  was  the  theme  of  Mr.  McRavenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  address,  and  it  had   nothing   to   do   with   being   a   warrior,   hardened   to   the   task   of   combat.   It   had   HYHU\WKLQJWRGRZLWKXQGHUVWDQGLQJVDFULÂżFHWROHUDQFHGLVFLSOLQHWKHZLOOWR succeed,  the  inevitability  of  failure,  and  how  each  applies  to  the  real  world  the   rest  of  us  inhabit. He  told  of  the  uniform  inspection,  when  despite  the  fact  that  your  uniform   ZDVSHUIHFWO\SUHVVHG\RXĂ&#x20AC;XQNHG7KRVHZKRĂ&#x20AC;XQNHGZHUHUHTXLUHGWRUXQ fully  clothed  into  the  surf  and  then  roll  around  I  the  sand  until  they  were  cov-­ ered  with  sand.  They  were  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;sugar  cookiesâ&#x20AC;?  and  they  were  required  to   remain  cold,  wet  and  sandy  for  the  remainder  of  the  day. Sounds  stupid.  You  do  something  perfectly  and  are  still  punished. But  how  many  times  have  we  all  done  things  perfectly  and  still  felt  like  a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;sugar  cookie?â&#x20AC;? Get  over  it.  Move  on. Then,  there  was  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;circus,â&#x20AC;?  an  invited  event  for  those  who  failed  to  meet   the  physical  standards  required  of  the  wannabe  SEALS.  It  was  an  extra  two   KRXUVRIFDOLVWKHQLFVZKLFKZDVSLOHGRQWKHVL[KRXUVMXVWÂżQLVKHG It  happened  to  everyone.  Even  Superman. The  lesson:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  will  fail.  You  will  likely  fail  often.  It  will  be  painful.  It  will   be  discouraging.  At  times  it  will  test  you  to  your  very  core.â&#x20AC;? Sound  familiar?  Do  nay  of  us  know  anyone  who  has  succeeded  who  has  not   tasted  failureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  bitterness?  Do  you  think  SEAL  instructors  had  out  trophies  to   all  those  who  bothered  to  show  up? Probably  not.   The  admiral  spoke  of  practicing  underwater  attacks  against  enemy  shipping,   where  the  SEALS  were  dumped  two  miles  from  the  target,  at  night,  and  re-­ quired  to  swim  the  distance  underwater  armed  with  a  compass  and  a  depth   gauge.  When  the  swimmer  reached  the  keel  (the  target),  the  sound  of  the  shipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   machinery  was  deafening  and  it  was  pitch  black,  zero  visibility.  He  said  it  was   the  ultimate  test  of  oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  physical  and  mental  strength. The  lesson:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  you  want  to  change  the  world,  you  must  be  your  very  best  in   the  darkest  moment.â&#x20AC;? Not  many  of  us  are  faced  with  the  need  to  blow  up  enemy  ships,  but  no  one   skips  through  life  without  encountering  chaos  at  one  level  or  another. In  the  world  of  SEAL  training  the  ninth  week  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;hell  week.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  For  six  days  no   one  sleeps,  the  physical  and  mental  harassment  is  perpetual.  There  is  the  trip  to   the  Mud  Flats,  where  for  15  hours  you  are  required  to  lie  in  the  freezing  mud   forbidden  to  move.  He  told  the  graduates  of  the  single  off-­key  voice  that  began   to  sing  with  eight  hours  remaining.  Others  join  in,  giving  hope  to  all.   As  the  admiral  observed:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  I  have  learned  anything  in  my  time  traveling   the  world,  it  is  the  power  of  hope.  The  power  of  one  person  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Washington,   Lincoln,  King,  Mandela  and  even  a  young  girl  from  Pakistan,  Malala  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  can   MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  senior  Max  Moulton  takes  a  solo  during  an  outdoor  concert  by  the   change  the  world  by  giving  people  hope. schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  jazz  ensemble  last  Wednesday  night. +LVÂżQDOSRLQWIRFXVHGRQWKHEUDVVEHOOLQWKHFHQWHURIWKHFRPSRXQG,I Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell you  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  like  being  a  sugar  cookie,  or  making  your  bed,  or  doing  calisthenics,   or  getting  up  at  5  a.m.,  all  you  had  to  do  was  walk  to  the  compoundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  center   and  ring  the  bell.  You  could  leave.   But  people  who  quit  by  ringing  the  bell  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  change  the  world. The  admiralâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  parting  words:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Know  that  life  is  not  fair  and  that  you  will   fail  often,  but  if  you  take  some  risks,  step  up  when  the  times  are  toughest,  face   down  the  bullies,  lift  up  the  downtrodden  and  never,  ever  give  up  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  if  you   do  these  things,  the  next  generation  and  the  generations  that  follow  will  live   in  a  world  far  better  than  the  one  we  have  today  and  what  we  started  here  will   Serving  in  the  Vermont  House  of   me  are  the  district  residents  I  have   through  education  and  a  competi-­ indeed  have  changed  the  world  for  the  better.â&#x20AC;? Representatives  this  past  biennium   met,  answered  questions  for,  or   tive  business  environment,  afford-­ Words  to  live  by. Emerson  Lynn,  St.  Albans  Messenger has  been  a  privilege  and  honor  for   coordinated  visits  to  public  hearings   ability  including  leveling  of  prop-­ me  as  your  representative  from  the   in  Montpelier  to  provide  well-­in-­ HUW\WD[LQFUHDVHVÂżVFDOUHVWUDLQWLQ ADDISON COUNTY Addison,  Ferrisburgh,  Panton,  Ver-­ formed  testimony  to  other  commit-­ state  spending  and  taxation  in  line   gennes  and  Waltham  district. tees  of  the  Legislature.  Based  on   with  personal  income  gains. I  have  taken  this  responsibility   the  concerns  of  district  residents,  in   During  the  campaign  season  I   Periodicals  Postage  Paid  at  Middlebury,  Vt.  05753 seriously  as  a  member  of  House   January  I  introduced  a  bill  on  trau-­ hope  to  meet  many  other  residents   Postmaster,  send  address  change  to  Addison  Independent, General,  Housing  and  Military   matic  brain  injury  treatment  after   in  order  to  listen  to  your  concerns   0DSOH6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQWÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;)D[Â&#x2021;:HEZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP Affairs  Committee  and  often   criminal  actions,  that  Gov.  Shumlin   and  answer  questions.  At  any  time   (0DLOQHZV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRPÂ&#x2021;(0DLO$GYHUWLVLQJDGV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP expressed  the  views  of  local,  small   signed  into  law  last  week. you  may  contact  me  via  email  at   3XEOLVKHGHYHU\0RQGD\7KXUVGD\E\WKH$GGLVRQ3UHVV,QF0HPEHU9HUPRQW3UHVV$VVRFLDWLRQ1HZ(QJODQG3UHVV$V businesses  against  increased  state   I  look  forward  to  continue  to   WVanWyck@leg.state.vt.us  or   VRFLDWLRQ1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ 68%6&5,37,215$7(69HUPRQWÂą0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV2XWRI6WDWHÂą regulations  and  mandates.  Many  of   serve  and  plan  to  run  for  the  seat   phone  at  877-­2169. 0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV'LVFRXQWHGUDWHIRU6HQLRU&LWL]HQVFDOOIRUGHWDLOV  P\Ă&#x20AC;RRUYRWHVKDYHEHHQWRFRQWURO this  November.  My  goals  include:   Rep.  Warren  Van  Wyck 7KH,QGHSHQGHQWDVVXPHVQRÂżQDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURUVLQDGYHUWLVHPHQWVEXWZLOOUHSULQWWKDWSDUWRIDQ DGYHUWLVHPHQWLQZKLFKWKHW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURURFFXUUHG$GYHUWLVHUZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\WKHPDQDJHPHQWLPPHGLDWHO\RIDQ\ excessive  government  spending   public  safety  despite  increased   Addison-­3  District HUURUVZKLFKPD\RFFXU and  taxes.  Especially  important  to   opiate  abuse,  economic  prosperity   Ferrisburgh 7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636

Blowinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  in  the  wind

Letters to the Editor

Van  Wyck  announces  run  for  Addison-­3  House  seat

INDEPENDENT


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  5

(GLWRULDOVWDQFH RQSURWHVWZURQJ

Letters to the Editor

I  thought  the  recent  edito-­ rial  claiming  that  protesters  of  the   proposed  gas  pipeline  are  â&#x20AC;&#x153;inaneâ&#x20AC;?   and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;meatheadsâ&#x20AC;?  was  over  the  top,   the  entire  system.  Thea  Gaudette   almost  a  parody  of  the  way  that  the   owes  Monkton  a  full  explanation  of   powers  that  be  have  always  tried  to   her  actions  and  to  demonstrate  how   portray  those  who  offered  a  chal-­ VKHZLOODYRLGVXFKFRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWVLQWKH lenge  to  the  status  quo.  (Historians   future.   FDQÂżQGWKHVDPHNLQGRILQWHPSHU-­ To  be  sure,  the  blame  does  not   ate  language  used  for  abolitionists,   ride  on  her  shoulders  alone.  Ver-­ opponents  of  Jim  Crow,  womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mont  Gasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  games  of  trespassing,   rights  activists,  ACT-­Up  campaign-­ calculated  release  of  misinforma-­ ers,  and  so  on  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  though  â&#x20AC;&#x153;meat-­ tion,  threats  of  eminent  domain,   headsâ&#x20AC;?  may  date  the  author  to  a   lack  of  good  faith,  incompetence,   childhood  in  the  1970s,  heyday  of   etc.,  have  been  so  damaging  to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  in  the  Family.â&#x20AC;?)   some  of  our  fellow  Monkton   The  real  question,  I  think,  goes  like   residents.  The  prospect  of  having   this:  For  a  single  day  last  month  Ger-­ a  gas  pipeline  rammed  close  to  a   many  managed  to  generate  74  percent   cherished  homestead  by  a  callous,   of  its  power  with  renewable  resourc-­ greedy  crew  is  ghastly.  I  so  resent   es.  This  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  mean  such  progress   Vermont  Gas  causing  these  deep   is  easy:  There  remain  problems  with   divisions  in  our  town  just  for  the   storage  and  grid  management.  But   HDUQLQJDSURÂżWIRUWKHLURZQHUVDQG it  does  indicate  that  a  sophisticated   investors.  The  cost  of  their  impro-­ economy  (arguably  the  strongest   prieties,  criminal  acts  and  mistakes   economy  in  the  world)  can  supply   should  be  borne  by  those  owners   its  needs  with  renewable  resources,   and  not  ratepayers. and  at  our  latitude.  Given  this,  why   I  believe  the  commission  has   do  we  want  to  install  new  fossil  fuel   accomplished  a  great  deal  during   infrastructure  that  will  stretch  out  our   my  tenure  with  both  an  up-­to-­date   dependence  on  hydrocarbons  for  an-­ town  plan  and  zoning  regulations   RWKHUJHQHUDWLRQRUWZR":RXOGQÂśWZH IRUWKHÂżUVWWLPHLQPDQ\\HDUV:H be  better  off  investing  in  a  renewable   also  welcomed  back  former  zoning   infrastructure? DGPLQLVWUDWRU.HQ:KHHOLQJZKRVH Name-­calling  gets  in  the  way  of   HIIRUWVKDYHVLJQLÂżFDQWO\LPSURYHG straightforward  analysis  here,  and   the  organization  and  professional-­ straightforward  analysis  is  exactly   LVPRIWKHRIÂżFH whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  needed. Sam  Burr Bill  McKibben Monkton Ripton

0RQNWRQRIÂżFLDOUHVLJQVLQZDNHRIJDVSLSHOLQHHYHQWV I  have  decided  to  resign  from  my   position  on  the  Monkton  Planning   Commission. I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  anything  we  do  on   the  commission  will  have  as  big  an   impact  on  our  town  as  the  Vermont   Gas  Pipeline  project.  Yet  we  have   so  little  opportunity  to  weigh  in  and   be  heard,  either  as  an  individual  or   a  town,  and  the  weighing  in  makes   so  little  difference,  especially  in  the   Section  248  process.  I  hope  some-­ day  the  Legislature  will  change  the   process  to  give  participation  by  citi-­ zens  and  municipalities  more  clout.   I  am  so  frustrated  that  the  only  way   I  can  gain  attention  is  by  resigning. My  action  is  a  loud  protest  to   the  actions  of  the  Addison  County   Regional  Planning  Commission   (ACRPC)  in  voting  that  Phase  II  of   the  Vermont  Gas  Pipeline  complies   with  the  Addison  County  Regional   Plan.  I  believe  the  process  followed   E\WKH$&53&ZDVĂ&#x20AC;DZHGDQGRQH of  Monktonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  delegates  should  have   recused  herself  from  the  vote. 7KHSURFHVVZDVĂ&#x20AC;DZHGIRUWZR reasons.  First,  two  of  the  ACRPC   committees,  Energy  and  Act  250/ Section  248,  voted  that  the  project   did  not  comply  with  their  sections   of  the  regional  plan  and  those  vot-­ ing  the  project  does  comply  ignored   those  votes.  I  also  believe  the   biased  speech  given  by  the  execu-­

tive  director  of  the  ACRPC  before   the  vote  was  totally  inappropriate   and  detrimental  to  the  commission   process. Second,  Monkton  delegate  Thea   Gaudette  should  have  kept  herself   recused  from  the  process  and  not   voted.  During  the  time  the  ACRPC   was  examining  the  proposal,   Ms.  Gaudette  applied  for  a  job  at   Vermont  Gas,  a  situation  she  let  be   known  and  recused  herself  but  then   unrecused  herself  when  Vermont   Gas  reported  no  job  was  available.   In  my  opinion,  it  is  not  ethical  for   a  person  charged  with  a  role  in   regulating  a  company  to  try  to  be-­ come  an  employee  of  that  company.   Regardless  of  whether  an  actual   employment  results,  the  act  of  ap-­ plying  for  the  job  compromises  the   personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ability  to  appear  unbiased.   I  also  was  deeply  disturbed  by   the  comments  made  by  delegate   Gaudette  regarding  Monktonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  town   meeting  nearly  unanimous  vote  to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;denounce  the  Vermont  Gas  project   through  Monkton.â&#x20AC;?  Gaudette  stated   the  vote  â&#x20AC;&#x153;was  symbolic  and  about   Phase  Iâ&#x20AC;?  and  she  did  not  believe  the   Town  Meeting  Day  vote  was  repre-­ sentative  of  the  entire  town  because   she  believed  that  many  residents   who  support  the  pipeline  project   were  not  present  at  town  meeting. I  believe  anybody  who  was  there  

that  day  considered  the  vote  as   a  way  of  trying  to  support  those   residents  who  have  been  victimized   by  Vermont  Gasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  illegal  and  bul-­ lying  tactics  in  dealing  with  them.   I  would  have  thought  the  message   would  have  been  clear  to  all  our   HOHFWHGRIÂżFLDOVWRGRZKDW\RXFDQ to  force  Vermont  Gas  to  halt  this   kind  of  behavior.  Applying  for  a  job   with  the  company  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do  that.   The  idea  that  an  elected  (Gaud-­ ette  also  serves  on  the  Monkton   Planning  Commission)  and  ap-­ SRLQWHGRIÂżFLDO VKHDOVRVHUYHVRQ the  Development  Review  Board)   would  question  the  authority  of   a  legal  town  meeting  vote  based   on  the  supposition  that  supporters   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  attend,  forces  me  to  realize   she  is  unwilling  to  accept  a  process   that  produces  a  result  in  disagree-­ ment  with  her  own  positions.  How   about  the  votes  on  the  other  articles   at  town  meeting?  How  about  close   votes  in  recent  times  such  as  the   vote  on  zoning  regulations?  Should   we  disregard  that  vote  because   enough  people  to  defeat  it  stayed   home?  How  about  the  ACRPC   delegates  who  were  absent  for  the   Vermont  Gas  vote? Our  process  may  not  be  perfect   but  it  is  a  democratic  process  and  to   KDYHDQRIÂżFLDOTXHVWLRQLQJWKHUH-­ sult  based  on  their  own  guess  hurts  


PAGE  6  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

ADDISON COUNTY

Obituaries

Florence Otten, 78, Cornwall CORNWALL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Florence   Margaret   Otten,   78,   died   Wednesday,   June   4,   2014,   at   her   home   in   Cornwall   after   a   brief   illness. Born   Sept.   12,   1935,   in   Jersey   City,   N.J.,   she   was   the   daughter   of   the   late   Charles   Raphael   and   Winifred  (Crooks)  Brinkman.  She   was  a  graduate  of  Port  Richmond   High  School,  class  of  1953. She   married   Werner   Otten   Oct.   20,   1956,   at   Trinity   Lutheran   Church,   Staten   Island,   N.Y.   Florence,   together   with   her   husband,   owned   and   operated   the   Whiting  Corner  Cupboard  General   Store  for  over  20  years. Florence   enjoyed   oil   painting,   rug  making,  reading  and  teaching   sewing.   She  is  survived  by  her  children,   Kathleen   Johnson   and   husband   Steven   of   Clymer,   N.Y.,   Richard   Otten   of   Brockton,   Mass.,   and   Steven   Otten   and   wife   Holly   of   Exeter,  R.I.;Íž  and  by  her  grandchil-­ dren,   Kevin,   Kristie   and  Amanda   Johnson   and   Kirsten,   Courtney   and  Cameron  Otten.   She   was   predeceased   by   her   husband,   Werner   Otten,   on   May   9,  2006 Funeral  services  will  be  held  on   Tuesday,  June  10,  2014,  at  11  a.m.   at   Sanderson-­Ducharme   Funeral   Home   with   the   Rev.   John  Appelt   officiating.   Family   and   friends   may   call   from   10   a.m..   until   the   time  of  the  service  at  11  a.m.  

VERGENNES  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   David   Richard   Barrows  Sr.,  age  65,  died  at  Fletcher   Allen   Health   Care   in   Burlington   on   Monday,  June  2,  2014. David   was   born   Oct.   21,   1948,   in   Vergennes   to   the   late   Earl   and   Genevieve   (Panton)   Barrows.   He   attended   Vergennes   High   School   before  joining  the  Navy.    He  honorably   served  in  the  U.S.  Navy  and  later  as  a   reservist  in  the  Army  National  Guard.   After  leaving  the  military  he  went  on   to  work  as  a  school  bus  driver,  he  then   worked   at   White   Pigment,   and   later   at  GE  in  Burlington.  He  then  proudly   owned  and  operated  Little  City  Citgo   in  Vergennes.  David  retired  from  his   position  with  the  Vermont  Department   of  Transportation. David  was  a  member  of  American   Legion   Post   14   in   Vergennes   and   enjoyed   the   friendships   he   made   WKHUH +H DOVR KDG D VLJQLÂżFDQW

support  network   in   his   neighbors   in   Whispering  Pines. He   is   survived   by   his   son,   David   Barrows   Jr.   and   wife   Carrie   and   their   children,   Sevie   and   Barret,   and   by   his   daughter,   Betsy   Barrows   and   her   daughter,   Lydia.   David   is   also   survived  by  his  sister  Lucille  Lafrance   and   brother   Roland   Barrows   and   his   wife  Pam.   David   was   predeceased   by   his   sisters   Shirley   LeCompte   and   Janice   Betz;Íž   and   his   brothers,   George,   Clement,  Roger  and  Ronnie  Barrows. As  per  Davidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  wishes,  no  services   are   planned   at   this   time.   Memorial   contributions   are   welcome   and   should   be   mailed   to   the   American   Legion   Post   14,   100   Armory   Lane,   Vergennes,   VT   05491.   The   family   invites   you   to   share   your   memories   and   condolences   by   visiting   www. DZUIKFRP¸

!

DAVID  R.  BARROWS  SR.

"

Linda Fairbanks, 66, Fair Haven

FLORENCE  OTTEN Memorial  contributions  may  be   made   to   Addison   County   Home   Health   and   Hospice,   P.O.   Box   754,  Middlebury,  VT  05753. Arrangements   are   under   the   direction   of   the   Sanderson-­ Ducharme   Funeral   Home.   Online   condolences   may   be   made   at   www.sandersonfuneralservice. FRP¸

Obituary Guidelines

The Addison Independent considers obituaries community news and does not charge to print them, as long as they fol-­ low certain guidelines. These

David Barrows Sr., 65, Vergennes

guidelines are published on our web site: addisonindependent. com. Families may opt for un-­ edited paid obituaries, which are GHVLJQDWHGZLWK´š¾DWWKHHQG

FAIR  HAVEN   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Linda   Jean   Fairbanks,   66,   of   Fair   Haven   died   Tuesday,  June  3,  2014. She   was   born   on   June   25,   1947,   in   Windsor,   the   daughter   of   Ronald   and   Shirley   (Martin)   Harrington.   She   received   her   early   education   in   Bridgewater  and  Woodstock  and  grad-­ uated  from  Woodstock  High  School. She   married  Alan   Rickert   and   four   children  were  born  in  that  union.  She   later   married   Willie   Thomas   and   one   child  was  born  in  that  union.  She  later   married   Alfred   Leon   Fairbanks   of   Orwell.  He  died  Nov.  26,  1996. She   lived   in   the   Orwell   and   Hubbardton  area  for  many  years  and   has  been  a  resident  of  Fair  Haven  for   the   past   several   years.   She   was   an   active  genealogist  and  was  a  member   of  the  Hubbardton  Historical  Society,   Center   Grange   290   in   Hubbardton,   the   New   Horizon   Pomona   Grange   in   Bomoseen   and   the   Vermont   State  Grange,  and  was  a  7th  Degree   National  Granger. She   is   survived   by   a   son,   Douglas  

Harrington  of   Belleview,   Fla.;͞   four   daughters,   Kristie   Harrington   of   Bennington,   Tracy   Harrington   of   Rutland,   Sedona   Harrington   of   Castleton   and   Tori   Thomas   of   Hubbardton;͞  four  sisters,  K  Dunbarof   Worcester,  Vt.,  Shirleen  Perniciaro  of   Laconia,   N.H.,   Shannon   Blanchard   of   Somersworth,   N.H.,   and   Jennifer   7KRG\RI(Q¿HOG1<JUDQGFKLO-­ dren;͞  one  great-­grandchild;͞  and  several   nieces  and  nephews.   Calling   hours   will   be   held   on   Monday,  June  9,  2014,  from  3-­5  p.m.   at  the  Mallory  Funeral  Home,4  South   Park   Place,   Fair   Haven.   Following   the  calling  hours,  members  of  Center   Grange   290   will   conduct   the   Grange   memorial  service  at  the  funeral  home   at  5  p.m.  A  reception  and  luncheon  will   take  place  after  this  service  at  Center   LINDA  FAIRBANKS Grange   290,   1831   Monument   Hill   in   Hubbardton.  A   graveside   service   and   burial   will   take   place   on   Tuesday,   Memorial   contributions   may   be   June  10,  2014  at  9  a.m.  in  the  Vermont   made   to   American   Cancer   Society,   Veterans   Memorial   Cemetery   in   Vermont   Division,   55   Day   Lane,   Randolph. Williston,  VT  05495-­4420.

WBON  to  meet  at  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  June  17 MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Women   Business  Owners  Network  (WBON)   will   meet   Tuesday,   June   17,   from   8-­9:30   a.m.   at   Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   restaurant   in   Middlebury.   This   month,   Sarah   Gillen   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three   Massive   Mistakes   Professional   Women   Make.â&#x20AC;? Gillen   will   share   the   three   missteps   women   business   owners   take   that   keep   them   stuck   and  

spinning  their   wheels.   Participants   will   also   learn   how   to   clear   their   minds,  settle  their  energy  and  focus   on  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  really  important  for  their   businesses. Gillen,   MA,   PCC,   LMFT,   is   a   credentialed   leadership   coach,   master  energy  medicine  healer  and   licensed  marriage  and  family  thera-­ pist  with  over  30  yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  experience.   6KH VSHFLDOL]HV LQ IXOÂżOOPHQW DQG

Peace of mind is knowing your loved one never leaves our care.

Affordable Cremation & Burial Plans Â&#x2021;WKHRQO\RQVLWHFUHPDWRU\LQ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\ Â&#x2021;ORFDOO\RZQHGDQGRSHUDWHGE\:DOWHU'XFKDUPH

Sanderson-Ducharme Funeral Home 6RXWK0DLQ6W0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021; sandersonfuneralservice.com

well-­being,  interaction   styles   and   communication,   and   increasing   emotional  intelligence. WBON   discussions   are   open   to   area   women   involved   in   assorted   professional   and   personal   endeavors.   They   are   held   the   third   Tuesday   of   the   month.   The   cost   is   $7  for  members,  $10  for  guests.  To   RSVP   or   learn   more,   email   info@ nourishyourpurpose.com.

Funeral, Cremation & Memorial Services, Pre-Planning Services

BROWN-McCLAY FUNERAL HOMES

Bristol 453-2301

Vergennes 877-3321


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  7

CONTACT GOV. SHUMLIN

Signed,  sealed  delivered MIDDLEBURY  SELECTMEN  NICK  Artim,  left,  and  Dean  George,  right,  meet  with  Middlebury  College   President  Ron  Liebowitz  in  front  of  the  Lazarus  building  at  20  Main  St.  in  downtown  Middlebury  last   7KXUVGD\PRUQLQJ7KHFROOHJHRI¿FLDOO\VLJQHGWKHSURSHUW\RYHUWRWKHWRZQZKLFKZLOOHYHQWXDOO\ GHPROLVKWKHVWUXFWXUHWRSURYLGHIRUDZLGHU3ULQWHUœV$OOH\DFFHVVWRWKH0DUEOH:RUNV Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Opiate addiction film to be re-screened By  LEE  J.  KAHRS BRANDON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Once   was   not   enough.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   what   local   organiz-­ HUV WKRXJKW DERXW WKH ÂżUVW VKRZLQJ of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Hungry  Heart,â&#x20AC;?  a  powerful   GRFXPHQWDU\ÂżOPKLJKOLJKWLQJ the   opiate   addiction   crisis   in   Ver-­ mont. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone  was  so  overwhelmed,â&#x20AC;?   said  Brandon  Town  Clerk  Sue  Gage   of   the   April   30   screening   at   Otter   Valley  Union  High  School.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  called   a  few  people  and  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;We  need  to   keep  this  conversation  going.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? So   Gage,   Brandon   Police   Chief   Chris   Brickell,   Brandon   Recreation   Director   Bill   Moore,   Brandon   Se-­ lectman   Devon   Fuller,   Brandon   Boys   and   Girls   Club   Board   Chair   Christy  Gahagan  and  several  others   planned   another   showing   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Hungry  Heart.â&#x20AC;?  It  is  set  for  Tuesday,   June   10,   at   7   p.m.   at   the   Brandon   Town  Hall,  with  a  public  forum  the   following   night,   June   11,   from   6-­8   p.m.  at  the  Brandon  Congregational   Church  Fellowship  Hall. Following   the   movie   will   be   a   Q&A   session   with   Jessica   Farn-­ sworth   from   the   West   Ridge   Treat-­ ment   Center   in   Rutland   and   Mary   Alice  McKenzie,  executive  director   of   the   Burlington   Boys   and   Girls   Club. The   public   forum   will   be   moder-­ ated  by  Bernie  Carr  and  will  feature   seven   different   discussion   areas,   with  the  goal  of  producing  an  action   plan  for  the  community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Hungry   Heartâ&#x20AC;?   is   direct-­ HG E\ 9HUPRQW ÂżOPPDNHU %HVV Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien  and  chronicles  the  struggles   of   St.  Albans   pediatrician   Dr.   Fred   Holmes   as   he   tries   to   treat   several   of   his   patients   suffering   from   pre-­ VFULSWLRQ GUXJ DGGLFWLRQ 7KH ÂżOP DOVRSURÂżOHVVRPHROGHUDGGLFWVZKR went  through  rock  bottom,  recovery,   relapse  and  recovery  again. 7KHUHDVRQWKHÂżOPLVVRULYHWLQJ and  thought-­provoking  is  that  every   town   in   Vermont   has   been   touched  

by  addiction  in  the  last  decade.  Ev-­ eryone  seems  to  know  someone  af-­ fected  by  drug  addiction.  While  Ver-­ montâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drug   problem   has   expanded   VLQFHWKHÂżOPZDVPDGHLQ to   include   the   fast   re-­emergence   of   cheap  heroin,  the  issue  of  addiction   remains  as  serious  as  ever. For  Gage,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  also  personal.  She  is   the  mother  of  two  daughters  in  their   20s  with  friends  who  have  died  from   drug   addiction.   Gage   said   she   feels   the  enormity  of  the  problem. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  really  a  pervasive  issue,â&#x20AC;?  she   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  have  died,  people  have   been  robbed  â&#x20AC;Ś   It  affects  the  entire   community.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   huge.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   losing   an   entire   generation,   or   two.   The   community   had   to   respond   in   some  manner.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  the  forum   is  about.â&#x20AC;? Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  also  why  Gage  and  Brickell   sought  to  include  different  facets  of   the   community,   including   medical   professionals,  students  and  others. Âł2QFH \RX VHH WKH ÂżOP LW LPPH-­ diately  sparks  thoughts  and  conversa-­ tions,â&#x20AC;?  Brickell  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So,  we  thought   if   we   had   a   forum   the   next   day,   it   would  give  people  a  chance  to  actu-­ ally   have   a   discussion   and   see   what   kind  of  strategy  they  could  come  up   with  to  deal  with  this  issue.â&#x20AC;? Since   Gov.   Peter   Shumlinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   State   of   the   State   address   in   Janu-­ ary  highlighted  the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drug  cri-­ sis,   followed   by   U.S.   Sen.   Patrick   Leahyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Judiciary   Committee   Field   Hearing   on   the   issue   in   Rutland   in   April,  some  say  there  has  been  some   progress.   Rutland   County   now   has   in  place  the  Rapid  Intervention  Pro-­ gram,   which   is   based   on   a   Chitten-­ den  County  program  at  work  for  the   last   several   years.   It   seeks   to   offer   non-­violent   drug   offenders   the   op-­ tion   of   treatment   instead   of   prison   time. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People   being   (arrested   on   drug-­ related   charges)   are   now   being   screened   and   put   into   treatment,â&#x20AC;?   Brickell  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  look  at  the  per-­

son  and   their   circumstances   of   the   arrest   and   if   they   are   suitable,   they   try   to   push   that   person   into   treat-­ ment.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   voluntary   program,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   real   opportunity   for   someone   who  wants  treatment,  to  get  it.â&#x20AC;? But   Brickell   said   the   forum   in   Brandon  is  not  designed  to  get  peo-­ ple   together   to   share   their   experi-­ ences  with  addiction-­related  issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   to   come   up   with   ideas   from   the   medical   community   and   others   to  help  curb  the  tide  here,â&#x20AC;?  Brickell.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  that  means  engaging  the  medical   community  more  to  be  more  careful   about   who   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   prescribing   to,   great.â&#x20AC;? The   forum   will   be   divided   into   seven   categories:   Addiction,   Treat-­ ment  and  Recovery,  Education,  Cost   and   Resources,   Prevention,   Com-­ munication/Outreach,   and   Other.   Participants  will  rotate  from  table  to   WDEOHVSHQGLQJÂżYHPLQXWHVDWHDFK station,   brainstorming   ideas   under   the  topic  at  hand.   Chief   Brickell   is   hoping   that   the   IRUXPLVDVZHOODWWHQGHGDVWKHÂżOP screening. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  hope  is  that  we  do  come  up   with   new   and   different   ideas,   not   just   for   law   enforcement,   but   for   families,  doctors  and  to  help  people   feeling  safe  in  their  homes,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   could   be   that   someone   comes   up  with  a  great  idea  we  just  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   thought  of  before.â&#x20AC;? Gage  said  since  she  became  town   clerk  in  March,  she  has  felt  an  even   stronger  need  to  help  her  town  in  the   face  of  the  drug  crisis.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   seeing   it   in   our   back-­ yard   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   heartbreaking,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  just  feel  like  we  need  to  do   something.  It  touches  all  aspects  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   church,   work,   home.   It   touches   my   life,   even   more   now   as   the   town   clerk,   because   I   feel   a   kinship   with   people  in  the  community.â&#x20AC;? For   more   information,   contact   Sue   Gage   at   247-­3635   or   sgage@ townofbrandon.com.

June 21st Bristol Governor Peter Shumlin  9WRQO\ Â&#x2021; 109  State  Street,  Pavillion Montpelier,  Vermont  05609-­0101 www.vermont.gov/governor

25

May 9 June 13 July 11 August 8 September 12 October 10


PAGE  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

communitycalendar

Jun

9

MONDAY

Vergennes  City   Band   rehearsal   in   Vergennes.   Monday,   June   9,   6:45-­8   p.m.,   VUHS   band   room.   Instrumentalists   of   all   ages  are  welcome  to  join  the  band.  Come   rehearse   for   the   summer   concert   series.   Info:  877-­2005.   Addison   County   Right   to   Life   meeting   in   Bristol.   Monday,   June   9,   7-­8   p.m.,   First   Baptist   Church.   Visitors   welcome.   Info:   388-­2898  or  L2Paquette@aol.com.   Bread   Loaf   Orion   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference  opening  in  Ripton.  Monday,   June   9,   8-­10   p.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Opening   event   for   the   conference,   which   runs   through   June   15.   Welcome  by  directors  and  reading  by  Rick   Bass.  Info:  443-­5286.    

Jun

10

TUESDAY

8QIROGLQJĂ&#x20AC;RZHU BARBARA  EKEDAHLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   â&#x20AC;&#x153;LOTUS   Mudraâ&#x20AC;?   can  

Environmental  writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   be   seen   at   the   Jackson   Gallery   at   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   conference   lecture   in   Ripton.   Town   Hall   Theater   in   an   exhibit   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three   Tuesday,   June   10,   9-­11   a.m.,   Woodblock  Artists.â&#x20AC;?  An  artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  reception  for  the   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   exhibit,  which  also  includes  works  by  Ray  Hud-­ Alan   Weisman   presents,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where   son  and  Jane  Eddy,  is  on  Friday,  June  13,  from   Environmentalists   Fear   to   Tread.â&#x20AC;?   Part   5-­7  p.m.,  during  the  Arts  Walk. of   the   Bread   Loaf   Orion   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Conference.  Info:  443-­5286.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Garden   Tea   and   Poemsâ&#x20AC;?   in   Lincoln.   Senior  luncheon  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,  June   Wednesday,   June   11,   10-­11:30   a.m.,   meet   at   10,  11:30  a.m.-­1:30  p.m.,  Russ  Sholes  Senior   Lincoln   Library.   The   libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Senior   Program   Center.   CVAA   sponsors   a   noon   luncheon   of   this   month   includes   a   trip   from   the   library   to   French   onion   soup   with   crackers,   chef   salad   the  home  of  Sue  Allen  for  a  tour  of  her  gardens   with  turkey,  ham,  eggs  and  ranch  dressing,  and   and   refreshments.   Carpooling   available.   Info:   pear   slices.   Suggested   donation   $4.   Please   453-­2665.   bring   your   own   place   setting.   Reservations   Senior   night   meal   and   silent/teacup   auction   required:  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  634.  Free  trans-­ in   Bridport.   Wednesday,   June   11,   4:30-­6:30   portation  via  ACTR:  388-­1946.   p.m.,   Bridport   Grange.   CVAA   sponsors   an   CCV   Information   Session   in   Middlebury.   evening   meal   of   baked   salmon,   potato   salad,   Tuesday,  June  10,  noon-­1  p.m.,  10  Merchants   peas   and   lemon   Bundt   cake,   Row.   Find   out   about   Community   College   of   catered   by   Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,   at   5   p.m.   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   classes.   Info:   388-­3032   or   jennifer. Silent   auction   and   teacup   auction   stefani@ccv.edu.   as   well;   winners   announced   just   Environmental  writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  conference  publishing   after   dinner.   Suggested   dona-­ panel  in  Ripton.  Tuesday,  June  10,  3:30-­5:30   tion   $5.   Bring   your   own   place   p.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   setting.   Reservations   required:   The   Bread   Loaf   Orion   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  615.   Conference   holds   a   publishing   panel   with   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ask   an   Herbalistâ&#x20AC;?   in   Lincoln.   Jennifer   Sahn   of   Orion   Magazine   and   others.   Wednesday,   June   11,   5:30-­7:30   Info:  802-­443-­5286.   p.m.,   Lincoln   Library.   Clinical   Brain   injury   support   group   meeting   in   herbalists   Anna   Blackwell   and   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   June   10,   6-­8   p.m.,   Emily   French   will   hold   15-­minute   Hannaford   Career   Center,   room   208.   The   one-­on-­one   consultations   with   monthly  Middlebury  Brain  Injury  Support  Group   people   to   answer   their   questions   meeting.   Special   guest.   Light   refreshments.   and  provide  personal  herbal  formu-­ Info:  388-­2720.   las.  Info:  www.sweetgrassherbals. Talk   by   Eileen   Rockefeller   in   Middlebury.   com.   Tuesday,   June   10,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Book  discussion  group  in  Lincoln.   Theater.   Rockefeller   reads   from   her   latest   Wednesday,   June   11,   7-­9   p.m.,   book,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being  a  Rockefeller,  Becoming  Myself.â&#x20AC;?   Lincoln   Library.   Discussing   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   The   pioneering   philanthropist   and   daughter   Good   Scent   from   a   Strange   of   American   royalty   reveals   what   it   was   like   Mountainâ&#x20AC;?  by  Robert  Olen  Butler.   to  grow  up  in  one  of  the  worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  most  famous   Environmental  writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  conference   families.   Q&A   follows.   Free.   Info:   www.town-­ reading   in   Ripton.   Wednesday,   halltheater.org.   June   11,   8-­9   p.m.,   Little   Environmental   writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   conference   reading   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   in   Ripton.   Tuesday,   June   10,   8-­9   p.m.,   Little   Reading   by   Alison   Hawthorne   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Reading   by   Deming.   Part   of   the   Bread   Loaf   Camille   Dungy.   Part   of   the   Bread   Loaf   Orion   Orion   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference.   Info:   Conference.  Info:  443-­5286.   443-­5286.  

Jun

11

WEDNESDAY

%XVLQHVV ÂżQDQFLQJ ZRUNVKRS in  Middlebury.   Wednesday,   June   11,  8:30-­10:30  a.m.,  Ilsley  Library.  The   Addison  County  Economic  Development  Corp.   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Financing   Resources   to   Help   Your   Business.â&#x20AC;?   Register   at   http://addisoncoun-­ tyedc.org.  Info:  802-­388-­7953.   Environmental   writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   conference   lecture   in   Ripton.   Wednesday,   June   11,   9-­11   a.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Maurice   Manning   presents,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;How   Landscape   Went   From  Being  the  Setting  of  a  Poem  to  Being  the   Subject   of   the   Poem.   Part   of   the   Bread   Loaf   Orion  Environmental  Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Conference.  Info:   443-­5286.  

Jun

12

lecture  in   Ripton.   Thursday,   June   12,   9-­11   a.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Lecture   by   Rick   Bass,   title   TBA.   Part   of   the   Bread   Loaf   Orion   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference.  Info:  443-­5286.   Vermont   Adult   Learning   graduation   cele-­ bration   at   Middlebury   College.   Thursday,   June   12,   6:30-­8   p.m.,   Kirk   Alumni   Center.   In   addition   to   the   VAL   graduation   ceremony,   select   students   will   be   inducted   into   the   National   Adult   Education   Honor   Society   for   WKHÂżUVWWLPH5HFHSWLRQIROORZV Lance   Armstrong   author   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   June   12,   7-­9   p.m.,   Champlain   Valley   Unitarian   Universalist   Society.   A   conversation   between   Reed   Albergotti,   co-­author   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wheelmen:   Lance   Armstrong,   the  Tour   de   France   and   the   Greatest   Sports   Conspiracy   Ever,â&#x20AC;?   with   Sports   Illustrated   senior  writer  Alexander  Wolff.  Free.  The  event   is  part  of  Middlebury  Cyclefest  2014,  a  cele-­ bration   leading   up   to   the   inaugural   Vermont   Gran  Fondo  on  June  14.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whole   Lotta   Loveâ&#x20AC;?   Led   Zeppelin   tribute   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   June   12,   8-­10   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.   Clint   Bierman   and   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best   rockers,   led   by   vocalist   Josh   Panda,  play  a  one-­night  tribute  to  the  worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   greatest  heavy  metal  band.  Tickets  available   DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  ZZZ townhalltheater.org,  or  at  the  door,  if  available.   Environmental   writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   conference   read-­ ing  in  Ripton.  Thursday,  June  12,  8-­9  p.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Reading   by   Maurice   Manning.   Part   of   the   Bread   Loaf   Orion  Environmental  Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Conference.  Info:   443-­5286.  

Jun

13

FRIDAY Environmental  writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   confer-­ ence   lecture   in   Ripton.   Friday,   June   13,   9-­11   a.m.,   Little   Theatre,  

Bread  Loaf  Campus.  Alison  Hawthorne  Deming   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;To   See   Beyond   Earthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Noise:   New   Relationships   Between  Art   and   Science.â&#x20AC;?   Part   of  the  Bread  Loaf  Orion  Environmental  Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference.  Info:  443-­5286.   Senior   luncheon   in   Bristol.   Friday,   June   13,   11:30   a.m.-­1:30   p.m.,   Bristol   Masonic   Lodge.   A   senior   meal   of   soup,   salad   and   sandwich.   Suggested  donation  $4.  Reservations  required:   453-­3451.   New  Music  on  the  Point  annual  festival  concert   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   13,   2:30-­6:30   p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  Contemporary  cham-­ ber  music  artists  and  composers  present  new   works   develops   during   the   New   Music   on   the   Point  Festival  2014.  Free.  Info:  www.newmusi-­ conthepoint.com   or   www.townhalltheater.org.   Also  on  June  14.   Artistsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   reception   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   13,   5-­7   p.m.,   Jackson   Gallery   at   the   Town   Hall   Theater.   Celebrating   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Three   Woodblock   Artists,â&#x20AC;?   an   exhibit   of   multilayered   woodblock   prints  by  Jane  Eddy,  Barbara  Ekedahl  and  Ray   Hudson.  Exhibit  runs  May  23-­June  29.   Arts   Walk   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   13,   5-­7   p.m.,   downtown   Middlebury   and   the   Marble   Works.   Monthly   outdoor   stroll   through   town   featuring  art,  music,  food  and  fun.  May  through   2FWREHU6HHPRQWKO\Ă&#x20AC;LHUDWZZZPLGGOHEXU\-­ artswalk.com.   Exhibit   opening   reception   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   13,   5-­7   p.m.,   Edgewater   Gallery.   Celebrating  the  opening  of  an  exhibit  of  Cynthia   Kirkwoodâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   summery   paintings.   Exhibit   runs   through  June  30.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Armstrong   Lieâ&#x20AC;?   documentary   screen-­ ing  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  June  13,  7-­9  p.m.,   Marquis   Theater.   Admission   $5,   free   to   Gran   Fondo  registrants.   New   Music   on   the   Point   annual   festival   concert  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  June  13,  7-­11   p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  Contemporary  cham-­ ber  music  artists  and  composers  present  new   works   develops   during   the   New   Music   on   the   Point   Festival   2014.   Free.   Info:   www.newmusiconthepoint.com   or   www.townhalltheater.org.   Also   on   June  14.   Environmental   writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   confer-­ ence   reading   in   Ripton.   Friday,   June   13,   8-­9   p.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Reading   by   Jane   Brox.   Part   of   the   Bread   Loaf   Orion   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference.  Info:  443-­5286.  

THURSDAY

Monthly  wildlife   walk   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   June   12,   7-­9   a.m.,   Otter   View   Park   and   Hurd   Grassland.   A   monthly   OCAS-­MALT   event   (note   earlier   time),   inviting   community   members   to   help   survey   birds   and   other   wildlife.   Meet   at   Otter   View   Park   parking   area,   corner   of  Weybridge  Street  and  Pulp  Mill   Bridge   Road.   Beginning   birders   welcome.  Shorter  routes  possible.   Info:  388-­1007  or  388-­6019.   Environmental  writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  conference  

Century  celebration â&#x20AC;&#x153;BLUE  LADY,â&#x20AC;?  A  1935  watercolor  by  German  artist  George  Gro-­ sz,  is  on  display  in  the  Middlebury  College  Museum  of  Artâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  sum-­ mer  2014  exhibit  of  its  German  art  collection.  The  exhibit,  mark-­ ing   the   100th   year   of   the   collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   German   Language   School,   runs  June  13-­Aug.  10.

Jun SATURDAY

14

The  Vermont   Gran   Fondo   in   Hancock.   Saturday,   June   14,   8   a.m.-­5   p.m.,   Middlebury   College   Snow   Bowl.   A   non-­competitive   ride   through   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Green   Mountains.   Challenging   climbs,   amazing  views.  Three  ride  options:   Gran  Fondo,  103  miles,  all  four  gaps;   Medio  Fondo,  75  miles,  Lincoln  and   App  gaps;  Piccolo  Fondo,  46  miles,   Brandon  and  Middlebury  gaps.  Info:   www.vermontgranfondo.com.   Annual   church   porch/basement   sale  in  Bristol.  Saturday,  June  14,   9   a.m.-­3   p.m.,   Bristol   Federated   Church.   Clothing,   household   items,   books.   Rummage   sale   info:   453-­5840.   Basement   porch   sale   info:   453-­2379.   To   make   dona-­ tions  in  advance,  call  the  church  at   453-­2321.   Environmental   writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   confer-­ ence   lecture   in   Ripton.   Saturday,   June   14,   9-­11   a.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread  Loaf  Campus.  Camille  Dungy   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like   Taming   Something   Wild:   Why   Setting,   Simile   and   Metaphor  Make  Sense.â&#x20AC;?  Part  of  the   Bread   Loaf   Orion   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Conference.  Info:  443-­5286.   Prize  Bingo  in  Leicester.  Saturday,   June  14,  1-­3  p.m.,  Leicester  Senior   Center.   Refreshments   will   be   served.  All  are  invited.  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  9

communitycalendar

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Court   Martial   of   Maj.   Gen.   Arthur   St.   Clairâ&#x20AC;?   in   Orwell.   Saturday,   June   14,   2-­3:30   p.m.,   Mt.   Independence   State   Historic   Site.   The   Vermont   Judicial   History   Society   holds   a   second   â&#x20AC;&#x153;properâ&#x20AC;?   court   martial   of   St.   Clair,   with   a   jury   weighing   arguments   presented   by   the  judge  advocate  and  St.  Clair  himself.  With   commentary.  Info:  802-­948-­2000.   New  Music  on  the  Point  annual  festival  concert   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   June   14,   2:30-­6:30   p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.  Contemporary  cham-­ ber  music  artists  and  composers  present  new   works   develops   during   the   New   Music   on   the   Point   Festival   2014.   Free.   Info:   www.newmu-­ siconthepoint.com  or  www.townhalltheater.org.   Cold   roast   turkey   and   salad   supper   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,   June   14,   5-­6:30   p.m.,   Vergennes   United   Methodist   Church.   Cold   roast   beef,   potato   salad,   broccoli   salad,   rolls,   strawberry   shortcake   and   beverage,   served   buffet   style.   Adults   $8,   children   $4.   Takeout   available.  Info:  877-­3150.   Free  community  concert  in  Monkton.  Saturday,   June   14,   5:30-­7:30   p.m.,   Monkton   Rec   Field,   Hollow   Road.   The   Bessette   Quartet   with   special  guests  Charlie  Frazier  and  Abby  Jenne   play   rock,   jazz   and   blues   at   the   third   annual   Monkton  Flag  Day  concert.  Free.  Pack  a  picnic.   Âł(WKLRSLDQ %RRJLH %HQHÂżW´ LQ /LQFROQ   Saturday,   June   14,   6-­9   p.m.,   Burnham   Hall.   Celebrating   the   Vermont/Ethiopia   connection   with   live   music   by   the   New   Nile   Orchestra   DQG (WKLRSLDQ GDQFH ZLWK .LĂ&#x20AC;X .LGDQH IURP 7-­10   p.m.   The   Vermont   Ethiopian   Teacher   Exchange  will  provide  Ethiopian  food  from  6-­8   p.m.  Tickets  $20  adults,  $10  students,  free  for   kids  under  10.  Cash  bar  and  food.   Chamber   music   concert   in   Rochester.   Saturday,   June   14,   7-­9   p.m.,   Rochester   Federated   Church.   The   20th   anniversary   opening   concert,   featuring   Soovin   Kim   on   violin   and   Ieva   Jokubaviciute   on   piano   play-­ ing  three  Beethoven  sonatas.  Pre-­concert  talk   with  Cynthia  Huard  at  7  p.m.;  concert  starts  at   7:30  p.m.  Free  but  donations  requested.  Info:   802-­767-­9234  or  www.rcmsvt.org.   Silent  movie  screening  in  Brandon.  Saturday,   June   14,   7-­9   p.m.,   Brandon   Town   Hall   and   Community   Center,   Route   7.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Silent   Comedy   with   Harold   Lloyd,â&#x20AC;?   with   live   musical   accom-­ paniment   by   Jeff   Rapsis.   Part   of   the   Brandon   7RZQ +DOOÂśV VXPPHU VLOHQW ÂżOP VHULHV )UHH but  donations  to  the  town  hall  restoration  fund   appreciated.  Info:  www.brandontownhall.org.   The   David   Vandervort   Quartet   in   Brandon.   Saturday,   June   14,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Brandon   Music.   David   Vandervort,   piano;   Mike   Roninson,  bass;  Steve  Kirsty,  saxophone;  and   Frantz   Celestin,   percussion,   play   improvisa-­ tion-­heavy  music  drawing  from  a  diverse  array   RI LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHV 7LFNHWV  &DOO  or   email   info@brandon-­msuci.net   for   reserva-­ tions  and  info.   Environmental   writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   conference   reading   in   Ripton.   Saturday,   June   14,   8-­9   p.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Reading   by   Alan   Weisman.   Part   of   the   Bread   Loaf   Orion   Environmental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference.   Info:   443-­5286.  

Jun

15

SUNDAY

&KLFNHQ EDUEHFXH LQ /LQFROQ  Sunday,   June   15,   11:30   a.m.-­2:30   p.m.,  Lincoln  Fire  Station,  34  Gove  Hill   Road.  Fundraiser  for  the  Lincoln  Volunteer  Fire   Company.  Adults  $10,  children  $7.  BBQ  goes   until  the  food  is  gone.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rachaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   New   York   Postcards   at   100â&#x20AC;?   presentation   in   Ferrisburgh.   Sunday,   June   15,   3-­5   p.m.,   Rokeby   Museum.   Celebrating   the  opening  of  an  exhibit  of  100-­year-­old  post-­ cards   of   iconic   New   York   City   scenery,   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Art  Loverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  New  York,â&#x20AC;?  by  Rachael  Robinson   Elmer.   Elmer   was   raised   on   the   Robinson   homestead,  now  the  Rokeby  Museum.  Exhibit   runs  through  Oct.  26.  Info:  www.rokeby.org  or   802-­877-­3406.   Âł/LJKWV &DPHUD $XFWLRQ´ IXQGUDLVHU LQ Middlebury.  Sunday,  June  15,  6-­9  p.m.,  Town   Hall  Theater.  Annual  bash  to  raise  funds  for  the   THT,   with   live   and   silent   auction,   food,   drinks  

with  cranberry   mayo,   potato   leek   soup,   salad   with   ranch   dressing   and   chocolate   torte   for   dessert.  Suggested  donation  $5.  Please  bring   your  own  place  setting.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   615.   Free   transportation   through  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Arts  Walk  in  Vergennes.  Thursday,  June  19,  5-­7   p.m.,   downtown   Vergennes.   Monthly   celebra-­ tion  of  art  in  Vergennes,  with  over  15  venues,   including   the   Vergennes   Opera   House   and   Bixby   Memorial   Library,   displaying   work   by   local  artists.  During  the  farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  market  on  the   green.   Takes   place   the   third   Thursday   of   the   month.   Info:   http://vergennesdowntown.com/ mainstreet/vergennes-­arts-­walk.   Historical   society   potluck   and   meeting   in   Bristol.  Thursday,  June  19,  6-­9  p.m.,  Howden   Hall.   The   Bristol   Historical   Society   holds   a   potluck   at   6   p.m.   followed   by   Buzz   Kuhnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   poetry   at   7   p.m.   Handicap-­accessible.   Info:   453-­3439  or  453-­2888.  

Jun

20

Balladeer  and  bluesman &223(5  /$92,( WKH JXLWDUVWUXPPLQJ KDUPRQLFDSOD\LQJ GXR RI %RE5HFXSHURDQG0DUN/D9RLHSOD\DFRXVWLFEOXHVDQGIRONFODVVLFVDW 51  Main  in  Middlebury  on  Thursday,  June  19,  at  8  p.m.

and  entertainment.  Review  the  auction  catalog   at   www.townhalltheater.org/auctioncatalog.   7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH 382-­9222  or  www.townhalltheater.org.   The   Stuttgart   Hymnus   Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Choir   in   Middlebury.   Sunday,   June   15,   7-­9   p.m.,   Champlain   Valley   Unitarian   Universalist   Society.   This   German   boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   choir   makes   its   U.S.   debut   with   an   East   Coast   tour.   The   program   includes   music   by   J.S.   Bach,   Felix   Mendelssohn   and   Benjamin   Britten.   Free   admission,   but   donations   are   welcome.   Info:   www.hymnus.chor.de.  

Jun

16

MONDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Bristol.   Monday,   June   16,   10:45   a.m.-­12:45   p.m.,   Cubbers   Restaurant.   CVAA   sponsors   this   monthly   event   for   down-­home   cooking   and   friendly   service.   Menu   TBA.   Suggested  donation  $5.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  615.   Tai   Chi   for   Arthritis   evening   class   in   East   Middlebury.  Monday,  June  16,  5-­6  p.m.,  Valley   Bible  Church.  A  special  outdoor,  evening  class   sponsored   by   CVAA   for   adults   50   and   older.   ,PSURYH EDODQFH VWUHQJWK DJLOLW\ DQG Ă&#x20AC;H[LELO-­ ity.   Free.   Meets   Mondays   and   Wednesdays   through  Aug.   13.   Register   at   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.  1017.   Vergennes  City  Band  rehearsal  in  Vergennes.   Monday,   June   16,   6:45-­8   p.m.,   VUHS   band   room.  Instrumentalists  of  all  ages  are  welcome   to   join   the   band.   Come   rehearse   for   the   summer  concert  series.  Info:  877-­2005.  

Jun

17

TUESDAY

Women  Business   Owners   Network   meeting   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,  June  17,  8-­9:30  a.m.,  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   restaurant.  This  month  Sarah  Gillen  presents  â&#x20AC;&#x153;3   Massive   Mistakes   Professional   Women   Make   That   Keep   Them   Overwhelmed,   Exhausted   and  Dreading  the  Next  Work  Day.â&#x20AC;?  Cost  $7  for   members,  $10  for  guests.  RSVP  to  info@nour-­ ishyourpurpose.com  Info:  www.wbon.org.  

Senior  luncheon,   presentation   and   foot   care   clinic   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   June   17,   10   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center.   CVAA   sponsors   a   foot   care   clinic   at   10   a.m.   At   11:15,  The   Rhythmic   Paws   with   Peg   Cobb   and   company   will   performs.   Lunch,   at   noon,   is   roast   pork   loin   with   apple   maple   glaze,   oven-­roasted   yams,   red   potatoes   and   onions,   green   beans   almandine,   mesclun   mix   with   spinach   salad,   dinner   roll   and   cheesecake   with  strawberries.  Please  bring  your  own  place   setting.   Suggested   donation   $4.   Reservations   required:  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  634.  Free  trans-­ portation  via  ACTR:  388-­1946.  

Jun

18

WEDNESDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,  June  18,  11  a.m.-­1  p.m.,   Bristol  American   Legion.   CVAA   invites   seniors   to   a   meal   of   pot   roast   with   vegetable   gravy,   mashed   potatoes,   Brussels   sprouts,   dinner   roll   and   sugar   cookie.   Suggested   donation   $4.   Bring   your   own   place   setting.   Free   transportation   with   ACTR:   388-­1946.   Reservations   required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   610.   Chicken  BBQ  in  Bristol.  Wednesday,  June  18,   5:30-­8   p.m.,   Bristol   green.  Annual   event   runs   until  the  chicken  runs  out.  Dessert  provided  by   the  Order  of  the  Eastern  Star.  Town  band  will   perform  after  the  BBQ.  Half  chicken  $10,  quar-­ ter  chicken  $7.50,  hot  dog  dinner  $3.50.   Healthcare  Is  a  Human  Right  campaign  meet-­ ing   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   June   18,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Ilsley   Library.   Hosted   by   the   Vermont  Workers  Center.  Info:  343-­7565.  

Jun

19

THURSDAY

Senior  luncheon   and   perfor-­ mance   in   Vergennes.   Thursday,   June   19,   11   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   St.   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Parish  Hall.  CVAA  sponsors  this  special  event   for   seniors   60   or   over   and   their   spouses   of   any   age.   At   11,   a   performance   by   singer/ songwriter   Patti   Casey,   followed   at   noon   by   a   meal   of   turkey   and   cheese   spinach   wrap  

FRIDAY

Three-­day  Junior   Fishing   Derby   in   Vergennes.   Friday,   June   20,   5   a.m.-­8   p.m.,   Vergennes   Falls   Basin.   Free   event   for   kids   ages   3-­15.   Friday   ends   with  a  Karaoke  Dance  Party  from  6:30-­8  p.m.   Special  prizes  and  giveaways  all  weekend.  Info   and   pre-­registration:   877-­9986   or   marsulli@ aol.com.  Continues  Saturday  and  Sunday.   Golf   tournament   in   Ferrisburgh.   Friday,   June   20,   9   a.m.-­2   p.m.,   Basin   Harbor   Club.   The   Teen   Challenge   Golf   Classic   is   a   fundraiser   for   substance   abuse   and   addiction   treatment   programs   in   Vermont.   Registration   at   7   a.m.,   tee-­off  at  9  a.m.  Fee  of  $125  per  person,  $450   per   foursome,   includes   greens   fees,   cart   and   awards   luncheon.   Info:   802-­635-­7807,   ggent-­ ley@tcvermont.org  or  www.tcgolfclassic.com.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Roots  of  Rock  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n  Rollâ&#x20AC;?  preview  event  in   Brandon.  Friday,  June  20,  5-­8  p.m.,  Compass   Music  and  Arts  Center.  To  kick  off  the  summer   exhibit   at   the   CMAC,   the   dance   duo   of   Dave   Allan   and   Erica   Hemond   will   demonstrate   some  of  the  dances  made  popular  in  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50s   and  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s.  The  exhibit  will  feature  artifacts  of  the   early   rock   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n   roll   era,   from   clothing   to   record   players.  It  runs  June  21-­Aug.  31.  Admission  is   free.   Rock-­it  Science  concert  in  Middlebury.  Friday,   June   20,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.   A   blow-­out   concert   to   cap   off   the   week-­long   Rock-­It  Science  program  for  young  musicians,   led   by   Clint   Bierman   and   his   rocker   friends.   Students  will  perform  both  covers  and  original   compositions.   Free.   Info:   382-­9222   or   educa-­ tion@townhalltheater.org.  

LIVEMUSIC Alicia  Phelps   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   June   12,  8-­10  p.m.,  51  Main.   &RRSHU  /D9RLH LQ 0LGGOHEXU\   Friday,   June   13,  6-­8  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   Yankee  Chank  in  New  Haven.  Friday,  June  13,   6-­8  p.m.,  Lincoln  Peak  Vineyard.   Myra  Flynn  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  June  13,  8-­11   p.m.,  51  Main.   Shannon   Hawley   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   June  14,  9-­10  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   Thunderbolt  Research  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,   June  14,  10  p.m.-­1  a.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   The  Avant-­Garde  Dogs  in  Middlebury.  Sunday,   June   15,   5:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Drop-­In   Brewery,   Route  7  South.   &RRSHU DQG /D9RLH LQ 0LGGOHEXU\   Thursday,   June  19,  8-­10  p.m.,  51  Main.   Canopy   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   20,   9   p.m.-­midnight,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.  

See  a  full  listing  of  

O N G O IN G E V E N T S in  the  Thursday  edition  of  the

Addison Independent and  on  the  Web  at

www.addisonindependent.com


PAGE  10  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

David  Vandervort  Quartet brings  their  jazz  to  Brandon The  David  Vandervort  Quartet  will   (percussion)  is  the  driving  force  of  the   perform   at   7:30   p.m.   on   Saturday   at   band.  He  has  been  performing  live  his   Brandon   Music.   A   dynamic   quartet   entire  life,  whether  on  horn,  hand  per-­ that  highlights  the  multitude  of  sonic   cussion  or  behind  a  drum  set. Tickets  are  $15.  A  pre-­concert  din-­ possibilities   available   within   small   jazz   combos,   the   David   Vandervort   ner  is  available  for  an  additional  $20.   Quartet   grew   out   of   impromptu   jam   Reservations  are  recommended  for  the   sessions,   gigs   and   events   in   the   jazz   show   and   required   for   dinner.   Venue   is   BYOB.   Call   465-­4071   community   around   up-­ or   e-­mail   info@brandon-­ state  New  York.   music.net  for  reservations   David   Vandervort   (pi-­ or   information.   Brandon   ano)   and   Mike   Roninson   Music   is   located   at   62   (bass)   met   while   playing   Country   Club   Road   in   in  the  Empire  State  Youth   Brandon.  For  more  infor-­ Jazz  Band  and  have  since   mation,   visit   www.bran-­ played   side   by   side   in   BY GREG PAHL don-­music.net. big   bands.   Steve   Kirsty   RCMS  SEASON   (saxophone)   developed   his   musical   skills   playing   jazz   and   OPENS The   Rochester   Chamber   Music   blues.   He   still   continues   to   perform   with   blues   singer   Tas   Cru   Society   opens   its   20th   season   at   the   and   recently   returned   Rochester   Federated   Church   with   a   from   a   tour   across   powerhouse   duo   of   violinist   Soovin   the  country  with  the   Kim   and   pianist   Ieva   Jokubaviciute   Ori   Naftaly   band.   at  7:30  p.m.  on  Saturday.  This  not-­to-­ Frantz   Celestin   be-­missed  all-­Beethoven  evening  will   feature  Sonatas  No.  2  in  A  major,  No.   5  in  F  major  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring,â&#x20AC;?  and  No.  9  in  A   major   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kreutzer.â&#x20AC;?   There   will   be   a   7   p.m.  pre-­concert  talk  by  RCMS  Artis-­ tic  Director  Cynthia  Huard. Internationally   renowned   violinist   Soovin  Kim  performs  as  both  a  con-­ cert  soloist  and  recitalist  and  with  the   Johannes   String   Quartet.   In   2009   he   founded   the   Lake   Champlain   Cham-­ ber  Music  Festival  in  Burlington.  Kim   UHFHLYHGÂżUVWSUL]HDWWKH3DJDQLQL,Q-­ ternational  Competition  when  he  was   only   20,   which   launched   an   interna-­ SOOVIN  KIM tional  concert  career. Known   for   her   deep   musical   and   emotional   commitment   to   a   wide   range  of  repertoire,  Lithuanian  pianist   Ieva  Jokubaviciute  performs  regularly   throughout   the   U.S.   and   Europe.   In   2006,  she  was  honored  with  a  Borletti-­ Buitoni  Trust  Fellowship. June 21st Bristol Although  the  concert  is  free,  dona-­ tions  in  support  of  the  series  are  grate-­ fully  accepted.  The  Rochester  Federat-­ ed  Church  is  located  at  15  North  Main   St.  (Route  100)  in  Rochester.  For  more   information,  call  767-­9234  or  visit  rc-­ msvt.org.

arts beat

DAVID  VANDERVORT  QUARTET LED  ZEPPELIN  TRIBUTE Recreating   famous   rock-­and-­roll   records,  note  for  note,  is  a  passion  of   Clint  Bierman  and  his  talented  friends.   7KH\UHFHQWO\UHFUHDWHG3DXO6LPRQÂśV immortal   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gracelandâ&#x20AC;?   before   a   sold-­ RXWKRXVHDW0LGGOHEXU\ÂśV7RZQ+DOO 7KHDWHU DQG WKH\ÂśUH FRPLQJ EDFN ZLWK D WULEXWH WR WKH ZRUOGÂśV JUHDWHVW heavy  metal  band,  Led  Zeppelin,  at  8   p.m.  on  Thursday. Âł3HRSOH DUH VWLOO WDONLQJ DERXW WKH Graceland  show,â&#x20AC;?  says  THT  executive   director   Douglas   Anderson.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   musicians  can  play  anything.â&#x20AC;? Rolling   Stone   calls   Led   Zeppelin   â&#x20AC;&#x153;unquestionably   one   of   the   most   en-­ during  bands  in  rock  history.â&#x20AC;?  The  is-­ sue   with   any   Led   Zeppelin   tribute   is   ÂżQGLQJ D VLQJHU ZKR FDQ KDQGOH WKH towering  vo-­ cals   made   f a m o u s   by   Rob-­

JACK Â QUARTET

HUW3ODQW+DQGOLQJWKHOHDGYRFDOVDW 7+7ZLOOEH-RVK3DQGD³,œYHQHYHU heard  anyone  sing  Led  Zeppelin  with   as   much   power   and   agility   as   Josh   3DQGD+HSOD\HGDW7+7UHFHQWO\DQG LWœVDPDVVLYHYRLFH´VD\V$QGHUVRQ Tickets  may  be  purchased  at  town-­ halltheater.org,   at   382-­9222,   at   the   7+7 ER[ RI¿FH 0RQGD\6DWXUGD\ noon   to   5   p.m.)   and   at   the   door,   if   available. CHAMBER  CONCERT   The  Lake  Dunmore  program  is  back   at  the  Town  Hall  Theater.  New  Music   RQWKH3RLQWRIIHUVPXVLFLDQVDJHG and   up   a   chance   to   explore   contem-­ porary   chamber   music.   The   exciting   news  for  local  music  lovers  is  that  the   two-­week   camp   ends   with   two   free   PXVLF UHFLWDOV DW 0LGGOHEXU\œV 7RZQ Hall   Theater   on   Friday,  at  7  p.m.,   and  on  Saturday,  

at  2:30  p.m. 1HZ 0XVLF RQ WKH 3RLQW HQFRXU-­ ages   collaboration   among   compos-­ ers,   instrumentalists   and   vocalists.   3DUWLFLSDQWV ZRUN ZLWK GLVWLQJXLVKHG composers-­in-­residence   Kathryn   Al-­ exander   (Yale   University)   and   David   Rakowski   (Brandeis   University),   the   innovative   ensemble-­in-­residence   5th   House  Ensemble,  the  exciting  mezzo-­ VRSUDQR -HQQLIHU %HDWWLH 3KLODGHO-­ phia)  and  pianist  Jillian  Zack. The   upcoming   recital   will   feature   premieres   by   talented   young   com-­ posers   of   chamber   music   for   violin,   FHOORĂ&#x20AC;XWHFODULQHWSLDQRDQGYRLFH 3HUIRUPHUV LQFOXGH $PHULFDQ 0RG-­ ern   Ensemble,   the   JACK   Quartet,   mezzo-­soprano   Jennifer   Beattie,   pia-­ nist   Donna   Loewy   and   participating   instrumentalists  and  singers. The   concerts   are   free.   For   more   LQIRUPDWLRQ FDOO WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH at   382-­9222   or   visit   newmusiconthe-­ point.com. AVANT-­GARDE  DOGS The  Drop-­In  Brewery  is  host-­ LQJ D )DWKHUÂśV 'D\ HYHQLQJ program:   craft   beers,   barbe-­ cue   and   music   by   the  Avant-­ Garde   Dogs,   an   Addison   County   band   that   features   danceable  rock  by  extraor-­ dinary   songwriters.   The   brewery,   across   from   G.   Stone   Motors   on   Route.   7,  will  host  the  festivities   from  5:30  to  9:30  p.m.  on   Sunday. Opening  the  musical  eve-­ ning   will   be   the   acoustic   folk-­blues  trio  of  Erik  Be-­ nepe,   Taylor   Bickford   and   Weyland   Joyner.   7KH\ÂśOO EH IROORZHG by   the   Avant-­Garde   Dogs,  which  has  late-­ ly   added   vocalist   and   guitarist   Liz   Cleve-­ land. With  a  potent  mix  of   rock   guitars,   harmony   vocals  and  world-­music   (See  Arts  Beat,   Page  11)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of June 9

THE  AVANT-­GARDE  DOGS

Arts  Beat   (Continued  from  Page  10) percussion,   the   Avant-­Garde   Dogs   bring  their  own  spin  to  music  by  Ry   Cooder,   Lucinda   Williams,   John   Hi-­ att,  Bruce  Cockburn,  Delbert  McClin-­ ton,  the  Rolling  Stones,  and  others. The   Grapevine   Grille   will   serve   barbecue  and  more  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  the  Drop-­ In  Brewery  will  feature  its  acclaimed   selection  of  beers,  all  brewed  on  site.   The  brewery  asks  that  guests  park  at   G.  Stone  Motors.  For  more  informa-­ tion,  call  989-­7414. TWO  BROTHERS  TAVERN There  will  be  four  live  musical  per-­ formances  this  week  at  Two  Brothers   Tavern   in   Middlebury.   On   Wednes-­ day,  the  Open  Mike  Night  begins  at  9   p.m.  Hosted  by  Kai  Stanley,  the  stage   is   open   to   musicians   and   performers   RIDOONLQGVRQDÂżUVWFRPHÂżUVWVHUYH basis,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free  to  enter.  There  is  no   cover  charge. On   Friday,   Cooper   &   LaVoie   will   perform  at  6  p.m.  Bob  Recupero  and   Mark  LaVoie,  both  veterans  of  the  lo-­ cal   music   scene,   will   perform   in   the  

Lounge  for  a  special  Arts  Walk  happy   hour.   Reservations   and   walk-­ins   are   welcome.  There  is  no  cover.   Then,   at   9   p.m.   on   Saturday,   Two   Brothers   presents   Shannon   Hawley   who  lures  audiences  in  with  her  sweet   voice,   image-­producing   lyrics,   and   VSLWÂżUH VWDJHSUHVHQFH7KHUH LV D  cover. Finally,   at   10   p.m.   on   Saturday,   Thunderbolt   Research   takes   to   the   stage  for  its  debut  appearance  at  Two   Brothers  playing  a  distinctly  Vermont-­ inspired  brand  of  blues  rock.  Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   DFRYHU)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO  GERMAN  BOYSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  CHOIR As   part   of   an   East   Coast   tour,   the   Stuttgart  Hymnus  Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Choir,  under   the  musical  direction  of  Rainer  Hom-­ burg,   will   perform   at   the   Champlain   Valley  Unitarian  Universalist  Society   on  Sunday,  at  7  p.m.  The  program  in-­ cludes  music  by  J.S.  Bach,  Felix  Men-­ delssohn  and  Benjamin  Britten. As   the   oldest   and   largest   boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   (See  Beat,  Page  13)

CLINT Â BIERMAN

*(0,1,0$<-81(<RXQHHGWRIRFXV This  week  you  will  be  presented  with  a  big  obstacle,   and  get  back  to  work  this  week.  Things  have  slipped   and  you  will  have  to  step  up  to  tackle  the  hard  stuff. RXWRI\RXUÂżQJHUVDQGLWFRXOGWDNHDOLWWOHZKLOH $48$5,86 -$18$5< )(%58$5<  before   you   get   back   on   a   Keep  your  eyes  open  and   schedule. you   just   may   stumble   on   &$1&(5 -81(  something  new  and  fasci-­ -8/<6KRSDURXQGIRU nating  this  week.  This  is  a   the  best  deals  before  mak-­ good  time  to  explore  new   ing  a  big  purchase.  A  little   ideas   and   apply   them   to   extra   work   can   lead   to   your  daily  life. substantial  savings.  There   3,6&(6 )(%58$5< are  deals  to  be  had,  so  be   0$5&+  6RPH-­ patient. one  gets  bent  out  of  shape   /(2 -8/< $8-­ over   something   that   ENOUGH  SAID *867([SHFWWRUHDFK seems   laughable   to   you.   a   milestone   in   your   life.   You   may   need   to   adjust   16 Creek Rd, Middlebury This  may  have  something   your  view.   388-6054 to   do   with   your   family   ARIES:   MARCH   Mon. - Fri. 7:30 - 5:30, Sat. 8:00 - 3:00 or   career.   Either   way,   the   $35,/)RFXV\RXU www.countrysidecarpetandpaint.com praise   you   will   receive   is   energies   in   a   positive   warranted. way.  You  can  accomplish   VIRGO:   AUGUST   anything   you   set   your   6(37(0%(5  mind   to,   and   now   is   the   Sometimes  it  can  be  easy   time   to   put   your   attitude   IRU \RX WR JHW Âż[DWHG RQ to  work. a   certain   way   of   doing   7$8586 $35,/  things.   There   are   really   0$<  <RX DUH UHDG\ many   different   paths   to   for   something   or   some-­ the   same   outcome   when   one   new.   Right   now   is   a   you  are  open  to  ideas. good   time   to   reach   out   /,%5$ 6(37(0%(5 and   connect   with   a   new   2&72%(5'RQRW passion.   Things   will   get   383  Exchange  Street panic  when  a  glitch  arises   more   interesting   rather   Â&#x2026;ÂĄÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;¤Â?Â&#x161;­ª¹Ă&#x2C6;kppejjji in   your   plans.   Just   ap-­ quickly. proach   the   situation   from   www.cacklinhens.com a  different  angle,  and  you   ZLOO ÂżQG D VROXWLRQ LQ QR FAMOUS time. BIRTHDAYS 6&253,2 2&72%(5 JUNE  8 129(0%(5  7U\ Joan  Rivers, not   to   push   yourself   too   Comic  (81) hard   this   week.   This   is   a   JUNE  9 good   time   to   maintain   a   1DWDOLH3RUWPDQ ORZ SURÂżOH 'UDZLQJ WRR $FWUHVV  much  attention  to  yourself   JUNE  10 PLJKW UXIĂ&#x20AC;H WKH ZURQJ Leelee  Sobieski, feathers  this  week. $FWUHVV 

388-2800 SAGITTARIUS:  NO-­ JUNE  11 Congratulations 9(0%(5 '(&(0-­ 3HWHU'LQNODJH High School Graduates! %(5  6RPHWKLQJ ZLOO Actor  (45) bring  a  smile  to  your  face   -81( Mon.  -­  Fri.  9  -­  5:30,  Sat.  9-­2 early   in   the   week,   and   Chris  Young, ZZZPLGGOHEXU\Ă&#x20AC;RUDODQGJLIWVFRP thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   pretty   much   noth-­ 6LQJHU 

5W6RXWK0LGGOHEXU\ ing  that   can   put   you   in   a   -81( bad   mood.   This   is   an   ideal   time   to   get   things   ac-­ Tanner  Foust,  Race  Car  Driver  (41) complished.   JUNE  14 &$35,&251 '(&(0%(5 -$18$5<  /XF\+DOH$FWUHVV 

You  are  never  one  to  walk  away  from  a  challenge.  

Malabrigo is in!


PAGE 12  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

PUZZLES

Sponsored by:

help keep the mind independent and active throughout life.

This week’s  puzzle  is  rated Across 1.  TV  Dr. 5.  Pause 10.  Little  food  measuring   tool,  for  short 13.  Marriage  destination 14.  Be  of  use 15.  Pro  ___  (in  proportion) 16.  Work  over  the  shirts 17.  Persian  language 18.  Esprit 19.  Dog  of  mixed  breed 21.  Save 23.  Your  mother’s  daughter 24.  Japanese-­American 25.  Prepare  for  surgery 28.  “My  ___”  by  Usher 29.  Wedding  helper 33.  Found  in  a  University 34.  Lowly  workers 36.  French  currency 37.  Tree  offshoot 38.  Humerus’s  neighbors 39.  Pull 40.  Alcove 41.  San  Diego  baseballer 42.  Cast  a  ballot 43.  Aquarium  pals 45.  At  ___  :  cornered 46.  Joint 47.  Mixed  metal 49.  “This  means  ___!” 50.  Outdoors 53.  Ace 57.  Microprocessor  type,   abbr. 58.  Duck  and  down  preceder 60.  Minute  amount 61.  Make  do  with 62.  Knot 63.  Pass  away  notice 64.  In  the  least 65.  Encouraged,  with  “on” 66.  Nozzle

1

Easy

Down 1. Victorian 2.  'XVWLQ+RIIPDQ¿OP 3.  Privy  to 4.  Patient  endurance  of  pain  or   unhappiness 5.  Small  restaurants 6.  Elliptical 7.  Spoil  to  an  extent 8.  Someone  who  works  to   convert  to  a  religious  cause 9.  Assumed  name 10.  Indian  percussion  pattern 11.  Doe’s  mate 12.  French  door  part 15.  Bible  edition 20.  Adam’s  ___ 22.  Rumanian  penny 24.  12 25.  Water  balloon  sound 26.  Kind  of  paper 27.  Cut  of  beef

4

28. Attacking  verbally  with   harsh  criticism 30.  Michigan  lake 31.  A  muse 32.  The  second  growth  of  grass   in  a  season 34.  Baby  dog 35.  Holy  __ 44.  Mode  or  king? 46.  Body  mark 48.  Feudal  lord 49.  Series  opener? 50.  Sea  World  attraction 51.  7KH¿UVWPHVRQGLVFRYHUHG 52.  Catch  a  glimpse  of 53.  Epitaph  starter 54.  Vagabond 55.  Elevator  brake  inventor 56.  London’s  ___  Gallery 59.  U.N.’s  Hammarskjold

7

8

1

7 3

2

4

7 3

4

8

7

8

9

17

18

19

20

21

23 25

26

28

29

34

37

38

39

40

41

42

44 47

50

51

35

45 48

52

53

62

63

64

65

66

8

31

32

54

55

56

49

61

3

30

46

58

6

12

36

57

5

11

24

27

43

10

22

33

1

9

6

16

3

4

5

15

6 4

8

4

14

59

60

This week’s  puzzle  solutions can  be  found  on  Page  43.

Sudoku

8

4

3

13

2

8 5

2

7 5

Each Sudoku  puzzle  consists  of  a  9x9  grid  that  has  been   subdivided  into  nine  smaller  grids  of  3x3  squares.  To  solve  the   puzzle  each  row,  column  and  box  must  contain  each  of  the   numbers  1  to  9.  Puzzles  come  in  three  grades:  easy,  medium   DQGGLI¿FXOW Level:  Medium.    


Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  —  PAGE  13

‘Being a  Rockefeller’  reading  and talk  to  be  held  at  THT,  June  10 0,''/(%85<²(LOHHQ5RFN-­ HIHOOHU UHDGV IURP KHU ODWHVW ERRN ³%HLQJ D 5RFNHIHOOHU %HFRPLQJ 0\VHOI´ IROORZHG E\ D TXHVWLRQ DQG DQVZHU VHVVLRQ DW 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU RQ 7XHVGD\ -XQH  DW  SP ³(LOHHQLVDZRQGHUIXOVXSSRUWHU RI WKH WKHDWHU DQ DPD]LQJ DQG WDO-­ HQWHGZRPDQDQGZHDUHGHOLJKWHG WR KDYH KHU KHUH 6KH KDV D IDVFL-­ QDWLQJ VWRU\ WR VKDUH´ VD\V 'RXJ-­ ODV$QGHUVRQH[HFXWLYHGLUHFWRURI 7RZQ+DOO7KHDWHU $ SLRQHHULQJ SKLODQWKURSLVW DQG GDXJKWHU RI $PHULFDQ UR\DOW\ 5RFNHIHOOHUUHYHDOVZKDWLWZDVOLNH WR JURZ XS LQ RQH RI WKH ZRUOG¶V PRVW IDPRXV IDPLOLHV 7KH JUHDW JUDQGGDXJKWHU RI -RKQ ' 5RFN-­ HIHOOHU (LOHHQ 5RFNHIHOOHU OHDUQHG LQFKLOGKRRGWKDWZKLOHZHDOWKDQG IDPH FRXOG RSHQ DQ\ GRRU WKH\ FRXOGQRWEX\DIHHOLQJRISHUVRQDO ZRUWK 7KHSULYLOHJHVRIKDYLQJVHUYDQWV DQG ODYLVK VXPPHU KRPHV ZHUH RIIVHW E\ KHU SDUHQWV¶ WKRXJKWIXO \HW ¿UP OHVVRQV LQ VRFLDO REOLJD-­ WLRQDWWLPHVE\KHUPRWKHU¶VGDUN

SHANNON HAWLEY

Beat (Continued  from  Page  11) choir  in  Stuttgart,  Germany,  the  Stutt-­ gart  Hymnus  Boys’  Choir  contributes   YDOXDEOHZRUNLQWKH¿HOGRIPXVLFDO \RXWKHGXFDWLRQDQGSURPRWLRQ6LQFH LWVLQFHSWLRQLQER\VDQG\RXQJ PHQIURPWKHDJHRI¿YHWRDURXQG \HDUVDUHWUDLQHGPXVLFDOO\,QUHFHQW years,   the   Stuttgart   Hymnus   Boys’   &KRLU FRQGXFWHG VROGRXW FRQFHUW WRXUVWKURXJK)UDQFH6SDLQ'HQPDUN DQG6ZLW]HUODQGDVZHOODVLQ%HUOLQ +DQQRYHUDQG/HLS]LJ )UHH DGPLVVLRQ GRQDWLRQV ZHO-­ FRPH7KH&KDPSODLQ9DOOH\8QLWDU-­ LDQ8QLYHUVDOLVW6RFLHW\LVORFDWHGDW 'XDQH&RXUWLQ0LGGOHEXU\ YANKEE  CHANK   Yankee   Chank,   the   Big   Easy-­in-­ VSLUHG DQG *UHHQ 0RXQWDLQEDVHG EDQG UHWXUQV WR /LQFROQ 3HDN 9LQH-­ \DUGRQ)ULGD\DWSP&RPHHQMR\ &DMXQDQG=\GHFRWXQHV²WUDGLWLRQDO GDQFH PXVLF IURP VRXWKZHVW /RXLVL-­ DQD ² SOD\HG ZLWK VSLULW DQG YLJRU 7KH TXDUWHW LQFOXGHV %RE 1DHVV RQ ¿GGOH &DQQRQ /DEULH RQ DFFRUGLRQ -LP %XUQV RQ JXLWDU DQG ¿GGOH DQG 0DUN6XVWLFRQEDVV $V ZLWK DOO )ULGD\ VKRZV WKH ³GRRUV´ RSHQ DW  SP IRU SLF-­ QLFNLQJ :LQH LV VROG E\ WKH JODVV $GPLVVLRQLVIUHH%ULQJODZQFKDLUV RUDSLFQLFEODQNHW7KH:LQH'RZQ )ULGD\ VHULHV KDSSHQV UDLQ RU VKLQH ²WKHUH¶VURRPRQWKHZLQHU\SRUFK LQWKHFDVHRIUDLQ1RDOFRKROPD\EH

EURXJKWRQWRWKHJURXQGVDQGSOHDVH OHDYH\RXUSHWVDWKRPH/LQFROQ3HDN 9LQH\DUGLVDW5LYHU5RDGLQ1HZ +DYHQ0RUHLQIRUPDWLRQLVDWOLQFRO-­ QSHDNYLQH\DUGFRP WOODBLOCK EXHIBIT 7KH-DFNVRQ*DOOHU\DW7RZQ+DOO 7KHDWHU LV SUHVHQWLQJ ³7KUHH :RRG-­ EORFN$UWLVWV´ WKURXJK -XQH  ZLWK DQDUWLVW¶VUHFHSWLRQRQ)ULGD\IURP WRSP ³7KUHH:RRGEORFN$UWLVWV´IHDWXUHV -DQH(GG\%DUEDUD(NHGDKODQG5D\ +XGVRQ $OO DUH VHDVRQHG ZRRGFXW DUWLVWVDQGWKHVRPHSULQWVRQH[-­ hibit   showcase   what   can   be   accom-­ SOLVKHG ZLWK WKLV YHUVDWLOH PHGLXP (DFKRIWKHDUWLVWVKDVDOVRKXQJRQH RI WKH EORFNV RI ZRRG IURP ZKLFK D SULQWZDVPDGH 7KHUHFHSWLRQLVIUHH*DOOHU\KRXUV DUH QRRQ WR  SP 0RQGD\ WKURXJK 6DWXUGD\DQGIRUDQKRXUEHIRUHHDFK 7RZQ+DOO7KHDWHUSHUIRUPDQFH&RQ-­ WDFW WKH -DFNVRQ *DOOHU\ DW  RU HPDLO MDFNVRQJDOOHU\#WRZQKDOO-­ WKHDWHURUJ LIVE  MUSIC  AT  51  MAIN 7KHUH ZLOO EH WZR OLYH PXVLFDO HYHQWV WKLV ZHHN DW 0LGGOHEXU\¶V  0DLQ$W  SP RQ7KXUVGD\$OLFLD 3KHOSV ZLQQHU RI ¶V %XUOLQJWRQ )LUVW 1LJKW 5LVLQJ 6WDU &RPSHWLWLRQ ZLOOSOD\DPL[RIMD]]VWDQGDUGVVHQW VWUDLJKWIURPWKHVZLQJHUDDQGRULJL-­ QDOVZLWKD1HZ$JHÀDLU 7KHQ DW  SP RQ )ULGD\ 0\UD

GHSUHVVLRQV DQG PHUFXULDO PRRGV DQG WKH FRPSHWLWLRQ IRU DWWHQWLRQ DPRQJ KHU VLEOLQJV ,Q DGXOWKRRG 5RFNHIHOOHUKDV\HDUQHGWREHVHHQ QRWDVDQLFRQEXWDVDZRPDQDQG PRWKHUZLWKDQRUPDOOLIHDQGOLNH DOORIXVVKHKDGWROHDUQWR¿QGKHU RZQZD\³%HLQJD5RFNHIHOOHU%H-­ FRPLQJ 0\VHOI´ LV DQ DI¿UPDWLRQ RI KRZ IDPLO\ VKDSHV RXU LGHQWLW\ DQG WKH ZD\V ZH FRQWULEXWH WR WKH ODUJHU IDPLO\ RI OLIH UHJDUGOHVV RI RXURULJLQV 7KH ¿UVW 5RFNHIHOOHU ZRPDQ WR ZULWH D SHUVRQDO IDPLO\ PHPRLU 5RFNHIHOOHU UHYHDOV KHU IDPLO\¶V wholesome values   that   contrast   ZLWKWKRVHRIWHQKHOGE\WKHULFKDQG IDPRXV+HULQWLPDWHVWRULHVDI¿UP KRZVHOIXQGHUVWDQGLQJKHOSVPDNH us   whole,   whatever   the   circum-­ VWDQFHVRIRXUELUWK$ERXWZULWLQJ ³%HLQJ D 5RFNHIHOOHU %HFRPLQJ 0\VHOI´ VKH VD\V ³, OHDUQHG KRZ PXFK IDPLO\ VKDSHV RXU LGHQWLW\ DQG WKH ZD\V ZH FRQWULEXWH WR WKH ODUJHUIDPLO\RIOLIH´ $GPLVVLRQ LV IUHH )RU PRUH LQ-­ IRUPDWLRQ FDOO    or   YLVLWZZZWRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJ

presents:

RAY HUDSON’S ‘RED  SQUARE’ )O\QQWDNHVWRWKHVWDJH+DOI,ULVKDQG KDOI $IULFDQ $PHULFDQ KHU RULJLQDO LQGLHVRXOIRONVRQJVEOHQGVRXOIXOYR-­ FDOVZLWKDO\ULFDOGHOLYHU\WKDWGRHVQ¶W OHWRQHJHWWRRFRPIRUWDEOH $OO DJHV QR FRYHU )RU DGGLWLRQDO LQIRUPDWLRQYLVLWZZZJRPDLQFRP RUSKRQH GERMAN  ART  EXHIBIT $ QHZ H[KLELW “Deutsche   Kunst   aus   unserer   Sammlung”   (“German   $UWIURP2XU&ROOHFWLRQ´ RSHQVRQ )ULGD\ LQ WKH 2YHUEURRN *DOOHU\ DW WKH 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH 0XVHXP RI $UW,QDFNQRZOHGJPHQWDQGFHOHEUD-­ WLRQ RI WKH FHQWHQDU\ RI 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH¶V*HUPDQ/DQJXDJH6FKRRO WKHPXVHXPIHDWXUHVVHOHFWLRQVIURP LWVRZQFROOHFWLRQRI*HUPDQDUW7KH H[KLELWLRQ ZKLFK UXQV WKURXJK$XJ LVIUHH)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQFDOO  RU YLVLW PLGGOHEXU\HGX DUWV

2014 Garden Game Think you can beat these past winners? These winners say it takes excellent fertilizer, lots of patience, plenty of water, and even talking or singing to your plants... Hey, you never know! It might help!

CATEGORIES ‡%HHWV (circumference) ‡%URFFROL(diameter) ‡&DEEDJH(circumference) ‡&DQWDORXSH(circumference) ‡&DUURW(length x circumference) ‡&DXOLÁRZHU(diameter) ‡&XFXPEHU (length x circumference) ‡(JJSODQW(circumference x circumference) ‡*UHHQ%HDQ(length) ‡%HOO3HSSHU (circumference x circumference)

‡2QLRQ(circumference) ‡3RWDWR(length x circumference) ‡3XPSNLQ(circumference x circumference) ‡5XWDEDJD(circumference) ‡6XPPHU6TXDVK (length x circumference) ‡6XQÁRZHU(diameter) ‡7RPDWR(circumference) ‡7XUQLS(circumference) ‡=XFFKLQL(length x circumference)

RULES OF THE GARDEN GAME ‡(QWULHVPXVWEHKRPHJURZQLQWKHJUHDWHU$GGLVRQ&RXQW\DUHD‡2QO\SURGXFHEURXJKWWRWKH $GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWRIÀFHEHWZHHQDP SP0RQ)ULZLOOEHHOLJLEOH‡7KHJDUGHQHURU DIULHQGRUIDPLO\PHPEHUVKRXOGEULQJLQWKHHQWU\‡:HHNO\IURQWUXQQHUVZLOOEHOLVWHGLQWKH ´*DUGHQ*DPHµFROXPQXQWLOVRPHRQHHOVHEXPSVWKHPRIIZLWKDODUJHUH[DPSOHRIWKDWSDUWLFXODU IUXLWRUYHJHWDEOH 7KHODUJHVWHQWULHVDVRI7KXUVGD\QRRQGHDGOLQHZLOOEHWKHIURQWUXQQHUVOLVWHGLQ WKDW0RQGD\·VHGLWLRQ ‡7KHUHZLOOEHRQHZLQQHUSHUFDWHJRU\‡:KDWWKH-XGJHVVD\JRHV‡$W WKHVLJQRIWKHÀUVWIURVWÀQDOÀUVWSODFHZLQQHUVZLOOEHDQQRXQFHG ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONT’S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97‡  ‡ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

YANKEE CHANK


PAGE  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

~ Middlebury Union High School Spring Concert ~

Moves  like  Jagger MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  senior  Jonah  Lefkoe  sings  The  Rolling  Stonesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beast  of  Burdenâ&#x20AC;?  dur-­ ing  a  jazz  band  and  menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  and  womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ensemble  performance  at  the  school  last  Wednesday  night. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

ONC NEW C

EPT QUALIT Y DO

ORS June 21st Bristol

Lettinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  it  go Support  your  community!

MIDDLEBURY  UNION   HIGH   School   senior   Zaidie   Barnard-­Mayers   belts  out  her  version  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let  it  Goâ&#x20AC;?  during  the  schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  spring  concert   last  Wednesday  evening. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

For All the Nice Things that Dads Do! Carhartt,  Columbia  &  Woolrich  Clothing Red  Wing  &  LaCrosse  Work  Boots Merrell,  Keen  &  Teva  Footwear New  Balance  &    Asics  Sneakers

ALL MENS FOOTWEAR & APPAREL

20% OFF JUNE 8TH - 15TH

Green  Mountain Shoe  &  Apparel HUGE SELECTION OF CARHARTT!

Hannaford  Plaza,  Middlebury   388-­4399 0DLQ6W%ULVWROÂ&#x2021;453-­6337

ADDISON COUNTY

StudentBRIEFS

Local students make deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s list at Saint Lawrence University

CANTON,  N.Y.   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   follow-­ ing   local   students   have   been   named   to   the   deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   list   for   the   spring   2014   semester   at   St.   Lawrence   University   in  Canton,  N.Y.: Benjamin   J.   Brisson   of   Shoreham,   class  of  2016,  majoring  in  economics;Íž   Matthew  J.  Dier  of  Brandon,  class  of   2016,   majoring   in   biology,   graduate   of   Otter   Valley   Union   High   School;Íž   Katherine   E.   Higgins   of   Middlebury,   class   of   2014,   majoring   in   global   studies,   graduate   of   Kimball   Union   Academy;Íž  Sophie  J.  Owen-­Jankowski   of  Bristol,  class  of  2014,  majoring  in   environmental  studies-­biology,  gradu-­ ate   of   Mount   Abraham   Union   High   School;Íž  Alison  L.  Walter  of  Salisbury,   FODVV RI  PDMRULQJ LQ ÂżQH DUWV graduate   of   Middlebury   Union   High   School;Íž   and   Zelie   S.   Wright-­Neil   of   Leicester,   class   of   2015,   majoring   in   anthropology,  graduate  of  Middlebury   Union  High  School.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  15

Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Day Specials BEAUTIFUL

hanging baskets! Great Selection and Color!

Get Dad the Grill heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always wanted! Best Price & Selection Anywhere!

Potting Mix

2/$19.98 $11.99 Â each

Now  thru  June  30,  2014

BIG  2  Cu.  Ft. Bag

AGWAY

Top Soil

1.99

$ Roses  in  bloom   and  ready  for   planting!  

.75  Cu.  Ft. Bag

Now  thru  June  30,  2014

AGWAY

Help Dad create the yard heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s always wanted!

FREE SURSDQHÃ&#x20AC;OOZSXUFKDVH

Cedar Mulch

Many  Weber  Gas  &  Charcoal  models  available   in  colors!  (black,  blue,  green).  Also  available  with   stainless  steel  upgrades.  

3.99

$

Visit  our  greenhouse  &  nursery  to  see  our  selection   of  trees,  shrubs,  hanging  baskets,  herbs,  annual   bedding  plants,  LOCALLY  GROWN  PERRENIALS,   roses,  pottery,  statuary  &  more.  

3  Cu.  Ft.

Now  thru  June  30,  2014

BIG Â BAGS!

AGWAY GIFT CARDS MAKE GREAT GIFTS!

Plant a Tree for Dad!

Grill  accessories  make  great  gifts!  

TOOLS,  ROASTERS,  COVERS  &  MORE!   Now  thru  Monday,  June  16,  2014

20% OFF ALL MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

Our greenhouse is Ã&#x20AC;OOHGZLWKDQQXDOV veggies & herbs!

10% OFF ALL WEBER ACCESSORIES

Dress Dad Up Just Right! Great Selection!

Shorts,  Pants,   T-­shirts,  Hats,   Work  Gloves,   Belts,  Wallets  &   more!  

Middlebury  Agway  Coupon The  more  you  buy,  the  more  you  save!

NURSERY  CUSTOMER  BUCKS R$5 off

any $50 Nursery Purchase

R$15 off any $100 Nursery Purchase

R$25 off any $150 Nursery Purchase

In  stock  items  only.

Combined nursery purchases include Trees, Shrubs, Annuals, Herbs, Perennials, Bird Baths & Statuary. In-­stock  items  only  only  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  while  supplies  last.  Expires  June  16,  2014 Coupons can not be combined with any other in-store sale, coupon or offer.

Now  thru   Monday,  June  16,  2014

MIDDLEBURY AGWAY FARM & GARDEN

([FKDQJH6W0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021; 0RQ)ULG6DW6XQ YOUR YARD, GARDEN and PET PLACEâ&#x201E;¢

Open 7 days a week

www.MiddleburyAgway.com


PAGE  16  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

LINCOLN  COMMUNITY  SCHOOL  teachers  Donna  Wood,  left,  and  Alice  Leeds  are  retiring  at  the  end  of  the   school  year  after  combining  for  more  than  50  years  in  the  profession. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Lincoln saying goodbye to dynamic duo By  ZACH  DESPART LINCOLN   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   For   two   Lincoln   thespians,  the  curtain  is  about  to  fall.   The  pair,  teachers  at  Lincoln  Commu-­ nity   School   whose   combined   teach-­ ing  experience  spans  more  than  half  a   century,  are  retiring  at  the  end  of  this   school  year.

Alice  Leeds  and  Donna  Wood,  the   started   teaching   at   Lincoln   Commu-­ dynamic   duo   who   have   shepherd-­ QLW\6FKRROLQ. ed   Lincoln   youngsters   through   the   HIGH  POINTS  IN  LINCOLN brookside  school  for  decades,  will  say   Leeds  said  one  of  the  most  memo-­ JRRGE\HWRWKHLUÂżQDOFODVVHV-XQH rable  days  of  her  teaching  career  oc-­ The  pair  for  many  years  organized  a   FXUUHGLQZKHQWKHVFKRROKRVWHG series  of  ambitious  theater  productions   civil  rights  icon  Ruby  Bridges.  Bridg-­ (even  Shakespeare!)  at  the  school. es  gained  national  notoriety  at  the  age   Despite  working  in  adjacent  rooms   RIVL[ZKHQLQVKHEUDYHGWKUHDWV in  the  tiny  school  year  after  year,  each   DQG LQWLPLGDWLRQ WR EHFRPH WKH ÂżUVW said   they   never   tired   of   the   other.   black  student  to  attend  William  Frantz   Wood  credited  the  good  working  rela-­ Elementary  School  in  New  Orleans. tionship  the  pair  have  to  a  stark  differ-­ The   school,   through   the   help   of   ence  in  their  personalities. parents   and   the   community,   raised   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   very   different,   night   and    WR FRYHU %ULGJHVÂś H[SHQVHV day,   yin   and   yang,â&#x20AC;?   Wood   joked.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   from   the   trip.   In   preparation   for   her   tell  Alice  to  lighten  up,  and   visit,   the   students   com-­ then   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   turn   around   to   pleted  a  unit  on  civil  rights   me   and   say   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Settle   down.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;What keeps and  performed  a  play  about   it alive is Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  been  our  motto.â&#x20AC;? Bridges. /HHGVVWDUWHGWHDFK-­ changing it â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  was  a  phenomenal   LQJDW/&6LQ$QD-­ every year. experience   to   bring   some-­ WLYHRIWKH-HUVH\6KRUHVKH of   that   stature   to   our   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re a little one   ZDV D PHPEHU RI WKH ÂżUVW community,â&#x20AC;?  Leeds  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153; graduating  class  of  the  Col-­ crazy and Leeds  said  Bridgesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  pre-­ lege   of   the  Atlantic   in   Bar   even my sentation   to   the   children   Harbor,   Maine,   where   she   principal was  especially  moving  be-­ majored   in   English.   Leeds   tried to talk cause  Bridges  had  just  lost   began   her   career   teaching   me out of it, her  home  to  Hurricane  Ka-­ at   a   Montessori   school   in   trina  and  one  of  her  sons  to   Manhattan,   and   has   also   but every a  drive-­by  shooting. taught   in   North   Carolina   two years â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   really   hit   home,â&#x20AC;?   we did a and  England. Leeds   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   really   With   the   exception   of   different opened   their   eyes   to   rac-­ three   years   in   which   she   play with ism,  and  it  was  profound.â&#x20AC;? lived  in  Philadelphia  while   Wood   said   the   school   a different her  husband  attended  semi-­ felt  honored  to  host  Bridg-­ QDU\VFKRRO:RRGKDV theme.â&#x20AC;? es,  who  usually  only  spoke   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; teacher at  large  urban  schools. lived  in  New  York  and  New   Alice Leeds England  her  whole  life.  She   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  it  was  powerful   grew   up   in   Hudson   Falls,   that  she  talked  to  the  whole   N.Y.,   and   graduated   from   the   State   school,  and  talked  about  her  family,â&#x20AC;?   University  of  New  York  at  Plattsburgh   Wood  said. LQ The   pair   said   another   memorable   Originally  a  nursing  student,  Wood   experience   from   their   tenure   was   a   said   she   changed   her   mind   halfway   SOD\VWXGHQWVLQZURWHDQGSHU-­ through  her  studies,  recalling  how  her   formed   in   honor   of   their   classmate,   mother  taught  in  a  one-­room  school-­ -HVXV 5RVD,YH\ -U ZKR VXFFXPEHG KRXVHIRU\HDUV to   complications   from   cerebral   palsy   â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  instructor  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  natu-­ that  year. ral  at  this,  you  should  keep  with  it,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  lost  him  just  as  we  were  about   Wood  recalled. to  rehearse  the  play  about  a  child  with   :LWKKHUGHJUHH:RRGÂżUVWWDXJKW cerebral  palsy,â&#x20AC;?  Leeds  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  were   in  the  small  Adirondack  town  of  Fort   going  to  have  him  in  the  play,  but  in-­ (See  Lincoln  teachers,  Page  19) Ann,  before  moving  to  Vermont.  She  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  17

Pocock  Rocks  looks   for  best  festival  yet

Bristol Beat

Organizers  seek  volunteers  for  event By  ZACH  DESPART BRISTOL   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Organizers   of   Bris-­ WROÂśV ÂżIWK DQQXDO 3RFRFN 5RFNV IHV-­ tival  say  the  June  21  event  is  coming   together  slowly  but  surely. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everything  is  right  on  track,â&#x20AC;?  said   Kate  Selby,  executive  director  of  the   %ULVWRO'RZQWRZQ&RPPXQLW\3DUW-­ nership.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  bands  are  all  locked  in,   and  we  have  lots  of  great  food  ven-­ GRUVQRQSURÂżWVDQGORFDOEXVLQHVVHV coming.â&#x20AC;? Selby   said   she   is   still   looking   for   volunteers  to  help  staff  booths  when   vendors   need   a   break,   and   also   to   help  set  up  and  tear  down  the  event. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  biggest  need  is  volunteers,  to   make  sure  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  successful  day,â&#x20AC;?  she   said. 7KHHYHQWZKLFKIDOOVRQWKHÂżUVW day  of  summer,  will  run  from  3-­8  p.m.  

on  Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Main  Street,  and  feature   more  than  20  vendors.  The  food  ven-­ dors  include  Willâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Lemonade,  Aqua   Vitea,  Rainbow  Ice,  Lazy  Farmer  and   Moâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Backyard  Barbeque. Âł:HÂśUH JRLQJ WR ÂżOO WKH VWUHHW´ Selby  said. Also  on  hand  will  be  Vermont  Vic-­ tory   Greenhouses,   Vermont   Skydiv-­ ing   Adventures,   soap   manufacturer   Dorset  Daughters,  henna  body  artists   Maple   Mehndi,   face   painters   from   Vermont   Face   and   Beauty,   jewelers   Wear   It   Well,   and   a   new   business   called  Yarn  and  Yoga,  a  yarn  retailer   and  yoga  studio. For   the   age   21-­and-­over   crowd,   four   vendors   will   sell   alcohol   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   6KRUHKDPEDVHG :KLVWOH3LJ WKH Burlington   Beer   Company,   Fiddle-­ (See  Pocock,  Page  19)

Dr. Robert Austin, Optometrist    JACKMANâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  INC.  DRIVER  Dave  Blair  proudly  displays  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Founders  Awardâ&#x20AC;?  he  recently  received  from  the   Vermont  Fuel  Dealers  Association.  Shown  with  him  are  Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Vice  President  Peter  Jackman,  left,  and   Service  Manager  Tim  Bouvier,  right.

Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  employee  wins  award By  JOHN  S.  McCRIGHT BRISTOL   /   STARKSBORO   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Sometimes   when   Dave   Blair   is   de-­ livering   fuel   oil   to   houses   around   the   Bristol   area   he   sees   something   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  right  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  light  left  on,  a   door  left  open,  or  even  evidence  of   a  break-­in.  Although  he  usually  has   more   deliveries   to   make,   he   said   KH DOZD\V FDOOV WKH RIÂżFH RU VRPH-­ where   to   have   someone   alert   the   homeowners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   a   renter   and   a   home-­ owner  myself,  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  hope  someone   would  call  me  if  they  saw  something   wrong  at  my  home,â&#x20AC;?  Blair  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   like  a  neighborhood  watch.â&#x20AC;? It   was   that   kind   of   customer   ser-­ vice,  and  his  dedication  to  all  aspects   of  his  job,  that  prompted  Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Inc.  in  Bristol  to  nominate  Blair  for   the   Vermont   Fuel   Dealers   Asso-­ ciation  Founderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Award.  The  state-­

wide  organization   last   month   chose   Blair   to   receive   the   award,   which   recognizes  outstanding  performance   and   dedication   to   the   heating   fuel   and  service  industry  in  Vermont. The  Founderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Award  is  intended   to   honor   the   service   technician,   truck  driver  or  customer  service  spe-­ cialist   that   goes   above   and   beyond.   The   association   considers   nomina-­

tions  from  all  of  its  members.   Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   has   been   quite   happy   with   Blair,   who   has   worked   at   the   company  for  19  years.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dave   takes   great   care   of   his   company   oil   truck,   coming   in   on   Saturdays,   if   it   needs   servicing,â&#x20AC;?   9LFH3UHVLGHQW3HWHU-DFNPDQZURWH in   his   nomination   of   Blair   for   the   (See  Blair,  Page  18)

48 Mountain Terrace Bristol, VT 05443 0(    s FAX 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: www.wallacere.com www.greenbuiltvermont.com

Kelly

Claire

Tom

Please  call  Kelly,  Claire,  or  Tom

2SHQ0RQGD\7XHVGD\Âą)ULGD\Â&#x2021;&DOOIRUDQDSSRLQWPHQWWRGD\

27 Main Street, Vergennes

(802) 877-2422

Summer  is  for  Teachers Č&#x2039;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x192;ƥǨČ&#x152; Summer  Action  Plan  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Make  it  a  FITcation:

Brand  New,  State-­of-­the-­Art  Facility  

Join  Bristol  Fitness  all   Â&#x2022;Â&#x2014;Â?Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Í&#x2020;Í&#x2122;Í?Í&#x2DC;Ǥ ĆĄÂ&#x2021;Â&#x201D; Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2030;Â&#x160; Â&#x2014;Â?Â&#x2021;Í&#x161;Í&#x2DC;Í&#x2122;Í&#x153;

Low  Radiation Digital  Imaging  

WALLACE REALTY

EMERGENCY  &  ROUTINE  EYE  EXAMS )$6+,21$%/((<(:($5Â&#x2021;&217$&7/(16(6

Comprehensive  Care   for  All  Ages  

Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2021;ƤÂ&#x2013;Â&#x2022;:  Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2019; Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2026;Â&#x17D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x192;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021; Ǩ Use  of  all  Edge  locations  in  Chittenden  County   ÇĄÇĄ Ǩ

Most  Dental   Insurance  Accepted

Call Today For An Appointment

802.453.3911

Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x201E;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;ƤÂ?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Ǩ Â

61  Pine  Street    Building  #4  in  BristolWorks!  

Check  Out  the  Class  Schedule at  edgevtwellness.com Í&#x2122;Í&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;ÇĄÂ&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Č&#x2C6;Í&#x153;Í?Í&#x203A;ÇŚÍ?Í&#x161;Í&#x2DC;Í?


PAGE  18  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

Lathrops  receive  award  from  loggers  assoc. BRISTOL   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;     The   World   War   II   Memo-­ Northeastern   Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   The project rial  Gym,  built  in  1947,   Association   (NELA)   involved 38 had  served  the  town  of   recently   honored   Tom   land owners, Craftsbury   well   over   and   Pam   Lathrop   of   approximately its   60-­year   history.   In   Exclusively   Vermont   180 trees â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 1986   the   gym   was   of-­ Wood   Products   LLC   FRQGHPQHG DV including nearly ÂżFLDOO\ as   the   recipient   of   its   structurally   unsound.   2013   Outstanding   Use   9,000 feet of For   the   next   12   years,   of  Wood  Award.  NELA   sugar maple for plans   for   a   new   gym   President   Bill   Poli-­ the main gym were  drawn,  costs  were   hronakis   presented   the   Ă RRUÂłDQG estimated,   and   bond   award   at   the   annual   almost 3,000 votes  were  held  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and   Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Banquet   in   defeated. South   Burlington,   in   a   feet of yellow â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   cost   of   re-­ ceremony   attended   by   birch for the out- placing   the   gym   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   over   200   members   of   of-bounds area. $150,000   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   was   felt   the   Northeastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   forest   to   be   too   expensive.   It   products  industry. was   then   that   Harry   Miller,   a   local   During   the   awards   presentation,   builder,   made   note   of   the   fact   that   President   Polihronakis   told   the   au-­ the   local   forested   landscape   and   dience,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Craftsbury   Academy   wood  resource  had  always  played  a  

major  role  in  his  community  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and   perhaps  it  was  time  to  look  outside   the  box.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  when  he  approached   WKH/DWKURSV7RP/DWKURSLVDÂżIWK generation   sawyer   from   Bristol   ZKRVH WRS TXDOLW\ KDUGZRRG Ă&#x20AC;RRU-­ ing   is   part   of   many   local   homes.   When  Miller  approached  him  about   the  gym  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Lathropâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  response  was   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Count  us  in.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   project   involved   38   land   owners,  approximately  180  trees  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   including  nearly  9,000  feet  of  sugar   PDSOHIRUWKHPDLQJ\PĂ&#x20AC;RRU²DQG almost   3,000   feet   of   yellow   birch   for  the  out-­of-­bounds  area.  The  logs   were  trucked  to  the  Lathropâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mill  in   Bristol,   where   Tom   supervised   the   sawing   and   the   tongue-­and-­groove   SODQLQJRIWKHQHZĂ&#x20AC;RRULQJ$QGKH did  this  at  a  very  favorable  rate,  sav-­ (See  Lathrops,  Page  19)

(Continued  from  Page  17) award.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dave  takes  real  pride  in  his   job  and  responsibilities.  You  cannot   teach   this   kind   of   work   ethic   and   dedication.   The   day   he   retires,   not   only   will   Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Inc.   miss   him,   but  his  customers  will  miss  him,  just   as  much. â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  knows  how  to  save  the  com-­ pany   money,   when   not   to   go   into   certain   driveways   in   bad   weather   conditions.   Dave   takes   real   owner-­ ship  in  his  job,  which  is  so  valuable   to  all  of  us  here  at  Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Inc.â&#x20AC;? Blair,   63,   was   tickled   to   receive   the  recognition,  but  that  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  why  he   comes  to  work.  He  said  he  likes  be-­ ing  outdoors  and  he  likes  the  people. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  there  if  I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  like   it,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Even   the   frigid   days,   when   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   delivering   fuel   to   families   on   the   coldest   days   of   the   year,   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   faze   him.   Still,   when   he   comes   to   an   icy   driveway,   Blair   knows   how   to   take   care.  He  said  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  never  had  an  ac-­ cident. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  a  vehicle  with  hazardous   material   in   it,â&#x20AC;?   Blair   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   not   going  to  jeopardize  my  company  or   myself  by  trying  to  get  fuel  down  a   driveway  that  is  covered  with  glare   ice  like  a  bobsled  run.â&#x20AC;? Blair,  a  Starksboro  resident,  came  

â&#x20AC;&#x2122;S AY

SEAFO

O

D

R

Bristol Beat

Blair Â

DAVE   BLAIR to  Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  from  a  career  in  truck   driving  and  construction.  He  says  he   learned   to   work   hard   in   those   jobs,   and  in  his  early  childhood  on  a  farm.   At  the  moment  he  is  laid  up  with  a   partial  knee  replacement,  which  was   brought   on   from   a   lifetime   of   hard   work   and   banging   around.   Blair   expects   to   return   to   Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   and   hopes   work   there   until   his   retire-­ ment. Peter  Jackman  was  effusive  in  his   praise  for  Blair.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  wish  that  they  had  not  broken   the  mold  on  him,  because  we  would   want  a  whole  crew  of  him,â&#x20AC;?  he  wrote   in   his   nomination.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   is   a   truly   great  employee,  but  better  than  that,   he  is  an  awesome  friend,  community   member,  that  we  think  the  world  of.â&#x20AC;?

Great Prices on the

Freshest Seafood!

Catch the Fish Truck Wed. 1-6pm now thru Fall at Livingston Farms. Special Orders Always Welcome Call 802-879-3611 :MWMX6E]´W7IEJSSH1EVOIXÂ&#x2C6;3TIR(E]WEQTQ 4MRIGVIWX(VMZI)WWI\.YRGXMSR Raysseafoodmarket.com

info@raysseafoodmarket.com

Choose an exotic fair-trade gift. 18 Main Street, Bristol VT

453-­7202

www.emeraldrosegifts.com Monday â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Saturday, 10 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 6


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  19

Lincoln  teachers   to  step  into  a  classroom?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Leeds  said.   (Continued  from  Page  16) stead   we   had   his   empty   wheelchair   â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  is  the  nature  of  teaching;Íž  it  nev-­ er  stops  being  challenging.â&#x20AC;? portray  the  child.â&#x20AC;? Asked   what   she   would   miss   the   Leeds  said  what  has  kept  her  sane   over  all  the  years  is  continually  updat-­ most   about   teaching,  Wood   said,   un-­ ing   the   curriculum,   rather   than   recy-­ surprisingly,  the  children. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   miss   their   bright   cling  lesson  plans. â&#x20AC;&#x153;What   keeps   it   alive   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll miss (the eyes,â&#x20AC;?   Wood   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Espe-­ cially   when   I   pull   a   prank   changing   it   every   year,â&#x20AC;?   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s) on  them.â&#x20AC;? Leeds   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   a   little   Wood,   scheming   crazy   and   even   my   princi-­ bright eyes. jokester   of   the   pair,   was   pal  tried  to  talk  me  out  of  it,   Especially known   to   put   paper   hole   but  every  two  years  we  did   when I pull punches  in  studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  shoes   a  different  play  with  a  dif-­ a prank on and   place   a   bowling   ball   ferent  theme.â&#x20AC;? them.â&#x20AC;? in   an   unsuspecting   pupilâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   This   year,   as   the   pairâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; teacher backpack. swan   song,   the   students   Donna Wood Wood   said   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   also   performed  a  play  about  the   miss   the   humor   students   Flood  of  1998,  which  dam-­ mastering   the   English   language   un-­ aged  much  of  the  town. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  all  of  the  25  years  here,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   intentionally   insert   into   their   writing.   never   done   a   play   about   the   river,â&#x20AC;?   She  recalled  a  day  years  ago  when  a   Leeds  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  I  would  be   student  wrote,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermont  depends  a  lot   able  to  have  the  level  of  enthusiasm  if   on  tourist  hunting.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   laughed   for   days   about   that   we  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  keep  doing  fresh  material.â&#x20AC;? Leeds  said  that  even  after  a  quarter   one,â&#x20AC;?  Wood  said,  the  unfortunate  turn   century  in  the  classroom,  she  still  does   of  phrase  cracking  her  up  to  this  day. CLOSE-­KNIT  COMMUNITY not  consider  herself  a  master. Both  Wood  and  Leeds  were  quick   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  days  I  go  home  thinking  that   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   really   got   it,   and   the   next   day   I   to   praise   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   close-­knit   think  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Where  did  I  ever  get  the  nerve   staff,   who   they   said   were   always  

Lathrops Â

Pocock Â

(Continued  from  Page  18) ing   the   town   $40,000.   Over   a   long   weekend  60  volunteers  installed  the   Ă&#x20AC;RRULQJ²DOORIZKLFKZDVJURZQ within  10  miles  of  the  gym.â&#x20AC;?   Polihronakis   concluded,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tom   and   Pam   Lathrop,   known   for   their   integrity,   hard   work   and   the   pride   they   take   in   producing   superior   quality   products   are   very   deserv-­ ing  of  the  Outstanding  Use  of  Wood   Award  in  connection  with  this  proj-­ ect  as  well  as  their  lifelong  commit-­ ment  to  the  forests  of  Vermont.  The   Lathropsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   personal   investment   of   time  and  talent  allowed  this  project   to   become   a   reality,   a   legacy   that   will  live  on  for  future  generations.â&#x20AC;? The  Northeastern  Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Asso-­ ciation,  headquartered  in  Old  Forge,   N.Y.,   is   a   trade   group   representing   nearly  2,000  members  of  the  North-­ eastâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   logging,   sawmilling,   and   pa-­ per  industry.  The  Loggersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Banquet   is  held  each  year  immediately  prior   to  the  Northeastern  Forest  Products   Equipment  Exposition.

(Continued  from  Page  17) head   Brewing   Company   of   Shel-­ burne,   and   Champlain   Orchards   of   Shoreham,   which   will   be   selling   its   hard  cider. Musical  acts  Abby  Jenne,  BandAn-­ na,  Gang  of  Thieves,  Lynda  Malzac,   Patrick   Fitzsimmons   and   Waylon   Speed  will  be  spread  across  two  stag-­ es.  Many  of  the  musicians  have  ties  to   WKHÂżYHWRZQDUHD The  festival  will  include  childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   games,   a   silent   auction   and   demon-­ strations   by   blacksmith   Lee   Beck-­ ZLWK )LYH QRQSURÂżWV ² :DWHUVKHG Center,  Mountain  Health  Center  and   Five  Town  Drug  and  Safety  Alliance   ²ZLOODOVREHRQKDQG For   the   festival,   Main   Street   will   be   closed   between   North   Street   and   Mountain   Street,   but   motorists   will   be   guided   on   detours   through   town   to   easterly   destinations   to   the   east   and  west.  Additional  parking  will  be  

453-SIGN Vehicle Graphics Signs, Embroidery, Awards, Trophies Screen Printing, and More!

73 WEST STREET, BRISTOL

supportive. Asked  about  their  plans  for  retire-­ ment,  the  duo  said  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  still  dedi-­ FDWHGWRÂżQLVKLQJRXWWKHVFKRRO\HDU strong. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  have  thought  as  far  as  Monday   the   16th,â&#x20AC;?   Wood   said,   referencing   the  last  day  of  school.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  time  of   year   you   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   time   for   any-­ thing  else.â&#x20AC;? Leeds  said  that  she  expects  retire-­ ment  to  be  a  huge  change  in  her  life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   going   to   be   dropping   off   a   cliff,  for  sure,â&#x20AC;?  she    said. She   added   that   she   plans   to   do   more  theater  work  with  children,  but   ZLOOWDNHWKHWLPHWRHQMR\WKHÂżQHU things  in  life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  want  to  be  able  to  read  a  book   in  the  afternoon  and  take  a  walk  in   the  morning  if  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  nice  out,  and  trav-­ el   when   no   one   else   is   traveling,â&#x20AC;?   Leeds  said. But  despite  their  reluctance  to  call   it   a   career,   Leeds   and   Wood   both   said   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   time   to   quit   while   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   ahead. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   kids   teach   us,   and   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   smarter   than   we   are,â&#x20AC;?   Leeds   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  getting  smarter  faster,   so  we  better  get  out  while  we  can.â&#x20AC;?

453-2325

125 Monkton Road, Bristol, VT 3/80%,1*Â&#x2021;+($7,1*Â&#x2021;$,5&21',7,21,1*Â&#x2021;:$7(56<67(06

Call  us  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  here  to  help Heating  System  Inspection  &  Maintenance Energy  Efficiency  Advice Dependable  Delivery  &   24-­Hour  Emergency  Service 3URGXFWV)RU$OO<RXU3HWUROHXP3OXPELQJ +HDWLQJ1HHGV For Fuel/Oil Delivery

388-4975 185 Exchange St., Middlebury

Got Firewood? We Do! Available for Prompt Delivery

Green or Dry (Kiln Processed)* Dried per USDA requirements for heat processing Approved Supplier VT Fuel Assistance Program

available  around  downtown  Bristol. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  actually  block  off  Bris-­ tol,  we  create  a  detour,â&#x20AC;?  Selby  said. Selby   said   she   hopes   the   spell   of   beautiful   weather   holds   for   another   week,  but  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  taking  any  chanc-­ es. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyone  should  do  a  sun  and  no-­ wind  dance,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. Pocock   Rocks   derives   its   name   from   the   original   name   of   Bristol,   incorporated   in   1762   and   named   af-­ ter   British   Admiral   George   Pocock.   In   2009,   the   festival   won   the   Green   Mountain   Award   for   the   Best   New   Event  in  Vermont. Pocock  Rocks  is  sponsored  by  sev-­ eral   local   businesses,   including   the   Addison  Independent.  Other  sponsors   include   the   Heritage   Auto   Group,   99.9  The  Buzz,  the  Bobcat  CafĂŠ  and   Stark  Mountain. See   more   online   at   discoverbris-­ tolvt.com/pocock-­rocks.

Used  &  New  Books   CDs,  DVDs  &  Toys New Musical Instruments & Supplies! String Instrument Repair

DRUM JAM!

Wed, June 11th, 6:30-8:00 pm

Bring your own drum or use ours.

Come check out our selection of quality Acoustic & Electric Guitars & Accessories

*Dry Wood is heated in our Kilns at 200Âş until the average moisture is down to 20-25%

Folk & Wood Instruments THE A. JOHNSON CO., LLC BRISTOL, VT 05443 802-453-4884 www.VermontLumber.com

Just in! New Line 6 Amps 0DLQ6W%ULVWROÂ&#x2021;453-­5982 www.recycledreadingofvt.com

Call Bill, Andrea, or John DQG\RX¡OOĂ&#x20AC;QGIULHQGO\local service and very competitive rates.

453-6600 35  West  St.,  Bristol,  VT +20(Â&#x2021;%86,1(66Â&#x2021;$872 Serving Vermonters for over 90 years. www.paigeandcampbell.com


PAGE  20  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

Jamboree  (Continued  from  Page  1) KHOLFRSWHUV$ Ă&#x20AC;LJKW VLPXODWLRQ VWD-­ The  concept  of  a  parade  morphed   tion  was  also  slated  to  be  offered  at   into   a   three-­day-­long   â&#x20AC;&#x153;coming   the  site. homeâ&#x20AC;?  party  for  veterans,  spearhead-­ Proceeds   from   the   Jamboree   will   ed  by  the  East  Coast  Animals  Motor-­ be  donated  to  the  Wounded  Warriors   cycle  Family  at  a  site  off  Route  125   Project. in  Cornwall.  The  June  5-­7  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Veterans   Organizers   on   Thursday   morn-­ Appreciation   Jamboreeâ&#x20AC;?   drew   vari-­ ing   were   setting   up   staging,   sound   ous   job   recruiters,   equipment   and   a   human   services   pro-­ large  tent.  Jones  and   fessionals,   state   of-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our goal is to Wayne   Burlett,   an-­ ÂżFLDOV YHQGRUV DQG have people who other  East  Coast  An-­ musical   performers   come here that imals   member   and   whose   primary   mis-­ Jamboree   planner,   they develop an sion  was  to  celebrate   called   the   gather-­ veterans   and   to   help   understanding ing  a  family  friendly   them   improve   their   that the event  that  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like   lives. to  stage  on  an  annual   similarities they Rick  Carroll,  pres-­ basis  at  the  same  lo-­ ident   of   East   Coast   have with combat cation. Animals,   offered   up   veterans are far â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   can   have   a   the  Cornwall  site  for   more than the great  idea,  but  if  you   the   Jamboree.   Orga-­ donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  a  place  to   differences.â&#x20AC;? nizers   brought   their   have  it,  you  might  as   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jamboree coidea   to   the   Corn-­ well  not  have  a  great   wall   selectboard   and   organizer Morrie Jones idea,â&#x20AC;?  Jones  said. then   reached   out   to   Along   with   food   various  service  providers  and  enter-­ concessions,   the   Jamboree   featured   tainers   to   participate.   Their   efforts   a   closely   monitored   beer   tent.   Cus-­ proved   successful,   as   such   widely   tomers  were  limited  to  three  beers. known   acts   as   Waylon   Speed,   Blue   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  people  want  to  drink  more  than   Fox  and  Tammy  Fletcher  &  The  Dis-­ that,   they   have   to   go   somewhere   ciples  agreed  to  perform  for  next  to   else,â&#x20AC;?   said   Jones,   who   believes   the   nothing.  Admission  was  set  at  $10  a   Jamboree   is   the   only   veterans-­ori-­ head,  with  veterans  (and  their  fami-­ ented   celebration   planned   in   Ver-­ lies)   and   children   younger   than   12   mont  so  far  this  year.  It  was  intended   allowed  in  for  free. to  be  devoid  of  politics  and  focus  on   â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Veterans)  have  already  paid  their   appreciation  and  healing. ticket,â&#x20AC;?  said  Jones,  a  member  of  East   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   can   have   whatever   politi-­ Coast  Animals. cal   opinion   you   want,â&#x20AC;?   Jones   said.   Plans   called   for   the   display   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   you   are   on   the   ramparts,   operation   of   some   model   Chinook   politics   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   amount   to   anything  

at  all.  What  matters  is  the  guys  who   are  there  and  what  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  there  for.â&#x20AC;? He   said   veterans   returning   from   combat   in   the   Middle   East   are   en-­ countering  some  new  issues  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  such   as  exposure  to  depleted  uranium  and   improvised  explosive  devices.  There   are  also  the  common  issues  veterans   have   grappled   with   throughout   his-­ tory,   such   as   Post   Traumatic   Stress   Disorder  and  reintegration  into  civil-­ ian  life. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  trying  to  get  recognition   going,â&#x20AC;?  Jones  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   goal   is   to   have   people   who   come  here  that  they  develop  an  un-­ derstanding  that  the  similarities  they   have   with   combat   veterans   are   far   more  than  the  differences,â&#x20AC;?  he  add-­ ed.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  also  want  veterans  to  be  in   an  environment  where  they  are  com-­ fortable.   And   if   people   leave   here   saying  they  had  a  great  time,  we  will   have  met  our  goal  100  percent.â&#x20AC;? SERVICES  FOR  VETS Lynn   Coale,   director   of   the   Pa-­ tricia  A.   Hannaford   Career   Center,   was   one   several   recruiters   at   the   Jamboree   on   Thursday.   He   was   there   to   let   veterans   know   that   tu-­ ition   for   several   Career   Center   courses   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   including   the   meat   cut-­ ter  program  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  is  eligible  for  reim-­ bursement   through   veteransâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   ben-­ HÂżWV Vermont   Army   National   Guard   Sgt.   1st   Class   Matthew   Lang   was   also  on  hand  to  speak  to  folks  who   might  want  to  enlist  or  re-­up.  As  a   PLOLWDU\ RIÂżFLDO KH ZDV LPSUHVVHG with  the  Jamboree. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  this  is  a  great  service,â&#x20AC;?  he  

MORRIE  JONES,  LEFT,  and  Wayne  Burlett  co-­organized  the  Veterans   Appreciation  Jamboree  held  in  Cornwall  last  Thursday,  Friday  and  Sat-­ XUGD\$OOSUR¿WVIURPWKHHYHQWZHQWWRWKH:RXQGHG:DUULRU3URMHFW Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  an  opportunity  for  veter-­ Beth   Diamond   was   there   on   be-­ ans   to   be   thanked,   to   get   together,   half   of   Vermont   2-­1-­1,   which   in-­ and   celebrate   the   things   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   cludes   a   database   of   hundreds   of   done.â&#x20AC;? UHVRXUFHV WKDW VSHFLÂżFDOO\ VHUYH veterans,   active   military   and   their   families,   plus   thousands   of   addi-­ tional  resources  for  any  citizen. Kathleen   Pratt   and   Cheryl   Con-­ nor   of   Addison   County   Home   Health  &  Hospice  encouraged  vet-­ erans   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   particularly   those   who   served   as   medics   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   to   consider   a   career   as   a   Licensed   Nurse  Assis-­ tant,  or  LNA. And   David   Wheel,   executive   di-­ rector   of   Vermont   Employer   Sup-­ port   of   the   Guard   &   Reserve,   dis-­ played   many   brochures   to   inform   veterans   how   to   connect   with   em-­ ployers  as  they  re-­enter  civilian  life. Surveying  it  all  was  Vermont  Lt.   Gov.  Phil  Scott. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   week   in   particular,   when   we  had  Memorial  Day  last  week  and   the   70th   anniversary   of   the   D-­Day   invasion   this   week,   I   think   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ap-­ propriate  to  thank  our  veterans  and   recognize  what  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  done  for  all   of  us,â&#x20AC;?  Scott  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  should  do  as   much  as  we  can  to  help.â&#x20AC;? The   effort   was   not   lost   on   Ron   Woodley,  a  former  U.S.  Army  para-­ trooper   with   the   173rd   and   101st   Airborne.  Woodley,  a  part-­time  Ver-­ mont   resident,   came   to   check   out   the  activities  Thursday  morning  and   vowed   to   become   a   regular   visitor   during   the   three   days   of   Jamboree   activities. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   is   wonderful   and   puts   a   great  feeling  in  the  heart,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   makes   you   feel   good   inside   if   /7*293+,/6FRWWOHIWWDONVODVW7KXUVGD\PRUQLQJZLWK0RUULH-RQHVIURQWULJKWDQG5LFN&DUUROOWZRRIWKHRUJDQL]HUVRIWKH9HWHUDQV$S-­ youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  vet.â&#x20AC;? Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   SUHFLDWLRQ-DPERUHHDWKUHHGD\HYHQWODVWZHHNLQ&RUQZDOOIHDWXULQJOLYHPXVLFPRWRUF\FOHVKRZVIRRGDQGPRUH Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell johnf@addisonindependent.com.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  21

Candidates stronghold. Addison-­2  (Cornwall,   Goshen,   Hancock,   Leicester,   Ripton   and   Salisbury):   Incumbent   Rep.   Wil-­ lem   Jewett,   D-­Ripton,   is   thus   far   the   only   declared   candidate   for   the  seat  he  has  held  for  the  past  12   years.   Jewett   is   the   current   House   Majority  Leader. Addison-­3   (Addison,   Ferris-­ burgh,   Panton,   Vergennes   and   Waltham):   Incumbent   Reps.   Di-­ ane   Lanpher,   D-­Vergennes,   and   Warren  Van  Wyck,   R-­Ferrisburgh,   KDYH FRQ¿UPHG WKH\ ZLOO EH UXQ-­ ning  for  re-­election  in  the  two-­seat   district.   Addison   Democrat   John   Spencer   has   also   thrown   his   hat   into   the   ring.   Lanpher   is   seeking   her   fourth   consecutive   two-­year   term,   while   Van   Wyck   will   com-­ SHWHLQKLV¿UVWHOHFWLRQIRUWKHMRE Gov.  Peter  Shumlin  appointed  him   to  the  position  in  January  of  2013   following  the  tragic  death  of  Rep.   Greg  Clark,  R-­Vergennes. Addison-­4   (Bristol,   Lincoln,   Monkton   and   Starksboro):   Vet-­ eran   Democratic   incumbent   Reps.   Dave   Sharpe   of   Bristol   and   Mike   Fisher   of   Lincoln   are   again   run-­ ning   for   re-­election.   They   ran   un-­ opposed   in   2012,   but   they   will   be   challenged   this   year   in   the   two-­ seat   district   by   Republicans   Fred   Baser  of  Bristol  and  Valerie  Mullin   of  Monkton. Sharpe   is   seeking   his   seventh   consecutive   two-­year   term   in   the   House,   while   Fisher   is   vying   for   his   eighth.   Sharpe   is   a   member   of   the  House  Ways   and   Means   Com-­ mittee,  while  Fisher  is  chairman  of   the  House  Health  Care  Committee. %DVHU LV D ORQJWLPH ¿QDQFLDO planner   and   former   Bristol   select-­ man  who  has  competed  in  the  past   for   an   Addison-­4   seat.   Mullin   is   D EXVLQHVVSHUVRQ PDNLQJ KHU ¿UVW run  for  the  House. Addison-­5  (Bridport,  New  Ha-­ ven   and   Weybridge):   Rep.   Har-­ vey   Smith,   R-­New   Haven,   will   seek   another   term   in   the   one-­seat   district.   He   will   face   opposition   this  year  from  New  Haven  Demo-­ crat  Susan  Smiley. Smith,   former   president   of   the   Addison  County  Farm  Bureau  and   DORQJWLPHIDUPHUZDV¿UVWHOHFWHG to   the   House   in   1998   and   served   through  2007,  the  year  in  which  he   was  defeated  by  New  Haven  Dem-­ ocrat   Chris   Bray,   who   now   serves   in  the  state  Senate.  Smith  won  the   seat  again  in  2010.  He  has  primar-­ ily  served  his  legislative  career  on   the  House  Agriculture  Committee. 7KLVZLOOEH6PLOH\œV¿UVWUXQIRU the   House.   The   Addison   Indepen-­ dent ZLOO SUR¿OH 6PLOH\ DQG RWKHU challengers   for   House   and   Senate   seats  during  the  coming  weeks. Addison-­Rutland-­1   (Benson,   Orwell,  Shoreham  and  Whiting):   Incumbent   Rep.   Will   Stevens,   I-­ Shoreham,   announced   last   month   that  he  would  not  seek  re-­election   after  four  terms,  all  of  them  spent   on   the   House   Agriculture   Com-­ mittee.   Stevens   said   he   needs   to   devote   more   time   to   Golden   Rus-­ set  Farm,  the  business  he  operates  

with  wife,  Judy. Stevensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  announcement  took  lo-­ cal  Democrats  and  Republicans  by   surprise.  As   the   Addison   Indepen-­ dent   went   to   press,   Alyson   East-­ PDQ RI 2UZHOO FRQÂżUPHG VKH ZLOO run  for  the  seat  as  an  independent. State  Senate  (Addison  County,   Huntington   and   Buelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Gore):   Incumbent   Sens.   Claire   Ayer,   D-­ Addison,  and  Christopher  Bray,  D-­ New   Haven,   will   seek   new   terms   in   the   Legislatureâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   upper   cham-­ ber.  As  of  Friday,  Ripton  indepen-­ dent  Robert  Wagner  (via  his  Face-­

ERRNSDJH ZDVWKHRQO\FRQ¿UPHG challenger  for  one  of  the  two  seats.   Wagner  has  run  unsuccessfully  for   a   state   Senate   seat   the   past   two   election  cycles. Ayer   is   seeking   her   sixth   con-­ secutive   two-­year   term,   while   Bray  will  vie  for  his  second.  Bray   previously  served  two  terms  in  the   House.   Bray   serves   on   the   Senate   Finance   and   Agriculture   Commit-­ tees. Ayer  currently  serves  as  the  Sen-­ ate  majority  whip.  She  also  chairs   the   Senate   Health   and   Welfare  

Committee  and   the   Health   Care   Oversight  Committee. 7KH*23GLGQRWÂżHOGDQ\FKDO-­ lengers  for  the  two  Senate  seats  in   2012. The   current   Addison   County   side   judges   are   Francis   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Frankâ&#x20AC;?   Broughton   and   Margaret   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Betsyâ&#x20AC;?   Gossens.   The   incumbent   Addison   County   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   attorney   is   David   Fenster.  The  countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  probate  court   judge  is  Eleanor  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Misseâ&#x20AC;?  Smith. Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

580 5 $ $/,&,286 un e

(Continued  from  Page  1) Aug.  26  primary  ballot,  which  puts   them  in  line  to  appear  on  the  Nov.  4   General  Election  ballot.  The  dead-­ line  applies  to  candidates  who  are   running   for   U.S.   representative,   governor,   lieutenant   governor,   treasurer,   secretary   of   state,   audi-­ tor   of   accounts,   attorney   general,   all   30   state   senate   seats,   all   150   state   representative   seats,   probate   judge,  assistant  judge  (side  judge),   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   attorney,   sheriff,   high   bai-­ liff,  and  justice  of  the  peace. &DQGLGDWHVPXVWÂżOHWKHLUQRPL-­ nation  papers,  bearing  the  requisite   number   of   signatures,   with   their   representative   district   clerk   or   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   in  the  case  of  county  and  state  Sen-­ ate   candidates   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   at   the   Addison   County   Courthouse.   Those   vying   for  statewide  or  Congressional  of-­ ÂżFH PXVW JDWKHU  VLJQDWXUHV Candidates   for   state   Senate   and   FRXQW\RIÂżFHVQHHGVLJQDWXUHV while  House  hopefuls  must  collect   50. Candidates   can   jump   into   the   UDFH DIWHU WKH -XQH  ÂżOLQJ GHDG-­ line   if   they   wage   write-­in   cam-­ paigns  for  the  Aug.  26  primary.  In   order  to  be  successful,  a  candidate   for   state   senate   would   have   to   re-­ ceived   at   least   50   write-­in   votes   (and   a   majority)   in   the   primary   in   order   to   be   placed   on   the   General   Election  ballot.  A  House  candidate   would   need   at   least   25   votes   (and   a  majority)  to  advance  to  the  Gen-­ eral  Election  ballot. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  will  have  someone  running   for   each   position,â&#x20AC;?   said   Paul   For-­ lenza,  leader  of  the  Addison  Coun-­ ty   Democratic   Committee.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   feel   good  about  the  slate.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   still   talking   to   pro-­ spective   candidates,â&#x20AC;?   said   Bryan   Young,   leader   of   the   Addison   County   Republican   Committee.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  would  love  to  have  a  pony  in   every   race,   but   realistically,   that   probably  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  happen.â&#x20AC;? As   the   Addison   Independent   went  to  press  on  Friday,  the  Addi-­ son  County  Republican  and  Demo-­ cratic  leaders  continued  to  network   with  potential  candidates. Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   how   the   roster   of   candi-­ dates  stacks  up  at  this  point: Addison-­1   (Middlebury):   Three  Democrats  and  one  indepen-­ dent  have  thus  far  stepped  forward   to  vie  for  the  two  seats  in  this  dis-­ trict.  A  Democratic  primary  will  be   needed  to  select  two  of  that  partyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   three   declared   candidates   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   in-­ cumbent  Rep.  Better  Nuovo,  Amy   Sheldon   and   Donna   Donahue.   In-­ cumbent   Rep.   Paul   Ralston,   D-­ Middlebury,  has  announced  he  will   QRW UXQ IRU UHHOHFWLRQ 7KH ÂżHOG also   includes   Middlebury   College   student  Calvin  McEathron,  who  is   running  as  an  independent. Nuovo  is  the  countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  most  vet-­ eran   lawmaker,   with   27   years   of   service.   She   currently   serves   on   the   House   Natural   Resources   and   Energy  Committee. The   Republican   Party   has   not   recently   run   a   candidate   in   Ad-­ dison-­1,   which   has   proven   itself   a   particularly   strong   Democrat  

fJ o h mont

dark &

STORMY

ginger beer with our house infused spiced rum and lime

Mojito

light rum with a mint maple syrup, fresh squeezed lime, club soda and local mint

%$57(1'(5n6

63(&,$/

strawberry DAIQUIRI

hurricane

light rum with lime juice and strawberry puree

light and dark rum with a sweet citrus blend

passion fruit

DAIQUIRI

light rum, pineapple and passion fruit juice

piĂąa colada

light rum, pineapple juice and coconut blend

Check our daily specials to see what we have whipped up for you!

OPEN

TUES.rSAT. 30r/$7( 0$,1670,''/(%85<97

388.8209 go51main.com


PAGE  22  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

MONDAY

SPORTS

Otters  top  Eagles  to  advance  in  D-­II  playoffs By  ANDY  KIRKALDY BRISTOL   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Getting   contribu-­ tions  from  the  entire  batting  order   and   a   three-­hit   shutout   from   se-­ nior   pitcher  Taylor  Aines,   the   No.   5  Otter  Valley  Union  High  School   softball  team  eliminated  host  No.  4   Mount  Abraham  from  the  Division   II   playoffs,   6-­0,   in   a   Friday   quar-­ WHUÂżQDO Eight   Otters   had   hits,   including   a   two-­run   homer   by   senior   third   baseman   Brittany   Bushey,   a   triple   by   senior   shortstop   Cortney   Pol-­ jacik,  and  an  RBI  double  by  senior   FHQWHUÂżHOGHU DQG 1R  KLWWHU 2O-­ ivia  Bloomer. The   Otters   improved   to   13-­5,   a   record   they   earned   despite   a   2-­3   start  to  the  season  that  included  an   11-­10  loss  at  Mount  Abraham. Bushey   said   the   recipe   for   suc-­ cess   has   been   chemistry   and   the   kind  of  balance  the  Otters  showed   on  Friday.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   all   just   come   together,â&#x20AC;?   Bushey  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  played  a   part.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  one  player.  It  takes  all   of  us  every  game.â&#x20AC;? The  Otters  advanced  to  meet  No.   1   Lyndon   on   Tuesday.   The   14-­1   9LNLQJV RQ )ULGD\ HGJHG 1R  6SULQJÂżHOG  LQ HLJKW LQQLQJV 6SULQJÂżHOGLVWKHRQO\FRPPRQIRH for  the  two  teams.  OV  defeated  the   Cosmos  by  scores  of  7-­0  and  3-­1.     Bushey   said   the   Otters   will   be   SOD\LQJZLWKFRQÂżGHQFH â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   never   know   what   could   happen,â&#x20AC;?   Bushey   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   we   have  a  smile  on  our  face  now.  We   should  be  good.â&#x20AC;? Of  course,  Mount  Abraham  (14-­ 4)  enjoyed  a  strong  season  against   a   tough   schedule,   posting   wins   RYHU ', VHPLÂżQDOLVWV 0LVVLVTXRL and  BFA-­St.  Albans. Coach   Kelley  Trayah   noted   that  

in  the   competitive   Metro   Con-­ ference,   four   of   his   players   were   QDPHG ÂżUVWWHDP DOOVWDUV DQG WZR more  made  the  second  team. The   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   seven   seniors   have   contributed   to   the   programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   steady   improvement   in   recent   years,  Trayah  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   a   great   bunch,â&#x20AC;?   Trayah   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  going  to  miss  them.â&#x20AC;? Six   of   those   seniors   started   on   Friday,   but   one   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   always   this   spring:  Senior  Sam  Forand  took  the   mound  for  Mount  Abe  and  pitched   creditably,   allowing   four   earned   runs   against   the   hard-­hitting   Ot-­ ters   while   walking   just   one   batter   in  six  innings.  Normally  freshman   Rachael   McCormick   starts   for   the   Eagles,  but  she  was  ill. Trayah   said   Forand   threw   well,   and   that   with  Aines   on   top   of   her   game   McCormickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   absence   was   not  a  game-­changing  factor.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   get   anything   go-­ ing,  rally-­wise,â&#x20AC;?  Trayah  said. Forand   kept   the   Otters   off   the   board   for   two   innings,   thanks   in   part   to   a   second-­inning   double   play.  OV  catcher  Laura  Beth  Rob-­ erts   singled   and   moved   to   second   base   on   a   wild   pitch.   Forand   got   the   next   hitter   to   ground   to   senior   shortstop  Meghan  Livingston,  who   JRW WKH EDWWHU DW ÂżUVW )LUVW EDVH-­ man   Kelsey   Haskins   then   threw   out  Roberts  trying  to  reach  third. OV   broke   through   in   the   third.   First   basemen   Danielle   Eddy   sin-­ gled,  and  Bushey  laced  a  line  drive   GRZQWKHOHIWÂżHOGOLQH/HIWÂżHOGHU Ashley   Boise   dove   for   the   ball,   missing  by  inches,  and  Bushey  cir-­ cled  the  bases  for  a  two-­run  homer. Boise   was   the   only   Eagle   bas-­ HUXQQHU LQ WKH ÂżUVW WKUHH LQQLQJV reaching  second  base  on  a  one-­out   LQÂżHOG HUURU LQ WKH VHFRQG %XW D

OTTER  VALLEY  UNION  High  School  junior  Margaret  Santell  slides  past  Mount  Abraham  catcher  Madi  Wood   and  scores  during  last  Fridayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  game  in  Bristol. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

grounder  to   second   baseman  Amy   -RQHVRQHRIKHU¿YHFOHDQSOD\V ended  the  threat. OV   made   it   3-­0   in   the   fourth   when   Poljacik   lined   a   triple   to   right   center   and   scored   on   a   Rob-­ erts   squeeze   bunt.   In   the   bottom   of  the  inning,  Eagle  senior  catcher   Madi  Wood  singled  to  no-­hit  spec-­ ulation.

29 VFRUHG WZLFH LQ WKH ÂżIWK WR make  it   5-­0.   Aines   singled   and   VWROH VHFRQG 6HQLRU OHIW ÂżHOGHU Megan  Santell  singled  Aines  home   and  then  came  around  to  score  on  a   WKURZLQJHUURU29DGGHGLWVÂżQDO UXQLQWKHVL[WKZKHQULJKWÂżHOGHU Maia   Edmunds   reached   on   an   er-­ ror,   moved   up   on   an   Eddy   single,   and  scored  on  Bloomerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  double.    

The  Eagles   had   a   chance   to   do   some  damage  in  the  bottom  of  the   ÂżIWKZLWKWZRRXWZKHQ'+.HQGUD Thompson  singled  and  senior  right   ÂżHOGHU 7LIIDQ\ 7UDFH\ UHDFKHG RQ an  Ainesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  own  throwing  error.  But   $LQHV UHFRUGHG KHU ÂżIWK DQG ÂżQDO strikeout  to  end  the  threat. OV   Coach   Pattie   Candon   said   Aines  has  taken  a  step  forward  this   (See  Softball,  Page  24)

Vergennes, Mt. Abe, OV softball, OV baseball win; MUHS nine lose ADDISON  COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Higher   seeds  won  all  the  playoff  games  this   past  Wednesday  involving  local  high   school   softball   and   baseball   teams.   All  the  games  were  either  postponed   or  suspended  from  Tuesday.   In   softball,   the  Vergennes,   Mount   Abraham   and   Otter   Valley   squads   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  Nos.  2,  4  and  5  seeds,  respec-­ tively,  in  Division  II  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  all  won  one-­ sided   games   without   allowing   runs,   while   No.   7   Fair   Haven   ousted   No.   10  Middlebury.   In  baseball,  No.  7  Otter  Valley,  the   defending  D-­II  champion,  advanced,   while   in   D-­I   No.   11   MUHS   lost   a   heartbreaker  to  No.  6  Rutland.   VUHS  SOFTBALL   In   softball,   the   host   No.   2   Com-­ modores   posted   the   biggest   win,   18-­0   over   No.   15   Lamoille   (2-­13)  

LQ ¿YH LQQLQJV Taylor  Paquette   tossed  a  no-­hitter,  striking  out  seven   and   walking   one,   and   also   drilled   a   bases-­loaded  double  to  spark  the  at-­ tack.   Phoebe   Plank   added   two   hits   and  two  RBIs  for  VUHS,  which  im-­ proved  to  15-­2. EAGLE  SOFTBALL The   host   No.   4   Eagles   won   al-­ most   as   impressively,   15-­0   over   1R  5LFH   DOVR LQ ¿YH LQ-­ nings.   Rachael   McCormick   and   Sam  Forand  teamed  up  to  toss  a  no-­ hitter  and  Melanie  Rotax  homered,   tripled,   singled   twice,   and   drove   in   three   runs.   Kelsey   Haskins   picked   up   two   RBIs,   while   Meghan   Liv-­ ingston  and  Ashley  Boise  drove  in  a   run   apiece   as   Mount  Abe   improved   to  14-­3.   OTTER  SOFTBALL

,Q%UDQGRQ29  ¿QLVKHGXS a  suspended   game   by   topping   visit-­ ing   No.   12   Lake   Region,   14-­0.  The   Otters   led,   4-­0,   when   play   resumed   and   pulled   away.   Taylor   Aines   tossed   a   two-­hit   shutout   and   fanned   11,   and   also   homered,   singled   and   drove  in  three  runs.  Brittany  Bush-­ ey  knocked  out  three  hits  and  drove   in  two  runs,  Megan  Santell  doubled   and   singled   twice,   and   Maia   Ed-­ munds  drove  in  two  runs.  LRU  fell   to  6-­10,  while  OV  moved  to  12-­5.     SLATERS  VS.  TIGERS Fair  Haven  pulled  away  late  to  top   the  Tigers,   13-­5.  The   Slaters   scored   VL[ UXQV LQ WKH ¿IWK DIWHU WKH 7LJHUV had   rallied   to   tie   the   game   at   5-­5.   Anna   Fabian   earned   the   pitching   win,   while   Timi   Carone   (four   hits)   and   Marissa   Lamoureux   (three  

hits)  led   the   attack   as   the   Slaters   improved   to   11-­6.   Justina   Jackson   started  for  MUHS  and  took  the  loss,   while  Haley  Davis  pitched  in  relief.   Krisandra   Provencher   had   three   KLWV DV 08+6 ¿QLVKHG DW  LQ-­ cluding  many  close  losses.       OTTER  BASEBALL   The   OV   baseball   team   advanced   by  edging  visiting  No.  10  Enosburg,   4-­2.   Winning   pitcher   John   Win-­ slow   tripled   home   Will   Claessens   WR VQDS D  WLH LQ WKH ¿IWK LQQLQJ and  then  scored  an  insurance  run  on  a   single  by  his  brother  Mike  Winslow.   Shane   Quenneville   added   a   pair   of   hits   to   boost   OV.   John   Winslow   tossed  a  complete  game,  striking  out   11,   as   OV   improved   to   10-­7.   Enos-­ burg  dropped  to  6-­10.     TIGER  BASEBALL

In  Rutland   in   D-­I,   No.   6   Rutland   edged  the  No.  11  Tigers,  1-­0,  on  an   unearned   run   in   the   sixth   inning:   Andy   Cassarino   tripled   and   scored   on  a  throwing  error.  That  was  all  the   Raiders  could  muster  off  MUHS  se-­ nior  hurler  Aaron  Smith,  who  struck   out   eight   while   allowing   three   hits   and  two  walks  in  six  innings.   The   game   was   suspended   in   the   second  inning  on  Tuesday,  and  Rut-­ land   hurlers   Cassarino   and   Andy   Kenosh  combined  to  hold  the  Tigers   to  one  hit,  a  Sam  Messenger  single.   7KDWFDPHLQWKH¿IWKZKHQWKH7L-­ gers  put  runners  on  second  and  third   with  none  out.  But  a  double  play  on   a  failed  squeeze  bunt  helped  Rutland   RXWRIWKHMDP7KH7LJHUV¿QLVKHGDW  ZKLOH WKH 5DLGHUV LPSURYHG WR 11-­5.  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  23

Tiger  boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  lacrosse  only  area  team  still  alive By  ANDY  KIRKALDY ADDISON   COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Middlebury   Union   High   School   boys   were   the   only   local   lacrosse   team   left   standing   at   the   end   of   last  week,  as  the  MUHS  girls  and   Mount   Abraham   and   Vergennes   boys   all   dropped   mid-­week   con-­ tests.  The   Otter  Valley   boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   pro-­ gram   chose   not   to   participate   in   the  Division  II  postseason  after  its   one-­win  season.   TIGER  BOYS On   Saturday,   the   No.   5   Tiger   boys   defeated   host   No.   4   Brattle-­ boro,   20-­8,   to   improve   to   13-­4   and  earn  a  Tuesday  semifinal  date   at   tops-­seeded   Champlain   Val-­ ley.   The   Tigers   will   take   on   the   15-­1  Redhawks  at  4:30  p.m.  CVU   twice  defeated  MUHS  this  spring,   12-­8  and  12-­11.  The  final  will  be   played   at   Castleton   State   College   next   weekend   at   a   time   to   be   an-­ nounced. Vs.   Brattleboro   (12-­5   against   a   softer   schedule   than   MUHS   faced),   the   Tigers   took   a   quick   5-­0   lead   and   never   looked   back.   They  led  by  6-­3  after  one  quarter   and  by  10-­5  at  the  half.  Sam  Usil-­ ton   led   the   attack   with   six   goals,   Bobby   Ritter   scored   four,   Con-­ nor  Quinn  scored  three  goals  and   set   up   two,   and   Keenan   Bartlett   found   the   net   three   times   to   lead   the  attack.   Jackson   Hounchell,   Nathan   Herrmann   and   Cullen   Hatha-­ way   chipped   in   a   goal   apiece,   and   Andrew   Gleason   added   two   assists.   Goalie   Nathan   Lalonde  

backstopped  the   win   with   eight   saves.   On   Thursday,   the   Tigers   fin-­ ished  off  No.  12  Spaulding,  15-­5.   MUHS   had   taken   a   6-­1   lead   on   Tuesday  before  the  game  was  sus-­ pended   late   in   the   first   half.   Her-­ rmann  sparked  MUHS  in  the  early   going  on  Tuesday  with  three  first-­ period   goals;Íž   he   finished   with   four  scores,  as  did  Usilton.  Quinn   scored  twice  and  set  up  five  goals,   Ali  Abdul  Sater  scored  twice,  and   Bartlett,   Ritter   and   Chris   Ewell   added  a  goal  apiece.  The  Tide  fin-­ ished  at  1-­13. TIGER  GIRLS In   D-­I   girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   lacrosse   on   Wednesday,  visiting  No.  12  Essex   bolted  to  a  5-­0  lead  in  the  first  12   minutes,   and   No.   5   MUHS   never   really   recovered.   The   6-­10   Hor-­ nets  led  by  at  least  three  goals  the   rest  of  the  way,  led  by  seven  goals   from   Anna   Olsen   and   four   from   Charlotte   Stuart.   Essex   goalie   Haley  Drury  stopped  10  shots.   Emily   Robinson   led   MUHS,   which   reached   the   final   in   each   of   the   past   three   years,   with   five   goals  and  an  assist,  and  also  con-­ tributing   were   Katie   Holmes   (two   goals,   assist),   Emma   Do-­ nahue   and   Sophia   Abdul   Sater   (a   goal   and   an   assist   each),   and   Emily  Kiernan  and  Alexis  Ouel-­ lette  (a  goal  apiece).  Tiger  goalie   Baily  Ryan  stopped  eight  shots  as   MUHS  finished  at  10-­5. EAGLE  BOYS In   D-­II   boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   lacrosse   in   Bris-­ MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  senior  Keenan  Bartlett  rushes  past  a  Brattleboro  defender  Saturday.   (See  Lacrosse,  Page  24) The  Tigers  won  the  game,  13-­4. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Vergennes  softball  advances  to  semis Mount Abe, By  ANDY  KIRKALDY VERGENNES   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   rematch   is  on  for  Wednesday  at  4:30  p.m. Because   the   No.   2   Vergennes   Union   High   School   softball   team   got  past  No.  7  Fair  Haven  in  a  Sat-­ urday   quarterfinal,   5-­2,   the   16-­2   Commodores  will  host  undefeated   defending   Division   II   champion   BFA-­Fairfax,   the   No.   3   seed   this   year,  in  a  Wednesday  semifinal.   In   2013,   the   Bullets   earned   their  second  straight  crown  at  the   Commodoresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   expense,   4-­1,   and   the   Commodores   probably   have   known   all   along   they   would   see   BFA   and   ace   pitcher   Kayla   Ma-­ thieu  again.     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   be   tough,â&#x20AC;?   said   junior   second   baseman   K.C   Ambrose,   whose   fifth-­inning   squeeze   bunt   scored   Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   go-­ahead  run.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  to  stick   together,   and   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   to   come   out   right   off   in   the   first   inning,   I   think.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   to   be   on   our   toes.â&#x20AC;? Coach   Mike   Sullivan   hinted   he   might   call   for   more   smallball   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   bunting,  stealing,  taking  the  extra   base  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  this  time  against  the  Bul-­ lets.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  know  what  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  up  against.   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   they   hit   as   well   as   their  teams  in  the  past,  but  we  still   have  to  score  runs,â&#x20AC;?  Sullivan  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  pull  out  all  the  

stops  for  that  game.â&#x20AC;? The   reason   the   Commodores   needed   Ambroseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   squeeze   bunt   was   their   difficulty   solving   the   soft  serves  and  curveball  of  Slater   pitcher   Anna   Fabian,   who   espe-­ cially  kept  the  power  hitters  in  the   heart  of  the  VUHS  order  off  stride   and   worked   out   steady   trouble   until  VUHS   broke   through   in   the   fifth. The   11-­7   Slaters   served   no-­ tice   they   came   to   play   by   scor-­ ing   twice   in   the   first   inning.   Fa-­ bian  and  Kayla  Stoodley  both  laid   down  perfect  bunts  against  VUHS   senior   starter   Dani   Brown,   and   cleanup  hitter  Marissa  Lamoureux   followed   by   lofting   a   double   to   right  center  to  score  both  runners.   After   that   inning,   Brown   and   VUHS   kept   the   Slaters   in   check,   allowing   only   three   baserunners   and  one  hit  (a  second-­inning  bunt   by  catcher  Timi  Carone)  between   the   second   and   sixth   innings.   Er-­ rors   allowed   the   others   to   reach,   but   Brown   (12   strikeouts,   one   walk,   five   hits)   limited   the   dam-­ age. The   Commodores   got   two   runs   back  in  the  second  inning.  Senior   Phoebe   Plank   singled   to   lead   off   and   moved   to   second   on   a   Sarah   Poirier-­Thayer   single.   Carone   picked  the  runner  off  first,  but  Fe-­ licia   Armell   singled   Plank   home  

and  reached   second   on   the   play.   Armell   then   scored   on   an   infield   error.   VUHS   had   runners   reach   third   base  each  of  the  next  two  innings,   but   could   not   bring   them   home.   Finally,  thanks  to  some  Slater  de-­ fensive   lapses   and   good   VUHS   execution,   the   Commodores   took   charge  in  the  fifth. Brown   led   with   a   fly   ball   to   right  field  that  was  misplayed,  al-­ lowing  her  to  reach  second.  Cour-­ tesy  runner  Jayme  Fulcher  moved   to   third   on   Tamara   Aunchmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   groundout,   and   then   scored   on   Ambroseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   well-­placed   sacrifice   bunt.  Ambrose  reached  third  base   when  Fabian  threw  wildly  to  first.   Fabian   then   hit   Plank   with   a   pitch,  and  she  stole  second,  bring-­ ing   Poirier-­Thayer   to   the   plate.   Poirier-­Thayer   drilled   the   ball   hard,  but  right  at  the  second  base-­ men,   who   misplayed   it   as   two   more   runs   scored.   Suddenly,   it   was  5-­2,  and  fans  started  to  think   about  BFA. Brown   said   he   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   usually   like  to  bunt,  but  knew  VUHS  had   already  stranded  seven  runners. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   nine   pretty   good   hit-­ ters.   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   like   to   take   the   bat   out  of  their  hands,â&#x20AC;?  Sullivan  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  when  you  get  into  a  situation   like   this,   where   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   maybe   going   to   be   a   one-­run,   two-­run   differ-­

ence,  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  to  use  what  you   can.â&#x20AC;? There   was   one   more   anxious   moment,   when   Abby   Ferrara   led   off   the   Slater   seventh   with   a   sin-­ gle   and   Brown   issued   a   one-­out   walk   to   bring   up   the   top   of   the   order.   But   Brown   finished   with   a   flourish   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;consecutive   strikeouts   to  end  the  game.   Sullivan   said   the   grit   that   has   helped   the   Commodores   win   16   games   in   the   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   toughest   league   this   spring   served   them   well  on  Saturday  and  should  do  so   again  on  Wednesday.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Like  I  told  these  girls,  I  summed   up  this  game  in  one  word,  and  that   was   resolve.   Our   team   has   great   resolve.   They   got   us   down   two   runs  in  the  first  inning,  and  a  team   can   just   all   of   a   sudden   lie   down   or   whatever,â&#x20AC;?   Sullivan   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   my   team   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   do   that.   Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   continue  to  fight  hard,  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   fight  hard  until  the  end.â&#x20AC;? Ambrose   said   she   believes   the   Commodores   will   be   ready   to   play.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  pretty  confident,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   little   jitters,   but  other  than  that  I  think  we  will   come   together   and   hopefully   pull   through.â&#x20AC;? Andy   Kirkaldy   may   be   reached   at   andyk@addisonindependent. com.

Middlebury golfers excel at state open

ADDISON  COUNTY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Two  lo-­ cal  high  school  golfers  competing  as   independents   at   state   championship   meets   last   week   recorded   top-­10   VFRUHVDQGTXDOLÂżHGIRUIXUWKHUFRP-­ petition.   On   Wednesday,   Mount   Abraham   VRSKRPRUH &DUVRQ 6DQFKH] ÂżUHG D 75   at   the   Country   Club   of  Vermont   in   Waterbury   at   the   boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Vermont   championships,  a  score  good  enough   to  place  him  in  the  top  10  overall. Within   Division   II,   Sanchezâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   score   trailed   only   that   of   medalist   Caleb  Connerty  of  Rice,  who  shot  a   par  72.   By   virtue   of   his   performance   on   :HGQHVGD\ 6DQFKH] TXDOLÂżHG WR compete   for   Vermont   against   New   Hampshire   in   the   upcoming   Twin   State  golf  competition. On   Tuesday,   Middlebury   junior   Isabel  Velez  shot  96  at  the  Williston   Country  Club,  good  for  second  place   in  D-­II  behind  Riceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Madison  My-­ ers,   who   shot   an   84,   and   for   sixth   place  overall.   9HOH] TXDOLÂżHG WR FRPSHWH LQ WKH upcoming   New   England   champion-­ ship  tournament.


PAGE  24  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

Lacrosse (Continued  from  Page  23) tol   on   Wednesday,   visiting   No.   9   6WUDWWRQ EHVWHG WKH 1R  (DJOHV  7KH JDPH KDG VWDUWHG RQ Tuesday,  but  was  suspended  after   eight   minutes   with   Stratton   lead-­ LQJ  6WUDWWRQ OHG DW WKH KDOI DQGVORZO\SXOOHGDZD\DIWHU WKH EUHDN )LQQ 0F1DPDUD OHG 6WUDWWRQ  ZLWKVL[JRDOVDQG goalie   Sean   Pomerantz   stopped   three  shots.   For  the  Eagles,  who  finished  at   Charlie  MeyerOHGWKHDWWDFN with   three   goals   and   an   assist,   Gus  Catlin  and  Travis  Bachand   each   scored   twice,   Tyler   Wil-­ ley   and   Lucas   Richter   added   a   goal   apiece,   and   goalie   Tucker   Paradee  made  eight  saves.   Coach   Paul   Lowe   said   given   WKDWWKH(DJOHVKDGRQO\SOD\-­

ers,  he  was  happy  with  their  sea-­ son  and  their  effort  on  Wednesday.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   team   played   hard   through-­ out   the   game   and   left   nothing   on   the  field.  It  was  a  close  game  until   the   end   and   I   am   proud   of   their   performance,â&#x20AC;?   Lowe   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   a   young   team   and   relatively   small,   but   we   never   give   up   on   ourselves.â&#x20AC;? VUHS  BOYS Another   young   and   inexperi-­ HQFHG ',, OD[ VTXDG WKH 1R  VUHS   boys,   fell   at   No.   4   Rice,   RQ:HGQHVGD\5LFHPRYHG onto   the   quarterfinal   round   with   DQUHFRUGErik  Eisenhower   scored   both   of   his   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   goals   as   the   Commodores   wrapped   up   WKHLUVHDVRQZLWKDUHFRUG 0,''/(%85< 81,21 +,*+ 6FKRRO VHQLRU &KULVWRSKHU (ZHOO ÂżJKWV Andy   Kirkaldy   may   be   reached   past  a  Brattleboro  defender  Saturday. at   andyk@addisonindependent. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Otters  nipped  by  Mill  River EAST  CLARENDON  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Host  No.   2  Mill  River  snapped  a  tie  with  two   outs  in  the  bottom  of  the  seventh  and   ousted  the  No.  7  Otter  Valley  Union   High  School  baseball  team  from  the   Division  II  playoffs,  3-­2,  in  a  Friday   TXDUWHUÂżQDO The   defending   champion   Otters   ÂżQLVKHG DW  ZKLOH 0LOO 5LYHU DGYDQFHGWRWKHVHPLÂżQDOURXQGZLWK DPDUN Minuteman   Dan   Blanchardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   sin-­ gle  off  losing  pitcher  Will  Claessens   plated   the   winning   run   from   third   base. &ODHVVHQVZHQWWKHGLVWDQFHVWULN-­ LQJ RXW WKUHH DQG ZRUNLQJ RXW RI

trouble  with  his  off-­speed  pitches. 29 WRRN D  OHDG LQ WKH VHF-­ ond  inning  off  MRU  starter  Lincoln   3ULWFKDUG RQ WZR ZDONV DQ LQ¿HOG KLWDQG(PPHWW7KXUVWRQœV¿HOGHUœV choice  grounder. Prtichard  doubled  home  two  runs   in  the  third  to  give  MRU  the  lead. OV  tied  the  game  on  a  Dean  Dou-­ glass  RBI  single  in  the  sixth  off  re-­ liever  Ben  Upton,  who  ended  up  as   the   winning   pitcher.  A   mix-­up   on   a   suicide  squeeze  cost  OV  a  shot  at  the   go-­ahead  run  in  that  inning. OV  had  three  other  hits,  by  Shane   Quenneville,   Connor   Gallipo   and   Claessens.    

Softball (Continued  from  Page  22) VHDVRQ E\ QRW OHWWLQJ PLVWDNHV RU TXHVWLRQDEOH EDOODQGVWULNH FDOOV distract  her.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  just  mentally,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  going   to  get  this  batter,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  going  to  win   this  game,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Candon  said.     The   Eagles   got   the   leadoff   bas-­ HUXQQHU RQ LQ HDFK RI WKH ÂżQDO two  innings,  on  a  single  by  senior   second   baseman   Sam   Reiss   in   the   VL[WKWKHLUWKLUGDQGÂżQDOKLWDQG DZDONWR%RLVHLQWKHVHYHQWKWKH only   one   Aines   issued.   But   each   time   the   Otters   made   the   plays   in  

MCTV  SCHEDULE  Channels  15  &  16 MCTV Channel 15 Tuesday, June 10   4  a.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   6:30  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   8  a.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   9:30  a.m.   Eckankar   10  a.m.   Selectboard   1  p.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   5:30  p.m.   Eckankar:  A  Talk  by  Sri  Kemp   6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   7  p.m.   Selectboard  (LIVE)  Wednesday, June 11   6  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   7:30  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   9:30  a.m.   Development  Review  Board     (DRB)/Public  Affairs   10  a.m.   Selectboard   1  p.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   4:03  p.m.   The  Way  Home  (GNAT)   4:35  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios     6  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   7  p.m.   DRB Thursday, June 12   4  a.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   7:30  a.m.   DRB   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone  10:30  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   Noon   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Eckankar:  A  Talk  by  Sri  Kemp   5  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   8  p.m.   Selectboard  Friday, June 13   4  a.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9:05  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   10  a.m.   Selectboard   1  p.m.   DRB   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board

 6  p.m.   The  Way  Home   7  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II Saturday, June 14   5  a.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9:01  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard  12:30  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   6:30  p.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs  10:30  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II Sunday, June 15   5:30  a.m.   The  Way  Home  (GNAT)   6:30  a.m.   Words  of  Peace   7:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   8  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9  a.m.   Catholic  Mass   11  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service  12:30  p.m.   Public  Meetings/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service     5:30  p.m.   Eckankar   6:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   Catholic  Mass   7:31  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   8:05  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II Monday, June 16   4  a.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   8  a.m.   Eckankar   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   DRB/Public  Affairs   10  p.m.   Eckankar:  A  Talk  by  Sri  Kemp  10:30  p.m.   The  Way  Home METV Channel 16 Tuesday, June 10   5:30  a.m.   Yoga   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0     7  a.m.   Vermont  Board  of  Education  11:15  a.m.   ID-­4  Board

Score BOARD HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Lacrosse D-­I Girls 6/4  #12  Essex  vs.  #5  MUHS  ...........15-­11 D-­I Boys 6/4  #5  MUHS  vs.  #12  Spaulding  .......15-­5 6/7  #5  MUHS  vs.  #4  Brattleboro    ......20-­8 D-­II Boys 6/4  #9  Stratton  vs.  #8  Mt.  Abe  ...........13-­9 6/4  #4  Rice  vs.  #13  VUHS  ................14-­2 Softball D-­II Girls 6/4  #5  OV  vs.  #12  Lake  Region  ........14-­0 6/4  #7  Fair  Haven  vs.  #10  MUHS  .....13-­5 6/4  #2  VUHS  vs.  #15  Lamoille  ..........18-­0 6/4  #4  Mt.  Abe  vs.  #13  Rice  ..............15-­0 6/6  #5  OV  vs.  #4  Mt.  Abe  ....................6-­0 6/7  #2  VUHS  vs.  #7  Fair  Haven  ..........5-­2 Baseball D-­I 6/4  #6  Rutland  vs.  #11  MUHS  .............1-­0 D-­II 6/4  #7  OV  vs.  #10  Enosburg  ...............4-­2 6/6  #2  Mill  River  vs.  #7  OV  ..................3-­2

Schedule

WKH ÂżHOG WR HDUQ WKHLU GDWH ZLWK Lyndon.  Meanwhile,  Trayah  said  the  Ea-­ HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS JOHV FDQ ORRN WR QH[W \HDU ZKHQ Lacrosse despite   graduation   losses   he   be-­ D-­I Boys lieves   the   Eagles   will   be   com-­ 6/10  #5  MUHS  at  #1  CVU   .........4:30  p.m. petitive   with   the   younger   players   Final  .................... TBA  at  Castleton  State returning   and   additions   from   a   Softball standout  JV  team.   D-­II Girls â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   miss   these   se-­ 6/10  #5  OV  at  #1  Lyndon   ..........4:30  p.m. QLRUVEXWZHÂśUHORRNLQJDOOULJKWLQ 6/11  #3  Fairfax  at  #2  VUHS  ......4:30  p.m. the  future,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Final  ...............................TBA  at  Poultney Andy   Kirkaldy   may   be   reached   Spectators   are   advised   to   consult   school   at   andyk@addisonindependent. websites  for  the  latest  schedule  updates.   com.

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please  see  the  MCTV  website,  www.middleburycommunitytv.org,  for  changes  in  the  schedule;  MCTV  events,   classes  and  news;  and  to  view  many  programs  online.  Submit  listings  to  the  above  address,  or  call  388-­3062.

 Noon   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   4  p.m.   François  Clemmons  Sings     Songs  of  Freedom   5:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   6  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   11  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Wednesday, June 11   5:30  a.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   6:30  a.m.   Yoga   8:30  a.m.   François  Clemmons  Sings     Songs  of  Freedom   Noon   Middlebury  Five-­0  12:30  p.m.   Michael  Nerney:  Addison  County       Prevention  Lecture   2:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   4:30  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   6  p.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   7  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   9  p.m.   Gardening  in  Vermont Thursday, June 12   4:30  a.m.   Yoga   4:55  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6:30  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education   1:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   4:30  p.m.   Yoga   4:50  p.m.   François  Clemmons  Sings     Songs  of  Freedom   7:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   8  p.m.   UD-­3  Board  10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0 Friday, June 13   5:30  a.m.   Yoga   8  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   10  a.m.   UD-­3  Board     Noon   François  Clemmons  Sings     Songs  of  Freedom   3  p.m.   Michael  Nerney:  Addison  County       Prevention  Lecture   5  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   5:35  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action

 6  p.m.   From  the  College   7  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   8:30  p.m.   François  Clemmons  Sings     Songs  of  Freedom  11:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Saturday, June 14   5  a.m.   Yoga     5:30  a.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6  a.m.   Michael  Nerney:  Addison  County      Prevention  Lecture   10  a.m.   Middlebury  Union  High  School     Graduation  (LIVE)  12:30  p.m.   From  the  VMX:  Dear  Pina   1:30  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   3  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation   6  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6:30  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation   Sunday, June 15   6:35  a.m.   Yoga   7  a.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   9:25  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   10  a.m.   Gardening  in  Vermont  11:30  a.m.   Middlebury  Union  High  School  Graduation   2:30  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   4  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   4:30  p.m.   From  the  VMX   5:40  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  p.m.   Local  Performance  10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   11  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation  Monday, June 16   4:30  a.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   5:35  a.m.   Yoga   6  a.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education  12:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   1  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   3  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation   5:30  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   10  p.m.   Gardening  in  Vermont


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  25

June  senior  luncheons  announced Rotary   rallies   readers ROTARY  CLUB   OF  Middlebury   President  Nancy   Foster,  left,   presents  Jane   Reilly  of  Mary   Johnson  Child   Care  Services   with  picture  books   for  distribution   to  home  daycare   centers  through-­ out  the  county.   Rotary  promotes   the  value  and  plea-­ sure  of  reading  by   thanking  each  of   its  guest  speak-­ ers  with  a  donated   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  book   and  by  supporting   the  Dolly  Parton  Imagination  Library,  a  program  to  give  each  child   in  Addison  County  a  free  book  each  month  until  5  years  of  age,   through  Addison  County  Readers  Inc.

Public  meeting  on  tap  to  help  small EXVLQHVVOHDUQDERXWÂżQDQFLQJ MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  Addison   County   Economic   Development   Corp.  (ACEDC)  will  host  a  public   PHHWLQJ DERXW YDULRXV ÂżQDQFLQJ options   available   to   small   busi-­ ness   owners   on   Wednesday,   June   11,  from  8:30  to  10:30  a.m.  in  the   Ilsley  Library  community  meeting   room  in  Middlebury. Topics   will   include   crowdfund-­ ing,  angel  investing,  microlending,   WUDGLWLRQDOÂżQDQFLQJDQGPRUH Lenders   and   representatives   from   the   ACEDC,   Community   Capital  of  Vermont,  National  Bank   of   Middlebury,   Opportunities   Credit  Union,  U.S.  Small  Business   Administration,   U.S.   Department  

of  Agriculture,   Vermont   Com-­ munity   Loan   Fund   and   Vermont   Economic   Development  Authority   will   address   how   their   organiza-­ tions  assist  small  businesses  obtain   capital. Nancy  Sunderland,  who  recently   launched  Poe  Wovens,  will  explain   the   different   approaches   she   took   WR ¿QDQFH KHU QHZ FRPSDQ\ 3RH Wovens,   located   in   Middlebury,   manufactures  baby  slings. The   free   event   is   open   to   the   public,   but   registration   is   request-­ ed.  To  register,  visit  www.addison-­ countyedc.org/register/535. For  more  information,  call  Robin   Scheu,  ACEDC,  at  802-­388-­7953.

ADDISON  COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   CVAA   welcomes   everyone   ages   60   and   older  to  attend  senior  meals  through-­ out  the  month  of  June.  Attendees  are   asked   to   bring   their   own   place   set-­ tings.  Unless  otherwise  noted,  there   is   a   $4   donation.   Reservations   are   required  and  can  be  made  at  1-­800-­ 642-­5119,   ext.   615,   unless   an   alter-­ nate   number   is   listed   below.   Free   transportation   is   available   through   ACTR;Íž  call  (802)  388-­1946. Â&#x2021; Bridport   Seniors   Luncheon.   Sponsored   by   CVAA.   Every   Mon-­ day  and  most  Wednesdays  at  noon  at   the  Bridport  Grange.  Open  to  every-­ one  age  60  and  up  and  their  spouse   of  any  age.   Â&#x2021; Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center,   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   June   10,   ar-­ rive   11:30   a.m.   for   a   noon   lunch.   A   wonderful   meal   of   French   onion   soup  with  crackers,  a  chef  salad  with   turkey,   ham,   eggs,   and   ranch   dress-­ ing,   and   pear   slices   will   be   served.   Call  CVAA  at  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.   634,  to  reserve.   Â&#x2021; Bridport   Seniorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   annual   Silent   Auction/Teacup   Auction.   Wednesday   June   11,   4   p.m.   at   the   Bridport  Grange.  The  event  features   SODQWVDQGĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVIURP*ROGHQ5XV-­ sett   Farm.  A   CVAA-­sponsored   din-­ ner   of   baked   salmon,   potato   salad,   peas  and  lemon  Bundt  cake  catered   by   Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   will   be   served   at   5   p.m.   Suggested   donation   just   $5.Auction   closes  just  after  dinner  and  all  win-­ ners   will   be   drawn   immediately   af-­ ter.  All  people  age  60  and  over  and   their  spouse  of  any  age  are  welcome.   Advanced  reservations  required. Â&#x2021; Masonic   Lodge,   Bristol.   Fri-­ day,   June   13,   11:30   a.m.   The   soup,   salad   and   sandwich   featured   at   this   meal   are   sure   to   be   a   lunchtime   fa-­ vorite.   Call   Marion   to   reserve   at   (802)  453-­3451. Â&#x2021; Cubbers   luncheon,   Bristol.   Monday,  June  16,  arrive  10:45  a.m.  

Cubbers  hosts  a  special  meal  on  the   third   Monday   of   each   month.   Sug-­ gested  donation  for  these  wonderful   meals  is  $5.   Â&#x2021; Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center,   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   June   17,   ar-­ rive   at   10   a.m.   Home   Health   will   hold   a   Footcare   Clinic   at   10   a.m.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Rhythmic   Pawsâ&#x20AC;?   with   Peg   Cobb  and  company  will  be  perform-­ ing   at   11:15   a.m.  A   lunch   featuring   roast   pork   loin   with   apple   maple   glaze,   oven   roasted   yams,   red   po-­ tatoes   and   onions,   green   beans   al-­ mandine,  mesclun  mix  with  spinach   salad  and  poppy  seed  dressing,  din-­ ner  roll,  and  cheesecake  with  straw-­ berries  will  be  served  at  noon.  Call   CVAA  at  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  634,   to  reserve. Â&#x2021; American   Legion,   Bristol.   Wednesday,   June   18,   arrive   11   a.m   for   a   noon   lunch.   A   hearty   meal   of   pot   roast   with   vegetable   gravy,   mashed   potatoes,   Brussels   sprouts,   dinner  roll,  and  a  sugar  cookie  will   be   served.   To   reserve   call   1-­800-­ 642-­5119,  ext.  610. Â&#x2021; St.   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Parish   Hall,   Ver-­ gennes.   Thursday,   June   19.   Ver-­ gennes  Area  Seniors  present  singer/ songwriter   Patti   Casey   at   11   a.m.   Following   the   performance   will   be   a   CVAA-­sponsored   luncheon   at  

noon  featuring   turkey   and   cheese   spinach   wrap   with   cranberry   mayo,   potato   leek   soup,   and   salad   with   ranch   dressing,   plus   chocolate   torte   for  dessert.  Open  to  everyone  age  60   and  over  and  their  spouse  of  any  age.   Suggested  donation  $5.   Â&#x2021; Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center,   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   June   24,   ar-­ rive   11:30   a.m.   for   a   noon   lunch.   Enjoy   a   delicious   meal   of   roast   pork  cutlet  with  white  sauce,  beets,   mashed   potatoes,   sourdough   Italian   bread,   and   carrot   cake   with   cream   cheese   icing.   Call   CVAA   at   1-­800-­ 642-­5119,  ext.  634,  to  reserve.   Â&#x2021; %ULGSRUW 6HQLRUV HQWHUWDLQPHQW and   meal.   Wednesday,   June   25,   4   p.m.   at   the   Bridport   Grange.   The   Addison   County   Home   Health   and   Hospice  Wellspring  Singers  perform   at  4  p.m.  A  CVAA-­sponsored  dinner,   catered  by  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  follows  at  5  p.m.,   featuring   baked   ham,   scalloped   po-­ tatoes,  fruit  salad,  and  cookies.  Sug-­ gested  donation  $5  per  person.  Open   to   everyone   age   60   and   over   and   their  spouse  of  any  age.   Â&#x2021; Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Restaurant,   Middle-­ bury.   Friday,   June   27,   arrive   at   QRRQ5RDVWWXUNH\VWXIÂżQJPDVKHG potatoes,   peas   and   tapioca   pudding   will   be   served.   Suggested   donation   $5.

The Addison County Firefighterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Association Training Committee would like to thank the following businesses and organizations for helping make our Annual Regional Fire School a Great Success!

t(SBZCBSo TBX[BMMCMBEFT t)BSUJHBOTo 1PSUBMFU

t)FòFSOBOT(SBWFM1JU t"+PIOTPO$PNQBOZ

t#FUDIB5SBOTJU

t/BUJPOBM#BOLPG .JEEMFCVSZo .POLUPO5SBJOJOH)PVTF

t.JEEMFCVSZ5SBOTJU

t#SJTUPM8BUFSTIFE$FOUFS

t#SJTUPM"NFSJDBO-FHJPO 4POTPGUIF"NFSJDB -FHJPO BOE-BEJFT "VYJMJBSZ

t&BSUIXBTUFo CVTTFTBOEDBS

t.U"CSBIBN6OJPO .JEEMF)JHI4DIPPM t#SJTUPM3FD$MVC

t&SJD.VSSBZo &).5PXJOH t/PQT.FUBMXPSLTo XPPECVOLT CMPDLJOH

Contact Your U.S. Senators Sen. Patrick Leahy 1-­800-­642-­3193

5XVVHOO6HQDWH2I¿FH%OGJ Washington,  D.C.  20510 senator_leahy@leahy.senate.gov

Sen. Bernie Sanders 1-­800-­339-­9834

SRC-­2  United  States  Senate Washington,  D.C.  20510 www.sanders.senate.gov


PAGE  26  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

READ. LEARN. GIVE.

Best of Luck in the future to all Addison County Students!

We reward each Student of the Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s achievement!

[]

www.vermontbookshop.com 38 MAIN ST Middlebury

802-388-2061

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

Students of the Week from area high schools 2013-2014 School Year

What are they doing after graduation?

Middlebury Union High School .HHQDQ%DUWOHWW 2OLYLD&DFFLDWRUH $QQD&DOLDQGUR .DWH'D3ROLWR 6DPXHO)HUJXVRQ 1DWKDQ+HUUPDQQ +DQQDK+REEV 6RQLD+RZOHWW *DEULHOOH,QJHQWKURQ .DWKHULQH.QRZOHV -RQDK/HINRH 0D[/LYLQJVWRQH3HWHUV 0D[RQ0RXOWRQ (PLO\5RELQVRQ 0DWWKHZ6FKLOGNDPS 1LNRODV6KDVKRN 6DPXHO6PLWK 6DPXHO8VLOWRQ

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

Vergennes Union High School 7KRPDV/HH+RGVGHQ,,, 7D\ORU3DTXHWWH 5\DQ0RULJOLRQL 5XE\'RPEHN 5RZDQ.DPPDQ  3KRHEH3ODQN 0DWWHR3DOPHU 0DU\)ORRG .D\OD6DZ\HU -RUGDQ6WHDUQV -R7DWORFN -DUHG%LUFKPRUH (PLOHH7UXGR 'DQLHOOH%URZQ $QQD:LOOHQEDNHU $OL[.DXIIPDQ $DURQ5RZHOO /HYL:DWHUPDQ 

Congratulations on a great kick start for your future!

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to support all area students and want to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanksâ&#x20AC;? to those who volunteer with us!

Prepare for black beltâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; prepare for life. TaeKwon Do classes, Self defense classes, Birthday parties & After school programs.

To volunteer call 388-­7044 or visit www.unitedwayaddisoncounty.org

377-0476 tkdkicks101@yahoo.com

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ÂśV&ROOHJHDFFRXQWLQJ 6W0LFKDHOV&ROOHJHSUHODZ &HGDUYLOOH8QLYHUVLW\PXVLFHGXFDWLRQ %HQWOH\8QLYHUVLW\DFFRXQWLQJ 8QLYHUVLW\RI1RUWKZHVWHUQ2KLR DJULFXOWXUDOGLHVHOPHFKDQLFV

Barash  Mediation  Services 3KRHEH%DUDVK )DPLO\'LYRUFH0HGLDWLRQÂ&#x2021;)DFLOLWDWLRQ &RQĂ&#x20AC;LFW0DQDJHPHQW7UDLQLQJV

ations

l Congratu

Name  & STUDENTS! Name

32%R[%0DLQ6WÂ&#x2021;%ULVWRO97 Â&#x2021;SKRHEH#EDUDVKPHGLDWLRQFRP ZZZEDUDVKPHGLDWLRQFRP

VERGENNES

REDEMPTION CENTER Congratulations Students! &RPSOHWH'HOLÂ&#x2021;6QDFNVÂ&#x2021;%HYHUDJHV

877-­6768 0DLQ6WUHHW9HUJHQQHV

FERRISBURGH

BAKE SHOP & DELI Warmest Congratulations,

Students!

Congratulations Congratulations Taylor & Casey Students! Two locations to help serve you better...

Plumbing  &  Heating  

125 Monkton Rd. Bristol, VT 453-2325

Fuel  /Oil  Delivery

185 Exchange St., Middlebury, VT 388-4975

859 Route 7 South Middlebury 802-388-9500

68 West Street Bristol 802-453-3617

Telecommunications Sales and Service Data Cabling & Fiber Optic Solutions

802-388-8999 Middlebury

Great Job Students! 5 6 R287( OUTE  7  S287+ OUTHÂ&#x2021; 5RXWH6RXWKÂ&#x2021; 0)Â&#x2021;6 $7 AT  0)Â&#x2021;66

Congratulations, Name & Name! Students 877-3118 Main St., Vergennes, VT


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  27

18th-­century court  martial  to be  re-­enacted

Puppets  for  prevention FERRISBURGH  CENTRAL  SCHOOL  students,  with  Mike  Capra,  left,  and  Tom  Denecker  of  Denecker  Chevrolet,  pose  with  10  puppets  used   in  prevention  workshops  led  by  Vermont-­based  Puppets  in  Education  at  the  school  May  14.  Denecker  Chevrolet  provided  the  funding  for   the  full-­day  event  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  which  focused  on  alcohol,  tobacco  and  other  drug  prevention  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  as  well  as  donated  the  puppets  to  the  school  for  role-­ playing  problem solving scenarios in the future.  

Strawberry  festival  set  in  Monkton MONKTON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   28th   annual   Strawberry  Festival,  Book  Sale  and   6LOHQW$XFWLRQWREHQHÂżWWKH5XVVHOO Memorial  Library  will  be  held  at  the   Monkton  Central  School  on  Sunday,   June  22,  from  noon  to  3  p.m. As   ever,   the   strawberries   will   be   local   and   fresh-­picked,   the   cake   homemade,   the   ice   cream   mouth-­

watering  and  the  hot  dogs  plump  and   ready.  Rows  and  rows  of  used  books   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  hardcover,  softcover,  adult,  chil-­ GUHQÂśVÂżFWLRQDQGQRQÂżFWLRQ²ZLOO be   available   for   browsing   and   buy-­ ing  at  bargain  prices.  There  will  also   be   a   silent   auction   of   local   goods   and   services.   Stephanie   Lepine   and   Nicholas   Williams   will   play   lively  

4XHEHFRLV¿GGOHDQGIRONPXVLF Donations  of   books   (no   encyclo-­ pedias,   condensed   books,   maga-­ zines,  videos  in  any  format  or  CDs)   will   be   accepted   at   the   library   dur-­ ing   regular   hours.   For   more   info,   call   453-­4471.   More   information   is   at   Russell   Memorial   Library,   rus-­ sellmemoriallibrary@comcast.net.

%HQHÂżWJROIWRXUQH\WREHKHOGDW%DVLQ+DUERU-XQH at  802-­635-­7807,   e-­mail:   ggent-­ 9(5*(11(6 ² *ROÂżQJ DQG available.   For   more   information   about   the   ley@tcvermont.org,   or   visit   www. giving   come   together   at   the   sixth   annual   Teen   Challenge   Golf   Clas-­ golf   classic,   or   Teen   Challenge   tcgolfclassic.com. sic   on   Friday,   June   20,   at   Basin   programs,   contact   Gilles   Gentley   Harbor  Club  in  Vergennes,  to  raise   funds   for   substance   abuse   and   ad-­ diction  treatment  programs  in  Ver-­ mont.   Registration   is   at   7   a.m.   on   Friday,   June   20,   and   tee-­off   is   at   9   a.m.   Mulligans   are   available   at   sign-­in. This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   contest   offers   the   chance   for   individual   and   corpo-­ rate   sponsors   to   team   up   and   tee   off   for   a   noble   cause   at   a   premier   18-­hole  championship  course  over   6,500  yards  designed  by  renowned   architect  Geoffrey  Cornish. The   event   offers   a   variety   of   sponsorship   opportunities   and   packages.  Teen  Challenge  is  a  reg-­ LVWHUHG F QRQSURÂżWFKDULWDEOH organization,   and   all   sponsorships   are  considered  in-­kind,  tax-­deduct-­ ible   donations.   If   you   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   play,   sponsorship   or   donations   are   still   welcome;Íž   make   checks   payable   to   Teen   Challenge   Vermont,   1296   Collins   Hill   Road,   Johnson,   VT   05656. Registration   fees   of   $125   per   person/$450   per   foursome   include   green  fees,  cart,  and  an  awards  lun-­ cheon  following  play. Patronage   promotions   are   also  

ORWELL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Vermont   Judi-­ cial  History  Society  will  hold  a  sec-­ ond   â&#x20AC;&#x153;properâ&#x20AC;?   court   martial   of   Maj.   Gen.  Arthur  St.  Clair,  last  American   commander  of  Mount  Independence,   at   the   Mount   Independence   State   Historic  Site  on  Saturday,  June  14,  at   2  p.m.  The  event  is  part  of  Vermont   Days   Weekend   and   is   the   annual   J.   Robert  Maguire  program,  sponsored   by   the   Mount   Independence   Coali-­ tion,   the   friends   group   for   the   his-­ toric  site. )LJKW RU Ă&#x20AC;LJKW ZKLFK ZDV ULJKW" A  jury  to  be  empanelled  will  weigh   arguments   presented   by   the   judge   advocate  and  St.  Clair  himself.  Ron   Morgan,   attorney   and   Mount   Inde-­ pendence   Coalition   board   member,   will   provide   commentary.   The   Ver-­ mont  Judicial  History  Society  is  cel-­ ebrating   its   20th   year.   The   event   is   free  and  open  to  the  public. The   Mount   Independence   State   Historic  Site  is  open  daily  9:30  a.m.   to  5:30  p.m.  through  Oct.  13.  Regu-­ lar   admission   is   $5   for   adults   and   free  for  children  under  15. For   information   about   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   state-­owned   historic   sites,   visit     www.historicsites.vermont.gov.  

Join the Mary Hogan School Community Thursday, June 12, at 12:00 noon to say farewell to former principal Bonnie Bourne who leaves Mary Hogan at the end of the school year after 27 years at Mary Hogan. We will â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ring the Bellâ&#x20AC;? for Bonnie 12 times at 12:00 noon to express our appreciation for her years of service. Bring your own bag lunch if you like. (Mary Hogan kids will be enjoying their annual school-wide picnic.) Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll provide a small treat for dessert! Call 388-4421 with questions.

Over 31 years of personalized, comfortable care in a high-tech dental office!

1FUFS+)PQQFS %%4t"EBN&'BTPMJ %.% #SJBO%$PMMJOT %%4 t.PTU*OTVSBODF8FMDPNFt&NFSHFODJFT8FMDPNF t/FX1BUJFOUT8FMDPNF 133&YDIBOHF4USFFU 4VJUFt.JEEMFCVSZ (802) 388-3553

www.middleburydentalvt.com


PAGE  28  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

University  of  Vt.  names  2014  county  graduates BURLINGTON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   following   local  students  graduated  from  the  Uni-­ versity  from  Vermont  on  May  18. Marissa  Andersen   of   North   Ferris-­ burgh,  B.A.,  English,  College  of  Arts   &   Sciences;Íž   Courtney   Andersen   of   North   Ferrisburgh,   B.S.,   Education,   Secondary   Education   English,   Col-­ lege  of  Education  &  Social  Services;Íž   Amy  Bourgeois  of  New  Haven,  M.E.,   interdisciplinary,   Graduate   College;Íž   Grace   Buckles   of   Middlebury,   B.A.,   Religion,  College  of  Arts  &  Sciences;Íž   Tia   Burke-­Sumner   of   Bridport,   B.S.,   Community   Entrepreneurship,   Col-­ lege   of   Agriculture   &   Life   Science;Íž   Yairalis   Candelaria-­Rodriquez   of  

Middlebury,  M.E.,  Special  Education,   Graduate  College;͞  and  Eliza  Carver  of   Ripton,   B.A.,   Studio  Art,   College   of   Arts  &  Sciences. Also,   Matthew   Clayton   of   Bristol,   B.S.,   Medical   Laboratory   Sciences,   College   of   Nursing   &   Health   Sci-­ ences;͞  Katherine  Coale  of  Weybridge,   M.S.,   Nutrition   and   Food   Sciences,   Graduate   College;͞   Jonathan   Connor   of   Addison,   B.S.,   Public   Communi-­ cation,  College  of  Agriculture  &  Life   Science;͞   Erik   Davis   of   Bristol,   B.S.,   Nutrition  and  Food  Sciences,  College   of  Agriculture  &  Life  Science;͞  Jacob   Dearborn   of   Bristol,   B.A.   and   B.S.,   Psychology,   College   of   Arts   &   Sci-­

ences;͞  Madeline   Delaney   of   North   Ferrisburgh,   B.A.,   English,   College   of  Arts  &  Sciences;͞  Hilary  Delisle  of   Vergennes,   B.S.,   Mathematics,   Col-­ lege  of  Engineering  &  Math  Sciences;͞   and  Dana  Desautels  of  Salisbury,  B.S.,   Computer   Science,   College   of   Engi-­ neering  &  Math  Sciences. Also,  Morgan  Devoid  of  Vergennes,   B.S.,  Dietetics  Nutrition  &  Food  Sci-­ ences,  College  of  Agriculture  &  Life   Science;͞  Bela  Dobkowski  of  Lincoln,   B.S.,  Business  Administration,  School   of   Business  Administration;͞   Rebecca   Domingue  of  Ferrisburgh,  B.S.,  Civil   Engineering,   College   of   Engineering   &   Math   Sciences;͞   Hannah   Faesy   of  

Starksboro,  B.S.,   Human   Develop-­ ment   &   Family   Studies,   College   of   Education   &   Social   Services;͞   Gerald   Fitz-­Gerald   of   North   Ferrisburgh,   B.S.,   Sustainable   Landscape   Horti-­ culture,  College  of  Agriculture  &  Life   Science;͞   Jillian   Fitz-­Gerald   of   North   Ferrisburgh,  D.P.T.,  Physical  Therapy,   Graduate  College;͞  Timothy  Glassberg   of  Waltham,   B.S.,   Civil   Engineering,   Civil   Engineering,   College   of   Engi-­ neering  &  Math  Sciences;͞  and  Bridget   Gosselin   of   Bridport,   B.S.,   Human   Development  &  Family  Studies,  Col-­ lege  of  Education  &  Social  Services. Also,   Scott   Hamshaw   of   Bristol,   M.S.,   Civil   &   Environmental   Engi-­ neering,   Graduate   College;͞   Morgan   Harrison   of   Middlebury,   B.S.,   Busi-­ ness  Administration,   School   of   Busi-­ ness   Administration;͞   Eman   Hayyat   of  Middlebury,  B.A.,  Global  Studies,  

College  of  Arts  &  Sciences;Íž  Sara  Hig-­ gins  of  Ripton,  M.D.,  College  of  Med-­ icine;Íž  Brady  Hoffman  of  Middlebury,   Master  of  Public  Administration,  Pub-­ lic  Administration,  Graduate  College;Íž   Krysta  Hoxsie  of  Cornwall,  B.S.,  Al-­ ternate  Track   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Vermont   R.N.,   Col-­ lege   of   Nursing   &   Health   Sciences;Íž   Ruby   Kane   of   Starksboro,   B.A.,   Ge-­ ography,  College  of  Arts  &  Sciences;Íž   DQG'HYRQ.DUSDNRI5LSWRQ&HUWLÂż-­ cate  of  Graduate  Study,  Public  Health,   Graduate  College. Also,   Laura   Keir   of   Middlebury,   M.S.,   Natural   Resources,   Graduate   College;Íž   Devon   Lane   of   Vergennes,   B.A.,  English,  College  of  Arts  &  Sci-­ ences;Íž  Nicholas  McDougal  of  Lincoln,   B.S.,   Forestry,   Rubenstein   School   of   Environment   &   Natural   Resources;Íž   Katherine  McElroy  of  Sudbury,  M.S.,   (See  UVM,  Page  29)

Three VUHS students receiving top honors THOMAS  LEE  HODSDEN  III VALEDICTORIAN

RUBY Â DOMBEK SALUTATORIAN

ROWAN  KAMMAN THIRD  HONORS

VERGENNES  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The  Vergennes   Union   High   School   counseling   and   guidance  department  announced  the   valedictorian,  salutatorian,  and  third   honors  students  for  the  class  of  2014   at   the   Memorial   Day   assembly   on   May  23. The  student  who  has  earned  third   honors   for   the   class   of   2014,   and   who  will  deliver  the  challenge  to  the   class  of  2015  at  graduation,  is  Row-­ an  Kamman,  son  of  Carla  Mayo  and   Neil  Kamman  of  Vergennes.  Rowan   plans   to   study   Environmental   Sci-­ ences  as  a  student  in  the  Honors  Col-­ lege   at   the   University   of   Vermont   after  taking  a  gap  year.  Rowanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  gap-­ year  plan  is  to  hike  the  Appalachian   Trail.   The   salutatorian,   the   student   who   ranks   second   in   the   graduat-­ ing   class   and   who   will   deliver   the   welcome   address   at   graduation,   is   Ruby  Dombek,  daughter  of  Kristina   MacKulin   and   Andrew   Dombek   of   Ferrisburgh.   Ruby   plans   to   at-­ tend  Dickinson  College  and  pursue   international   studies   and   biology.   Ruby  will  also  continue  to  play  soc-­ cer,   violin   and   viola   at   Dickinson   College.   The  student  who  ranks  highest  in   the  class  of  2014,  the  valedictorian,   and  who  will  deliver  the  farewell  ad-­ dress   at   graduation,   is   Thomas   Lee   Hodsden   III,   son   of   Lee   and   Suzie   Hodsden   of   Addison.   Tommy   Lee   will   be   attending   Dartmouth   Col-­ lege  to  study  engineering  next  year.   At  Dartmouth  Tommy  Lee  will  stay   involved   in   sports   and   he   plans   to   continue  drumming  in  a  jazz  or  pep   band  (or  maybe  both,  knowing  Tom-­ my  Lee).   The   school   counseling   and   guid-­ ance  department  at  Vergennes  Union   High  School  wishes  to  congratulate   these  students  for  their  accomplish-­ ments.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  29

Battle  of  the   blades JACK  BRISSON  OF   Shoreham  battles  Paul   Horak  of  Norwich  in  the   VHPL¿QDOURXQGRIWKH 17th  Annual  Ticond-­ eroga  Challenge  Out-­ door  Epee  tournament   recently.  Brisson  won   the  bout  and  went  on  to   ¿QLVKVHFRQGRYHUDOOLQ the  Senior  Mixed  Epee   GLYLVLRQ2WKHU$GGLVRQ County  residents  placed   in  the  Youth  Mixed  Epee   GLYLVLRQ5\DQ%DJOH\RI Weybridge  won  and  Al-­ exander  Yaggy  of  Bristol   was  fourth.

S ummertime... and the

reading is easy

UVM  (Continued  from  Page  28) Counseling,   Graduate   College;͞   April   Mentzer   of   Ferrisburgh,   B.S.,   Social   Work,  College  of  Education  &  Social   Services;͞  Jennifer  Moltz  of  Rochester,   Doctor  of  Physical  Therapy,  Graduate   College;͞   Jennifer   Morse   of   Middle-­ bury,   B.S.,   Business   Administration,   School   of   Business   Administration;͞   Philip   Nevins   of   Vergennes,   B.S.,   Public   Communication,   College   of   Agriculture   &   Life   Science;͞   Sonja   Patno  of  Vergennes,  Master  of  Social   Work,  Social  Work,  Graduate  College;͞   and  Tanja  Pixley  of  Middlebury,  B.A.,   History,  College  of  Arts  &  Sciences. Also,  Adam  Pouliot  of  Bristol,  B.S.,   Business   Administration,   School   of   Business   Administration;͞   Margaret   Quinn  of  North  Ferrisburgh,  B.A.,  Po-­

litical  Science,  College  of  Arts  &  Sci-­ ences;͞   Joshua   Quinn   of   Middlebury,   M.B.A.,   Business   Administration,   Graduate   College;͞   Hugh   Randall   of   Rochester,  B.A.,  Psychology,  College   of  Arts   &   Sciences;͞   Hannah   Rickner   of   Bristol,   B.A.,   Biology,   College   of   Arts  &  Sciences;͞  Emily  Rule  of  New   Haven,   B.S.,   Animal   Sciences,   Col-­ lege   of   Agriculture   &   Life   Science;͞   .ULVWLQ6PLWKRI%UDQGRQ&HUWL¿FDWH of   Graduate   Study,   Ecological   Eco-­ nomics,  Community  Development  &   Applied   Economics,   Graduate   Col-­ lege;͞   Sylvia   Sword   of   Bristol,   B.A.,   Theater,  College  of  Arts  &  Sciences;͞   Brent   Thomas   of   East   Middlebury,   B.S.,   Music   Education,   College   of   Education  &  Social  Services;͞  Lauren   Todisco   of   Bristol,   B.S.,   Education,  

Elementary  Education   K-­6,   College   of   Education   &   Social   Services;͞   and   Kathleen   VanWyck   of   Ferrisburgh,   B.S.,  Dietetics  Nutrition  &  Food  Sci-­ ences,  College  of  Agriculture  &  Life   Science. Also,  David  Viscido  of  Vergennes,   B.S.,   Biological   Science,   College   of   Arts   &   Sciences;͞  Viscaya  Wagner   of   North   Ferrisburgh,   B.A.,   Studio   Art,   College   of   Arts   &   Sciences;͞   Logan   Williams   of   Vergennes,   B.S.,   Me-­ chanical  Engineering,  College  of  En-­ gineering   &   Math   Sciences;͞   Taylor   Wood   of   Cornwall,   B.A.   and   B.S.,   Business   Administration,   College   of   Arts   &   Sciences;͞   and   Robert  Worley   II  of  Vergennes,  B.S.,  Civil  Engineer-­ ing,   College   of   Engineering   &   Math   Sciences.  

Bridport,  VT  Homeowner   Recommends  Bristol  Electronics

sit b ack and

with Ad the

REL

AX

diso n In dep end entâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; add s is

Sum m er Guid e

on c oun ty ar ea

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  had  been  wanting  to  do  a  solar  installation  and  had  started  to  gather   some  equipment.    Once  I  realized  that  micro  inverters  are  the  way  to   go,  I  found  out  that  the  panels  I  had  would  not  work  with  them.    I  had  to   start  looking  around  again.    Then  I  realized  that  Bristol  Electronics,  the   company  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  known  all  these  years  and  trust  with  my  electronic  needs,   was  also  in  the  solar  business.    They  came  down  and  checked  out  the   QHZJDUDJHWKDW,KDGEXLOWVSHFLÂżFDOO\WRSODFHVRODUSDQHOVRQDQG gave  me  a  price  that  was  comparable  to  installing  it  myself.    In  no  time   at  all,  I  was  producing  electricity  and  have  not  paid  a  power  bill  for  the   last  six  months.                                                                                                       Chris  Goodrich  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Bridport,  VT                    

com ing

802 . 453 . 2500 BristolElectronicsVT.com FREE  SITE  EVALUATIONS

Jun e 26


PAGE  30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

MUHS  names  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;14  valedictorians,  salutarorian MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Middlebury   Union  High  School  announces  that   its   2014   co-­valedictorians   will   be   Sonia   Howlett   and   Maxon   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maxâ&#x20AC;?   Moulton,   and   its   salutatorian,   Nikolas  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nikâ&#x20AC;?  Shashok. Sonia  Howlett  is  the  daughter  of   Brian  and  Sigrid  Howlett  of  Corn-­ wall.  She  has  achieved  high  honors   at  MUHS,  earning  the  Presidential   Award  for  Academic  Excellence  in   grades  10  and  11,  and  is  a  member   of  the  National  Honor  Society.  So-­ nia  was  the  recipient  of  the  Welles-­

June 21st Bristol

ley  College   Book   recipient  of  the  spe-­ Award   and   the   Soci-­ cial   French   Book   ety   of   Women   Engi-­ Award.   She   scored   neers   Highest   Honor   in  the  top  10  percent   in  grade  11.  She  was   on   the   UVM   Math   awarded   the   UVM   Contest  in  2012  and   Green   and   Gold   2013   and   the   high-­ Scholarship  last  sum-­ est   score   at   MUHS   mer  and  was  recently   on   the   American   named   a   National   Mathematics   Com-­ Merit   Scholarship   petitions. receipient.   She   was   Sonia  has  compet-­ selected  to  attend  the   ed  on  the  tennis  and   Governorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Institute   basketball   teams.   for   Engineering.   So-­ She   is   a   member   of   nia   also   received   the   the   Concert   Choir   Advanced  Placement   and  Model  U.N.  and   Scholar   with   Dis-­ is   a   Peer   Leader.   tinction   Award   for   She   was   the   recipi-­ SONIA  HOWLETT achievement   in   AP   ent   of   the   St.   Mi-­ VALEDICTORIAN courses   in   French,   chaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Book  Award   English,   biology,   calculus   I   and   for   community   service   in   grade   II,   and   U.S.   history.   She   received   11.   She   is   the   Prudential   Spirit   of   American   Legion   Department   Community   Award   Distinguished   Awards  for  science  and  social  stud-­ Finalist   for   Vermont,   as   well   as   a   ies   in   grade   10   and   for   English,   recipient   of   the   Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Volun-­ math,  science  and  social  studies  in   teer  Service  Award. grade   11.   In   2012,   Sonia   was   the   Sonia   will   continue   her   educa-­ tion  at  Princeton  University. Max   Moulton   is   the   son   of   Ser-­ ena   Guiles   and   Jim   Moulton   of   Middlebury.  He  has  achieved  High   Honors   all   four   years   and   earned   the   Presidential   Award   for   Aca-­ demic   Excellence   in   grades   nine,   10   and   11.   Max   received   the   Wil-­ liams  College  Book  Award  and  the   Spanish   Book   Award   in   grade   11.   He  was  the  recipient  of  the  Ameri-­ can  Legion  Department  Awards  for   (QJOLVK DQG ÂżQH DUWV LQ JUDGH  ZRUOG ODQJXDJHV LQ JUDGH  DQG physical   education   in   grade   11.   Max   is   a   member   of   the   National   Honor   Society   and   is   a   National   Merit  Scholarship  Finalist.  He  was   selected   to   attend   HOBY   in   grade   10   and   Green   Mountain   Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   State   in   grade   11.   Max   scored   in  

SALON & Spa  SPA at  Indulge

the  top  10  percent  on    DQG    Nik   re-­ the  UVM  Math  Con-­ ceived  the  American   test  in  grades  10  and   Legion   Department   11. Award   for   world   He  was  the  captain   languages   in   grade   of   the   cross-­country   nine   and   Honorable   team   and   the   re-­ Mention  for  math  in   gional   champion   in   JUDGHDQG(QJOLVK grades  11  and  12.  He   in  grade  11.  Nik  has   is   the   captain   of   the   played   trumpet   for   track   team,   earning   the   MUHS   Concert   the   800   meters   Ver-­ Band   all   four   years   mont   State   Champi-­ and   the   Jazz   Band   onship   in   grade   10   since   grade   10.   He   and   the   4x800   relay   was   the   recipient   team   Vermont   State   of   the   Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Championship   in   Award   for   the   Con-­ grades  10  and  11.  He   cert   Band   in   grade   has  competed  in  soc-­ 11.   Nik   was   se-­ MAX  MOULTON FHU DQG TXDOLÂżHG IRU lected  for  the  Green   VALEDICTORIAN the   J2   with   the   Nor-­ Mountain   District   dic  ski  team  in  grade   Music  Festival  Con-­ 10.   He   was   selected   to   attend   the   cert  Band  in  grades  10,  11  and  12   Vermont   State   Athletic   Directorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   and   for   the   Green   Mountain   Dis-­ Association   Leadership   Confer-­ trict   Jazz   Band   in   grades   11   and   ence  in  grade  11. 12.  He  was  selected  to  play  in  the   Max   plays   saxophone   for   the   All-­State   Concert   Band   in   grade   Concert   Band   and   the   Jazz   Band.   11   and   the  All-­State   Jazz   Band   in   He   was   selected   to   play   in   the   grade  12.  He  was  also  selected  for   Green   Mountain   District   Concert   the  National  Honors  Band  and  per-­ Band   in   grades   10,   formed   last   October   DQGWKH*UHHQ in  Nashville,  Tenn. Mountain   District   Nik   has   been   a   Jazz   Band   in   grade   member   of   the   De-­ DQGWKH$OO6WDWH sign  and  Build  Engi-­ Band   in   grades   11   neering  Club,  and  his   and   12.   Max   is   cur-­ team   placed   second   rently   the   Student   for  â&#x20AC;&#x153;fastest  deliveryâ&#x20AC;?   Senate   president.   at  the  UVM  competi-­ He  is  one  of  the  four   tion  for  a  giant  cross-­ Peer   Leader   Coor-­ bow.   Nik   played   the   dinators.   He   com-­ role   of   the   guard   peted   in   the   Schol-­ in   the   senior   play,   arsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Bowl  and  was  a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Wizard  of  Oz.â&#x20AC;?   member  of  the  Prom   He   has   volunteered   Committee.   Maxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   for   several   commu-­ volunteer   efforts   in-­ nity   service   projects   clude   coaching   the   ranging  from  manag-­ Special   Olympics   ing   the   East   Middle-­ track  team. bury   sign   board   to   NIK  SHASHOK Max   will   attend   coaching.   SALUTATORIAN Harvard  University.   Nik   will   attend   Nik   Shashok   is   the   son   of  Alan   Tufts  University.   and  Susan  Shashok  of  East  Middle-­ Middlebury  Union  High  Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   bury.  He  has  achieved  High  Honors   2014   commencement   will   be   held   for   most   of   his   high   school   years   at   the   Memorial   Sports   Center   in   and  earned  the  Presidential  Award   Middlebury   on   Saturday,   June   14,   for  Academic  Excellence  in  grades   at  10  a.m.

To place an ad for your

Salon or Spa,

Body,  Mind  &  Soul

please call Sarah at

388-4944

or email: sarahf@ addisonindependent.com

Â&#x153;ÂŞĹ&#x192;Â&#x17D;ÂĄÂ&#x201C;Â&#x161;Â&#x2018;á&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Facials Â&#x201C;Â&#x152;ÂĄÂ&#x153;ÂŻÂ&#x153;Â&#x161;Â&#x17D;¤¢Â&#x17D;Â&#x160;¤Â&#x2122;Â&#x17D;Â&#x161;¤£

ALYCEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

HAIR STYLING

Â&#x2013;Â&#x201C;Â&#x161;Â&#x160;ÂĄÂ&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â&#x161;ÂŁÂŚÂ&#x2014;¤Â&#x160;¤Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â&#x161;ÂŁ

ORGANIC GREEN HOUSES

Waxing

9HJHWDEOHDQG)ORZHU3DFNVÂ&#x2021;)LHOG3URYHQ9DULHWLHV

&  SPRAY  TANNING

Now Open! Looking forward to seeing you!

388-­4217

0DH&OLII&RXUWÂ&#x2021;0LGGOHEXU\

Open Daily Contact  Leigh

11  Â&#x160;ÂŁÂ&#x2019;Â&#x201C;Â&#x161;Â&#x2018;ÂĽÂ&#x153;Â&#x161;¤¢Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;¤

Â&#x201C;Â?Â?Â&#x2014;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;ÂŚÂĄÂŽá&#x20AC;&#x2018;

802-­â&#x20AC;?282-­â&#x20AC;?1903 Â?Â&#x160; Â&#x161;Â?ÂŚÂ&#x2014;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;¨¤á &#x;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2014;á&#x20AC;&#x201D;Â&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;

9-5 Â

Herbs,  Hanging  Baskets,  Perennials,   Compost,  Organic  Potting  Mix,  Fertilizer,   Onion  Sets,  Organic  Seed  Potatoes,   and  Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Seeds

897-7031Â&#x2021;1329 Lapham Bay Rd, Shoreham

www.goldenrussetfarm.com


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  31

h e t f W o e s e t e k P Hi, our names are Ben...

...and Gus! We are 10-month-old yellow Labs. We live in Bristol with our Mom and Dad. We love to run up around the sugarhouse, swim in the pond and dig holes in the yard. Our favorite thing to do, however, is help Dad putting on his shoes in the morning â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if we are really much

If  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   like   to   include   your   pet   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pet   of   the   Weekâ&#x20AC;?   simply   include   your   petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   name,   gender,   approximate   age   (if   you   know   it),   along   with   comments  about  the  petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  favorite  activities,  your   favorite  activity  with  the  pet,  what  the  pet  enjoys   eating,  and  any  particular  stories  or  incidents  you  

help but we have fun! In this picture we went to get hay for Aunt Beth using Uncle Steveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s fourwheeler. It was a blast!

Ceres barge begins new season VERGENNES  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  A   crew   of   four   will   set   sail   down   the   Hudson   River   early  this  June  on  the  Ceres,  the  volun-­ teer-­built  sailing  barge  of  the  Vermont   Sail   Freight   Project,   whose   mission   is  to  bring  low-­carbon  regional  food   trade   back   to   the   Hudson.   VSFP   is   entering   its   second   season   of   opera-­ tion  and  plans  to  host  about  15  public   markets   on   its   journey   down   to   the   New   York/New   Jersey   harbor   and   back.   Ceres   will   transport   up   to   12   tons   of   seasonal   local   products   including   grains   and   beans,   plus   value-­added   foods  such  as  maple  syrup,  honey  and   pickles.   Participating   local   produc-­ ers   include   Champlain   Orchards,   Nitty   Gritty   Grain   Co.,   Vermont   Bean   Crafters,   and   Champlain   Valley   Apiaries.   Dockside   markets   are   scheduled   for   Kingston,   Beacon,   Croton,  Hudson  and  Whitehall.     This   year,   the   main   event   of   the   voyage   is   the   Great   Hudson   River   Revival   in   Croton-­on-­Hudson,   N.Y.,   the  weekend  of  June  21.  Ceres  will  be   a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Working  Waterfrontâ&#x20AC;?  attraction  at   this   environment   and   music   festival   hosted   by   Clearwater,   an   organiza-­ tion  founded  by  the  late  Pete  Seeger.   Last   fall   in   Beacon,   the   VSFP   crew   was   honored   to   give   Seeger   a   tour   of  Ceres.    The  legendary  folk  singer   campaigned  in  the  late  1970s  to  raise   awareness   about   the   health   of   the   Hudson   by   constructing   the   sloop   Clearwater,   a   teaching   vessel   that   is   still  extremely  active  in  its  mission. Ceresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  maiden  voyage  from  Orwell   to   Brooklyn   in   October   2013   culmi-­ nated   in   a   week-­long   stay   at   the   Brooklyn   Navy   Yards   and   a   busy   day   at   the   New   Amsterdam   Market   at  the  South  Street  Seaport.  The  New   York   Times,   the   New   Yorker,   Crainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   New   York   and   National   Geographic  

featured  the  boatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  arrival  in  the  city. Ferrisburgh   farmer   Erik   Andrus   conceived  of  the  Vermont  Sail  Freight   Project   several   years   ago   as   a   solu-­ tion  to  the  challenge  of  opening  new   markets  for  his  Vermont  rice  without   drastically   increasing   the   operationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   carbon   footprint.   Last   year,   Andrus   enlisted   the   Willowell   Foundation,   D QRQSURÂżW LQ 0RQNWRQ GHGLFDWHG WR connecting   people   to   the   arts,   envi-­ ronment   and   education,   to   act   as   WKH SURMHFWÂśV QRQSURÂżW VSRQVRU DQG educational  partner.     In  six  short  months  between  April   and  September,  Andrus  and  dozens  of   volunteers  built  Ceres  under  the  barn   roof  at  Boundbrook  Farm.  A  success-­ ful  Kickstarter  campaign  raised  over   $15,000   for   the   construction,   and   the   project   received   extra   funding   from   the   Eastman   and   Waterwheel   Foundations.   Experts   in   rigging,   sail-­making,   sailing   and   other   trades   stepped   up   to   make   the   project   a   success.   The   Greenhorns,   a   network   of   young   farmers,   helped   to   manage   LQYHQWRU\ DQG SXEOLFLW\ IRU WKH ÂżUVW voyage.   The   June   voyage   will   be   directed   by   Andrew   Willner,   former   New   York/New   Jersey   Baykeeper   and   a   longtime  marine  sustainability  advo-­ cate   who   has   been   a   skipper   of   the   schooner  Pioneer  and  other  commer-­ cial  craft.  Steve  Schwartz  will  return   for  a  second  year  as  captain  of  Ceres,   and   recent   Binghamton   University   JUDGXDWH0DWW+RUJDQZLOODFWDVÂżUVW mate.  Middlebury  College  is  sponsor-­ ing  Meade  Atkinson  to  serve  as  proj-­ ect   intern   through   the   MiddCORE   program;Íž  Meade  will  organize  cargo   logistics   and   social   media.   Vermont   AmeriCorps  members  and  staff  of  the   Willowell   Foundation   are   assisting   with  educational  and  youth  outreach.

Boarding & Daycare

Jodi James Bristol

might  like  to  share  concerning  your  pet. Send   the   photo   and   story   by   email   ZLWK \RXU ODUJHVW VL]H SKRWR ¿OH  WR   news@addisonindependent.com,  or  via  physical   mail   to   the  Addison   Independent,   Pet   Page,   58   Maple  St.,  Middlebury,  Vt.,  05753.

We keep your pet smiling! :]JJMZ.TWWZQVOÂ&#x152;6W+WVKZM\M ;]XMZ^Q[ML8TIa\QUMÂ&#x152;+TQUI\M+WV\ZWTTML =VTQUQ\ML1VLWWZ7]\LWWZ)KKM[[ 0RXQWDLQ5RDGÂ&#x2021;$GGLVRQ 5WÂ&#x2021;)HUULVEXUJK

802-­349-­3370

PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUND ANIMAL WELFARE CENTER Hi,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  Audi. If  you  adopt  me, hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  get:   Â&#x2021;)XQDQGSOD\IXO Â&#x2021;/RWVRIVQXJJOHSRWHQWLDO Â&#x2021;0D\EHVK\DQGKLGHDURXQG \RXQJFKLOGUHQ Â&#x2021;0D\KLGHDWÂżUVWEXWZLOO EORVVRPRQFHFRPIRUWDEOH Â&#x2021;6XSHUFXWH

3HHNDERR,œP%HDQV,œPD KDQGVRPHVZHHWEXWVK\NLWW\ ZKRLVDQ[LRXVO\DZDLWLQJP\VSH-­ FLDOIRUHYHUKRPH,œPORRNLQJIRUD TXLHWDQGFDOPKRPHZKHUH,FDQ QDSLQWKHVXQDQGHQMR\P\WLPH SHUFKHGDWDZLQGRZZDWFKLQJWKH DFWLYLWLHVRXWVLGH ,œPVLPSO\DVZHHWER\ZKRZRXOG JODGO\ZHOFRPH\RXKRPHHYHU\ GD\DQGZRXOGMXVWORYHWRVSHQG some  time  with  you.  

,ÂśP0DULQR,ÂśPDORYLQJDQGOR\DO ER\ZKRZLOOVLWIRUKRXUVRQ\RXU ODSDQGQX]]OH\RXUQRVH2K$QG ,ORYHWRVOHHSZLWK\RXDWQLJKW 0\LGHDOKRPHLVRQHZKHUH,DP WKHRQO\DQLPDODVRWKHUDQLPDOV WHQGWRFDXVHPHVWUHVV ,ÂśPVLPSO\DVZHHWER\ZKR ZRXOGJODGO\ZHOFRPH\RXKRPH HYHU\GD\DQGZRXOGMXVWORYHWR VSHQGVRPHVQXJJOHWLPHZLWK you. Â

%RDUGPDQ6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;&DOORUFKHFNRXUZHEVLWH:HPD\KDYHDSHWIRU\RXZZZKRPHZDUGERXQGDQLPDOVRUJ


PAGE  32  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

Desorda (Continued  from  Page  1) may   have   piqued   Desordaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   interest   State  College.  Determined  to  become   in  world  events  as  a  high  schooler,  he   a  teacher,  Desorda  landed  a  job  at  his   acknowledged  there  may  be  a  discon-­ alma  mater,  and  joined  the  faculty  at   nect  with  students  today. Mount  Abraham  in  the  fall  of  1975. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   lot   of   students   really   believe   Now   61,   Desorda   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   at   the   center   will   retire   at   the   con-­ of   the   universe,   and   clusion   of   the   current   â&#x20AC;&#x153;History helps our   society   seems   to   school  year,  his  39th  as   explain how we think   that,â&#x20AC;?   Desorda   a   teacher.   The   bespec-­ got to this point said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;When  they  start   tacled,   bow-­tied   dean   in time. You keep to  look  at  what  people   of  the  Mount  Abraham   have   done   in   the   past,   going back and faculty   sat   down   with   if   you   do   it   in   such   a   the  Independent  Thurs-­ realize, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t way   that   involves   a   day  to  talk  about  his  ca-­ we done this student  digging  around   reer,  his  profession  and   before? How for  information,  as  op-­ his  plans  for  the  future. come weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re doing posed   to   just   telling   Enlightened   by   his   this again?â&#x20AC;&#x2122; them,   they   latch   onto   own   experiences,   Des-­ it.â&#x20AC;? orda  said  he  wanted  to   Because people Desorda   said   he   teach   history   because   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t really pay engages   students   in   it   offers   invaluable   in-­ attention.â&#x20AC;? current   global   events   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rick Desorda that   may   directly   or   sight   to   both   our   past   and  future. indirectly   affect   them   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   history   helps   explain   how   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   this   year   he   led   class   discussions   we  got  to  this  point  in  time,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   RQ WKH FRPSOH[ XQIROGLQJ FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWV â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   keep   going   back   and   realize,   in   Syria   and   Ukraine.   He   said   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   we   done   this   before?   How   high  school  curriculum  when  he  was   come   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing   this   again?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Be-­ a  student  lacked  this  focus  on  current   cause   people   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   really   pay   atten-­ events. tion.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;What   was   weird   is   that   we   never   He   said   that   it   is   incumbent   upon   really   talked   about   the   Vietnam   War   history   teachers   to   demonstrate   how   in  high  school,  because  we  had  a  cur-­ national  and  global  events  affect  their   ULFXOXPZKHUH\RXÂśGVWDUWDWWKHÂżUVW lives.   While   the   possibility   of   being   FKDSWHURIWKHERRNDQGWU\WRĂ&#x20AC;\DOO VHQWWRÂżJKWDZDULQDIRUHLJQFRXQWU\ the  way  through  it,â&#x20AC;?  Desorda  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  

was  like  you  were  out  of  breath  when   you.   They   want   you   to   have   certain   his  wife,  Sandy. you  got  to  Vietnam,  which  played  out   skills.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   are   enough   things   around   every  night  on  your  television  screen,   Desorda   said   teachers   and   admin-­ the  house  that  need  to  be  done,â&#x20AC;?  Des-­ and  people  around  you  were  involved   istrators  can  no  longer  allow  students   orda  said. in  it.â&#x20AC;? to   merely   skate   through   high   school   +HÂśOODOVRFRQWLQXHWRRIÂżFLDWHVRF-­ When  he  teaches  about  the  Vietnam   ZLWKRXWGHPRQVWUDWLQJSURÂżFLHQF\LQ cer   and   baseball,   his   longtime   pas-­ War,  Desorda  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  rely  solely  on  a   skills  needed  to  succeed  afterwards. sions. textbook  or  regimented   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatever  I  do  I  want  it  to  be  done   curricula.   For   the   last   the   only   teacher   in   in   the   morning,   so   I   can   play   in   the   20  years,  he  has  invited   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He is probably Vermont   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   saying   afternoon,â&#x20AC;?   Desorda   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;That   has   local  Vietnam  veterans   the only deer we  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  just  have  kids   always  been  a  stress  reliever.â&#x20AC;? to   speak   to   students   hunter Jeff and walking   out   of   high   But  he  acknowledged  that  he  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   about   their   experi-­ I know that school,  just  getting  by,â&#x20AC;?   be  able  to  completely  step  away  just   ences  in  the  war,  which   takes his papers he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   society   yet. claimed   the   lives   of   around   them   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  just  walk  away  at  the  end   100   Vermonters,   ac-­ from his classes want   them   just   getting   of  the  year  and  say  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  done,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Des-­ cording  to  Department   into the woods by,   they   want   people   orda  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  kids  are  scrambling,   to grade while of  Defense  records. that   are   capable   and   and   parents   are   calling   an   emailing   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   really   waiting to slay have  skills.â&#x20AC;? you  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  I  think  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  gonna  miss  that  in   important   to   keep   in   the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;big buck.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? Desorda   said   his   some  perverse  way.â&#x20AC;? mind   that   today   we   years  at  the  chalkboard   His  colleagues  said  he  will  be  deep-­ â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Mary Stetson have   an   all-­volunteer   have  taught  him  to  nev-­ ly  missed  around  the  halls  of  Mount   army,  and  some  of  our   er   judge   kids   for   who   Abraham. kids   will   be   in   that   army,â&#x20AC;?   Desorda   they  are  when  they  are  18  years  old  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   the   thing   that   amazes   me   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lost   on   our   kids   is   the   many  times  he  said  he  was  pleased  to   the   most   about   Rick   is   his   ability   to   actions   of   the   United   States   govern-­ VHHDWURXEOHG\RXWKÂżQGVXFFHVVODWHU personalize   his   teaching,â&#x20AC;?   said   Co-­ ment   affect   their   future,   and   in   my   in  life. athletic  Director  Mary  Stetson. mind  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  incredibly  important.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  we  give  up  on  kids  some-­ Stetson,   and   her   husband   Jeff,   the   Desorda   said   the   linear   model   of   times   too   soon,â&#x20AC;?   Desorda   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   other   Co-­athletic   Director,   said   that   teaching  American  history  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  that  is,   good  days  outnumber  the  days  when   Desorda  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  ever  off  the  clock,  even   VWDUWLQJZLWKWKHÂżUVW(XURSHDQVHWWOHUV you  scratch  your  head.â&#x20AC;? while  hunting. and  slogging  chapter  by  chapter  to  the   Desorda  said  he  truly  enjoyed  com-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Personally,  he  is  probably  the  only   21st  century  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  is  not  the  best  way  to   ing  to  school  day  after  day,  year  after   deer  hunter  Jeff  and  I  know  that  takes   present  the  subject  to  students. year,  and  that  his  most   his   papers   from   his   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  immensely  important  to   trying  times  as  a  teach-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s classes  into  the  woods   teach   current   events,â&#x20AC;?   Desorda   said.   er   had   nothing   to   do   to  grade  while  waiting   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   beating   the   drum,   and   I   with   his   students.   He   immensely to  slay  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;big  buck,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  if  anyone  is  going  to  listen   cited   the   sudden   death   important to teach Mary  Stetson  said. to  it  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  to  do  more  of  the   of   longtime   colleague   current events. Principal   Andy   storytelling.   We   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   do   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;ready,   Greg   Clark   in   2012   as   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve been beating Kepes   also   praised   set,  goâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;;Íž  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  more  the  important  things   one  of  his  darkest  days   the drum, and Desorda. you   ought   to   have   when   you   leave   at   Mount   Abraham,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rick   wants   all   I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know if high  school.â&#x20AC;? and   praised   his   stu-­ his   students   to   be   When   important   events   occurred   dents   for   handling   his   anyone is going successful   and   will   to listen to it â&#x20AC;&#x201D; around   the   globe,   Desorda   said   he   death  with  grace. bend   over   backwards   took   time   from   the   scheduled   lesson   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  is  a  resiliency   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve got to to   help   them   in   his   to  discuss  them  with  students. that  kids  have  that  you   do more of the classes,â&#x20AC;?   said   Kepes,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   go   away   from   the   curricu-­ donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  realize,â&#x20AC;?  Desorda   storytelling.â&#x20AC;? who  also  served  with   lum,  because  that  is  the  curriculum,â&#x20AC;?   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   kids   were   Desorda   on   the   fac-­ â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Rick Desorda ulty.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;His  bowtie  and   Desorda   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   what   exceptional,  better  than   makes  history  fun  and  come  alive.â&#x20AC;? most  of  the  adults.â&#x20AC;? sense   of   humor   will   Desorda  said  that  his  role  as  a  teach-­ Looking   back,   Desorda   said   he   be  missed  by  all.â&#x20AC;? er  has  changed  greatly  since  he  started   would   have   chosen   the   exact   same   Desorda   said   he   may   also   work   at  Mount  Abraham  four  decades  ago,   career  path. in   some   part-­time   capacity,   and   largely   because   the   expectations   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  cannot  think  of  a  career  in  which   that   his   students   have   taken   to   giv-­ high  school  graduates  have  changed. I   could   have   had   more   satisfaction,   ing   him   unsolicited   career   advice.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids   used   to   be   able   to   graduate   because   working   with   teenagers   for   He  recalled  a  conversation  with  one   from   high   school   and   get   a   job   that   all  these  years  has  been  more  reward-­ particular  pupil,  who  said  he  would   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  to  do  with  anything  post-­ ing  than  I  ever  could  have  imagined,â&#x20AC;?   make   a   good   applicant   because   he   secondary,â&#x20AC;?   he   explained.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now   the   Desorda  said. enjoyed   his   job   and   rarely   missed   game   has   changed   so   much   that   if   RETIREMENT  PLANS work. youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   graduating   from   high   school   Come  next  week,  Desorda  said  he   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Could  I  use  you  for  a  reference?â&#x20AC;?   and   are   undecided   about   what   you   plans   to   slow   things   down,   but   only   Desorda  asked  the  student. want  to  do,  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  a  lot  of  jobs  out   just  a  little.  He  said  he  looks  forward   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yeah,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  give  you  one,â&#x20AC;?  the  stu-­ there   that   people   are   willing   to   give   to  spending  more  time  at  home  with   dent  replied.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  hire  ya.â&#x20AC;?

Silent auction, food, drink on tap at THT MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lights!   Camera!   Auction!â&#x20AC;?   is   no   ordinary   auction   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   party   as   well.   On   Sunday,  June  15,  at  6  p.m.,  the  Town   Hall  Theater  doors  open,  the  drinks   Ă&#x20AC;RZ DQG WKH VLOHQW DXFWLRQ EHJLQV Bidders   can   vie   for   their   favorite   items  while  enjoying  delicious  food   and  drink. The   event   includes   a   silent   auc-­ WLRQDOLYHDXFWLRQDUDIĂ&#x20AC;HDQGHQ-­ tertainment.  This  year  features  offer-­ ings  for  every  budget,  from  a  week   in  a  Paris  apartment  to  gift  cards  to  

a  favorite  spa.  Red  Sox  tickets,  art,   wine  tastings,  jewelry  and  a  private   plane  tour  are  just  a  sampling  of  the   various  items  up  for  bid,  which  have   been   graciously   donated   by   many   local   and   regional   businesses   and   individuals. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lights!   Camera!   Auction!â&#x20AC;?   is   a   EHQHÂżW IRU 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU DQG helps  fund  the  entertainment  and  ed-­ ucational  opportunities  that  THT  of-­ fers   throughout   the   year.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Revenue   from  ticket  sales  only  covers  a  frac-­ tion   of   the   cost   of   producing   all   of  

our  varied   programming,â&#x20AC;?   explains   Haley   Rice,   THT   operations   man-­ ager.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  auction  is  a  great  way  to   support  the  theater,  and  have  a  good   time  doing  it.â&#x20AC;? While  bidding  is  not  available  on-­ line,   folks   needing   a   plan   of   attack   may   preview   the   auction   catalog   at   www.townhalltheater.org/auction-­ catalog. Tickets,   $25,   may   be   purchased   at   www.townhalltheater.org,   802-­ 382-­9222DWWKHER[RIÂżFHRUDWWKH door.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  33

E G S A A R L E A G KITS Now Available at ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

Everything you need to promote your sale! For as low as $10 youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll receive: Â&#x2021;$FODVVLÃ&#x20AC;HGOLQHDGLQWKH$GG\,QG\ & online Â&#x2021;KHDY\GXW\DOOZHDWKHUVLJQV Â&#x2021;3UHSULFHGODEHOVÂ&#x2021;6DOHVUHFRUGIRUP Â&#x2021;7LSVIRUDVXFFHVVIXOVDOH

OR get the kit for FREE when you run \RXUFODVVLÃ&#x20AC;HGDGLQLVVXHVRUPRUHRI WKHSDSHUIRUDVORZDV

Let us help you make your Garage Sale a GREAT SUCCESS! Call Lisa at 388-4944 or stop in to the Addison Independentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s office at 58 Maple Street in the Marble Works to get all set up for your next yard sale!


PAGE  34  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

SERVICES DIRECTORY APPLIANCE REPAIR t!

Alexander Appliance Repair Inc. tr

us

v

Se r

yo e ic

n u ca

GAS OR ELECTRIC

Washers Refrigerators Dishwashers Disposals

Dryers Ranges Microwaves Air Conditioners

$FMMt0GmDF

Jack Alexander

#SJHHT)JMMr#SJTUPM 75

BOARDING Dog Obedience & Agility

MASONRY

DENTISTRY â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  try  our  best  to  give  superior   quality  and  comfort. Our  team  cares  about  your   dental  health.â&#x20AC;?

F��� D�� S���� M������ J���� M��������

Thomas  A.  Coleman,  D.D.S.

C�������� �� ��� D�� S���� W������ A���������� �� G���� B������

Ayrshire  Professional  Building 5  Carver  Street   Brandon,  VT  05733

802-233-4670

(802)  247-­3336

jmasefield@gmavt.net www.jamiemasefield.com

www.drtomcoleman.com

EQUIPMENT RENTALS

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

40  TYPES  OF  RENTAL  EQUIPMENT  TO  CHOOSE  FROM

Dave Ringer

Â&#x2021;PDWHULDOIRUNOLIWV Â&#x2021;H[FDYDWRUV Â&#x2021;EXOOGR]HUV Â&#x2021;PLQLH[FDYDWRUV Â&#x2021;VNLGVWHHUV

Â&#x2021;0DQOLIWVXSWRÂś Â&#x2021;PDQEDVNHWZFUDQH XSWR

Â&#x2021;FRQFUHWHFRPSDFWRUV Â&#x2021;EDFNKRHV

Property Maintenance Lawn Care & Landscaping Driveway Repair Roto-Tilling, Light Excavation Trucking â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Top Soil, Sand & Crushed Stone

Oliver,  Peg  Cobb  and  Ethan

Hand-in-Paw Training & Boarding Kennel

(802) 877-3879

5RXWH&RUQZDOOÂ&#x2021;

www.brownswelding.com 275 South 116, Bristol, Vermont 05443  Â&#x2021;&HOO  

CARPENTRY

FLOOR CARE

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Stripping - Waxing - Buffing Carpet Cleaning & Emergency Water Removal

LITTLE VALLEY

17 South Middlebrook Rd. Vergennes, VT 05491

Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s R&R

Furniture and Building Repair & Restoration Expertise in restoration of antique wood, stains, paints, and finishes. Careful and fine detail woodworking Attention to original design and function Protection & preservation of original hardware DRESSERS s TABLES s CHESTS s CHAIRS s WINDOWS s DOORS s ARMOIRES s ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS

#ALL FOR ESTIMATES AND FURTHER INFORMATION

802-545-2099 -ARK 3HIFF s 7EYBRIDGE 64 40+ years of experience in historic preservation

DENTISTRY

802-759-2706

LANDSCAPING

phone or fax or

GENERAL LAWN MAINTENANCE & EXCAVATING

cell phone

802-­475-­2943 802-­343-­4592

802-349-6050 email: cmulliss@gmavt.net 1900 Jersey St., S. Addison, VT 05491

LOCKSMITH

LOCK-­N-­GLASS CRAFTERS Â&#x2DC;#(''48+%'5 Â&#x2DC;'2#+45 Â&#x2DC;1/$+0#6+10*#0)'5 NOW AVAILABLE

No  job  too  small,  give  us  a  call!

*DU\61RUWRQÂ&#x2021;3DQWRQ97

RENEWABLE ENERGY Soak  Up  The  Sun! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  spend  your  hard-­earned  money   making  the  hot  water  or  electricity  that   you  use  todayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SOLAR  IS  MORE  AFFORDABLE  THAN  EVER! Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  here  for  you  for  41  years  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   Let  us  help  you  with  your  solar  projects  today.  

 70f4+))'4.1%-5 Key & combination operated

Dennis Cassidy 388-­7633 63 Maple Street, Middlebury in the Marble Works

www.middleburysafeandlock.com

Go  Green  with  us. Call  for  a  FREE  on-­site  evaluation


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  35

German  choirâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  North  American  tour  includes  Middlebury MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Stuttgart   Hymnus   Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Choir   will   perform   at   the   Champlain   Valley   Unitarian   Universalist   Society   in   Middlebury   on   Sunday,   June   15,   at   7   p.m.   The   program  includes  music  by  J.S.  Bach,   Felix   Mendelssohn   and   Benjamin   Britten.   Admission   is   free   but   dona-­ tions  are  welcome. The  concert  is  part  of  an  East  Coast   tour   June   7-­17.   Under   the   musical   direction   of   Rainer   Homburg   the   boys  will  perform  on  this  side  of  the   $WODQWLFIRUWKHÂżUVWWLPH

The  tour   program   consists   of   a   cappella   motets   for   choir,   as   well   as   works  for  choir  and  organ,  including   motets   by   Andreas   Hammerschmidt,   Heinrich   SchĂźtz,   Mendelssohn,   Bartholdy,  and  Britten.  Of  course  the   great   master   Johann   Sebastian   Bach   (motet   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Singet   dem   Herrn   ein   neues   Liedâ&#x20AC;&#x153;)  may  not  be  missed  in  a  classi-­ cal  concert  tourâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  program. After   touring   in   Philadelphia   and   New   York   City,   the   choir   will   discover   Vermont,   performing   in   Burlington  and  Middlebury.  Further,  

the  boys  and  young  men  get  a  chance   to   experience   the   Vermont   outdoors   and   to   spend   time   with   their   host   families.   Vermont   is   home   away   from   home   for   Manu   Fieber,   a   lifelong   member  of  the  choir  and,  since  2004,   a   frequent   visitor   to   the   state.   Fieber   was   a   foreign   exchange   student   that   year,   attending   the   Gailer   School   in   Shelburne  for  his  junior  year  of  high   school   and   living   with   Kate   Gridley,   John  Barstow,  and  their  sons,  Charles   and  Angus,  of  Middlebury.

He  has   stayed   in   touch   with   his   Vermont   family,   which   includes   among  many  others  John  Canning  of   South  Burlington,  with  whom  Fieber   collaborates   each   summer   to   work   for   the   Lake   Champlain   Chamber   Music  Festival.  While  Fieber  lived  in   Middlebury,  he  sang  solos  at  CVUUS.   As  the  oldest  and  largest  boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  choir   in   Stuttgart,   Germany,   the   Stuttgart   Hymnus   Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Choir,   with   its   200   members,   contributes   valuable   work   LQWKHÂżHOGRIPXVLFDO\RXWKHGXFDWLRQ and  promotion.  Since  its  inception  in  

1900,  boys  and  young  men  from  the   age  of  5  to  around  25  years  are  trained   musically.  In  recent  years,  the  Stuttgart   Hymnus  Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Choir  conducted  sold-­ out   concert   tours   through   France,   Spain,   Denmark   and   Switzerland,   as   well   as   in   Berlin,   Hannover   and   Leipzig. The   last   stop   of   the   trip   leads   the   choir  to  Boston,  where  they  will  give   a  concert  at  St.  Ignatius  Church  before   departing  for  Germany  on  June  17. For   more   information   visit   www. hymnus-­chor.de.

SERVICES DIRECTORY RENT - A - SPOUSE

STAMPS

Serving  Vermont  &  New  York  for  over  30  years!

The Pampered Home Rent-­a-­Spouse/Home  Economist

6WUHVVHGIRUWLPH"Â&#x2021;&KRUHVSLOHGXS"

Self   Inking  &  Hand  Stamps

Home economist WRWKHUHVFXH

I  will... Call Katie Grocery  Shop 802-388-1254 Run  Errands or Drive  to  appointments kbs10@comcast.net Light  Housekeeping Do  Laundry Let  me  make  your   Mend  &  Sew house  tidy  &  cheerful   Gift  Wrap for  you  to  come home  to! &  more!

TREE SERVICE

MADE TO ORDER                             Available  at  the                                Addison  Independent in  the  Marble  Works,  Middlebury

BROWNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TREE & CRANE SERVICE Dangerous Trees Cut & Removed Stumps Removed Trusses Set

FREE  ESTIMATES   FOR  TREE   SERVICES

Trees Trimmed Crane Service Grain Bins Set

Â

388-4944

%6LQ+RPH(FRQRPLFV(GXFDWLRQÂ&#x2021;5HIHUHQFHV$YDLODEOH

ROOFING

roofing Michael Doran

5HDVRQDEOH5DWHVÂ&#x2021;<HDUURXQG6HUYLFHÂ&#x2021;)XOO\,QVXUHG

 Â&#x2021;&HOO   +RXU(PHUJHQF\6HUYLFH

%URZQVZHOGLQJFRP

STORAGE

TREE SERVICE

STORAGE

WEDDING

As  seen  at  Addison  County  Field  Days!

Â&#x2021;6WDQGLQJVHDP Â&#x2021;$VSKDOWVKLQJOHV Â&#x2021;6ODWH )UHHHVWLPDWHVÂ&#x2021;)XOO\,QVXUHG

Phone (802) 537-3555

SEPTIC

Storage  Units  Available! Boat,  Car  &  R.V.  Storage TANK  &  CESSPOOL  PUMPING ELECTRONIC  TANK  LOCATING TANK  &  LEACH  FIELD  INSPECTIONS CAMERA  INSPECTIONS NEW  SYSTEMS  INSTALLED ALL  SEPTIC  SYSTEM  REPAIRS DRAIN  &  PIPE  CLEANING Full   Excavation Service Middlebury,  VT

Climate  Control   Coming  Soon!  

U-­Haul Box  Dealer

NEW  HAVEN SELF  STORAGE

Now  owned  by  Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Auto  &  Towing 2877  ETHAN  ALLEN  HWY.  (RT.7) 1(:+$9(197Â&#x2021;  

Stop in to the Addison Independent office in the Marble Works to view a wonderful selection of

Wedding Invitations for Your Special Day!

388-4944

    For  more  info  call      


PAGE  36  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Notice

Public  Meetings

DOG  TEAM   CATERING.   Seating   up   to   300,   plus   bar   available,   Middlebury   VFW.   Full   menus.   802-­388-­4831,   www.dogteamcatering.net.

ADULT  ALL-­RECOVERY   Group   Meeting   for   anyone   over  18  who  is  struggling  with   addiction  disorders.  Tuesdays,   3-­4  p.m.  at  the  Turning  Point   Center.  A  great  place  to  meet   PARTY   RENTALS;   CHI-­ with  your  peers  who  are  in  re-­ NA,   flatware,   glassware,   covery.  Bring  a  friend  in  recov-­ linens.   Delivery   available.   ery.  For  info  call  802-­388-­4249   802-­388-­4831. or  802-­683-­5569  or  visit  www. WERE   YOU   IMPLANTED   turningpointaddisonvt.org. WITH  a  St.  Jude  Riata  Defi-­ ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   brillator   Lead   Wire   between   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   June   2001   and   December   SATURDAY:   Discussion   2010?   Have   you   had   this   Meeting  9:00-­10:00  AM  at  the   lead   replaced,   capped,   or   Middlebury  United  Methodist   did  you  receive  shocks  from   Church.   Discussion   Meeting   the  lead?  You  may  be  entitled   10:00-­11:00   AM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   to   compensation.   Contact   Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Be-­ Attorney   Charles   Johnson,   ginnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Meeting   6:30-­7:30   1-­800-­535-­5727. PM.   These   three   meetings  

Cards  of  Thanks

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   NORTH   FERRISBURGH   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   Daily   Reflections  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   PM,  at  the  United  Methodist   Church,  Old  Hollow  Rd.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   WEDNESDAY:   Big   Book   Meeting   7:15-­8:15   AM   is   held  at  the  Middlebury  United   Methodist  Church  on  N.  Pleas-­ ant  Street.  Discussion  Meet-­ ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting  5:30-­6:30  PM.  Both   held   at   The   Turning   Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   NEW   HAVEN   MEETINGS:   Monday,   Big   Book   Meeting   7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the  Congre-­ gational  Church,  New  Haven   Village  Green.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   FRIDAY:  Discussion  Meeting   Noon-­1:00  PM  at  The  Turning   Point   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   THURSDAY:  Big  Book  Meet-­ ing   Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   Turning   Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.   Speaker   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   PM  at  St.  Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,   are  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Main  St.(On  the  Green). Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

THANKS  HOLY  FATHER  and   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   St.  Jude  for  prayers  answered.   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   MONDAY:   As   Bill   Sees   It   V.B. Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM.   Big   Book  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.   Both  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Services

Public  Meetings

Services

Our

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HG $GV:RUN Call 388-4944 to place one!

Services

Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r i s a c o l l a b o rat i o n b e t we e n RSV P a n d t h e Un i te d Way o f Addi s o n C o u n t y. P le a s e c a l l 388-7044 t o f i n d o u t mo re a b o u t t h e doze n s o f v o l u n te e r o pp o r t u n i t ie s t h at a re c u r re n t l y av a i l a ble .

MAKING  RECOVERY  EAS-­ IER  (MRE).  Starting  January   15,   5:30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  7:00   PM   at   The   Turning  Point  Center.  This  will   be  a  facilitated  group  meeting   for   those   struggling   with   the   decision   to   attend   12-­step   programs.   It   will   be   limited   to  explaining  and  discussing   our  feelings  about  the  12-­step   programs   to   create   a   better   understanding   of   how   they   can  help  a  person  in  recovery   on   his  /  her   lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   journey.   A   certificate  will  be  issued  at  the   end  of  all  the  sessions.  Please   bring  a  friend  in  recovery  who   is  also  contemplating  12-­step   programs.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   SUNDAY:   12   Step   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   held   at   the   Middlebury  United  Methodist   Church  on  N.  Pleasant  Street.   Discussion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00   PM  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   BRISTOL  MEETINGS:  Sun-­ day,   Discussion   Meeting   4:00-­5:00   PM.   Wednesday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.  Friday,  Big  Book  Meeting,   6:00-­7:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   Federated  Church,  Church  St.

NA  MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Fridays,  7:30pm,  held   at   the   Turning   Point   Center   located  in  the  Marble  Works.

Services

Services

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   TUESDAY:   11th   Step   Meet-­ ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  ALATEEN   Group.  Both  held  at  Turning   Point,   228   Maple   Street.   12   Step  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.   12   Step   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   PM.  Both  held  at  The  Turning   Point  Center  in  The  Marble-­ works,  Middlebury.

Surprise

RATES

Name: Address: Phone: Email:

Looking for the perfect employee?

Advertise Here! Call 388-4944 or email ads@ addisonindependent.com

Services

teer!

Volun e t i r o v a F r You

gnized  for   to   be   reco   s e rv e s e o   d lly  sits  on   meone   wh who  faithfu o )   s e   n w (i o ro n e k   ng  h ,  patiently   Do   you ?    An  unsu hes  a  team g c n a ri o   e c   te y ll n a lu c sti ing  but   an their  vo rs,  enthusia n  of   anyth to o c ti e ,   ta ir c re d e f   tu p o   x ic a  board   their   p ith  no  e  mentor,  w   youâ&#x20AC;??     Please   send   serena@ k serves  as  a n n le   â&#x20AC;&#x153;tha rmatio   to p fo im in s   t   l, c a ta n n   co iddlebury,   occasio name   and   Street,  M rt r   u u o o y C     h 8 it 4 w ,     they   are   SVP along   how   much rg   or   to   R   o t. m v e in th   rs w e o sh otlight!   volunte â&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   love   to   lunteer  Sp e o W V   r   u .   3  o 5 n 7  i VT   05 ng  them d  by  honori appreciate

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM Â&#x2021; Â&#x201E;SHUZRUGÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPSHUDG Â&#x2021; LQWHUQHWOLVWLQJIRUXSWRLVVXHVÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPLQVHUWLRQV &DVK LQ RQ RXU IRU UDWHV 3D\ IRU  LVVXHV JHW WK LVVXH IUHH ([DPSOH $ ZRUG DG LV MXVW  $Q DG SODFHG IRU FRQVHFXWLYH LVVXHV 0RQGD\V  7KXUV GD\V  LV UXQ WK WLPH IUHH &RVW LV  IRU  LVVXHV LQFOXGHV   LQWHUQHW FKDUJH 6SHFLDO  IRU  UDWHV QRW YDOLG IRU WKH IROORZLQJ FDWHJRULHV +HOS :DQWHG 6HUYLFHV 2SSRUWXQLWLHV 5HDO (VWDWH :RRG KHDW $WWQ )DUPHUV  )RU 5HQW 

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   VERGENNES   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.   Friday,   Dis-­ cussion   Meeting   8:00-­9:00   PM.   Both   held   at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church,   Park   St.   Tuesday,   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Discussion  Meeting  7:00-­8:00   RIPTON   MEETINGS:   Mon-­ PM,   at   the   Congregational   day,   As   Bill   Sees   It   Meet-­ Church,  Water  St. ing  7:15-­8:15  AM.  Thursday,   Grapevine  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   ARE   YOU   BOTHERED   BY   PM.  Both  held  at  Ripton  Fire-­ someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drinking?   Open-­ house,  Dugway  Rd. ing   Our   Hearts   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Al-­Anon   Group   meets   each   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Wednesday   at   7:15   p.m.   at   BRANDON   MEETINGS:   the  Turning  Point  Center  in  the   Monday,  Discussion  Meeting   Marbleworks   in   Middlebury.   7:30-­8:30   PM.   Wednesday,   Anonymous   and   confiden-­ 12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   tial,  we  share  our  experience,   PM.  Friday,  12  Step  Meeting   strength  and  hope  to  solve  our   7:00-­8:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   common  problems. St.  Thomas  Episcopal  Church,   RT  7  South.

Enjoy a delicious meal while you volunteer! The Middlebury Community Supper Program is seeking volunteers to help out during the next several months. Every Friday evening, volunteers meet at the Congregational Church to make delicious meals and share them with members of our community. Tasks include setting up buffet tables, simple food preparation, and cleanup. This is a great opportunity for groups or businesses that would like to volunteer as a team. You can volunteer once a year or once a month! Please call 388-7044 if you are interested. Thank you.

Public  Meetings

D E A D L I N E S Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

CATEGORIES Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost & Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities

Work Wanted Public Meetings** For Sale Help Wanted For Rent Want to Rent Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals

Spotlight with large $2

** No charge for these ads

Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted Adoption

NA  MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:   Mondays,   6pm,   held   at  The  Turning   Point  Center   located  in  The  Marble  Works.

TEEN  ALL-­RECOVERY   Group   Meeting   for   anyone   15-­18  years  old  who  is  strug-­ gling   with   addiction   disor-­ ders.   Tuesdays,   4-­5   p.m.   at   the   Turning   Point   Center.  A   great  place  to  meet  with  your   peers   who   are   in   recovery.   Bring   a   friend   in   recovery.   For  info  call  802-­388-­4249  or   802-­683-­5569   or   visit   www. turningpointaddisonvt.org.

Services BOAT  DOCK   REPAIR   and   construction.  Experienced  and   reliable.   Fully   insured.   Call   802-­349-­6579,  Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Prop-­ erty  Management,  Leicester,   Vermont. CHAIN  SAW  CHAINS  sharp-­ ened.  Call  802-­759-­2095.

ADDISON INDEPENDENT 58 Maple St., Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

The Independent assumes no Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUHUURUV LQDGVEXWZLOOUHUXQWKHDGLQ ZKLFKWKHHUURURFFXUHGDWQR FKDUJH1RUHIXQGVZLOOEHPDGH $GYHUWLVHUVZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\XVRI DQ\HUURUVQRWHG

1XPEHURIZRUGV &RVW RIUXQV 6SRWOLJKW&KDUJH ,QWHUQHW/LVWLQJ 727$/




Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  —  PAGE  37

Addison Independent

Opportunities

CLASSIFIEDS Services

Services

Garage Sales

CONSTRUCTION: ADDI-­ TIONS,   RENOVATIONS,   new   construction,   drywall,   carpentry,   painting,   flooring,   roofing,   pressure   washing,   driveway  sealing.  All  aspects   of  construction,  also  property   maintenance.   Steven   Fifield   802-­989-­0009.

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY Deli-Catering Business in Addison County

MB CONSTRUCTION.   AS-­ PHALT  SHINGLES,  corrugat-­ Well-established ed  metal.  Roof  repairs.  Free   W H I T I N G   C O M M U N I T Y   business, sales estimates.   Insured.   Michael   YARD  SALE.  Saturday  June   Berard.  802-­324-­2013. $426,000, asking 14,   8am-­4pm.   Whiting   El-­ $139,000 + inventory MISC  GRAPHICS  offers  de-­ ementary   School.   Rain   lo-­ sign   services.   Reasonable   cation   next   door   at   the   Fire   pricing,   references.   8   years   House.   Tables   available   to   For details, call professional   experience.   BA   rent,  $10  each.  Call  Shaina   Michael Henry degree   in   Graphic   Design.   at   802-­623-­6144   to   reserve   E-­mail  Mandy  at  miscgraph-­ yours  today.  Do  some  spring   Business Brokers cleaning   and   join   us   to   sell   icsvt@gmail.com. DAVE’S   TREE   SERVICE.   some  things  or  come  to  shop   Trimming,  pruning,  land  clear-­ R O T O T I L L I N G   &   and   find   some   great   trea-­ ing.  Tree  removal  and  stump   BRUSH-­HOGGING.   Ron   sures.  Sponsored  by  Friends   grinding.  Also  selling  firewood.   Stevens  802-­462-­3784. of  Whiting  School. Dangerous  trees  our  specialty.   Help  Wanted Free  estimates.  Fully  insured.   Leicester,  802-­282-­9110. AMERICAN  FLATBREAD  IS   Free HIRING  a  Dining  Room  Man-­ ager.  If  you  have  experience   1  YEAR  OLD  friendly  rooster;   offering   excellent   customer   Copper   Maran.   Needs   own   service,  possess  great  com-­ LAWN   MOWING,   LAWN   flock.  Free.  802-­897-­5151. munication   skills,   work   well   raking,   debris   cleanup   from   with   a   team,   know   how   to   snow   plowing.   Brush   trim-­ motivate  others  and  have  an   ming,   hedge   trimming,   pow-­ Garage  Sales interest  in  delicious,  local  and   er   washing,   light   trucking.   organic  food,  please  forward   Small   carpentry   jobs,   prop-­ ESTATE  SALE  AT     1 2 6 8   your  resume  to  Danielle:  Dani-­ erty  maintenance  and  repairs.   Panton  Road,  Vergennes,  Ver-­ elle@american  flatbread.com   Gene’s   Property   Manage-­ mont.  June  14th  and  15th,  8   or  drop  it  off  at  the  restaurant.   ment,  Leicester,  VT.  Fully  in-­ a.m.  —  4  p.m.  Tools,  antiques,   35-­40  hours  /  week,  nights  and   sured.  Call  for  a  free  estimate,   vintage   bikes,   building   sup-­ Check the weekends  a  must.  EOE. 802-­349-­6579. plies,   barbed   wire,   chicken  





802-775-4337

Buy it! Sell it! Find it!



LOGGING, LAND   CLEAR-­ wire  and  much  more.  Every-­ ING,   forest   management.   thing  must  go,  no  reasonable   Highest   rate   on   all   timber.   offer  refused. Double   rates   on   low   grade   chip  wood.  518-­643-­9436.

Garage Sales

$

Garage Sales

7

Classifieds twice a week in the Addison Independent.

BANKRUPTCY: CALL  to  find   out   if   bankruptcy   can   help   you.   Kathleen   Walls,   Esq.   802-­388-­1156.

Garage Sales

Garage Sales

It’s GARAGE SALE Season... Let us get the word out for you!

7

$

$

YOUR AD INFORMATION

TOWN: DATES & TIMES: STREET ADDRESS:

77 CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

$$

Deadlines: Thursday Noon for Monday papers Monday 5pm for Thursday papers

DESCRIPTION: (Up to 10 words)

YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION NAME: PHONE: MAILING ADDRESS:

Mail in your classified ad with payment to : E-MAIL: 58 Maple Street, For just $3 more, Middlebury VT 05753 OR Email your ad to: classifieds @ come in and pick up an all-inclusive addisonindependent.com GARAGE SALE KIT OR Stop in and drop it with everything at our office in the you need for Marble Works, Middlebury a successful sale.

$7(ad w/out kit) x___#of runs* $10 (ad plus kit) x___#of runs (*Kit comes FREE with 3 runs or more!)

Additional words

x # of runs

x 25¢ Total Payment Enclosed

$

7

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted


PAGE  38  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

Addison Independent

Help  Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Resident  Centered,  Locally  Governed EastView  is  continuing  to  grow  and  we  are   adding  more  members  to  our  team!

Servers â&#x20AC;&#x201D; full-­time and part-­time 2XUGLQLQJWHDPSURYLGHVUHVLGHQWVZLWKD¿QHGLQLQJH[SHULHQFHDQGIXOOWDEOH VHUYLFHLQDG\QDPLFUHWLUHPHQWFRPPXQLW\:LWKDPDQDJHDEOHVFKHGXOHDQG VXSHUENLWFKHQIDFLOLWLHVZHRIIHUDZRUNHQYLURQPHQWWKDWLVKDUGWR¿QGLQWKH KRVSLWDOLW\LQGXVWU\$SSOLFDQWVPXVWEHZLOOLQJWRZRUNHYHQLQJVZHHNHQGVDQG VRPHKROLGD\V Cook â&#x20AC;&#x201D; full time 2XUFRRNZLOOKDYHH[SHULHQFHSURGXFLQJKLJKTXDOLW\VRXSVVDXFHVDQGHQWUpHV IURPVFUDWFKGHPRQVWUDWHGH[SHULHQFHLQDOODVSHFWVRIFRRNLQJIURPJULOOLQJWR VDXWpLQJ DQG VWURQJ DWWHQWLRQ WR IRRG FRQVLVWHQF\ TXDOLW\ DQG GHOLYHU\ 7KLV SRVLWLRQUHTXLUHVVRPHZHHNHQGDQGKROLGD\DYDLODELOLW\

Help  Wanted

Lathrop Forest Products Seeking Truck Drivers Forestry Company looking to hire 2 full time truck drivers. Class A-CDL required. Clean driving recored. Must be able to pass drug test and physical via DOT regulations. 24 monthsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience. Local work, no travel, woods experience necessary, but will train the right candidates. Health benefits, paid vacation, federal holidays included. Looking for individuals who want roots with a company. Stop by to fill out an application: Lathrop Forest Products 44 South St, Bristol, VT. No phone calls please.

Residential Care Assistant â&#x20AC;&#x201D; full-­time and part-­time 7KH5HVLGHQW&DUH$VVLVWDQWSDUWLFLSDWHVDVDNH\PHPEHURIWKHKHDOWKFDUH WHDPLPSOHPHQWLQJFDUHGHOLYHU\V\VWHPVLQDPDQQHUWKDWPDLQWDLQVDQXUWXULQJ HQYLURQPHQWWKDWVXSSRUWVWKHKHDOWKDQGLQGHSHQGHQFHRIWKHUHVLGHQWV7KH 5HVLGHQWLDO&DUH$VVLVWDQWXVHVSULPDU\FDUHDVVLJQPHQWVWRSURYLGHUHVLGHQW FHQWHUHGFDUHWRVXSSRUWWKHUHVLGHQW¶VDFWLYLWLHVRIGDLO\OLYLQJ5HVLGHQWLDO&DUH $VVLVWDQWVXVHWKHLUFDUHJLYLQJVNLOOVWRHQVXUHWKHSK\VLFDODQGFRJQLWLYHZHOO EHLQJRIUHVLGHQWVDVZHOODVWKHLUHPRWLRQDODQGVRFLDOZHOOEHLQJ,QDGGLWLRQ WKH\SURYLGHVXSSRUWDQGLQIRUPDWLRQWRIDPLOLHVRWKHUVZKHUHDSSURSULDWH )RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQDERXW(DVW9LHZDW0LGGOHEXU\JRWR ZZZHDVWYLHZPLGGOHEXU\FRP ,QWHUHVWHGFDQGLGDWHVSOHDVHHPDLO greatplacetowork@eastviewmiddlebury.com RUVHQGFRYHUOHWWHUDQGUHVXPHWR EastView at Middlebury 100 Eastview Terrace Middlebury, VT 05753 (2(

REQUIREMENTS: &EGLIPSV´WHIKVIIMREGGSYRXMRKSVFYWMRIWWVIPEXIH½IPHTVIJIVVIH 6IPIZERX½RERGMEPQEREKIQIRXI\TIVMIRGI -RHITXLORS[PIHKIERHI\TIVMIRGIMR1MGVSWSJX3J½GIWYMXI /RS[PIHKISJ½RERGMEPWSJX[EVITVIJIVEFP]8]PIV8IGL-R½RMXI:MWMSRW

Apply to www.SchoolSpring.com or by sending a letter of interest, resume, three current reference letters and complete transcripts to: Peter Burrows, D. Ed., Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 'LEVPIW%ZIRYI 1MHHPIFYV]:8 4SWMXMSREZEMPEFPIMQQIHMEXIP]3TIRYRXMP½PPIH )3)

SUBSCRIBE!

GET ALL THE ADDISON COUNTY NEWS THATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FIT TO PRINT WHEN YOU

Subscribe &DOO Ã&#x20AC;QGRXWKRZRUFKHFNRXW ZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP

Help  Wanted

CARPENTERS  AND   CON-­ STRUCTION   LABORERS   needed.  Steady  work.  Chitten-­ den  County.  Pay  commensu-­ rate  with  tools  and  experience.   802-­825-­6510.

DRIVERS  PRIME,  INC.  Com-­ pany  drivers  and  independent   contractors   for   refrigerated,   tanker   and   flatbed   needed.   Plenty   of   freight   and   great   pay.   Start   with   Prime   today.   Call   877-­736-­3019   or   apply   online  at  driveforprime.com.

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  SCHOOL Math Teacher and Science Teacher for Summer School MUHS is looking for both a Math Teacher and Science Teacher for summer school from June 30th through August 1st, 8:00am to 11:30am. :IVQSRX'IVXM½IH0MGIRWIMRETTVSTVMEXIGSRXIRX area is required.  %TTP] F] WIRHMRK E PIXXIV SJ MRXIVIWX VIWYQI XLVII GYVVIRX VIJIVIRGI PIXXIVW GSQTPIXI XVERWGVMTXWERHIZMHIRGISJPMGIRWYVIXS (V4IXIV&YVVS[W7YTIVMRXIRHIRX %HHMWSR'IRXVEP7YTIVZMWSV]9RMSR 'LEVPIW%ZIRYI 1MHHPIFYV]:8 %TTPMGEXMSRHIEHPMRI.YRI)3)

Monument Farms

DRIVER

Full-time Delivery CDL-Clean Record Apply in person: -DPHV5RDGÂ&#x2021;:H\EULGJH97 802.545.2119

ADDISON COUNTY SUPERVISORY UNION BUSINESS MANAGER

The Addison Central Supervisory Union is seeking an experienced Business Manager to provide leadership for a committed educational community. Responsibilities for this full-time position include budgeting, planning, organizing, WYTIVZMWMRK ERH HMVIGXMRK XLI FYWMRIWW ERH ½WGEP STIVEXMSRW SJ XLI 7YTIVZMWSV] Union, and required reporting to Vermont Agency of Education. The applicant will supervise cash management, student transportation, food service operations, JEGMPMX] TVSNIGXW ERH GSRXVEGX ERH WTIGMEP TVSNIGXW QEREKIQIRX 4VS½GMIRX ORS[PIHKISJKSZIVRQIRXEP½RERGMEPEGGSYRXMRK JYRHEGGSYRXMRK MWTVIJIVVIH-R addition, the candidate should possess proven management and communication skills to operate in a diverse environment as a team-oriented employee. 8LI%HHMWSR'IRXVEP7YTIVZMWSV]9RMSR %'79 WIVZIW4VI/WXYHIRXW in the greater Middlebury, Vermont area, including the towns of Middlebury, Bridport, Cornwall, Ripton, Salisbury, Shoreham, and Weybridge. ACSU is comprised of seven elementary schools, a union middle school, and a union high WGLSSPERHFIRI½XWJVSQEPSRKXVEHMXMSRSJI\GIPPIRGIMRIHYGEXMSR )\GIPPIRXFIRI½XTEGOEKIEZEMPEFPIMRGPYHMRKQIHMGEPHIRXEPPMJIFVIXMVIQIRX plan and competitive leave package. Salary commensurate with experience.

Help  Wanted

ENTRY  LEVEL  FULL-­TIME  COUNTER  PERSON

:HSURYLGH+HDOWK%HQH¿WV &$))XQG Â&#x2021;. Â&#x2021;3DLGYDFDWLRQDQG3HUVRQDOWLPH Â&#x2021;*HQHURXVHPSOR\HHGLVFRXQW Â&#x2021;(YHU\RWKHUZHHNHQGRII 0XVWEHDEOHWROLIWSRXQGV $SS\LQSHUVRQ 99  Wilson  Road,  Middlebury,  VT  Rt.  7  South      388-­3143      E.O.E NORTHLANDS  JOB  CORPS

Independent  Living  Advisor Basin   Harbor   Club,   recognized   as   one   of   the  Best  Places  to  Work  in  Vermont  in  2014,   has   opened   for   our   128th   season   on   Lake   Champlain.     We   are   currently   accepting   applications   for   multiple   seasonal   full-­time   and   part-­time   positions   for   June   through   October.  Certain  candidates  could  be  eligible   for  on-­property  housing. Fine  Dining  Room  Floor  Captains Fine  Dining  Room  Servers  &  Assistants Host  /  Hostess Banquet  Set-­up  Staff Housekeepers Bell  Person Front  Desk  Agent Babysitters 6HDVRQDO (PSOR\HH %HQH¿WV (PSOR\HH meals  during  work  in  the  cafeteria  for  $3.00   (includes  hot  buffet,  salad  bar,  sandwich  bar,   dessert,   fruit,   and   drinks).   Free   uniforms.   Employee   discounts   on   lodging,   food,   spa   and  property  activities. For  full  position  listings  and  to  apply  online   got   to   www.basinharbor.com/jobs.     Must   be   willing   and   able   to   pass   a   background   check  prior  to  employment.

Call 388.4944, or go to www.addisonindependent.com.

Counsels  and   guides   students   in   assigned   dorms   on   attitude,   behavior,  and  interpersonal  relations   with  others.    Provides  students  with   training   in   independent   living   and   leadership  skills.    Apply  to:  

northlandshumanresources@ jobcorps.gov  Equal  Opportunity  Employer  Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran

Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Inc. of Bristol TRUCK  DRIVER  NEEDED -­  Hazmat  CDL  Class  A  License -­  Fuel  Oil  Delivery/Crane  Truck Â&#x2021;+LJK6FKRRO'LSORPDRUHTXLYDOHQWQHHGHGZLWK DFOHDQGULYLQJUHFRUG Â&#x2021;3UH(PSOR\PHQW'UXJ $OFRKRO7HVW   %DFNJURXQGFKHFNDQG'273K\VLFDO Â&#x2021;([FHOOHQWFXVWRPHUVHUYLFHVNLOOVQHHGHGDQG PXVWEHDWHDPSOD\HU Â&#x2021;\HDUVWUXFNGULYLQJH[SHULHQFHDELOLW\WROLIW   OEVIUHTXHQWO\ Â&#x2021;*RRG:RUNHWKLFDQGDWWLWXGHDPXVWDQGWKH   DELOLW\WRGRRWKHUWDVNVDVQHHGHG Â&#x2021;&RPSHWLWLYHEHQH¿WSDFNDJHLQFOXGLQJ   UHWLUHPHQWSODQKHDOWKSDFNDJHDQGWLPHRII ,QKRXVHDSSOLFDWLRQWREH¿OOHGRXW DQGVHQGUHVXPHWR Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Inc.  P.O.  Box  410,  Bristol  ,  VT  05443      


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  39

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Help  Wanted

For  Sale

For  Rent

For  Rent



P R I VA C Y  H E D G E S  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   BLOWOUT   sale.   6   foot   arborvitae   (cedar).   Regu-­ lar   $129,   now   $59.   Free   installation  /  f ree   delivery.   Call   today,   limited   supply:   518-­536-­1367,   www.low-­ costtrees.com.  Beautiful  and   nursery  grown.

2  BEDROOM,   FIRST   floor   apartment,  with  office,  in  Mid-­ dlebury   at   85   Court   Street.   Full   basement   with   laundry   hook-­ups.   Available   June   1.   $1,000  /  mo.   plus   utilities.   Deposit,   credit   check   and   references  required.  No  pets   or  smoking.  No  exceptions.   802-­352-­6678.

BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  NEW   SCHOOL   HOUSE  office  suites  located   in  Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Old  High  School   complex   on   the   green   is   now   renting.   Five   separate   one   and   two   room,   newly   renovated,   offices   with   a   common  waiting  area,  con-­ ference  room,  bathroom  and   kitchenette.   Rent   includes   heat,  electricity  and  shared   wi-­fi.  The  5  suites  range  from   377  s.f.  up  to  648  s.f.  Two  of   the  suites  are  single  rooms.   Three   have   an   inner   and   outer  office.  Newly  refinished   floors,   painted   trim,   ceiling   fans   and   lighting.   Tenants   choose  the  wall  colors.  The   first  year  of  lease  will  have   2  free  months  and  first  ten-­ ant   to   sign   a   lease   will   get   a  third  month  free  rent.  Call   802-­453-­4065   or   twells@ wellslaw.com  for  more  info.

RINGERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  HOME  CARE  is   looking  for  dependable,  car-­ ing  and  motivated  care  givers   to   join   our   family.   We   have   Help  Wanted Help  Wanted Help  Wanted all  shifts  and  weekend  hours   FARM  HELP  NEEDED.  Tie   I N S U R A N C E   U N D E R -­ LOOKING  FOR  LOGGERS   available.   On-­sight   training   stall   barn.   Must   be   good   WRITER:   Are   you   a   CSR   and   laborers   for   tree   re-­ given.  To  apply  please  email   milker.  Some  field  work  and   looking   for   an   opportunity?   moval   in   the   Panton   area.   resume  to  ringerhomecare@ THE  BARREL  MAN:  55  gal-­ equipment   maintenance.   Underwriting   experience   of   Interested   and   serious   ap-­ gmail.com   or   call   Angie   lon   Plastic   and   Metal   bar-­ References   required.   Call   3-­5  years.  Strong  computer   plicants  please  contact  us  at   802-­877-­1363. rels.  Several  types:  55  gallon   802-­377-­9083. skills.   Ability   to   deal   effec-­ 800-­427-­2617  for  more  info   SELF-­MOTIVATED,   EX-­ rain   barrels   with   faucets,   tively   with   companies   and   and  to  apply. P E R I E N C E D   C A R P E N -­ food   grade   with   removable   FULL-­TIME   DELI  /  P IZZA   agents.   Knowledge   of   ba-­ locking  covers,  plastic  food   cook   position   available.   sic  underwriting  guidelines.   MEDICAL  OFFICE  TRAIN-­ T E R   N E E D E D .   Wa g e s   grade   with   spin-­on   covers   reflect   abilities.   Call   Barry,   Must   have   prior   work   re-­ Send   resume   to:   PO   BOX   EES  NEEDED.  Train  to  be-­ (pickle   barrels).   Also,   275   lated   experience   with   food   323,  Middlebury,  VT  05753. come  a  Medical  Office  Assis-­ 802-­989-­9170. gallon  food  grade  totes,  $125   preparation.   Work   related   tant.  No  experience  needed.   VERMONT  SOAP  IS  LOOK-­ each.   55   gallon   sand  /  salt   preferences   required.   Set   LOOKING  FOR  2-­3  Carpen-­ Online   training   at   SC   Train   ING   for   the   right   people   to   barrels   with   PT   legs,   $50   schedule   6   a.m.  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  2   p.m.,   ters   with   2-­5   years   experi-­ gets   you   job   ready.   HS   di-­ add  to  our  team  of  full-­time,   each.   Delivery   available.   Mon.  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Fri.  Applicant  should   ence.   Busy   season.   Valid   ploma  /  GED  and  PC  /  Internet   honest,  hard  working,  friend-­ 802-­453-­4235. be   energetic,   self-­directed   driver â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   license   and   own   needed.  1-­888-­221-­0295. ly,   long-­term   employees.   with   positive   attitude.   Ap-­ basic   tools   a   must.   Please   Must  be  good  with  numbers,   TORO  RIDING  LAWNMOW-­ MIDDLEBURY   NATURAL   ply   in   person   at   Small   City   call  802-­355-­3193. ER.  Excellent  condition.  15.5   FOODS   CO-­OP   is   seeking   have   good   computer   skills,   Market  in  Vergennes  or  call   hp,   hydrostatic.   Must   see.   and   be   able   to   lift   up   to   50   a  cashier  with  excellent  cus-­ Cory  at  802-­349-­7101. Asking  $750.  802-­462-­2366. tomer  service  skills  who  val-­ lb.  boxes.  Will  train.  Please   e-­mail   resume   to   Hilde@ ues  natural  /  local  foods.  Ideal   TREK  520  TOURING  bicycle.   candidate  has  cashiering  and   vermontsoap.com. 12  years  old.  Excellent  condi-­ accurate   money   handling   tion.  $400.  802-­388-­9274. experience.   Part-­time   year   Help  Wanted Help  Wanted round   position.   Great   work   For  Sale environment,  generous  store   Vacation  Rentals discount  and  benefits.  Com-­ A P A R T M E N T   S I Z E   NORTHLANDS  JOB  CORPS   WASHER,   like   new.   $250.   plete   application   online   at   ADDISON:   LAKE   CHAM-­ ADMINISTRATIVE/CLERICAL www.middleburycoop.com  or   802-­877-­1399. PLAIN   waterfront   camp.   in  our  store  at  9  Washington   BUYING,  SELLING,  TRAD-­ Beautiful   views,   gorgeous   We   have   ongoing   and   periodic   Street  in  Middlebury. ING,   repairing:   aluminum   sunsets,  private  beach,  dock,   need   for   a   variety   of   entry   level   PART-­TIME  HELP  NEEDED   fishing   boats,   row   boats,   rowboat   and   canoe   includ-­ administrative/clerical   positions.     for   yard   work   and   clean-­ trailers,   canoes,   kayaks,   ed.  $600.  weekly,  or  call  for   ing  at  Lake  Champlain.  Call   dinghies,   jon   boats,   small   weekends.  802-­349-­4212. All   positions   require   computer  

VNLOOV JHQHUDO RI¿FH VNLOOV attention  to   detail,   and   ability   to   work  as  part  of  a  team.   Apply  to:  

802-­353-­6188.

northlandshumanresources@ jobcorps.gov  Equal  Opportunity  Employer  Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran

Help  Wanted

sail  boats,   used   oars   and   boating  access.  at  fair  cash   prices.  Old  retired  boatsmith   802-­453-­4235. MAXIM  OUTDOOR  WOOD   PELLET   Furnace   by   Cen-­ tral   Boiler.   Clean,   safe   and   thermostatically   con-­ trolled.  Boivin  Farm  Supply   802-­475-­4007.

For  Rent

For  Rent 2  BEDROOM  APARTMENT   in   a   quiet   country   setting,   15   min.   from   Middlebury.   $725  plus  utilities  and  $500   deposit.  No  pets  or  smoking   please.  802-­897-­5447.

For  Rent

2  BR   BRANDON   $650   +   utilities.  802-­773-­9107  www. thefuccicompany.com. 2 , 0 0 0   S Q U A R E   F E E T   Professional   office   space   in   Middlebury,   multi-­room.   Ground  level,  parking,  handi-­ capped-­accessible.  Available   now.  802-­558-­6092.

ADDISON  APARTMENTS;  2   bedroom,  1  bath  $900  /  mo.  3   bedroom,  2  bath  $1,400  /  mo.   Dog   OK.   1   year   lease.   No   smoking.  Both  include  heat,   electric   and   water.   Karla   BRISTOL  OPEN,  AIRY  and   clean  one  bedroom  upstairs   802-­377-­7445. apartment   in   two-­family   vil-­ BRANDON  ONE  BR.  $650,   lage  Victorian.  Separate  en-­ one  person;  $700,  two  per-­ trance  with  porch.  No  pets,   sons.   Includes   heat,   snow   no  smoking.  Off-­street  park-­ and  rubbish  removal.  Dam-­ ing.  Heat,  hot  water  included.   age   deposit,   first   monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   $750  /  month.  First  month  plus   rent,   one   year   lease   re-­ security.  Available  now.  Call   quired.  No  smoking  or  pets.   802-­453-­4161,  evenings. 802-­247-­0115. BRISTOL;  QUAKER  COUN-­ BRISTOL   2   BEDROOM   TRY   home   (circa   1850),   A PA R T M E N T,   u p s t a i r s .   twenty-­five   acres.   Refer-­ One  block  from  Main  Street.   ences  required.  No  alcohol.   Heat,   electricity,   hot   water   Deposit  required.  $1,395  /  mo.   furnished.   Available   July   Please  call  864-­630-­6905. 1.   $975  /  m o.   References.   CLIMATE  CONTROL  STOR-­ 802-­453-­3818. AGE   now   available   in   New   BRISTOL   2   BEDROOM   Haven.  Call  802-­453-­5563. APARTMENT.   One   block   from  downtown.  Upstairs  and   EAST   MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one   includes   TED heat,   downstairs.  Heat  and  hot  wa-­ bedroom,   EN ter  furnished.  Available  July   electric  and  hot  water,  $850.   u! Thank  Yo 1.   $850  /  mo.   W/D   hookups.   No  pets.  Call  after  4:00  p.m.   References.  802-­453-­3818. 802-­388-­7716.

R

.

BRISTOL  LARGE  ONE  bed-­ room   apartment.   Walking   distance   to   town.   No   pets.   No   smoking.   $695  /  month   plus  utilities  and  deposit.  Call   802-­388-­0730.

HOUSE  FOR  RENT:  3  bed-­ room,  1  bath.  1  finished  room   in  basement.  5  minute  drive   to   downtown   Middlebury,   located  in  a  family  neighbor-­ hood.  Call  802-­310-­0983  for   more  information.

For  Rent

For  Rent

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  against  the  law   to  discriminate  when   advertising  housing Particularly  on  sites  like  Craigslist. And  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you   might  think.  You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no  childrenâ&#x20AC;?   or  â&#x20AC;&#x153;adults  only.â&#x20AC;?  There  is  lots  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say.   The  federal  government  is  watching  for  such   discrimination. Let  us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities   of  the  Fair  Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the   right  side  of  the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Fair  Housing  Law.   Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

$G &ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HG

V 3XEOLVK

HG

ollege.  For  Rent  Close  to  c MENT OM  APART y,  newly  refurbished. 1  BEDRO ur eb 000. ,  Middl Main  Street ,  includes  heat.  000-­0 th y $750/mon f  Middlebur T, EN ile  north  o sit.  000-­0000. M po ubbish,  1  m OM  APART 1  BEDRO ludes  heat,  electric,  r  $595/month  plus  de ly, upstairs,  inc Available  immediate .   rence on  Route  7 it  and  refe e om ies.  Depos LE  h OM  MOBI t.  $650/mo.  plus  utilit 2  BEDRO lo .  Private   in  Salisbury -­0000. d. 00 ces  require required.  0 t.  Referen ONDO HOUSE/C arage  and  basemen 0. N W O T   M 00 O 2  BEDRO mons,  Vergennes.  G eat.  No  pets.  000-­0  h om Country  C xcluding  utilities  and her,  e o. /m y 00 el atellite,  was plet $1,0 ERN,  com  Hi-­speed  internet,  s ery  energy OM,  MOD 2  BEDRO ke  Dunmore  house. 85â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  lake  frontage.  V URXJK-XQH WK l,   678. La furnished   ed  porch,  drilled  wel QJ$XJXVW s  utilities.  802-­352-­6 UWL lu en dryer,  scre PRQWKUHQWDOVWD tiable.  $1,000/mo.  p go RU ne ) g.  Pets   HIÂżFLHQW on-­smokin 26,  2010.  N


PAGE  40  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

Addison Independent

Att. Â Farmers

CLASSIFIEDS For  Rent

For  Rent

Real  Estate

M I D D L E B U RY  H O U S E   SHARE.   Furnished,   W/D,   wifi.   Utilities   included.   No   smoking  or  pets.  References.   First,   last   and   $300   secu-­ rity   deposit.   Credit   check.   $600  /  mo.   Month-­to-­month.   802-­989-­3097.

WEST  ADDISON:   2   story,   furnished  house  on  lakefront.   Washer,  dryer.  No  smoking.   Available  September  through   May.  860-­653-­8112.

2 . 1 2  A C R E   B U I L D I N G   lot   in   Salisbury,   1/4   mile   from   Waterhouses   Res-­ taurant   and   Marina.   1285   West   Shore   Road.   4   bed-­ room   septic   installed   with   drilled   well.   28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   garage   in   place.   $119,900.   Call   802-­352-­6678.

M I D D L E B U RY  R E TA I L   SPACE,   just   available.   500   square   ft.   of   prime   space   across  from  Edgewater  Gal-­ lery   at   2   Frog   Hollow  Alley.   Recently   upgraded.   Start   your  business  with  the  best  6   months  of  retail  ahead  of  you.   $850   per   month   with   heat,   electricity   and   water  /  sewer   included.  Call  802-­759-­2511   and  ask  for  Dana.



45  OCEANFRONT  ACRES   overlooking   Bay   of   Fundy,   Digby   Neck,   Nova   Scotia.   Solar   powered   summer   cabin.   Complete   privacy.   $250,000.   firm.   www.fun-­ dygetaway.com

PITTSFORD  HOUSE.   3-­4   bedrooms,   backyard.   First   monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  and  security  deposit.   $1,000  /  month.   Available   in   early   June.   802-­352-­4124.   Leave   a   message   in   the   evening. RENT   REDUCED:   WEST   ADDISON   completely   fur-­ nished  2  bedroom  apartment.   Lake   Champlain   access.   No   pets.  Available   immedi-­ ately.   Rent   is   $900  /  month   which  includes  utilities.  Call   802-­759-­2382.

Wood  Heat



ROOM  TO   RENT   in   Bran-­ ADDISON   COUNTY   FIRE-­ d o n .   $ 1 2 0   p e r   w e e k .   WOOD.  Premium  hardwoods   802-­417-­4057. cut,   split   and   delivered.   SALISBURY   FURNISHED   Custom  sizes  available.  For   STUDIO   apartment.   Nice   honest,  reliable  service  call   porch,  like  new  condition.  No   802-­238-­7748. smoking,   no   pets.   Deposit   DRY   FIREWOOD   $225  /   and  references  required.  In-­ CORD.   Green   firewood.   cludes  all  utilities.  $750  /  mo.   Mixed   hardwoods.   $200  /   802-­352-­9094. cord.   $100  /  half   cord.   Also   SELF   STORAGE,   8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   units.   Your   lock   and   key,   $55  /  m onth.   Middlebury,   802-­558-­6092. SOUTH   STARKSBORO   2   bedroom   mobile   home   on   owner-­occupied   lot.   $875  /   month  plus  utilities.  Security   deposit   required.   Includes   W/D,   water,   sewer,   trash   removal,  snow  plowing  and   lawn   care.   No   smoking,   no   pets.   References   required.   802-­453-­4856. S T O R A G E   S P A C E S ,   11â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;.   Large   overhead   doors,   extra   high   ceilings.   Will   accommodate   large   campers,   boats   or   lots   of   stuff.  Call  802-­388-­8394.

chunk  wood  available.  Deliv-­ ery  available  at  extra  charge.   Call  802-­545-­2144.

HAY  FOR   SALE:   First   cut   $3   /   square   bale.   First   cut   round  bales  $30.  Mike  Quinn,   end  of  South  Munger  Street,   Middlebury.  802-­388-­7828. JD  74  RAKE,  purchased  new   in  1999  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one  owner,  stored   undercover  when  not  in  use.   Very   good   condition   with   very   good   tires.   Operatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Manual  included.  Teeth  are   tripled  with  approx.  two  thirds   rubber  and  one  third  original   spring  steel.  Asking  $2,500.   Call  Nate  at  545-­2320. K U H N   1 8 â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   T E D D E R .   $1,500.   OBO.   Mike   Quinn,   802-­388-­7828. MULCH   HAY   FOR   SALE:   Delivery   available.   Call   for   pricing.   802-­453-­4481,   8 0 2 -­ 3 4 9 -­ 9 2 8 1 ,   o r   802-­989-­1004. W H I T N E Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S   C U S T O M   FARM   WORK.   Pond   agi-­ tating,   liquid   manure   haul-­ ing,  drag  line  aerating.  Call   for   price.   462-­2755,   John   Whitney.

COMMERCIAL  /  FLEX-­USE   FACILITY.   Auction   June   19.   For   details   and   terms,   v i s i t   w w w. t r a n z o n . c o m  /   AP14035.   Tranzon   Auction   Properties,   93   Exchange   Street,  Portland,  ME  04101;   Boats 207-­775-­4300.  Thomas  Sat-­ urley,  NH  RE  Lic.  #11528,  NH   2006   BAYLINER   185BR   AC  #  2495. in   excellent   condition.   130   h.p.  Mercrusier  engine  with   LEICESTER   6.8   ACRES,   very  low  usage.  Entire  boat   $59,000.   Very   nice   build-­ meticulously   maintained.   ing   site   surveyed,   septic   Seats   and   carpeting   like   design   included.   Ready   to   new.   Custom   cover   and   build   on,   with   all   permits.   trailer  are  included.  $10,000.   Owner  financing.  Call  Wayne   802-­247-­6870. 802-­257-­7076. BOSTON   WHALER   BOAT   LIGHTLY  WOODED  BUILD-­ (1982)   17â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Newport,   90hp   ING   LOT   in   East   Middle-­ Johnson   motor   (1987)   with   bury   on   private   road.   Lot   few  hours.  Galvanized  trail-­ has   village   water,   under-­ er,   new   controls,   tune-­up,   ground  electric  /  communica-­ starter,  starter  solenoid  and   tion   services   and   conven-­ trailer   tires.   Extra   prop   in-­ tional  septic.  Nearby  tennis   cluded.   Also   some   acces-­ courts,   playground,   library   sories.   Fresh   water   boat,   and   ball   field.   Restrictions   second   owner.   Very   good   on   mobile   homes,   ranches   condition.  $4,500.  OBO.  Pic-­ and  double  wides.  $69,500.   tures   on   Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   list,   Bris-­ 802-­388-­2502. tol,   Vermont.   Cash   or   bank   check.  802-­453-­4235.



FIREWOOD,  DRY,   CUT,   split.   $200  /  cord.   You   truck.   WE   ARE   SELLING   our   double   wide   home   and   802-­247-­6061. looking  for  a  buyer  who  will   FIREWOOD;   CUT,   SPLIT   take   it   away.   3   bedroom,   and  delivered.  Green  or  sea-­ 2   bath.   Comes   with   porch,   soned.   Call   Tom   Shepard,   hot  water  heater,  forced  air   802-­453-­4285. heating  system,  kitchen  ap-­ FIREWOOD;  MIXED  HARD-­ pliances   and   wood   pellet   WOOD.  Beech,  maple,  oak,   stove.  26x48  in  size.  Asking   cherry,  ash.  Order  early  and   $24,000,   OBRO.   Contact   save.   2   cord   loads.   Leave   Lisa  at  802-­388-­1457. message  802-­282-­9110.

MOUNTAIN  ROAD   FIRE-­ Animals WOOD.  Green  and  partially   seasoned   available.   Oak,   ash,   maple,   beech.   Order   now  and  save  for  next  sea-­ VERGENNES   COMMER-­ son.  Cut,  split  and  delivered.   BERNESE  MOUNTAIN  DOG   CIAL  10-­YEAR  lease.  1,300   Call  802-­759-­2095. PUPPIES.  Five  males  avail-­ sq.   ft.   $1,500  /  month   plus   able   June   18th   for   homes.   utilities.  Karla  377-­7445. Great   family   or   companion   dogs.  AKC  registered,  pure,   VERY   NICE   3   BEDROOM   Real  Estate $1,500.   Visit   our   website   apartment  in  village  setting,   for   more   information.   www. 2  BEDROOM  RUSTIC  cabin   large  living  room,  eat-­in  kitch-­ bellavillaberners.com  or  call   en,   den,   1   1/2   baths,   wood   on   1.7   acres   in   Salisbury   802-­545-­2052. floors,  laundry  hookups,  heat   with   320â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   of   Lake   Dunmore   frontage   across   Route   53   /  garbage  included,  off  street   GERMAN  SHEPHERD  PUP-­ parking,  on  site  storage  unit   with   sundeck   and   dock   on   PIES.   Whelped   5/14/2014,   available   for   additional   fee,   water.   Beautiful   swimming   pure  German  lines,  AKC  reg,   no   smokers  /  pets,   $1,250  /   and  sunsets.  Quiet  and  pri-­ OFA,   parents   on   premises,   mo.,   first  /  last  /  security,   ref-­ vate.   $249,900.   Serious,   raised   with   children,   expe-­ erences.   Available   July   1,   qualified  buyers  only  please.   rienced  breeder,  references   2014.   802-­382-­8522   (D),   802-­352-­6678. available.   http:  /  /  b lackfor-­ 802-­734-­1166  (C). estshepherds.com   or   call   518-­494-­7409.  $1,200.



Cars



2001  BUICK  LESABRE  LIM-­ ITED.   97K   miles,   loaded,   heated  leather  seats,  heated   side   mirrors,   well   cared   for   with   maintenance   records   available.   $4,000   OBO.   802-­989-­7073.

Wanted ANTIQUES  WANTED.  Local   3rd   generation   dealer,   free   verbal  appraisals.  Call  Brian   Bittner   at   802-­272-­7527   or   visit   www.bittnerantiques. com.

Addy Indy

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGV DUHRQOLQH www. addisonindependent. com/classifieds

Public Notices

Public  notices  for  the  following  can  be  found  in  this   ADDISON  INDEPENDENT  on  Pages  40,  41  &  42.

Addison  County  Superior  Court  (3) Champlain  Valley  Agency  on  Aging  (1) Ferrisburgh  (1) Middlebury  (2) Monkton  (3) P.  Hannaford  Career  Center  (1) Ripton  (1) Shoreham  (1) MORTGAGEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. As  ordered  by  the  Court  set  forth  below  and  in  connection  with  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Kelly  Newton  and  David  Newton  to  National  City  Mortgage  Co  dba  Commonwealth   United  Mortgage  Company,  dated  November  23,  2004  and  recorded  in  Book  60  Page  137   of  the  land  records  of  the  Town  of  Leicester,  of  which  mortgage  the  Plaintiff  is  the  pres-­ ent  holder.    In  accordance  with  the  Judgment  Order  and  Decree  of  Foreclosure  entered   October  30,  2014  in  the  action  entitled  PNC  Bank,  National  Association  v  Kelly  Newton.,   by  the  Addison  Unit,  Civil  Division,  Vermont  Superior  Court,  Docket  No.  162-­7-­12  Ancv  for   breach  of  the  conditions  of  said  mortgage  and  for  the  purpose  of  foreclosing  the  same  will   be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at  2486  Route  7,  Leicester,  Vermont  on  July  7,  2014  at  2:30  pm   all  and  singular  the  premises  described  in  said  mortgage,      To  wit:   Schedule  A Mortgage  Deed  From  David  R.Newton  and  Kelly  G.  Newton  To  National  City  Mortgage Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  to  be  conveyed  to  David  Newton  and  Kelly   Newton  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Rene  Quenneville  and  Lorraine  Quenneville  to  be  recorded   in  the  Town  of  Leicester  Land  Records. Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Rene  Quenneville  and  Lor-­ raine  Quenneville  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Dennis  R  Charron  and  Linda  D  Charron  dated  April   21,  1976  and  recorded  at  Book  31,  Page  435  of  the  Town  of  Leicester  Land  Records  and   being  more  particularly  described  therein,  in  part,  as  follows: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being   a   portion   of   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   the   herein   Grantors   by   Warranty   Deed   of   Jean   Guy   Quenneville   and   Lillian   D.   Quenneville,   dated   July   25,   1973,  recorded  in  Book  31  at  page  179  of  the  Leicester  Land  Records,  the  portion  herein   conveyed  being  more  particularly  described  on  a  Survey  Map  entitled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Portion  of  Property   of  Gene  Guy  Quenneville  et  al,  Addison,  County,  Leicester,  Vermont,â&#x20AC;?  made  by  Lee  H.   Lowell,  dated  September  4,  1972,  as  follows: Beginning  at  a  point  marked  by  a  fence  post  and  iron  pipe  on  or  near  the  westerly  edge   of  the  right  of  way  of  U  S  Route  7,  said  point  being  the  northeasterly  corner  of  lands  of   Howard  Scarborough  and  the  southeasterly  corner  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed, Thence  go  N  77  degrees  03â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  250.00  feet  along  a  wire  fence  and  hedgerow  in  the   northerly  line  of  Scarborough  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe,  said  point  being  the  south-­ westerly  comer  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed; Thence  go  N  29  degrees  07â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  205.00  feet  in  a  blazed  and  painted  line  in  the  easterly   line  of  lands  retained  by  the  herein  Grantors  and  to  be  reconveyed  by  them  to  Jean  Guy   Quenneville  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe  set  in  stones,  said  point  being  the  northwest-­ erly  comer  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed; Thence  go  S  69  degrees  06â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  in  the  southerly  line  of  other  lands  of  the  said  Jean  Guy   Quenneville  four  (4)  distances  as  follows: 1)    83.00  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe,     2)    81.23  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe, 3)    74  39  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe, 4)    4  00  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  a  painted  spot  on  a  stone  on  or  near  the  westerly   edge  of  the  right  of  way  of  said  highway,  said  point  being  the  southeasterly  corner  of   said  other  lands  of  said  Jean  Guy  Quenneville  and  the  northeasterly  comer  of  the  lands   herein  conveyed; Thence  go  S  29  degrees  07â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  170.00  feet  in  a  wire  fence  line  on  or  near  the  westerly   edge  of  the  right  of  way  of  said  highway  to  the  point  of  beginning. Also  hereby  conveyed,  by  quit  claim  only,  is  all  right,  title  and    interest    of  the  herein     Grantors   in     and   to   the   lands   lying   between   the   easterly   boundary   of   the   lands   herein   conveyed  as  described  above  and    the  center  line  of  said  highway.   Reference  is  hereby  made  to  the  above  instruments  and  to  the  records  and  references   contained  therein  in  further  aid  of  this  description.   Terms  of  sale:  Said  premises  will  be  sold  and  conveyed  subject  to  all  liens,  encum-­ brances,   unpaid   taxes,   tax   titles,   municipal   liens   and   assessments,   if   any,   which   take   precedence  over  the  said  mortgage  above  described. TEN  THOUSAND   ($10,000.00)   Dollars   of   the   purchase   price   must   be   paid   in   cash,   FHUWLÂżHGFKHFNEDQNWUHDVXUHUÂśVRUFDVKLHUÂśVFKHFNDWWKHWLPHDQGSODFHRIWKHVDOHE\WKH SXUFKDVHU7KHEDODQFHRIWKHSXUFKDVHSULFHVKDOOEHSDLGLQFDVKFHUWLÂżHGFKHFNEDQN treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  within  thirty  (30)  days  after  the  date  of  sale.        The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  pay-­ ing  the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.   Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale.   DATED:  June  3,  2014 By:  /s/:  Amber  L.  Doucette,  Esq. Amber  L.  Doucette,  Esq. Bendett  and  McHugh,  PC,  270  Farmington  Ave.,  Ste.  151,  Farmington,  CT  06032, (860)  606-­1090,  Fax  (860)  409-­0626 6/9,  16,  23


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  41

TOWN OF FERRISBURGH

AN  EXPERIENCED   NATURALIST   leads   a   small   group   of   beginning   birders   through   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Wright   Park  during  a  past  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Go  Birdingâ&#x20AC;?  outing.  This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  event  is  on  Saturday  morning,  June  21. Photo  by  Gary  Starr

Audubon  offers  bird  walks  for  all MIIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Otter   Creek   Audubon   Society   and   Middlebury   Area  Land  Trust  on  Saturday,  June  21,   will  once  again  offer  an  all-­ages  begin-­ ning  bird  walk  in  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Wright   Park. Small   groups   led   by   experienced   naturalists   will   follow   the   Quest   Trail,  an  offshoot  of  the  Trail  Around   Middlebury.   The   parkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   varied   habi-­ tats,  from  shrubland  to  maturing  forest  

TOWN OF MONKTON PLANNING COMMISSION VACANCY

The  Selectboard   is   accepting   written   applications   to   be   appointed   to   the   Monkton   Planning   Commission   until   the   next   town-­wide   election   on   Town   Meeting   March   4,   2015.     Applications   must   be   submitted   by   June   23rd.     The   Planning   Commission   recently   completed  the  Town  Plan  and  is  starting   ZRUNRQUHYLVLRQVWRWKH8QL¿HG3ODQQLQJ Document.   The   Monkton   Planning   Commission   meets   on   the   1st   and   3rd   Tuesdays  of  each  month  at  7:30  p.m.  in   the  Monkton  Town  Hall.   Town  of  Monkton  -­  Selectboard   6/5,  9

INVITATION TO BID TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY BID NUMBER 05-­18-­2014

Sealed  competitive  bids  for  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Town  of   Middlebury  Milling,  Recycling  and  Paving   SURMHFWV´ZLOOEHUHFHLYHGDWWKHRIÂżFHRI WKH 7RZQ 0DQDJHU 7RZQ 2IÂżFHV  Main  Street,  Middlebury,  Vermont  05753   XQWLODPRQ-XQHDQGZLOO be  publicly  opened  and  read  aloud  soon   thereafter.  Bid  packet  is  available  at  the   7RZQ0DQDJHUÂśV2IÂżFHDW0DLQ6WUHHW and   Public   Works   Department   1020   South  Rt.  7   There   will   be   a   mandatory   Pre-­Bid   0HHWLQJ RQ :HGQHVGD\ -XQH   DW DP 0HHWLQJ ZLOO EH RQ VLWH DW Washington   St   Ext.   @   east   intersection   of  Colonial  Dr. The   Town   of   Middlebury,   Vermont   reserves   the   right   to   waive   any   informalities  in,  or  reject  any  and  all  bids,   or  to  accept  any  bid  deemed  to  be  in  the   best  interest  of  Town. Kathleen  Ramsay Town  Manager 

to  the  banks  of  Otter  Creek,  give  great   opportunities   to   see   and   learn   about   birds.  Walkers  will  listen  for  birdsong,   watch  for  nesting  behaviors  and  enjoy   whatever  natural  wonders  come  along.   This   year,   thanks   to  Al   Stiles   and   the   Rotarians,  the  rebuilt  â&#x20AC;&#x153;crooked  bridgeâ&#x20AC;?   will   give   hikers   an   additional   trail   segment  to  explore.  Happily,  there  will   still  be  the  traditional  snack  stop  along   the  way.

Participants  are  encouraged  to  bring   binoculars   from   home,   or   borrow   a   pair  from  OCAS.  The  walk  is  family-­ friendly   and   suitable   for   all   ages,   but   not  appropriate  for  baby  strollers.  The   group  will  meet  at  9  a.m.,  rain  or  shine,   at  the  Wright  Park  parking  lot  north  of   Pulp  Mill  Covered  Bridge  on  Seymour   Street   Extension.   The   walk   ends   by   about   11   a.m.   For   more   information   call  989-­7115.

TOWN OF RIPTON

SPECIAL SHOREHAM SELECTBOARD MEETING

As  of  June  4,  2014  the  abstract  of  the    *UDQG /LVW LV ¿OHG ZLWK WKH WRZQ FOHUN *ULHYDQFHV PXVW EH UHFHLYHG LQ ZULWLQJE\SP7KXUVGD\-XQHWK *ULHYDQFH KHDULQJV EHJLQ DW  SP -XQH   E\ DSSRLQWPHQW &RQWDFW WKHOLVWHUVDWRU32%R[5LS WRQ97 5LSWRQ%RDUGRI/LVWHUV

Tuesday,  June  10,  2014  7PM   Shoreham  Elementary  Gym Presentation  of  Draft  of  Memorandum  of   Understanding Between  the  Town  of  Shoreham  and Vermont  Gas  System 6/2  

NOTICE OF HEARING MONKTON DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD

++++++++++++++ AGENDA PATRICIA A HANNAFORD CAREER CENTER :('-81(Â&#x2021;30

  Notice  is  hereby  given  that  the  Monkton   Development   Review   Board   will   consider   the   following   applications   at   its   regularly   scheduled   Public   Hearing   on   June   24,   2014  at  the  Monkton  Town  Hall.      At  8:00PM      Jeffrey  &  Ann  Lester  #  2014-­ 11-­VAR  for  a  Set  Back  Variance  located  at   23  ABCD  Lane,  Monkton,  VT.    The  present   ]RQLQJ FODVVL¿FDWLRQ RI WKLV SURSHUW\ LV RA   2   and   RA5.     The   Tax   Parcel   ID#   is   13.11.020.000.    This  application  will  also  be   reviewed   as   a   Conditional   Use   under   the   Pond  Overlay  regulations.    At  9:05  PM      William  Porter  and  Kristen   Goldstein  #  2014-­04-­Min    Final  Plat  Hearing   for   a   two   lot   subdivision   located   at   3130   Rotax   Road,   Monkton,   VT.       The   present   ]RQLQJ FODVVL¿FDWLRQ RI WKH SURSHUW\ LV 5$ 5.    The  Tax  Parcel  ID  #  04.111.048.001     Application   materials   are   available   for   review   during   normal   business   hours   at   WKH 2I¿FH RI WKH 0RQNWRQ 7RZQ &OHUN Interested   parties   who   wish   to   be   heard   may   attend   the   hearing,   or   send   a   representative.     Communications   relating   WR WKH DSSOLFDWLRQ PD\ EH ¿OHG LQ ZULWLQJ to   the   Board   either   before   or   during   the   hearing.    Pursuant  to  24  VSA  117  §  4464(a) (1)(C)   and   4471(a)   participation   in   this   hearing   is   necessary   to   establish   status   as   an   Interested   Person   and   the   right   to   appeal.   Thea  Gaudette,  Clerk 6/9                Monkton  Development  Review  Board

1.  Introduction  of  Board  Members   2.  Visitors  Comments   3.  Correspondence 4.  Student  Presentation  of  Capstone              Project 5.  Report  from  the  Chair        Consent Agenda 6.  1.Minutes  of  May  14,  2014 7.  2.Monthly  A/P  for  June   a.  Adult  Program   b.  Revolving   c.  Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Orders Action Agenda 8.  Authorizing  Invoice  Payments  in          Absence  of  Brd.  Mtg. 9.  Policy  2.4  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Financial  Planning  &          Budgeting 10.  Revenue  Anticipation  Note 11.  Resolution  to  Increase  Credit  Card              Line  of  Credit 12.  Act  Upon  Hiring  Recommendation  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;              ATE/Co-­op 13.  Act  Upon  Hiring  Recommendation  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;              Guidance  Coordinator 14.  Act  Upon  Hiring  Recommendation  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;              Medical  Professions   Informational Agenda 15.  Superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Report 16.  Budget/Policy  Report 17.  Executive  Session  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  (If  needed) 18.  Policy  4.1  Governing  Style  -­  Board              Evaluation

6/9

NOTICE OF ADOPTION OF AMENDMENT TO FERRISBURGHâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S ORDINANCE TO REGULATE MOTOR VEHICLES ON OLD HOLLOW ROAD (TOWN HIGHWAY #1) WITHIN THE TOWN OF FERRISBURGH On  June  3,  2014,  the  Ferrisburgh  Selectboard  adopted  an  amendment  to  its  existing   Ordinance   to   Regulate   Motor   Vehicles   by   providing   for   a   local   speed   ordinance   on   Old   Hollow  Road  (Town  Highway  #1)  within  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh. This  Ordinance  amendment  will  take  effect  on  August  3,  2014,  unless  a  petition  for  a   vote   at   a   special   meeting   on   the   question   of   disapproving   the   Ordinance  Amendment,   VLJQHGE\QRWOHVVWKDQSHUFHQWRIWKHTXDOLÂżHGYRWHUVRI)HUULVEXUJKLVSUHVHQWHGWRWKH Selectboard  or  the  Clerk  of  the  municipality  within  45  days  following  the  date  of  adoption,   all  in  accordance  with  24  V.S.A.  §1973. The  full  text  of  the  Speed  Ordinance  amendment  may  be  examined  at  the  Ferrisburgh   7RZQ2IÂżFHVEHWZHHQWKHKRXUVRIDPDQGSPDQGVWDWHVLQSDUWDVIROORZV The  Ferrisburgh  Selectboard  hereby  resolves  by  authority  of  24  V.S.A.  §1971  et.  seq.   and  23  V.S.A.  §1007(f)  that  Section  1  of  its  existing  Ordinance  to  Regulate  Motor  Vehicle   Speed   adopted   by   the   Ferrisburgh   Selectboard   on   December   5,   2000,   be   amended   by   DGGLQJWKHIROORZLQJVXEVHFWLRQDVIROORZV K 2OG+ROORZ5RDG0W3KLOR5RDGDQG)RXU:LQGV5RDG$VSHHGQRWLQH[FHVV RIWKLUW\ÂżYH  PLOHVSHUKRXURQ2OG+ROORZ5RDG 7RZQ+LJKZD\ EHJLQQLQJDW the  intersection  of  U.S.  Route  7  extending  easterly  .31  miles.    A  speed  not  in  excess   of  thirty  (30)  miles  per  hour  on  Old  Hollow  Road  (Town  Highway  #1)  beginning  .31   miles  east  of  U.S.  Route  7  (at  the  intersection  of  Old  Hollow  Road  (Town  Highway  #1)   DQG0W3KLOR5G H[WHQGLQJHDVWHUO\WRPLOHVRQ2OG+ROORZ5RDG 7RZQ+LJK-­ way  #1),  approximately  400â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  east  of  the  intersection  of  Four  Winds  Road.    A  speed  not   LQH[FHVVRIWKLUW\ÂżYH  PLOHVSHUKRXURQ0W3KLOR5RDG 7RZQ+LJKZD\ IURP the  Charlotte/Ferrisburgh  town  line  extending  .45  miles  southerly  to  the  intersection   of  Old  Hollow  Road  (Town  Highway  #1),  and  on  Four  Winds  Road  (Town  Highway   #14)  from  the  intersection  of  Fuller  Mountain  Road  (Town  Highway  #16)  extending   northerly  .20  miles  to  the  intersection  of  Old  Hollow  Road  (Town  Highway  #1). This  ordinance  amendment  shall  become  effective  sixty  (60)  days  after  its  adop-­ WLRQE\WKH)HUULVEXUJK6HOHFWERDUG,IDSHWLWLRQLVÂżOHGXQGHU96$Â&#x2020;WKDW statute  will  govern  the  effective  date  of  this  ordinance. All  other  provisions  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh  Ordinance  to  Regulate  Motor  Ve-­ hicle  Speed  dated  December  5,  2000  shall  remain  in  full  force  and  effect. Any  questions  relating  to  the  adoption  of  these  Ordinance  amendments  may  be  directed   toward  Gloria  Warden,  Town  Clerk,  Town  of  Ferrisburgh,  P.O.  Box  6,  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont       7KHWRZQZHEVLWHLVZZZIHUULVEXUJKYWRUJ

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 8-­1-­13 Ancv

Citizens  Bank,  N.A.  f/k/a  RBS  Citizens,  N.A.,   Plaintiff   v. Bruce  Donovan,  Administrator  of  the  Estate  of  Linda  T.  Aktins  aka  Linda  Thorpe  Morrison   fka  Linda  Esther  Thorpe,  Lisa  Stockwell,  Patrick  A.  Morrison  and  Occupants  residing  at   219  Cross  Road,  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont,   Defendants   NOTICE OF SALE      By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Hubert  S.  Atkins  (now  deceased)  and  Linda  T.  Aktins  aka  Linda  Thorpe  Morrison  fka   Linda   Esther  Thorpe   (now   deceased)   to   Citizens   Bank,   N.A.   dated   December   12,   2005   and  recorded  in  Volume  119,  Page  438  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh,   of  which  mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of   said  mortgage  and  for  the  purposes  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction   at  9:00  A.M.  on  July  8,  2014,  at  219  Cross  Road,  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont  all  and  singular  the   premises  described  in  said  mortgage:    To  Wit: Being   all   and   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Lisa   Stockwell   and   Patrick  A.   Morrison,  reserving  a  life  estate  for  Linda  T.  Atkins,  by  Quit  Claim  Deed  of  Linda  T.  Atkins   dated  June  2,  2010  and  recorded  June  10,  2010  in  Volume  134,  Page  504  of  the  Land   Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh.    A   certain   piece   of   land   in   Ferrisburgh   in   the   County   of  Addison   and   State   of   Vermont   described  as  follows,  viz,    Being  all  my  right,  title  and  interest  in  and  to  the  following  described  piece  or  parcel  of  land   together  with  all  improvements  thereon;Íž     Being   a   part   of   the   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Linda   Esther  Thorpe,   now   Linda   Thorpe   Morrison,   and   George   Roger   Thorpe,   by   Warranty   Deed   of   Rupert   Thorpe   and   Julia  Thorpe   dated   February   16,   1952,   and   recorded   at   Book   34   Pages   574-­575   in   the   Ferrisburgh  Land  Records,  and  being  more  particularly  described  in  said  Warranty  Deed   as  follows:     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being   a   piece   on   the   north   side   of   the   road   with   dwelling   house   and   other   buildings   thereon,  said  piece  commencing  at  the  telephone  pole  just  westerly  of  the  house;Íž  thence   in   an   easterly   direction   along   said   road   a   distance   of   313   feet,   more   or   less   to   a   point   PDUNHGE\DFHPHQWPDUNHUVDLGSRLQWDOVREHLQJLGHQWLÂżHGE\DEDUEHGZLUHIHQFHWKHQFH northerly  along  said  barbed  wire  fence  at  an  approximate  90  degrees  angle  to  the  said  road   a  distance  of  236  feet  6  inches,  more  or  less,  to  a  point  marked  by  a  cement  monument;Íž   thence  westerly  in  a  line  parallel  with  the  road  a  distance  of  313  feet,  more  or  less,  to  a  point   marked  by  a  cement  monument;Íž  thence  southerly  a  distance  of  236  feet,  6  inches  more  or   less,  to  the  point  or  place  of  beginning.â&#x20AC;?    Terms  of  Sale:    $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the  time   of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the   Town  of  Ferrisburgh.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.    Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  30  Kimball   Avenue,  Ste.  307,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.    This  sale  may  be  cancelled   at  any  time  prior  to  the  scheduled  sale  date  without  prior  notice.      DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  4th  day  of  June,  2014 Citizens  Bank,  N.A.  f/k/a  RBS  Citizens,  N.A. By:  Joshua  B.  Lobe,  Esq.,  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  PLC 6/9,  16,  23   30  Kimball  Ave.,  Ste.  307    South  Burlington,  VT    05403


PAGE  42  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

Lots  of  summer  reading  fun   planned  at  Orwell  Free  Library ORWELL   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Orwell   Free   Library  will  host  a  series  of  summer   reading   events   for   local   children.   Events   are   held   on   Tuesdays   from   3-­4  p.m. Â&#x2021; Âł6FLHQFH RI 6RXQG´ -XQH  Rob   Zollman   invites   children   of   all   ages   to   experience   sound   like   never   before.   Audience   participation   is   expected.   Â&#x2021; Âł(Z*URVV´-XO\1HYHUIHDU there   is   enough   slime   and   ooze   for   all.  School-­aged  children  should  wear   messy  clothes  and  come  prepared  to   be  disgusted  by  science.   Â&#x2021; Âł7KH6FRRSRQ6FDW´-XO\-RVK Hardt   teaches   school-­aged   children   how  to  track  and  identify  animals  by   the  sign  they  leave  behind. Â&#x2021; Âł7LHLW'\HLW´-XO\6FKRRO aged   children   can   turn   chemical  

ADDISON COUNTY

Clowning  around DANCERS  WITH  SPOTLIGHT  on  Dance  get  into  character  during  a  circus-­themed  routine  at  the  studioâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   spring  recital  in  Middlebury  on  May  31.

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

Public Notices TOWN OF MONKTON NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS

As  of  6/2/2014  the  abstract  of  the  2014   Monkton   Grand   List   has   been   lodged   with  the  Monkton  Town  Clerk.  Greivance   hearings   will   be   held   at   the   Monkton   Town  Hall  on  June  18  &  19,  2014  from   6:00PM  to  8:00  PM.  To  make  an  appoint-­ ment,   call   the   Town   Clerk   at   802-­453-­ 3800.   Grievances   MUST   be   submitted   in  writing. Monkton  Listers 6/5,  9

CHAMPLAIN VALLEY AGENCY ON AGING REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS

    CVAA  is  seeking  bid  proposals  to  provide   Senior   Nutrition   Services   for   Community   Meals   and   Meals   on   Wheels   in   Addison   &RXQW\ 6SHFL¿FDWLRQV DUH DYDLODEOH E\ calling   Zoe   Hardy,   Nutrition   Director,   at   (802)   865-­0360.   Proposals   must   be   submitted   by   July   11,   2014.   The   program   reserves   the   right   to   reject   any   and   all   bids.                                                        6/9,  12

The Â

Public Notices section  appears   every  Mon.  &   Thurs.  in  the

Addison

Independent

++++++++++++++++++++++++++++++ TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY REGULAR SELECTBOARD MEETING TUESDAY, JUNE 10, 2014 5PM

72:12)),&(6&21)(5(1&(5220Â&#x2021;0$,1675((7 AGENDA 7:00 1.  Call  to  Order  $SSURYDORI0LQXWHVRI0D\ 5HJXODU0HHWLQJDQG0LQXWHV RI0D\3XEOLF+HDULQJRQ 3XOS0LOO%ULGJH3HGHVWULDQ6FRSLQJ 6WXG\  $SSURYDORI$JHQGD &LWL]HQ&RPPHQWV>2SSRUWXQLW\ WRUDLVHRUDGGUHVVLVVXHVWKDWDUH QRWRWKHUZLVHLQFOXGHGRQWKLV DJHQGD@ 7:10  $SSRLQWPHQWWR0LGGOHEXU\ %XVLQHVV'HYHORSPHQW ,QQRYDWLRQ $GYLVRU\%RDUG 7:15  -DPLH*DXFKHU'LUHFWRURI %XVLQHVV'HYHORSPHQW ,QQRYDWLRQ ZLWKDPRQWKO\XSGDWH 7:30 &RPPLWWHH 3URMHFW5HSRUWV D+HDOWK +XPDQ6HUYLFHV $JHQF\)XQGLQJ6XEFRPPLWWHHÂą 8SGDWH 2SSRUWXQLW\IRU$JHQFLHVWR SURYLGHIHHGEDFNWRWKH6HOHFWERDUG E3ODQQLQJ&RPPLVVLRQ0HHWLQJ RI-XQH F3DUNV 5HFUHDWLRQ&RPPLWWHH 0HHWLQJRI-XQH G(QHUJ\&RPPLWWHH0HHWLQJRI -XQH H3XEOLF:RUNV&RPPLWWHH 0HHWLQJRI-XQH I7RZQ&ROOHJH/XQFK0HHWLQJRI -XQH J7RZQ2IÂżFHV 5HFUHDWLRQ )DFLOLWLHV%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH 0HHWLQJRI-XQH

K0DLQ6WUHHW 0HUFKDQWV5RZ 5DLOURDG2YHUSDVV%ULGJH 5HSODFHPHQWV 8:00  /D]DUXV%XLOGLQJÂą1H[W6WHSV 7LPHOLQH  'LVFXVVUHTXHVWIRUVXSSRUWIRU DQDSSOLFDWLRQIRUJUDQWIXQGLQJIRU FRQWLQXDWLRQRIWKH+23(&KDUWHU +RXVH&RDOLWLRQ&ROG:HDWKHU 6KHOWHU  $GRSW5HVROXWLRQ6XSSRUWLQJ $SSOLFDWLRQWR9HUPRQW$JHQF\RI 7UDQVSRUWDWLRQÂśV%LNH 3HGHVWULDQ 3URJUDPIRUIXQGLQJIRUWKH FRQVWUXFWLRQRIWKH3XOS0LOO%ULGJH $UHD6LGHZDON6FRSLQJ6WXG\  8SGDWHRQ(FRV\VWHP 5HVWRUDWLRQ3URJUDP*UDQW 2SSRUWXQLW\  (OHFWULF9HKLFOH&KDUJLQJ 6WDWLRQ*UDQW$JUHHPHQWZLWK6WDWH RI9HUPRQW  3DUWLFLSDWLRQLQ9HUPRQW 0XQLFLSDO%RQG%DQN%RQG ,VVXDQFHIRU7RZQ2IÂżFHV  5HFUHDWLRQ&HQWHU3URMHFWDQG WKH5DLOURDG2YHUSDVV%ULGJH 5HSODFHPHQW3URMHFW ,I$YDLODEOH

8:20  $SSURYDORI&KHFN:DUUDQWV 7RZQ0DQDJHUÂśV5HSRUW %RDUG0HPEHU&RQFHUQV  ([HFXWLYH6HVVLRQÂą,I1HHGHG  $FWLRQRQ0DWWHUV'LVFXVVHGLQ ([HFXWLYH6HVVLRQ 8:30  $GMRXUQ

'HFLVLRQ,WHP 3RVVLEOH'HFLVLRQ ,I\RXQHHGVSHFLDODFFRPPRGDWLRQVWRDWWHQGWKLVPHHWLQJSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKH7RZQ 0DQDJHUÂśV2IÂżFHDW[DVHDUO\DVSRVVLEOH$GGLWLRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQDERXW PRVW$JHQGDLWHPVLVDYDLODEOHRQWKH7RZQÂśVZHEVLWHZZZWRZQRIPLGGOHEXU\RUJ RQWKH6HOHFWERDUGSDJH 6/9

StudentBRIEFS

Jessica  Gipson  of  Vergennes  and   list   for   the   spring   2014   semes-­ Jonathan   Wells   of   Middlebury   ter   at   Saint   Anselm   College   in   have   been   named   to   the   deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Manchester,  N.H.

Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

can  be  found  on Pages  40,  41  &  42.

reactions  into   colorful   creations.   Participants   should   bring   something   to  tie-­dye  and  wear  messy  clothing. Â&#x2021; Âł)LUH 0DNLQJ´ -XO\  1R matches   or   lighters   allowed.   School-­ aged   children   will   see   two   sticks   ignite  a  tiny  coal  and  birch  bark  burst   LQWRĂ&#x20AC;DPHV6ÂśPRUHVZLOOEHVHUYHG,I it   rains,   kids   can   bring   their   favorite   board  game  to  share. Â&#x2021; Âł$UFKDHRORJ\LQ$FWLRQ´-XO\ Archaeologist   Scott   A.   McLaughlin   will   host   a   simulated   archaeological   dig  based  on  a  Lake  Champlain  canal   boat  shipwreck.  School-­aged  children   can   examine   artifacts   and   discover   what  life  was  like  100  years  ago.   For  more  information  about  Orwell   Free  Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  summer  programs,  call    RU YLVLW RUZHOOIUHHOLEUDU\ org.

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 14-­1-­13 Ancv

Central  Mortgage  Company,   Plaintiff               v.             Jennifer  Hessel  Smith,  Scott  Smith,  Marion  F.  Hessel  and  Occupants  residing  at  140  Old   Gravel  Lane,  Starksboro,  Vermont,   Defendants  NOTICE OF SALE    By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith,   Scott   Smith   and   Marion   F.   Hessel   to   Mortgage   Electronic   Registration  Systems,  Inc.,  as  nominee  for  CTX  Mortgage  Company,  LLC  dated  August  27,   2008  and  recorded  in  Volume  92,  Page  334,  which  mortgage  was  assigned  from  Mortgage   Electronic   Registration   Systems,   Inc.,   as   nominee   for   CTX   Mortgage   Company,   LLC   to   Central   Mortgage   Company   by   an   instrument   dated   October   1,   2012   and   recorded   on   January  26,  2013  in  Volume  105,  Page  208  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Starksboro,   of  which  mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of   said  mortgage  and  for  the  purposes  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at   10:15  A.M.  on  July  8,  2014,  at  140  Old  Gravel  Lane,  Starksboro,  Vermont  all  and  singular   the  premises  described  in  said  mortgage:    To  Wit:    Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Jennifer  Hessel  Smith,   Scott   Smith   and   Marion   F.   Hessel   by   Quit   Claim   Deed   of   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith   dated   August  22,  2008  and  recorded  September  4,  2008  in  Volume  92,  Page  331  of  the  Town  of   Starksboro  Land  Records  and  being  more  particularly  described  as  follows:     Being   all   and   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith     by   Warranty  Deed  of  Michael  Flack  dated  April  25,  2006  and  recorded  May  1,  2006  in  Volume   84   at   Page   563   of   the   Town   of   Starksboro   Land   Records   and   being   more   particularly   described  as  follows:    A  lot  of  land  with  building  thereon  situated  easterly  of  Vermont  Route  17E,  and  situated   on   the   easterly   side   of   the   former   highway   leading   southerly   from   Hanksville,   so-­called,   to  South  Starksboro,  so-­called,  and  land  being  all  and  the  same  described  in  a  Warranty   Deed  from  Floyd  N.  Thompson  and  Sadie  L.  Thompson  to  the  within  Grantors  dated  June   15,  1959  and  recorded  in  Book  25  at  Page  100  of  the  Starksboro  Land  Records.  Said  land   is  more  particularly  described  therein,  in  part  as  follows:     â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;ŚBeginning   at   a   point   in   said   easterly   line   of   above   mentioned   highway   and   at     the   northwesterly  corner  of  land  of  George  and  Eleanor  Spark,  thence  northerly  along  the  said   easterly  line  of  said  highway  165  feet  to  the  old  road  leading  to  a  gravel  pit,  thence  in  a   northeasterly  direction  along  said  road  260  feet  to  the  Huntington  River,  so-­called,  thence   southerly  along  the  westerly  bank  of  said  river  250  feet  to  the  said  northerly  line  of  said   6SHDU/DQGIHHWWRÂżUVWDERYHPHQWLRQHGKLJKZD\DQGWKHSRLQWRIEHJLQQLQJ    Being  part  and  parcel  of  the  so-­called  Ober  lot,  and  is  part  and  parcel  of  the  land  described   in  a  deed  from  Nixon  Thompson  to  Floyd  N.  and  Said  L.  Thompson  as  duly  appears  of   record  in  Starksboro  Land  Records  in  Volume  19  at  Page  120â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? 6XEMHFWWRDQGEHQHÂżWWHGE\DOOULJKWVRIZD\HDVHPHQWVFRYHQDQWVSHUPLWVDQGULJKWV of  record.    Reference  is  hereby  made  to  the  above  instruments  and  to  the  records  and  references   contained  therein  in  further  aid  of  this  description.      Terms  of  Sale:    $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the  time   of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the   Town  of  Starksboro.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.    Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  30  Kimball   Avenue,  Ste.  307,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.    This  sale  may  be  cancelled   at  any  time  prior  to  the  scheduled  sale  date  without  prior  notice.   DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  4th  day  of  June,  2014 Central  Mortgage  Company    By:  Joshua  B.  Lobe,  Esq. Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  PLC 6/9,  16,  23   30  Kimball  Ave.,  Ste.  307    South  Burlington,  VT    05403


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  43

Reader Comments

OVUHS  honor  roll BRANDON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   following   Otter   Valley   Union   High   School   students   received   recognition   for   their   academic   achievement   dur-­ LQJWKHÂżIWKPDUNLQJSHULRGRIWKH 2013-­2014  school  year. SCHOLARSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  ROLL Grade  9:  Brigid    Enright,  Alyssa   Falco,   Colby   McKay,   Hannah   Roberts,  Kendra  Stearns  and  Maria   Wiles.   *UDGH  (PPD &LMND +DO-­ ey   Gearwar,   Amy   Jones,   Jonna   Keith,   Caitlyn   Ketcham,   Isabelle   Kingsley,   Colton   Leno,   Aus-­ tin   McCullough,   Sierra   Norford,   MacGregor   Shannon   and   Lucas   Tremblay. Grade   11:   Mei   Lin   Barral,   Nora   Enright,   Andrew   Jerome,   Max-­ well   Maron,   Isaac   Roberts,   Laura   Beth  Roberts,  Margaret  Smith  and   Kirsten  Werner. Grade   12:   Taylor   Aines,   Grace   %DUW 2OLYLD %ORRPHU -RVHSK 'HPSVH\ -HVVLFD )UD]LHU %ULDQQD Hedding,   Mallory   Johns,   Christo-­ SKHU .H\HV 6XPD /DVKRI 6DYDQ-­ nah   Lynch,   Michelle   Maseroni,   Megan   McKeighan,   Cortney   Pol-­ MDFLN1LFROH:HEVWHU-XVWLQ:HG-­ in  and  Marley  Zollman. PRINCIPALâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  LIST Grade   7:   Joshua   Beayon,   Samuel   Buswell,   Ella   Chaney,   Meghan   Chaney,   Hayden   Gallo,   $UURQ *LDUG &OD\ +D\V 0LFNHHQ Hogan,   Timothy   Kittler,   Nicholas   /D&RLOOH /DXUHQ /DSH -XOLD /HH '\ODQ0DFNLH6RSKLH0DUNRZVNL 3DWULFN 0F.HLJKDQ ,VDEHOOH 1RODQ%HQMDPLQ6LNHV)R[&ROE\ 6PLWKDQG(WKDQ6XOLN'RW\ Grade  8:  Sabrina  Brown,  Aylala-­ NLQ+DUW&DUVRQ+ROPTXLVW2ZHQ .XOS $OH[DQGUD /HDU %HQMD-­ PLQ 0DUNRZVNL -XVWLQ 7UHPEOD\ Christina  Wiles,  Maxwell  Williams   and  Payson  Williams. Grade   9:   Kayleigh   DeRosa,   Meghan   Hallett,   Alexa   Moyer,   &ROOHHQ6PDUWDQG6RSKLH:RRG Grade  10:  Nathan  Bertrand. Grade   11:   Kylee   Bissette,   Fran-­ cis  Dolney  and  John  Winslow. *UDGH  0DULDK 0HUNHUW &ODLUH 6PLWKDQG(ULN6WDJH HONOR  ROLL *UDGH  -DFN $GDPV 0LFKDHO Bedard,   Nathan   Claessens,   Na-­ WKDQ'HSDWLH&ROOLQ(OOLRWW-RVKXD Granger,   Nathaniel   Hudson,   Ben-­ jamin   Klein,   Anna   Marie   Krans-­ Gould,   William   Mattsson,   Brenna   McCullough,  David  Mills,  Chaunc-­ ey  Moncrief,  Isaiah  Nelson,  Kath-­ ryn  Paynter,  Reilly  Shannon,  Jacob   White,   Daniel   Whitney,   Heather   :RRGDQG(OL]DEHWK:ULJKW   Grade   8:   Michael   Beauregard,   5REHUW &RRN .DWKU\Q &RROLGJH Michael   Daly,   Jared   Disorda,   Ol-­ LYLD*DLVVHUW'HUHN+DWFK&DO\V-­ WD +D\HV .DWOLQ ,IĂ&#x20AC;DQG %UDQGRQ -DQNRVN\ /XFDV -RQHV :LOOLDP .HOO\ %ULDQ .LOSHFN &RXUWQH\ Lee,   Joshua   Letourneau,   Ian   McRae,   Jacob   Miner,   Adrianna   Mitrano,  Eric  Notte,  James  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Neil,   0DGLVRQ 3DUNHU (PLO\ 3HUU\ *D-­ briela   Poalino,   Ashley   Reynolds,   Colby   Reynolds,   Cameron   Sil-­

ORZD\ 0DND\OD 6PDUW %ULWWDQ\ Stewart,  Christa  Wood  and  Wilson   Worn. *UDGH  'HUHN $LQHV .DLWO\Q $QGHUVRQ -RYH %DXWLVWD 6RSKLD Bloomer,   Rebecca   Brenenstuhl,   Courtney   Bushey,   Heather   Carroll,   Sarah   Dolney,   Olivia   Drew,   Chad   Eddy,   Grace   Euber,   Molly   Fisher,   Jillian  Flanders,  Scott  Furness,  Pay-­ ton  Hinds,  Benjamin  Jerome,  Tyler   Kimball,   Orion   Ladd,   Eric   Laugh-­ OLQ$OOLVRQ/RZHOO&RQRU0DFNLH Angelo   McCullough,   Myliah   Mc-­ Donough,   Molly   McGee,   Collin   3DUNHU $ELJDLO 3LQNRZVNL 7UHYRU Quigley,   Courtney   Randall,   Mi-­ FKDHOD5RVV&KORH6SH\HUV0HJDQ :HOFKDQG0DNDOD:ULJKW *UDGH  &ROE\ &DVH 0LND\OD &ODUN 1DWKDQ 'RW\ $PEHU (DVW-­ man,   Danielle   Eddy,   Maia   Ed-­ munds,   Jamee   Eugair,   Ben   Fran-­ coeur,   Alexis   Hedding,   Alexis  

/DSH .HHJDQ /D5RFN .ULVWHQ Lee,  Alaisha  Lucia,  Ann  Manning,   7UHYRU 3HGXWR 1LNNLWWD 3RZHOO Jason  Rice,  Logan  Riesterer,  Den-­ nis  Ryan,  Michaela  Shewin,  Cherie   Smith,  Samantha  Sumner  and  Matt   Wedin.   *UDGH  5\DQ %DUNHU +XQWHU Birchmore,   Marissa   Colburn,   Da-­ vid  Coolidge,  Brenda  Cram,  Conor   *DOOLSR$P\ 0DLOKLRW .DW\ 0F-­ Carthy,  Chyna  Meriman,  Margaret   Santell,   Josef   Scarborough,   Ka-­ trina  Taylor  and  Sarah  Young. Grade  12:  Devin  Beayon,  Sierra   Bodell,   Brittany   Bushey,   Alexia   Colburn,   Peggy   Sue   Cram,   Cait-­ lyn   Curtis,   Dougles   Friend,   Amy   Gauthier,   Barron   Harvey,   Julie   -DFNVRQ /XNH 0DUWLQ 5\DQ 0LOO-­ HU 1LFKRODV 0LVFKDQNR 1DWKDQ-­ iel   Mylott,   Candace   Price,   Kaley   Sanborn,   Forrest  Wright   and   Kyle   Wyman.

H

A reader from Bristol, VT writes,

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

June 9 Puzzle Solutions

I  will  sell  the  following  at  the  farm   located  at  2745  South  Randolph  Rd,   Randolph  Center,  VT   off  I89  exit  4  to  Randolph  Center,   go  right  at  the  college  (VTC)  onto  South  Randolph  Rd  and  3  miles  to   farm.    Watch  for  auction  signs.

021'$<-81(TH 67$57,1*#$0 FARM  MACHINERY,   TOOLS,  2  GREEN  HOUSES,  MISC

1

4

3

7

8

2

6

5

9

1

8 6

1 5

2 9

5 3

4 1

9 7

7 2

6 4

3 8

1

2

6

4

3

5

8

7

9

5 7

9 8

3 4

6 2

7 9

8 1

1 3

2 5

4 6

9

7

5

1

6

3

4

8

2

3 2

4 6

8 1

9 7

5 8

2 4

6 9

1 3

7 5

P

13

R

16

I

2

H E

3

I

R O

19

M O

MISC.

Bally  8x12  walk  in  cooler,  16x96  Green  House  w/furnace  &  fans,  20x70   Green  House  w/furnace  &  fans,  Sheep  or  Goat  sorting  gates  &  scale,   Comm   Chicken   plucker,     Cub   Cadet   125   lawn   tractor,   6x8   Building,   Chevy  p/up,  Peddlers  cart,  lawn  roller,  and  English  saddle.

Â

Â

Â

N

S

33

P

37

L

40

A

43

T

EAST  THETFORD,  VT 97/,&Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;)LHOG Email  address:  cwgray@valley.net            Web  address:  www.cwgray.com  

A

17

N 20

G R

C

27

R

U

R O E P E

A S T

R

O

57

R

P I

52

E

S

61

C O N

P Y

N C E

A

E

9

A R

I

10

S

A

I

S

28

E O

U

L

41

P

44

A 45

A

B

48

L

A

I 58

E

O I

G N E

D A

A R

A

G G

R E

L

A

N

L

V

A

G

E

E

I S

30

H

36

E

5XVVHOO6HQDWH2I¿FH%OGJ Washington,  D.C.  20510 senator_leahy@leahy.senate.gov

31

E

32

R

U

R O

R

A W

V

O

T

E

T

E

N O

N

W A

R

39

E

D

42

E 46

R L D

T

S 60

54

55

H O

56

T

I

O

T

A

O

B

I

T

N O

S

E

63 66

Contact Your U.S. Senators Sen. Patrick Leahy 1-­800-­642-­3193

P

E

22

49

E

12

A

S

H O

D

S T

35

53 59

11

A

U

Y

Y

R

62 65

N

N

R

18

29

B O O

P

15

I

S

N

T

L

S 21

24

38

L

8

L

34

E

7

V

F

B

F

A

51

I

F

47

A

AUCTIONEERS:  C  W  GRAY  &  SONâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S,  INC.      

26

6

C O M M A

14

S

25

64

TERMS  CASH,  GOOD  CHECK,  OR  MASTER  CARD/VISA  W/)((  

5

L

23

50

LUNCH  BY  WRIGHTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S 2ZQHU6WHZDUW6NULOO

4

N O

TOOLS

Metal  Cutting  band  saw,  Chains  &  binders,  Craftsman  welder,  Power   Matic  drill  press,  Grinder,  Anvil,  torches,  punch  press,  Husqvarna  455   chainsaw,  air  compressor,  sand  blaster,  Dayton  tool  box  w/tools,  Delta   planer,  hand  carts,  plus  quantity  of  small  tools.

ut u s!

Quotes are taken from reader comments submitted with subscription renewals.

AUCTION

      

e reader has to say abo

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great paper â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Thank you! Best photos in the state â&#x20AC;&#x201C; go Trent!â&#x20AC;?

AUCTIONS

-'  4WD  tractor  w/cab  &  loader,  -'4WD  tractor  w/canopy   &  loader,  -'  tractor,  )RUG1  tractor,  &DVH  skidsteer,  3RODULV ;34x4  Ranger,  :RUN6DYHU  hyd  bale  clamp,  1+  rake,  -'   hyd  push  spreader,  %HHIFR3pth  roto  tiller,  :LIR  hyd  bale  clamp,  NH   Baler  w/kicker,  Âś  Hay  elevator,  28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  hay  elevator,  (]7UDLOsteel   kicker   wagon,    :RRGHQ   kicker   wagons,   5LQJ tractor   chains,   SWK   )HUW  spreader,  9DOE\&+  3pth  chipper,  )RUGSWK  post  hole  digger,   %ULOOLRQSWK  seeder,  )HUJXVRQ2  bottom  plow,  1+tandem  rake   hitch,  &KDLQ  Harrow,  :KHHOharrow,  :KHHO  running  gear,  1+   hay   conditioner,   %DOHU   twine,   %6& WUDFWRU   w/tiller   &   mower,   3RWDWR   hiller,  SWK5RZ  cover  layer,  +HDGgate,  Farm  gates,  )XHO  tank  w/  12V   pump,  'HODYDO  milking  machine,  SS  pails,  0LQHUDOfeeders,    FG  fence   post,  :DWHUtubs  and  more.

h a t on w s â&#x20AC;&#x2122; e er

Sen. Bernie Sanders 1-­800-­339-­9834

SRC-­2  United  States  Senate Washington,  D.C.  20510 www.sanders.senate.gov


PAGE  44  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  9,  2014

If  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  sleeping,   Maybe  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  doing  it  wrong.

Experience  Recharging  Sleep

All SimmonsÂŽ mattresses are built so well you never have to flip them for the life of the mattress.

SUPER POCKETED COILâ&#x201E;˘ SPRINGS

THE GOLD STANDARD IN UNDISTURBED REST.

  

BROOKWOODâ&#x201E;˘ PLUSH   

&+$5/277(â&#x201E;˘ PLUSH   

$%5,$1$â&#x201E;˘

Twin Set ...... $299 Full Set ............. $379 Queen Set .............. $399 King Set ................... $699 Twin Set .... $1199 Twin XL Set ... $1349 Full Set ............ $1349 Queen Set ............ $1399 King Set ................. $1799 Twin XL Set ... $1699 Full Set ............ $1899 Queen Set ........... $1999 King Set ................ $2699 Cal King Set ............ $2699

1-800-261-WOOD 388-6297

  

'($1'5$â&#x201E;˘ /8;85<),50

Twin Set ...... $599 Twin XL Set ..... $799 Full Set .............. $799 Queen Set .............. $849 King Set ................. $1099

Twin XL Set ... $2199 Full Set ............ $2399 5(6725('63,5,76â&#x201E;˘ Queen Set ........... $2499 King Set ................ $2999 LUXURY PLUSH Cal King Set ............ $2999

$16/(,*+â&#x201E;˘

&+$5/277(â&#x201E;˘ ),50   

  

  

  

Twin XL Set ... $1899 Full Set ............ $2099 Queen Set ........... $2199 King Set ................ $2699 Cal King Set ............ $2699

&20)253(',&â&#x201E;˘ (;&/86,9(&20)257

Twin Set .... $1199 Twin XL Set ... $1349 Full Set ............ $1349 Queen Set ............ $1399 King Set ................. $1799 Twin XL Set ... $2949 Full Set ............ $3349 Queen Set ........... $3499 King Set ................ $4099 Cal King Set ............ $4099

  

Twin XL Set ... $2199 Full Set ............ $2399 Queen Set ........... $2499 %522./<1â&#x201E;˘ King Set ................ $3099 3/86+),503,//2:723 Cal King Set ............ $3099

Â&#x2021;FREE Delivery Â&#x2021;FREESet-up Â&#x2021;FREE Removal

5RXWH6RXWKÂ&#x2021;0LGGOHEXU\97www.woodwarevt.com+RXUV0RQGD\6DWXUGD\&ORVHG6XQGD\

Motion  Separation   Index

170

Monday, June 9, 2014  

Addison Independent

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you