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MONDAY    EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 26 No. 15

Middlebury, Vermont

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Higher  milk  prices  help farmers  play  catch-­up Yarn shop to offer yoga ‡$JURXSRIHQWUHSUHQHXUVLV RSHQLQJDEXVLQHVVWKDWFRPELQHVWKHPHGLWDWLYHTXDOLWLHV RIWZRDFWLYLWLHV6HH3DJH

By  ZACH  DESPART ADDISON   COUNTY   —   Local   dairy   farmers   are   riding   a   wave   of   high   wholesale   prices   that   some   say   ZLOO ÂżQDOO\ SXOO WKHP RXW IURP WKH dairy  crash  of  2009. “The   prices   we’re   receiving   now   are   much   stronger,â€?   said   Bob   Foster   of   Foster   Brothers   Farm   in   Middle-­ bury.  

Foster  said  much  of  the  surge  is  due   to  high  overseas  demand. Âł:HÂśYHVHHQDUHĂ€HFWLRQRIKLJKHU demand   for   product,   particularly   in-­ ternationally,â€?   he   said.   “We’re   now   exporting   upwards   of   17   percent   of   dairy  produced  in  the  U.S.â€? Foster  said  this  increase  in  exports   is  a  good  thing,  as  the  U.S.  dairy  in-­ (See  Milk  prices,  Page  15)

Monday, June 16, 2014

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36 Pages

75¢

Author  schools  writers in  environmental  activism By  WEYLAND  JOYNER RIPTON  —  Acclaimed  writer   and   activist   Rick   Bass   sparked   a   lively   discussion   about   activ-­ ism,   the   environment,   and   the   justice   system   when   he   gave   a   lecture  titled  “The  Joy  of  Being   Arrested�   at   Middlebury   Col-­ lege’s   Bread   Loaf   campus   this  

past  Thursday  morning. Bass  told  the  story  of  being  ar-­ rested   when   he   zip-­tied   himself   to   the   gates   of   the  White   House   to   protest   the   Keystone   XL   pipeline   the   day   after   President   Obama’s   State   of   the   Union   ad-­ dress  in  February  2013. (See  Bass,  Page  13)

ACSU schools seek new leaders ‡&RUQZDOO DQG%ULGSRUW ZLOOVSHQGQH[W \HDUORRNLQJ IRUQHZSULQFLSDOVDIWHUWKH FXUUHQWOHDGHUV OHDYH6HHVWRU\ RQ3DJH

Teams are set for D-II girls’ softball ‡7KH9HUJHQQHVYV)DLUID[ VHPLÀQDOGHWHUPLQHGZKR29 ZLOOIDFHLQ0RQGD\¡VFKDPSLRQVKLSJDPH6HH3DJH

The  race  is  on

MIDDLEBURY81,21+,*+6FKRROVHQLRUV0XUSK\*LDUGOHIW+DQQDK+REEV5DFKHO+RZOHWWDQG&DUV\Q%X[WRQDSSURDFKWKH¿QLVKOLQH LQWKHRSHQLQJURXQGRIWKHVHQLRUUDIWUDFHRQ/DNH'XQPRUHODVW:HGQHVGD\DIWHUQRRQ7KHWHDPPDGHLWWRWKH¿QDOVDQGWRRNVHFRQG place.  See  more  photos  from  the  lake  on  Page  2. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Musicians tackle Brahms, Chopin ‡7KH1RUWKHUQ7KLUG3LDQR 4XDUWHWZLOOSHUIRUPFKDPEHU PXVLFWKLV6DWXUGD\6HH$UWV %HDWRQ3DJH

Pipeline  foes  urge  PSB  to  nix  project By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY   —  Around   80   people   took   to   the  podium  at  the  Middlebury  Union  High  School   auditorium  on  Thursday  to  urge  the  Vermont  Pub-­ lic   Service   Board   to   reject   Vermont   Gas’s   pro-­ posed  natural  gas  pipeline  that  would  extend  from   Middlebury  to  the  International  Paper  Co.  mill  in   Ticonderoga,  N.Y. 7KXUVGD\œV ZDV WKH VHFRQG DQG ¿QDO KHDULQJ the  PSB  held  regarding  Phase  II  of  Vermont  Gas’s  

Addison-­Rutland  Natural  Gas  Project,  a  $70  mil-­ lion   pipeline   that   will   also   traverse   the   towns   of   Cornwall  and  Shoreham  and  be  drilled  under  Lake   Champlain  before  arriving  at  the  IP  mill.  The  plan   KDV GUDZQ FRQVLGHUDEOH ¿UH IURP DIIHFWHG ODQG-­ owners,   environmentalists   and   community   lead-­ ers  who  believe  the  pipeline  could  be  dangerous,   would   infringe   on   private   property   rights,   and   could  affect  the  water  quality  of  Lake  Champlain. Opponents  have  also  objected  to  the  notion  that  

WKH SLSHOLQH ZRXOG SULPDULO\ EHQHÂżW WZR RXWRI state  corporate  entities  —  IP  of  New  York  and  Ver-­ mont  Gas,  a  Canadian-­owned  company.  They  note   that  only  small  pockets  of  Vermont  residents  along   the  pipeline  route  would  be  able  to  tap  into  the  nat-­ ural  gas,  and  some  of  them  pledged  on  Thursday   not  to  become  consumers  of  a  product  that  is  cur-­ rently  about  half  as  costly  as  fuel  oil. “We  would  say  ‘no,’  we  absolutely  do  not  want   (See  Pipeline  hearing,  Page  22)


PAGE  2  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

MUHS seniors hit the lake

MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  held  its  annual   senior  raft  race  at  Lake  Dunmore  last  Wednesday   afternoon.  A  steady  rain  fell  during  the  races,  but   it  did  not  dampen  the  spirits  of  the  students,  who   built  their  own  rafts  and  raced  them  in  teams  of  four.   Pictured  are,  clockwise  from  top,  Kate  Knowles,  Leila   Kiernan,  Samantha  Cherrier  and  Kiera  Kirkaldy;;  Max   Livingstone-­Peters;;  Zaidie  Barnard-­Mayers,  Gabrielle   Ingenthron  and  Kate  DaPolito;;  Paige  Viens,  Tyler  Hogan   and  Olivia  Carpenter;;  Sam  Smith,  Keenan  Bartlett,   Kevin  Galenkamp  and  Sam  Usilton;;  and  Chris  Ryan,   Sara  Boe,  Sophia  Abdul  Sater  and  Julia  Cluss. Independent  photos/Trent  Campbell


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  —  PAGE  3

Cornwall  seeking  new  principal Bridport  Central   lands  interim  duo By  JOHN  FLOWERS CORNWALL  —  Two  of  the  Addi-­ son  Central  Supervisory  Union’s  sev-­ en   elementary   schools   —   Bridport   Central   and   Cornwall’s   Bingham   Memorial   —   will   be   led   by   interim   leaders   next   year   while   permanent   principals   are   being   recruited   this   coming  winter. Peter  Burrows,  ACSU  superinten-­ GHQW FRQÂżUPHG ODVW ZHHN WKDW IRU-­ mer  Mary  Hogan  Elementary  School   Principal  Bonnie  Bourne  and  current   Ripton   Elementary   Principal   Tracey   Harrington   will   co-­manage   Bridport   Central  for  the  2014-­2015  academic   year. Burrows  is  also  looking  for  a  per-­ son  or  team  to  lead  the  Cornwall  el-­ ementary  school  next  year,  in  light  of   the   recently   announced   resignation   of   Principal   Susan   Hackett.   Hack-­ HWW RQ :HGQHVGD\ FRQÂżUPHG VKH LV stepping  down  as  Cornwall  principal   in  order  to  help  her  husband  conva-­ lesce  from  a  serious  illness.  But  she   will  continue  to  be  a  presence  in  the   ACSU,   as   she   has   accepted   a   part-­ time   position   as   a   literacy   specialist   with  the  district. “I   need   to   scale   back   my   duties   in   light   of   my   husband   (Jimmy’s)   illness,â€?   Hackett   said   during   a   brief   phone   interview.   “He   has   a   surgery   coming  up.â€? Hackett  joined  the  Cornwall  school   last   year,   replacing   then-­Principal   Denise   Goodnow,   who   left   to   be-­ come   leader   of  Thatcher   Brook   Pri-­ mary   School   in   Waterbury.   Hackett   previously   worked   as   reading   inter-­ vention  teacher  at  the  Rutland  Town  

SUSAN    HACKETT School   and   as   afterschool   site   coor-­ dinator  at  the  Clarendon  Elementary   School.  She  is  also  past  principal  of   the   Plymouth   and   Sunderland   el-­ ementary  schools. Hackett   leaves   the   Cornwall   job   with   regrets,   but   knows   that   family   FRPHVÂżUVW “I  especially  enjoyed  the  children,â€?   she  said  of  her  brief  stint  at  Bingham   Memorial   School.   “It’s   the   nicest   group   of   kids.   And   it’s   a   very   sup-­ portive  community.  I  was  very  happy   to   get   this   position.   I   had   heard   so   many   good   things   about   Cornwall,   and  they  all  proved  to  be  true.â€? That   said,   Hackett   is   looking   for-­ ward  to  beginning  her  new  job.  She   holds  a  master’s  degree  in  reading. “It’s   my   passion,â€?   she   said   of   lit-­ eracy  instruction. Meanwhile,   a   transition   team   is   now   in   place   for   Bridport   Central.  

As   recently   reported   in   the   Addison   Independent,  Principal  Kathleen  Kil-­ bourne  is  stepping  down  this  month   to  take  the  top  administrative  post  at   Castleton   Elementary   School.   Kil-­ bourne   took   the   helm   of   Bridport   Central   in   July   of   2011,   succeeding   then-­Principal  Georgette  Childs. The   Bridport   School   Board   on   June   10   agreed   to   hire   two   current   ACSU  administrators  —  Bourne  and   Harrington  —  to  serve  as  an  interim   leadership  team  beginning  this  fall. “Our  goal  was  to  support  the  great   work  that  Kathleen  has  done  and  the   systems  she  has  put  in  place  in  Brid-­ port,â€?  Burrows  said.  He  noted  the  ad-­ vantage  of  hiring  two  people  already   familiar  with  ACSU  programs. Bourne   served   as   principal,   and   then  co-­principal,  at  the  Mary  Hogan   Elementary  School  in  Middlebury  for   more  than  two  decades.  She  stepped   down  from  that  role  last  year,  but  has   continued   to   serve   the   school   as   a   part-­time  administrative  consultant. Harrington   is   the   part-­time   prin-­ cipal   at   Ripton   Elementary   and   will   continue  in  that  role  in  concert  with   her   new   Bridport   duties.   She   joined   the  Ripton  school  in  2011  after  hav-­ ing  taught  math  at  Middlebury  Union   High  School  since  2000. Burrows   said   Bourne’s   and   Har-­ rington’s   combined   salaries   as   part-­ timers   next   year   will   amount   to   a   little   less   than   what   Kilbourne   has   been  earning  in  the  job. The   pair   will   devise   a   work   plan   WKLVVXPPHUWRGHÂżQHWKHLUUHVSHFWLYH responsibilities. “They  will  work  together  to  cover   the   needs   of   the   school,â€?   Burrows   said. Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

Republican  Milne  to  challenge  Gov.  Shumlin By  TOM  BROWN,  VTDigger.org MONTPELIER   —   Republicans   will  have  a  party-­approved  candidate   for  governor  after  all. Scott   Milne,   president   of   Milne   Travel  American  Express,  said  Thurs-­ day   he   is   entering   the   race   against   two-­term  Democratic  incumbent  Gov.   Peter   Shumlin.   Milne,   a   55-­year-­old   Pomfret   resident,   will   appear   on   the   GOP  primary  ballot  with  Emily  Pey-­ ton,  who  does  not  have  the  support  of   the   party   apparatus,   and   Steve   Berry   of  Wolcott. Admitting  that  his  chances  of  beat-­ ing  Shumlin  are  a  “long-­shot,�  Milne   said  he  looks  forward  to  bringing  at-­ tention  to  the  “failures  of  leadership�   in  the  Shumlin  administration. “My  goal  is  to  win,�  Milne  said.  “I  

at   least   plan   to   get   some   tangible   is-­ sues   on   the   plate   that   Shumlin   will   need  to  respond  to.  If  I  thought  he  was   doing  an  adequate  job,  I  wouldn’t  be   running.â€? Milne   said   he   would   run   a   “coun-­ terinsurgency,  low-­budget  campaign,â€?   and  would  work  to  raise  “some  money   to  be  competitive.â€? Milne  waited  until  the  last  day  can-­ didates   could   submit   petitions   to   the   6HFUHWDU\ RI 6WDWHÂśV 2IÂżFH WR DSSHDU on   the   primary   and   general   elections   ballots.   He   made   his   announcement   on  WDEV’s  The  Mark  Johnson  Show. Eric   Davis,   professor   emeritus   of   political   science   at   Middlebury   Col-­ lege,  told  VTDigger  it  is  going  to  be   D GLIÂżFXOW UDFH IRU 5HSXEOLFDQV WKLV year.   Milne   has   not   showed   any   evi-­

dence   of   building   a   strong   campaign   organization,  Davis  said. Nonetheless,   Davis   said   Shumlin   has  weaknesses  that  make  him  vulner-­ able  to  challenges  from  the  right.

UI June 19 nd– June 22

ACRPC  decides  not  to   change  vote  on  pipeline By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY  —  The  Addison   County   Regional   Planning   Com-­ mission   (ACRPC)   on   Wednesday,   June   11,   narrowly   rejected   a   re-­ quest   from   the   town   of   Cornwall   that   the   panel   rescind   its   earlier   vote  indicating  a  majority  opinion   that  Vermont  Gas’s  proposed  Phase   II   pipeline   could   comply   with   the   county’s  regional  plan. It   was   on   April   9   that   the   ACRPC  board  voted  15-­11  that  the   proposed  natural  gas  pipeline  from   Middlebury   to   Ticonderoga,   N.Y.,   could  pass  muster  with  the  Addison   County   Regional   Plan.   The   board   took   the   vote   in   light   of   the   Ver-­ mont   Public   Service   Board’s   on-­ going  review  of  the  pipeline  plan,   ZKLFKZRXOGDOVRĂ€RZWKURXJKWKH towns   of   Cornwall   and   Shoreham   and   under   Lake   Champlain   on   its   way  to  the  International  Paper  mill. Cornwall’s   ACRPC   delegation   of  Holly  Noordsy,  Jim  Duclos  and   alternates   Stan   Grzyb   and   Colin   Kriwox   introduced   the   motion   to   rescind  the  April  9  vote  on  behalf   of  their  local  selectboard. On  Wednesday,  the  board  voted   13-­10  against  the  motion. “I   was   pleased   that   the   motion   JRWWRWKHĂ€RRULQVSLWHRIVSLULWHG efforts   to   block   the   vote   by   any   means   possible,â€?   Noordsy   said   in   an   email   Friday   morning.   “I   was   of  course  disappointed  that  the  mo-­ tion  did  not  pass  but  the  very  close   13-­10  result  again  showed  a  com-­ mission  sharply  divided.â€? The   pipeline   plan   has   drawn   heavy   opposition   from   affected   property   owners,   environmental-­ LVWV DQG YDULRXV WRZQ RIÂżFLDOV The  communities  of  Cornwall  and   Shoreham  both  passed  Town  Meet-­ ing   Day   resolutions   opposing   the   $70   million   project,   which   would   be  underwritten  by  IP.

ST. MARY’S SCHOOL

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Street to Middlebury high school still closed MIDDLEBURY   —   The   Public   Works   Department   in   Middlebury   plans   to   continue   closure   this   week   of   Water   Street/Charles   Avenue   be-­ tween   Cross   Street   and   Middlebury   Union  High  School. Last   week’s   closure   of   the   street,   which   is   one   of   only   two   routes   to   08+6FDXVHGVRPHWUDI¿FEDFNXSV on  Cross  Street  and  Court  Street.   Water   Street/Charles   Avenue   was   UHRSHQHGWRWKURXJKWUDI¿FWKLVSDVW Friday   afternoon.   But   the   street   will  

be  closed    starting  on  Monday,  June   16,  at  7  a.m.  and  continuing  through   Wednesday,   June   18.  Access   to  Wa-­ ter   Street   will   be   limited   to   resident   WUDI¿F RQO\ $FFHVV RQ WKH VWUHHW WR Duane  Court  will  remain  open  from   the  south  during  this  period. 0LGGOHEXU\WRZQRI¿FLDOVVDLGWKH contractor   will   make   every   effort   to   re-­open  Water  Street/Charles  Avenue   at  the  close  of  work  each  day. Call  the  Public  Works  Dept.  at  388-­ 4045  with  questions  or  concerns.

Opponents   have   pointed   to   the   energy   section   of   the   Addison   County  Regional  Plan,  which  takes   a  position  against  the  construction   or   expansion   of   “large-­scale   en-­ ergy  or  transmission  facilitiesâ€?  that   serve   the   primary   purpose   of   fun-­ neling   energy   to   markets   outside   of   the  Addison   region.   Opponents   have  also  argued  that  Ticonderoga,   N.Y.,  should  not  be  considered  part   of  the  “Addison  region.â€? But  a  slight  majority  of  ACRPC   board  members  on  April  9  said  they   believed   the   Addison   region   ex-­ tends  beyond  the  county’s  borders.   Proponents  also  contended  that  the   county  should  not  oppose  a  project   that  would  offer  lower-­cost  natural   gas  to  Addison  County  businesses   and  homes;Íž  a  few  homes  in  Corn-­ wall  and  Shoreham  may  be  able  to   tap  into  the  pipeline. Cornwall’s   motion   drew   sub-­ stantive   debate   for   quite   awhile   at   the   June   11   ACRPC   meeting.   Adam   Lougee,   executive   director   of   the   ACRPC,   said   board   mem-­ bers   on   both   sides   were   given   an   opportunity   to   speak   before   the   closely  drawn  vote.   1RRUGV\JDYHKHUUHĂ€HFWLRQVRQ the  reasons  for  the  split  on  the  com-­ mission. “Most  concerning  ‌  is  the  con-­ tinued  inability  or  unwillingness  of   some   delegates   to   distinguish   be-­ tween  Phase  I  and  Phase  II  of  the   project   and   the   lingering   miscon-­ ception  that  the  vote  was  somehow   about   whether   a   given   delegate   ‘supported’  the  project,â€?  she  wrote.   “Delegates   were   not   charged   to   vote  on  support  or  non-­support  but   rather  to  determine  whether  or  not   the   Phase   II   project   conforms   to   the  regional  plan,  which  I  believe  it   clearly  does  not.â€? Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

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PAGE  4  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

A DDIS ON    INDE P E NDEN T

Guest  Editorial Health  care  providers  have   good  reason  to  be  anxious The  most  powerful  word  in  the  English  language  is  the  word  no.  That   is  particularly  true  to  people  and  organizations  who  consistently  depend   on  the  word  yes  to  get  things  done.  When  they  are  told  no,  they  have  to   change  what  they  do,  or  stop  doing  it.   When   Fletcher  Allen   CEO   John   Brumsted   last   week   was   quoted   as   VD\LQJKHGLGQÂśWVHHKRZDSXEOLFO\ÂżQDQFHGKHDOWKFDUHV\VWHPLQ9HU-­ mont  could  bring  in  enough  money  to  meet  its  needs,  he  was  assigning   more  power  to  the  word  no,  than  has  been  customary.  Fletcher  Allen  is   WKHSRXQGJRULOODLQ9HUPRQWÂśVKHDOWKFDUHV\VWHPLWQRUPDOO\JHWV what  it  wants  and  it  always  wants/needs  more.   Fletcher  Allen  is  not  the  only  800-­pound  gorilla  in  the  healthcare  pro-­ cess.   Blue   Cross   Blue   Shield   is   the   state’s   dominant   health   insurance   FRPSDQ\IRUWKRVHLQWKHKHDOWKFDUHH[FKDQJHWKHFRPSDQ\LVWKHLQ-­ surer  for  96  percent.  The  company  has  asked  for  an  average  rate  increase   of  9.8  percent  and  it,  too,  banks  its  business  on  the  ability  to  get  regula-­ tors  to  go  along  with  its  requests.   %XW RXU KHDOWK FDUH ODZ DQG RXU ÂżYHPHPEHU *UHHQ 0RXQWDLQ &DUH %RDUG *0&% DUHÂż[DWHGRQWKHZRUGQR+HDOWKFDUHFRVWVDSSUR[L-­ mate   19   percent   of   the   state’s   gross   domestic   product   and   it’s   the   ex-­ SUHVVHGREMHFWLYHRIWKH*0&%WRORZHUFRVWV That  means  saying  no.   A  lot.   To  the  800-­pound  gorillas.   Mr.  Brumsted  understands  that.  But  health  care  is  like  the  proverbial   three-­legged  stool.  It’s  built  on  access,  affordability  and  quality.  You  can   have   any   two,   but   you   can’t   have   all   three   without   one   suffering.   Mr.   Brumsted  is  looking  at  a  politically  based  system  that  will  be  inclined  to   say  no  to  the  money  necessary  to  provide  access  to  a  high-­quality  health-­ care  system.  He  worries  about  that.   Most   hospital   CEOs   share   the   same   concern.  With   good   reason.  All   they  need  to  do  is  to  point  out  the  poor  reimbursement  patterns  of  years   SDVW ,W ZLOO EH GLIÂżFXOW HQRXJK IRU WKH /HJLVODWXUH WR GHYLVH D SODQ WR generate  the  $2  billion  necessary  to  replace  what  we  pay  now  for  com-­ mercial  insurance.  But  our  costs  continue  to  rise  and  the  worry  is  that  the   /HJLVODWXUHZLOOQRWUHVSRQGZLWKWKHPRQH\WRNHHSSDFHZLWKLQĂ€DWLRQ-­ ary  needs.  Again,  the  state  has  a  poor  record  of  meeting  these  respon-­ sibilities.  We  need  to  look  no  further  than  state  appropriation  levels  for   higher  education.   But   hospitals,   like   our   university   and   state   colleges,   are   generally   YLHZHGDVELJHQRXJKDQGVWURQJHQRXJKWRVXUYLYHZKDWHYHUWKH/HJ-­ islature  can  toss  their  way.  Some  way  or  another,  they  always  manage.   Except  they  don’t.  The  cost  is  just  transferred  to  others  in  the  form  of   higher  tuitions  for  higher  education,  and  higher  insurance  costs  for  those   with  private  insurance.   ,QWKHVHH[DPSOHVVD\LQJQRLVQÂśWVRPHWKLQJWKDWVLJQLÂżHGWKHSRZHU of  new  thinking.  Rather,  it  was  the  “powerâ€?  that  comes  from  denying  the   need  to  think  things  through.  It’s  the  power  of  inertia.   If  the  mistakes  of  the  past  are  to  be  avoided,  we  will  need  a  level  of   transparency  and  trust  that  we’ve  yet  to  see.   What  hospitals  are  asking  is  this:  If  they  rebuild  their  systems  to  ac-­ commodate  a  new  set  of  expectations,  what  assurance  do  they  have  that   they  will  be  supported  in  that  effort?   What  hospitals  fear  most  is  the  word  no,  but  with  no  strategic  plan  be-­ hind  it,  leaving  providers,  including  insurance  companies,  to  battle  it  out   DPRQJVWWKHPVHOYHVOHDYLQJ9HUPRQWDWDWWHUHGKHDOWKFDUHODQGVFDSH ,WÂśV-XQH,QVL[PRQWKVWKHPDNLQJVRIDSODQQHHGWREHLQSODFH/LWWOH wonder  people  are  beginning  to  feel  anxious.   By  Emerson  Lynn St.  Albans  Messenger

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT Periodicals  Postage  Paid  at  Middlebury,  Vt.  05753

Postmaster,  send  address  change  to  Addison  Independent, 0DSOH6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQW‡‡)D[‡:HEZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP (0DLOQHZV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP‡(0DLO$GYHUWLVLQJDGV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP 3XEOLVKHGHYHU\0RQGD\7KXUVGD\E\WKH$GGLVRQ3UHVV,QF0HPEHU9HUPRQW3UHVV$VVRFLDWLRQ1HZ(QJODQG3UHVV$V VRFLDWLRQ1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ 68%6&5,37,215$7(69HUPRQW¹0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV2XWRI6WDWH¹ 0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV'LVFRXQWHGUDWHIRU6HQLRU&LWL]HQVFDOOIRUGHWDLOV  7KH,QGHSHQGHQWDVVXPHVQR¿QDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURUVLQDGYHUWLVHPHQWVEXWZLOOUHSULQWWKDWSDUWRIDQ DGYHUWLVHPHQWLQZKLFKWKHW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURURFFXUUHG$GYHUWLVHUZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\WKHPDQDJHPHQWLPPHGLDWHO\RIDQ\ HUURUVZKLFKPD\RFFXU 7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636

Fired  up MIDDLEBURY81,21+,*+6FKRROVHQLRUVJLYHRXWDFKHHUEHIRUHWKHLU¿QDODZDUGVDVVHPEO\ODVW )ULGD\PRUQLQJDWWKH0HPRULDO6SRUWV&HQWHU7KHVFKRROKHOGLWVFRPPHQFHPHQWFHUHPRQ\6DWXUGD\ PRUQLQJ6HHWKH7KXUVGD\HGLWLRQRIWKHAddison  IndependentIRUIXOOFRYHUDJH ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO

Letters to the Editor Many  helped  make  Sand  Hill  Bridge  project  a  success It  is  indeed  laudable  that  the   Sand  Hill  Bridge  was  completed   ahead  of  schedule  and  that  T.  Buck   Construction  did  that  great  work. As  an  East  Middlebury  resident,   I’d  like  to  see  credit  also  given  to  

our  local  businesses  that  contrib-­ uted  in  a  big  way  to  the  project,   namely  J.P.  Carrara  who  provided   the  bridge  components,  and  Cham-­ plain  Construction  who  provided   logistics  for  the  project,  to  name  

two  that  come  to  mind  immediate-­ ly.  There  probably  were  others. Thank  you  for  the  good  article. Jack  Brown Middlebury

Message  rings  true  for  natural  gas  pipeline  opponents I  was  moved  by  the  June  9  guest   editorial,  “Make  your  bed  perfectly,   and  don’t  ring  that  bell.�  I  also  had   read  and  watched  the  video  of  the   commencement  address  delivered   by  Naval  Admiral  William  H.   McRaven  to  the  University  of  Texas  

graduates.  I  highly  recommend   reading  or  watching  his  speech  in   its  entirety.  They  truly  are  “words  to   live  by.� The  admiral’s  address  struck   close  to  home.  For  me,  making  my   bed  brings  the  satisfaction  of  suc-­

FHVVIXOO\FRPSOHWLQJWKH¿UVWWDVNRI the  day.  Even  if  you  have  a  horrible   day,  you  know  you  have  a  freshly   made  bed  waiting  for  you  at  the  end   of  it. The  brass  bell  in  the  center  of  the   (See  Letter,  Page  5)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  —  PAGE  5

More  pre-­K  access ZLOOEHQHÂżWXVDOO /DVW ZHHN WKH JRYHUQRU VLJQHG WR EH ZHOO SUHSDUHG IRU NLQGHUJDUWHQ + DQ$FW 5HODWLQJ WR 8QLYHUVDO increased  from  24  percent  in  2007  to   3UHNLQGHUJDUWHQLQWRODZ$VDQHDUO\  SHUFHQW LQ  ZKLFK FRUUHODWHV and   active   supporter   of   this   legisla-­ with   when   the   school   district   started   WLRQ WKH 9HUPRQW (DUO\ &KLOGKRRG RIIHULQJ SXEOLFO\ IXQGHG SUHNLQGHU-­ Alliance  celebrates  the  passage  of  this   garten. historic  legislation  that  will  ensure  ac-­ 3UHNLQGHUJDUWHQ RIIHUV VNLOO GHYHO-­ cess  for  all  of  Vermont’s   opment   and   support   WKUHHIRXUDQGHOLJLEOH ZKHQNLGVQHHGLWPRVW ÂżYH\HDUROG FKLOGUHQ WR Many   parents   already   KLJKTXDOLW\ SUHNLQGHU-­ NQRZ WKDW SUHNLQGHU-­ garten.   This   week’s   writer   garten   is   good   for   their   H.270   builds   upon   is  Matt  Levin,  incom-­ NLGVDQGQRZVFLHQFHLV legislation   passed   in   ing   executive   direc-­ showing   that   too.   Stud-­ 2007  that  allowed  school   tor   of   the   Vermont   ies   show   that   90   per-­ districts   to   provide   pub-­ Early   Childhood   Al-­ cent   of   a   child’s   brain   OLFO\ IXQGHG SUHNLQGHU-­ liance.   He   and   his   is   developed   by   age   garten   for   age-­eligible   family  live  in  Berlin. ÂżYH EHIRUH D FKLOG HQ-­ FKLOGUHQHLWKHUWKURXJKD WHUV NLQGHUJDUWHQ *LY-­ public   school   or   private   ing   children   access   to   SURYLGHU,QWKH$JHQF\RI(GX-­ high-­quality   early   education   lays   the   FDWLRQ HVWLPDWHG WKDW MXVW  SHUFHQW IRXQGDWLRQ IRU IXWXUH OHDUQLQJ VNLOO of  age-­eligible  children  participated  in   EXLOGLQJDQGVRFLDOHPRWLRQDOGHYHO-­ SXEOLFO\IXQGHGSUHNLQGHUJDUWHQVWDWH-­ opment.   We   help   our   children   build   ZLGH&XUUHQWO\WRZQVLQ9HUPRQW strong  brains  and  the  best  possible  fu-­ GRQRWRIIHUSUHNLQGHUJDUWHQDQGPDQ\ ture  by  giving  them  access  to  quality   towns  have  low  participation  rates. early  experiences. H.270   will   increase   participation   $QGSHUKDSVMXVWDVLPSRUWDQWNLGV and   access   by   expanding   the   avail-­ ORYHSUHNLQGHUJDUWHQ,NQRZWKDWÂżUVW DELOLW\ RI TXDOLW\ SUHNLQGHUJDUWHQ KDQG EHFDXVH P\ ÂżYH\HDUROG VRQ education   to   all   families   who   choose   loves   going   to   our   local   elementary   to   enroll   their   age-­eligible   children.   VFKRROWKUHHGD\VDZHHN+HJHWVWR 6WDUWLQJ ZLWK WKH  VFKRRO EHZLWKWKHELJNLGVOHDUQDERXWQXP-­ \HDU VFKRRO GLVWULFWV ZLOO SURYLGH RU EHUVDQGOHWWHUVDQGVWDUWWREXLOGVNLOOV SD\ IRU DW OHDVW  KRXUV SHU ZHHN that   will   help   him   succeed   when   he   RI SUHNLQGHUJDUWHQ HGXFDWLRQ IRU  HQWHUVNLQGHUJDUWHQWKLVIDOO+HFDQÂśW ZHHNVD\HDUIRUDOOWKUHHIRXUDQG wait  to  get  started. ÂżYH\HDUROGFKLOGUHQZKRDUHQRWHQ-­ H.270   will   ensure   that   all   young   UROOHGLQNLQGHUJDUWHQLQWKHLUGLVWULFW children  in  Vermont  can  access  these   and   whose   parents   enroll   them   in   a   NLQGVRIKLJKTXDOLW\HDUO\H[SHULHQF-­ SUHTXDOLÂżHGSURJUDP es.  We  are  fortunate  that  Gov.  Shum-­ :K\LVSUHNLQGHUJDUWHQLPSRUWDQW" OLQ DQG WKH /HJLVODWXUH DUH PDNLQJ +LJKTXDOLW\ SUHNLQGHUJDUWHQ HGXFD-­ VLJQLÂżFDQW LQYHVWPHQWV LQ LPSURYLQJ tion  helps  children  reach  their  full  po-­ WKHHDUO\FKLOGKRRGV\VWHPIURPELUWK tential.  It  leads  to  higher  high  school   WKURXJK SUHNLQGHUJDUWHQ 7KHVH LQ-­ JUDGXDWLRQUDWHVIRUH[DPSOH3UHNLQ-­ vestments  will  have  a  positive  impact   GHUJDUWHQKHOSVRXUNLGVJHWVWDUWHGRQ on  the  rest  of  a  child’s  life  and  on  the   the  right  foot  and  avoid  problems  that   health  and  success  of  the  whole  com-­ end  up  costing  all  of  us.  Studies  show   munity  now  and  into  the  future. WKDW IRU HYHU\  LQYHVWHG LQ SUHNLQ-­ On   behalf   of   the   members   of   the   GHUJDUWHQZHVDYHLQIXWXUHSXEOLF 9HUPRQW (DUO\ &KLOGKRRG $OOLDQFH FRVWV IRU WKLQJV OLNH VXEVWDQFH DEXVH ,ZRXOGOLNHWRWKDQNWKHDGPLQLVWUD-­ treatment  and  corrections. WLRQWKHJRYHUQRUWKH/HJLVODWXUHDQG 3UHNLQGHUJDUWHQKHOSVNLGVEHUHDG\ all  of  the  people  who  contacted  their   WRPDNHWKHPRVWRINLQGHUJDUWHQ,Q legislators  to  declare  their  support  for   6SULQJÂżHOGIRUH[DPSOHWKHSHUFHQW-­ XQLYHUVDOSUHNLQGHUJDUWHQLQ9HUPRQW age   of   incoming   students   considered   $QGWKHNLGVWKDQN\RXWRR

Community

Forum

Parade  onlooker  was  insensitive My  niece  lost  the  use  of  her  legs   and  now  lives  in  a  care  center.  She   KDVWREHOLIWHGIURPEHGRUFKDLU HWFWRDZKHHOFKDLU $SHRSOHORYLQJSDWULRWVKHZDQW-­ ed  to  see  the  Middlebury  Memorial   Day  parade.  Her  wish  was  granted.   She  ran  her  wheelchair  up  into  the   EDFNRIDYDQDQGZDVWUDQVSRUWHG from  Rutland  to  Middlebury  and  a   spot  to  watch. She  wheeled  herself  from  the  van   to  a  spot  beside  it.  She  was  im-­ PHQVHO\HQMR\LQJWKHSDUDGHZKHQD QHZVSKRWRZDVWDNHQRIKHUZLWKD huge  smile. %XWDVSRLOHUH[WUHPHO\KHDOWK\ VFUHDPHGVKHZDVEORFNLQJKHU view.  It  sort  of  got  to  her  that  people   RIWRGD\ZRXOGNLFNDSHUVRQD FULSSOHRXWRIWKHLUZD\VRWKH\ themselves  have  the  best  spot  to  

ZDWFK1RWRQO\WKDWEXWWRZULWHD letter  to  a  paper  telling  its  readers   she  should  have  not  been  allowed  to   watch  that  parade. :HQRZOLYHLQDPHJHW\RXJHW world. Arnold  C.  Gale Salisbury

Letters to the Editor Green  technology  not  yet  able  to  meet  all  demands In  a  letter  to  the  editor  last   ZHHNHQYLURQPHQWDOVFKRODUDQG OHDGHU%LOO0F.LEEHQVKRZFDVHG the  progress  Germany  has  made   in  moving  from  fossil  fuels  to   renewable  energy  sources  as  a   UHDVRQZHVKRXOGUHMHFWDQDWXUDO gas  pipeline  in  Addison  County.   The  argument  goes  that  investing   in  a  fossil  fuel  infrastructure  only   PDNHVXVPRUHUHOLDQWRQIRVVLO IXHOVLQWKLVFDVHQDWXUDOJDV He  cites  one  day  in  Germany   when  the  country  generated  74   percent  of  its  energy  from  renew-­ ables  as  the  example  we  should   VWULYHIRU+HDUKHDU([FHSW\RX can  bet  that  day  wasn’t  in  winter.   8QIRUWXQDWHO\OLNHPDQ\ZKR RSSRVHQDWXUDOJDVKHIDLOVWR

distinguish  generating  electricity   from  generating  heat. ,QIDFW*HUPDQ\JHWVOHVVWKDQ 8  percent  of  its  heat  from  renew-­ able  sources  (mostly  biomass   OLNHEXUQLQJZRRGSURGXFWV 7KH country  has  set  a  goal  of  14  per-­ cent  of  its  heat  from  renewables   by  2020  —  a  far  cry  from  the  74   percent  one  might  infer  is  possible   IURP%LOO0F.LEEHQœVOHWWHU 6RODUZLQGELRPDVVKDYH made  great  strides  in  generat-­ LQJHOHFWULFLW\DQGPXFKPRUH VKRXOGEHGRQH%XWWKHUHDUHQR advancements  in  technology  on   the  horizon  that  will  allow  those   WHFKQRORJLHVWRKHDWIRUH[DPSOH Porter  Hospital  or  Middlebury   Union  High  School  or  even  my  

VKRXVH0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJH with  its  heavy  investment  in  a  bio-­ PDVVSODQW EXUQLQJZRRGFKLSV  DQGLWVJRDOWREHFDUERQQHXWUDO still  gets  50  percent  of  its  heating   RXWRIVOXGJHOLNHIXHORLO 7KHIDFWLVZHEXUQIRVVLOIXHOV LQWKHQRUWKHUQFOLPDWHVRUZHGLH economically  and  literally.  Until   VRPHRQHFDQVROYHWKDWZHDUH left  with  the  unfortunate  choice  of   which  fossil  fuel  to  burn.  Natural   JDVKDVSOHQW\RILVVXHVWREH VXUHEXWLWLVWKHEHVWDYDLODEOH technology  today  —  and  for  the   foreseeable  future  —  to  stay  warm   DQGPDNHDWOHDVWDVPDOOGHQWLQ carbon  dioxide  output. Peter  Conlon Cornwall

far  better  than  the  one  we  have   today  and  what  we  started  here  will   indeed  have  changed  the  world  for   the  better.� It  is  as  if  these  inspirational   words  were  written  for  the  Inter-­ QDWLRQDO3DSHUSLSHOLQHRSSRQHQWV who  are  growing  in  number  and   GHWHUPLQDWLRQHYHU\GD\:HNQRZ it’s  not  fair  to  the  landowners  who   DUHDVNHGWRKRVWWKLVSLSH:H NQRZLWœVQRWIDLUWRRXUFKLOGUHQ grandchildren  and  other  heirs  of   this  earth  to  build  more  fossil  fuel   infrastructure  that  will  add  to  our   climate  change  problems. And  so  we  will  face  down   9HUPRQW*DVZKLFKKDVEXOOLHGLQ-­

WLPLGDWHGWUHVSDVVHGDQGWKUHDWHQHG eminent  domain  to  landowners.  We   ZLOOQHYHUJLYHXSRXU¿JKWWRVWRS WKLVSLSHOLQH:HNQRZWKDWLIZH FRQWLQXHWR¿JKWZHZLOOZLQDQG the  next  generation  and  generations   to  follow  will  live  in  a  far  better   world  than  the  one  we  have  today.   :KDW9HUPRQW*DVKDVVWDUWHGKHUH ZHZLOOVWRSDQGZHZLOOFKDQJH RXUUHPDUNDEOHFRUQHURIWKHZRUOG for  the  better. ,NQRZWKDW,FDQVSHDNIRUDOO of  the  opponents  of  this  insidious   SLSHOLQHSURMHFWZKHQ,VD\ZHZLOO 1(9(5(9(5ULQJWKHEHOO Randy  Martin Cornwall

Letter   (Continued  from  Page  4) compound  symbolizes  the  easy  way   RXW,IWKLQJVEHFRPHWRRGLIÂżFXOW WRRKDUGRUWRRFKDOOHQJLQJMXVWJR ULQJWKHEHOO4XLWZDONDZD\DQG QHYHUORRNEDFN%XWWUXHZDUULRUV QHYHUULQJWKHEHOO7KRVHWKDWGR don’t  change  the  world. Mr.  McRaven’s  parting  words   are  worth  repeating:  “Know  that   life  is  not  fair  and  that  you  will  fail   RIWHQEXWLI\RXWDNHVRPHULVNV step  up  when  the  times  are  tough-­ HVWIDFHGRZQWKHEXOOLHVOLIWXS WKHGRZQWURGGHQDQGQHYHUHYHU JLYHXS²LI\RXGRWKHVHWKLQJV the  next  generation  and  the  genera-­ tions  that  follow  will  live  in  a  world  

Send  your  Letter  to  the  Editor  to:  news@addisonindependent.com

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PAGE  6  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

Two  ways  to  meditate  combined  in  one  new  Bristol  shop By  ZACH  DESPART BRISTOL   —   What   do   yarn   and   yoga  have  in  common?  Much  more   than  you  might  think,  it  turns  out. A   group   of   Addison   County   women  are  opening  up  a  yarn  shop   and   yoga   studio   —   appropriately   called   simply   “Yarn   and   Yogaâ€?   —   on   Bristol’s   main   drag   that   offers   both  of  those  things. One  of  the  group,  Bristol  resident   Elissa   Cobb,   explained   how   yarn   and  yoga  are,  in  fact, �� similar. “Why   not   combine   the   essence   of   meditative   qualities   of   knitting   with   the   mindful   properties   and   OLIHDIÂżUPLQJMR\VRIGRLQJ\RJD"´ Cobb   said   during   an   interview   at   the   store   Monday.   “We   found   a   lot   of   research   online   about   yarn   and   yoga,   and   the   Yoga   Journal   had   several  articles  about  the  meditative   qualities  of  knitting.â€? Cobb   said   the   epiphany   to   open   up   a   yarn   and   yoga   studio   came   to   her  in  a  dream. “Basically,   I   sat   up   in   bed   one  

morning   and   thought   ‘yarn   and   DJR WKHUH DUH ÂżYH RWKHU SDUWQHUV yoga,’â€?  Cobb  said. of   Yarn   and   Yoga.   They   are   Diane   She   pitched   the   idea   to   other   Corey,   Mary   McGuire,   Janet   Chill,   women   she   knew,   who   gave   her   Laurie  Lawy  and  Karen  McEachen.   positive  feedback. All  live  in  Bristol  except  McGuire,   Anne   Wallace,   who   resides   in   another   partner   of   New  Haven. “I don’t have an Yarn   and   Yoga,   The   group   UHFDOOHG WKDW ÂżUVW entrepreneurial rented   the   space   conversation. occu-­ bone in my body, formerly   “After  a  yoga  class   pied   by   Recycled   one   day   (Elissa)   but this sounded Reading   on   the   said,   ‘I   woke   up   like a fun group south  side  of  Main   thinking   about   yarn   Street.   Much   of   and  yoga,’â€?  Wallace   of women, and the  800  square  feet   said.   “I   don’t   have   I’m very interof  space  is  covered   an   entrepreneurial   with   shelves   for   bone   in   my   body,   ested in creating yarn;Íž   the   space   but   this   sounded   community.â€? is   cozy.   Cobb   like   a   fun   group   of   said   she’s   not   — Anne Wallace concerned   about   women,   and   I’m   very   interested   in   the  limited  space. creating  community.â€? “In   a   real   community,   people   In   addition   to   Cobb,   61,   and   bump  into  each  other,â€?  she  said. Wallace,   65,   who   retired   from   the   In  addition  to  its  meditative  bene-­ Addison   County   Parent-­Child   ÂżWV &REE VDLG NQLWWLQJ LV D JRRG Center   in   Middlebury   two   years   way   to   step   away   from   the   hustle   and  bustle  of  21st-­century  life  for  a   while. ADDISON “There’s   something   uniquely   COUNTY special  about  the  kind  of  communi-­ cation  and  learning  and  developing   when  people  sit  together  and  create   something  beautiful  rather  than  use   ASHEVILLE,   N.C.   —   Jean   the   elderly,   the   Democratic   Party   their   hands   for   technology,â€?   Cobb   Audrey   Puechl,   85,   passed   away   and,   together   with   her   husband,   said.   “Not   to   bash   technology,   but   peacefully   on   the   morning   of   May   served   often   on   behalf   of   their   we  don’t  want  to  lose  this  art,  the  art   30,   2014,   with   her   children   at   her   Unitarian   Universalist   congrega-­ that  happens  between  people.â€? side. tion.   In   later   years,   she   made   her   For  Cobb  the  new  studio  will  offer   Jean   was   born   Sept.   11,   1928,   in   home  in  Asheville,  N.C. her  a  way  to  cope  with  chronic  pain.   Salisbury,   Vt.,   the   third   daughter   She   is   survived   by   her   four   Three  years  ago,  she  was  diagnosed   of   Sedgwick   Preston   and   Beatrice   children,   Linda,   Carol,   Bob   and   ZLWK ÂżEURP\DOJLD D SDLQ GLVRUGHU Ann   Devoid.   She   grew   up   on   a   Marianne,   and   their   spouses;Íž   characterized   by   hypersensitivity   farm   in   Salisbury   and   attended   the   four   grandchildren;Íž   and   extended   to  stimuli  that  don’t  normally  cause   University  of  Vermont  in  Burlington,   family.   At   her   request,   her   ashes   pain. where  she  studied  music  education. will   be   buried   with   those   of   her   Âł,ZDQWHGWRÂżQGDSODFHZKHUH, While  in  attendance,  she  met  her   husband,   and   laid   to   rest   at   a   could  specialize  in  yoga  for  chronic   future  husband,  Karl  Heinz  Puechl,   later   date   at   Holman   Cemetery   in   pain,   gentle   yoga   and   restor-­ and   they   married   in   1949.   He   was   Salisbury,  Vt. ative   yoga,â€?   Cobb   said.   “It   has   a   nuclear   physicist   and   World   War   Memorial   donations   may   be   helped   me   calm   my   symptoms   of   II   veteran.   They   lived   in   several   made   to   the   congregation   she   and   ÂżEURP\DOJLD´ different   states   during   their   59   her   husband   were   last   most   active   Cobb   said   she   hopes   the   new   years  together,  including  New  York,   with:   UU   Fellowship   of   Hemet   &   studio   helps   others   cope   with   Pennsylvania,  Georgia,  Connecticut   San   Jacinto,   796   E.   Main   St.,   San   constant   pain.   For   that   reason,   she   and  California.  She  taught  music  and   Jacinto,  CA  92583. VSHFLÂżFDOO\VRXJKWDORFDWLRQZKHUH entertained   as   a   musical   performer   Condolences   can   be   made   to   the   customers   would   not   have   to   navi-­ throughout  her  life,  and  volunteered   family  at  www.ashevilleareaalterna-­ gate   stairs.   The   front   door   of   the   on  behalf  of  public  schools,  the  arts,   tive.com studio  is  right  off  the  sidewalk,  for   easy  access. Cobb   said   that   the   yoga   she   will   teach   at   Yarn   and   Yoga   will   EH JHDUHG WRZDUG WKRVH ZKR ÂżQG Consider yourself invited to movement  “less  easy.â€? “The   yoga   that   we   do,   anyone   can   come   and   take   part,   if   they’re   looking  for  something  that’s  a  little   bit   more   mindful,   restorative   and   Saturday, June 21st gentle,â€?   Cobb   said.   “It’s   not   going   to  be  vigorous  exercise  yoga.â€? Drop In Between 1&4 PM Cobb  is  no  stranger  to  the  ancient   Indian   art   —   she   taught   yoga   for   The Kirk Center at the Middlebury

Obituaries

Jean Puechl, 85, native of Salisbury

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ELISSA  COBB  AND  six  other  owners  will  open  Yarn  and  Yoga,  a  yoga   studio  and  yarn  shop,  on  June  20  in  the  former  Recycled  Reading  shop   on  Main  Street  in  Bristol. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

35   years   and   was   the   director   of   Phoenix   Rising   Yoga   in   Bristol   before   retiring   in   2012.   She’s   also   been   knitting   since   she   was   a   kid,   DQG VDLG VKH HQMR\HG VKRSSLQJ DW Knits   and   Bolts   in   New   Haven   before  it  closed.  So  to  her,  opening   a  yoga  and  yarn  studio  was  the  next   logical  step. “Those   are   two   things   I   love   to   do   —   why   couldn’t   they   be   in   one   place  at  the  same  time,�  Cobb  said. NOT  A  MONEYMAKER As  most  of  the  partners  are  retired,   Cobb  said  they’re  not  out  to  get  rich   on  this  venture.  Rather,  they  hope  to   build  a  center  for  the  community. “We   decided   we’re   only   going   to   do   it   as   long   as   it’s   fun,   we’re   having   a   good   time   together,   and   no  one  is  working  too  hard,�  Cobb   said. This   isn’t   to   say   they   won’t   run   Yarn  and  Yoga  like  savvy  business-­ women   —   but   if   the   money   starts   pouring  in,  all  of  it  won’t  be  lining   their  pockets. “We’d  like  to  get  our  investment  

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back,  and  we’d  like  it  to  be  success-­ ful,   but   we’re   not   in   the   business   to   make   a   lot   of   money,â€?   Cobb   explained.   “If   we   do,   we’re   going   WR ÂżQG ZD\V WR JLYH EDFN WR WKH community.â€? Cobb   said   she   hopes   the   studio   also  will  host  storytelling  nights  for   children,   and   plans   to   teach   yoga   and   knitting   to   people   of   all   ages,   from  teens  to  senior  citizens. Cobb   said   the   group   plans   to   hold  their  grand  opening  on  Friday,   -XQHMXVWLQWLPHIRUWKH3RFRFN Rocks  music  fair  and  street  festival   the  following  day.  The  store  will  be   open  10  a.m.-­8  p.m.  on  the  20th,  and   many   items   will   be   on   sale.   Cobb   said   the   group   is   also   putting   the   ÂżQLVKLQJWRXFKHVRQWKHLUZHEVLWH Despite  the  challenges  of  opening   a  new  business,  Wallace  said  she  is   optimistic. “I  think  that  we’re  going  to  make   this  a  really  fun  place  to  come  to,â€?   Wallace  said.  “It’s  going  to  be  inti-­ mate,  and  that’s  part  of  what  makes   it  exciting,  in  a  way.â€?

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PAGE  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

communitycalendar

Bristol  bash DOWNTOWN  BRISTOLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  MAIN  Street  is  closed  off  for  the  annual  Pocock  Rocks!  Music  Festival  and  Street  Fair  in  2012.  This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  festival  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  featuring  great  local  bands  and  danc-­ ing,  specialty  food  and  craft  vendors,  kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  activities  and  more  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;    is  on  Saturday,  June  21,  from  3-­8  p.m.  

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Jun

16

MONDAY

Vergennes  City  Band  rehearsal  in   Vergennes.  Monday,  June  16,  6:45-­8   p.m.,  VUHS  band  room.  Instrumentalists   of  all  ages  are  welcome  to  join  the  band.  Come   rehearse   for   the   summer   concert   series.   Info:   877-­2005.  

Jun

17

TUESDAY

Women   Business   Owners   Network   meeting   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,  June  17,  8-­9:30  a.m.,  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   restaurant.  This  month  Sarah  Gillen  presents  â&#x20AC;&#x153;3   Massive   Mistakes   Professional   Women   Make   That   Keep   Them   Overwhelmed,   Exhausted   and  Dreading  the  Next  Work  Day.â&#x20AC;?  Cost  $7  for   members,  $10  for  guests.  RSVP  to  info@nour-­ ishyourpurpose.com  Info:  www.wbon.org.   Senior   luncheon,   presentation   and   foot   care   clinic   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   June   17,   10   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center.   CVAA  sponsors  a  foot  care  clinic  at  10  a.m.  At   11:15,  The  Rhythmic  Paws  with  Peg  Cobb  and   company  will  performs.  Lunch,  at  noon,  is  roast   pork  loin  with  apple  maple  glaze,  oven-­roasted   yams,   red   potatoes   and   onions,   green   beans   almandine,   mesclun   mix   with   spinach   salad,   dinner   roll   and   cheesecake   with   strawber-­ ries.   Please   bring   your   own   place   setting.   Suggested  donation  $4.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   634.   Free   transportation   via  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Tai   Chi   for   Arthritis   evening   class   in   East   Middlebury.  Tuesday,  June  17,  5-­6  p.m.,  Valley   Bible  Church.  A  special  outdoor,  evening  class   sponsored   by   CVAA   for   adults   50   and   older.   ,PSURYHEDODQFHVWUHQJWKDJLOLW\DQGĂ&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\ Free.   Meets  Tuesdays   and  Thursdays   through   Aug.  14.  Register  at  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  1017.  

Jun

18

WEDNESDAY

Senior   luncheon   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,  June  18,  11  a.m.-­1  p.m.,   Bristol   American   Legion.   CVAA   invites   seniors   to   a   meal   of   pot   roast   with   vegetable   gravy,   mashed   potatoes,   Brussels   sprouts,   dinner  roll  and  sugar  cookie.  Suggested  dona-­ tion  $4.  Bring  your  own  place  setting.  Free  trans-­ portation   with   ACTR:   388-­1946.   Reservations   required:  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  610.   Caregiver  support  group  in  Lincoln.  Wednesday,   June  18,  1-­2  p.m.,  Lincoln  Library.  A  group  open   to  all  caregivers,  even  at  a  distance.  The  group   is  about  caring  for  yourself  during  this  process.   Info:  453-­2665.   Addison   Community   Action/CVOEO   open   house   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   June   18,   2:30-­6:30   p.m.,   54   Creek   Road.   The   public   is   invited   to   drop   by   and   see   the   organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   QHZRIÂżFHVSDFH/LJKWUHIUHVKPHQWVVHUYHG Chicken   BBQ   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,   June   18,  

5:30-­8   p.m.,   Bristol   green.   Annual   event   runs   until  the  chicken  runs  out.  Dessert  provided  by   the   Order   of   the   Eastern   Star.   Town   band   will   perform  after  the  BBQ.  Half  chicken  $10,  quarter   chicken  $7.50,  hot  dog  dinner  $3.50.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Seeds  of  Renewalâ&#x20AC;?  talk  on  Abenaki  agriculture   in  Ferrisburgh.  Wednesday,  June  18,  6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Lake   Champlain   Maritime   Museum.   Frederick   M.   Wiseman   and   Melody   Walker   Brook   piece   together   an   agricultural   calendar   complete   with   the   technical   and   ritual   compo-­ QHQWV RI ÂżHOG SUHS SODQWLQJ QXUWXUH KDUYHVW and  cuisine  based  on  the  Wabanaki  area  of  the   far  Northeast.  They  discuss  how  their  research   has  helped  the  Koasek  Abenakis  reconnect  with   their  agricultural  roots.  Cost  $5  per  person.  Info:   802-­475-­2022  or  www.lcmm.org.   Healthcare   Is   a   Human   Right   campaign   meet-­ ing   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   June   18,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Ilsley   Library.   Hosted   by   the   Vermont  Workers  Center.  Info:  343-­7565.   Blues  jam  in  Middlebury.  Wednesday,  June  18,   8-­10   p.m.,   51   Main.   Dennis   Willmott   from   Left   Eye   Jump   will   provide   lead   guitar,   bass   and   drums  if  you  need  backup  or  take  a  break  and   let  you  play.  Bring  your  instrument  and  get  ready   to  jam.  Info:  www.go51main.com.  

Jun

19

THURSDAY

Senior  luncheon  and  performance   in   Vergennes.   Thursday,   June   19,   11   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   St.   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Parish   Hall.   CVAA  sponsors  this  special  event  for  seniors  60   or  over  and  their  spouses  of  any  age.  At  11,  a   performance   by   singer/songwriter   Patti   Casey,   followed  at  noon  by  a  meal  of  turkey  and  cheese   spinach  wrap  with  cranberry  mayo,  potato  leek   soup,  salad  with  ranch  dressing  and  chocolate   torte  for  dessert.  Suggested  donation  $5.  Please   bring   your   own   place   setting.   Reservations   required:  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  615.  Free  trans-­ portation  through  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Arts  Walk  in  Vergennes.  Thursday,  June  19,  5-­7   p.m.,   downtown   Vergennes.   Monthly   celebra-­ tion   of   art   in   Vergennes,   with   over   15   venues,   including   the   Vergennes   Opera   House   and   Bixby   Memorial   Library,   displaying   work   by   local  artists.  During  the  farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  market  on  the   green.   Takes   place   the   third   Thursday   of   the   month.   Info:   http://vergennesdowntown.com/ mainstreet/vergennes-­arts-­walk.   Historical   society   potluck   and   meeting   in   Bristol.  Thursday,   June   19,   6-­9   p.m.,   Howden   Hall.   The   Bristol   Historical   Society   holds   a   potluck  at  6  p.m.  followed  by  Buzz  Kuhnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  poetry   at   7   p.m.   Handicap-­accessible.   Info:   453-­3439   or  453-­2888.   Concert   band   rehearsal   in   Orwell.   Thursday,   June   19,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Orwell   Village   School   band   room.   Musicians   of   all   ages,   abilities   and   instruments   are   invited   to   join   in.   Weekly   concerts   will   take   place   Thursdays,   July   3-­31,   on  the  Orwell  village  green.  Info:  www.facebook. com/OrwellTownBand.  

Jun

20

FRIDAY

Three-­day   Junior   Fishing   Derby   in   Vergennes.   Friday,   June   20,   5   a.m.-­8   p.m.,   Vergennes   Falls   Basin.   Free   event   for   kids   ages   3-­15.   Friday   ends   with   a   Karaoke   Dance   Party   from   6:30-­8   p.m.   Special  prizes  and  giveaways  all  weekend.  Info   and  pre-­registration:  877-­9986  or  marsulli@aol. com.  Continues  Saturday  and  Sunday.   Golf   tournament   in   Ferrisburgh.   Friday,   June   20,   9   a.m.-­2   p.m.,   Basin   Harbor   Club.   The   Teen   Challenge   Golf   Classic   is   a   fundraiser   for   substance   abuse   and   addiction   treatment   programs   in   Vermont.   Registration   at   7   a.m.,   tee-­off  at  9  a.m.  Fee  of  $125  per  person,  $450   per   foursome,   includes   greens   fees,   cart   and   awards   luncheon.   Info:   802-­635-­7807,   ggent-­ ley@tcvermont.org  or  www.tcgolfclassic.com.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Roots   of   Rock   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n   Rollâ&#x20AC;?   preview   event   in   Brandon.  Friday,  June  20,  5-­8  p.m.,  Compass   Music  and  Arts  Center.  To  kick  off  the  summer   exhibit   at   the   CMAC,   the   dance   duo   of   Dave   Allan  and  Erica  Hemond  will  demonstrate  some   of  the  dances  made  popular  in  the  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;50s  and  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s.   The  exhibit  will  feature  artifacts  of  the  early  rock   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;n  roll  era,  from  clothing  to  record  players.  It  runs   June  21-­Aug.  31.  Admission  is  free.   Rock-­it   Science   concert   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   20,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.   A   blow-­out   concert   to   cap   off   the   week-­long   Rock-­It   Science   program   for   young   musicians,   led   by   Clint   Bierman   and   his   rocker   friends.   Students   will   perform   both   covers   and   original   compositions.   Free.   Info:   382-­9222   or   educa-­ tion@townhalltheater.org.  

Jun

21

SATURDAY

Three-­day   Junior   Fishing   Derby   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,   June   21,   5   a.m.-­9   p.m.,   Vergennes   Falls   Basin.   Free  event  for  kids  ages  3-­15.  Saturday  events   include  lure  taping  and  a  Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Go  Fishing  semi-­ nar.   Free   BBQ   at   1   p.m.   Fishing   boat   rides.   Matteo  Palmer  provides  live  music  from  8-­9  p.m.   Special  prizes  and  giveaways  all  weekend.  Info   and  pre-­registration:  877-­9986  or  marsulli@aol. com.  Continues  Sunday.   Two-­day  4-­H/open  horse  show  in  New  Haven.   Saturday,   June   21,   8:30   a.m.-­4   p.m.,   Addison   County   Fair   &   Field   Days   grounds.   Twelfth   annual   show.   Entry   fees   $8   per   class.   Food   available   for   purchase   from   the   Silver   Hooves   4H   Club.   Free.   Continues   June   22.   Info   and   registration:   453-­3294   or   jill@wishfulthinking-­ farm.org.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Go  Birdingâ&#x20AC;?  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  June   21,   9-­11   a.m.,   Wright   Park,   Seymour   St.   Ext.   Meet   promptly   at   9   a.m.   for   a   two-­hour   guided   walk  for  beginning  birders  of  all  ages  along  the   Quest  Trail,  a  spur  off  the  Trail  Around  Middlebury.   Bring   binoculars   or   borrow   ours.   Snacks.   Family-­friendly,   but   not   for   strollers.   A   MALT/ OCAS  event.  Weather  questions?  989-­7115.  

Town-­wide   yard   sale   in   Salisbury.   Saturday,   June   21,   9   a.m.-­5   p.m.,   around   Salisbury.   Maps  will  be  available  showing  the  location  and   addresses   of   participating   homes.   The   church   and  library  will  also  participate.   Boy   Scout   tag   sale   fundraiser   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,  June  21,  10  a.m.-­3  p.m.,  Middlebury   American   Legion.   The   Middlebury   Boy   Scouts   will   hold   an   indoor   tag   sale   featuring   home   furnishings,   antiques,   tools,   knick   knacks   and   more.   Pocock   Rocks!   street   fair   and   music   festival   in  Bristol.  Saturday,  June  21,  3-­8  p.m.,  down-­ town  Bristol.  The  downtown  will  be  hopping  with   performances  by  well-­known  and  loved  regional   bands,  wine,  microbrews,  hard  ciders,  specialty   food   and   craft   vendors,   activities   for   the   kids,   and,   of   course,   Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   incredible   restaurants   and   shops.   Info   at   453-­7378   or   www.discover-­ bristolvt.com/pocock-­rocks.   BBQ  chicken  dinner  in  Brandon.  Saturday,  June   21,   4:30-­6:30   p.m.,   Brandon   United   Methodist   Church,   57   Carver   St.   Barbecued   chicken,   tossed   salad,   macaroni   salad,   baked   beans,   rolls,  beverage  and  dessert.  Adults  $10,  children   6-­12  $5,  children  under  6  free.   Summer   Salad   Supper   in   Monkton.   Saturday,   June   21,   5-­6:30   p.m.,   Monkton   Friends   Methodist   Church,   78   Monkton   Ridge.   Annual   Monkton  Friends  Methodist  Church  supper  with   a   menu   of   assorted   salads   and   baked   beans,   hot   dogs,   homemade   rolls,   pies   and   cakes.   Adults   $8,   children   6-­12   $4,   families   $20.   Info:   453-­2870.   Steak   and   lobster   dinner   and   dance   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,   June   21,   6-­11   p.m.,   Steak   $12,   lobster   $13,   combo   $22.   Dance   at   SPIHDWXULQJWKH5HWURÂżW2SHQWRWKHSXEOLF Advance  tickets  only.  Deadline  June  15.   The  Northern  Third  Piano  Quartet  in  Brandon.   Saturday,   June ��  21,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Brandon   Music.  The  quartet  will  perform  a  varied  cham-­ ber   music   program   including   Brahmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Piano   Quartet  in  C,  Op.  60,  and  the  Mozart  Duo  in  G   for  violin  and  viola  and  the  Piston  Duo  for  viola   and  cello.  Tickets  $15.  Reservations  and  info  at   802-­465-­4071.  

Jun

22

SUNDAY

Three-­day   Junior   Fishing   Derby   in   Vergennes.   Sunday,   June   22,   5   a.m.-­3   p.m.,   Vergennes   Falls   Basin.   Free   event   for   kids   ages   3-­15.   Fishing   5-­10   a.m.,  cleanup  10-­11  a.m.  Awards  ceremony  and   ice   cream   party   at   1:30   p.m.   at   the   American   Legion.   Info   and   pre-­registration:   877-­9986   or   marsulli@aol.com.   Two-­day   4-­H/open   horse   show   in   New   Haven.   Sunday,   June   22,   8:30   a.m.-­4   p.m.,   Addison   County   Fair   &   Field   Days   grounds.   Twelfth   annual   show.   Entry   fees   $8   per   class.   Food   available   for   purchase   from   the   Silver   Hooves   4H   Club.   Free.   Continues   June   22.   Info   and   registration:   453-­3294   or   jill@wishfulthinking-­ farm.org.  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  9

communitycalendar Strawberry   Festival   in   Monkton.   Sunday,   June   22,   noon-­3   p.m.,   Monkton   Central   School.   7ZHQW\HLJKWK DQQXDO HYHQW WR EHQH¿W WKH Russell   Memorial   Library.   Local,   fresh-­picked   strawberry  treats,  ice  cream,  cake,  hot  dogs  and   more.  All  genres  of  books  for  sale.  Silent  auction   of   local   goods   and   services.   Live   Quebecois   music.  Advance  book  donations  welcome.  Info:   453-­4471   or   russellmemoriallibrary@comcast. net.  

Jun

23

MONDAY

Drop-­in   crafts   and   activities   for   kids   in   Shoreham.   Monday,   June   23,   11   a.m.-­noon,   Platt   Memorial   Library.  All-­ages  program.  Meets  Mondays  and   Wednesdays  through  July  30.  Info:  897-­2647  or   platt@shoreham.net.   Preschool   story   time   in   Shoreham.   Monday,   June  23,  11  a.m.-­noon,  Platt  Memorial  Library.   Weekly   event   for   kids   ages   3-­5.   Runs   through   July  28.  Info:  897-­2647  or  platt@shoreham.net.  

Jun

24

TUESDAY

Senior   luncheon   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   June   24,   11:30   a.m.-­1:30   p.m.,  Russ  Sholes  Senior  Center.  CVAA   sponsors  a  noon  luncheon  of  roast  pork  cutlet   with  white  sauce,  beets,  mashed  potatoes,  sour-­ dough  Italian  bread,  and  carrot  cake  with  cream   cheese   icing.   Suggested   donation   $4.   Please   bring   your   own   place   setting.   Reservations   required:  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  634.  Free  trans-­ portation  via  ACTR:  388-­1946.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science   of   Soundâ&#x20AC;?   summer   reading   event   in   Orwell.  Tuesday,   June   24,   3-­4   p.m.,   Orwell   Free   Library.   Children   of   all   ages   are   invited   to  experience  sound  like  never  before.  Led  by   Rob  Zollman.  Audience  participation  event.  Info:   948-­2041.  

Jun

25

Birding  buddies BINOCULARS   IN   HAND,   young   bird-­ ers   negotiate   the   Quest   Trail   in   Middle-­ buryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Wright   Park   during   last   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Go  Birdingâ&#x20AC;?  event.  This  year,  the   family-­friendly   guided   walk   for   begin-­ ning   birders   is   on   Saturday,   June   21,   from  9-­11  a.m.   Photo  by  Joni  Osterhaudt

WEDNESDAY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weed   and   feedâ&#x20AC;?   garden-­ ing   get-­together   in   Monkton.   Wednesday,  June  25,  9:30  a.m.-­1  p.m.,   Willowell  Foundation  (Stoney  Meadow  Lane  and   Bristol  Road).  Weekly  summer  gathering  for  all   ages  and  levels  of  experience  to  lend  a  hand  at   the  Willowell  Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  teaching  garden  and   farm,   followed   by   a   lunch   of   brick-­oven   pizza.   Produce  harvested  goes  to  the  Walden  Project   and  local  schools  and  food  shelves.  Check  for   weather-­based   decisions:   www.willowell.org   or   info@willowell.org.   Youth   story   time   in   Shoreham.   Wednesday,   June   25,   1-­2   p.m.,   Platt   Memorial   Library.  

Weekly  story  time  for  kids  ages  6  and  up.  Runs   through  July  30.  Info:  897-­2647  or  platt@shore-­ ham.net.   Special   dinner   and   a   show   for   seniors   in   Bridport.   Wednesday,   June   25,   4-­6   p.m.,   Bridport   Grange.   CVAA   sponsors   this   meal   catered  by  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Restaurant  and  the  Grange.   The   ACHHH   Wellspring   Singers   perform   at   4   p.m.,  followed  by  a  5  p.m.  meal  of  baked  ham,   scalloped   potatoes,   fruit   salad   and   cookies.   Suggested  donation  $5.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  615.   School   of   Leadership   Afghanistan   presenta-­ tion   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   June   25,   5-­6:30  p.m.,  Ilsley  Library.  Author  and  journalist   Mary  Kerr,  just  back  from  two  months  in  Kabul   D 62/$ $IJKDQLVWDQÂśV ÂżUVW ERDUGLQJ VFKRRO for  girls,  will  share  stories  and  photos  from  the   lives  of  the  30  young  women  studying  and  living   there.  Refreshments  at  5  p.m.   Irish  music  session  in  Bristol.  Wednesday,  June   25,  6:30-­8  p.m.,  Recycled  Reading  of  Vermont,   20  Main  St.  Bring  your  instrument  and  join  in  the   jam  or  just  come  enjoy  some  lively  Celtic  music.   Info:  453-­5982.   The   Keating   5   in   concert   in   Brandon.   Wednesday,  June  25,  6:30-­8  p.m.,  Central  Park.   The  Keating  5  play  rock,  reggae,  blues,  ska  and   funk.  Info:  247-­6401  or  www.brandon.org.  Part   of  Brandonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free  summer  concert  series.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Porches   of   North   Americaâ&#x20AC;?   presentation   in   Addison.   Wednesday,   June   25,   7-­8:15   p.m.,   Chimney  Point  State  Historic  Site.  Historic  pres-­ ervationist   and   author   Thomas   Durant   Visser   presents   an   illustrated   program   on   the   history   and   architecture   of   porches   in   North  America.   Book  signing  and  refreshments  afterward  on  the   Chimney  Point  porch.  

Jun

26

THURSDAY

Strawberry   festival   in   Shoreham.   Thursday,   June   26,   5-­7   p.m.,   Shoreham   Congregational   Church.   Strawberry   shortcake,   strawberry   pie,   straw-­ berry   sundaes,   just   plain   strawberries,   ice   cream,   and   more.  Annual   event   sponsored   by   the  Shoreham  Congregational  Church.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ask   an   Herbalistâ&#x20AC;?   in   Lincoln.   Thursday,   June   26,   5:30-­7:30   p.m.,   Lincoln   Library.   Clinical   herbalists   Anna   Blackwell   and   Emily   French   will   hold   15-­minute   one-­on-­one   consultations   with   people   to   answer   their   questions   and   provide   personal   herbal   formulas.   Info:   www.

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LIVEMUSIC Cooper   and   LaVoie   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   June  19,  8-­10  p.m.,  51  Main.   Canopy   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   20,   9   p.m.-­midnight,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   The  Spectacular  Average  Boys  in  Middlebury.   Saturday,   June   21,   9   p.m.-­midnight,   Two   Brothers  Tavern.   Zephrus   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   27,   9   p.m.-­midnight,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.  

See  an  extended  calendar  and     a  full  listing  of  

O N G O I N GE V E NT S

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sweetgrassherbals.com.   Social   responsibility   business   networking   event  in  Bristol.  Thursday,  June  26,  5:30-­7:30   p.m.,   Aqua   Vitea,   74   Munsill   Ave.   Vermont   Businesses   for   Social   Responsibility   invites   forward-­thinking   business   professionals   for   an   evening   of   networking.   Learn   about   Aqua   Viteaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  socially  responsible  business  model  and   taste  the  companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  kombucha.  Free.  Register   at  http://conta.ccRafYXy.   Concert   band   rehearsal   in   Orwell.   Thursday,   June   26,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Orwell   Village   School   band   room.   Musicians   of   all   ages,   abilities   and   instruments   are   invited   to   join   in.   Weekly   concerts   will   take   place   Thursdays,   July   3-­31,   on  the  Orwell  village  green.  Info:  www.facebook. com/OrwellTownBand.   Historical   society   presentation   in   Salisbury.   Thursday,   June   26,   7-­9   p.m.,   Salisbury   Congregational   Church.   The   Salisbury   Historical   Society   welcomes   Bill   Powers   and   %ULDQ/LQGQHUZKRZLOOJLYHÂżUVWKDQGDFFRXQWV of  the  1957  Army  airplane  that  claimed  four  lives   in   Chittenden   and   its   remarkable   rediscovery   over  50  years  later.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer   Shortsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   June   26,   8-­9:30   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.  Middlebury  Actors  Workshop  presents   an   evening   of   hilarious   new   short   plays   about   love   and   life   at   its   craziest.   Runs   June   26-­29.   7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH 382-­9222  or  www.townhalltheater.org.  

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NORTHERN  THIRD  PIANO  QUARTET

Accomplished musicians tackle Brahms, Mozart, Chopin The   Northern   Third   Piano   Quartet   will  perform  a  varied  chamber  music   program   at   Brandon   Music   at   7:30   p.m.   on   Saturday,   including   Brahmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Piano   Quartet   in   C,   Op.   60,   as   well   as   Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Duo   in   G   for   violin   and   viola,  and  Pistonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Duo  for  viola  and   cello.   Chopinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Fantaisie-­Impromptu,   Op.   66   rounds   out  the  concert. With   mem-­ bers,   violinist   6RÂżD +LUVFK violist   Eliza-­ beth   Reid,   cel-­ BY GREG PAHL list   John   Dun-­ lop   and   pianist   Alison   Bruce   Cerutti,   the   Northern   Third   Piano   Quartet   has   performed   together   in   various   combinations   all   over   Vermont,   most   notably   at   Nor-­ wich  University  and  the  Barre  Opera   +RXVH)RXQGHGLQWKHHQVHP-­ ble  has  been  noted  for  its  strength  of   ensemble   playing   and   emotive   musi-­ cality,   offering   audiences   a   showcase   of  remarkable  Vermont  talent. +LUVFKPDLQWDLQVDSURIHVVLRQDOSHU-­ formance  career  as  a  guest  with  New   York   Chamber   Soloists   Orchestra   DQG +DQGHO 6RFLHW\ RI +DQRYHU DQG Boston,  and  as  a  member  of  other  top   Vermont   orchestras   and   groups.   Reid   is   in   high   demand   as   a   viola   soloist,   chamber   and   orchestral   musician   in   Vermont.  She  also  performs  with  Ari-­

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tions   or   information.   Brandon   Music   LVORFDWHGDW&RXQWU\&OXE5RDGLQ Brandon.   For   more   information   visit   brandon-­music.net. ROOTS  OF  ROCK  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  ROLL As  part  of  this  summerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brandon   Rocks   Onâ&#x20AC;?   events,   an   exhibit   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Roots  of  Rock  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;nâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Rollâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  will  be   showing   at   the   Compass   Music   and   Arts   Center   from   Saturday   through   the  month  of  August. The  exhibit  will  concentrate  on  the   ELUWKRIURFNDQGUROOPXVLFLQ (credited   to   the   movie   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blackboard   -XQJOH´ZKLFKSURSHOOHG%LOO+DOH\ÂśV Âł5RFN$URXQG WKH &ORFN´ WR 1R   up   to   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;British   Invasionâ&#x20AC;?   of   the  

SPECTACULAR  AVERAGE  BOYS

%HDWOHV DQG RWKHU JURXSV LQ  The   exhibit   will   also   cover   some   of   the   legendary   names   of   the   period   and   a   few   of   the   hundreds   of   sing-­ ers  and  bands  who  found  their  fame   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  some  long-­lasting,  and  some  very   short-­lived. $SUHYLHZHYHQWRQ)ULGD\IURP to   8   p.m.   will   feature   the   dance   duo   RI 'DYH $OODQ DQG (ULFD +HPRQG demonstrating   some   of   the   dances   PDGHSRSXODULQWKHVDQGÂśV Return  to  the  era  of  rock-­and-­roll  for   the  evening  with  your  favorite  music   and  dances. The   exhibit   will   feature   artifacts   of  the  period  from  clothing  to  record   players,   will   introduce   younger   gen-­ erations   to   a   time   before   iPods   and   mobile   music   and   will   bring   back   plenty  of  memories  for  everyone  who   grew  up  in  those  fast-­changing  times. Admission   is   free.   The   exhibit   is   supported   by   Compass   Music   and   $UWV)RXQGDWLRQDQRQSURÂżWGHYRWHG to   supporting   the   arts   (memberships   DYDLODEOHDQGGRQDWLRQVDSSUHFLDWHG  The  Compass  Music  and  Arts  Center   LV RSHQ VHYHQ GD\V D ZHHN IURP  DPWRSPDQGLVORFDWHGDW3DUN Village,  333  Jones  Drive  in  Brandon   (Park  Village   is   the   former   Brandon   7UDLQLQJ 6FKRRO ORFDWHG  PLOHV north   of   downtown   Brandon   off   of   $UQROG'LVWULFW5RDG  (See  Arts  Beat,  Page  11)

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for  additional  products   and  deals. Available  in-­store   starting  June  19th

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Mon. - Fri. 8-6, Sat. 8-5, Sun. 9-4 www.MiddleburyAgway.com

You  can  help  blaze  a  trail  towards  a  cure  for  Cystic  Fibrosis You  must  call  no  later  than  3pm  for  reservations  the  day  you   wish  to  dine  and  let  Fire  &  Ice  know  you  are  a  diner  supporting   the  Three  Day  Stampede.

)LUH ,FH)XQGUDLVHU7R%HQHĂ&#x20AC;W

JUNE 23, 24, 25 & 26 ONLY

Present  this  coupon  to  the  host  when  you  arrive  and  half  of  your  food  check  (less  bar  sales,  tax   and  gratuity)  will  be  donated  to  the  Three  Day  Stampede  for  Cystic  Fibrosis.  Discounts  and  gift   FHUWL¿FDWHVPD\QRWEHXVHGZLWKWKLVIXQGUDLVLQJHYHQW

7KH7KUHH'D\6WDPSHGH Dinners  and  Sandwiches   every  evening  starting  at  5pm and  lunch  on  the  weekends.   Reservations,  Please!

800-­367-­7166 or 388-­7166

JUNE 23, 24, 25, & 26 ONLY


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of June 16

SHADED  GRAY

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Arts  Beat   (Continued  from  Page  10) POCOCK  ROCKS   Main  Street  in  Bristol  will  be  rock-­ ing  with  music,  food  and  fun  on  Sat-­ XUGD\GXULQJWKHÂżIWKDQQXDO3RFRFN Rocks  Music  Festival  and  Street  Fair   from  3  to  8  p.m.  The  event  is  spon-­ sored  by  the  Bristol  Downtown  Com-­ munity  Partnership. 7KH GRZQWRZQ ZLOO EH ÂżOOHG ZLWK performances   by   well-­known   and   loved   regional   bands,   wine,   micro-­ brews,  hard  ciders,  specialty  food  and   craft   vendors,   activities   for   the   kids,   as   well   as   Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   restaurants   and   shops. There   will   be   two   separate   stages   for   the   musical   entertainment.   The   East  Stage  will  feature  Lynda  Malzac,   Sign  Language  Kids,  Patrick  Fitzsim-­ mons   and   karaoke.   The   West   Stage   will  offer  Waylon  Speed,  Abby  Jenne,   BandAnna  and  Gang  of  Thieves.   For   the   festival,   Main   Street   will   be   closed   between   North   Street   and   Mountain   Street,   but   motorists   will   be   guided   on   detours   through   town   to   destinations   to   the   east   and   west.   Additional   parking   will   be   available   around  downtown  Bristol. Pocock   Rocks   derives   its   name   from   the   original   name   of   Bristol,   incorporated   in   1762   and   named   af-­ ter   British   Admiral   George   Pocock.   In   2009,   the   festival   won   the   Green   Mountain  Award   for   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best   New   Event  in  Vermont.â&#x20AC;? ROCK-­IT  SCIENCE  CONCERT   Clint   Bierman,   members   of   the   Grift,   and   other   talented   local   rock   musicians   work   with   young   musi-­ cians   for   a   solid   week   on   musician-­ ship,   songwriting   and   performance,   ending  in  a  blow-­out  concert  on  Fri-­ day,  at  7  p.m.  at  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Town   Hall  Theater. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   program   is   so   popular   that   families   make   their   summer   plans   around   it,â&#x20AC;?   says   Education   Direc-­ tor   Lindsay   Pontius.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most   of   the   participants   have   been   involved   for   four  years.  The  skills  they  have  built   are   quite   extraordinary.   Some   of   the   bands  have  been  performing  together   in  local  venues  and  even  recording.â&#x20AC;? Student   performers   include   rock   school   veterans   Josh   Burnett-­Breen,   Tobias   Broucke,   Alex   Kite,   Bryce   Kowalczyk,   Zara   London-­Southern,   Ethan  Nerney,  Will  Ross,  Micah  Ru-­ bin,   DJ   Sandler,  Addison   and   Oziah  

GEMINI:  MAY  22-­JUNE  21  It  is  an  uphill  battle   have  reached  a  decision,  then  go  with  your  gut  in-­ to  focus  on  chores  this  week.  You  would  rather  be   stincts.   out  having  fun,  but  putting   AQUARIUS:   JANU-­ off   chores   now   will   only   ARY   21-­FEBRUARY   lead   to   more   work   down   18   Although   everyone   the  road. around   you   seems   to   be   CANCER:   JUNE   22-­ stressing   out,   for   some   JULY  22  Although  you  are   reason   you   are   able   to   capable  of  keeping  up  ap-­ breeze  through  your  days   with pearances   this   week,   you   without   a   worry   in   the   coupon will   be   lost   in   your   own   world. *excludes items already on sale thoughts.   Personal   issues   PISCES:   FEBRUARY   Exp. 6/21/14 prove  to  be  a  distraction. 19-­MARCH   20   Your   in-­ LEO:   JULY   23-­AU-­ tuition   is   telling   you   to   383  Exchange  Street GUST   23   Serve   as   a   dip-­ proceed   with   caution.   lomat   this   week,   placing   Watch   where   you   step,   Â&#x2026;ÂĄÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;¤Â?Â&#x161;­ª¹Ă&#x2C6;kppejjji yourself   in   the   middle   of   but  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  let  caution  take   FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWEHFDXVH\RXZDQW over  your  life. www.cacklinhens.com to  help.  Keep  a  level  head   ARIES:   MARCH   and   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   get   swept   into   21-­APRIL   20   People   the  argument. seem   to   be   going   out   of   VIRGO:   AUGUST   their   way   to   be   nice   to   FINAL 24-­SEPTEMBER  22  Your   you.  While  you  may  sus-­ ability   to   focus   is   very   pect   they   have   ulterior   WEEKS strong,   but   this   week   you   motives,   their   kindness   cannot   seem   to   get   your   really   is   nothing   more   mind   to   cooperate.   You   than  good  will. may  have  a  million  things   TAURUS:   APRIL   21-­ to  think  about. MAY   21   Approach   your   LIBRA:   SEPTEMBER   workload   with   an   opti-­ 23-­OCTOBER  23  You  are   mistic   attitude   this   week.   tempted   to   join   the   party   You   can   expect   your   ef-­ this   week,   even   though   forts   to   produce   positive   you  know  it  is  probably  a   results   that   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   go   un-­ better  idea  to  decline.  But   noticed. the  prospect  of  socializing   FAMOUS and  having  a  good  time  is   BIRTHDAYS too  tempting. JUNE  15 SCORPIO:   OCTOBER   Leah  Remini, 24-­NOVEMBER   22   You   Actress  (44) often   feel   uncomfortable   JUNE  16 when   you   have   too   many   Eddie  Cibrian, loose   ends.   It   may   take   Actor  (41) quite  a  while  this  week  to   JUNE  17 wrap  up  all  of  your  obliga-­ Greg  Kinnear, tions  before  you  can  relax. Actor  (51) SAGITTARIUS:   NO-­ JUNE  18 388-2800 VEMBER   23-­DECEM-­ Blake  Shelton, Congratulations BER   21   The   more   you   Singer  (38) High School Graduates! ponder   the   decisions   you   JUNE  19 have   to   make,   the   more   Kathleen  Turner, Mon.  -­  Fri.  9  -­  5:30,  Sat.  9-­2 you   struggle   to   determine   Actress  (60) ZZZPLGGOHEXU\Ă&#x20AC;RUDODQGJLIWVFRP a   positive   outcome.   Give   JUNE  20 5W6RXWK0LGGOHEXU\ yourself   some   breathing   Frank  Lampard, room. Athlete  (36) CAPRICORN:   DECEMBER   22-­JANUARY   20   JUNE  21 Career   issues   must   be   dealt   with.   You   may   have   Prince  William,  Royalty  (32) been   running   through   various   options,   and   if   you  

Wales  and  Jack  Waterman. The   concert   is   free,   but   donations   are  accepted  to  further  the  work  of  the   THT   Education   Program.   For   more   information   about   THT   Education,   contact   Lindsay   Pontius   at   educa-­ tion@townhalltheater.org. TWO  BROTHERS  TAVERN There   will   be   three   live   perfor-­ mances  this  week  at  the  Two  Brothers   Tavern  in  Middlebury.  On  Thursday,   Comedy  Night  returns  at  6  p.m.  Two   Brothers  is  proud  to  present  the  return   of  a  comedy  showcase  in  the  lounge,   this   time   featuring   the   talented   im-­ prov  comedy  troupe  Autoschediasm.   Local  comedy  is  alive  and  well.  There   is  a  $3  cover  charge. Then,   at   9   p.m.   on   Friday,   Two   Brothers  presents  Canopy.  Grounded   in   rock,   funk   and   blues,   with   an   af-­ ÂżQLW\ IRU SXVKLQJ ERXQGDULHV &DQR-­ py   is   tight   and   loose   in   all   the   right   ways.   The   lockstep   communication   displayed   by   these   three   musicians   results  in  precisely  executed  compo-­ sitions,  as  well  as  completely  unique   and  unpredictable  pieces  of  improvi-­ sation.  There  is  a  $3  cover. Finally,  at  9  p.m.  on  Saturday,  the   Spectacular  Average  Boys  take  to  the   Tavernâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  stage.  The  Spectacular  Aver-­ age  Boys  are  a  folk  band  that  rocks.   Or   a   rock   band   with   their   grandfa-­ thersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   instruments.   With   a   lineup   of   banjo,   guitar,   bass   and   drums,   the   Boys  take  ideas  from  traditional  folk   music   and   update   them   for   a   faster,   louder,  modern  generation.  There  is  a   $3  cover.  For  more  information,  call   388-­0002. LIVE  MUSIC  AT  51  MAIN There   will   be   two   live   musical   events  this  week  at  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  51   Main.  At   8   p.m.   on   Wednesday,   the   51   Main   Blues   Jam   continues.   Den-­ nis  Willmott  from  Left  Eye  Jump  will   provide   lead   guitar,   bass   and   drums   and   these   guys   will   back   you   up   or   take  a  break  and  let  you  play.  All  mu-­ sicians   and   blues   fans   are   welcome.   Everyone  will  get  a  chance  to  play. Then,  at  8  p.m.  on  Thursday,  Coo-­ per  &  LaVoie  take  to  the  stage.  Coo-­ per   &   LaVoie   play   a   great   mix   of   acoustic  blues  and  folk  classics,  fea-­ turing   Bob   Recupero   on   guitar   and   Mark  LaVoie  on  harmonica. All   ages,   no   cover.   For   additional   information   visit   www.go51main. com  or  phone  388-­8209.


PAGE  12  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

PUZZLES

Sponsored  by:

help keep the mind independent and active throughout life.

It's  As  Easy  As... By  Myles  Mellor  and  Sally  York

This  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  puzzle  is  rated Across

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  13

Bass   (Continued  from  Page  1) felt   that   Bass   took   too   much   for   He  was  arrested  along  with  a  cast   granted.   One   woman   pointed   out   RI QRWDEOH SXEOLF ÂżJXUHV LQFOXG-­ WKDW IRU %DVV ÂłDQ DWWRUQH\ ZLOO EH LQJ5REHUW).HQQHG\-UDFWUHVV WKHUH VKRUWO\ DIWHU WR VHW \RX IUHH 'DU\O +DQQDK DQG 0LGGOHEXU\ even  though  there  are  many  people   College   scholar-­in-­residence   Bill   in  this  country  who  do  not  have  that   0F.LEEHQ ZKRVH JURXS RUJ â&#x20AC;Ś  there  are  more  subtle  and  com-­ organized  the  demonstration. SOH[ZD\VWRHQJDJHZLWKSHRSOH´ The   proposed   pipeline   project   Another   audience   member   re-­ would   carry   tar   sands   called   protesting   the   RLO  PLOHV IURP â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a shame Vietnam  War. $OEHUWD &DQDGD WR WKH â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   was   hard   to   call   Gulf   Coast.   It   has   been   that while home   when   your   voice   a   major   item   of   nation-­ we were had   been   changed   by   al   contention   and   has   protesting, WHDUJDV´VKHVDLG drawn   sharp   criticism   Bass   acknowledged   from   environmental   or-­ the president that   a   protest   such   as   JDQL]DWLRQVVXFKDV was in this   one   can   be   a   spec-­ org. WDFOHEXWLWZDVDQHFHV-­ Florida, The   venue   for   Bassâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   playing golf sary  spectacle. lecture  was  not  a  politi-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  shame  that  it  is   cal  forum  per  se;Íž  it  was   with Tiger D GRJ DQG SRQ\ VKRZ´ the   1st   annual   Bread   Woods.â&#x20AC;? KH VDLG %XW KH DGGHG â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Author being  arrested  as  an  ac-­ Loaf   Orion   Environ-­ Rick Bass WLYLVWÂłLVDPHGLDFLUFXV mental   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   confer-­ ence.  The   conference   is   and  it  can  be  a  chink  in   FRVSRQVRUHG E\ 0LGGOHEXU\ &RO-­ WKHDUPRU´ lege   and   Orion   PDJD]LQH D OHDG-­ He  also  saw  such  arrests  as  only   ing  publication  of  environmentally   D ÂżUVW VWHS +H TXRWHG *DQGKL WR oriented  writing.   show  the  progression  that  such  ac-­ ,Q KLV WDON %DVV FDVW WKH GHP-­ tivism  ideally  takes:   onstration  as  a  successful  effort  to   Âł)LUVWWKH\LJQRUH\RXWKHQWKH\ raise  awareness  in  the  media  of  the   ODXJKDW\RXWKHQWKH\ÂżJKW\RX² Keystone  controversy.   DQGWKHQ\RXZLQ´ Âł%HLQJ DUUHVWHG ZDV IXQ´ KH Bass   also   criticized   President   VDLGÂłOLNHZKHQ\RXÂśUHRU\HDUV 2EDPD IRU ÂłODUJHO\ LJQRULQJ´ WKH old   and   you   get   to   go   with   your   issue  of  climate  change.   IULHQGVWRDELUWKGD\SDUW\´ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  shame  that  while  we  were   Some   members   of   the   audience   SURWHVWLQJ WKH SUHVLGHQW ZDV LQ

)ORULGD SOD\LQJ JROI ZLWK 7LJHU :RRGV´KHVDLG Bass  knows  a  thing  or  two  about   energy   development.   He   is   a   for-­ mer  oil  and  gas  geologist  who  be-­ gan   writing   short   stories   on   his   lunch   breaks.   Now   a   highly   re-­ VSHFWHG ZULWHU %DVV KDV LQFUHDV-­ ingly   turned   his   attention   to   envi-­ ronmental  writing  and  activism. %DVVZKROLYHVLQWKH<DDN9DO-­ OH\ RI 0RQWDQD LV FRPPLWWHG WR preserving   that   wilderness   and   others   like   it.   His   books   include   Âł:K\,&DPH:HVW´Âł$OOWKH/DQG 7KDW+ROGV8V´DQGÂł7KH/LYHVRI 5RFNV´ +H KDV YLVLWHG 0LGGOHEXU\ &RO-­ OHJH VHYHUDO WLPHV DQG LV D FORVH IULHQGDQGFROOHDJXHRI0F.LEEHQ who   resides   in   Ripton.   A   well-­re-­ spected   author   on   environmental   LVVXHV0F.LEEHQIRXQGHGRUJ as   an   effort   to   raise   awareness   of   carbon  dioxide  pollution. The   lecture   was   part   of   a   pro-­ gram  of  public  events  at  the  Bread   Loaf   Environmental  Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Con-­ IHUHQFH ZKLFK WRRN SODFH IURP -XQH,WDOVRLQFOXGHGZULWLQJ workshops  and  tutoring  for  its  par-­ ticipants.   $ORQJ ZLWK WKH 0LGGOHEXU\ 6FKRRORIWKH(QYLURQPHQWZKLFK will  have  its  inaugural  session  this   VXPPHU DV ZHOO WKH FRQIHUHQFH LV AUTHOR  RICK  BASS  talks  to  others  interested  in  his  craft  during  the   the  latest  in  a  series  of  environmen-­ Middlebury  Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  inaugural  Bread  Loaf  Orion  Environmental  Writ-­ tally  conscious  initiatives  launched   ersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  conference  in  Ripton  on  Thursday.   by  the  college.   Photo  by  Brett  Simison/Middlebury  College


PAGE  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

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GRAND OPENING!

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GRAND RE-OPENING

of our downstairs TOY DEPARTMENT! Check out our Toy Department & sign up to WIN one of 30 prizes! Ranging from $5 - $50!

& many more toys in our downstairs department! Drawing Saturday, June 28 at 2:30pm You do not have to be present to win. th

GRAND OPENING!

Self Serve Healthy Premium Yogurt

fresh fruit

choose from to several other toppings: +HDWK%DUVÃ&#x2022;&RFRQXWÃ&#x2022;6SULQNOHVÃ&#x2022;&KRFRODWH&KLSV )UHVK)UXLWÃ&#x2022;&DNH&UXPEOHÃ&#x2022;2UHRVÃ&#x2022;5LFH&DNHV and many more toppings for our frozen yogurt! 'RZQWRZQ0LGGOHEXU\0DLQ6WUHHWÂ&#x2021; 6XQ¦7KXUDPSP)UL¦6DWDPSP

Splish  splash

MIDDLEBURY   UNION   HIGH   School   senior   Nick   Felkl   gets   splashed  while  competing  in  the  senior  raft  race  on  Lake  Dunmore   last  Wednesday  afternoon. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Pops Concert and fireworks on tap June 27 in Middlebury MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Sheldon   Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  annual  outdoor  Pops  Con-­ FHUWDQG¿UHZRUNVLQ0LGGOHEXU\DUH D9HUPRQWVXPPHUWUDGLWLRQIRU$G-­ GLVRQ&RXQW\IDPLOLHVDQGWRXULVWV 7KH HYHQW FHOHEUDWHV WKH DQQL-­ YHUVDU\ RI ,QGHSHQGHQFH 'D\ ZLWK D FRQFHUW RI %URDGZD\ VWDQGDUGV SRSV DQG SDWULRWLF PXVLF RQ )ULGD\ -XQH  SHUIRUPHG E\ WKH 9HUPRQW 3KLOKDUPRQLF ,W WDNHV SODFH LQ WKH PHDGRZEHKLQGWKH0DKDQH\&HQWHU IRU WKH$UWV DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH ZLWKFRPPDQGLQJYLHZVRIWKH*UHHQ 0RXQWDLQV IROORZHG E\ D JORULRXV ¿UHZRUNVGLVSOD\ 7KH JURXQGV ZLOO EH RSHQ DW  SPIRUSLFQLFNLQJZLWKWKHFRQFHUW EHJLQQLQJ DW  5DLQ VLWH LV LQ 1HOVRQ $UHQD LQ WKH DGMDFHQW 0LG-­ GOHEXU\ &ROOHJH DWKOHWLF FRPSOH[  7KH HYHQLQJ ZLOO FORVH ZLWK YLYLG ¿UHZRUNV²UDLQRUVKLQH$WWHQGHHV DUH HQFRXUDJHG WR EULQJ Ã&#x20AC;DVKOLJKWV FKDLUVEODQNHWVDQGDSLFQLF 7KH 9HUPRQW 3KLOKDUPRQLF ZDV IRXQGHG LQ  E\ -RQ %RURZLF] DQG LV 9HUPRQW¶V ROGHVW FRPPXQLW\ RUFKHVWUD7RGD\WKH3KLOKDUPRQLF¶V PHPEHUPXVLFLDQV PRUH WKDQ  VWURQJDUHFRPPLWWHGWRWKHRUFKHV-­ WUD¶VWZRIROGPLVVLRQRIVKDULQJWKHLU ORYH RI PXVLF ZLWK DXGLHQFHV RI DOO DJHV DQG HQFRXUDJLQJ \RXQJ PXVL-­ FLDQVWRGHGLFDWHWKHPVHOYHVWRWKHLU PXVLFDO HGXFDWLRQ 7KH %RURZLF] 6FKRODUVKLSDZDUGHGDQQXDOO\E\WKH RUFKHVWUD WR D 9HUPRQW KLJK VFKRRO PXVLFLDQ SURYLGHV WKH RSSRUWXQLW\ IRU WKH ZLQQHU WR SHUIRUP ZLWK WKH

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GRAND OPENING!


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  15

CVOEO takes stock in the â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;American Dreamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   Somalia,   I   lost   my   mother   year,   Community   Action   agencies   and  my  father  at  age  seven.  I  ran  for   help   20   million   Americans   achieve   weeks,   actually   for   years:   was   hun-­ DQG PDLQWDLQ ÂżQDQFLDO VWDELOLW\ gry,  frightened  and  alone.â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  Nepal,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Services   offered   by   CVOEO   and   I   was   a   math   teacher.   In   Vermont,   Community   Action   agencies   across   I   work   in   a   factory.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   family   the   country   are   so   critical,   espe-­ owned   a   farm   and   land   until   it   was   cially   when   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   millions   of   taken   away   through   class   wars.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   people   facing   an   uncertain   econom-­ worked  for  the  U.S.  in   ic   future,â&#x20AC;?   said   Don   a  Middle  Eastern  coun-­ Mathis,   president   and   try,   now   I   work   as   an   CEO  of  the  Communi-­ interpreter   and   drive   ty   Action   Partnership.   a   taxi.   I   taught   my-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   are   people   self   English   and   will   who   worked   hard   and   be   graduating   from   played   by   the   rules,   the   a   U.S.   college.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   but   now   the   pressures   am   so   grateful   for   the   of   long-­term   unem-­ education   I   received   ployment,   foreclo-­ in   Vermont.   I   lived   in   sures,   and   dwindling   a  small  village  in  Viet-­ savings   are   putting   a   nam  and  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  go  to   tremendous   strain   on   school  there  until  I  was   them.â&#x20AC;?   10.  I  am  an  interpreter   CVOEOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  programs   QRZ´Âł,ÂżQDOO\OHDUQHG Bridging gaps, include   Head   Start;Íž   that  I  had  to  stop  whin-­ Weatherization;Íž   Fi-­ ing.   Things   are   what   building futures nancial   Futures;Íž   Voic-­ they  are.  In  the  Congo,   By Jan Demers es   Against   Violence;Íž   I   was   a   professional   Chittenden   Emer-­ Executive Director with  a  masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree.   gency   Food   Shelf;Íž   Here   I   am   completing   &KDPSODLQ9DOOH\2IĂ&#x20AC;FH Addison,   Chittenden,   my   associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree   of Economic Opportunity Franklin   and   Grand   and   working   as   a   re-­ Isle  community  action   ceptionist.â&#x20AC;? RIÂżFHV WKH 0RELOH +RPH 3URMHFW On   May   16,   CVOEO   held   its   all-­ Vermont  Tenants;Íž  and  the  Fair  Hous-­ agency   meeting.  We   had   an   hour   of   ing   Project.   With   such   an   array   of   cultural  competency  training  present-­ programs,   we   are   able   to   walk   with   ed  by  Jacob  Bogre,  executive  director   those   experiencing   poverty   through   of  the  Association  of  Africans  Living   the  crisis,  toward  stabilization  and  ul-­ in  Vermont.  This  was  followed  by  a   timately  out  of  poverty. panel   of   articulate   new   Americans.   Robert   Sargent   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sargeâ&#x20AC;?   Shriver   Jr.   Six   people   told   the   powerful   stories   was   a   statesman,   activist   and   an   ar-­ of   their   lives.   Some   were   refugees   chitect   of   President   Johnsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   War   Ă&#x20AC;HHLQJIRUWKHLUOLYHV6RPHZHUHLP-­ on  Poverty.  It  was  through  his  efforts   PLJUDQWV PDNLQJ GLIÂżFXOW FKRLFHV WR that  the  Peace  Corps,  Job  Corps,  Head   move   to   another   nation   without   any   Start   and   Community   Action   were   guarantee   of   support   or   assurance   created.   Fifty   years   later   we   listen   of   realizing   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;American   Dream.â&#x20AC;?   carefully   to   his   words   as   he   cautions   They  spoke  with  gratitude  laced  with   us,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Break  your  mirrors!  Yes,  indeed,   frustration.   We   need   to   hear   their   shatter  the  glass.  In  our  society,  which   words  and  to  understand  their  lives  if   is  so  self-­absorbed,  begin  to  look  less   we  are  to  be  good  neighbors.   at   yourself   and   more   at   each   other.   May   is   designated   as   National   Learn   more   about   the   face   of   your   Community   Action   Month.   Each   neighbor  and  less  about  your  own.â&#x20AC;?  

Aqua  Vitea  to  host  business networking  get-­together BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Vermont  Businesses   for   Social   Responsibility   (VBSR)   announces  that  Aqua  Vitea  in  Bristol   will   host   VBSRâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   next   Networking   Get-­Together  on  Thursday,  June  26,   from   5:30-­7:30   p.m.   VBSR   mem-­ bers,   friends   and   like-­minded   busi-­ ness  professionals  are  invited  to  at-­ tend  the  event  held  at  the  kombucha   manufacturerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   facility.   Attendees   will  taste  Aqua  Viteaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  product  line,   learn   what   social   responsibility   means  to  the  Aqua  Vitea  team,  tour   their   state-­of-­the-­art   brewery   and   see  how  they  are  bringing  kombucha   to  the  masses  in  a  sustainable  way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Aqua  Vitea  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  just  a  fun  com-­ pany   with   a   delicious   and   healthful   product,â&#x20AC;?   noted   VBSR   Communi-­ cations   and   Development   Manager   Scott   Buckingham.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   bring-­ ing   sustainable   jobs   to   Addison  

County,   working   to   build   and   sup-­ port   sustainable   business   practices,   utilizing   green   energy,   sourcing   local   and   contributing   to   a   healthy,   vibrant   community.â&#x20AC;?   Buckingham   noted   that   because   of   these   things,   VBSR  is  expecting  a  large  crowd  of   forward-­thinking   business   profes-­ sionals  to  attend  the  event. The   Networking   Get-­Together   is   free   to   attend   and   open   to   anyone   interested   in   the   triple-­bottom-­line   approach  to  business.  To  learn  more   about   the   event   or   register   to   at-­ tend,  visit  www.vbsr.org.  The  event   is   sponsored   by   Merritt   &   Merritt   &   Moulton,   SunCommon,   Green   Mountain  College,  Bristol  Financial   Services,   City   Market   Onion   River   Co-­op,  Common  Ground  Center  and   Poe  Wovens.  Food  and  drink  is  gen-­ erously  provided  by  Aqua  Vitea.

Milk  prices   (Continued  from  Page  1) dustry   is   now   known   as   a   reliable   supplier,   rather   than   one   that   just   dumps  surplus  on  the  global  market.   Agri-­Mark,   which   purchases   Fosters   Brothersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  milk,  exports  to  27  different   countries. Foster   said   that   China   is   a   major   destination  for  exports,  as  well  as  re-­ gions  without  a  large  dairy  infrastruc-­ WXUH OLNH 6RXWK$PHULFD WKH 3DFLÂżF Rim  and  the  Middle  East.  In  addition,   PLONLVQRWVROGMXVWDVDĂ&#x20AC;XLGSURGXFW Foster   said   that   lactose,   when   dried,   is  a  popular  food  ingredient  in  animal   feed.   Whey   proteins,   such   as   WPC   80,  are  used  for  infant  formulas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  take  the  whey  we  used  to  dis-­ card,   separate   the   protein   and   sugar   out  of  it,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;China  is  a  big  cus-­ tomer  of  WPC  80.â&#x20AC;? But  while  exports  may  open  up  the   U.S.  dairy  industry  to  more  markets  it   also  greatly  increases  risk  from  vola-­ tility   in   demand.   Foster   said   if   for-­ eign  demand  was  to  drop  as  little  as   2  percent,  prices  that  farmers  get  paid   could  drop  as  much  as  30  percent.  In   DGGLWLRQ WR Ă&#x20AC;XFWXDWLQJ GRPHVWLF DQG overseas   demand,   the   U.S.   dairy   in-­ dustry  is  increasingly  tied  to  the  value   of  the  U.S.  dollar  against  the  Euro  and   other  foreign  currencies. While  the  price  of  milk  is  currently   at   record   levels,   farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   operating   margins   are   still   relatively   tight.   De-­ pending  on  the  region  and  transporta-­ tion   costs,   the   current   price   per   hun-­ dredweight   is   around   $24.   The   price   of  production  has  also  risen  in  recent   years,  to  about  $19  per  hundredweight. In   2009,   when   prices   dropped   sig-­ QLÂżFDQWO\WKHSULFHSHUKXQGUHGZHLJKW was   as   low   as   $10   and   production   costs  were  $13  to  $14,  Foster  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Relatively,   the   margins   have   in-­ creased   from   2009   from   being   nega-­ tive  to  positive,  but  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  wildly   positive,â&#x20AC;?   Foster   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   impression   that   everyone   is   fat   and   happy  and  making  bundles  of  money,   but  much  has  gone  to  pay  production   costs.â&#x20AC;? But   even   though   farmers   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   awash  in  cash,  Foster  said  these  good   times  are  a  huge  lift  to  the  industry. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  are  paying  down  debt  and   becoming  current  on  past  obligations,   which  is  crucial,â&#x20AC;?  Foster  said. This  includes  unpaid  bills  to  veteri-­ narians,  feed  producers  and  other  sup-­ port  that  dairies  rely  on. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   an   industry   that   works   all   to-­ gether   and   is   very   local,   in   the   com-­ munity,â&#x20AC;?  Foster  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  why  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   really  helping  the  whole  economy.â&#x20AC;? The  veteran  farmer  noted  that  while   2014  has  been  good  to  dairy  farmers,   he  always  has  his  eye  out  for  the  his-­

June 21st Bristol

torically   volatile   swings   Foster   said   he   hopes   of   the   industry,   which   he   ´7KHSURĂ&#x20AC;W Congress   or   the   USDA   said,   when   graphed,   look   margins have implements   more   safe-­ increased from guards  to  protect  farmers   like  a  sine  wave. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Its   amplitude   over   the   2009 from against   economic   reali-­ last   15   years   has   gone   EHLQJQHJDWLYH ties  overseas,  which  U.S.   IURP DOPRVW Ă&#x20AC;DW OLQH WR policymakers   have   little   WRSRVLWLYH pretty   wild   swings,â&#x20AC;?   Fos-­ control  over. EXWWKH\¡UH ter  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  in  an  evolving   He   said   legislation   like   QRWZLOGO\ market   right   now,â&#x20AC;?   he   the   farm   bill,   which   was   SRVLWLYHÂľ said. ÂżQDOO\ UHQHZHG E\ &RQ-­ Âł%RE)RVWHU Foster   said   he   hopes   gress   this   past   February   the  high  prices  will  bring   after   more   than   a   year   of   delay,   has   stability   and   allow   younger   genera-­ helped. tions   of   farmers   to   enter   the   aging   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   more   variability,   and   the   industry. farm   bill   does   develop   some   tools,â&#x20AC;?   Âł+RSHIXOO\ LW ZLOO EH VXIÂżFLHQW Foster  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  the  rules  and  regula-­ to   bring   another   generation   into   the   tions  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  been  written.â&#x20AC;? business,â&#x20AC;?  Foster  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  see.â&#x20AC;?

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PAGE  16  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

ADDISON COUNTY

School Briefs Charles  Mulcahy  of  Middlebury   was  named  to  the  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list  for  the   spring   2014   semester   at   Lyndon   State   College.   Mulcahy   is   a   senior   majoring  in  criminal  justice. Emma   Craven-­Matthews   of   Middlebury   has   been   placed   on   the   deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list  of  the  College  of  Arts  and   Sciences   at   Cornell   University   for   the  spring  2014  semester.

Bench  builders

GRADY  DEVOID,  LEFT,  and  Zander  Wildasin  build  a  bench  over-­ looking   the   Vergennes   Union   Elementary   School   Outdoor   Class-­ room  pond  as  part  of  a  grade  6  service  learning  project.

Katharine  Cutting  of  Ferrisburgh   has   graduated   from   Boston   College   with  a  bachelor  of  science  degree  in   nursing   from   the   Universityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Wil-­ liam  F.  Connell  School  of  Nursing. Sonia   Howlett   of   Cornwall,   a   2014  graduate  of  Middlebury  Union   High   School,   on   June   13   at   the   08+6ÂżQDODVVHPEO\ZDVSUHVHQWHG with   an   engraved   bronze   medallion   to   recognize   her   selection   as   a   Dis-­ tinguished   Finalist   for   Vermont   in   the   2014   Prudential   Spirit   of   Com-­ munity  Awards. Howlett   participates   in   a   number   of   service   projects,   including   help-­ ing   at   the   public   library,   serving   in   student   government   and   volunteer-­ ing  with  her  local  4-­H  club.  

Saint  Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  College names  spring  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list COLCHESTER  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  following   local   residents   were   named   to   the   spring  2014  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list  at  Saint  Mi-­ chaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  College: Ethan   Baldwin,   son   of   Bruce   and   Donna   Baldwin   of   Vergennes,   a   graduate   of   Vergennes   Union   High   School;Íž   Lea   Gipson,   daugh-­ ter   of   David   and   Luella   Gipson   of   Vergennes,   a   graduate   of   Middle-­ bury   Union   High   School;Íž   Rachael   Lynch,   daughter   of  Ann   Larrow   of   Middlebury,   a   graduate   of   Middle-­ bury   Union   High   School;Íž   and   Jil-­ lian   Mulcahy,   daughter   of   Barry   and   Mari   Mulcahy   of   Brandon,  

a   graduate   of   Otter   Valley   Union   High  School. Also,   Nicholas   Paquin,   son   of   Paul   Paquin   of   Ferrisburgh   and   Jeanne   Senesac   of   Vergennes,   a   graduate  of  Vergennes  Union  High   School;͞  Cody  Randall,  son  of  Diane   and  Gregory  Randall  of  Brandon,  a   graduate  of  Otter  Valley  Union  High   School;͞  Amanda  Sanderson,  daugh-­ ter   of   Candy   Counter   of   Brandon,   a   graduate   of   Otter   Valley   Union   High  School;͞  and  Asa  Sargent,  son   of   Charles   and   Tiffany   Sargent   of   Ripton,   a   graduate   of   Middlebury   Union  High  School.

UVM  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list  announced

BURLINGTON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   follow-­ ing  area  residents  were  named  to  the   spring  2014  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list  at  the  Univer-­ sity  of  Vermont: Taylor   Allred   of   Bristol,   An-­ gela   Brisson   of   Shoreham,   Ashley   Brunet   of   Addison,   Anna   Carr   of   Whiting,  Morgen  Clark  of  Addison,   Madeline  Delaney  of  North  Ferris-­ burgh,   Patrick   Foley   of   Leicester,   Nina  Gage  of  Brandon,  Alexandria   Hall   of   Vergennes,   Robert   Hamil-­ ton   of   Lincoln,   Heath   Hescock   of   Bristol,  Asa  Hunt  of  Addison,  Seth   Beatrice  Shlansky  of  Ferrisburgh   Jewett   of   New   Haven,   Ruby   Kane   graduated  from  eighth  grade  at  Ma-­ of  Starksboro,  and  Lane  Kessler  of   ter   Christi   School   in   Burlington   on   North  Ferrisburgh. June   2.   She   received   the   Catherine   McAuley  Award  and  the  Presidentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Award  for  Educational  Excellence. POTSDAM,  N.Y.  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  follow-­

Also,   Brian   Kilbride   of   Ferris-­ burgh,   Devon   Lane   of   Vergennes,   Eliza   Mayer   of   Cornwall,   April   Mentzer  of  Ferrisburgh,  Reed  Mess-­ ner  of  Middlebury,  Ariel  Mondlak  of   Brandon,  Jenna  Munger  of  Brandon,   Dominique   Powers   of   Middlebury,   Hannah   Rickner   of   Bristol,   Tyler   Sawyer   of   Vergennes,   Kelsey   Scar-­ borough  of  Leicester,  Eben  Schum-­ acher   of   Ripton,   Katrina   Smith   of   Bristol,   Sylvia   Sword   of   Bristol,   Mariko  Totten  of  Salisbury,  Stephen   Van   Wyck   of   Ferrisburgh,   David   Viscido   of   Vergennes,   Anna   Wal-­ dron  of  Shoreham  and  Rachael  Zeno   of  Starksboro.

Students  score  high  at  Clarkson

Sarah  C.  Stanley  of  Brandon  has   been  named  to  second  honors  on  the   Clark   University   deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   list   for   the   spring  2014  semester.

County  students named  to  UNE spring  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list

Reader Comments H

h at w s â&#x20AC;&#x2122; e er

one reader has to say abo

ut u s!

ing  local  students  have  been  named   presidential   scholars   for   the   spring   2014  semester  at  Clarkson  Univer-­ sity: Adam  M.  Rainville  of  Lincoln,  a   senior  majoring  in  engineering  and   management;͞  Jessica  Hasler  Martin  

of  Starksboro,  a  freshman  majoring   in   chemical   engineering;͞   Spencer   Elliot   Griswold   of   Bristol,   a   soph-­ omore   majoring   in   mathematics   and   physics;͞   and   Nathan   T.   North   of   Vergennes,   a   junior   majoring   in   mechanical  engineering.  

B I D D E F O R D / P O RT L A N D ,   Maine   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   following   area   resi-­ dents  have  been  named  to  the  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   list   for   the   spring   2014   semester   at   the  University  of  New  England: Dustin   E.   Booska-­Moulton   of   Vergennes,   Madeleine   M.   Cox   of   Middlebury,   Emily   K.   Fleming   of   Bridport,   Kelsey   Foley   of   Bridport,   Hallie  E.  Logan  of  Bristol  and  Molly   V.  Wright  of  Middlebury.

A reader from Middlebury, VT writes, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thank you for great local reporting and thoughtful, informative opinions.â&#x20AC;?

June 21st Bristol

Quotes are taken from reader comments submitted with subscription renewals.

ADDISON COUNTY

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Moving  up William  Hillier  of  North  Ferrisburgh  and  Hannah  Freedner-­Ma-­ tesi   of   Vergennes   smile   for   the   camera   at   the   Lake   Champlain   Waldorf   Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   eighth-­grade   graduation   ceremonies   recently.   Freedner-­Matesi   is   wearing   the   dress   she   made   as   part   of   her   eighth-­grade  capstone  project.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  17

United  Technologies  Aerospace  Systems  based  in  Vergennes,  Vermont,  designs  and  manufactures   a  variety  of  systems  for  the  aerospace  industry  worldwide.  Our  systems  include  fuel  measurement   and  management,  health  and  usage  management,  motion  control  and  actuators,  fuel  safety  devices,   SUR[LPLW\VHQVLQJ¿UHSURWHFWLRQEUDNLQJDQGVWHHULQJ

ANNA    WILLENBAKER

Willenbaker  awarded Scholarship  of  Excellence ADDISON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Anna   Willenbaker,   daughter  of  Wendy  Willenbaker  and   Edward  Willenbaker  of  Addison,  was   RQHRI¿YH9HUPRQWKLJKVFKRROVH-­ QLRUVWREHDZDUGHGD6FKRO-­ DUVKLS RI ([FHOOHQFH E\ WKH RZQHUV RIWKH8QLYHUVLW\0DOOLQ%XUOLQJWRQ UHFHQWO\ TKH FROOHJH VFKRODUVKLS UHFRJQL]HVH[FHOOHQFHLQFRPPXQLW\ VHUYLFHOHDGHUVKLSDQGDFDGHPLFV :LOOHQEDNHU ZKR UHFHQWO\ JUDGX-­ DWHG IURP 9HUJHQQHV 8QLRQ +LJK 6FKRRO VWDUWHG KHU RZQ EDFN\DUG EXVLQHVV 6KHOOKRXVH &KLFNHQ (JJV,QVKHUHFHLYHGWKH$G-­ GLVRQ &RXQW\ 5HORFDOL]DWLRQ 1HW-­ ZRUN¶V ¿UVWSODFH %XVLQHVV (QWUH-­

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Notes of appreciation Northlands  thankful  for  your  support We  wish  to  thank  all  the   ZRQGHUIXOSHRSOHZKRFDPHWR RXU&DU:DVKDQG%DNH6DOHLQ 9HUJHQQHV:HUHDOO\DSSUHFL-­ DWHG\RXUVXSSRUWDQGJHQHURVLW\

7KHSURFHHGVZLOOKHOSIXQGRXU XSFRPLQJSURP Marguerite  Senecal  for  the   Northlands  Job  Corps  Students Vergennes

Community  helps  build  hockey  team 2QEHKDOIRIWKH0LGGOHEXU\ 8QLRQ+LJK6FKRROER\V¶YDUVLW\ KRFNH\WHDPZHZRXOGOLNHWRWKDQN DOOWKHPHPEHUVRIRXUFRPPXQLW\ WKDWKHOSHGXVDFKLHYHJUHDWWKLQJV WKLVVHDVRQ Finishing  the  regular  season  in   ¿UVWSODFHDQGPDNLQJLWWRWKHVWDWH FKDPSLRQVKLSDW890RQ0DUFK KHOSHGIXUWKHUWKHSURPLQHQFHRI KRFNH\LQ0LGGHEXU\:LWKRXWWKH VXSSRUWRIRXUIDPLOLHVWHDFKHUV FODVVPDWHV ZKRDUHWKHPRVWDPD]-­ LQJIDQFHHYHU\ )ULHQGVRI0LGGOH-­ EXU\+RFNH\DQGQXPHURXVORFDO EXVLQHVVHVDQGFRPPXQLW\PHPEHUV LWZRXOGQRWKDYHEHHQSRVVLEOH :HKRSH\RXDOOFRQWLQXHWR HPEUDFHDQGVXSSRUWWKHVSRUWRI KRFNH\DVLWFRQWLQXHVWRJURZLQRXU FRPPXQLW\:H¶GDOVROLNHWRJLYH VSHFLDOUHFRJQLWLRQDQGWKDQNVWRRXU FRUSRUDWHVSRQVRUV -XGJH&DWKHULQH%DUWOHWW&DQRS\ 7LPEHU$OWHUQDWLYHV,QF:LOOLDP

'H3URVSR(QJOLVK&DUUROO %RH 3&*6WRQH&RPPHUFLDO'LYLVLRQ *6WRQH0RWRUV,QF/DQJURFN 6SHUU\ :RRO//3/HPRQ)DLU ([FDYDWLQJ /DQGVFDSLQJ//& 0RXQWDLQ9LHZ(TXLSPHQW//& 5DQG\¶V0LGGOHEXU\6HUYLFH&HQWHU //&5ROODVRQ¶V3URSHUWLHVDQG6WRU-­ DJH:RRGZDUH*UHHQ3HSSHUVDQG %DUWOHWW'HYULHV%XLOGHUV$SSUDLVHUV $OVR$XGHW¶V%OXH6SUXFH)DUP DQG,QWHUQDWLRQDO3DSHU&R-3&DU-­ UDUD 6RQV&RQOH\ )RRWH/DZ 2I¿FHV)RUWK¶1*RDO6SRUWV6KHDU &XWV0*DOH%XLOGHUV0LGGOHEXU\ )ORUDODQG*LIWV3ORRI([FDYDWLQJ 5RVLH¶V5HVWDXUDQW&RXQW\7LUH &HQWHU,QF60%&XVWRP/DQG-­ ZRUNV//&9HUPRQW6XQ)LWQHVV DQGWKH9LHQVIDPLO\ Keenan  Bartlett  and Jordan  Stearns Co-­captains Middlebury  Union  High  School   Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Hockey  Team

Join  UTC  Aerospace  Systems  at  our  Job  Fair  to  learn  about  full-­time  opportunities  for  Manufacturing   Technicians  and  Assemblers.  Positions  are  available  on  a  variety  of  teams  and  shifts. Manufacturing Technicians & Assemblers Job Fair 6DWXUGD\-XQHÂ&#x2021;DPSP 87&$HURVSDFH6\VWHPV 100 Panton Road Vergennes, Vermont 3UHUHJLVWUDWLRQIRUWKHHYHQWLVUHTXLUHGWRUHFHLYHDQRQVLWHLQWHUYLHZ  To  register  for  this   event,  visit  ZZZXWFDHURVSDFHV\VWHPVFDUHHUVFRP  and  apply  to  the  appropriate  position: Â&#x2021;Manufacturing Technicians:  Job  Number  -­  4502314 Â&#x2021; Assemblers:  Job  Number  -­  4502429 All  applicants  must  be  US  citizens,  permanent  residents  or  have  designated  asylee  status.  If  you   are  unable  to  attend  the  event,  please  apply  online  atZZZXWFDHURVSDFHV\VWHPVFDUHHUVFRP. 8QLWHG7HFKQRORJLHV&RUSRUDWLRQLV$Q(TXDO2SSRUWXQLW\$I¿UPDWLYH$FWLRQ(PSOR\HU$OOTXDOL¿HGDSSOLFDQWV ZLOOUHFHLYHFRQVLGHUDWLRQIRUHPSOR\PHQWZLWKRXWUHJDUGWRUDFHFRORUUHOLJLRQVH[QDWLRQDORULJLQGLVDELOLW\ RUSURWHFWHGYHWHUDQVWDWXV


PAGE  18  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

SPORTS MONDAY

vs.   Brown   only   in   three   innings:   the   fourth   (on   a   Sierra   Benoit   single),   ÂżIWKDQGVHYHQWKDQGWKH\VFRUHGLQ WKHÂżIWK In  that  inning,  Kayla  Nester  walked,   moved  to  second  on  a  passed  ball  and   scored  on  an  Ashley  Williams  single,   all   with   none   out.   Then   came   what   Sullivan   called   the   defensive   play   of   the   game:  Aunchman   raced   in   to   catch   a   bunt   and   doubled   Williams   RIIÂżUVWZLWKDVWURQJWKURZ&DWFKHU Felicia  Armell  then  threw  out  the  next   runner  trying  to  bunt  her  way  on.   The  Commodores  played  errorless   ball  behind  Brown,  Sullivan  noted. â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   played   very   well,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  just  seemed  to  be  right  on  top   of  everything.â&#x20AC;? In  the  seventh,  Nester  singled  with   WZRRXWEXW%URZQVWUXFNRXWWKHÂż-­ nal  batter  to  end  the  game. Fairfax   coach   Geri   Witalec   said   the  Commodores  deservedly  won  the   contest  and  ended  the  Bulletâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  cham-­ pionship  reign.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wednesday   was   tough,   certainly   not   ideal   conditions   for   either   team.â&#x20AC;?   :LWDOHF VDLG Âł:H GHÂżQLWHO\ FDQÂśW blame  this  result  on  that.  Do  I  in  hind-­ sight  think  it  would  have  been  a  bet-­ ter  decision  not  to  start  the  game,  sure,   but  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  take  anything  away   from  Vergennes.  They  earned  it.â&#x20AC;? Witalec  also  praised  the  VUHS  se-­ nior  pitcher.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dani   Brown   is   phenomenal.   We   VERGENNES  UNION  HIGH  School  sophomore  Tamara  Aunchman,  above,  connects  with  the  ball  as  coach  Mike  Sullivan  watches  from  the  third   EDVHOLQHGXULQJ6DWXUGD\ÂśVJDPHDJDLQVW%)$)DLUID[%HORZOHIW)HOLFLD$UPHOOULSVDWKURZWRÂżUVWIRUWKHRXWDIWHUSLFNLQJXSDEXQW%HORZULJKW knew  coming  into  this  game  that  we   senior  Dani  Brown  struck  out  eight  BFA-­Fairfax  batters  in  the  Commodoresâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  3-­1  win  Saturday  afternoon. could  never  get  too  comfortable  in  the   Independent  photos/Trent  Campbell box,â&#x20AC;?  Witalec   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   has   a   great   selection  of  pitches.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  rare  you  are   (See  Softball,  Page  19)

98+6GHIHDWV%)$IDFHV29LQ',,ÂżQDO By  KYLE  THWEAT,  ST.  ALBANS   MESSENGER,  &  ANDY  KIRKALDY VERGENNES  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  In  Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  contin-­ XDWLRQRIWKH'LYLVLRQ,,VRIWEDOOVHPLÂżQDO game,   the   No.   2   Vergennes   Union   High   School  Commodores  outlasted  previously   undefeated   No.   3   BFA-­Fairfax,   3-­1,   to   DGYDQFHWR0RQGD\ÂśVÂżQDODJDLQVW1R Otter  Valley.   Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   game   was   started   on   Wednesday   but   was   suspended   with   98+6OHDGLQJLQWKHERWWRPRIWKHÂżUVW 2-­0,  and  then  in  what  has  been  a  prevailing   theme  throughout  this  season,  rain  caused   the  game  to  be  moved  to  the  weekend. VUHS  then  pushed  another  run  across   LQ WKH ÂżUVW DQG ZLQQLQJ SLWFKHU 'DQL Brown  (three  hits,  one  walk,  nine  strike-­ RXWV DOORZHGRQO\RQHÂżIWKLQQLQJUXQDV the  17-­2  Commodores  earned  the  right  to   IDFHWKH2WWHUVDQGDYHQJHGSOD\RII losses  to  Fairfax  in  each  of  the  past  two   seasons. While  the  Commodores  are  undefeated   in  D-­II  this  season,  OV  has  only  two  D-­II   losses,  and  avenged  one  of  them  by  blank-­ LQJ0RXQW$EUDKDPLQD',,TXDUWHUÂżQDO VUHS  coach  Mike  Sullivan  said  he  and   his  team  expect  a  tough  game.   Âł<RXKDYHWRKDYHVRPHOHYHORIFRQÂż-­ dence,  I  suppose.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  gotten  this  far,â&#x20AC;?   6XOOLYDQ VDLG Âł7KH\ÂśUH GHÂżQLWHO\ D YHU\ legitimate  team.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  have  our   hands  full.â&#x20AC;?

Last  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  game  between  VUHS  and   Fairfax   was   a   rematch   of   the   2013   D-­II   ÂżQDOZRQE\WKH%XOOHWV%XWEHIRUH WKH UDLQV LQWHQVLÂżHG RQ :HGQHVGD\ WKH Commodores  took  the  lead  this  time.   Commodore  senior  pitcher  Dani  Brown   retired   the   Bullets   in   order   in   the   top   of   WKHÂżUVWLQQLQJ%XWZLWKWKHUDLQFRPLQJ down  a  little  harder,  Bullet  ace  and  Ver-­ mont  Gatorade  Player  of  the  Year  Kayla   Mathieu   struggled   with   her   control   vs.  

VUHS.   Mathieu   walked   leadoff   hitter   Kayla  Charron,  and  threw  two  wild  pitch-­ es,  allowing  Charron  to  advance  to  third.   98+6 VHQLRU ÂżUVW EDVHPDQ (PLOHH Trudo   followed   with   a   bunt   single,   with   Charron   holding   at   third.   Mathieu   then   tossed   another   wild   pitch,   scoring   Char-­ ron   and   advancing  Trudo   to   second.   Se-­ nior   shortstop   Taylor   Paquette   then   put   GRZQ D VDFULÂżFH EXQW DQG D ÂżHOGLQJ HU-­ ror  allowed  Trudo  to  score  and  Paquette   to   reach   second.   After   Mathieu   walked   Brown,   the   umpires   suspended   play   un-­ til  Thursday.   But   rain   again   bumped   the   game  ultimately  to  Saturday. :KHQ SOD\ UHVXPHG RQ D GU\ ÂżHOG Mathieuâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   control   did   not   immediately   improve.   After   VUHS   third   baseman   7DPDUD$XQFKPDQ ODLG GRZQ D VDFULÂżFH bunt,   moving   the   runners   to   second   and   third,   second   baseman   K.C.   Ambrose   walked   to   load   the   bases.   Phoebe   Plank   then  walked  to  bring  home  Paquette  from   third,  and  the  score  was  3-­0,  Vergennes. But  Mathieu  (two  hits,  six  walks,  nine   Ks)   settled   down   to   work   out   of   further   trouble  by  inducing  two  ground-­ball  outs.   The   only   other   baserunners   she   allowed   came   in   the   third,   when  Aunchman   sin-­ gled  for  the  only  other  hit,  and  then  Am-­ brose   and   Plank   walked   again.   But   Ma-­ thieu   got   out   of   trouble   with   a   strikeout   and  popup. The   Bullets   got   baserunners   on   board  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  19

Softball (Continued  from  Page  18) going  to  see  that  fastball  right  down   the  middle  of  the  plate.â&#x20AC;? 6XOOLYDQFRQÂżUPHGRQ6XQGD\WKDW the  Otters  would  also  see  Brown  on   WKH PRXQG RQ 0RQGD\ DW  SP LQ 3RXOWQH\ 7KDW DOLJQPHQW DOORZV KLV RWKHUDFHSLWFKHUV3DTXHWWHDQG7UX-­ GR 7UXGR SLWFKHG LQ WKH  ÂżQDO and   Paquette   faced   the   Bullets   in   a   TXDUWHUÂżQDO WRSOD\VKRUWDQG ÂżUVWUHVSHFWLYHO\ Âł(YHU\WKLQJMXVWVHHPVWRIDOOLQWR place   behind   her   much   better,â&#x20AC;?   Sul-­ livan  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;She  does  have  great  spin   on  the  ball,  and  kids  have  a  hard  time   squaring  it  up.â&#x20AC;?

Schedule HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Softball Playoffs ',,*LUOV6HPLĂ&#x20AC;QDO 6/12  #3  Fairfax  at  #2  VUHS  .....................3-­1

Schedule

COMMODORES   KC   AMBROSE,   left,   and   Emilee   Trudo   celebrate  in  Vergennes  Saturday  after  beating  BFA-­Fairfax   LQWKH'LYLVLRQ,,VRIWEDOOVHPL¿QDO

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Softball ',,*LUOV)LQDODW3RXOWQH\ 6/14  #5  OV  vs.  #2VUHS  .....................7  p.m.

Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

MCTV  SCHEDULE  Channels  15  &  16 MCTV Channel 15 Tuesday, June 17   1  a.m.   ACRPC:  Planning  Commision  Meeting   4  a.m.   Future  of  Retail/Public  Meeting   8  a.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   9:30  a.m.   Eckankar   10  a.m.   Selectboard   12:15  p.m.   Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Future  of  Retail/Public  Affairs   6:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   7  p.m.   Selectboard   9:30  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II  Wednesday, June 18   12:30  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   2:30  a.m.   Future  of  Retail  DP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   5:30  a.m.   Future  of  Retail   7:30  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   9  a.m.   Public  Affairs   10  a.m.   Selectboard   12:10  p.m.   ACRPC:  Planning  Commission  Meeting   4:30  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   5  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios     6  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   6:31  p.m.   Eckankar:  A  Talk  by  Sri  Kemp   7  p.m.   Development  Review  Board  (DRB)   9  p.m.   Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II/Public  Affairs Thursday, June 19  DP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   2  a.m.   The  Future  of  Retail   4  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   5:20  a.m.   Selectboard   7:30  a.m.   DRB   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone  DP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   Noon   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   4:30  p.m.   The  Way  Home  (GNAT)   5  p.m.   Public  Affairs   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   The  Future  of  Retail   8  p.m.   ACRPC:  Planning  Commission  Meeting  Friday, June 20   4  a.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   7  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9:05  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   10  a.m.   Selectboard

  12:15  p.m.   DRB   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   The  Way  Home   6:30  p.m.   Eckankar   7  p.m.   ACRPC:  Planning  Commission  Meeting Saturday, June 21   5  a.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9:01  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard  SP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   6:30  p.m.   The  Future  of  Retail  SP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   10:30  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II Sunday, June 22   2  a.m.   The  Future  of  Retail  DP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   6  a.m.   The  Way  Home  (GNAT)   6:30  a.m.   Words  of  Peace   7:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   8  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9  a.m.   Catholic  Mass   11  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   12:30  p.m.   Public  Meetings/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service     5:30  p.m.   Eckankar   6:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   Catholic  Mass   7:31  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   8:05  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II Monday, June 23   4  a.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   8  a.m.   Eckankar   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs  SP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   DRB/Public  Affairs   10  p.m.   Eckankar:  A  Talk  by  Sri  Kemp   10:30  p.m.   The  Way  Home   11  p.m.   The  Future  of  Retail METV Channel 16 Tuesday, June 17   5  a.m.   The  Learning  Curve

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please  see  the  MCTV  website,  www.middleburycommunitytv.org,  for  changes  in  the  schedule;  MCTV  events,   classes  and  news;  and  to  view  many  programs  online.  Submit  listings  to  the  above  address,  or  call  388-­3062.

  5:30  a.m.   Yoga   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0     7  a.m.   Vermont  Board  of  Education   11:15  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   1:12  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert     Chorale  Spring  Concert   3:30  p.m.   The  Learning  Curve   4  p.m.   François  Clemmons  Sings  Songs  of  Freedom   5:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   7:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   8:30  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation   11  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Wednesday, June 18   4  a.m.   MUHS  Graduation   6:30  a.m.   Yoga   8:30  a.m.   MUHS  Graduation   Noon   Middlebury  Five-­0   12:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   2:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   3:12  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert     Chorale  Spring  Concert   4:30  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   6  p.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   7  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   9  p.m.   Gardening  in  Vermont   10  p.m.   François  Clemmons  Sings  Songs  of  Freedom Thursday, June 19   4:30  a.m.   Yoga   4:55  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6:30  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education   1:30  p.m.   François  Clemmons  Sings  Songs  of  Freedom   3:30  p.m.   Gardening  in  Vermont   4:30  p.m.   Yoga   5  p.m.   The  Learning  Curve   5:45  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert  Chorale   Spring  Concert   7:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   8:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0 Friday, June 20   5:30  a.m.   Yoga   6  a.m.   From  the  VMX   7:30  a.m.   The  Learning  Curve   8  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   10  a.m.   UD-­3  Board     Noon   François  Clemmons  Sings  Songs  of  Freedom

  3  p.m.   Michael  Nerney:  Addison  County     Prevention  Lecture   5  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   5:35  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6  p.m.   From  the  College   7  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley   8:30  p.m.   François  Clemmons  Sings  Songs  of  Freedom   11:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Saturday, June 21   5  a.m.   Yoga   5:30  a.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6  a.m.   Michael  Nerney:  Addison  County           Prevention  Lecture   9  a.m.   UD-­3  Board   10  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   Noon   The  Learning  Curve   12:30  p.m.   From  the  VMX:  Dear  Pina   1:30  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert     Chorale  Spring  Concert   3  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation   6  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6:30  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert     Chorale  Spring  Concert Sunday, June 22   6:35  a.m.   Yoga   7  a.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley   9:25  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   10  a.m.   Gardening  in  Vermont   11:30  a.m.   MUHS  Graduation   4  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   4:30  p.m.   From  the  VMX   7  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  p.m.   Local  Performance   10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   11  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation  Monday, June 23   4:30  a.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   5:35  a.m.   Yoga   6  a.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education   12:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   1  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   2  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   5:30  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   10  p.m.   Gardening  in  Vermont


PAGE  20  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

June Specials Agway

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Mentors say goodbye to Monkton classmates MONKTON  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Mentors,  men-­ tees,  and  supporters  of  the  Monk-­ ton  Mentors  program  at  Monkton   Central   School   recently   gathered   one  last  time  before  summer  vaca-­ tion  to  say  goodbye  to  one  another   and  offer  gratitude  for  their  friend-­ ship.   The   mentors   are   community   members   who   volunteer   their   time     to   one   special   student   each   week  during  the  school  year.  This   ZDVWKHÂżUVW\HDURIWKHSURJUDP which   was   funded   through   Mo-­ bius,   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Mentoring   Part-­ nership,   the   Monkton   PTO,   and   some  federal  school  funding.  The   program   will   continue   next   year   and  is  currently  recruiting  for  new   mentors  for  the  fall. For   more   information   on   this   program,   contact   Monkton   Men-­ tors   Coordinator   Catherine   Sha-­ han   at   cshahan@anesu.org   or   MONKTON  MENTORS  COORDINATOR  Catherine  Shahan,  back  left,  and  to  her  immediate  right,  Monkton   453-­2314,   or   visit   www.mobius-­ Central  School  principal  Susan  Stewart  join  adult  mentors  and  elementary  school  mentees  for  an  end  of   mentors.org.       WKH\HDUFHOHEUDWLRQRIWKHÂżUVW\HDURIWKHSURJUDP

Healthy lifestyles celebrations to be held July 20 FERRISBURGH  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  One  hundred   ÂżIW\ WR  SHRSOH IURP DFURVV WKH country  will  come  together  on  Sun-­ GD\-XO\IRUDGD\RIDFWLYLW\DW the   eighth   annual   Champâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Chal-­ lenge  for  Cystic  Fibrosis.  The  event   will  be  held  at  the  Basin  Harbor  Club  

in  Ferrisburgh  to  help  create  change   by   raising   funds   for   exercise-­based   activities,   a   critical   part   of   thriving   with  the  lung  congestion  of  CF.   Registration   for   the   Champâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Challenge   is   now   open   online,   at   www.ChampsChallenge.org,   where  

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people   can   sign   up   to   bike,   walk,   run,  sponsor,  volunteer,  or  just  show   their   support   at   the   lakeside   lunch   reception.  Those  who  cannot  attend   the   event   in   person   can   participate   virtually   from   their   own   local   area.   $OO SURFHHGV ZLOO EHQH¿W WKH &\V-­ tic   Fibrosis   Lifestyle   Foundation   (CFLF). 7KH &)/) ZDV IRXQGHG LQ  by   Brian   Callanan,   an   adult   diag-­ nosed  with  the  disease  at  birth.  With   a  mission  of  promoting  healthy  and   DFWLYHOLIHVW\OHVLQWKHF\VWLF¿EUR-­ sis   community,   the   organization  

began   awarding   Recreation   Grants   RIXSWRWRSHRSOHZLWKWKHJH-­ netic  lung  disease,  while  also  offer-­ LQJDQDGGLWLRQDOIRUDIRUPDO Recreation   Mentor   or   less   formal   Peer  Support. To   date,   the   foundation   has   DZDUGHGRYHU5HFUHDWLRQ*UDQWV WRWDOLQJ RYHU  LQ WKH &) community  nationally.  These  grants   contribute  to  the  drastically  increas-­ ing  median  life  expectancy  through   promotion   of   active   lifestyles,   new   opportunities   and   empowered   atti-­ tudes.  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  21

Best of Luck in the future to all Addison County Students! ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

Students of the Week from area high schools 2013-2014 School Year

What are they doing after graduation?

Otter Valley Union High School Mount Abe Union High School 7D\ORU$LQHV 2OLYLD%ORRPHU %ULWWDQ\%XVKH\ :LOO&ODHVVHQV %DUURQ+DUYH\ %ULDQQD+HGGLQJ 0DOORU\-RKQV &KULV.H\HV 6XPD/DVKRI 6DYDQQDK/\QFK 0LFKHOOH0DVHURQL 0HJDQ0F.HLJKDQ 1DWH0\ORWW &RUWQH\3ROMDFLN 6KDQH4XHQQHYLOOH $OLFLD5RVVL 0LFKDHO:LQVORZ 0DUOH\=ROOPDQ

&ROE\6DZ\HU&ROOHJH +XVVRQ8QLYHUVLW\ (QGLFRWW&ROOHJH %UDGOH\8QLYHUVLW\ &DVWOHWRQ6WDWH&ROOHJH &DVWOHWRQ6WDWH&ROOHJH &DVWOHWRQ6WDWH&ROOHJH 7XIWV8QLYHUVLW\ 8QLYHUVLW\RI9HUPRQW 8QLYHUVLW\RI5RFKHVWHU &DVWOHWRQ6WDWH&ROOHJH (ORQ8QLYHUVLW\ 8QLYHUVLW\RI)DLUEDQNV &DVWOHWRQ6WDWH&ROOHJH (OHFWULFLDQDSSUHQWLFHVKLS 8QLYHUVLW\RI9HUPRQW 681<&REEOHVNLOO 8QLYHUVLW\RI9HUPRQW

/XNH&DO]LQL $GG\&DPSEHOO 6LODV3RKOPDQ 6DPDQWKD5HLVV 6DZ\HU.DPPDQ 4XLQQ'DYLV +HQU\.RHQLJ 0HJKDQ+DKU 7XUQHU%UHWW 1DW0D\ &DOH7K\JHVHQ 0HJKDQ/LYLQJVWRQ 5LGHU0DF&UHOOLVK &DVH\%ULJJV &DOYLQ-RRV 0DGL:RRG *DEULHOOH6FKOHLQ +DQQDK-DFNPDQ

6NLGPRUH&ROOHJH 8QLYHUVLW\RI9HUPRQW :KLWPDQ&ROOHJH %DWHV&ROOHJH 6\UDFXVH8QLYHUVLW\ +DPOLQH8QLYHUVLW\ &DVWOHWRQ6WDWH&ROOHJH 8QLYHUVLW\RI1HZ+DPSVKLUH &RORUDGR&ROOHJH 8QLYHUVLW\RI9HUPRQW 8QLYHUVLW\RI9HUPRQW 6DOYH5HJLQD8QLYHUVLW\ 0RQWDQD6WDWH8QLYHUVLW\ &DVWOHWRQ6WDWH&ROOHJH 8UVLQXV&ROOHJH (QGLFRWW&ROOHJH &RQQHFWLFXW&ROOHJH 8QLYHUVLW\RI9HUPRQW

Barash  Mediation  Services 3KRHEH%DUDVK )DPLO\'LYRUFH0HGLDWLRQÂ&#x2021;)DFLOLWDWLRQ &RQĂ&#x20AC;LFW0DQDJHPHQW7UDLQLQJV

Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re proud to support all area students and want to say â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thanksâ&#x20AC;? to those who volunteer with us!

ons

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To volunteer call 388-­7044 or visit www.unitedwayaddisoncounty.org

Telecommunications Sales and Service Data Cabling & Fiber Optic Solutions

Students!

Two locations to help serve you better... Plumbing  &  Heating  

125 Monkton Rd. Bristol, VT 453-2325

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Insurance & Financial Services Andrea Ryan, Bill Bryden & John Mailloux wish all students a bright future.

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READ. LEARN. GIVE. We reward each Student of the Weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s achievement!

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Congratulations, Name & Name! Students! 877-3118 Main St., Vergennes, VT


PAGE  22  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

Pipeline  hearing   (Continued  from  Page  1) through   speeches,   poetry,   Haikus   to   burn   natural   gas,â&#x20AC;?   said   Sharon   and  signs. Tierra,   a   Shoreham   village   resident.   One   of   the   speakers,   Leslie   Rea-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some   of   my   neighbors   feel   the   gan-­Caer,   said   the   installation   of   a   same  way  about  that.  There  are  very   pipeline   below   Lake   Champlain   is   few  people  I  think  that  would  be  cus-­ likely  to  stir  up  toxic  sediment  in  the   tomers  of  gas  in  Shoreham.â&#x20AC;? bed  of  the  lake,  which  is  a  drinking   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  my  energy  at  the  ex-­ water  resource  for  188,000  people. pense  of  someone  elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  misfortune,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  we  are  considering  is  threat-­ echoed   Salisbury   resident   David   ening  the  health  of  Lake  Champlain   Wally  Bailey. and   the   drinking   water   supply   of   Tierra   was   among   the   nearly  200,000  people,   many   who   signed   up   for   for  a  handful  of  Phase   the   right   to   deliver   up   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;What we are II  gas  customers,â&#x20AC;?  she   two  minutes  of  testimony   considering is said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is  it  in  the  public   to   the   PSB,   a   quasi-­judi-­ threatening the good   to   grant   a   Phase   cial  panel  that  will  deter-­ health of Lake ,, FHUWLÂżFDWH VR WKDW mine   whether   to   award   gas  can  be  delivered  to   D &HUWLÂżFDWH RI 3XEOLF Champlain and just  a  handful  of  users   Good   to   the   Phase   II   the drinking in  Cornwall  and  Shore-­ project.  The  board  has  al-­ water supply of ham?  Or  is  it  more  tru-­ FRAN   PUTNAM   OF   Weybridge   ready   green-­lighted   Ver-­ nearly 200,000 ly   in   the   public   good   speaks   at   last   weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Public   Ser-­ mont  Gasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Phase  I  pipe-­ people, for to  protect  the  health  of   vice  Board  hearing  in  Middlebury. line  that  will  extend  from   nearly   200,000   people   a handful of Colchester  to  Middlebury   by   safeguarding   the   was  one  of  several  speakers  who  ob-­ Phase II gas and  Vergennes. drinking   water   supply   jected  to  the  notion  that  communities   Only   a   handful   of   customers.â&#x20AC;? from   the   actual   threat   and   citizens   along   Vermont   Gasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   speakers   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Leslie of  toxins  stirred  up  by   proposed   pipeline   routes   are   having   urged  the  PSB  to  approve   Reagan-Caer horizontal,   directional   to  spend  money  to  react  and  defend   themselves  against  the  plan.  He  esti-­ Phase  II,  intended  to  give   drilling?â&#x20AC;? IP   a   cheaper   fuel   source   Andrew  Bojanowski  is  a  manager   mated  Monkton  has  thus  far  incurred   to   power   its   boilers.   The   company   of  the  Eddy  Farm  School  for  Horse   around   $27,000   in   pipeline-­related   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which   would   pay   the   entire   $70   and   Rider,   located   off   South   Street   expenses   (from   Phase   I)   and   sug-­ million   price   tag   of   the   pipeline   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Extension   in   Middlebury.   He   said   gested  the  town  submit  an  invoice  to   currently  burns  more  expensive  No.   the   pipeline   is   slated   to   be   buried   Vermont  Gas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   encourage   all   6   fuel   oil.   Project   proponents   have   under  an  often  wet,  20-­ towns   and   schools   in   argued  that  Phase  II  will  underwrite   DFUH KD\ ÂżHOG WKH IDUP â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are not the   (pipeline)   path   to   BETH  THOMPSON,  WHO  lives  in  Rutland  County,  speaks  against  the   $45  million  of  the  costs  of  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Phase   depends   on   for   its   op-­ proposed  Vermont  Gas  natural  gas  pipeline  during  last  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Vermont   IIIâ&#x20AC;?  project  to  extend  the  natural  gas   eration.  He  added  pipe-­ talking a bridge; also   ask   for   reimburse-­ Public  Service  Board  public  hearing  at  Middlebury  Union  High  School. conduit   to   Rutland   by   2020,   which   line  construction  would   we are talking a ment,â&#x20AC;?   Hughes   said.   Independent  photos/Trent  Campbell â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  ask  for  this,   would  be  15  years  sooner  than  previ-­ be   very   disruptive   for   gangplank.â&#x20AC;? and   we   shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   RXVO\SURMHFWHG7KHÂżUVW36%KHDU-­ horses   and   riders,   who   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Fran Putnam to  pay  for  it.â&#x20AC;? ing   on   Phase   II,   held   in   Shoreham   would   be   riding   100   Weybridge   resident   last   month,   drew   several   economic   yards   from   where   the   Fran  Putnam  joined  others  in  object-­ GHYHORSPHQW RIÂżFLDOV IURP XSVWDWH pipeline  would  be  laid. New   York   who   advocated   for   the   Âł7KDWÂżHOGLVWKHFRUHRIRXUIDUP´ ing   to   the   pipelineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   depiction   by   project.   There   was   no   such   delega-­ Bojanowski  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  fear  the  disrup-­ some   as   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;bridge   fuelâ&#x20AC;?   to   renew-­ tion  present  on  Thursday  night,  when   tion   of   the   pipeline   could   affect   the   ables.  She  suggested  that  IP  could  in-­ stall   a   formidable   renewable   energy   the  three  PSB  board  members  heard   ÂżHOG´ project  at  its  mill  for  the  $70  million   from  a  rapid  succession  of  opponents   COSTS  TO  TOWNS who  delivered  passionate  statements   Monkton   resident   Ivor   Hughes   (See  Hearing,  Page  23)

TIMOTHY  FISHER  GIVES  feedback  on  the  proposed  natural  gas  pipeline  from  Middlebury  to  International   POLLY  BIRDSALL  OF  Shoreham  gives  feedback  to  the  Vermont  Pub-­ lic  Service  Board  during  last  Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  public  hearing  on  Phase  II  of   Paper  in  Ticonderoga,  N.Y.,  during  last  Thursday  nightâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Vermont  Public  Service  Board  hearing  in  the  Middle-­ bury  Union  High  School  auditorium. the  Vermont  Gas  pipeline  proposal.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  23

Hearing   (Continued  from  Page  22) the  stanzas: it  is  preparing  to  spend  on  the  pipe-­ Change  before  it  is  too  late. line. Turn  back  the  hands  of  fate... â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   not   talking   a   bridge;Íž   we   The  Planetâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dying  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  you  see? are   talking   a   gangplank,â&#x20AC;?   Putnam   That   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   killed   by   you   and   said. me? Orwell  resident  Marlene  Latourel-­ Elizabeth  Frank  of  Orwell  also  de-­ le  said  that  while  IP  should  be  credit-­ livered  her  message  in  poetry: ed  for  trying  to  get  â&#x20AC;&#x153;cleanerâ&#x20AC;?  by  burn-­ This  Canadian  pipeline  will  do  us   ing  natural  gas  instead  of  fuel  oil,  the   no  good, company   should   get   its   natural   gas   And  would  set  us  back  greatly  from   by  some  other  means.  And  she  added   where  we  once  stood that   if  Vermont   Gas   wants   to   get   to   A  progressive  state,  a  little  engine   Rutland   County   sooner,   that  could, it  should  do  so  by  raising   We   want   to   save   our   rates  on  current  custom-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want land  from  the  corporate   ers   rather   than   building   my energy at hood. a   new   pipeline   that   she   the expense of Addison  resident  Jan   said   could   cause   harm   someone elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Louise   Ball   urged   the   and  that  few  Vermonters   PSB   to   remember   who   misfortune.â&#x20AC;? will  be  able  to  use. it  is  serving  when  it  de-­ â&#x20AC;&#x201D; David Dale   Birdsall   of   cides  whether  to  grant  a   Wally Bailey Shoreham   said   the   PSB   permit  to  Phase  II. should   not   approve   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Here   is   your   pub-­ SURMHFWWKDWZRXOGEHQHÂżWWZRODUJH lic,â&#x20AC;?  she  said  of  the  crowd  seated  be-­ corporations  and  relatively  few  Ver-­ hind  her.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  are  the  board,  and  you   monters  at  the  expense  of  many  oth-­ serve  us.  So  you  remember  that  and   ers. understand  that?â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;While  we  would  like  to  help  our   Hillary  Hatch  of  Leicester  was  one   fellow  Vermonters,  this  comes  at  too   of  several  people  who  alleged  that  IP   costly  a  price,â&#x20AC;?  Birdsall  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Your   and  its  agents  were  not  treating  land-­ vote  should  uphold  the  wishes  of  the   owners   with   respect.   The   company   majority  of  Vermonters  who  oppose   has   been   criticized   for   threatening   this  pipeline.â&#x20AC;? eminent  domain. Former   Cornwall   Selectwoman   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  pipeline  is  being  bullied  into   Judy   Watts   spoke   of   meetings   with   existence,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. 9HUPRQW*DVRIÂżFLDOVZKRVKHVDLG Middlebury  resident  Ross  Conrad   presented   various   promises   on   how   gave  the  PSB  what  he  acknowledged   the  project  would  be  organized.  She   as   a   premature   thanks   for   what   he   FODLPHG WKH FRPSDQ\ GLG QRW IXOÂżOO forecast   as   the   panelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   inescapable   many  of  its  original  promises. denial   on   a   permit   for   Phase   II.   He   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   do   need   rapid   transition   to   cited  Vermont  law  governing  the  use   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;4F,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  is  a  fossil-­fuel   of  eminent  domain  and  other  factors   free  future.â&#x20AC;? in  arriving  at  his  conclusion. Bristol  resident  Jessie  Ruth  Cork-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   can   see   this   pipeline   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   ins  said  Vermont  would  be  better  off   built,â&#x20AC;?  Conrad  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  want  to  thank   using  more  wood  pellet  energy  than   you  all  so  much.â&#x20AC;? expanding  its  use  of  natural  gas.  She   SPEAKING  IN  FAVOR UHFDOOHGGHYHORSLQJDQRQSURÂżWYHQ-­ A  few  project  proponents  also  took   ture  while  a  student  at  Mount  Abra-­ to  the  microphone. ham  Union  High  School  that  has  re-­ Among   them   was   Middlebury   sulted  in  pellet  stoves  being  installed   resident  Bill  Mraz,  who  said  natural   in  more  than  20  low-­income  homes.   gas  would  help  Vermonters  heat  their   It  is  a  fuel  source  that  she  said  could   homes  and  grow  businesses. become  cheaper  than  natural  gas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heat   makes   the   Vermont   econo-­ OPPOSITION  IN  VERSE my  go,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Tom   Tailer,   a   teacher   at   Mount   Mraz   challenges   pipeline   op-­ Abraham,  read  a  poem  summing  up   ponents   to   instead   protest   the   rail   his  opposition  to  the  pipeline.  One  of   transport   of   fuel   oil   near   the   shores  

FORMER  CORNWALL  SELECTWOMAN  Judy  Watts  was  one  of  80  people  who  gave  feedback  to  the  Public   Service  Board  last  Thursday  during  a  hearing  on  Phase  II  of  the  proposed  Vermont  Gas  natural  gas  pipeline. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

of   Lake   Champlain.   He   suggested   the   accidental   spill   of   oil   from   one   of  those  20,000-­gallon  rail  cars  into   Lake   Champlain   would   cause   a   di-­ saster   that   would   â&#x20AC;&#x153;dwarfâ&#x20AC;?   any   po-­ tential   impact   of   drilling   a   pipeline   beneath  the  lake. Betsy   Bishop,   president   of   the   Vermont   Chamber   of   Commerce,   advocated   for   the   Phase   II   pipeline   on   behalf   of   18   area   business   orga-­ nizations  representing  â&#x20AC;&#x153;tens  of  thou-­ sandsâ&#x20AC;?  of  residents. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   here   to   respectfully   submit   the  fact  that  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  an  overwhelming   majority  of  Vermonters  and  regional   partners   who   support   this   project,â&#x20AC;?   Bishop   said,   a   comment   that   drew   some   chuckles   and   hisses   from   the   audience.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Natural   gas   is   cleaner,  

safer  and  about  half  the  cost  of  alter-­ natives.â&#x20AC;? Bishop   reeled   off   the   names   of   various   economic   development   and   union   organizations   who   she   said   support   the   pipeline   as   a   means   of   preserving  and  growing  jobs. â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  majority  supports  this  proj-­ ect  because  cleaner,  lower-­cost  fuel   will   make   our   region   more   afford-­ able,   preserve   and   create   new   jobs,   and  improve  air  quality,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. Starksboro   resident   Dan   Yon-­ kovig  noted  the  businesses  that  have   sprung   up   near   current   natural   gas   service   in   Chittenden   and   Franklin   counties. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   all   located   right   next   to   the   pipeline;Íž   look   in   the   park-­ ing   lot,   these   people   drive   OK   cars  

and   trucks,   their   houses   are   decent   looking,   the   schools   are   doing   OK,   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   getting   by   and   are   reason-­ ably  happy,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  prob-­ DEO\ QHYHU KHDUG RI KDOI WKH RXWÂżWV making   ceramic   spark   plugs,   indus-­ trial   hoses,   medical   supplies,   just   like  most  of  them  have  never  heard   of   Omya.   If   IBM   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   natu-­ ral  gas  with  an  economic  edge,  they   would  have  left  town  a  decade  ago.   America   is   a   manufacturing   nation.   We  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  all  be  farmers,  housewives,   retirees,   school   teachers   and   road   crew.   Some   of   us   build   things,   pro-­ cess   milk   at   Agri-­Mark,   make   beer   at  Otter  Creek  Brewing,  make  micro   chips  and  make  paper.â&#x20AC;? Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

Bristol,  VT  Homeowner   Recommends  Bristol  Electronics â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Bristol  Electronics  people  are  very  pleasant  to  work  with.   We  looked  at  rental  vs.  ownership  and  it  became  clear  that  owner-­ ship  was  a  better  deal  in  the  long  run.  The  installation  time  was   very  quick.  We  expect  to  pay  off  our  loan  in  10  years  and  then  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   have  free  electricity  for  the  rest  of  our  lives.  Bristol  Electronics  is   very  professional.  The  process  was  easy  and  we  are  very  happy.â&#x20AC;?                                                                                                                      Gerry  &  Claire  Tetrault  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Bristol,  VT

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PAGE  24  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

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Vt.  Folklife  Center  receives  funds  for  oral  history  research MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Vermont   Folklife  Center  announces  the  receipt   of  a  $33,750  Archie  Green  Fellowship   Award   from   the   American   Folklife   Center   at   the   Library   of   Congress   to   conduct  ethnographic  and  oral  history   research  into  contemporary  grassroots   agriculture   in   the   state.   The   Archie   Green   Fellowship   was   established   by   the   American   Folklife   Center   to   stimulate  innovative  research  projects   documenting   occupational   culture   in   contemporary  America.

Farming   has   held   a   central   role   in   the  culture  and  economy  of  Vermont   since  the  colonial  period.  The  current   explosion   of   small-­scale,   grass-­roots   agriculture   in   the   state   draws   on   this   long   history,   mixing   historical   ap-­ proaches   and   perspectives   with   con-­ temporary  ideas,  needs  and  goals.  At   the   same   time,   these   efforts   also   in-­ volve   the   adoption   of   new   ideas   and   approaches   that   were   never   part   of   past   agricultural   practice   in   Vermont   or  the  region.

Although   the   Vermont   Folklife   Center   Archive   has   extensive   hold-­ ings   on   Vermont   agriculture   across   the   20th   century,   these   new,   emerg-­ ing  models  of  agricultural  practice  are   an   under-­documented   aspect   of   the   culture  of  the  state.  Support  from  the   Archie  Green  Fellowship  Program  al-­ lows   the   Vermont   Folklife   Center   to   undertake  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Grass-­Roots  Food   Movement  in  Vermont:  Documenting   New  Models  of  Locally  Focused  Ag-­ ULFXOWXUHLQWKH6WDWH´SURMHFWDQGÂżOO

this  hole  in  the  record  of  the  folklife   of  Vermont. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   Vermont   prior   to   the   Second   World  War  practically  all  food  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  with   WKH H[FHSWLRQ RI ZKLWH VXJDU Ă&#x20AC;RXU coffee,  tea  and  spices  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  was  locally   produced,â&#x20AC;?   said   Vermont   Folklife   Center   Co-­Director   and   Director   of   Education,   Greg   Sharrow.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Con-­ temporary   efforts   to   re-­localize   food   production   tie   our   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   agricultural   heritage  to  innovative  ideas  and  new   approaches  that  can  keep  small  scale  

farming  economically  viable  and  help   us  answer  the  question:  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Can  we  feed   ourselves?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? The   fellowship   was   established   to   honor   the   memory   of   Archie   Green   (1917-­2009),   a   pioneering   folklorist   who   championed   the   establishment   of   the   American   Folklife   Center   at   the  Library  of  Congress.  As  a  scholar,   Green   documented   and   analyzed   the   culture   and   traditions   of   American   workers  and  encouraged  others  to  do   the  same.

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PAGE  28  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Notice

Cards  of  Thanks

Public  Meetings

DOG   TEAM   CATERING.   Seating   up   to   300,   plus   bar   available,   Middlebury   VFW.   Full   menus.   802-­388-­4831,   www.dogteamcatering.net.

THANK   YOU   ST.   JUDE   for   ADULT   ALL-­RECOVERY   prayers  answered.  JR Group   Meeting   for   anyone   over  18  who  is  struggling  with   THANKS  HOLY  FATHER  and   addiction  disorders.  Tuesdays,   St.  Jude  for  prayers  answered.   3-­4  p.m.  at  the  Turning  Point   V.B. Center.  A  great  place  to  meet   PARTY   RENTALS;   CHI-­ with  your  peers  who  are  in  re-­ NA,   flatware,   glassware,   covery.  Bring  a  friend  in  recov-­ linens.   Delivery   available.   ery.  For  info  call  802-­388-­4249   802-­388-­4831. or  802-­683-­5569  or  visit  www. turningpointaddisonvt.org.

Services

Services

Services

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   M E E T I N G S   S A T U R -­ DAY:   Discussion   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   at   the   Mid-­ dlebury   United   Methodist   Church.  Discussion  Meeting   10:00-­11:00   AM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Be-­ ginnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Meeting   6:30-­7:30   PM.   These   three   meetings   are  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Center  in  The  Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS   WEDNESDAY:   Big  Book  Meeting  7:15-­8:15   AM  is  held  at  the  Middlebury   United  Methodist  Church  on   N.  Pleasant  Street.  Discus-­ sion  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Meeting  5:30-­6:30   PM.  Both  held  at  The  Turning   Point  Center  in  the  Marble-­ works,  Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ MOUS   BRANDON   MEET-­ INGS:  Monday,  Discussion   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   PM.   Wednesday,  12  Step  Meet-­ ing  7:00-­8:00  PM.  Friday,  12   Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.   All   held   at   the   St.   Thomas   Episcopal   Church,   RT   7   South.

MAKING  RECOVERY  EAS-­ IER  (MRE).  Starting  January   15,   5:30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  7:00   PM   at   The   Turning   Point   Center.   This   will   be   a   facilitated   group   meeting  for  those  struggling   with   the   decision   to   attend   12-­step  programs.  It  will  be   limited   to   explaining   and   discussing  our  feelings  about   the  12-­step  programs  to  cre-­ ate  a  better  understanding  of   how  they  can  help  a  person   in  recovery  on  his  /  her  lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   journey.  A  certificate  will  be   issued  at  the  end  of  all  the   sessions.   Please   bring   a   friend   in   recovery   who   is   also  contemplating  12-­step   programs.

ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   M E E T I N G S   M O N D AY:   As   Bill   Sees   It   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM.   Big   Book   Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.  Both   held   at   The   Turning   Point   Center  in  The  Marbleworks,   Middlebury. ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ MOUS   NORTH   FERRIS-­ BURGH   MEETINGS:   Sun-­ day,  Daily  Reflections  Meet-­ ing   6:00-­7:00   PM,   at   the   United   Methodist   Church,   Old  Hollow  Rd. ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS  FRIDAY:  Discus-­ sion  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM   at  The  Turning  Point  in  The   Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

For  the  past  year,  Aurora  Middle  School  students  have  been   volunteering   once   a   week   all   over   town!  They   have   helped   out   by   serving   lunch   at   the   Charter   House,   making   Bradyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Blankets,   carving   pumpkins   for  Porter  Nursing  Home,  visiting  at  Elderly  Services,  and  planting  gardens   during   the   United   Wayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Days   Of   Caring,   just   to   name   a   few!   On   Friday,   June  6th,  they  cooked  18  dozen  desserts  and  served  meals  at  the  Middlebury   Community  Supper  as  a  culmination  of  a  year  of  community  service.  Aurora   administrators   are   proud   of   their   studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   commitment   to   volunteering,   explaining:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;They  have  really  enjoyed  helping  out  and  getting  to  know  the   community.â&#x20AC;?  Thank  you,  Aurora!

ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS   THURSDAY:   Big  Book  Meeting  Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   Turning   Point   Center  in  the  Marbleworks,   Middlebury.  Speaker  Meet-­ ing  7:30-­8:30  PM  at  St.  Ste-­ phenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,  Main  St.(On   the  Green).

ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS  TUESDAY:  11th   Step   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM.  ALATEEN  Group.  Both   held   at   Turning   Point,   228   Maple  Street.  12  Step  Meet-­ ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  12  Step   Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.  Both   held   at   The   Turning   Point   Center  in  The  Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

RATES

Name: Address: Phone: Email:

ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ M O U S   V E R G E N N E S   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   12   Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.   Friday,  Discussion  Meeting   8:00-­9:00   PM.   Both   held   at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church,   Park   St.   Tuesday,   Discussion   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM,   at   the  Congregational  Church,   Water  St.

TEEN   ALL-­RECOVERY   Group   Meeting   for   anyone   15-­18  years  old  who  is  strug-­ gling   with   addiction   disor-­ ders.  Tuesdays,  4-­5  p.m.  at   ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ the  Turning  Point  Center.  A   M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   great  place  to  meet  with  your   MEETINGS   SUNDAY:   12   peers   who   are   in   recovery.   Step   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   Bring   a   friend   in   recovery.   AM   held   at   the   Middlebury   For  info  call  802-­388-­4249  or   United  Methodist  Church  on   802-­683-­5569  or  visit  www. N.  Pleasant  Street.  Discus-­ turningpointaddisonvt.org. ARE  YOU  BOTHERED  BY   sion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00  PM   held   at   The   Turning   Point   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drinking?  Open-­ Center  in  The  Marbleworks,   ing   Our   Hearts   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Al-­Anon  Group  meets  each   Services Middlebury. Wednesday   at   7:15   p.m.   ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ at   the   Turning   Point   Cen-­ BOAT   DOCK   REPAIR   and   MOUS  NEW  HAVEN  MEET-­ ter   in   the   Marbleworks   in   construction.   Experienced   INGS:   Monday,   Big   Book   Middlebury.  Anonymous  and   and   reliable.   Fully   insured.   Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the   confidential,   we   share   our   Call  802-­349-­6579,  Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Congregational  Church,  New   experience,   strength   and   P r o p e r t y   M a n a g e m e n t ,   Haven  Village  Green. hope  to  solve  our  common   Leicester,  Vermont. problems. CHAIN  SAW  CHAINS  sharp-­ ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ M O U S   R I P TO N   M E E T-­ NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ ened.  Call  802-­759-­2095. INGS:  Monday,  As  Bill  Sees   BURY:  Mondays,  6pm,  held   CONSTRUCTION:   ADDI-­ It   Meeting   7:15-­8:15   AM.   at  The  Turning  Point  Center   TIONS,   RENOVATIONS,   Thursday,  Grapevine  Meet-­ located  in  The  Marble  Works. new   construction,   drywall,   ing  6:00-­7:00  PM.  Both  held   carpentry,  painting,  flooring,   at  Ripton  Firehouse,  Dugway   NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ roofing,   pressure   washing,   BURY:   Fridays,   7:30pm,   Rd. held   at   the   Turning   Point   driveway  sealing.  All  aspects   Center  located  in  the  Marble   of  construction,  also  property   maintenance.  Steven  Fifield   Works. 802-­989-­0009.

Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new on the Block? Check  out  the  Auctions&Real  Estate   every  Mon.  and  Thurs.

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM Â&#x2021; Â&#x201E;SHUZRUGÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPSHUDG Â&#x2021; LQWHUQHWOLVWLQJIRUXSWRLVVXHVÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPLQVHUWLRQV &DVK LQ RQ RXU IRU UDWHV 3D\ IRU  LVVXHV JHW WK LVVXH IUHH ([DPSOH $ ZRUG DG LV MXVW  $Q DG SODFHG IRU FRQVHFXWLYH LVVXHV 0RQGD\V  7KXUV GD\V  LV UXQ WK WLPH IUHH &RVW LV  IRU  LVVXHV LQFOXGHV   LQWHUQHW FKDUJH 6SHFLDO  IRU  UDWHV QRW YDOLG IRU WKH IROORZLQJ FDWHJRULHV +HOS :DQWHG 6HUYLFHV 2SSRUWXQLWLHV 5HDO (VWDWH :RRG KHDW $WWQ )DUPHUV  )RU 5HQW 

ALCOHOLICS   ANONY-­ MOUS   BRISTOL   MEET-­ INGS:   Sunday,   Discussion   Meeting   4:00-­5:00   PM.   Wednesday,  12  Step  Meet-­ ing   7:00-­8:00   PM.   Friday,   Big  Book  Meeting,  6:00-­7:00   PM.  All  held  at  the  Federated   Church,  Church  St.

D E A D L I N E S Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

CATEGORIES Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost & Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities

Work Wanted Public Meetings** For Sale Help Wanted For Rent Want to Rent Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals

Spotlight with large $2

** No charge for these ads

Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted Adoption

ADDISON INDEPENDENT 58 Maple St., Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

The Independent assumes no Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUHUURUV LQDGVEXWZLOOUHUXQWKHDGLQ ZKLFKWKHHUURURFFXUHGDWQR FKDUJH1RUHIXQGVZLOOEHPDGH $GYHUWLVHUVZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\XVRI DQ\HUURUVQRWHG

1XPEHURIZRUGV &RVW RIUXQV 6SRWOLJKW&KDUJH ,QWHUQHW/LVWLQJ 727$/




Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  29

Addison Independent

Help  Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS Services



Garage  Sales

Garage  Sales

3  FAMILY  YARD  SALE.  Sat-­ urday,  June  21,  9am-­3pm.  Ma-­ ple  Meadow  Farm,  Salisbury,   just   off   Route   7.   Furniture,   dishes,  some  antiques,  baby   clothes  and  items.  Clothes,  re-­ ally  nice  menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  LL  Bean  shirts   and  pants.  DVDs,  CDs,  books,   something  for  everyone.  Rain   or  shine.

LAWN   MOWING,   LAWN   r a k i n g ,   d e b r i s   c l e a n u p   from   snow   plowing.   Brush   trimming,   hedge   trimming,   power  washing,  light  truck-­ ing.   Small   carpentry   jobs,   property   maintenance   and   repairs.   Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Property   Management,  Leicester,  VT.   DEADLINE   REMINDER:   Fully  insured.  Call  for  a  free   Classified   ads   to   start   on   a   Monday  need  to  be  in  by  the   estimate,  802-­349-­6579. prior  Thursday  at  noon.  Ads  to   LOGGING,  LAND  CLEAR-­ start  on  a  Thursday  must  be  in   ING,   forest   management.   by  the  prior  Monday  at  5pm. Highest   rate   on   all   timber.   Double   rates   on   low   grade   ESTATE   SALE.   146   Horton   Road,   Orwell.   Friday,   Sat-­ chip  wood.  518-­643-­9436. urday,   Sunday.   June   20-­22,   MB  CONSTRUCTION.  AS-­ 9am-­5pm. PHALT   SHINGLES,   corru-­ gated   metal.   Roof   repairs.   MOVING   AND   DOWN-­SIZ-­ Free  estimates.  Insured.  Mi-­ ING   sale,   rain   or   shine.   393   chael  Berard.  802-­324-­2013. East   Main   St.,   East   Middle-­ bury.   Friday,   June   20   and   MISC  GRAPHICS  offers  de-­ Saturday,  June  21,  9am-­2pm.   sign   services.   Reasonable   Hutch,  sofa  bed,  bureaus  and   pricing,   references.   8   years   other  furniture,  art  work,  other   professional   experience.   BA   household  and  garden  items.   degree   in   Graphic   Design.   Cash  only. E-­mail  Mandy  at  miscgraph-­ MULTI-­FAMILY  YARD  SALE.   icsvt@gmail.com. Sunday,   June   22,   7   a.m..   R O T O T I L L I N G   &   Housewares,  clothing,  tools,   BRUSH-­HOGGING.   Ron   sports  equipment  and  more.   Stevens  802-­462-­3784. 1411  Route  125  in  Ripton,  just   past  the  Ripton  Country  Store.

$

7



ORWELL  MULTI-­FAMILY  at   Plunder  Bay  Marina,  250  Mt.   Independence   Road,   June   20-­21,   9am-­3pm.   Motor  /  sail   boat   parts  /  supplies,   tools,   camping  /  h ousehold   stuff,   Dept.   56   collectibles,   fabric  /   craft  supplies  /  books  and  much   more.



SALISBURY   TOWN   WIDE   GARAGE   Sale.   Saturday,   June  21  (rain  date  June  22).   Many,  many  items,  large  and   small:  beds,  bikes,  ping-­pong   table,  canoe,  clothes,  glass-­ ware,   ceiling   fan,   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   toys,   books   (at   the   library),   refreshments  (at  the  church),   9:00  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  5:00.  Benefit  for  the  lo-­ cal  newsletter.  Maps  available   at   sale   sites:   Kampersville,   the  library,  the  church,  Water-­ houses   and   Maple   Meadow   Farm.  Câ&#x20AC;&#x2122;mon  down,  the  shop-­ pings  fine. TWO   FAMILY   GARAGE   SALE.  1020  North  Street,  New   Haven.   June   21,   8am-­4pm.   Household  items  plus  numer-­ ous  other  items.  Something  for   everyone.  Reasonable  prices.

A   GREAT   EMPLOYMENT   OPPORTUNITY   with   a   col-­ laborative   team   in   Middle-­ bury  to  motivate  and  support   job   seekers   with   barriers   to   employment  with  job  search,   retention  of  employment  and   overcoming   their   barriers.   The   ideal   candidate   will   be   a  self-­starter  with  attention  to   detail,  creative  problem  solv-­ ing   skills,   knowledge   of   the   business  community  and  the   ability  to  market  to  employers.   Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree   in   an   ap-­ propriate  field,  plus  two  years   of   relevant   experience,   or   a   combination  of  education  and   experience  from  which  com-­ parable  knowledge  and  skills   are  acquired.  Minimum  quali-­ fications  include  HS  diploma,   reliable   transportation,   good   interpersonal  and  communica-­ tion  skills  and  and  computer   knowledge.   Position   starts   at  28K  plus  benefits.  Please   apply   online   through   www. vabir.org   under   employment   opportunities.   Please   attach   current  resume  to  the  online   CareerBuilder  application. AMERICAN  FLATBREAD  IS   HIRING  a  Dining  Room  Man-­ ager.  If  you  have  experience   offering   excellent   customer   service,  possess  great  com-­ munication   skills,   work   well   with   a   team,   know   how   to   motivate  others  and  have  an   interest  in  delicious,  local  and   organic  food,  please  forward   your  resume  to  Danielle:  Dani-­ elle@american  flatbread.com   or  drop  it  off  at  the  restaurant.   35-­40  hours  /  week,  nights  and   weekends  a  must.  EOE.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GARAGE SALE Season... Let us get the word out for you!

7

$

$

YOUR AD INFORMATION

TOWN: DATES & TIMES: STREET ADDRESS:

77 CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

$$

Deadlines: Thursday Noon for Monday papers Monday 5pm for Thursday papers

DESCRIPTION: (Up to 10 words)

YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION NAME: PHONE: MAILING ADDRESS:

Mail in your classified ad with payment to : E-MAIL: 58 Maple Street, For just $3 more, Middlebury VT 05753 come in and pick up OR Email your ad to: classifieds @ an all-inclusive addisonindependent.com GARAGE SALE KIT OR Stop in and drop it with everything at our office in the you need for Marble Works, Middlebury a successful sale.

$7(ad w/out kit) x___#of runs* $10 (ad plus kit) x___#of runs (*Kit comes FREE with 3 runs or more!)

Additional words

x # of runs

x 25¢ Total Payment Enclosed

$

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EXECUTIVE  DIRECTOR ADDISON  COUNTY  COMMUNITY  TRUST Location:  Vergennes,  VT

The  Addison  County  Community  Trust  (ACCT)  seeks  an  Executive   'LUHFWRU$&&7LVD\HDUROGSULYDWHQRQSURÂżWWKDWVHUYHVDV the   principal   developer   and   manager   of   affordable   housing   for   Addison   County,   Vermont.     ACCT   works   in   23   municipalities   DQG LWV ZRUN EHQHÂżWV GLUHFWO\ WKH  SHRSOH ZKR UHVLGH LQ the  County.    With  over  725  units  of  housing  to  steward  currently,   and  a  serious  development  pipeline,  ACCT  partners  with  Housing   9HUPRQW D VWDWHZLGH QRQSURÂżW RQ ODUJH GHYHORSPHQW SURMHFWV DQGZLWKORFDOKRXVLQJDQGVHUYLFHDJHQFLHVWRIXOÂżOOLWVPLVVLRQ â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  all  starts  with  a  home.â&#x20AC;? The  Executive  Director  oversees  a  staff  of  eleven  and  is  responsible   for  overall  leadership  of  ACCT  in  coordination  with  an  active  and   committed  Board  of  Directors.  ACCTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  annual  operations  budget   LV  $&&7 KDV LWV RIÂżFHV LQ GRZQWRZQ 9HUJHQQHV Vermont.Salary   is   negotiable   and   will   depend   upon   experience.   +HDOWK GHQWDO DQG UHWLUHPHQW EHQHÂżWV DUH SURYLGHG 3OHDVH YLVLW ZZZDGGLVRQWUXVWRUJ IRU D FRPSOHWH MRE GHVFULSWLRQ DQG application   instructions.    The   deadline   to   apply   is   Monday,   July   1RWHOHSKRQHFDOOVSOHDVH $&&7LVDQ(TXDO2SSRUWXQLW\(PSOR\HUÂ&#x2021;-XQH


PAGE  30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

Addison Independent

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NORTHLANDS  JOB  CORPS

Independent  Living  Advisor ENTRY  LEVEL  FULL-­TIME  COUNTER  PERSON

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:HSURYLGH+HDOWK%HQHÂżWV &$))XQG Â&#x2021;. Â&#x2021;3DLGYDFDWLRQDQG3HUVRQDOWLPH Â&#x2021;*HQHURXVHPSOR\HHGLVFRXQW Â&#x2021;(YHU\RWKHUZHHNHQGRII 0XVWEHDEOHWROLIWSRXQGV $SS\LQSHUVRQ 99  Wilson  Road,  Middlebury,  VT  Rt.  7  South      388-­3143      E.O.E

Counsels   and   guides   students   in   assigned   dorms   on   attitude,   behavior,  and  interpersonal  relations   with  others.    Provides  students  with   training   in   independent   living   and   leadership  skills.    Apply  to:  

northlandshumanresources@ jobcorps.gov   Equal  Opportunity  Employer  Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran

ADDISON NORTHWEST SUPERVISORY UNION FINANCIAL ASSISTANT (.50 FTE)

Addison Northwest Supervisory Union is seeking qualifed candidate for a .50 FTE Financial Assistant. Responsibilities include General Ledger maintenance and preparation of monthly financial reports for five districts. A qualified candidate should have an Associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Degree in Accounting and at least five yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s experience in school accounting. If interested, please apply through SchoolSpring.com or send a resume, cover letter and three current letters of reference by July 3rd to: Business Manager Addison Northwest Supervisory Union 48 Green Street, Suite 1 Vergennes, VT 05491

MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  SCHOOL Temporary Assistant School Nurse â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Long Term

   

MUHS has an opening for a Temporary Licensed RN to assist the School Nurse. The position runs from August 21-October 30, 2014. The position requires working with students with self-care needs. Join a team that focuses on promoting a healthy and educationally supportive environment for students. Apply by sending letter of interest, resume, three current reference letters, complete transcripts and evidence of licensure to:

Blueprint  Practice  Facilitator

Porter   is   now   seeking   a   Blueprint   Practice   Facilitator.   The   candidate   would   work   with   primary   care   medical   practices   participating  in  the  Vermont  Blue  Print  for  Health  initiative.  This   is  a  quality  improvement  position.  Background  in  continuous   quality   improvement   and   medical   practice   environment   desirable.   Excellent   communication   skills   and   ability   to   work   with   teams   required.   Bachelors   Degree   and   health   care   EDFNJURXQGUHTXLUHG3RVLWLRQUHTXLUHVĂ&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\RIKRXUVDQG some  travel.  Submit  applications  no  later  than  June  27,  2014.   Porter  Medical  Center  offers  competitive  pay,  a  comprehensive   EHQHÂżWVSDFNDJHDQGDJHQHURXV E SODQ:HDOVRRIIHU paid   vacation,   tuition   reimbursement,   and   the   opportunity   to   work  with  dedicated  professionals  in  a  dynamic  organization. To  apply,  please  email  your  cover  letter  and  resume  to:   apply@portermedical.org

Lathrop Forest Products Seeking Truck Drivers Forestry Company looking to hire 2 full time truck drivers. Class A-CDL required. Clean driving recored. Must be able to pass drug test and physical via DOT regulations. 24 monthsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; experience. Local work, no travel, woods experience necessary, but will train the right candidates. Health benefits, paid vacation, federal holidays included. Looking for individuals who want roots with a company. Stop by to fill out an application: Lathrop Forest Products 44 South St, Bristol, VT. No phone calls please.

Dr. Peter Burrows, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 Application deadline: June 25, 2014 E.O.E

Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Inc. of Bristol TRUCK  DRIVER  NEEDED -­  Hazmat  CDL  Class  A  License -­  Fuel  Oil  Delivery/Crane  Truck Â&#x2021;+LJK6FKRRO'LSORPDRUHTXLYDOHQWQHHGHGZLWK DFOHDQGULYLQJUHFRUG Â&#x2021;3UH(PSOR\PHQW'UXJ $OFRKRO7HVW   %DFNJURXQGFKHFNDQG'273K\VLFDO Â&#x2021;([FHOOHQWFXVWRPHUVHUYLFHVNLOOVQHHGHGDQG PXVWEHDWHDPSOD\HU Â&#x2021;\HDUVWUXFNGULYLQJH[SHULHQFHDELOLW\WROLIW   OEVIUHTXHQWO\ Â&#x2021;*RRG:RUNHWKLFDQGDWWLWXGHDPXVWDQGWKH   DELOLW\WRGRRWKHUWDVNVDVQHHGHG Â&#x2021;&RPSHWLWLYHEHQHÂżWSDFNDJHLQFOXGLQJ   UHWLUHPHQWSODQKHDOWKSDFNDJHDQGWLPHRII ,QKRXVHDSSOLFDWLRQWREHÂżOOHGRXW DQGVHQGUHVXPHWR Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Inc.  P.O.  Box  410,  Bristol  ,  VT  05443      


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  31

Addison Independent

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BANKRUPTCY:   CALL   to   find   out   if   bankruptcy   can   help   you.   Kathleen   Walls,   Esq.  802-­388-­1156.

CARPENTERS  AND  CON-­ STRUCTION   LABORERS   needed.  Steady  work.  Chit-­ tenden   County.   Pay   com-­ mensurate   with   tools   and   experience.  802-­825-­6510.

LOOKING  FOR  LOGGERS   and   laborers   for   tree   re-­ moval   in   the   Panton   area.   Interested  and  serious  ap-­ plicants   please   contact   us   at   800-­427-­2617   for   more   info  and  to  apply.

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NIGHT   SHIFT   COMMER-­ CIAL   cleaning   position   available,  Middlebury.  Flex-­ ible  schedule.  $12  /  hour.  No   experience   required,   will   train.   References,   back-­ ground   check   required.   518-­681-­1069.

M E C H A N I C   T O   R U N   our   fleet   shop   and   be   re-­ sponsible   for   our   trucks,   trailers   and   forklifts   at   a   family   owned   lumber   mill.   Supervise   two   other   peo-­ ple,   maintain   parts   inven-­ tory  and  work  with  our  mill   maintenance   manager   as   needed.  Need  an  individual   who  works  well  with  others   and  would  like  a  responsible   position  with  a  fair  amount   of  hands  on  work.  Safety  is   a   top   priority.   Major   repair   to   engines   or   transmis-­ sions   normally   sent   out.   Health   insurance,   401(k)   and   competitive   wages.   Send   resume   to:   The   A.   Johnson   Co.,   995   South   116  Rd.,  Bristol,  VT  05443.   802-­453-­4538,  Ken  or  Dave   Johnson.

PAINTERS   WANTED.   We   are  looking  to  fill  3  positions   with  3-­5  yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  interior  and   exterior  experience.  Tools,   valid   VT   driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   license,   and   three   references   are   required.  We  offer  excellent   starting   pay   with   room   for   advancement.  Pay  increas-­ es  for  motivated  employees   who   can   take   charge   and   lead.  Serious  inquiries  only.   Call   802-­453-­5611   for   an   appointment.

SHARED   LIVING   PRO-­ VIDER   sought,   preferably   in  a  village  setting  for  a  21   year   old   man   with   a   mild   autism   spectrum   disorder.   He  has  a  strong  interest  in   gaming,   role-­playing,   an-­ ime   and   film-­making.   He   would  like  to  be  supported   by   someone   with   similar   interests  or  open  to  learn-­ ing.   Needs   a   home   that   can  provide  support  in  daily   living  skills  and  developing   a   social   network.   Gener-­ ous  annual  tax-­free  stipend   of   $27,300   plus   room   and   board   payment   of   around   $8,400,   as   well   as   respite   budget.   Call   Mindy   Ham-­ mann  at  Community  Associ-­ ates,  802-­388-­4021.

FULL-­TIME   DELI  /  PIZZA   cook   position   available.   Must   have   prior   work   re-­ lated  experience  with  food   preparation.   Work   related   preferences   required.   Set   schedule   6   a.m.  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  2   p.m.,   Mon.  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Fri.  Applicant  should   be   energetic,   self-­directed   with   positive   attitude.   Ap-­ ply  in  person  at  Small  City   Market  in  Vergennes  or  call   Cory  at  802-­349-­7101.

Weatherization  Crew  Members  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   Williston  and  St.  Albans

Addy Indy ClassLĂ&#x20AC;HGV DUH RQOLQH

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addisonindependent. com/classifieds

7KHLGHDOFDQGLGDWHPXVWPHHWWKHIROORZLQJPLQLPXPUHTXLUHPHQWV +LJK 6FKRRO GLSORPD RU HTXLYDOHQW EDVLF FDUSHQWU\  HOHFWULFDO VNLOOVDELOLW\WRVDIHO\XVHSRZHUWRROVHTXLSPHQWLQFOXGLQJRQ ODGGHUVDQGKDYHDQXQGHUVWDQGLQJRIEXLOGLQJFRQVWUXFWLRQDQG PDWHULDOVDVZHOODVWKHSULQFLSOHVRIHQHUJ\HI¿FLHQWUHWUR¿WV:H DUHORRNLQJIRUWHDPSOD\HUVZLWKDSRVLWLYHFDQGRDWWLWXGH7KLV SRVLWLRQ LV SK\VLFDOO\ GHPDQGLQJ  'HVLUHG TXDOL¿FDWLRQV LQFOXGH WUDLQLQJLQ26+$OHDGVDIHUHQRYDWRUDQG)LUVW$LG&359DOLG GULYHUœVOLFHQVHDQGUHOLDEOHWUDQVSRUWDWLRQUHTXLUHG7KLVLVDIXOO WLPHSRVLWLRQZLWKH[FHOOHQWEHQH¿WVPlease  submit  resume  and   cover   letter   via   email   to:   wxcrewjob@cvoeo.org.     5HYLHZ RI DSSOLFDWLRQV EHJLQV LPPHGLDWHO\ DQG ZLOO FRQWLQXH XQWLO VXLWDEOH FDQGLGDWHVDUHIRXQG1RSKRQHFDOOVSOHDVH    CVOEO  IS  AN  EQUAL  OPPORTUNITY  EMPLOYER

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REQUIREMENTS: &EGLIPSV´WHIKVIIMREGGSYRXMRKSVFYWMRIWWVIPEXIH½IPHTVIJIVVIH 6IPIZERX½RERGMEPQEREKIQIRXI\TIVMIRGI -RHITXLORS[PIHKIERHI\TIVMIRGIMR1MGVSWSJX3J½GIWYMXI /RS[PIHKISJ½RERGMEPWSJX[EVITVIJIVEFP]8]PIV8IGL-R½RMXI:MWMSRW

Apply to www.SchoolSpring.com or by sending a letter of interest, resume, three current reference letters and complete transcripts to: Peter Burrows, D. Ed., Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 'LEVPIW%ZIRYI 1MHHPIFYV]:8 4SWMXMSREZEMPEFPIMQQIHMEXIP]3TIRYRXMP½PPIH )3)

Help  Wanted

Saint Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Summer Camp in   Middlebury   is   seeking   a   lead   counselor   to   implement   a   robust   and   fun   summer   day   camp  program  for  a  small  group   of   elementary   students   between   June  23rd  and  August  15th.    Experience   with  elementary-­age  children,  creativity   and  energy  all  a  plus.    

ADDISON COUNTY SUPERVISORY UNION BUSINESS MANAGER

The Addison Central Supervisory Union is seeking an experienced Business Manager to provide leadership for a committed educational community. Responsibilities for this full-time position include budgeting, planning, organizing, WYTIVZMWMRK ERH HMVIGXMRK XLI FYWMRIWW ERH ½WGEP STIVEXMSRW SJ XLI 7YTIVZMWSV] Union, and required reporting to Vermont Agency of Education. The applicant will supervise cash management, student transportation, food service operations, JEGMPMX] TVSNIGXW ERH GSRXVEGX ERH WTIGMEP TVSNIGXW QEREKIQIRX 4VS½GMIRX ORS[PIHKISJKSZIVRQIRXEP½RERGMEPEGGSYRXMRK JYRHEGGSYRXMRK MWTVIJIVVIH-R addition, the candidate should possess proven management and communication skills to operate in a diverse environment as a team-oriented employee. 8LI%HHMWSR'IRXVEP7YTIVZMWSV]9RMSR %'79 WIVZIW4VI/WXYHIRXW in the greater Middlebury, Vermont area, including the towns of Middlebury, Bridport, Cornwall, Ripton, Salisbury, Shoreham, and Weybridge. ACSU is comprised of seven elementary schools, a union middle school, and a union high WGLSSPERHFIRI½XWJVSQEPSRKXVEHMXMSRSJI\GIPPIRGIMRIHYGEXMSR )\GIPPIRXFIRI½XTEGOEKIEZEMPEFPIMRGPYHMRKQIHMGEPHIRXEPPMJIFVIXMVIQIRX plan and competitive leave package. Salary commensurate with experience.

MIDDLEBURY   NATURAL   FOODS   CO-­OP   is   seek-­ ing   a   cashier   with   excel-­ lent  customer  service  skills   who   values   natural  /  local   foods.  Ideal  candidate  has   cashiering   and   accurate   money   handling   experi-­ ence.  Part-­time  year  round   position.   Great   work   envi-­ ronment,   generous   store   discount  and  benefits.  Com-­ plete   application   online   at   www.middleburycoop.com   or  in  our  store  at  9  Wash-­ ington  Street  in  Middlebury.

PART  TIME  HELP  needed   taking   care   of   gentleman   in   wheel   chair.   Please   call   for   more   information.   802-­771-­7153.

PART-­TIME   HELP   NEED-­ ED  for  yard  work  and  clean-­ ing  at  Lake  Champlain.  Call   T R I -­ TO W N   WAT E R   i s   802-­353-­6188. searching   for   a   Plant   Op-­ SERVICE  COORDINATOR:   erator  /  Maintenance  Worker.   37.5   and   32.5   hour   posi-­ Applicant  must  have  or  be   tions.  Develop,  coordinate   able   to   obtain   a   Class   4   and   monitor   supports   for   Water   Operator   License   individuals  with  disabilities.   and   valid   driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   license.   Need  skills  and  experience   Job   includes:   plant   main-­ (3+   yrs.)   in   this   or   related   tenance,  water  meter  read-­ field,   good   boundaries,   ing   and   willingness   to   do   ability  to  identify  concerns   manual  labor.  Good  benefit   and   problem-­solve,   excel-­ package.  Send  resumes  to:   lent   writing  /  documentation   Tri-­Town  Water,  PO  Box  85,   skills,  flexibility  and  adapt-­ Bridport,   VT   05734.   Attn:   ability.   Qualifications   also   Darwin   Pratt   or   email   to   include  a  B.A.  degree  and   tritownwater@gmavt.net. good  driving  record.  Benefit   V E R M O N T   S O A P   I S   package  includes  medical,   LOOKING   for   the   right   dental,  life  insurance,  gen-­ people  to  add  to  our  team   erous   paid   time-­off.   Re-­ of   full-­time,   honest,   hard   spond   to   CSAC   HR,   89   working,  friendly,  long-­term   Main   St.,   Middlebury,   VT   employees.   Must   be   good   05753;  802-­388-­6751,  ext.   with   numbers,   have   good   425,   or   visit   www.csac-­vt. computer  skills,  and  be  able   org. to   lift   up   to   50   lb.   boxes.  

Contact  Judy  Adams  at  388-­8392

 

 



THE   STOVE   DEPOT   in   Ferrisburgh   is   looking   for   a  full-­time  Service  Tech  /  In-­ staller  starting  immediately.   Tech   and   carpentry   skills   a   plus,   but   not   required.   Send   a   resume   to   chad@ thestovedepot.com   or   call   802-­870-­3220   and   ask   for   Chad.

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     Town              of  Shelburne HIGHWAY  DEPARTMENT Seasonal  Help  Wanted

Experienced  laborer  needed  for  roadside  mowing  along   Town  roads  and  assistance  with  Highway  Dept.  projects.   Approx.  June  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  September.  Valid  driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  license,  clean driving  record,  and  excellent  past  work  record  required.   Some  mechanical  ability  helpful.  Attention  to  detail,  adherence   to  safety  policies  and  commitment  to  positive  customer  service   required.  Must  have  ability  to  work  independently with  minimal  supervision.

Pay  rate:  $16.00/hr. Apply  by  June  25,  2014  to:   Paul  Goodrich,  Highway  Superintendent 420  Shelburne  Rd.,  P.O.  Box  88 Shelburne,  VT  05482 Phone:    (802)  316-­1536 Fax:  (802)  985-­9550 (2(Â&#x2021;ZZZVKHOEXUQHYWRUJ

Will   train.   Please   e-­mail   resume  to  Hilde@vermont-­ soap.com. WE  ARE  LOOKING  TO  hire   3  to  5  hard  working  people   for   the   summer   months   to   join  our  team  of  professional   painters.   No   experience   necessary,  but  helpful.  This   is  a  temporary  opportunity   which  could  lead  to  full-­time   for  the  right  person.  Excel-­ lent  starting  pay.  Fun  work-­ ing  conditions,  bonuses  and   pay  increases  for  motivated   people.  Call  802-­453-­5611   for  an  appointment.

For  Sale BENNINGTON   CAMEL   BACK  SOFA.  2  years  old,   full  size,  excellent  condition.   $300.  802-­352-­9026,  leave   a  message.



B R A N D   N E W   Q U E E N   MATTRESS  and  matching   foundation   still   in   original   plastic.  Call  802-­870-­0998. BUYING,  SELLING,  TRAD-­ ING,   repairing:   aluminum   fishing   boats,   row   boats,   trailers,   canoes,   kayaks,   dinghies,   jon   boats,   small   sail   boats,   used   oars   and   boating  access  at  fair  cash   prices.  Old  retired  boatsmith   802-­453-­4235.


PAGE  32  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

Addison Independent

For  Rent

CLASSIFIEDS

D

Tha

Vacation  Rentals

MAXIM  OUTDOOR  WOOD   PELLET  Furnace  by  Cen-­ tral   Boiler.   Clean,   safe   and   thermostatically   con-­ trolled.  Boivin  Farm  Supply   802-­475-­4007.

ADDISON:   LAKE   CHAM-­ PLAIN   waterfront   camp.   Beautiful   views,   gorgeous   sunsets,   private   beach,   dock,   rowboat   and   canoe   i n c l u d e d .   $ 6 0 0 .   w e e k-­ ly,   or   call   for   weekends.   802-­349-­4212.

BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  NEW  SCHOOL   HOUSE  office  suites  located   in  Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Old  High  School   complex   on   the   green   is   now  renting.  Five  separate   one   and   two   room,   newly   renovated,   offices   with   a   common  waiting  area,  con-­ ference   room,   bathroom   and   kitchenette.   Rent   in-­ cludes  heat,  electricity  and   shared   wi-­fi.   The   5   suites   range   from   377   s.f.   up   to   648   s.f.   Two   of   the   suites   are   single   rooms.   Three   have   an   inner   and   outer   office.   Newly   refinished   floors,  painted  trim,  ceiling   fans   and   lighting.   Tenants   choose  the  wall  colors.  The   first  year  of  lease  will  have   2  free  months  and  first  ten-­ ant  to  sign  a  lease  will  get   a  third  month  free  rent.  Call   802-­453-­4065   or   twells@ wellslaw.com  for  more  info.

THE  BARREL  MAN:  55  gal-­ lon   Plastic   and   Metal   bar-­ rels.  Several  types:  55  gal-­ lon  rain  barrels  with  faucets,   food  grade  with  removable   locking  covers,  plastic  food   grade   with   spin-­on   covers   (pickle   barrels).   Also,   275   gallon   food   grade   totes,   $125  each.  55  gallon  sand   /  salt   barrels   with   PT   legs,   $50   each.   Delivery   avail-­ able.  802-­453-­4235.

For  Rent 2  BEDROOM,  FIRST  floor   apartment,   with   office,   in   Middlebury   at   85   Court   Street.  Full  basement  with   laundry  hook-­ups.  Available   June  1.  $1,000  /  mo.  plus  util-­ ities.  Deposit,  credit  check   and   references   required.   No   pets   or   smoking.   No   exceptions.  802-­352-­6678. 2 , 0 0 0   S Q U A R E   F E E T   Professional   office   space   in   Middlebury,   multi-­room.   Ground  level,  parking,  hand-­ icapped-­accessible.   Avail-­ able  now.  802-­558-­6092. BRANDON  1  BEDROOM,   Beaumont  Woods.  $635  /  mo.   with   heat,   snow   and   trash   removal.  802-­773-­9107.

SOUTH   STARKSBORO   2   bedroom  mobile  home  on  own-­ er-­occupied   lot.   $875  /  month   plus  utilities.  Security  deposit   required.  Includes  W/D,  water,   sewer,   trash   removal,   snow   plowing   and   lawn   care.   No   smoking,  no  pets.  References   RENT   REDUCED:   WEST   required.  802-­453-­4856. ADDISON   completely   fur-­ nished   2   bedroom   apart-­ S T O R A G E   S P A C E S ,   ment.   Lake   Champlain   ac-­ 11â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;.   Large   overhead   cess.   No   pets.   Available   doors,   extra   high   ceilings.   immediately.   Rent   is   $900  /   Will   accommodate   large   month   which   includes   utili-­ campers,   boats   or   lots   of   ties.  Call  802-­759-­2382. stuff.  Call  802-­388-­8394.

RENnkT  EYou!

For  Rent



.

PITTSFORD   HOUSE.   3-­4   bedrooms,   backyard.   First   monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  and  security  depos-­ it.  $1,000  /  month.  Available  in   early   June.   802-­352-­4124.   Leave   a   message   in   the   evening.

For  Sale

REQUEST  FOR  BIDS.  The   Town  of  New  Haven  is  now   accepting  bids  for  a  Morbark   woodchipper.  6  in.  capacity,   trailer   mount,   25   HP   gas   engine.   Min.   bid,   $2,500.   Please  contact  Roger  Boise   at  802-­760-­0132  if  you  have   questions.  Submit  a  sealed   bid  to  the  Town  of  New  Ha-­ ven,  78  North  Street,  New   Haven,   VT   05472   by   3:00   p.m.,  June  17,  2014.

For  Rent

RESPONSIBLE   HOUSE-­ MATE   WANTED   to   share   a   lovely   old   farmhouse.   Private,   nicely   furnished,   newly  painted  bedroom  with   attached,  recently  renovated   private  bath,  full  use  of  the   house  including  kitchen  and   water  /  dryer.  $500  per  month   includes  all  utilities  (includ-­ ing   Wi-­Fi).   Cooperation   on   some   meals   is   negotiable   (and   might   be   fun).   Space   for   a   garden   is   also   avail-­ able.   Located   on   Snake   Mountain,   near   the   trails,   10   minutes   from   Middle-­ bury  and  one  hour  to  down-­ BRISTOL  LARGE  3  BED-­ town   Burlington.   Available   ROOM,  1  1/2  bath  ground   July   1st.   802-­545-­2918   or   floor   apartment.   Rent   in-­ 802-­363-­5302. cludes  heat,  lights,  rubbish,   snow  removal  and  applianc-­ SALISBURY   FURNISHED   es.  $1,200  per  month  plus   STUDIO   apartment.   Nice   deposit.   One   year   lease   porch,  like  new  condition.  No   and   references   required.   smoking,   no   pets.   Deposit   No  pets.  Call  802-­893-­1234. and   references   required.   Includes   all   utilities.   $750  /   mo.  802-­352-­9094.

WEST   ADDISON:   2   story,   furnished  house  on  lakefront.   Washer,  dryer.  No  smoking.   Available  September  through   May.  860-­653-­8112.

BRANDON  ONE  BR.  $650,   one  person;  $700,  two  per-­ TREK   520   TOURING   bi-­ sons.  Includes  heat,  snow   cycle.   12 Â�� years   old.   Ex-­ and  rubbish  removal.  Dam-­ cellent   condition.   $400.   age   deposit,   first   monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   HOMESHARERS   WANT-­ SELF   STORAGE,   8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   units.   Your   lock   and   key,   rent,   one   year   lease   re-­ 802-­388-­9274. quired.  No  smoking  or  pets.   ED.   Individuals,   couples   $55  /  m onth.   Middlebury,   welcome.   Ideally,   should   802-­558-­6092. 802-­247-­0115. love   gardening,   tolerate   Wood  Heat housework,   like   poetry   SHOREHAM   VILLAGE.   and  sewing.  Being  a  good   Very  cute  2  bedroom  apart-­ cook   would   help.   $400  /   ment.  Washer  /  dryer  hook-­up.   mo.   plus   some   hours   of   Walking  distance  to  school,   work.  References  required.   $695  /  mo.   plus   utilities.   No   ADDISON   COUNTY   FIRE-­ smoking,  no  pets.  Available   WOOD.  Premium  hardwoods   802-­475-­2112. July  1.  802-­388-­5411. cut,  split  and  delivered.  Cus-­ tom   sizes   available.   For   honest,  reliable  service  call   802-­238-­7748. For  Rent For  Rent For  Rent For  Rent





D RY   F I R E W O O D   $ 2 2 5   /  C ORD.   Green   firewood.   Mixed   hardwoods.   $200  /   cord.   $100  /  half   cord.   Also   chunk  wood  available.  Deliv-­ ery  available  at  extra  charge.   Call  802-­545-­2144.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  against  the  law   to  discriminate  when   advertising  housing

FIREWOOD,   DRY,   CUT,   split.   $200  /  cord.  You   truck.   802-­247-­6061.

Particularly  on  sites  like  Craigslist.

Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

2  BEDROOM  RUSTIC  cab-­ in  on  1.7  acres  in  Salisbury   with  320â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  of  Lake  Dunmore   frontage   across   Route   53   with  sundeck  and  dock  on   water.   Beautiful   swimming   and   sunsets.   Quiet   and   private.   $249,900.   Seri-­ ous,   qualified   buyers   only   please.  802-­352-­6678.



Att.  Farmers JD   74   RAKE,   purchased   new   in   1999  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one   owner,   stored  undercover  when  not   in  use.  Very  good  condition   with  very  good  tires.  Opera-­ torâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Manual  included.  Teeth   are  tripled  with  approx.  two   thirds  rubber  and  one  third   original   spring   steel.   Ask-­ ing   $2,500.   Call   Nate   at   545-­2320.

MULCH   HAY   FOR   SALE:   Delivery   available.   Call   45  OCEANFRONT  ACRES   for   pricing.   802-­453-­4481,   overlooking  Bay  of  Fundy,   8 0 2 -­ 3 4 9 -­ 9 2 8 1 ,   o r   Digby   Neck,   Nova   Scotia.   802-­989-­1004. Solar   powered   summer   cabin.   Complete   privacy.   W H I T N E Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S   C U S T O M   $250,000.   firm.   www.fun-­ FARM   WORK.   Pond   agi-­ dygetaway.com tating,  liquid  manure  haul-­ ing,  drag  line  aerating.  Call   CHANNEL  WATERFRONT   for   price.   462-­2755,   John   COTTAGES.   Unique   1,   2,   Whitney. 3+   bdrm.,   kitchens,   sandy   beach,  walk  to  Weirs  Beach,   restaurants,   attractions,   Motorcycles shopping  and  convenience.   Very   clean   and   comfort-­ able,  A/C,  free  Wi-­Fi,  docks,   1985  HONDA  250  Big  Red   outdoor   fireplace,   tiki   bar   in  good  shape,  $600.  1985   with  stereo  and  outdoor  TV,   Honda  250  SX,  $400.  Call   gas  grills,  great  hospitality   802-­453-­3011. and  service,  pets  welcome.   Think   summer,   call   now.   603-­366-­4673,   www.chan-­ Boats nelcottages.com. 2006  BAYLINER  185BR  in   LEICESTER   6.8   ACRES,   excellent  condition.  130  h.p.   $59,000.  Very  nice  building   Mercrusier  engine  with  very   site  surveyed,  septic  design   low  usage.  Entire  boat  me-­ included.   Ready   to   build   ticulously  maintained.  Seats   on,   with   all   permits.   Own-­ and   carpeting   like   new.   er   financing.   Call   Wayne   Custom   cover   and   trailer   802-­257-­7076. are   included.   $10,000.   802-­247-­6870. L I G H T L Y   W O O D E D   BUILDING   LOT   in   East   BOSTON  WHALER  BOAT   Middlebury  on  private  road.   (1982)   17â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Newport,   90hp   Lot  has  village  water,  under-­ Johnson  motor  (1987)  with   ground  electric  /  communica-­ few  hours.  Galvanized  trail-­ tion   services   and   conven-­ er,   new   controls,   tune-­up,   tional  septic.  Nearby  tennis   starter,   starter   solenoid   courts,   playground,   library   and  trailer  tires.  Extra  prop   and   ball   field.   Restrictions   included.  Also  some  acces-­ on  mobile  homes,  ranches   sories.   Fresh   water   boat,   and  double  wides.  $69,500.   second   owner.   Very   good   802-­388-­2502. condition.   $4,500.   OBO.   Pictures  on  Craigâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list,  Bris-­ M I D D L E B U R Y;   2 0 1 0   tol,  Vermont.  Cash  or  bank   14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X70â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  home,  front  porch,   check.  802-­453-­4235. rear  deck,  2  storage  build-­ ings,   2   bedrooms,   large   living   room   and   kitchen,   1   Cars bathroom.  Central  air,  gen-­ erator,   washer   and   dryer,   LP  gas  furnace,  all  kitchen   appliances,   fully   furnished   (price   reduction   without   2001   BUICK   LESABRE   furniture).   John   Deere   LIMITED.  97K  miles,  load-­ riding   mower   included.   ed,   heated   leather   seats,   $52,500.   In   Lindale   Park.   heated   side   mirrors,   well   802-­453-­2682. cared  for  with  maintenance   records   available.   $4,000   OBO.  802-­989-­7073.





And  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you   might  think.  You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no  childrenâ&#x20AC;?   or  â&#x20AC;&#x153;adults  only.â&#x20AC;?  There  is  lots  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say.   The  federal  government  is  watching  for  such   discrimination. Let  us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities   of  the  Fair  Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the   right  side  of  the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Fair  Housing  Law.  

Real  Estate

$GV &ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HG

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FIREWOOD;   CUT,   SPLIT   and  delivered.  Green  or  sea-­ soned.   Call   Tom   Shepard,   WE   ARE   SELLING   our   double  wide  home  and  look-­ 802-­453-­4285. ing   for   a   buyer   who   will   MOUNTAIN   ROAD   FIRE-­ take   it   away.   3   bedroom,   WOOD.  Green  and  partially   2  bath.  Comes  with  porch,   seasoned   available.   Oak,   hot   water   heater,   forced   ash,   maple,   beech.   Order   air  heating  system,  kitchen   now  and  save  for  next  sea-­ appliances  and  wood  pellet   son.  Cut,  split  and  delivered.   stove.  26x48  in  size.  Asking   Call  802-­759-­2095. $24,000,   OBRO.   Contact   Lisa  at  802-­388-­1457.

ollege.   For  Rent  Close  to  c TMENT OM  APAR y,  newly  refurbished. 1  BEDRO ur eb dl 000. ,  Mid Main  Street ,  includes  heat.  000-­0 th ury $750/mon  of  Middleb 0000. T, 2.12   ACRE   BUILDING    mile  north TMEN 0-­ OM  APAR ,  electric,  rubbish,  1 th  plus  deposit.  00 O R D BE 1   on lot   in   Salisbury,   1/4   mile   ludes  heat ly,  $595/m upstairs,  inc Available  immediate .   from   Waterhouses   Res-­ ference re d   on  Route  7 an it   ies.  Depos LE  home taurant   and   Marina.   1285   OM  MOBI t.  $650/mo.  plus  utilit 2  BEDRO lo e   at .  Priv West   Shore   Road.   4   bed-­ in  Salisbury -­0000. d. ire requ 00 eferences   required.  0 DO R room   septic   installed   with   N t.   O en /C m SE se ba HOU arage  and   000. OM  TOWN drilled  well.  28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  garage   2  BEDRO mons,  Vergennes.  G eat.  No  pets.  000-­0  h om Country  C xcluding  utilities  and in   place.   $119,900.   Call   r, he  e as o.  w atellite, pletely $1,000/m ERN,  com  internet,  s ery  energy 802-­352-­6678. OM,  MOD e  house.  Hi-­speed  V O e. R D ag nt BE QH 2   or fro WKURXJK-X l,  85â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  lake   678. Lake  Dunm furnished   ed  porch,  drilled  wel QJ$XJXVW s  utilities.  802-­352-­6 UWL lu en dryer,  scre PRQWKUHQWDOVWD tiable.  $1,000/mo.  p RU ets  nego  P g. HIÂżFLHQW) in ok m on-­s 26,  2010.  N

Real  Estate

Att.  Farmers HAY   FOR   SALE:   First   c u t   $ 3   /   s q u a r e   b a l e .   First   cut   round   bales   $30.   Mike   Quinn,   end   of   South   Munger  Street,  Middlebury.   802-­388-­7828.

Wanted ANTIQUES  WANTED.  Lo-­ cal   3rd   generation   deal-­ er,   free   verbal   apprais-­ als.   Call   Brian   Bittner   at   802-­272-­7527  or  visit  www. bittnerantiques.com. NEEDED:   AN   ELECTRI-­ CAL  /  M ECHANICAL   en-­ gineer   to   help   this   kinetic   sculptor  to  finish  some  de-­ vices  that  are  near  comple-­ tion.  As  a  retired  professor   of   art   at   Oberlin   and   de-­ grees  from  Yale  University,  I   still  am  unable  to  pay  much   for  your  services.  This  will   be  for  art.  802-­453-­6975.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  33

TOWN OF RIPTON As  of  June  4,  2014  the  abstract  of  the    *UDQG /LVW LV ¿OHG ZLWK WKH WRZQ FOHUN *ULHYDQFHV PXVW EH UHFHLYHG LQ ZULWLQJE\SP7KXUVGD\-XQHWK *ULHYDQFH KHDULQJV EHJLQ DW  SP -XQH   E\ DSSRLQWPHQW &RQWDFW WKHOLVWHUVDWRU32%R[5LS WRQ97 5LSWRQ%RDUGRI/LVWHUV

SALISBURY COMMUNITY SCHOOLâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; INVITATION TO BID

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TOWN OF FERRISBURGH PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT

   A  public  hearing  before  the  Zoning  Board   of   Adjustment   of   the   Town   of   Ferrisburgh   ZLOO EH KHOG DW WKH7RZQ &OHUNÂśV 2IÂżFH RQ July   2,   2014   to   consider   the   following   applications: 7:05 PM     An   application,   #14-­055,   submitted   by   Steven   and   Susan   Lackey   for  a  Conditional  Use  Permit  to  replace  a   shed   formerly   on   the   property,   impacted   E\WKHĂ&#x20AC;RRGDQGQRWUHSODFHGZLWKLQWKH time  allowed.  Property  ID  #99.99.99.077.   SR-­2  Zoning  District. 7:15 PM   An   application,   #14-­054,   submitted   by   Mark   Franceschetti   for   a   Conditional   Use   Permit   to   convert   an   existing  residence  and  accessory  dwelling   unit   into   a   3   single-­bedroom   apartment   complex,   together   with   an   accessory   dwelling   unit   (Multiple   family   dwelling).   Property  ID  #  18.20.71.Village  District. 7:25 PM   An   application,   #14-­056,   submitted   by   Rory   Cartwright   for   a   Variance/Waiver   of   10   feet   to   erect   an   accessory   building.   Property   ID   #   11/01/02.8.  RA5  Zoning  District.   The   above   applications   are   available   IRU LQVSHFWLRQ DW WKH 7RZQ &OHUNÂśV 2IÂżFH Persons   wishing   to   appear   and   be   heard   may  do  so  in  person  or  be  represented  by   an  agent  or  an  attorney. PLEASE NOTE Participation   in   the   local   proceeding  is  a  prerequisite  to  the  right  to   take  any  subsequent  appeal.   Communications   about   the   above   DSSOLFDWLRQVPD\EHÂżOHGLQZULWLQJZLWKWKH Board  or  at  such  hearing.                                  6/16

The  Public  Notices   section  appears  every   Mon.  &  Thurs.  in  the

Addison Independent

VERMONT STATE HOUSING AUTHORITY PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

PHA 5-­Year/Annual Plan for Fiscal Years 2015-­2019    In  accordance  with  the  U.S.  Department   of   Housing   and   Urban   Development   regulation  found  at  24CFR  903.17,  Vermont   State   Housing   Authority   has   prepared   a   <HDU$QQXDO 3ODQ IRU ÂżVFDO \HDUV  2019.     This   document,   and   supporting   documents,   is   available   for   review   at   WKH 0DLQ $GPLQLVWUDWLYH 2IÂżFHV RI WKH Vermont   State   Housing   Authority   located   at   One   Prospect   Street,   Montpelier,   VT   between   the   hours   of   9:00   a.m.   and   3:00   p.m.,   Monday   through   Friday,   from   May   20,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  July  7,  2014.    A  public  hearing   on  the  5-­Year/Annual  Plan  will  be  held  on   -XO\DWDPDWWKHRIÂżFHVRI the  Vermont  State  Housing  Authority,  One   Prospect  Street,  Montpelier,  VT.   Equal  Housing  Opportunity                                6/5,  16

Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  encourage  bears  to  become  a  nuisance ADDISON   COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   People   love  to  see  the  black  bear  in  its  natu-­ ral   surroundings.   But   when   bears   venture   into   human   territory,   prob-­ lems  can  occur.  Often,  bears  pay  the   price. The   Independent   heard   that   a   bear   climbed   onto   the   porch   of   a   Cornwall   home   recently   (breaking   a   couple   balustrades   and   a   screen   door)  in  order  to  get  at  a  can  full  of   birdseed.  The  bear  left  without  inci-­ dent,  but  the  homeowner  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  an  older   woman   who   heard   the   racket   from   her  bed  upstairs  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  was  alarmed  by   the   prospect   of   a   bear   entering   the   residence. People   often   encourage   bears   to   come   out   of   the   forest   by   provid-­ ing   food   without   realizing   it.   Once   bears   become   used   to   these   food  

MORTGAGEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. As  ordered  by  the  Court  set  forth  below  and  in  connection  with  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Kelly  Newton  and  David  Newton  to  National  City  Mortgage  Co  dba  Commonwealth   United  Mortgage  Company,  dated  November  23,  2004  and  recorded  in  Book  60  Page  137   of  the  land  records  of  the  Town  of  Leicester,  of  which  mortgage  the  Plaintiff  is  the  pres-­ ent  holder.    In  accordance  with  the  Judgment  Order  and  Decree  of  Foreclosure  entered   October  30,  2014  in  the  action  entitled  PNC  Bank,  National  Association  v  Kelly  Newton.,   by  the  Addison  Unit,  Civil  Division,  Vermont  Superior  Court,  Docket  No.  162-­7-­12  Ancv  for   breach  of  the  conditions  of  said  mortgage  and  for  the  purpose  of  foreclosing  the  same  will   be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at  2486  Route  7,  Leicester,  Vermont  on  July  7,  2014  at  2:30  pm   all  and  singular  the  premises  described  in  said  mortgage,      To  wit:   Schedule  A Mortgage  Deed  From  David  R.Newton  and  Kelly  G.  Newton  To  National  City  Mortgage Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  to  be  conveyed  to  David  Newton  and  Kelly   Newton  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Rene  Quenneville  and  Lorraine  Quenneville  to  be  recorded   in  the  Town  of  Leicester  Land  Records. Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Rene  Quenneville  and  Lor-­ raine  Quenneville  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Dennis  R  Charron  and  Linda  D  Charron  dated  April   21,  1976  and  recorded  at  Book  31,  Page  435  of  the  Town  of  Leicester  Land  Records  and   being  more  particularly  described  therein,  in  part,  as  follows: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being   a   portion   of   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   the   herein   Grantors   by   Warranty   Deed   of   Jean   Guy   Quenneville   and   Lillian   D.   Quenneville,   dated   July   25,   1973,  recorded  in  Book  31  at  page  179  of  the  Leicester  Land  Records,  the  portion  herein   conveyed  being  more  particularly  described  on  a  Survey  Map  entitled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Portion  of  Property   of  Gene  Guy  Quenneville  et  al,  Addison,  County,  Leicester,  Vermont,â&#x20AC;?  made  by  Lee  H.   Lowell,  dated  September  4,  1972,  as  follows: Beginning  at  a  point  marked  by  a  fence  post  and  iron  pipe  on  or  near  the  westerly  edge   of  the  right  of  way  of  U  S  Route  7,  said  point  being  the  northeasterly  corner  of  lands  of   Howard  Scarborough  and  the  southeasterly  corner  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed, Thence  go  N  77  degrees  03â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  250.00  feet  along  a  wire  fence  and  hedgerow  in  the   northerly  line  of  Scarborough  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe,  said  point  being  the  south-­ westerly  comer  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed; Thence  go  N  29  degrees  07â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  205.00  feet  in  a  blazed  and  painted  line  in  the  easterly   line  of  lands  retained  by  the  herein  Grantors  and  to  be  reconveyed  by  them  to  Jean  Guy   Quenneville  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe  set  in  stones,  said  point  being  the  northwest-­ erly  comer  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed; Thence  go  S  69  degrees  06â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  in  the  southerly  line  of  other  lands  of  the  said  Jean  Guy   Quenneville  four  (4)  distances  as  follows: 1)    83.00  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe,     2)    81.23  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe, 3)    74  39  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe, 4)    4  00  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  a  painted  spot  on  a  stone  on  or  near  the  westerly   edge  of  the  right  of  way  of  said  highway,  said  point  being  the  southeasterly  corner  of   said  other  lands  of  said  Jean  Guy  Quenneville  and  the  northeasterly  comer  of  the  lands   herein  conveyed; Thence  go  S  29  degrees  07â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  170.00  feet  in  a  wire  fence  line  on  or  near  the  westerly   edge  of  the  right  of  way  of  said  highway  to  the  point  of  beginning. Also  hereby  conveyed,  by  quit  claim  only,  is  all  right,  title  and    interest    of  the  herein     Grantors   in     and   to   the   lands   lying   between   the   easterly   boundary   of   the   lands   herein   conveyed  as  described  above  and    the  center  line  of  said  highway.   Reference  is  hereby  made  to  the  above  instruments  and  to  the  records  and  references   contained  therein  in  further  aid  of  this  description.   Terms  of  sale:  Said  premises  will  be  sold  and  conveyed  subject  to  all  liens,  encum-­ brances,   unpaid   taxes,   tax   titles,   municipal   liens   and   assessments,   if   any,   which   take   precedence  over  the  said  mortgage  above  described. TEN  THOUSAND   ($10,000.00)   Dollars   of   the   purchase   price   must   be   paid   in   cash,   FHUWLÂżHGFKHFNEDQNWUHDVXUHUÂśVRUFDVKLHUÂśVFKHFNDWWKHWLPHDQGSODFHRIWKHVDOHE\WKH SXUFKDVHU7KHEDODQFHRIWKHSXUFKDVHSULFHVKDOOEHSDLGLQFDVKFHUWLÂżHGFKHFNEDQN treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  within  thirty  (30)  days  after  the  date  of  sale.        The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  pay-­ ing  the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.   Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale.   DATED:  June  3,  2014 By:  /s/:  Amber  L.  Doucette,  Esq. Amber  L.  Doucette,  Esq. Bendett  and  McHugh,  PC,  270  Farmington  Ave.,  Ste.  151,  Farmington,  CT  06032, (860)  606-­1090,  Fax  (860)  409-­0626 6/9,  16,  23

sources   and   come   into   frequent   human   contact,   people   sometimes   call   them   â&#x20AC;&#x153;nuisance   bears.â&#x20AC;?   But   ZLOGOLIH RIÂżFLDOV VD\ WKH\ DUH MXVW being  bears. It  is  nearly  impossible  to  relocate   a   nuisance   bear   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   they   frequently   have   to   be   put   down.   Some   of   the   most   common   sources   of   food   that   attract   bears   are   pet   food,   bird   feeders,   barbecue   grills,   garbage,   household   trash   containers,   open   Dumpsters,   and   campsites   with   accessible  food  and  food  wastes. Purposely   feeding   a   bear   is   not   MXVW EDG IRU WKH EHDU LWÂśV DOVR LOOH-­ gal.   Vermont   law   also   states   that   residents   must   take   reasonable   measures   to   protect   their   property   from   bears   before   lethal   force   can   be   taken.   Some   of   these   measures  

include: Â&#x2021; .HHS FKLFNHQV DQG KRQH\EHHV secure   within   an   electric   fence   or   other  bear-­proof  enclosure. Â&#x2021; 1HYHU IHHG EHDUV GHOLEHUDWHO\ or  accidentally. Â&#x2021; )HHGSHWVLQGRRUV Â&#x2021; 'R QRW IHHG ELUGV $SULO  through   Nov.   30.   Bringing   feeders   LQDWQLJKWGRHVQÂśWZRUNEHFDXVHRI seed  that  is  spilled  on  the  ground.   Â&#x2021; 6WRUH WUDVK LQ D VHFXUH SODFH Trashcans  alone  are  not  enough. To   learn   more   about   living   with   9HUPRQWÂśV EODFN EHDUV RQ WKH Vermont   Fish   &   Wildlife   website   ZZZYWÂżVKDQGZLOGOLIHFRP  )LVK &   Wildlife   also   asks   that   people   use  a  form  on  the  website  to  report   any   incidents   they   may   have   with   Vermont  bears.

Public Notices Index Pages  33  &  34. Addison  Co.  Superior  Court  (3) Ferrisburgh  (1) Ripton  (1)

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

Salisbury  Community  School  (1) Vermont  Public  Service  Board  (1) Vt.  State  Housing  Authority  (1)

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 14-­1-­13 Ancv

Central  Mortgage  Company,   Plaintiff               v.             Jennifer  Hessel  Smith,  Scott  Smith,  Marion  F.  Hessel  and  Occupants  residing  at  140  Old   Gravel  Lane,  Starksboro,  Vermont,   Defendants  NOTICE OF SALE    By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith,   Scott   Smith   and   Marion   F.   Hessel   to   Mortgage   Electronic   Registration  Systems,  Inc.,  as  nominee  for  CTX  Mortgage  Company,  LLC  dated  August  27,   2008  and  recorded  in  Volume  92,  Page  334,  which  mortgage  was  assigned  from  Mortgage   Electronic   Registration   Systems,   Inc.,   as   nominee   for   CTX   Mortgage   Company,   LLC   to   Central   Mortgage   Company   by   an   instrument   dated   October   1,   2012   and   recorded   on   January  26,  2013  in  Volume  105,  Page  208  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Starksboro,   of  which  mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of   said  mortgage  and  for  the  purposes  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at   10:15  A.M.  on  July  8,  2014,  at  140  Old  Gravel  Lane,  Starksboro,  Vermont  all  and  singular   the  premises  described  in  said  mortgage:    To  Wit:    Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Jennifer  Hessel  Smith,   Scott   Smith   and   Marion   F.   Hessel   by   Quit   Claim   Deed   of   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith   dated   August  22,  2008  and  recorded  September  4,  2008  in  Volume  92,  Page  331  of  the  Town  of   Starksboro  Land  Records  and  being  more  particularly  described  as  follows:     Being   all   and   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith     by   Warranty  Deed  of  Michael  Flack  dated  April  25,  2006  and  recorded  May  1,  2006  in  Volume   84   at   Page   563   of   the   Town   of   Starksboro   Land   Records   and   being   more   particularly   described  as  follows:    A  lot  of  land  with  building  thereon  situated  easterly  of  Vermont  Route  17E,  and  situated   on   the   easterly   side   of   the   former   highway   leading   southerly   from   Hanksville,   so-­called,   to  South  Starksboro,  so-­called,  and  land  being  all  and  the  same  described  in  a  Warranty   Deed  from  Floyd  N.  Thompson  and  Sadie  L.  Thompson  to  the  within  Grantors  dated  June   15,  1959  and  recorded  in  Book  25  at  Page  100  of  the  Starksboro  Land  Records.  Said  land   is  more  particularly  described  therein,  in  part  as  follows:     â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;ŚBeginning   at   a   point   in   said   easterly   line   of   above   mentioned   highway   and   at     the   northwesterly  corner  of  land  of  George  and  Eleanor  Spark,  thence  northerly  along  the  said   easterly  line  of  said  highway  165  feet  to  the  old  road  leading  to  a  gravel  pit,  thence  in  a   northeasterly  direction  along  said  road  260  feet  to  the  Huntington  River,  so-­called,  thence   southerly  along  the  westerly  bank  of  said  river  250  feet  to  the  said  northerly  line  of  said   6SHDU/DQGIHHWWRÂżUVWDERYHPHQWLRQHGKLJKZD\DQGWKHSRLQWRIEHJLQQLQJ    Being  part  and  parcel  of  the  so-­called  Ober  lot,  and  is  part  and  parcel  of  the  land  described   in  a  deed  from  Nixon  Thompson  to  Floyd  N.  and  Said  L.  Thompson  as  duly  appears  of   record  in  Starksboro  Land  Records  in  Volume  19  at  Page  120â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? 6XEMHFWWRDQGEHQHÂżWWHGE\DOOULJKWVRIZD\HDVHPHQWVFRYHQDQWVSHUPLWVDQGULJKWV of  record.    Reference  is  hereby  made  to  the  above  instruments  and  to  the  records  and  references   contained  therein  in  further  aid  of  this  description.      Terms  of  Sale:    $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the  time   of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the   Town  of  Starksboro.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.    Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  30  Kimball   Avenue,  Ste.  307,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.    This  sale  may  be  cancelled   at  any  time  prior  to  the  scheduled  sale  date  without  prior  notice.   DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  4th  day  of  June,  2014 Central  Mortgage  Company    By:  Joshua  B.  Lobe,  Esq. Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  PLC 6/9,  16,  23   30  Kimball  Ave.,  Ste.  307    South  Burlington,  VT    05403


PAGE  34  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014

Arms  race  in  the   woods:  how  beavers   recycle  tree  defenses By  DIETLAND   MĂ&#x153;LLER-­SCHWARZE Around  a  beaver  pond,  we  some-­ times   catch   a   whiff   of   beaver   odor.   People   have   described   it   to   me   as   smoky,   woody   or   like   tobacco.   It   may  waft  over  from  the  lodge,  or  it   might   emanate   from   scent   mounds   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   little   piles   of   mud   by   the  waterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  edge.  Beavers   make   scent   mounds   by   dredging   up   mud   from   the   bottom   of   a   pond,   then   carrying   it   up   on   land   in   their   front   paws   while   walking   upright.   The   beaver   drops   the   mud,   then   squats   over   the   mound   and   applies   castoreum   from   glands   near  the  base  of  the  tail.   The   smell   means:   Keep   away!   In   some   neighborhoods,   this   territorial   advertisement   works   remarkably   well.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   involved   in   studies   where   human-­made   scent   mounds   effectively   deterred   free-­ranging  

The

beavers  from  settling  in  unoccupied   beaver  habitat. When   a   beaver   detects   a   foreign   castor  smell  in  its  territory,  it  implies   brazen   behavior   that   has   to   be   dealt   with.   The   residents   invariably   eliminate   the   strange   scent   mark.   They   paw   it   apart   and   scent   mark   over   it.   If   they   come   across   the   perpetrator,   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  attack  viciously.   Researchers  have  found   that   beavers   can   iden-­ tify  family  members  by   their   castor   smell;Íž   they   can   also   distinguish   between   neighbors   and   complete  strangers. Castoreum   contains   many   differ-­ ent   kinds   of   compounds:   alkaloids,   phenolics,   terpenes,   alcohols   and   acids   among   them.   The   beaver   appropriates  the  ingredients  from  the   plants   it   eats;Íž   ironically,   the   plants   use   the   compounds   to   say:   Keep   away!

Outside Story

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 8-­1-­13 Ancv

Citizens  Bank,  N.A.  f/k/a  RBS  Citizens,  N.A.,   Plaintiff   v. Bruce  Donovan,  Administrator  of  the  Estate  of  Linda  T.  Aktins  aka  Linda  Thorpe  Morrison   fka  Linda  Esther  Thorpe,  Lisa  Stockwell,  Patrick  A.  Morrison  and  Occupants  residing  at   219  Cross  Road,  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont,   Defendants   NOTICE OF SALE      By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Hubert  S.  Atkins  (now  deceased)  and  Linda  T.  Aktins  aka  Linda  Thorpe  Morrison  fka   Linda   Esther  Thorpe   (now   deceased)   to   Citizens   Bank,   N.A.   dated   December   12,   2005   and  recorded  in  Volume  119,  Page  438  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh,   of  which  mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of   said  mortgage  and  for  the  purposes  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction   at  9:00  A.M.  on  July  8,  2014,  at  219  Cross  Road,  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont  all  and  singular  the   premises  described  in  said  mortgage:    To  Wit: Being   all   and   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Lisa   Stockwell   and   Patrick  A.   Morrison,  reserving  a  life  estate  for  Linda  T.  Atkins,  by  Quit  Claim  Deed  of  Linda  T.  Atkins   dated  June  2,  2010  and  recorded  June  10,  2010  in  Volume  134,  Page  504  of  the  Land   Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh.    A   certain   piece   of   land   in   Ferrisburgh   in   the   County   of  Addison   and   State   of   Vermont   described  as  follows,  viz,    Being  all  my  right,  title  and  interest  in  and  to  the  following  described  piece  or  parcel  of  land   together  with  all  improvements  thereon;Íž     Being   a   part   of   the   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Linda   Esther  Thorpe,   now   Linda   Thorpe   Morrison,   and   George   Roger   Thorpe,   by   Warranty   Deed   of   Rupert   Thorpe   and   Julia  Thorpe   dated   February   16,   1952,   and   recorded   at   Book   34   Pages   574-­575   in   the   Ferrisburgh  Land  Records,  and  being  more  particularly  described  in  said  Warranty  Deed   as  follows:     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being   a   piece   on   the   north   side   of   the   road   with   dwelling   house   and   other   buildings   thereon,  said  piece  commencing  at  the  telephone  pole  just  westerly  of  the  house;Íž  thence   in   an   easterly   direction   along   said   road   a   distance   of   313   feet,   more   or   less   to   a   point   PDUNHGE\DFHPHQWPDUNHUVDLGSRLQWDOVREHLQJLGHQWLÂżHGE\DEDUEHGZLUHIHQFHWKHQFH northerly  along  said  barbed  wire  fence  at  an  approximate  90  degrees  angle  to  the  said  road   a  distance  of  236  feet  6  inches,  more  or  less,  to  a  point  marked  by  a  cement  monument;Íž   thence  westerly  in  a  line  parallel  with  the  road  a  distance  of  313  feet,  more  or  less,  to  a  point   marked  by  a  cement  monument;Íž  thence  southerly  a  distance  of  236  feet,  6  inches  more  or   less,  to  the  point  or  place  of  beginning.â&#x20AC;?    Terms  of  Sale:    $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the  time   of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the   Town  of  Ferrisburgh.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.    Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  30  Kimball   Avenue,  Ste.  307,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.    This  sale  may  be  cancelled   at  any  time  prior  to  the  scheduled  sale  date  without  prior  notice.      DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  4th  day  of  June,  2014 Citizens  Bank,  N.A.  f/k/a  RBS  Citizens,  N.A. By:  Joshua  B.  Lobe,  Esq.,  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  PLC 6/9,  16,  23   30  Kimball  Ave.,  Ste.  307    South  Burlington,  VT    05403

Plants   synthesize   a   bewildering   variety   of   secondary   compounds   that   differ   from   the   basic   classes   of   proteins,   fats   and   carbohydrates.   Some,   like   alkaloids,   taste   bitter,   while   tannins   are   astringent.   When   they   work,   the   compounds   defend   the   plants   against   mammal   and   insect   herbivores,   as   well   as   fungi   and   other   microorganisms.   These   secondary  compounds  interfere  with   digestion   and   inhibit   reproduction.   Some   are   outright   toxic   and   even   deadly. Compounds  from  a  number  of  trees   in   the   beaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   diet   end   up   in   their   castoreum.  Benzyl  alcohol  occurs  in   aspens   and   poplars,   benzoic   acid   in   black   cherry   and   Scotch   pine,   and   catechol  in  common  cottonwood.  In   summer,   beavers   eat   aquatic   plants   such   as   pondweed   and   pond   lilies   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  alkaloids  that  these  plants  use  

to   deter   insects   also   end   up   in   the   beaverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mix. Beavers  cope  with  plant  chemicals   in  different  ways.  They  have  in  their   saliva   a   protein   that   binds   tannins   and   renders   them   harmless.   They   deal  with  other  compounds  by  break-­ ing  them  down  into  their  component   parts:  When  they  ingest  salicin  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a   bitter  chemical  in  willow  and  poplar   bark   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the   salicin   molecule   gets   broken  down  into  sugar  and,  eventu-­ ally,  salicylic  acid.  (Beavers  are  not   the  only  animals  that  have  this  trick   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   leaf   beetles   also   ingest   salicin   when   munching   on   willow   leaves.   They   use   the   glucose   as   a   nutrient   and   the   salicylic   acid   for   defense   against  predators,  such  as  ants.) Even   humans   appropriate   beaver   castor,  though  we  use  it  to  say:  Come   here!   Castor   sacs   are   a ��  secondary   product  of  the  fur  trade  and  are  sold  

STATE OF VERMONT PUBLIC SERVICE BOARD

Order  of  Notice Re:  Public  Hearing Docket  No.  8248 Petition of Champlain Valley Solar Farm, LLC Re Proposed Solar Facility in Middlebury, Vermont    :KHUHDV RQ$SULO   &KDPSODLQ 9DOOH\ 6RODU )DUP //& ÂżOHG D SHWLWLRQ IRU D FHUWLÂżFDWH RI SXEOLF JRRG SXUVXDQW WR  96$ Â&#x2020;  DXWKRUL]LQJ WKH LQVWDOODWLRQ DQG operation   of   a   2.2   MW   solar   electric   generation   facility   to   be   located   off   of   U.S.   Route   7   LQ0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQW7KHSURSRVHGSURMHFWZLOORFFXS\DSSUR[LPDWHO\DFUHVRID DFUHSDUFHORIODQGDQGLVFRPSULVHGRIVRODUDUUD\VFRQWDLQLQJDSSUR[LPDWHO\ VRODUSKRWRYROWDLFSDQHOVLQVWDOOHGLQURZVRQDÂż[HGPRXQWHGUDFNLQJV\VWHPIDFLQJ GXHVRXWK $GGLWLRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQUHJDUGLQJWKHSHWLWLRQLVDYDLODEOHRQWKH3XEOLF6HUYLFH %RDUGÂśVZHEVLWHDWZZZSVEYHUPRQWJRY  1RZ7KHUHIRUH,W,V+HUHE\2UGHUHGLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWK96$6HFWLRQVDQG WKDWD3XEOLF+HDULQJEHKDGXSRQVDLGSHWLWLRQEHIRUHD+HDULQJ2IÂżFHURIWKH3XEOLF6HUYLFH %RDUG-RKQ*HUKDUG6WDII$WWRUQH\RQ0RQGD\-XQHFRPPHQFLQJDW30 LQWKH&RPPXQLW\0HHWLQJ5RRPORFDWHGRQWKHORZHUOHYHORIWKH,OVOH\3XEOLF/LEUDU\ Main  Street,  Middlebury,  Vermont. 7KHDERYHKHDULQJORFDWLRQLVKDQGLFDSSHGDFFHVVLEOH$Q\SHUVRQZLWKDGLVDELOLW\ZKR ZLVKHVWRDWWHQGDQGZLOOQHHGVSHFLDODFFRPPRGDWLRQVKRXOGFRQWDFWWKH3XEOLF6HUYLFH %RDUG  E\QRODWHUWKDQ-XQHLIWKH\ZLOOQHHGWKDWDFFRPPRGDWLRQ ,W,V)XUWKHU2UGHUHGWKDWQRWLFHRIVDLGKHDULQJEHJLYHQE\RQHSXEOLFDWLRQRIWKLV2UGHU RQ 0RQGD\ -XQH   LQ WKH$GGLVRQ &RXQW\ ,QGHSHQGHQW D ELZHHNO\ QHZVSDSHU published  in  Middlebury,  Vermont. ,W,V)XUWKHU2UGHUHGWKDW3HWLWLRQHUVKDOOÂżOHZLWKWKH3XEOLF6HUYLFH%RDUGDFRS\RIWKH QHZVSDSHULQZKLFKWKLV2UGHUDSSHDUV6DLGQHZVSDSHUÂżOLQJVKDOOEHVXEPLWWHGQRWODWHU than  June  20,  2014. Dated  at  Montpelier,  Vermont,  this  10th  day  of  June,  2014. VERMONT  PUBLIC  SERVICE  BOARD  By:  Susan  M.  Hudson,  Clerk  of  the  Board OFFICE  OF  THE  CLERK Filed:  June  10,  2014     Attest:  Susan  M.  Hudson,  Clerk  of  the  Board

to   perfumers   who   use   the   castor   to   give   perfumes   an   â&#x20AC;&#x153;animal   note.â&#x20AC;?   In   fact,   the   chemical   investigation   of   castoreum   was   driven   by   the   perfume  industry. Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   also   not   above   recycling   plant   compounds   for   our   own   purposes.   Salicylic   acid   is   the   active  principle  of  aspirin.  Over  two   thousand   years   ago,   physicians   in   ancient   Greece   prescribed   willow   EDUN WR ÂżJKW IHYHUV DQG LQĂ&#x20AC;DPPD-­ tion.  Native  Americans  used  willow   bark   against   headaches,   and   today   we  still  treat  pain  of  the  lower  back   and   osteoarthritis   with   willow   bark   preparations. And  so  there  rages  a  chemical  arms   race  in  the  woods.  Trees  bolster  their   defenses   against   herbivores,   espe-­ cially   during   the   dormant   season.   Beavers   and   other   animals   defeat   these   defenses   by   breaking   down,   detoxing,  sequestering  and  recycling   potentially   harmful   compounds.   Plotting   their   next   move,   trees   will   crank   up   their   defenses.   Two-­   and   three-­year  old  aspen  saplings  are  rich   in   bitter-­tasting   salicin-­like   glyco-­ sides.  Beavers  avoid  these  and  feed   on   larger,   less   bitter   trees,   allowing   the  young  trees  to  prevail.  The  race   goes  on  and  no  one  ever  wins.  Each   measure  provokes  a  countermeasure. Dietland   MĂźller-­Schwarze   has   studied   beaver   behavior   for   over   30   years   and   currently   is   emeritus   professor   of   evironmental   biology   at   SUNY   College   of   Environmental   Science   and   Forestry   in   Syracuse,   N.Y.  The  illustration  for  this  column   was   drawn   by   Adelaide   Tyrol.   The   Outside  Story  is  assigned  and  edited   by   Northern   Woodlands   magazine   and   sponsored   by   the   Wellborn   Ecology   Fund   of   New   Hampshire   Charitable   Foundation:   wellborn@ nhcf.org.

Public Notices

can  be  found  on Pages  33  &  34.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  35

Real Estate EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 as amended which makes it illegal to advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or persons receiv-­ ing public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.â&#x20AC;? This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina-­ tion, call HUD Toll-­free at 1-­800-­424-­8590. For the Washington, DC area please call HUD at 426-­3500.

WALLACE REALTY ANDY  MAYER,  PRESIDENT  of  the  Addison  County  Chamber  of  Commerce,  congratulates  the  Chamberâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   2014  scholarship  recipient,  Matthew  Schildkamp.  The  award  is  made  possible  through  funds  raised  at  the   ACCOC  annual  Scholarship  Golf  Tournament,  set  this  year  for  June  27.

48 Mountain Terrace Bristol, VT 05443 0(    s FAX 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: www.wallacere.com www.greenbuiltvermont.com

Golf  tournament  to  honor  Schildkamp MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  Addison   County  Chamber  of  Commerce  will   host   its   20th   annual   Scholarship   Golf   Tournament   on   Friday,   June   27,   at   Middlebury   Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Ralph   Myhre   Golf   Course.   Participants   will   enjoy   18   holes   of   golf   and   an   awards   barbecue   during   which   the   2014  scholarship  recipient,  Matthew   Schildkamp,  will  be  recognized.   The   tournament   features   the   chance   to   win   a   new   Jeep   Grand   Cherokee  for  a  hole-­in-­one,  and  one   person  will  putt  for  $2,500. Schildkamp   will   be   attending   the   University   of   Maine   this   fall   and   plans   on   majoring   in   environ-­ mental   studies.  According   to   Marie   Eddy,   Hannaford   Career   Center   Scholarship  chair,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Matt  is  an  amaz-­ ing   student   who   is   a   member   of   both   our   National   Technical   Honor  

2014 Ruff Ride benefit June 29 NEW  HAVEN  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Homeward  Bound,   Addison   Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Humane   Society,   hosts   its   seventh   annual   Ruff   Ride,   a   PRWRUF\FOH ULGH WR EHQHÂżW WKH DQLPDOV on  Sunday,  June  29. Registration   for   the   ride   will   start   at   8:30  a.m.  at  CycleWise  in  New  Haven.   All  rides  will  begin  with  registration  and   FRQWLQHQWDO EUHDNIDVW DQG ZLOO ÂżQLVK DW CycleWise   for   a   BBQ,   music,   prizes,   games   and   more.   The   entrance   fee   for   the  ride  is  $25  per  person  and  includes   the  BBQ  and  a  T-­shirt.   Riders   can   raise   money   for   Homeward   Bound   through   sponsor-­ ship,  and  those  riders  who  raise  at  least   $50  will  have  the  entrance  fee  waived.   Those   who   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   riding   are   invited   to   come   out   for   the   BBQ   and   fun   at   CycleWise.  Admission  for  the  BBQ  for   non-­riders  is  $10  for  adults  and  $5  for   children  under  12.     Homeward  Bound  encourages  every-­ one  to  come  out  for  a  great  time  and  a   great  cause.  Funds  raised  from  the  Ruff   Ride  will  be  used  to  meet  the  rising  costs   of  caring  for  the  animals.  For  more  infor-­ mation,  visit  www.homewardboundani-­ mals.org  or  call  Jessica  at  802-­388-­1443.  

Society   and   National   Arts   Honor   Society.   He   has   been   on   the   honor   roll  at  his  home  school  (Middlebury   Union   High   School)   and   has   been   Outstanding   Student   of   the   Quarter   here   at   the   Career   Center.   Matt   has   spent   more   than   200   hours   with   the   Middlebury   Police   Explorers,   and   spent   a   year   teaching   sixth-­ grade   Sunday   school   at   St.   Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Addison   County   Chamber   of   Commerce   scholarship   is   very   much  appreciated.   It  is   a  huge  help   to   deserving   students   who   have   ÂżQLVKHGDSURJUDPDWWKH+DQQDIRUG Career  Center  to  get  started  on  their  

future,â&#x20AC;?   said   Lynn   Coale,   director   of   the   Hannaford   Career   Center.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Chamber  supports  the  business   community  a  great  deal  and  we  are   grateful  that  they  support  the  future   work  force  as  well.â&#x20AC;? J.P.  Carrara  &  Sons  returns  again   as   the   eventâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   major   sponsor   along   with  Bread  Loaf  Corp.  Sponsorships   and   participation   in   the   tournament   make  it  possible  to  fund  $4,000  each   year  in  scholarships  to  graduates  of   the  Hannaford  Career  Center. For  more  information  on  sponsor-­ ing   or   participating   in   the   tourna-­ ment,  call  Andy  Mayer  at  388-­7951   or  email  andy@addisoncounty.com.

Kelly

FOR  SALE  OR  LEASE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201C; +LJKTXDOLW\ZDUHKRXVH DQG RIÂżFH VSDFH DYDLODEOH IRU OHDVH LQ D YDULHW\ RI VL]HV 7HOO XV ZKDW \RXU QHHGV 227  Pond  Lane      Middlebury,  VT are   and   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   make   VRPHWKLQJ ZRUN 7KH HQWLUH SURSHUW\  DFUHV LPSURYHG ZLWK D 6)EXLOGLQJLVDYDLODEOHIRUVDOHDVZHOO

Redstone  |    802-­658-­7400,    ext  16    |  redstonevt.com Duncan  Harris  |    802-­343-­4661  |    dharris@redstonevt.com

Tom

June 16 Puzzle Solutions

FOR  SALE â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201C; %HDXWLIXO RIÂżFH VXLWH LQ the   heart   of   Middlebury,   SHUIHFW IRU DQ LQYHVWRU RU RZQHU RFFXSDQW 5HQRYDWHG LQ  the   Star   Mill   building   RIIHUV KLVWRULF UHWDLO DQG RIÂżFH VSDFHV ZLWK 5  Park  Street,  Unit  2      Middlebury,  VT JRUJHRXV YLHZV RI WKH 2WWHU &UHHN 8QLW  LV DQDSSUR[LPDWHO\6)RIÂżFHVXLWHFRPSULVHGRIWZRLQGHSHQGHQW VSDFHV2QHVSDFHLVDSSUR[LPDWHO\6)DQGFRQVLVWVRIVL[ODUJH RIÂżFHVDFRS\ID[DUHDDUHFHSWLRQDUHDDQGDNLWFKHQHWWH FXUUHQWO\ OHDVHGWR7RP7HOOLQJ&3$ 7KHVHFRQGRIÂżFHVXLWHLVDSSUR[LPDWHO\  6) DQG FRQVLVWV RI WKUHH SULYDWH RIÂżFHV D UHFHSWLRQ DUHD DQG D SULYDWH EDWKURRP FXUUHQWO\ OHDVHG WR 7LPEHUOLQH ,QWHUDFWLYH  %RWK VSDFHVKDYH+9$&

Claire

Please  call  Kelly,  Claire,  or  Tom

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PAGE  36  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  16,  2014


Monday, June 16, 2014