Page 1

MONDAY   EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 26 No. 10

Middlebury, Vermont

X

Monday, May 12, 2014

X

36 Pages

75¢

Iconic doll marking 50th ‡$ORFDOGHYRWHHRI*,-RHZLOO GLVSOD\KLVFROOHFWLRQLQ2UZHOO WRPDUN-RH¡VWKELUWKGD\6HH WKHFDOHQGDU3DJH

Celebrate dogs at Woofstock ’14 ‡+RPHZDUG%RXQGZLOOKRVW ´0HHWWKH%UHHG¾DQGRWKHU GRJGHPRVDW%DVLQ+DUERU WKLV6DWXUGD\6HH3DJH

Otters host as coach honored ‡7KH29VRIWEDOOWHDPZDV VHWWRSOD\RQDÀHOGQHZO\ QDPHGIRUORQJWLPH&RDFK 3DWWLH&DQGRQ6HH3DJH

POLLY  BIRDSALL  OF  Shoreham  was  one  of  more  than  60  people  given  the  chance  to  speak  at  the  Public  Service  Board  hearing  held  in  the   6KRUHKDP(OHPHQWDU\6FKRROJ\PQDVLXPODVW:HGQHVGD\QLJKW7KHPHHWLQJZDVWKH¿UVWRIWZRWRJDWKHUSXEOLFLQSXWRQWKH9HUPRQW*DV3KDVH II  pipeline  project. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Pipeline  plan  gets  frosty  reception 1HZ<RUNRI¿FLDOVXUJH DSSURYDOIRU¾3KDVH,,œ

Vermont  Gas  Systemâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  proposed  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Phase  IIâ&#x20AC;?  natu-­ ral  gas  pipeline  in  Shoreham  this  past  Wednesday   evening  urged  the  Vermont  Public  Service  Board   (PSB)  to  reject  the  project  based  on  environmen-­ By  JOHN  FLOWERS tal  and  public  safety  concerns. SHOREHAM  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Some  came  displaying  color-­ 7KH 0D\  KHDULQJ ZDV WKH ÂżUVW RI WZR VXFK ful   banners,   bearing   such   slogans   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tap   lines,   gatherings  that  the  PSB  scheduled  to  gather  testi-­ not  gas  lines,â&#x20AC;?  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Plant  trees,  not  pipelines.â&#x20AC;? mony  on  Phase  II  of  the  Addison-­Rutland  Natural   Others  recited  poems  and  prayers. Gas  Project  that  calls  for  a  pipeline  to  be  buried   All   who   walked   up   to   the   microphone   spoke   from   Middlebury,   through   Cornwall   and   Shore-­ passionately. ham,  then  under  Lake  Champlain  to  the  Interna-­ And  a  vast  majority  of  those  who  weighed  in  on   tional   Paper   mill   in   Ticonderoga,   N.Y.   Interna-­

Brothers blend vocal harmonies Â&#x2021;7KH'X3RQW%URWKHUVZLOO EULQJWKHLUPXVLFDOWDOHQWVWR 7ZR%URWKHUV7DYHUQ6HH$UWV %HDWRQ3DJH

:KLWH+RXVHRIÂżFLDOWR WDONFOLPDWHDWFROOHJH By  ZACH  DESPART MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Vermont   Congressional  delegation  will  host  a   :KLWH+RXVHFDELQHWRIÂżFLDODW0LG-­ dlebury  College  on  Friday. U.S.   Energy   Secretary   Ernest   Moniz  will  join  Sens.  Patrick  Leahy   and   Bernie   Sanders   and   Rep.   Peter   :HOFK IRU D SDQHO RQ HQHUJ\ HIÂż-­ ciency,   renewable   energy   and   cli-­ mate  change.

The  panel  will  be  held  at  the  Mc-­ Cullough  Student  Center  at  10  a.m.,   and   will   be   followed   by   a   question   and   answer   session.   The   event   is   open  to  the  public. 0RQL]ZDVFRQ¿UPHGXQDQLPRXV-­ ly  as  Energy  Secretary  last  May.  The   nuclear  physicist  and  Massachusetts   native  earned  a  Ph.D.  in  theoretical   physics  from  Stanford  University  in   (See  Energy,  Page  27)

tional  Paper   would   pay   the   $70   million   cost   of   the  project,  money  it  expects  to  quickly  recoup  by   having   access   to   natural   gas,   which   is   currently   around  half  as  costly  as  the  fuel  oil  the  company   currently  purchases  to  power  its  mill. The   towns   of   Cornwall   and   Shoreham   passed   Town  Meeting  Day  resolutions  opposing  the  proj-­ ect.  Residents  in  those  and  other  area  towns  have   expressed   concerns   about   the   projectâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   potential   impact   on   property   rights,   public   safety   and   the   environment.  Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hearing  saw  more  than   (See  Pipeline,  Page  2)

Middlebury  family  faces   graduation  day  dilemma By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Timing   is   everything,â&#x20AC;?   or   so   the   old   saying   goes.  And   unfortunately,   the   tim-­ ing  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  worse  for  the  Har-­ rison   family   of   Middlebury   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   at   least   as   it   pertains   to   graduation   ceremonies  this  year. Perhaps   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   through   a  skein  of  bad  luck,  perhaps  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a   freakish  alignment  of  the  stars,  but  

Jim  and  Shelley  Harrison  recently   learned  that  all  three  of  their  chil-­ drenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   college   commencement   services  would  be  taking  place  on   the  same  day,  Sunday,  May  18. Three  kids. Three  schools. Three  graduations. One  day. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   to   be   kid-­ (See  Graduates,  Page  34)


PAGE  2  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Pipeline  (Continued  from  Page  1) planet  when  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  grown  up?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Bailey   60   people   take   to   the   microphone,   said.  She  looked  at  the  PSB  members   with   most   speaking   out   against   the   and  asked,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;May  I  tell  my  grandson   pipeline.   Around   200   people   total   there  are  three  people  who  care  about   attended,   with   some   standing   along   his  future?â&#x20AC;? the  back  wall  at  the  Shoreham  school   Bailey   questioned   why   New  York   gym,  which  seats  around  160  people. state   has   not   been   amenable   to   ex-­ Cornwall   resident   Stan   Grzyb   ob-­ tending   a   pipeline   to   IP   through   the   jected   to   the   prospect   of   Vermont   Empire  State. Gas   using   eminent   domain   to   ac-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   York   considers   their   land   quire   property   from   those   along   the   to  be  too  pristine  to  host  a  pipeline,â&#x20AC;?   pipeline   route   who   are   unwilling   to   Bailey  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  en-­ negotiate   easements.   He   pointed   to   vironment  and  land?  Are  we  chopped   bill   S.246   signed   into   liver?â&#x20AC;? law   by   then-­Gov.   Jim   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I understand Cornwall   resident   Douglas   in   2006   that   Bobbie  Carnwath  said   prohibits   the   use   of   the value of a hosting   the   pipeline   eminent   domain   if   the   strong economy, extension   could   jeop-­ purpose   is   based   pri-­ but I just donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ardize   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   rep-­ marily   on   economic   understand why utation   as   one   of   the   development. this board would nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   most   pristine   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Economic   devel-­ states. even consider opment   is   the   primary   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  moved  here  from   goal   of   the   pipeline,â&#x20AC;?   approval of a Alabama;Íž  I  know  what   project that would itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   like   to   be   number   Grzyb  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   Vermont-­ put the short-term 49,â&#x20AC;?   Carnwath   said.   ers   who   have   lived   FRUSRUDWHSURĂ&#x20AC;WV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  go  there.â&#x20AC;? here   for   generations   above the future Shoreham   resident   whose   land   is   being   Rustan   Swenson   not-­ threatened   by   two   in-­ wellbeing of the ed   Vermont   and   New   ternational   corpora-­ next generations York   have   banned   tions,â&#x20AC;?  he  added,  refer-­ of Vermonters.â&#x20AC;? hydraulic   fracturing   ring   to   International   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Bridport resident as  a  means  of  extract-­ Paper   and   Vermont   %LOO)LĂ&#x20AC;HOG ing   natural   gas   from   Gas,   which   is   owned   the   ground.   Yet   both   by   Montreal-­based   states,  he  said,  appear   Gaz   MĂŠtro.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   our   land;Íž   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   our   willing  to  import  such  gas  as  a  matter   orchards;Íž  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  our  sugarbush;Íž  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  our   of  convenience. deeryards.   We   are   being   threatened     Swenson   called   the   pipeline,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   by   these   two   corporations   in   taking   great  leap  backwards.â&#x20AC;? our   land   for   those   two   businesses,   Bristol   resident   Jennifer   Vyhnak   and  we  resent  it.â&#x20AC;? recited   her   comments   in   the   form   Salisbury   resident   Barrie   Bailey   of   a   Christian   prayer,   during   which   said   she   wrote   her   comments   about   she   asked   for   Godâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   help   as   Ver-­ the   meeting   while   her   7-­year-­old   mont   weans   itself   from   fossil   fuel,   grandson  watched. overcomes   â&#x20AC;&#x153;greed   and   shortsighted-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Grandma,   will   those   ness,â&#x20AC;?  and  promotes  â&#x20AC;&#x153;peace  on  Earth,   three   (PSB   board   members)   make   through  peace  for  Earth.â&#x20AC;? sure   that   we   can   still   have   a   livable   Middlebury   resident   Ross   Conrad  

TANNA  KELTON  OF  Charlotte  asks  the  Public  Service  Board  why  they  are  willing  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;throw  Vermonters   under  the  busâ&#x20AC;?  during  last  Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  natural  gas  pipeline  hearing  in  Shoreham. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

was  among  several  people  who  took   issue   with   the   Addison   County   Re-­ gional   Planning   Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  April   9   vote   on   the   Phase   II   project.   The   commission   voted   15   to   11   in   favor   of  a  motion  that  the  Phase  II  pipeline   could   pass   muster   with   the   countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   regional   plan.   One   of   those   â&#x20AC;&#x153;yesâ&#x20AC;?   votes   was   cast   by   an   Otter   Creek   Audubon   Society   member   who   had   been  instructed  to  vote  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no,â&#x20AC;?  and  two   RWKHU DIÂżUPDWLYH YRWHV ZHUH FDVW E\ Monkton  delegates,  in  spite  of  the  fact   that  the  town  has  voiced  opposition  to   the  Phase  I  pipeline  (from  Colchester   to   Middlebury   and   Vergennes)   that   has  already  been  OKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  by  the  PSB. MILLâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  STEWARDSHIP Bethany   Menkart   of   Cornwall   questioned   IPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   history   of   environ-­ mental   stewardship,   alluding   to   past  

GRAND OPENING!

Beginning Friday, May 16th - 5:00PM thru Saturday, May 17th ALLď&#x161;şCLAD Cookware KITCHENAID Blender

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Great Door Prizes â&#x20AC;&#x201C;

NORDICWARE Cake Pan COOKBOOKS and MORE!

Hours: Tues -­ Sat, 10a.m. -­ 6p.m. 0DUEOHZRUNV0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021;RWWHUFUHHNNLWFKHQZDUHFRP

HIĂ&#x20AC;XHQW DQG VOXGJH VSLOOV IURP WKH consequences  of  the  project. plant  into  Lake  Champlain  and  its  at-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   your   land   is   used   for   this,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   tempt   in   2006   to   secure   permission   forever,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   decisions   to   burn   tires   as   an   alternative   fuel   here  will  carry  forward.â&#x20AC;? source. Birdsall   acknowl-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lake   Champlain   edged   that   Ticond-­ brings  millions  of  peo-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;New York eroga  is  dependent  on   ple   to   Vermont   every   considers their IP  for  jobs,  but  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   year   for   many   differ-­ land to be too donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   (Vermont)   ent   reasons,â&#x20AC;?   Menkart   pristine to host should  be  held  hostage   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   to  that.â&#x20AC;? a pipeline. So leak,   or   explosion   or   Tanna   Kelton   of   break  (in  the  pipeline),   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Charlotte  said  the  PSB   it   will   devastate   our   environment and would   be   unwise   to   state  and  economy.â&#x20AC;? land? Are we approve  a  project  that   Leslie   Regan-­Caer   chopped liver?â&#x20AC;? she  said  produces  little   of   Middlebury   urged   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Salisbury resident EHQHÂżW IRU 9HUPRQW-­ VWDWH RIÂżFLDOV WR SD\ Barrie Bailey ers. more   heed   to   the   im-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why   would   we   pact   the   project   will   take   these   peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   have   on   the   people   living   close   to   land   for   a   Canadian   oil   company   to   where  the  pipeline  would  be  built. EHQHÂżW ,3 ZKLFK LV DQ RXWRIVWDWH â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  not  a  question  of  pipeline  or   company?â&#x20AC;?  she  said. no  pipeline,â&#x20AC;?  Regan-­Caer  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Why   are   you   throwing   Vermont-­ question   is,   what   are   all   the   human   ers  under  the  bus?â&#x20AC;? needs   at   stake   and   how   do   we   to-­ %ULGSRUW UHVLGHQW %LOO )LÂżHOG gether   create   a   solution   and   build   a   agreed. community  that  is  inclusive,  fair  and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As  I  see  it,  what  Vermont  gets  for   responsive  to  the  needs  of  the  people   (See  Stewardship,  Page  7) who  live  and  work  in  it.â&#x20AC;? Maren  Visatka  is  a  Monkton  land-­ owner   whose   property   will   be   tra-­ versed   by   the   Phase   I   pipeline   from   Colchester   to   Middlebury,   a   project   that   has   already   been   OKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   by   the   PSB.  She  criticized  Gov.  Peter  Shum-­ lin   for   supporting   the   Phase   II   pipe-­ line   project   before   the   PSB   has   ren-­ dered  its  decision  on  the  application. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Because   the   governor   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   he   alone   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   is   to   decide   public   good,   I   guess  the  whole  concept  of  this  meet-­ ing  is  just  an  act  of  kindness  to  make   the   citizens   of  Vermont   believe   they   have  a  voice,â&#x20AC;?  Visatka  said. She  added  Vermont  should  instead   be  looking  at  greener  energy  sources   than  natural  gas. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  the  world  of  energy,  this  pipe-­ line   is   already   obsolete   before   it   is   even  in  the  ground,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. BARRIE   BAILEY   OF   Salisbury   Polly   Birdsall   of   Shoreham   said   raises   her   concerns   about   the   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  worried  that  pipeline  advocates   proposed   Vermont   Gas   pipeline   appear   to   be   focusing   on   short-­term   during   last   weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Public   Service   ÂżQDQFLDO JDLQV DQG QRW ORQJWHUP Board  hearing. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  3

Middlebury  drafts  surveys  to  evaluate  housing  market By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Middle-­ bury   Planning   Commission   will   be   circulating  two  new  surveys  to  better   discern,  and  help  solve,  the  obstacles   WKDW \RXQJ IDPLOLHV DUH ÂżQGLQJ DV they  look  for  housing  in  the  commu-­ nity. At   issue   are   two,   seven-­question   surveys  drafted  by  the  commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   housing   subcommittee.   One   of   the   surveys  will  be  distributed  to  people   who  have  purchased  homes  in  Mid-­ dlebury   within   the   past   year   and   a   half,  according  to  Town  Planner  Eric   Blair. The  other  survey  will  be  distributed   to  workers  at  some  of  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  larg-­

est  businesses,  including  Middlebury   public   schools,   Middlebury   College   and  Porter  Medical  Center. 0LGGOHEXU\RIÂżFLDOVKRSHWKHVXU-­ veys   will   paint   a   reliable   picture   of   what   kinds   of   homes   young   fami-­ lies  are  looking  for  and  what  kind  of   neighborhood   amenities   are   in   most   demand. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  a  lot  of  anecdotal  infor-­ mation   about   families   with   young   children   having   a   challenging   time   ÂżQGLQJ KRPHV LQ WKH  WR UDQJH´VDLG%DUEDUD6DXQ-­ ders,   co-­director   of   the   Mary   John-­ son  Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Center  and  a  member   of   the   housing   subcommittee.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   thought   we   need   better   information.  

The  anecdotal  stories  are  wonderful,   but  we  thought  we  should  do  a  survey   WR¿QGRXWPRUH´ 6DXQGHUVFUHGLWHGDVDVXUYH\FDWD-­ lyst  a  series  of  articles  in  the  Addison   Independent   that   explored   various   challenges  for  young  families  in  Ad-­ dison   County.   The   planning   com-­ mission  is  looking  forward  to  survey   results   to   help   inform   future   con-­ versations  about  how  local  planning   might  ease  some  of  the  challenges  for   this  demographic. Local  Realtors  helped  the  subcom-­ mittee   identify   recent   homebuyers   within   the   Middlebury/East   Middle-­ bury   market,   according   to   Blair.   7KHUHKDYHEHHQDURXQGSURSHUW\

closings  during  the  past  year,  he  said.   The  survey  to  be  sent  to  buyers  will   include  such  questions  as,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Was  there   a  good  inventory  (of  housing)  in  East   Middlebury/Middlebury  of  your  pre-­ IHUUHGKRXVLQJW\SHWRFKRRVHIURP"´ Respondents   will   also   be   asked   to   reveal  what  it  was  about  the  Middle-­ bury  area  that  attracted  them  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  com-­ mute  time,  type  of  housing,  schools,   amenities,   parks   and   recreation,   shopping,  or  other  factors. Blair   said   the   survey   will   be   sent   out  to  homebuyers  in  the  near  future.   Each   survey   will   include   a   self-­ad-­ dressed,  stamped  envelope  for  mail-­ ing  back  the  completed  document. Meanwhile,   the   second   survey  

asks  prospective  buyers  what  kind  of   housing  they  prefer,  what  price  range   they  could  afford,  what  kind  of  hous-­ ing  they  currently  occupy,  and  what   kinds   of   obstacles   have   prevented   them  from  settling  in  the  Middlebury   area  thus  far. 3ODQVFDOOIRUDURXQGRIWKH second   surveys   to   be   distributed   to   local   workers,   according   to   Blair.   They   will   be   dropped   off   and   then   collected   at   the   participating   busi-­ nesses. Information  from  both  surveys  will   be  studied  and  tabulated  in  June  for   the  commission  to  study  and  form  the   basis  for  ideas  to  help  make  the  local   housing  market  more  accessible.

Natural  gas  pipeline  to  serve  some  in  Ferrisburgh,  Waltham By  ANDY  KIRKALDY )(55,6%85*+ ² &RQVWUXFWLRQ ZLOOEHJLQVRRQRQWKH9HUPRQW*DV 6\VWHPVSLSHOLQHH[WHQVLRQWKDWZLOO serve  Vergennes  and  run  about  three   miles  along  Plank  Road  from  a  new   1HZ +DYHQ GLVWULEXWLRQ VWDWLRQ WR Route  7  and  from  there  to  the  city,  ac-­ FRUGLQJWRFRPSDQ\RIÂżFLDOV Along   the   south   side   of   Plank   Road,   the   pipeline   extension   will   pass  through  parts  of  Ferrisburgh  and   :DOWKDPDVZHOODV1HZ+DYHQDQG it  could  serve  homes  in  those  towns,   VDLG 9HUPRQW *DV VSRNHVPDQ 6WHYH Wark  late  last  week.   The   extension   is   part   of   the   com-­ panyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  larger  Addison  Rutland  Natu-­ UDO*DV3URMHFWZKLFKLVLQWHQGHGWR bring  the  fuel  to  Addison  and  Rutland   counties.  The  company  has  also  pro-­ posed  running  a  pipeline  under  Lake   Champlain   to   International   Paper   in   Ticonderoga,  a  plan  that  has  encoun-­ tered   opposition   (see   story   on   Page    6RPHSURSHUW\RZQHUVLQ0RQN-­ ton   and   Middlebury   have   also   op-­

posed  the  pipeline. &RPSDQ\ RIÂżFLDOV KDYH EHHQ working   to   obtain   the   rights   of   way   necessary  to  run  the  Vergennes  pipe-­ line   extension   along   Plank   Road.   9HUPRQW*DVUHSUHVHQWDWLYHVWROGWKH Ferrisburgh  selectboard  last  week  the   coated   steel,   hand-­welded   pipeline   would  be  buried  about  three  feet  deep   as  close  to  Plank  Roadâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  traveled  sur-­ face  as  possible. They   also   said   they   would   coor-­ dinate   with   Ferrisburghâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   highway   FUHZVWRÂłDYRLGWDNLQJRXWWUHHV´DV much  as  possible  during  the  pipeline   construction  process.  The  main  thrust   RI3KDVH,RIWKHSURMHFWLVDSLSHOLQH from  Colchester  to  Middlebury  with   an  extension  to  Vergennes.  Company   RIÂżFLDOV VDLG LQVWDOODWLRQ RI WKH9HU-­ gennes   extension   along   Plank   Road   should   start   in   June   and   its   target   FRPSOHWLRQGDWHLV$XJXVW 9HUPRQW *DV RIÂżFLDO &KDUOLH Pughe   told   the   Ferrisburgh   select-­ board   and   about   a   dozen   residents   last   Tuesday   that   natural   gas   safety  

concerns  are  minimal.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   believe   that   gas   from   our   pipeline  is  the  safest  fuel  you  can  use   RIWKDWW\SH´3XJKHVDLG Wark   on   Friday   provided   an   esti-­ mate   for   the   number   of   homeown-­ HUV LQ )HUULVEXUJK 1HZ +DYHQ DQG Waltham   who   would   automatically   qualify  to  tap  onto  the  pipeline.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  believe  there  is  a  potential  for   46  addresses  along  the  route  to  Ver-­ JHQQHV´KHVDLG 9HUPRQW *DV ZLOO SD\ IRU DW OHDVW IHHWRISLSHWRDKRPHRQ3ODQN Road,  and  homes  on  the  route  further   from  the  road  could  tap  on  at  the  own-­ HUVÂśH[SHQVHIRUSOXVIHHWKHVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   would   serve   customers   that   DUHIHHWIURPWKDWOLQHDORQJWKDW URDG´:DUNVDLG Wark  said  there  could  be  some  ex-­ FHSWLRQV ZKHUH 9HUPRQW *DV ZRXOG help   pay   for   longer   extensions,   and   he   also   noted   that   the   company   has   programs   to   help   subsidize   conver-­ sions   of   heating   systems   to   natural   gas,  which  is  now  less  expensive  than  

other  fossil  fuels. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   are   programs   to   help   with   WKHFRQYHUVLRQ´KHVDLG Another   company   initiative   helps   KRPHRZQHUV EX\ QHZ KLJKHIÂżFLHQ-­ cy  natural  gas  heating  systems,  Wark   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   people   are   looking   to   upgrade   WRPRUHHIÂżFLHQWKHDWLQJV\VWHPVZH would  help  them  with  the  incremen-­ WDOFRVWRIWKDWXSJUDGH´KHVDLG Wark   could   not   on   Thursday   say   whether  building  the  Plank  Road  ex-­ tension   would   require   crossing   any   private   land   or   purchasing   any   pri-­ vate  property  or  easements,  nor  could   he  provide  details  about  the  pipelineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   path  to  Vergennes  from  the  intersec-­ tion  of  Plank  Road  and  Route  7.   0HDQZKLOH 9HUPRQW *DV ODVW week  announced  that  it  had  signed  its   ÂżUVWFRQVWUXFWLRQFRQWUDFWIRU3KDVH,

RIWKH$GGLVRQ5XWODQG1DWXUDO*DV 3URMHFW7KH6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQEDVHG gas  company  signed  a  multi-­million-­ dollar   agreement   with   Engineers   Construction  Inc.  of  Williston  to  per-­ form  the  horizontal  directional  drill-­ ing  for  the  pipeline.   9HUPRQW *DV GHVFULEHV KRUL]RQWDO directional   drilling   as   a   trenchless   pipeline  installation  method  that  will   be   used   in   more   than   17   locations   along   41   miles   of   the   Phase   1   route   RIWKH$GGLVRQ5XWODQG1DWXUDO*DV 3URMHFW 7KH HTXLSPHQW XVHG LQ WKH directional   drilling   process   is   new   and   allows   ECI   to   bore   underneath   environmentally  and  archeologically   sensitive  areas,  thus  minimizing  im-­ pacts. Wark   said   contracts   for   construc-­ WLRQ RI WKH PDMRULW\ RI WKH 3KDVH , SLSHOLQHKDYH\HWWR¿QDOL]HG

New  Haven,  VT  Homeowner   Recommends  Bristol  Electronics â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  looked  into  installing  a  solar  system  ten  to  twelve  years  ago.   I  wish  we  had  done  it  back  then.  The  payback  has  been  amazing.   Bristol   Electronics   is   such   a   friendly   company.   The   guys   are   great,  everyone  is  easy  to  work  with  and  so  professional.   :KHQ,EXLOGDQHZKRPHLQWKHIXWXUH,ZLOOGHÂżQLWHO\SODQRQ incorporating  solar  and  using  Bristol  Electronics.â&#x20AC;?                                                  Karen  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  New  Haven,  VT

FREE  SITE  EVALUATIONS

Memorial Day Deadlines DQG2IĂ&#x20AC;FH+RXUV

2XU2IĂ&#x20AC;FHZLOOEHFORVHGRQ0RQGD\0D\ LQREVHUYDQFHRI0HPRULDO'D\ Advertising Deadlines will change as follows: Edition 7KXUVGD\0D\ 0RQGD\0D\ 7KXUVGD\0D\

Deadline 0RQGD\0D\DP :HGQHVGD\0D\QRRQ )ULGD\0D\SP

+DYHDVDIHDQGHQMR\DEOHZHHNHQGDVZHREVHUYHWKLV QDWLRQDOKROLGD\DQGZHOFRPHWKHVXPPHUVHDVRQ ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP


PAGE  4  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

A DDIS ON   INDE P E NDEN T

Editorial

Vote  this  Tuesday Special  elections  are  notorious  for  smaller  turnouts.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  particular-­ ly  unfortunate  for  issues  of  importance  and  which  have  dominated  the   public  discourse  for  months.  In  Middlebury,  almost  1,700  cast  votes  on   Town  Meeting  Day  to  decide  in  favor  of  a  $6.5  bond  to  build  a  new  mu-­ nicipal  building  and  recreational  center.  Almost  certainly,  fewer  people   will  vote  in  this  reconsideration  on  Tuesday,  but  hopefully  a  reasonable   number  will  turn  out  so  that  the  issue  can  be  put  to  rest. Please   do   your   part   and   vote   by   Australian   ballot   at   the   municipal   gymnasium,  7  a.m  to  7  p.m. ********** In  a  direct  mail  piece  on  the  building  proposals,  which  was  paid  for  by     project  opponents  and  mailed  last  week  to  all  Middlebury  residents,  three   issues  are  addressed:  inadequate  planning,  location,  and  a  questionable   DOOHJDWLRQWKDWWKHSURSRVDOLVQRWDJRRGÂżQDQFLDOGHDOIRUWD[SD\HUV If  a  24-­month  process  involving  three  large  committees  with  dozens   of  open  meetings  held  monthly  throughout  the  time  period  is  not  â&#x20AC;&#x153;thor-­ ough,  inclusive,  transparent  and  creative,â&#x20AC;?  our  only  assumption  is  that   such  process,  like  beauty,  is  in  the  eye  of  the  beholder.  The  college  and   town,  by  the  way,  do  meet  monthly  to  discuss  mutual  needs  and  objec-­ tives,  and  have  been  doing  so  for  years.  It  is  one  of  the  reasons  the  town-­ gown  relationship  has  been  so  solid  for  the  past  decade.   As  for  town  planning,  Middlebury  is  ahead  of  the  curve  with  layers   upon  layers  of  planning  carefully  crafted  through  years  of  community   input  and  staff  hours.  Could  more  be  done?  Sure,  more  of  anything  can   always   be   done.  Would   it   be   effective   or   wasted   time?  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   better   question. On   the   issue   of   money,   opponents   are   injecting   wild   conjecture   and   IHDUWRDWWDFNWKHSURMHFWÂśVVWURQJHVWSRLQWWKDWLWLVDÂżQDQFLDOEDUJDLQ for  taxpayers.  In  total,  the  town  is  getting  a  $8.5  million  to  $9  million   value  at  a  cost  to  taxpayers  of  $2  million.  That  is  a  fantastic  return  on  the   townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  modest  investment. Opponents  attack  it  by  suggesting  the  cost  to  raze  the  buildings  and   move   the   Osborne   House   could   be   far   more   than   the   $1   million   allo-­ FDWHG1RWVRRIÂżFLDOVVD\,QIDFWHVWLPDWHVE\WKRVHGRLQJWKHZRUN suggest  the  amount  might  be  too  much,  and  anything  left  over  can  go   to  other  facets  of  the  project.  On  that  point,  as  others,  voters  need  to  de-­ cide  whether  to  believe  the  professionals  or  those  who  want  the  project   defeated. On  location,  the  crux  of  the  issue  for  the  municipal  building  is  that  it   EHORFDWHGGRZQWRZQ7KLVÂżWVWKHELOO$VIRUWKHUHFUHDWLRQDOFHQWHUWKH new  location  solves  an  existing  problem  with  the  former  Legion  build-­ LQJEHQHÂżWVERWKVFKRROVDQGKDVDPSOHSDUNLQJ7KDWÂśVDZLQZLQZLQ As  for  the  two  new  buildings  having  13,000  less  square  feet  than  the   H[LVWLQJEXLOGLQJZHVHHWKDWDVDFRVWEHQHÂżWLQWZRZD\VÂżUVWLWÂśVOHVV space  to  heat  and  maintain  for  the  next  100  years;Íž  second,  the  basement   level  of  the  existing  buildings  is  dark  and  dingy,  drab  and  dreary,  and   moldy.  Moisture-­laden  basements  with  poor  natural  light  and  ventilla-­ tion  get  that  way.  Losing  that  square-­footage  is  a  blessing.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Small  archi-­ tectureâ&#x20AC;?  (doing  more  with  less  space)  is  the  laudable  new  era  of  design.   The  current  building  is  about  30,000  square  feet;Íž  the  new  buildings  will   be  closer  to  17,000.  That  in  itself  represents  a  huge  savings  over  the  long   WHUPLQHQHUJ\XVDJHDQGEXLOGLQJHIÂżFLHQFLHV Would  another  two-­to-­three  years  of  planning  and  community  debate   could  the  town  do  better?  We  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  so.   0D\EHWKHSURMHFWFRXOGEHÂżQHWXQHGKHUHRUWKHUHEXWWKHQLQĂ&#x20AC;DWLRQ would  drive  costs  higher,  and  the  college  offer  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  repeated,  so  the   cost   to   taxpayers   would   be   substantially   higher   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   at   minimum   three   times  or  more.   From  this  perspective,  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  a  better  deal  for  taxpayers.   Angelo  S.  Lynn

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT Periodicals  Postage  Paid  at  Middlebury,  Vt.  05753

Postmaster,  send  address  change  to  Addison  Independent, 0DSOH6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQWÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;)D[Â&#x2021;:HEZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP (0DLOQHZV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRPÂ&#x2021;(0DLO$GYHUWLVLQJDGV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP 3XEOLVKHGHYHU\0RQGD\7KXUVGD\E\WKH$GGLVRQ3UHVV,QF0HPEHU9HUPRQW3UHVV$VVRFLDWLRQ1HZ(QJODQG3UHVV$V VRFLDWLRQ1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ 68%6&5,37,215$7(69HUPRQWÂą0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV2XWRI6WDWHÂą 0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV'LVFRXQWHGUDWHIRU6HQLRU&LWL]HQVFDOOIRUGHWDLOV  7KH,QGHSHQGHQWDVVXPHVQRÂżQDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURUVLQDGYHUWLVHPHQWVEXWZLOOUHSULQWWKDWSDUWRIDQ DGYHUWLVHPHQWLQZKLFKWKHW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURURFFXUUHG$GYHUWLVHUZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\WKHPDQDJHPHQWLPPHGLDWHO\RIDQ\ HUURUVZKLFKPD\RFFXU 7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636

Plastic  wrap HAY  BALES  PEEK  out  from  under  plastic  on  an  Orwell  farm  last  Thursday  afternoon. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Letters to the Editor Middlebury  voters  need  some  additional  choices People  have  lots  of  ideas  about   why  to  reject  the  current  proposal   IRUWKHWRZQJ\PDQGRIÂżFHVZKHQ they  vote  this  Tuesday.  Many  have   ideas  about  what  Middlebury  could   do  instead. Here  is  mine. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  the  gardener  at  the  Ilsley   Library.  The  back  garden  there,   though  very  small,  has  become  a   place  that  welcomes  not  only  people   but  honeybees,  bumblebees,  praying   mantises,  grasshoppers,  rabbits,  lots   RIGLIIHUHQWELUGVDQGEXWWHUĂ&#x20AC;LHVD neighbor  cat,  and  a  toad.

For  awhile  now,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  think-­ ing  about  what  a  great  little  park  we   could  make  next  door:  raised  beds   along  the  sidewalk  for  a  childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   garden;Íž  benches  and  a  table;Íž  bird-­ baths  and  water  for  passing  dogs;Íž  a   fence  with  vines  to  keep  kids  safe;Íž   storytimes,  art  and  games  for  kids   XQGHUWKHĂ&#x20AC;RZHULQJEODFNORFXVW trees. The  white  house  could  be  a   senior  center  and  a  place  where   people  can  make  art  or  do  crafts   and  in  time  be  moved  to  make  room   for  a  library  expansion.  Wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  

this  be  lovely?  And  what  a  nice   and  welcome  surprise  for  people,  a   place  of  relative  cool  and  quiet  in   a  busy,  noisy  town  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  another  little   park  for  us. In  contrast,  what  is  proposed  at   present  is  a  two-­story  brick  building   very  close  to  the  library.  The  white   house  would  be  moved,  the  fragrant   locusts  cut  down.  The  building   would  dwarf  the  library,  block  sun-­ light  from  the  garden  and  windows.   and  make  the  lovely  Ilsley  look  out   of  place.  When  the  library  expands,   (See  Letter,  Page  5)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  5

Letters to the Editor

+RVSLWDOVDUHEHDULQJH[WUDEXUGHQ Thank  you  for  your  recent  article   RQ3RUWHU+RVSLWDOÂśVGLIÂżFXOWLHV with  â&#x20AC;&#x153;boardingâ&#x20AC;?  patients  with   psychiatric  emergencies  in  the   Emergency  Department.  It  is  time   that  some  light  was  shed  on  this   ward  to  transferring  my  knowledge   situation. and  experience  along  to  Gale  over   The  current  state  of  mental   the  next  year. health  care  in  Vermont  is  deplor-­ Grace  Simonds able.  Our  counseling  service  is   Past  Town  Clerk an  invaluable  resource  and  do  the   Whiting best  that  they  can  with  the  avail-­ DEOHIXQGLQJDQGVWDIÂżQJEXWWKH\ are  unable  to  care  for  the  sickest   patients  in  an  E.D.  setting  with  no   inpatient  psychiatric  beds,  just  as   we  keep  throwing  away  money   our  local  cardiologists  are  unable   and  wasting  energy  on  a  building   to  perform  cardiac  catheterization   beyond  repair? We  voted  for  a  great  sensible  plan   on  our  sickest  heart  patients. It  is  a  travesty  that  patients   for  our  future  and  we  need  to  vote   have  to  spend  weeks  on  end  in  our   for  it  again.  Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  move  forward;Íž   department.  These  individuals  are   OHWÂśVVROYHRXUQHHGVZLWKÂżVFDOUH-­ often  anxious,  upset  and  fright-­ sponsibility  and  with  two  imagina-­ WLYHDQGHIÂżFLHQWEXLOGLQJVWKDWZLOO ened,  and  the  stimulating  environ-­ serve  us  well.  Vote  yes  on  Article  1. ment  of  the  emergency  department   Donna  Donahue with  beeping  monitors,  overhead   Middlebury announcements,  bright  lights,  am-­ bulances  coming  and  going  outside   their  door,  crying  infants,  etc.,  is  

Simonds  thankful  for  33  years  as  Whiting  town  clerk I  wish  to  thank  all  those  who  at-­ tended  my  retirement  party  on  April   19.  After  33  years  as  town  clerk  and   treasurer  for  Whiting,  it  was  nice   WRYLVLWDQGUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWZLWKVRPDQ\RI you  at  the  party.   I  also  wish  to  thank  all  those  who  

brought  food  and  donated  money   for  the  Whiting  Food  Shelf.  It  was  a   great  boost  for  the  food  shelf. Gale  Quenneville  is  the  town   clerk  and  treasurer  and  I  am  hon-­ ored  to  continue  working  for  the   town  as  Galeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  assistant.  I  look  for-­

Middlebury  cannot  afford  to  throw  away  $5.5  million The  new  location  for  town  of-­ ¿FHVLQDFFRUGDQFHZLWKWKHWRZQ SODQNHHSVWKHRI¿FHVGRZQWRZQ WKHRI¿FHEXLOGLQJGHVLJQLVHI-­ ¿FLHQWDQGZHOFRPLQJ7KHQHZ location  for  the  municipal  gymna-­ VLXPQHVWOHGDPRQJDWKOHWLF¿HOGVLV incredibly  convenient  for  students   at  Mary  Hogan,  the  middle  school   and  the  high  school.  The  plan  which   was  passed  is  a  good  one  for  the   town  of  Middlebury  now  and  well  

into  the  future,  and  most  impor-­ tantly,  it  is  one  we  can  afford. What  we  cannot  afford  to  do  is   WRWKURZDZD\PLOOLRQ,WĂ&#x20AC;LHV in  the  face  of  common  sense.  Our   property  taxes  are  at  a  breaking   point.  There  will  be  increases  we   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  avoid,  but  funding  the  total   SULFHIRUQHZWRZQRIÂżFHVDQGD municipal  gymnasium  is  not  one.   How  would  we  fund  this  yet-­to-­ be-­imagined  superior  plan?  Should  

7RZQRIÂżFHSURSRVDOEHQHÂżWVWKHWRZQDQGFROOHJH A  mailing  from  the  Citizens  for   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Future  asks  for  our   thoughts.  Here  are  mine. You  are  asking  Middlebury   residents  to  give  up  one  of  the  best   ÂżQDQFLDORSSRUWXQLWLHVWKHWRZQKDV had  in  a  long  time,  if  not  ever. During  the  last  three  years  and   even  longer,  you  have  had  a  thor-­ ough,  inclusive,  transparent  and  cre-­ ative  planning  process,  if  you  have   read  the  newspapers,  and  reports,   and  gone  to  meetings.  I  have  only   OLYHGLQWKLVWRZQIRUÂżYH\HDUVDQG, feel  fully  informed. The  town  and  college  have  dis-­ cussed  mutual  needs  and  objectives   many  times.  A  plan  has  been  devel-­ RSHGWKDWLVEHQHÂżFLDOWRERWK7KH college  is  giving  the  town  a  fantastic   ÂżQDQFLDORSSRUWXQLW\DQGPXVWVHHLW as  a  top  priority,  given  the  large  sum   of  money,  for  the  collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  future  as   well  as  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.  It  has  also  been   made  clear  that  the  college  will  not   enter  into  future  discussions  or  make   such  a  generous  offer  again,  if  the   current  plan  is  abandoned. Careful  planning  for  our  historic   downtown  district  should  always   continue.  But,  careful  planning  has   been  done  for  a  new  town  hall  and   new  gym,  which  should  go  forward.   Once  implemented,  the  new  town   hall  will  be  a  beautiful  centerpiece  of   the  downtown  district.  It  will  be  the   anchor  at  the  Cross  Street  round-­ about,  which  will  provide  a  nice   southern  end  point  for  Main  Street   with  the  beautiful  Congregational   Church  at  the  northern  end  of  Main   Street. Long-­term  programming  and   planning  convenient  space  for  

seniors  and  teens  should  continue,   if  the  spaces  allocated  in  the  current   SODQDUHQRWVXIÂżFLHQW%XWWKLVLVQRW a  reason  to  stop  this  plan.  There  may   be  a  number  of  additional  locations   and  spaces  for  these  two  groups  that   would  be  a  great  improvement  over   the  old  gym. Discussion  of  long-­term  Ilsley   Library  needs  should  continue,  but   building  a  new  town  hall  next  to  the   library  can  only  enhance  the  latterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   future.  Connections  to  the  town  hall   could  be  made,  expansion  out  the   back  could  add  more  space.  Maybe   the  libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  needs  are  not  so  much   for  space,  but  rather  for  technology.   This  is  not  a  reason  to  stop  the  new   town  hall  plan. With  all  the  recreational  facilities   in  Middlebury,  I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  believe  there   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  a  comprehensive  Recreation   Department  plan.  But,  this  type  of   planning  should  always  continue   and  a  new  gym  on  Creek  Road  will   utilize  space  that  has  long  been   dormant.  It  could  be  the  catalyst  for   additional  uses  of  the  Creek  Road   land  that  is  so  convenient  for  the   townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  schools. (DVLO\DFFHVVLEOHPXQLFLSDORIÂżFH space  is  answered  with  the  current   plan.  It  will  be  much  more  easily  ac-­ FHVVLEOHWKDQWKHFXUUHQWRIÂżFH([-­ pandable  space,  should  it  be  needed,   could  be  added  in  the  direction  of   Otter  Creek. Serious  consideration  of  pres-­ ent  and  future  parking  downtown   should  always  be  included  in  long-­ range  planning  efforts.  The  new   location  of  the  town  hall  does  not   reduce  current  parking,  but  it  does   position  the  town  hall  in  a  better  

Letters to  the  editor

The  Addison  Independent  encourages  readers  to  write  letters  to  the  editor.  We  believe   a  newspaper  should  be  a  community  forum  for  people  to  debate  issues  of  the  day Because  we  believe  that  accountability  makes  for  responsible  debate,  we  will  print   signed  letters  only.  Be  sure  to  include  an  address  and  telephone  number,  too,  so  we  can   call  to  clear  up  any  questions. If  you  have  something  to  say,  send  it  to:  Letters  to  the  Editor,  Addison  Independent,  58   Maple  St.,  Middlebury,  VT  05753.  Or  email  to  news@addisonindependent.com.

place  to  be  near  additional  parking.   The  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  future  development  of   the  area  between  the  new  town  hall   and  Otter  Creek  should  include  a   parking  garage  of  at  least  two  levels,   LQDGGLWLRQWRRIÂżFHDQGRUUHWDLO space  above  the  parking  levels.   Completing  the  new  town  hall  will   enhance  the  opportunity  for  more   parking  close  to  Main  Street. Planning  for  our  energy  future   with  commitment  to  non-­fossil   fuels  should  always  continue  to  be  a   SULRULW\(QHUJ\HIÂżFLHQF\KDVEHHQ VSHFLÂżFDOO\LQFOXGHGLQWKHSODQVIRU the  new  town  hall  and  gym,  and  more   opportunities  are  currently  being   developed  at  no  additional  cost.  They   will  set  a  trend  for  other  steps  in  this   important  direction. Concerning  the  money,  I  have   faith  that  the  college,  Bread  Loaf   Construction,  the  town  committees   and  the  selectboard  are  pretty  good   at  estimating  and  budgeting  a  plan   such  as  that  already  approved.  I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   believe  that  people  would  walk  away   from  an  opportunity  to  get  a  new   town  hall  and  gymnasium,  plus  a   public  park,  for  only  $2  million.  This   plan  has  been  a  long  time  in  coming.   Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  complete  it  now. Tim  Williams Middlebury

Sue Audy

is retiring after 27 years at the

Middlebury 3RVW2IĂ&#x20AC;FH Stop by on Tuesday afternoon, May 13 between 3pm & 5pm to wish her well.

probably  the  least  appropriate  set-­ ting  for  these  patients  to  be  lodged. Some  patients  may  be  volatile,   unpredictable  and  violent  as  part  of   their  illness,  posing  a  threat  to  staff   as  well  as  other  patients,  some  of   whom  are  quite  frail.  As  we  are   unable  to  medicate  patients  against   their  will  except  in  the  most  ex-­ treme  situations,  they  are  basically   sitting  in  our  department  getting   minimal  treatment. Patients  with  psychiatric   emergencies  have  real  illness.   No  other  subset  of  our  sickest   patients  languish  in  our  depart-­ ment  because  there  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no  roomâ&#x20AC;?   for  the  patient  in  a  diabetic  coma   or  having  a  stroke  or  heart  attack.   Mental  health  patients  are  equally   ill  with  symptoms  beyond  their   control.  Until  the  state  recognizes   this  and  expands  the  availability  of   inpatient  beds  for  patients  in  acute   crisis  to  the  level  that  was  present   before  Hurricane  Irene,  I  am  afraid   that  this  situation  will  not  improve. Jessica  Racusin,  MD Middlebury

Letter  (Continued  from  Page  4) the  back  garden  might  be  destroyed. I  see  Article  1,  the  proposal  to   revote  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  yes  or  no  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  to  keep  the   present  town  plan  regarding  the   town  gym  and  municipal  building   as  a  chance  for  people  in  Middle-­ bury  to  give  yourselves  time  to   hear  each  otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ideas  and  talk  

about  them.  You  have  NOT  been   allowed  that  kind  of  time  and  you   deserve  it.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  your  town  and  your   very  important  choice  to  make;Íž  too   important  to  limit  yourselves  to  just   one  proposal. You  can  do  better. Anna  Rose  Benson Weybridge


PAGE  6  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

ADDISON COUNTY

Obituaries Richard Jackson, 76, native of Middlebury

FERNANDINA  BEACH,   Fla.   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Richard   Andrew   Jackson,   76,   of   Fernandina   Beach,   Fla.,   died   Thursday   morning,   May   8,   2014,   at   Baptist   Medical   Center   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Nassau. Born  in  Middlebury,  Vt.,  he  was   the   youngest   of   three   children   born   to   the   late   Alan   and   Vivian  

Jackson.  As   children,   he   and   his   sisters  grew  up  in  Bridport,  Vt. In   his   mid   20s,   Mr.   Jackson   moved   to   Chichester,   N.H.   He   later   accepted   employment   with   the  state  of  New  Hampshire  as  an   onsite   caretaker   with   the   Urban   Forestry   Service.   In   the   early   2000s,  he  retired  when  he  and  his  

wife  moved   to   Fernandina   Beach   to  be  near  their  daughter. While   living   in   Chichester,   he   was  a  former  president  of  the  Lions   Club   and   later   a   member   of   the   Portsmouth   Kiwanis   Club.   After   settling   in   Fernandina   Beach,   he   volunteered  at  the  Nassau  County   Humane  Society.

He  was   preceded   in   death   by   his  wife,  Tanya  Mayville  Jackson,   who  died  in  2006. He   leaves   behind   two   sons,   David   Jackson   (Susan)   of   Allenstown,   N.H.,   and   Gary   Jackson   of   Fernandina   Beach;͞   a   daughter,   Lynette   Little   (Timmy)   of   Fernandina   Beach;͞   a   sister,  

!

Norma  Stone   of   Bridport,   Vt.;͞   five   grandchildren;͞   and   a   great-­grandson. Funeral   services   will   be   held   at   a  later  date  when  he  will  be  laid  to   rest  beside  his  wife  in  the  Maryville   Family  Cemetery,  Middlebury,  Vt. Online   condolences   may   be   left   at  www.oxleyheard.com.

"

Alberta Cunningham, 73, Lincoln LINCOLN  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Alberta   Cota   Cunningham,  73,  died  Tuesday,  May   6,  2014,  at  her  home  in  Lincoln. She   was   born   July   16,   1940,   in   Monkton,  the  daughter  of  Arthur  and   Vera  Shepard  Cota. Her  relatives  say  she  was  a  caring   individual   and   enjoyed   spending   time   with   her   grandchildren   and   great-­grandchildren   at   family   gath-­ erings.  Her  hobbies  were  talking  on   CBs,  shopping,  crocheting,  traveling,   bird   watching   and   enjoying   nature,   playing   cards,   emailing   friends   and   family. She  is  survived  by  three  children,   David   Cunningham   Jr.,   George   and   Marlene   Cunningham,   and   Penny  

and  Edward   Stutzman;Íž   10   grand-­ children;Íž   six   great-­grandchildren;Íž   two   brothers,   Norman   and   Diane   Cota,  and  Ralph  and  Martha  Cota;Íž  a   sister,   Arlene   and   Leo   Lamoureux;Íž   and   several   nieces,   nephews,   great-­ nieces  and  great-­nephews. Funeral   services   will   be   held   at   11   a.m.   on   Tuesday,   May   13,   at   Starksboro  Baptist  Church.  Interment   will   be   in   Green   Mount   Cemetery   in   Starksboro.   Friends   may   call   at   Brown-­McClay   Funeral   Home   in   Bristol  on  Monday,  May  12,  from  5   WR  SP ,Q OLHX RI Ă&#x20AC;RZHUV FRQWUL-­ butions   may   be   made   to   the   family   Attn.  George  Cunningham,  45A  Hall   Road,  Lincoln,  VT  05443.

!

ALBERTA Â CUNNINGHAM

"

Joyce Duclos, 63, Middlebury

~Â&#x20AC;th Annual

G]]h]jkĂ&#x203A;Ga_Ă&#x203A;IgYkl

Thurs., May 15thĂ?Ă&#x203A;Â&#x201A;Â&#x2018;Â&#x20AC;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x203A;¤Ă&#x203A;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;he At the home of Woody & Ingrid Jackson â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 1301 Cider Mill Rd., Cornwall

;]XMZTI\Q^M

;QTMV\ )]K\QWV

Music Ja*WJ:MK]XMZWÂ&#x152;Juggling by the Grato Family 0WZ[M,ZI_V?IOWV:QLM[Â&#x152;.IJ]TW][.WWL/ZMI\ *MMZ?QVM+WZV+P]KS/IUM[

No need NWZI [Q\\MZ

Great family event to support the Addison County Parent/Child Center <QKSM\[ Â&#x152;.IUQTa8I[[ 

32%R[Â&#x2021;0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQW

.WZUWZMQVNWXTMI[MKITT Woody â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 802 999-2064

MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Joyce   S.   Duclos,   63,   of   Middlebury   died   unexpectedly   at   her   home   Tuesday,   May  6,  2014. She  was  born  March  23,  1951,  in   St.   Johnsbury,   the   daughter   of   the   late   Floyd   and   Margaret   (Martin)   Sumner.   She   was   a   graduate   of   Rutland  High  School,  class  of  1969. She   married   John   Duclos   June   11,   2004,   in   La   Paz,   Mexico.   Joyce   wore   many   hats   in   her   lifetime.   6KH ZDV D ÂżHUFHO\ GHYRWHG ZLIH mother   and   grandmother.   She   spent   countless   hours   doing   volunteer   work   for   several   local   causes   and   national   organizations,   including   Business   for   Professional   Women   and   the   American   Cancer   Society.   She   publicly   fought   against   water   contamination   in   Vermont,   and   we   also  have  her  to  thank  for  the  overdue   WUDIÂżFOLJKWDW5RXWHDQG0RQNWRQ Road. -R\FH ZDV HPSOR\HG DV DQ RIÂżFH manager  at  Solos  in  Middlebury.  She   also  spent  many  years  as  a  childcare   provider   in   her   home.   Joyce   loved   to   travel,   skydive,   do   photography,   and  plan  lavish  events  for  her  family  

and  friends.  Her  creative  energy  and   endless   imagination   made   every   event  extra  memorable. She   is   survived   by   her   husband,   John   Duclos   of   Middlebury;Íž   her   children,   Kristi   LaFayette   of   Lincoln,   Kasey   LaFayette   Trujillo   and   husband   Jeremy   of   Loveland,   Colo.,   Jesse   LaFayette   of   Colorado,   and   Karly   McConnell   of   Middlebury;Íž   her   mother-­in-­law,   Norma   Duclos   of   Middlebury;Íž   her   sister-­in-­law,   Amy   Quesnel   of   Whiting;Íž   her   grandchildren   (in   order),   Ora   LaFayette,   Domenic   DeNapoli,   Sunny   LaFayette,   Nina   Bel   DeNapoli,   Micah   McConnell,   Charlotte  McConnell,  River  Trujillo,   and  Magnolia  LaFayette. Joyce   was   predeceased   by   her   former  husband,  Richard  LaFayette,   on   Aug.   5,   1987;Íž   her   parents;Íž   her   siblings,   Lana   Sumner   and   Charles   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Chicâ&#x20AC;?   Sumner;Íž   and   her   father-­in-­ law  Norbert  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nubâ&#x20AC;?  Duclos. A   celebration   of   her   life   will   be   held   on   May   14   at   the   Town   Hall   Theater  from  4-­6  p.m. Memorial   contributions   can   be   made   to   Otter   Creek   Child   Center,  

Peace of mind is knowing your loved one never leaves our care.

Affordable Cremation & Burial Plans Â&#x2021;WKHRQO\RQVLWHFUHPDWRU\LQ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\ Â&#x2021;ORFDOO\RZQHGDQGRSHUDWHGE\:DOWHU'XFKDUPH

Sanderson-Ducharme Funeral Home 6RXWK0DLQ6W0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021; sandersonfuneralservice.com

JOYCE  DUCLOS or   to   www.gofundme.com/80gje8   for  Joyceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  granddaughter,  Charlotte   LaFayette   McConnell,   who   was   injured   by   a   vehicle   April   1   on   Weybridge  Street  in  Middlebury.

Funeral, Cremation & Memorial Services, Pre-Planning Services

BROWN-McCLAY FUNERAL HOMES

Bristol 453-2301

Vergennes 877-3321


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  7

Stewardship  (Continued  from  Page  2) EHU-LP2UWXQRVDLGORFDOÂżUHÂżJKWHUV the   most   part   is   the   liabilities   with   support   the   pipeline   project   from   a   this   project,   including   infringement   safety   standpoint.   He   said   it   would   on   property   rights   with   pipeline   be  generally  safer  to  have  natural  gas   routes   being   acquired   by   eminent   funneled   through   an   underground   domain,   while   landowners   continue   pipeline   than   the   current   situa-­ to  pay  property  taxes  on  parcels,â&#x20AC;?  he   tion  where  gasoline  and  fuel  oil  are   said. trucked  along  Route  22A. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  understand  the  value  of  a  strong   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   in   favor   of   the   pipeline,   economy,  but  I  just  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  understand   only   because   of   the   different   kind   why  this  board  would   RIÂżUHVWKDWZHÂżJKW´ even  consider  approv-­ 2UWXQR VDLG Âł:H ÂżQG al   of   a   project   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If your land is that  the  pipeline  is  the   would   put   the   short-­ used for this, safest   scenarioâ&#x20AC;Ś   We   term   corporate   prof-­ LW¡VIRUHYHUÂŤ are   in   charge   of   the   its   above   the   future   The decisions Route   22A   corridor   wellbeing   of   the   next   and  the  amount  of  fuel   generations   of   Ver-­ KHUHZLOOFDUU\ going   down   that   road   monters,   to   say   noth-­ IRUZDUGÂľ would   turn   most   peo-­ ing   of   the   future   of   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shoreham resident pleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  heads. Polly Birdsall our  planet,â&#x20AC;?  he  added. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Regardless   of   how   Middlebury   resi-­ we   all   feel   personally,   dent  Jono  Chapin  called  the  pipeline   we  feel  that  pipeline  is  coming,â&#x20AC;?  Or-­ proposal   a   classic   example   of   the   tuno  added. MATTHEW  COURTRIGHT,  EXECUTIVE  director  of  the  Ticonderoga  Area  Chamber  of  Commerce,  speaks  in   clash   between   economic   and   envi-­ He   noted   that   the   Shoreham   se-­ favor  of  the  proposed  Phase  II  of  the  Vermont  Gas  natural  gas  pipeline  project  at  last  Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Public   ronmental  interests.  He  said  that  un-­ lectboard  has  taken  a  neutral  stance   Service  Board  hearing  in  Shoreham. fortunately,   the   economic   argument   and   is   negotiating   (with   Vermont   Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell has  won  out  in  most  of  the  clashes. Gas)  for  as  many  safety  amenities  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Where  we  are  in  history  right  now   such  as  equipment  and  training  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  as   version   from   fuel   oil   to   natural   gas   2,000   annual   visits   to   IP   by   trucks   world-­class   environmental   perfor-­ mance,â&#x20AC;?  Calabrese  said. will   improve   environmental   condi-­ carrying  fuel  oil. is  economics  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  rule  the  day  any-­ it  can  secure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   (natural   gas   conversion   at   Lisa  Ventriss  of  the  Vermont  Busi-­ more,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  make  our  de-­ Nick  Causton  of  Shoreham  said  he   tions   for   area   neighbors.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   con-­ cisions   about   what   is   above   ground   is   one   of   many   local   residents   who   version  he  said  would  greatly  reduce   ,3 ZLOOQRWRQO\EHQHÂżW/DNH&KDP-­ QHVV5RXQGWDEOHFRQÂżUPHGKHUQRQ-­ and   not   the   fossil   fuels   that   are   be-­ can   see   and   hear   activity   at   the   IP   carbon  dioxide  and  sulfur  emissions   plain   and  Addison   County,   but   also   SURÂżWRUJDQL]DWLRQÂśVVXSSRUWIRUWKH low  ground,  as  we  go  forward.â&#x20AC;? mill  each  day.  He  believes  IPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  con-­ from  the  plant,  as  well  as  eliminate   Vermont  and  North  America,â&#x20AC;?  Caus-­ project  as  a  means  of  promoting  eco-­ ton  said. nomic  development  in  the  region. OUTSIDE  THE  COUNTY Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hearing  drew  repre-­ Âł:HDUHRUJDQL]HGDURXQGWKHPLV-­ The  hearing  also  drew  many  peo-­ sentatives  of  several  business  advo-­ sion  to  make  Vermont  the  best  place   ple  from  outside  of  Addison  County. cacy  groups  from  New  York  state. in  America   to   do   business,   be   edu-­ Ann  Krauss  of  Rutland  called  fos-­ NEW  YORKERS  MAKE  CASE cated   and   live   life,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   sil   fuel   an   addiction   that   she   said   One   of   them   was   Mathew   Cour-­ believe  the  Addison  Rutland  Natural   society   must   curb   if   it   is   to   protect   tright,   executive   director   of   the   Ti-­ Gas  Project  is  in  harmony  with  our   the  planet  from  more  environmental   conderoga   Area   Chamber   of   Com-­ vision.â&#x20AC;? damage. merce.   Courtright   recited   a   variety   Charlie   Harrington   of   Crown   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Unlike   most   addictions,   fossil   of   statistics   about   IPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   importance   Point,   N.Y.,   claimed   the   IP   mill   no   fuel   kills   as   well   as   destroys   health   within  the  economic  fabric  of  Essex   longer  emits  odors  and  has  improved   and  property  of  innocent  bystanders,   County,   N.Y.   He   said   its   environmental   re-­ UDWKHU WKDQ FRQÂżQLQJ LWV LPSDFW WR IP   is   Ticonderogaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   cord   during   the   past   the  user,â&#x20AC;?  Krauss  said. largest  employer,  with   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We are in favor few  decades. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Feeding  an  addiction  is  never  in   more   than   600   jobs   of the pipeline, â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   proposal   the  userâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  best  interest.â&#x20AC;? and   more   than   600   only because of from  IP  is  part  of  their   Patrick   Flood   of   Woodbury   was   DIÂżOLDWHG ODQGRZQHUV their   symbiotic   among   those   who   argued   the   state   the different kind story,   and   loggers.   He   said   relationship  with  Ver-­ should  clamp  down  on  further  fossil   the   mill   in   2012   pur-­ RIĂ&#x20AC;UHVWKDWZH mont  and  New  York,â&#x20AC;?   fuel  projects  because  of  their  alleged   chased   $160   million   Ă&#x20AC;JKWÂŤ:HĂ&#x20AC;QG Harrington   said.   impact  on  climate  change. in  goods  and  services   that the pipeline â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   pipeline   is   part   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Climate   change   is   coming   at   us   and  paid  $1.2  million   is the safest of   the   progression   of   like  one  of  those  half-­mile-­wide  tor-­ in  school  and  property   VFHQDULRÂľ HIÂżFLHQF\ RXU HQYL-­ nadoes  that  went  through  Arkansas,   taxes.   Courtright   said   ronmental  respect  and   and  what  are  we  doing?â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shoreham an   insurance   policy   IP  in  Ticonderoga  has   Vermont,  we  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even  pass  a  small   an   annual   payroll   of   Ă&#x20AC;UHĂ&#x20AC;JKWHU-LP2UWXQR that   this   industry   will   DSSURSULDWLRQ WR GR WKHUPDO HIÂż-­ more   than   $51   mil-­ VXUYLYH , UHDOL]H WKDW ciency  in  our  homes  and  save  money   lion. this  is  a  very  contentious  issue,  but   on   carbon   emissions.   Instead,   we   Having   access   to   natural   gas,   I  also  want  you  to  know  that  this  is   are   gathered   here   tonight   to   decide   Courtright   said,   would   greatly   re-­ not  a  sequel  to  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Tremorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  with  Kevin   whether   we   should   invest   tens   of   duce   IPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   operating   expenses   and   Bacon  as  the  star.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? millions  of  dollars  in  expanding  our   WKHUHIRUHJLYHLWÂżQDQFLDOVWDELOLW\ Shoreham   resident   Jim   Peden,   a   carbon  emissions.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   project   has   the   potential   of   retired   physicist,   said   he   was   look-­ Flood  said  it  is  future  generations   securing   the   long-­term   viability   of   ing   forward   to   the   Phase   II   project   ² DQG QRW WKRVH ZKR ZLOO EHQHÂżW IP,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. and   its   promise   of   bringing   what   from   the   pipeline   during   the   next   Carol   Calabrese   of   the   Essex   he   called   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;cleanest   burning   gas   10  to  30  years  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  who  will  â&#x20AC;&#x153;pay  the   County   (N.Y.)   Industrial   Develop-­ known  to  manâ&#x20AC;?  to  Addison  County. priceâ&#x20AC;?  for  the  project. PHQW $JHQF\ RIIHUHG DGGLWLRQDO Âż-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  very  happy  to  see  this  plant   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   is   much   more   than   an   eco-­ nancial   facts   about   IP   that   she   said   over   here   convert   to   methane,   be-­ nomic  issue,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  much  more  than   illustrate   the   plantâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   importance   to   cause  that  will  clean  up  the  air  over   a  political  issue,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  even  more   Vermonters.  She  said  the  mill  spends   here  for  us  in  Shoreham,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. than  an  environmental  issue,â&#x20AC;?  Flood   more   than   $3   million   annually   on   The   PSBâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   next   hearing   on   the   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   moral   issue.   I   goods  and  services  provided  by  Ver-­ pipeline   is   scheduled   for   Thursday,   think  it  is  wrong  for  us  to  make  de-­ mont   businesses.   Calabrese   added   June   12,   at   7   p.m.   at   Middlebury   cisions  that  will  burden  our  children   the   company   pays   approximately   Union  High  School.  People  can  also   for  the  next  30,  40  or  50  years.â&#x20AC;? $1  million  in  wages  each  year  to  its   submit  their  written  comments  to  the   Not   everyone   who   spoke   on   CORNWALL   RESIDENT   BOBBIE   Carnwath   listens   as   a   speaker   ad-­ Vermont   employees,   who   number   PSB  at  psbclerk@state.vt.us. Wednesday  was  opposed  to  the  proj-­ dresses  the  Public  Service  Board  during  last  Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  public  hear-­ around  16. Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   ect,  however. ing  in  Shoreham. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell â&#x20AC;&#x153;(IP)  is  committed  to  maintaining   johnf@addisoinindependent.com. Shoreham  Fire  Department  mem-­


PAGE  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

communitycalendar

May

12

MONDAY

Exhibit  opening   reception   in   Vergennes.   Monday,   May   12,   6-­7:30   p.m.,  Bixby  Memorial  Library.  Celebrating   the   opening   of   the   annual   Addison   Northwest   Supervisory   Union   Student   Art   Exhibit,   a   K-­12   show   highlighting   the   work   of   students   in   art   classes  through  the  supervisory  union.  Music  by   Jeff   Spencer,   refreshments.   Show   runs   through   June  6.   Addison   County   Right   to   Life   meeting   in   East   Middlebury.   Monday,   May   12,   7-­8   p.m.,   Valley   Bible  Church.  Visitors  welcome.  Info:  388-­2898  or   L2Paquette@aol.com.   Book   club   meeting   in   Bridport.   Monday,   May   12,   7-­8   p.m.,   Carl   Norton   Highway   Department   conference  room.  Discussing  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Color  Purpleâ&#x20AC;?   by  Alice  Walker.  Juneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  title  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Still  Lifeâ&#x20AC;?  by  Louise   Penny.  All  interested  readers  are  welcome.  Info:   758-­2858.   Senior   recital   of   original   works   at   Middlebury   College.   Monday,   May   12,   7:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Mahaney  Center  for  the  Arts.  Vanda  Gaidamovic   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;14  presents  three  original  compositions:  two  string   quartets  as  well  as  her  senior  work,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spitsbergen   Fantasia,â&#x20AC;?  scored  for  a  small  chamber  orchestra   and  based  on  a  tale  by  Hans  Christian  Andersen.   Free.  Info:  www.middlebury.edu  or  802-­443-­3168.  

May

13

TUESDAY

Blood  drive  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,   May   13,   10   a.m.-­4   p.m.,   Middlebury   American   Legion.   Info   or   appointments:   www.redcrossblood.org  or  1-­800-­RED-­CROSS.   Senior  luncheon  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,  May  13,   11:30  a.m.-­1:30  p.m.,  Russ  Sholes  Senior  Center.   CVAA   sponsors   a   luncheon   of   glazed   ham   loaf,   baked   beans,   winter   mixed   vegetables,   oatmeal   bread  and  fresh  fruit  cup.  Suggested  donation  $4.   Please  bring  your  own  place  setting.  Reservations   required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   634.   Free   trans-­ portation  via  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Technology  Drop-­in  Day  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,   May  13,  1-­4  p.m.,  Ilsley  Library.  Get  help  with  all   your  technology  questions,  from  word  processing   and  printing  to  handling  e-­mail  and  downloadable   books.  Info:  388-­4095.   Eat   Pizza   for   Art   fundraiser   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,  May  13,  5-­9  p.m.,  American  Flatbread.   The  Middlebury  Studio  School  is  holding  a  fund-­ raiser.  Eat  in  or  take  out  and  the  school  will  receive   money  for  each  pizza  sold.  Silent  auction  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;wetâ&#x20AC;?   (recently  painted)  paintings  by  local  artists.  

Spring  concert   in   Salisbury.   Tuesday,   May   13,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Salisbury   Community   School.   Salisbury  studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  annual  spring  concert.  Public   welcome.   Community  poetry  event  in  Orwell.  Tuesday,  May   13,  7-­9  p.m.,  Orwell  Free  Library.  Meet  Vermont   Poet   Laureate   Sydney   Lea.   He   will   talk   about   poetry  in  general  and  why  he  writes  poetry,  and   then  will  read  from  selected  works.  Q&A  session   follows.  Free.   MUHS   Spring   Concert   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   May  13,  7-­9  p.m.,  MUHS  auditorium.  Performances   by  the  Concert  Choir  and  Concert  Band,  who  will   SHUIRUP-RKDQGH0HLMÂśVÂżYHPRPHQWÂł6\PSKRQ\ No.  1,  Lord  of  the  Rings.â&#x20AC;?  Dedicated  to  the  recently   departed  Carl  Ciemniewski.  Free.   Pete   Seeger   documentary   in   Lincoln.   Tuesday,   May  13,  7-­9  p.m.,  Lincoln  Library.  The  library  pres-­ ents  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Power  of  Song.â&#x20AC;?  Info:  453-­2664.  

May

14

WEDNESDAY

Senior  Program   in   Lincoln.   Wednesday,   May   14,   10   a.m.-­noon,   Lincoln   Library.   Linda   Barnard   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermont   Towns   I   Have   Visited.â&#x20AC;?   Refreshments   served.  Info:  453-­2665.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermont   History   Through   Songâ&#x20AC;?   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,  May  14,  10:30-­11:30  a.m.,  Howden   Hall.   A   popular   Vermont   Humanities   Council   program  hosted  by  the  Addison  County  Teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Association.   Dressed   in   period   costume,   singer/ researcher  Linda  Radtke,  accompanied  by  pianist   Arthur   Zorn,   brings   Vermont   history   to   life   with   engaging   commentary   about   the   songs   found   in   the   Vermont   Historical   Societyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   collection   of   sheet  music.  Info:  802-­989-­7189.   Gallery   talk   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   May   14,   noon-­1   p.m.,   Henry   Sheldon   Museum.   Museum   Director   Bill   Brooks   leads   a   gallery   talk   on   the   new  exhibit  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lost  Gardens  of  New  England.â&#x20AC;?  Info:   388-­2117  or  www.henrysheldonmuseum.org.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tweenâ&#x20AC;?   movie   in   Lincoln.   Wednesday,   May   14,   3:30-­5   p.m.,   Lincoln   Library.  Ages   9-­12.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Howlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Moving  Castle.â&#x20AC;?  Popcorn  served.  Info:  453-­2665.   Special  senior  night  meal  in  Bridport.  Wednesday,   May  14,  3:45-­5:45  p.m.,  Bridport  Grange.  CVAA   sponsors  this  meal  catered  by  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Restaurant   and  the  Grange.  Menu:  meatloaf,  mashed  pota-­ toes,  peas  and  fruit  cobbler.  Suggested  donation   $5.   Reservations   required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   615.   Historical   society   meeting   in   Ferrisburgh.   Wednesday,  May  14,  6:30-­7:30  p.m.,  Ferrisburgh   Historical   Society.   The   Ferrisburgh   Historical   Society   welcomes   VUHS   history   students,   who  

Happy  birthday,  Joe! &(/(%5$7(7+(7+ELUWKGD\RIWKHLFRQLF*,-RHDFWLRQÂżJXUHDWWKH2UZHOO Free  Library  on  Saturday,  May  17,  from  9  a.m.-­1  p.m.  Local  collector  George  Macedo   will  display  his  large  collection  of  G.I.  Joe  memorabilia  and  invites  others  to  bring   theirs  in  to  share. will  discuss  their  history  odyssey  to  Philadelphia,   Gettysburg  and  Washington,  D.C.  Free.   Book   discussion   group   in   Lincoln.   Wednesday,   May  14,  7-­9  p.m.,  Lincoln  Library.  Discussing  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Say   Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  One  of  Them,â&#x20AC;?  by  Uwem  Akpan.   Historical   society   meeting   in   New   Haven.   Wednesday,   May   14,   7-­9   p.m.,   New   Haven   Community   Library.   The   New   Haven   Historical   Society   welcomes   Bev   Landon,   who   will   give   a   historical   presentation   about   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Dugoutâ&#x20AC;?   on   River  Road.  

May

15

Senior  luncheon   in   Vergennes.   Thursday,   May   15,   11   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   St.   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Parish   Hall.   CVAA   spon-­ sors   this   special   senior   meal   served   up   by   students   of   Champlain   Valley   Christian   School:   chicken   and   biscuits,   cabbage   broccoli   slaw,   PDVKHG FDXOLĂ&#x20AC;RZHU DQG FKHHVHFDNH WUXIĂ&#x20AC;HV Suggested   donation   $4.   Please   bring   your   own   place  setting.  Reservations  required  by  April  15:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   615.   Free   transportation   through  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Technology  Drop-­in  Day  in  Middlebury.  Thursday,   May  15,  2-­4  p.m.,  Ilsley  Library.  Get  help  with  all   your  technology  questions,  from  word  processing   and  printing  to  handling  e-­mail  and  downloadable   books.  Info:  388-­4095.   Historical   society   meeting   in   Bristol.   Thursday,   May   15,   7-­9   p.m.,   Howden   Hall.   The   Bristol   Historical   Society   welcomes   Bruce   Acciavatti,   who   will   present   his   photographic   tour   of   barns,   carriage   houses   and   garages   of   Bristol.   Handicap-­accessible.   Refreshments   follow.   Info:   453-­3439  or  453-­2888.  

May

16

Gardeners  on  the  green ANNE  COLLINS  AND  Lonnie  Fisher,  both  Middlebury  Garden  Club  members,  look   over  the  inventory  at  last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  garden  club  plant  sale  on  the  Middlebury  town  green.   This  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  sale  is  on  Saturday,  May  17,  from  9  a.m.-­1  p.m.

THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Bake  and   rummage   sales   in   Middlebury.  Friday,  May  16,  9  a.m.-­5   p.m.,   Middlebury   United   Methodist   Church,  corner  of  Seminary  and  North  Pleasant   streets.   Bake   sale   upstairs,   9   a.m.-­1   p.m.;   rummage   sale   downstairs   all   day.   Adult   and   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clothing,   shoes,   boots,   books,   house-­ KROG JRRGV DQG NQLFNNQDFNV 3URFHHGV EHQHÂżW missions  locally  and  around  the  world.  Continues   May  17.   Census  recruitment  event  in  Middlebury.  Friday,   May   16,   10   a.m.-­4   p.m.,   Ilsley   Library.   The   Census  Bureau  has  openings  for  part-­time  inter-­ viewers.   Valid   driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   license,   reliable   vehicle   and   telephone   required.   Info:   new.york.recruit@ census.gov.   Bike   to   Work   Day   celebration   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   May   16,   5-­5:30   p.m.,   meet   at   the   Middlebury   Municipal   Gym,   College   Street   side.   Join  other  cyclists  for  a  group  ride  through  down-­ town,   ending   up   at   American   Flatbread   in   the   Marble  Works.   Bixby   Library   Gala   in   Ferrisburgh.   Friday,   May   16,   6-­11   p.m.,   Basin   Harbor   Club.  Annual   fund-­ raiser.  Cocktails  6  p.m.,  dinner  7  p.m.,  silent  and   live  auctions,  and  live  music  by  the  Grift.  Tickets   available   in   Vergennes   at   the   Bixby   Library   or   Everywear,  or  online  at  www.bixbylibrary.org.  Info:   877-­2211.  

May

17

SATURDAY

Green  Mountain  Club  spring  work   party  in  Hancock.  Saturday,  May  17,   TBD.   Bread   Loaf   Section   work   party   at   Worth   Mountain.   Rain   date   May   18.   Tools   and   hard   hats   provided.   For   info,   contact   Heather   Bessette  at  453-­2004.   Bike   rodeo   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,   May   17,   9   a.m.-­3   p.m.,   St.   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church   parking   lot.   For   boys  and  girls.  Registration  9  a.m.  Admission  free   ZLWKSDUHQWDOSHUPLVVLRQVOLS*LIWFHUWLÂżFDWHVZLOO be  given  away  to  winner.  Info:  881-­8136.   G.I.   Joe   50th   birthday   celebration   in   Orwell.   Saturday,   May   17,   9   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Orwell   Free   Library.   Come   see   local   collector   George   Macedoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  large  collection  of  G.I.  Joe  memorabilia.   Bring  in  your  own  to  share.  Info:  948-­2041.   Garden  club  plant  sale  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,   May   17,   9   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Middlebury   town   green   DFURVVIURPSRVWRIÂżFH7KH0LGGOHEXU\*DUGHQ Club   offers   Vermont-­grown   plants,   hanging   baskets  and  seed  starts.  Ground  covers,  herbs,   Ă&#x20AC;RZHUV DQG VKUXEV DYDLODEOH 3URFHHGV VXSSRUW the  garden  clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  community  projects.   Rummage   sale   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   May   17,   9   a.m.-­noon,   Middlebury   United   Methodist   Church,  corner  of  Seminary  and  North  Pleasant   streets.   Bag   day:   $2.50.   Adult   and   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clothing,  shoes,  boots,  books,  household  goods,   NQLFNNQDFNV 3URFHHGV EHQHÂżW PLVVLRQV ORFDOO\ and  around  the  world.   Woofstock  2014  in  Ferrisburgh.  Saturday,  May  17,   9  a.m.-­3  p.m.,  Basin  Harbor  Club.  Annual  festival   for  the  dogs,  with  a  3K  fun  run  and  1.7-­mile  walk   (dogs  welcome),  plus  demos,  vendors,  kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  activ-­ LWLHVVLOHQWDXFWLRQWREHQHÂżW+RPHZDUG%RXQG doggie   play   park,   shelter   dog   parade,   food   and   more.   Info:   388-­1100   or   www.homewardbound-­ animals.org.  Rain  date  May  18.   3D   printing   demonstration   in   Orwell.   Saturday,   May   17,   10   a.m.-­noon,   Orwell   Free   Library.   A   live   demonstration   showing   how   the   3D   print-­ ing  process  can  make  a  three-­dimensional  solid   object  of  virtually  any  shape  from  a  digital  model.   Free.  Info:  948-­2041.   Otter   Creek   Child   Center   birthday   celebration   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   May   17,   10   a.m.-­2   p.m.,   Otter   Creek   Child   Center,   150   Weybridge   St.   Come   celebrate   30   years   of   early   childhood   education  at  OCCC.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Drumstrong  Vermontâ&#x20AC;?  drum-­a-­thon  in  Brandon.   Saturday,   May   17,   1-­5   p.m.,   Hands-­On   Music,   27   Center   St.   A   fundraiser   for   global   cancer   organizations.   Continuous   drumming   for   four   hours.   Three   people   must   be   drumming   at   all   times.  Use  one  of  our  percussion  instruments  or   bring  your  own.  For  info  and  pledge  forms,  visit   www.HandsOnMusicVT.com   or   text   or   phone   802-­345-­1714.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is   God   Still   Working   in   Vermontâ&#x20AC;?   presenta-­ tion  in  Panton.  Saturday,  May  17,  1:30-­7  p.m.,   Panton  Community  Baptist  Church.  Ben  Presten,   pastor  of  a  church  in  Wilmington,  will  talk  about   the  325-­percent  growth  in  attendees  at  his  church   in  one  year.  Three  sessions  will  be  interspersed   with  snacks,  fellowship  and  music.  Southern-­style   supper  for  all.  Childcare  available.  Info  and  regis-­ tration:  475-­2656  or  ericanet@gmavt.net.   Roasted  pork  dinner  in  Brandon.  Saturday,  May  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  9

communitycalendar 17,  5-­7   p.m.,   St.   Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Hall.   Two   sittings:   5   and   6   p.m.  Adults   $10,   children   under   10   $5.   Carryout  available. Talent   show   and   silent   auction   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,  May  17,  5-­7  p.m.,  Vergennes  Opera   House.   The   Vergennes   Union   Elementary   School   Community   Group   hosts   this   annual   event.   K-­6   students   will   perform.   Proceeds   IURP WKH VKRZ DQG DXFWLRQ EHQHÂżW WKH 98(6 artist-­in-­residence  program.  Tickets  at  the  door.   Info:  877-­6737.   King  Pede  party  in  Ferrisburgh.  Saturday,  May   17,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Ferrisburgh   Community   Center   and   Town   Hall.   Sandwich   supper   followed  by  an  evening  of  fun  and  card  games.   Come  planning  to  play  King  Pede  or  bring  your   own   favorite   card   game.   Requested   donation:   $2.50.   Red   Cedar   School   Rock-­and-­Roll   Ball   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   May   17,   7-­11   p.m.,   51   Main.   Red   Cedar   School   celebrates   its   25th   anniversary   with   a   ball   featuring   live   music   by   the   Grift,   plus   appetizers   and   desserts,   cash   bar,  and  a  fabulous  silent  auction.  Adults  only.   3URFHHGVEHQHÂżWWKHVFKRROÂśVVFKRODUVKLSIXQG Info:  www.redcedarschool.org.   Silent   movie   screening   in   Brandon.   Saturday,   May   17,   7-­9   p.m.,   Brandon   Town   Hall   and   Community   Center,   Route   7.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Winning   of   Barbara   Worthâ&#x20AC;?   (1926),   with   live   musical   accompaniment   by   Jeff   Rapsis.   Part   of   the   %UDQGRQ7RZQ+DOOÂśVVXPPHUVLOHQWÂżOPVHULHV Free,  but  donations  to  the  town  hall  restoration   fund   appreciated.   Info:   www.brandontownhall. org.   Snake   Mountain   Bluegrass   and   the   Connor   Sisters   in   Brandon.   Saturday,   May   17,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Brandon   Music.   The   popular   Addison   County   bluegrass   group   is   joined   by   the  unique  blend  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;sister  harmoniesâ&#x20AC;?  with  the   three  Connor  Sisters.  Tickets  $15,  available  at   802-­865-­4071  or  info@brandon-­music.net.  

May

18

Middlebury.  Wednesday,   May   21,   4-­5   p.m.,   Ilsley  Public  Library.  Helene  Lang,  using  books,   props   and   bibliography,   presents   Potterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   life,   highlighting   her   artistic   talent,   her   writing   abil-­ ity   and   her   years   as   a   countrywoman   raising   Herdwick  sheep.  Info:  388-­4095.   Ride  of  Silence  in  Middlebury.  Wednesday,  May   21,  5:45-­6  p.m.,  meet  at  Triangle  Park.  A  silent   bike  ride  to  commemorate  those  hurt  or  killed  in   road  bike  accidents.   Community   Resource   Meeting   in   Vergennes.   Wednesday,   May   21,   6:30-­9   p.m.,   Bixby   Memorial   Library.   The   third   meeting   in   the   Vergennes  Community  Visit  process  of  bringing   the  community  together  to  set  common  goals.   This  meeting  is  a  follow-­up  to  the  April  16  meet-­ ing,  where  community  members  voted  on  priori-­ ties  for  the  city.  Residents  are  invited  to  come   be  part  of  task  forces  to  create  action  steps  for   improving  Vergennes.  RSVP  optional  at  info@ vtrural.org.  

May

22

Tai  Chi   for   Arthritis   class   in   Starksboro.   Thursday,   May   22,   9:30-­10:30   a.m.,   Jerusalem   6FKRROKRXVH 7KH ÂżUVW LQ D VHULHV RI IUHH beginning   tai   chi   classes   meeting   Thursdays.   Sponsored   by   CVAA,   these   free   classes   for   people   age   50   or   older   can   help   improve   EDODQFH Ă&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\ DQG PXVFOH VWUHQJWK Register   at   453-­3964   or   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   1046.   Storymatters  meeting  in  Middlebury.  Thursday,   May  22,  7-­8  p.m.,  Middlebury  United  Methodist   Church.  The  local  storytelling  group  gathers  to   share  stories  on  the  theme  â&#x20AC;&#x153;This  story  is  ready   to  be  told!â&#x20AC;?  Tellers  and  listeners  welcome.  Info:   lar17g@comcast.net.  

May

SUNDAY

Green  Mountain   Club   hike   in   Lincoln.   Sunday,   May   18,   Sunset   Ledge.   A   Bread   Loaf   Section   outing.   Nice,   short,   family-­friendly   hike   to   Sunset   Ledge,  with  great  views  of  Lake  Champlain  and   the  Adirondacks.  Meet  at  trailhead  at  the  top  of   Lincoln  Gap.  Easy/moderate  2.2  miles  out  and   back;  400-­foot  elevation  gain.  Bring  binoculars,   water   and   a   snack.   For   meeting   time,   contact   5XWK 3HQÂżHOG  RU UXWKSHQÂżHOG# gmail.com.   Green   Mountain   Bicycle   Club   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vergennes   Voyagerâ&#x20AC;?   ride   in   Addison   County.   Sunday,   May   18,   9:45   a.m.-­12:45   p.m.,   meet   at   Vergennes  Union  High  School,  east  parking  lot.   Take   an   easy   26-­mile   rolling   or   39-­mile   easy/ PRGHUDWH Ă&#x20AC;DWWRUROOLQJ UXUDO ULGH DORQJ 2WWHU Creek  to  Middlebury  for  a  bakery  stop.  Longer   ULGHUROOVRXWE\.LQJVODQG%D\6WDWH3DUNÂżUVW Riders  younger  than  18  must  be  accompanied   by   parent.   Contact   leader   John   Bertelsen   at   802-­864-­0101  or  jo.bertel@gmail.com  for  infor-­ mation  and  a  weather  check.   Champlain   Valley   Fiddlersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Club   gathering   in   Middlebury.   Sunday,   May   18,   noon-­5:30   SP9):/RRNLQJIRUÂżGGOHUV\RXQJDQGROG Refreshments   available.   Meets   on   the   third   Sunday   of   the   month,   except   in   April   due   to   Easter.  Info:  342-­0079.   Chicken   and   biscuit   dinner   in   New   Haven.   Sunday,   May   18,   noon-­2   p.m.,   New   Haven   Congregational   Church.   Two   sittings:   noon   and  1  p.m.  $9  adults,  $4.50  children  age  6-­12,   under   6   free.   Walk-­ins   welcome   but   reserva-­ tions   appreciated.   Reservations:   453-­2342.   Takeout  available.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Songs   of   Freedomâ&#x20AC;?   celebration   in   Ferrisburgh.   Sunday,   May   18,   3-­5   p.m.,   Rokeby   Museum.   Noted   tenor   François   Clemmons   will   sing   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Songs   of   Freedomâ&#x20AC;?   to   celebrate  the  180th  anniversary  of  the  founding   of  the  Vermont  Anti-­Slavery  Society,  as  well  as   the  2014  opening  of  the  Rokeby  Museum.  Info:   rokeby@comcast.net.   Sheesham   and   Lotus   and   Son   in   a   home   concert  in  Bristol.  Sunday,  May  18,  4-­6  p.m.,   1477  Burpee  Road.  A  talented  and  entertaining   group  playing  old-­timey,  ragtime,  high-­stepping  

THURSDAY

23

History  at  Howden  Hall LINDA   RADTKE,   DRESSED   in   period   costume   and   accompanied   by   pianist   Ar-­ thur   Zorn,   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermont   History   Through   Songâ&#x20AC;?   at   Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Howden   Hall   on   Wednesday,  May  14,  at  10:30  a.m. PXVLFRQEDQMRÂżGGOHKDUPRQLFDERG\SHUFXV-­ sion,   bones   and   sousaphone.  Admission   $15.   Reservations  at  453-­4613.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet  the  Singersâ&#x20AC;?  opera  event  in  Middlebury.   Sunday,   May   18,   5-­7   p.m.,   Champlain   Valley   Unitarian   Universalist   Society.   The   Opera   Company   of   Middlebury   hosts   a   reception   with   the   cast   of   the   upcoming   production   of   Rossiniâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   comedy   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Italian   Girl   in   Algiers.â&#x20AC;?   Hors  dâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;oeuvres  and  performances  of  the  sing-­ ersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  favorite  arias.  Cash  bar.  Tickets  $25,  avail-­ DEOHDWWKH7+7ER[RIÂżFHRUZZZ townhalltheater.org,  or  at  the  door,  if  available.  

May

19

MONDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Bristol.   Monday,   May   19,   10:45   a.m.-­12:45   p.m.,   Cubbers   Restaurant.   CVAA   sponsors   this   monthly   event   for   down-­home   cooking   and   friendly   service.   Menu   TBA.   Suggested  donation  $5.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119.  

May

20

TUESDAY

Senior  luncheon,   presentation   and  foot  care  clinic  in  Middlebury.   Tuesday,   May   20,   10   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center.   CVAA   sponsors   a   foot   care   clinic   at   10   a.m.   The   Community  

of  Vermont   Elders   will   put   on   an   educational   skit   about   fraud   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Savvy   Seniorsâ&#x20AC;?   at   11   a.m.   On   the   menu   is   cream   of   broccoli   soup,   pan-­seared   chicken   tarragon,   vegetable   rice   pilaf,  green  salad  and  cheesecake  with  straw-­ berries.   Please   bring   your   own   place   setting.   Suggested  donation  $4.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   634.   Free   transportation   via  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Computer   class   in   Lincoln.   Tuesday,   May   20,   10:30-­11:30  a.m.,  Lincoln  Library.  Paul  Forlenza   has  volunteered  to  teach  a  series  of  classes  on   0LFURVRIW([FHO,QWKLVÂżUVWFODVV)RUOHQ]DZLOO survey  studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  needs  and  determine  what  to   teach.  All  levels  welcome.  Call  453-­2665  to  sign   up.    

May

21

WEDNESDAY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Keys  to   Creditâ&#x20AC;?   class   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   May   21,   10   a.m.-­noon,   State   Building,   156   South   Village   Green.   Learn   how   the   credit   system  works  and  how  to  make  it  work  better   for  you.  Register  at  802-­860-­1417,  ext.  113,  or   gfranks@cvoeo.org.   Caregiver   support   group   in   Lincoln.   Wednesday,  May  21,  1-­2  p.m.,  Lincoln  Library.   A   group   open   to   all   caregivers,   even   at   a   distance.  The  group  is  about  caring  for  yourself   during  this  process.  Info:  453-­2665.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beatrix   Potter   Revisitedâ&#x20AC;?   presentation   in  

FRIDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Middlebury.   Friday,  May  23,  11:30  a.m.-­1:30  p.m.,   Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Restaurant.  CVAA  and  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   partner  to  offer  a  home-­cooked  meal  of  chicken   and  vegetable  quiche,  coleslaw  and  fruit  crisp.   Suggested  donation  $5.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119.   Table   of   Grace   free   meal   in   Vergennes.   Friday,   May   23,   5:30-­6:30   p.m.,   Vergennes   Congregational   Church.   Monthly   dinner   sponsored   by   the   North   Ferrisburgh   United   Methodist,   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Episcopal,   Vergennes   Congregational  and  St.  Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  churches.  Free,   but   donations   accepted.   This   monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   menu:   meatloaf,  potatoes,  gravy,  corn,  dessert.   Senior   Week   choral   concert   at   Middlebury   College.  Friday,  May  23,  8-­10  p.m.,  Mahaney   Center   for   the   Arts.   The   Middlebury   College   Choir  celebrates  its  graduates  with  a  concert  of   studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  favorite  repertoire  from  the  past  four   years.  Free.  Info:  443-­3168  or  www.middlebury. edu/arts.  

LIVEMUSIC Andric  Severance   Quartet   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,  May  15,  8-­10  p.m.,  51  Main.   Atlantic   Crossing   in   New   Haven.   Friday,   May   16,  6-­8  p.m.,  Lincoln  Peak  Vineyard.   Starline   Rhythm   Boys   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   May  16,  6-­9  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   The   Milk   Chocolate   Project   in   Middlebury.   Friday,  May  16,  9-­11  p.m.,  51  Main.   The  Wheelers  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  May  16,  10   p.m.-­1  a.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   The  DuPont  Brothers  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,   May  17,  6-­9  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   Chamomile  and  Whiskey  in  Middlebury.  Friday,   May  23,  9-­11  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.

See  a  full  listing  of  

O N G O IN G E V E N T S in  the  Thursday  edition  of  the

Addison Independent and  on  the  Web  at

www.addisonindependent.com


PAGE  10  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Bluegrass group to join sister singers on stage Snake  Mountain   Bluegrass   uses   ovin  (mandolin  and  resophonic  gui-­ both  a  traditional  and  more  modern   tar),   Randy   Kirby   (bass)   and   Chris   approach   to   their   bluegrass   style,   3ULFNLWW ÂżGGOH  Snake  Mountain  will  be  joined  by   from   hard   driving   â&#x20AC;&#x153;breakdownsâ&#x20AC;?   to   the   unique   blend   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;sister   harmo-­ softer,  folk-­type  arrange-­ niesâ&#x20AC;?   with   three   young   ments.   Brandon   Music   women   from   Addison   presents  them  along  with   County,   known   as   The   the  talented  Connor  Sis-­ Connor   Sisters.   Middle-­ ters  on  Saturday  at  7:30   bury   Town   Hall   The-­ p.m. ater   Executive   Director   Gregg   Humphrey   and   Douglas   Anderson   says   Mike   Connor   formed   Snake   Mountain   Blue-­ BY GREG PAHL when   Katie   (guitar),   0RQLFD ÂżGGOH  DQG grass  about  25  years  ago.   Meaghan   (mandolin   and   At   the   time,   both   Hum-­ phrey   (guitar   and   vocals)   and   Con-­ lead  vocals)  â&#x20AC;&#x153;join  forces  with  Snake   nor   (banjo   and   vocals)   were   living   Mountain,  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  big  joyful  sound.â&#x20AC;? Snake   Mountain   Bluegrass   has   near   Snake   Mountain   and   someone   asked   them   what   style   of   bluegrass   recently   released   two   CDs:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Bout   they  played.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Snake  Mountain  blue-­ Time,â&#x20AC;?   which   features   their   unique   grassâ&#x20AC;?  was  their  immediate  response   blend   of   bluegrass   music   and   tight   and   the   name   has   been   theirs   ever   harmony   singing,   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Under   the   since.   Beside   them   stand   Earle   Pr-­ Radar,â&#x20AC;?  which  includes  seven  origi-­ nal  songs. Tickets  are  $15  with  a  pre-­concert   dinner   available   for   $20.   Reserva-­ tions  are  required  for  dinner.  Venue   is   BYOB.   Call   465-­4071   or   e-­mail   info@brandon-­music.net   for   reser-­ vations   or   more   information.   Bran-­ don  Music  is  located  at  62  Country   Club   Road   in   Brandon.   For   more   information  visit  brandon-­music.net. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MEET  THE  SINGERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; The   Opera   Company   of   Middle-­ bury  heads  into  its  11th  season  with   the   riotous   Rossini   comedy   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Italian   Girl   in  Algiersâ&#x20AC;?   (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Italiana   in  Algeriâ&#x20AC;?).  The  professional  singers   in   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   company   come   from   all   parts   of   the   country,   many   of   them  making  their  debut  with  OCM. It  is  now  a  tradition  for  the  OCM   singers   to   present   a   concert   just   a   few  days  after  they  arrive  in  Middle-­ bury.  Appropriately  titled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet  the   Singers,â&#x20AC;?  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  chance  for  audiences   WRJHWDÂżUVWORRNDWWKHÂżUVWUDWHWDO-­ â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;MEET  THE  SINGERSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;

arts beat

Otter Creek Child Center

SNAKE  MOUNTAIN  BLUEGRASS  &  THE  CONNOR  SISTERS ent   in   this   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   cast.   This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Meet  the  Singersâ&#x20AC;?  is  set  for  5  p.m.   on  Sunday  at  the  Unitarian  Univer-­ salist  Society  in  Middlebury. The  singers  perform  their  favorite   arias,   and   after   the   recital   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   reception  in  which  singers  and  audi-­ ence  meet  over  food  and  drink. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  singers  love  this  part  of  our   program,â&#x20AC;?  says  OCM   artistic  direc-­ tor   Douglas   Anderson.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   only   been   in   town   a   few   days   and   suddenly   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   embraced   by   the   community,   and   made   to   feel   wel-­ comed   and   admired.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   a   joy-­ ous   time.  And   the   recital   is   always   amazing.â&#x20AC;? Among   the   singers   joining   the   company  this  year  are  mezzo  Cher-­ ry   Duke,   whose   credits   include   the   New  York  City  Opera  and  Glimmer-­ glass   Opera;Íž   tenor   Thomas   Glenn,   veteran  of  the  Lyric  Opera  of  Chica-­ go,  English  National  Opera  and  the   Metropolitan   Opera;Íž   and   soprano   Sarah  Cullins  of  Burlington,  who  re-­

cently  returned  to  Vermont  after  run-­ ning  an  opera  program  in  Colombia   for  several  years.   Tickets   are   $25   and   may   be   pur-­ chased   at   townhalltheater.org,   382-­ DWWKH7+7ER[RIÂżFH 0RQ-­ day-­Saturday,  noon  to  5  p.m.)  and  at   the  door,  if  available.  The  Unitarian   Universalist   Society   is   located   at   2   Duane  Court  in  Middlebury. ATLANTIC  CROSSING Atlantic   Crossing   will   open   this   seasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   music   series   at   Lincoln   Peak  Vineyard  on  Friday,  at  6  p.m. :KHWKHUURFNLQJWKHGDQFHĂ&#x20AC;RRUDW a  contra  dance  or  playing  for  a  rapt   concert   audience,   Atlantic   Cross-­ ing  has  been,  for  over  a  decade  and   a   half,   a   favorite   in  Vermont.  Their   music   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the   traditional   music   of   New  England  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  is  deeply  rooted  in   the  Celtic  British  Isles  and  in  French   and   Maritime  Canada,   and   their   ar-­ rangements   reveal   a   profound   love   of  these  traditions,  together  with  cre-­ ative   and   emotional   expression   and  

cordially invites all Otter Creek alumni, present families, former and present staff, and friends from the community to join us!

Saturday May 17th 10:00 am - 2:00 pm Otter Creek Child Center 150 Weybridge Street Middlebury

Group Photo at 1pm

ating 30 years of caring for C e l eb r ountyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Children! Addison C

Live Music

rFace  Paintingr Bounce House Balloon  Art      rPopcornrSlide  Show Arts and Crafts Ă&#x2014;Picnic  Lunch

Join  us  for  a  picnic  lunch!   OCCC  will  provide  hamburgers,  hot  dogs,  and  drinks.   If  you  are  able,  please  bring  a  side  dish  or  salad  to  share. Contact  OCCC  at  802-­388-­9688  with  any  questions

THE  STARLINE  RHYTHM  BOYS

a  healthy  dose  of  fun. Band   members   include   Viveka   )R[RQÂżGGOHERGKUDQDQGGMHPEH Tristan   Henderson   on   mandolins,   tenor   banjo,   feet,   and   vocals;Íž   Rick   Klein  on  guitar  and  vocals;Íž  and  Pe-­ WHU0DFIDUODQHRQÂżGGOHORZZKLVWOH and  vocals. As  with  all  Lincoln  Peakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  shows,   the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;doorsâ&#x20AC;?  open  at  5:30  for  picnick-­ ing.  Local  cheeses  are  available  for   sale,  as  is  wine  by  the  glass.  Admis-­ sion   is   free.   Bring   lawn   chairs   or   a   picnic  blanket.  The  Wine  Down  Fri-­ day  series  happens  rain  or  shine  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  room  on  the  winery  porch  in   the  case  of  rain.  No  alcohol  may  be   brought  onto  the  grounds,  and  please   leave   your   pets   at   home.   Lincoln   Peak  Vineyard  is  at  142  River  Road   in  New  Haven.  More  information  is   at  lincolnpeakvineyard.com  or  388-­ 7368. TWO  BROTHERS  TAVERN There   will   be   four   live   musi-­ (See  Arts  Beat,  Page  11)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of May 12

THE  DUPONT  BROTHERS

Arts  Beat (Continued  from  Page  10) cal   performances   this   week   at   Two   Brothers  Tavern  located  at  86  Main   St.   in   Middlebury.   On   Wednesday,   the   Open   Mike   Night   begins   at   9   p.m.   Hosted   by   Kai   Stanley,   the   Open  Mike  Night  follows  Trivia  one   Wednesday  per  month.  The  stage  is   open  to  musicians  and  performers  of   DOONLQGVRQDÂżUVWFRPHÂżUVWVHUYHG basis,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free  to  enter.  There  is   no  cover  charge. On   Friday,   the   Starline   Rhythm   Boys   will   perform   at   6   p.m.   Al,   Billy   and   Danny   are   back   to   bring   a  modern  take  on  classic  rockabilly   and  honky  tonk  music.  They  are  one   of  the  most  exciting  live  bands  you   can   see   and   you   will   be   tempted   to   dance   the   night   away.   Reservations  

and  walk-­ins   welcome   for   this   spe-­ cial  early  show  in  the  Lounge.  There   is  a  $3  cover.   Then,   at   10   p.m.   on   Friday,   Two   Brothers   presents   the   Wheelers,   a   dance-­centric  cover  band  hitting  you   with   your   favorite   tunes   of   the   last   30  years.  Expect  genres  from  pop  to   reggae  to  rock  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  everything  in   between.  There  is  a  $3  cover. Finally,   at   6   p.m.   on   Saturday,   The   DuPont   Brothers   take   to   the   VWDJH/XVKÂżQJHUVW\OHJXLWDUZRUN is   complimented   by   elegant   prose   and  a  vocal  blend  that  could  only  be   matched  by  blood  relation.  Reserva-­ tions  and  walk-­ins  welcome  for  this   special   early   show   in   the   Lounge.   There  is  no  cover.  For  more  informa-­ (See  Beat,  Page  13)

TAURUS:  APRIL  21-­MAY  21  Steer  clear  of  add-­ tion.  Expect  a  few  raised  eyebrows,  but  most  people   ed   responsibilities   this   week,   as   you   already   have   will  be  receptive.   enough   on   your   plate.   Some   alone   time   might   be   CAPRICORN:   DECEMBER   22-­JANUARY   20   worth  its  weight  in  gold. You  are  ready  for  a  well-­ GEMINI:   MAY   22-­ deserved  vacation  or  re-­ JUNE   21   Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   treat.  But  you  cannot  run   easily   overwhelmed   by   away  from  your  respon-­ intense   people   or   things.   sibilities   this   week.   Just   Use   this   resilience   to   sail   hold  out  a  little  longer. through   a   particularly   AQUARIUS:   JANU-­ challenging  task  that  gets   ARY   21-­FEBRUARY   sent  your  way  this  week.  <RXU ÂżQDQFHV VHHP CANCER:   JUNE   22-­ to   be   a   constant   source   JULY  22  There  is  no  need   of   aggravation.   This   388-2800 WR ÂżJXUH RXW DOO RI WKH week   you   are   ready   to   answers   in   the   next   few   take  care  of  business  and   Your Bridal Specialist! days.   If   something   is   on   hammer   out   a   foolproof   Mon.  -­  Fri.  9  -­  5:30,  Sat.  9-­2 your  mind,  then  take  your   budget. ZZZPLGGOHEXU\Ă&#x20AC;RUDODQGJLIWVFRP time  to  weigh  all  of  your   PISCES:  FEBRUARY   5W6RXWK0LGGOHEXU\ options. 19-­MARCH  20  Your  en-­ LEO:   JULY   23-­AU-­ ergy   level   will   be   quite   GUST  23  It  could  be  chal-­ high,  making  it  vital  for   lenging   to   be   playful   and   you   to   do   something   lighthearted   this   week.   productive   before   your   Take   every   situation   se-­ stamina  slows  down.   riously   and   give   ample   ARIES:   MARCH   thought  to  each  and  every   21-­APRIL  20  No  matter   decision  you  must  make. how   challenging   it   may   VIRGO:   AUGUST   be,   slow   down   and   give   24-­SEPTEMBER   22   \RXUVHOI WLPH WR UHĂ&#x20AC;HFW Make   the   best   of   a   deli-­ Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   always   on   the   cate   situation   at   work.   go,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   important   to   Although  you  may  not  be   slow   down   every   now   ready   for   more   responsi-­ and  then. bility,   your   reaction   will   be  noticed  by  your  bosses. FAMOUS LIBRA:   SEPTEMBER   BIRTHDAYS 23-­OCTOBER   23   Hold   MAY  11 tight   to   your   beliefs   this   Brad  Marchand, week   and   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   let   any-­    Athlete  (26) one   sway   your   opinion.   MAY  12 You   will   serve   as   an   ex-­ Emilio  Estevez, ample  to  others  who  bend      Actor  (52) May 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201C; May 17 whichever   way   the   wind   MAY  13 blows. Stevie  Wonder, SCORPIO:   OCTOBER      Singer  (64) 24-­NOVEMBER   22   You   MAY  14 may   not   have   all   of   the   Mark  Zuckerberg, solutions,  but  rest  assured      Entrepreneur  (30) that   you   have   been   mov-­ MAY  15 ing   in   the   right   direction.   Jamie-­Lynn  Sigler,   383  Exchange  Street An   interesting   conversa-­    Actress  (33) Middlebury tion   illuminates   the   situ-­ MAY  16 ation. Janet  Jackson, www.cacklinhens.com SAGITTARIUS:   NO-­    Singer  (48) VEMBER   23-­DECEM-­ MAY  17 BER  21  You  have  gained  a  new  sense  of  purpose,   Derek  Hough,  Dancer  (29) and  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  ready  to  put  some  of  your  plan  into  ac-­

30% OFF

All Cotton Yarns!

Planning a Wedding? Check  out  stories,  tips  and  photos  in  the

Summer Wedding Issue ATLANTIC Â CROSSING

Coming May 29th


PAGE 12  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

PUZZLES

Sponsored by:

help keep the mind independent and active throughout life.

This week’s  puzzle  is  rated

1

Easy

Across

68. Enthusiastic

23. Portly

1. Hill  dwellers

69. Full  from  food

24. Stop

5. Track  shape

70. Lord  of  the  Rings  tree   shepherd

25. Savvy

9. Explosive  device 12.  Genealogy

71. “50  First  Dates”  star,   Barrymore

14. Metier

72. Starring  role

15. “___  you  sure?”

2

3

4

12

5 13

16

27. Feed  bag  contents

19

30. Cheesy  sandwiches 31.  Braid

23

32. More  advanced  in   years

28

16. Cad

Down

17. Flocks 18.  Drink  that  can  be  hot  or  cold

1. Something  curved  in   shape

19. “Who  ___?”

2. Not  for  love  __  money

40. Incision

21. “Indeed”

3. Nail’s  home

44. Trod

22. Get  your  ___  to  the  ground

4. Pilot

46. Figures

23. Ghost

5. Vein  contents

50. :LQHZLWK¿VK"

26. Openings

6. Diversify

52. Got  going

28. Brown  colored

7. Combined  sums

53. Power  type

29. Pace

8. Teachers’  bailiwick

55. Something  to  shoot  for

33. Shuteye

9. 5HOLDEOHÀHHWSURYLGHU

56. Surface  the  road

34. Fully  anesthetized

10. Fields,  of  study

58. Leaf

35. In  good  health

11. %UDQG\ÀDYRU

59. Part  of  w.p.m.

36. Passes  through  in  circular   motions

13. Icecream  treat  made   with  bananas

62. Opposite  of  used

39. Exploits

14. 'H¿QLWHDUWLFOH

65. Beach  water

41. Nipper

20. Agonize  over

66. Kind  of  user

37. Train  tracks

24

18 21

30

31

32

46

57

60

61

67

68

70

71

65

66

47 50

53

56

38

42

49

52

37

33 36

45

48

11

27

41 44

10

22

35 40

9

17

26 29

43

8

15

25

39

64. Enjoyed  good  food

7

14

20

34

38. Won  a  bee

6

54 58

51 55

59 62

63

64

69 72

42. Palm  hit 43.  Leaks

4

45. Headed  for  overtime 47.  Stretch  out 48.  Three  sheets  to  the  wind 51.  ...and  justice  for  ___ 52.  Mosquito  wounds 56.  Dowel

2

3

60. Get  on  in  years 61.  747,  e.g.

7

6

2 5 5

9 7

5

59. Transfered  money

67. Panel  truck

8 6

7

3

57. Cork  sound

63. Flirt

9

5 9

49. Farm  hat

54. Sensation  of  throat  dryness

1

9

7

2

4

4 3

1 6

6 8 2 5

1

This week’s  puzzle  solutions can  be  found  on  Page  35.

Sudoku Each Sudoku  puzzle  consists  of  a  9x9  grid  that  has  been   subdivided  into  nine  smaller  grids  of  3x3  squares.  To  solve  the   puzzle  each  row,  column  and  box  must  contain  each  of  the   numbers  1  to  9.  Puzzles  come  in  three  grades:  easy,  medium   DQGGLI¿FXOW Level:  Medium.    


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  13

Child  center  celebrates  30  years

SHEESHAM  &  LOTUS  &  SON

Beat (Continued  from  Page  11) tion,  call  388-­0002.   LIVE  MUSIC  AT  51  MAIN There   will   be   two   live   musical   events   this   week   at   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   51  Main.  At  8  p.m.  on  Thursday,  the   Andric   Severance   Quartet   takes   to   the  stage  to  perform  a  sizzling  stew   of   Latin,  Afro-­Cuban   and   Brazilian   jazz. Then,  at  9  p.m.  on  Friday,  the  Milk   Chocolate  Project  will  perform.  The   Milk  Chocolate  Project  is  a  soul  and   R&B   cover   band   with   smooth   vo-­ cals  and  an  infectious  groove.  Come   hear   some   blues   and   your   favorite   Motown  hits. All  ages,  no  cover.  For  additional  

information  visit   www.go51main. com  or  phone  388-­8209. SHEESHAM  &  LOTUS  &  SON There   will   be   a   house   concert   with  Sheesham  and  Lotus  and  Son   at   4   p.m.   on   Sunday   at   the   home   of  Carol  and  Santo  located  at  1477   Burpee  Road  in  Bristol.  This  popu-­ lar   band   from   Canada   is   without   a   doubt  one  of  the  most  talented  and   entertaining   groups   to   be   found   DQ\ZKHUH 3OD\LQJ EDQMR ¿GGOH harmonica,  body  percussion,  bones   and  sousaphone,  their  brand  of  old-­ timey,   ragtime,   high-­stepping   mu-­ sic   is   a   joy   to   behold.   $15   admis-­ sion.   For   reservations,   call   Rick   at   453-­4613.

MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   summer   of   2014   marks   the   30th   anniver-­ There will be live sary   of   Otter   Creek   Child   Center   music, face painting, a (OCCC)   in   Middlebury.   The   cen-­ ter   will   hold   a   celebration   to   mark   bounce house, balloon the   occasion   on   Saturday,   May   17,   art, a slide show, arts from  10  a.m.  to  2  p.m.  There  will  be   and crafts and a group live  music,  face  painting,  a  bounce   photo at 1 p.m. house,  balloon  art,  a  slide  show,  arts   and   crafts   and   a   group   photo   at   1   p.m.   Otter   Creek   will   provide   hot   by  expanding  its  curriculum  and  es-­ dogs,   hamburgers   and   drinks   for   a   tablishing   the   Eagle   classroom   for   picnic  lunch  and  is  asking  attendees   FKLOGUHQDJHGIRXUDQGÂżYH to  bring  a  side  dish  or  salad  to  share. In   response   to   the   lack   of   avail-­ able   child   care   for   infants,   Otter   Creek   Child   Center   was   founded   in   1984   as   an   educational   program   offering  high-­quality  care  to  greater   Middlebury   families   for   children   aged  6  weeks  to  3-­1/2  years.  From   the  outset,  OCCC  established  itself   as   an   innovative   program   not   only   by   virtue   of   providing   infant   care,   but  by  the  design  and  execution  of   its  curriculum. Utilizing   an   emergent,   rather   than  academic,  approach,  the  Otter   Creek  curriculum  provides  children   with  experiences  that  allow  them  to   learn   in   ways   meaningful   to   their   ability  and  interests,  rather  than  fo-­ cusing  on  isolated  skill  acquisition. Otter  Creek  Child  Center  initially   ÂżOOHGDJODULQJFRPPXQLW\QHHGE\ providing  quality  infant  and  toddler   care.   As   the   program   matured   and   grew,   and   as   families   increasingly   voiced  a  desire  for  their  children  to   remain  at  Otter  Creek  until  kinder-­ garten,  the  center  responded  in  1989  

Over  the  last  30  years  Otter  Creek   has  served  approximately  550  fami-­ lies   from   42   towns   in   and   around   Addison  County.  Over  the  years  Ot-­ ter   Creekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   enrollment   has   ranged   from  40  to  60  children,  with  the  cur-­ rent  school  year  serving  52  children   from   14   different   Vermont   towns   and  cities.   Otter   Creek   Child   Center   is   at   150  Weybridge   St.   Call   the   center   at   802-­388-­9688   with   any   ques-­ tions.


PAGE  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

453-2325

Bristol Beat

125 Monkton Road, Bristol, VT 3/80%,1*Â&#x2021;+($7,1*Â&#x2021;$,5&21',7,21,1*Â&#x2021;:$7(56<67(06

Call  us  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  here  to  help Heating  System  Inspection  &  Maintenance Energy  Efficiency  Advice Dependable  Delivery  &   24-­Hour  Emergency  Service 3URGXFWV)RU$OO<RXU3HWUROHXP3OXPELQJ +HDWLQJ1HHGV For Fuel/Oil Delivery

388-4975 185 Exchange St., Middlebury

Spring has finally arrived!! Shield your eyes from the harmful effects of the sunâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s UV rays with UV-protective lenses, sunglasses, or Transitions lenses! Stop in or call

802-877-2422

7HHQVVWXFNRQSXEOLFDZDUHQHVV

 -AIN 3T 6ERGENNES 64 s -ON   4UES &RI  

Letters to the editor

MOUNT  ABRAHAM   STUDENTS,   from   left,   Mercedez   Shackett,   Jordan   Cota,   Marie  Arena,   Makayla   Ouel-­ OHWWHVWDQGZLWKODZHQIRUFHPHQWRI¿FHUVGXULQJDUHFHQW9HUPRQW7HHQ/HDGHUVKLS6DIHW\3URJUDP³6WLFNHU 6KRFN´GD\6WXGHQWVIURPWKH9HUJHQQHV8QLRQ+LJK6FKRRO$VVHWVJURXSDOVRSDUWLFLSDWHG

Send  your  letters  by  email news@addisonindependent.com

ADDISON  COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Groups   of  students  from  Mount  Abraham  and   Vergennes   union   high   schools   took   part  in  a  recent  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sticker  Shockâ&#x20AC;?  day   around  the  county. The  purpose  of  Sticker  Shock  is  to   reinforce  public  awareness  about  the   minimum   drinking   age   law   by   plac-­ ing   stickers   on   packs   of   beer   larger   than  a  six-­pack.  The  goal  of  this  proj-­ ect   is   to   discourage   adults   and   older   peers  (those  who  are  21  or  over)  from   providing  alcohol  to  minors. The   campaign   consisted   of   teams   of  young  people,  accompanied  by  an   adult   chaperone,   placing   stickers   on   packs   of   alcoholic   beverages   at   par-­ ticipating   stores.   The   stickers   read:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Providing  Alcohol  To  Minors  is  IL-­ LEGAL.  Fines  are  up  to  $10,000  and/ RUXSWRÂżYH\HDUVLQMDLO6XSSRUWHG by:   Project   Sticker   Shock   Addison   County   START,   Addison   County   Prevention  Partnership,  Boys  &  Girls   Club   of   Greater   Vergennes,   VUHS,   MAUHS,   and   Vergennes   Police   De-­ partment.â&#x20AC;? The  Vergennes  High  School  Assets   group   visited   Vergennes-­area   stores   on   April   18:   Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   in   Vergennes,  

9(50217 7((1 /($'(56+,3 6DIHW\ 3URJUDP YROXQWHHUV DQG ODZ HQIRUFHPHQW DSSO\ ZDUQLQJ VWLFNHUV WR EHHU FDUWRQV RQ $SULO  7KH VWLFNHUVUHPLQGEX\HUVWKDWLWLVLOOHJDOWRSURYLGHDOFRKROWRPLQRUV

Kinney  Drugs,   Champlain   Farms,   Vergennes   Redemption   Store,   Ver-­ mont   Energy,   Ferrisburgh   Mobil,   Small   City   Market,   Addison   Four   Corner   Store   and   West   Addison   General   Store.   Students   participat-­ ing  were  Rachel  Clark,  Mary  Flood,   Felicia  Cornet  and  Emily  Delgadillo.   The  Mount  Abraham  High  School  

Vermont  Teen  Leadership  Safety  Pro-­ gram   (VTLSP)   visited   Bristol-­area   stores  on  April  16:  Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  in  Bristol,   Bristol  Beverage,  Champlain  Farms,   0DSOHÂżHOGÂśVLQ%ULVWRODQG-LII\0DUW and  the  Village  Store  in  New  Haven.   Students  participating  were  Makayla   2XHOOHWWH -RUGDQ &RWD 0HUFHGH] Shackett,  and  Marie  Arena.

1HZ+DYHQÂżOOVWRZQSRVLWLRQV sentative  to  the  Addison  County   By  ZACH  DESPART Solid   Waste   District;Íž   Richard   NEW   HAVEN   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Higbee,   inspector   of   lum-­ New   Haven   selectboard   at   ber,   shingles   and   its   April   1   meeting   ap-­ wood   and   weigh-­ pointed  a  slew  of  residents   er   of   coal;Íž   Mi-­ to  town  positions. chaela   Granstrom   The   selectboard   unani-­ as   library   trustee;Íž   mously  made  the  following   appointments:   Rick   Shappy,   town   and  Dave  Wetmore,  911  coordinator. The   board   also   approved   liquor   energy   coordinator;Íž   Earl   Bessette,   -RKQ 0F.LQOH\ DQG 3DXO $XG\ DV licenses   for   Tourterelle   Restaurant   fence  viewers;Íž  Phyllis  Smith,  repre-­ and  Inn  and  for  Green  Pasture  Meats  

UIFSFHJPO

â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  both  Route  7  businesses. Also  at  that  meeting,  New  Haven   Volunteer   Fire   Department   Chief   Alan   Mayer   and   assistant   chiefs   Dean  Gilmore  and  Mark  Livingston   spoke   with   the   selectboard   about   a   variety  of  issues. 7KH ÂżUHPHQ VDLG WKDW EHFDXVH WKHUHLVYHU\ORZFOHDUDQFHZKHQÂżUH WUXFNVH[LWWKHJDUDJHRIWKHÂżUHKRXVH it  is  imperative  that  the  Highway  De-­ (See  New  Haven,  Page  16)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  15

Bristol Beat

Lincoln  Library  has  programs  for  all LINCOLN   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Lincoln   Li-­ brary  has  a  busy  month  of  activities   planned  for  May. Wednesday,   May   14,   will   be   a   particularly   hectic   day,   with   three   events   planned.   First,   at   the   10   a.m.   Senior   Program,   Linda   Bar-­ nard   will   be   back   with   her   popular   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Walk   Through   Vermont   Townsâ&#x20AC;?   series.   She   will   bring   pictures   and   other   memorabilia   from   towns   she   has   visited   and   lots   of   knowledge   about  the  history  of  each  town  also.   Refreshments  will  be  served.  Librar-­ ian  Debi  Gray  said  this  program  was   originally  scheduled  for  March,  but   was  canceled  due  to  the  weather. Later   that   day,   from   3:30-­5   p.m.,   the   library   will   hold   its   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tween   Movie   Afternoonâ&#x20AC;?   for   youngsters   ages   9-­12.   The   library   will   screen  

the  Japanese  anime  classic  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Howlâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Moving   Castle.â&#x20AC;?   Popcorn   will   be   served.  Finally,  at  7  p.m.  on  Wednes-­ day,   the   public   is   invited   to   a   book   discussion.   The   book   this   month   is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Say  You  Are  One  of  Usâ&#x20AC;?  by  Uwem   Akpan. The   Lincoln   Library   Computer   Class   Series   will   be   starting   on   Tuesday,   May   20,   10:30-­11:30   a.m.   at   the   library.   Paul   Forlenza   has  volunteered  to  teach  classes  on   0LFURVRIW ([FHO ,Q WKH ÂżUVW FODVV the  Lincoln  resident  will  survey  the   studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  needs  and  make  decisions   on  what  to  teach.  All  levels  of  stu-­ dents   are   invited.   This   is   free,   but   call   or   email   the   Library   to   sign   up.  The  phone  number  is  802-­453-­ 2665;Íž   email   at   lincolnlibraryvt@ gmail.com.

The  Caregiver  Group  will  meet  on   Wednesday,   May   21,   at   1   p.m.  The   group   welcomes   everyone   who   is   taking   care   of   another   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   even   at   a   distance.  This  group  is  about  caring   for  yourself  during  this  process. Finally,   get   ready   for   the   annual   Book,   Plant   and   Bake   Sale   at   the   Lincoln   Library   on   Saturday,   May   24,  9  a.m.-­3  p.m.  The  library  is  cur-­ rently  accepting  used  books  for  the   sale.  Drop  them  off  when  the  library   is   open   or   call   453-­2665   to   make   other  arrangements.  The  library  will   EHUDIĂ&#x20AC;LQJRIIIRXUWLFNHWVWR)HQZD\ Park  for  a  game  on  Aug.  23  that  day   also.   The   Lincoln   Library   is   on   West   Road  just  west  of  the  village.  More   information   is   at   www.lincolnli-­ braryvt.com.

Have-­A-­Heart  Food  Shelf  thankful  for  support  of  towns Although  hunger  is  a  reality  in  the   the  Food  Shelf  in  the  past  year.  The   Five  Town  Area,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  fortunate  to   list  is  long  and  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  grateful  to  all   live  in  a  community  that  generously   of  you:  Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  (Bristol),  National   supports  its  local  food  shelf.  The   Bank  of  Middlebury  (Bristol),   Have-­A-­Heart  Food  Shelf  in   Champlain  Valley  Telecom,   Bristol  offers  monthly  food   The  Enchanted  Closet,   distribution  to  residents  of   Bristol  Fire  Department,   Bristol,  Starksboro,  New  Ha-­ %ULVWRO3RVW2IÂżFH0RXQW ven,  Monkton  and  Lincoln,   of appreciation Abraham  Union  High   and  is  open  to  any  resident   School  chapter  of  the   of  these  towns.  The  Food   National  Honor  Society,   Shelf  is  housed  in  the  basement  of   Mount  Abe  track  team,  St.  Ambrose   St.  Ambrose  Church,  which  has  gen-­ Church,  Bristol  Federated  Church,   erously  provided  rent-­free  space  for   Lincoln  United  Church,  New  Haven   24  years.  This  arrangement  allows   Congregational  Church,  New  Ha-­ the  Food  Shelf  to  focus  its  resources   ven  United  Reformed  Church,  First   on  meeting  the  food  security  needs   Baptist  Church  of  Bristol,  Monk-­ of  our  community. ton  Friends  Methodist  Church,   In  recent  years,  demand  has   Catholic  Charities;Íž  Bristol  Elemen-­ JURZQVLJQLÂżFDQWO\DQGWKH)RRG tary  School,  Beeman  Elemen-­ Shelf  now  provides  food  to  over  70   tary  School,  Monkton  Book  Club,   families  each  month,  solely  through   Libanus  Lodge  No.  47  Bristol,   donations  provided  by  the  com-­ Vergennes  Lions  Club,  Bristol  Boy   munity.  We  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  receive  any  food   Scouts,  Monkton  Boy  Scouts,  New   or  funding  from  the  Vermont  Food   Haven  Dairy  4-­H,  Monkton  4-­H,   Bank  and  instead  rely  on  small  but   the  American  Legion  Auxiliary  and   consistent  local  contributions  from   the  Sons  of  the  American  Legion,   a  variety  of  groups,  businesses   and  all  the  ongoing  donors  and   and  individuals.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  system  that   volunteers  who  give  monthly. works  well,  and  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like  to  thank   Your  contributions  of  food,  mon-­ the  many  people  who  have  helped   ey,  and/or  time  have  made  a  real  

Notes

difference  in  the  lives  of  our  neigh-­ bors  who  need  food  assistance.   Exciting  expansion  plans  are  in  the   works  for  the  coming  year,  which   will  allow  us  to  increase  our  stor-­ age  space  and  improve  accessibil-­ ity.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  always  looking  for  new   volunteers,  so  please  contact  me   if  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  like  to  become  involved.   Together,  we  can  continue  to  reduce   hunger  and  make  a  positive  impact   in  our  Five  Town  community. Rebecca  Stude-­Price,  Director Have-­A-­Heart  Food  Shelf Bristol

Lincoln

WALLACE REALTY 48 Mountain Terrace Bristol, VT 05443 0(    s FAX 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: www.wallacere.com www.greenbuiltvermont.com

Kelly

Claire

453-SIGN Vehicle Graphics Signs, Embroidery, Awards, Trophies Screen Printing, and More!

Tom

Please  call  Kelly,  Claire,  or  Tom

73 WEST STREET, BRISTOL

NEWS

LINCOLN  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Selectboard   mem-­ ber   Barbara   Rainville   let   the   paper   know   that   the   Lincoln   selectboard   will   hold   a   special   meeting   on   Wednesday,   May   14,   in   the   Town   2IÂżFHDWSP7KHSXUSRVHRIWKH meeting  is  to  develop  a  summer  road   ZRUN SODQ$ ÂżHOG YLVLW RI SUREOHP spots  in  the  town  will  also  take  place.

Join  for  a  Year  and  the Summer  is  FREE! Yes,  summer  is  just  a  season  away  and  Bristol  Fitness   wants  you  to  be  in  the  best  shape  ever!     Join  in  May  and  receive   Í&#x203A;Â&#x192;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â?Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D; FREEÂ&#x2122;Â&#x160;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x203A;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2019;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2019;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Í&#x2122;Í&#x161;Ǥ Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x201E;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2021;ƤÂ&#x2013;Â&#x2022;: ALL  Group  Fitness  classes  are  FREE! Use  of  all  Edge  locations  in  Chittenden  County   EVERY  DAY,  ALL  SUMMER,  FREE! Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x201E;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;ƤÂ?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Ǩ  

Check  Out  the  Class  Schedule at  edgevtwellness.com Í&#x2122;Í&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;ÇĄÂ&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Č&#x2C6;Í&#x153;Í?Í&#x203A;ÇŚÍ?Í&#x161;Í&#x2DC;Í?


PAGE 16  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

New Haven (Continued  from  Page  14) partment  clear  snow  from  in  front  of   the  bays,  especially  when  it  falls  off   the  roof. 7KH¿UHPHQDOVRDOHUWHGWKHVHOHFW-­ ERDUGDERXWDÀRRGLQJSUREOHPDVD UHVXOWRIVQRZPHOWZKLFKVHHSVLQWR DVWRUDJHFORVHWLQWKHEDFNRIWKH¿UH-­ KRXVH 7KH VHOHFWERDUG GLVSDWFKHG +DUROG 7ULFRX WKH WRZQ KDQG\PDQ WRORRNLQWRLW

0D\HU GLVFXVVHG PHUJLQJ 1HZ +DYHQ )LUVW 5HVSRQVH ZLWK WKH ¿UH GHSDUWPHQWQRWLQJWKDWWKHPHPEHU-­ VKLSRI)LUVW5HVSRQVHKDVGZLQGOHG WR MXVW VL[ SHRSOH DQG WKDW LW ZRXOG PDNHVHQVHIRUWKH¿UHGHSDUWPHQWWR DEVRUE WKH RUJDQL]DWLRQ $ GHFLVLRQ ZDVQRWPDGHDWWKHPHHWLQJDQGWKH LVVXHZLOOEHWDNHQXSLQWKHIXWXUH 7KHIROORZLQJSURSHUW\WUDQVIHUVLQ ZKLFK PRQH\ FKDQJHG KDQGV ZHUH

Bristol Beat

Call Bill, Andrea, or John DQG\RX·OOÀQGIULHQGO\local service and very competitive rates.

453-6600 35 West  St.,  Bristol,  VT +20(‡%86,1(66‡$872 Serving Vermonters for over 90 years. www.paigeandcampbell.com

UHFRUGHGDWWKH1HZ+DYHQWRZQRI-­ ‡ $XJ   9HUPRQW )HGHUDO ¿FHRYHUWKHODVWPRQWKV &UHGLW 8QLRQ WR 0LFKDHO DQG (PLO\ ‡ $SULO   %UHQW %MRUN-­ )LQGOD\DKRPHRQDFUHVDW PDQWR&KULVWRSKHU)RXWVDKRPHRQ 6RXWK6WIRU  DFUHV DW  +DOSLQ 5RDG IRU ‡ $XJ   -DPHV 6FKDHIHU  WR 'XERLV )DUP ,QF  DFUHV RII ‡ 0D\   9HUPRQW *DV WR 5RXWHIRU -RKQ 3HFN DQ HDVHPHQW DW *RUH ‡ $XJ   -RQDWKDQ$SJDU 6ZDPSIRU WR6WHSKHQ%DXHUDKRPH ‡ 0D\   -RKQ 7KHÀUHPHQ RQ  DFUHV DW  3HFN WR 9HUPRQW *DV DQ DOHUWHGWKH 0DLQ6WIRU HDVHPHQWDW*RUH6ZDPS VHOHFWERDUG ‡ 6HSW   IRU /RUL 9HQWXUD DQG 'HER-­ DERXWD ‡ 0D\   -HI-­ UDK *UHQLHU WR %UXFH ÁRRGLQJ IUH\ (YHUHVW WR 9HUPRQW DQG .DUHQ &KHHYHU  *DVDQHDVHPHQWDW*RUH SUREOHPDV acres off   East   Street   for   DUHVXOWRI 6ZDPSIRU  ‡ 0D\   -RKQ VQRZPHOW ‡ 6HSW7KH DQG $QQHORWWH /HJDXOW WR ZKLFKVHHSV (VWDWHRI%UXFH)6WXUWH-­ 9HUPRQW *DV DQ HDVH-­ LQWRDVWRUDJH YDQW WR 0DWWKHZ 1RUULV PHQW DW *RUH 6ZDPS IRU D PRELOH KRPH DW  FORVHWLQWKH  +XQW5RDGIRU ‡ 0D\1LFROH EDFNRIWKH ‡ 6HSW   +DPPHO WR (ULF :HGJH ÀUHKRXVH7KH 'DQQ\/H%RHXIWR0RPD DQG 7D\ORU 5R\DOV D VHOHFWERDUG 7RZQH //& D KRPH KRPHRQDFUHVDW GLVSDWFKHG RQ  DFUHV DW  3LQH 5LYHU5RDGIRU +DUROG7ULFRX &RQH/DQHIRU ‡ -XQH   :LO-­ ‡ 6HSW   OLDP%DUQDUGWR$YLV%XW-­ WKHWRZQ Thomas  Jerome  to  James   OHUDKRPHRQDFUHV KDQG\PDQWR 6KHHUDQDKRPHRQ DW  0XQJHU 6W IRU ORRNLQWRLW DFUHVDW(WKDQ$OOHQ  +LJKZD\IRU ‡ -XQH&KDQJ ‡ 6HSW  $PEHU +DOORFN <L 6DQG\ WR -DS 'KDQJXUX 1DQDN WR '. .D\KDUW 3URSHUWLHV //& D //& D PRWHO DW  (WKDQ $OOHQ KRPHRQDFUHVDW)LHOG'D\V +LJKZD\IRU 5RDGIRU ‡ -XO\,OO\D/LWFKHQEHUJ ‡ 2FW%UHWW6FKUHLEHUWR DQG ,PSXV 'HOHFWLL WR 9HUPRQW *DV -RKQ9DQ+RHVHQDKRXVHRQDFUHV HLJKW VHSDUDWH HDVHPHQWV DW *RUH DW/DGXF5RDGIRU 6ZDPS IRU  HDFK D WRWDO RI ‡ 2FW(YHUEDQNWR(Y-­  HUEDQNDKRPHRQDFUHVDW'RJ ‡ -XO\'HQQLVDQG/RDQ 7HDP5RDGIRU 0D\HU WR &XUWLV DQG .ULVWLQ 6ZDUW]-­ ‡ 2FW   -RQDWKDQ 0DUWLQ HQWUXEHU D KRPH RQ  DFUHV DW DQG.HUUL'LHJHOWR+HLGH%XVLHUDQG (DVW6WIRU &KROHQD3HJXHVDKRPHRQDFUHVDW ‡ $XJ7KRPDVDQG-RDQ 6RXWK6WIRU %UHHQ WR 7DQ\D 6DOFHGR D KRPH RQ ‡ 2FW-RDQQHVDQG7LQL DFUHVDW2OG)DUP5RDGIRU GH%RHU WR $OODQGUD )DUPV D KRPH  DQGIDUPEXLOGLQJVRQDFUHVDW  6RXWK 0LGGOHEURRN 5RDG IRU  ‡ 2FW   7ZLWFKHOO +LOO 3URSHUWLHV WR 5\DQ 0F&XH D KRPH RQDFUHVDW7ZLWFKHOO+LOO 5RDGIRU

Happy Spring!

OPEN FOR THE SEASON

Used &  New  Books,   CDs  &  DVDs New Musical Instruments & Supplies! Maple Landmark Toys

Gift Certificates Available!

(FSBOJVNTt"OOVBMTt1FSFOOJBMTtHanging Baskets 4FFETt)FSCTt7FHFUBCMFTt1PUUFSZ.PSF

VISIT OUR NEW EXPANDED LOCATION! 20 Main Street

/PSUI4USFFU #SJTUPM 

802-453-7555

)PVST Mon - Sat 8:30am - 6pm Sun 9am - 5pm

%JSFDUJPOT Take North Street from the traffic light in the center of Bristol. We’re 1 mile on the right!

‡ 2FW'DYLG+HLVOHUWR -RDQQHV GH%RHU D KRPH RQ  DFUHVDW6RXWK6WIRU ‡ 'HF   7KRPDV 0F-­ 4XDGH WR *UHJRU .HQW D KRPH RQ DFUHVDW3HDUVRQ5RDGIRU  ‡ 'HF   5ROHDX 5HDO (V-­ WDWH //& WR &KDPSODLQ 9W //& DFUHVDW7RZQ+LOO5RDGIRU  ‡ -DQ   +DUOH\ *ULFH 7UXVWHHWR&KULVDQG0LFKDHOD*UDQV-­ WURP  DFUHV DW  5LYHU 5RDG IRU ‡ )HE3DXO6DFKDUWR'DQLHO6D-­ FKDU D KRPH RQ  DFUHV DW  3ODQN5RDGIRU ‡ 0DUFK  (OJLQ 6SULQJ )DUP WR 9HUPRQW *DV RQH DFUH RII 3ODQN 5RDGXVHGIRUDQRSHUDWLQJIDUPIRU  ‡ 0DUFK(OJLQ6SULQJ)DUPWR 9HUPRQW *DV DQ HDVHPHQW DW 3ODQN 6WUHHW1RUWK6WUHHWIRU ‡ 0DUFK(OJLQ6SULQJ)DUPWR 9HUPRQW *DV DQ HDVHPHQW DW 0DLQ 6WUHHWIRU ‡ 0DUFK  -DPHV &KRLQLHUH WR 9HUPRQW*DVDQHDVHPHQWRQ1RUWK 6WUHHWIRU ‡ 0DUFK  5DOSK DQG <YRQQH )DUQVZRUWKWR9HUPRQW*DVDQHDVH-­ PHQWDW1RUWK6WIRU ‡ 0DUFK(OJLQ6SULQJ)DUPWR 9HUPRQW *DV DQ HDVHPHQW DW 1RUWK 6WUHHWIRU ‡ 0DUFK(OJLQ6SULQJ)DUPWR 9HUPRQW*DVDQHDVHPHQWRQ1RUWK 6WUHHWIRU ‡ 0DUFK(OJLQ6SULQJ)DUPWR 9HUPRQW*DVDQHDVHPHQWDW4XDUU\ 5RDGIRU ‡ 0DUFK(OJLQ6SULQJ)DUPWR 9HUPRQW *DV DQ HDVHPHQW DW 3ODQN 5RDGIRU ‡ 0DUFK(OJLQ6SULQJ)DUPWR 9HUPRQW *DV DQ HDVHPHQW DW 3ODQN 5RDGIRU ‡ 0DUFK  'DYLG DQG 6KDURQ /XWWRQWR9HUPRQW*DVDQHDVHPHQW DW1RUWK6WIRU ‡ 0DUFK*.¶V1RUWK6WUHHWWR +HQU\)XQGDFUHVRQ1RUWK6WUHHW IRU

MORE OF EVERYTHING:

Saturday June 21st DON’T MISS IT!

Acoustic & Electric Guitars Folk String Instruments World Drums & Percussion Buffalo Drums Used & New Bargain Books & Toys

0DLQ6W%ULVWRO‡453-­5982 www.recycledreadingofvt.com


Addison Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  —  PAGE  17

Bristol Beat

Brand New,  State-­of-­the-­Art  Facility  

Photo cops LIBANUS  LODGE  47  F&AM  members  present  the  Bristol  Police  Department  with  a  check  for  the  pur-­ chase  of  body-­worn  video  cameras.  Dick  Merrill  led  the  fundraising  effort  at  the  lodge.  Pictured,  from   left,  in  the  front  row  are  Matt  Prime,  Michael  Bushey,  Sgt.  George  Crowe,  Chief  Kevin  Gibbs,  Dick  Merrill   and  Ken  Goodrich;;  back  row,  Jack  Beatty,  Michael  Brown,  John  Johnston,  Steve  Jarvis,  Matt  Moyer  and   Jim  Burt.

Bristol Rec  wants  to  help  you  get  healthy BRISTOL   —   Bristol   Recreation   Department  of  Heath.  “Get  Moving,   Department  in  partnership  with  Ver-­ Vermont”  is  a  statewide  initiative  to   mont  Department  of  Health,  Moun-­ improve   overall   health   of  Vermont-­ tain   Health   Center,   Porter   Medical   ers   by   encouraging   people   of   all   Center   and   Bristol   Fit-­ ages  and  abilities  to  get   ness  are  bringing  health   “Get Moving, out   and   get   at   least   30   and  wellness  opportuni-­ minutes  of  physical  ac-­ Vermont” is a ties   to   Bristol   and   the   tivity   most   days   of   the   surrounding   area   with   statewide initia- week.   Get   moving,   set   what   we   are   calling   tive to improve goals  and  feel  better.   Bristol’s   Path   to   Well-­ overall health Bristol   Recreation   ness.   Department   Director   of Vermonters This  began  in  Febru-­ by encouragDarla   Senecal   said   this   ary  with  a  screening  of   summer  her  department   part   of   the   HBO   Film   ing people of all will  sponsor  a  series  of   Series   “Weight   of   the   ages and abiliwellness   seminars   by   Nation.”   Since   then,   ties to get out Ania  Mortier  of  Moun-­ smoking   cessation   and get at least tain  Health  Center. classes   have   been   of-­ 30 minutes of   The   next   opportu-­ fered   along   with   cook-­ nity  that  the  Recreation   physical activing  classes,  a  free  walk-­ Department  has  for  the   ing   program   in   Holley   ity most days of community   is   a   class   Hall  through  the  winter   the week. called   “Food   Glori-­ and   Kate   Barash-­Engel   ous   Food.”   It   offers   a   hosted  a  rockin’  Zumba  party. fresh  perspective  for  those  seeking  a     On   May   12   the   Recreation   De-­ greater  connection  to  the  daily  ritual   partment  will  kick  off  “Walk  for  the   of  eating.  Through  the  lens  of  “food   Health  of  It”  using  the  “Get  Moving,   as   medicine,”   those   in   the   program   Vermont”   program   via   the  Vermont   will   look   at   our   habits,   question  

our beliefs,   and   discuss   topics   such   as   whole   foods   vs.   nutrients;;   the   SK\VLRORJ\ RI ÀDYRUV GRVDJH DQG frequency;;   healthful   food   prepara-­ tion  and  combining;;  and  eating  with   changing  cycles  and  seasons.     Class  time  includes  guided  medi-­ tation   and   movement   exercises   to   ground,   listen,   and   learn   from   the   inside.   In   addition,   Senecal   will   schedule   a   one-­on-­one   consultation   with   each   participant   (included   in   the  workshop  fee)  to  offer  individu-­ alized  support.    For  anyone  suffering   from  digestive  problems,  experienc-­ ing   anxiety   around   eating,   or   inter-­ ested  in  cultivating  a  more  reverent   relationship  to  their  body  and  place   on  the  planet,  this  workshop  will  be   time  well  spent.    “Food,  Glorious  Food”  starts  Sat-­ urday,   May   17,   in   Bristol   through   the   Bristol   Recreation   Department.   Get   more   information   at   www.bris-­ tolrec.org. The  goal  of  this  and  all  of  our  pro-­ grams   is   to   help   the   community   be   healthy,   live   longer   and   enjoy   that   life.

Low Radiation Digital  Imaging   Comprehensive  Care   for  All  Ages   Most  Dental   Insurance  Accepted

Call Today For An Appointment

802.453.3911 61 Pine  Street    Building  #4  in  BristolWorks!  

Letters

to the editor

Send your  letters  by  email news@addisonindependent.com

Got Firewood? We Do! Available for Prompt Delivery

Green or Dry (Kiln Processed)* Dried per USDA requirements for heat processing Approved Supplier VT Fuel Assistance Program *Dry Wood is heated in our Kilns at 200º until the average moisture is down to 20-25%

Offer good May 13–20.

Limit 5 gallons. Certain Restrictions apply.

Our Beauty by DesignSM Colors offer you inspiring ideas in one special location. K]d][l^jgeh]]dfhdY[][gdgj[Yj\k$hjgb][llahkgj\][gjYlaf_a\]Yk& Our top-quality paint is the ideal solution to beautify your home.

Choose an exotic fair-trade gift. 18 Main Street, Bristol VT

453-­7202

www.emeraldrosegifts.com Monday – Saturday, 10 – 6

THE A. JOHNSON CO., LLC BRISTOL, VT 05443 802-453-4884 www.VermontLumber.com

Two  locations  to  help  serve  you  better...  

859 Route  7  South,  Middlebury   Mon  –  Fri    8am-­6pm                                         Sat    8am-­5pm    Sun  9am-­4pm                     802-­388-­9500      

             68  West  Street,  Bristol                Mon  –  Sat    7:30am-­5:30pm                Sun  9:30am-­3pm                  802-­453-­3617


PAGE  18  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

SPORTS MONDAY

Otters  roll  to  23-­0  win  behind  Aines  no-­hitter By  ANDY  KIRKALDY BRANDON   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  The   Otter  Valley   Union   High   School   softball   team   celebrated  Friday  afternoonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ded-­ LFDWLRQ RI WKH SURJUDPÂśV ÂżHOG WR longtime  Coach  Pattie  Candon  by   thumping   visiting   Mill   River,   27-­ LQÂżYHLQQLQJVDVVHQLRUSLWFKHU Taylor  Aines  tossed  a  no-­hitter. The   6-­3   Ottersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   18-­hit   attack   included   two   homers   and   seven   RBIs   by   senior   shortstop   Cortney   Poljacik,  giving  her  six  long  balls   LQ VL[ JDPHV WZR KLWV DQG ÂżYH RBIs  by  Aines;Íž  four  hits,  four  runs   and  three  RBIs  from  second  base-­ man  Amy   Jones;Íž   and   at   least   two   runs  from  every  starter. Nine   OV   runs   came   in   the   bot-­ WRPRIWKHÂżUVWLQWKHWKLUGDQG ÂżYH LQ WKH IRXUWK 7KH RQO\ VXV-­ pense   was   the   hard-­throwing   Ai-­ nes   could   toss   what   she   said   was   her  second  no-­hitter. Aines   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   emotional   after   the   ceremony   honoring   Candon,   an   OV   physical   education   teacher   DQG ÂżHOG KRFNH\ RIÂżFLDO DV ZHOO as   the   winner   of   309   OV   softball   games,   and   maybe   distracted   by   the  parade  of  Otter  baserunners  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   said   she   did   not   know   she   had   a   no-­hitter  until  told  afterward. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Me?  A  no-­hitter?  I  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  even   think   about   it,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   just   trying   to   strike   them   out   and   KDYHP\ÂżHOGHUVPDNHWKHSOD\V´ Aines  struck  out  11  and  walked   ÂżYH WKUHH LQ WKH ÂżUVW LQQLQJ 6KH worked  out  of  that  jam  by  striking   out  the  side,  and  admitted  she  was   yet  not  fully  focused. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   guess   it   was   a   little   a   little   nerve-­wracking   with   the   crowd   here,   and   the   ceremony   for   Miss   Candon  took  time  and  we  were  all   just   kind   of   still   happy   for   her,â&#x20AC;?   Aines  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;So  it  took  us  a  second   for   us   to   get   into   it.   But   once   we   did,  we  got  the  job  done.â&#x20AC;? Aines   has   better   harnessed   her   control   this   season   after   walk-­ ing  too  many  batters  in  2013.  She   pointed  to  an  adjustment  in  her  at-­ titude,  not  her  mechanics. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   trying   to   stay   consistent,   not  let  my  emotions  get  the  best  of  

me  on  the  mound.  Once  one  pitch   is  thrown  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  what  I  want,   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   change   anything,   so   the   next   one   is   most   important,â&#x20AC;?   she   said. Candon   appreciates   what  Aines   has  done  this  season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  very  happy  for  her,  because   it   seems   this   year   every   time   she   steps  in  there  sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  on  a  mission,â&#x20AC;?   Candon  said. Once  Aines  worked  out  of  trou-­ EOHLQWKHÂżUVWWKH29EDWVZHQWWR ZRUN-RQHVUHDFKHGRQDQLQÂżHOG hit,   and  Aines   doubled   her   home.   Third   baseman   Megan   Santell   walked,   and   Poljacik   singled   in   Aines.   MRU   pitcher   Carly   Ward   threw   the   ball   away   as   catcher   Laura   Beth   Roberts   reached   on   D ÂżHOGHUÂśV FKRLFH ZLWK 6DQWHOO VFRULQJ DQG VHQLRU FHQWHU ÂżHOGHU Olivia   Bloomer   singled   two   runs   home. /HIW ÂżHOGHU 0DLD (GPXQGV walked,   and   senior   DH   Brittany   Bushey  reached  on  an  error,  scor-­ ing  Bloomer  to  make  it  6-­0.  Jones   SRNHGDQRWKHULQÂżHOGKLWWRVFRUHD run,   and   then  Aines   lined   another   hit  to  make  it  9-­0. In  the  OV  third,  when  the  Otters   scored  13  times  on  a  dropped  third   strike,  a  walk,  a  misplay  of  an  Ai-­ QHV SRS Ă&#x20AC;\ D 6DQWHOO 5%, VLQJOH Poljacikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  line  shot  over  the  right-­ center   fence,   singles   by   Roberts   DQG %ORRPHU ZDONV WR (GPXQGV DQG VHQLRU ULJKWÂżHOGHU 0HJDQ McKeighan,   a   two-­run   Bushey   single,  a  two-­run  Jones  double,  an   error,   Santellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   RBI   double,   and   Poljacikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  RBI  grounder. MRU   came   closest   to   a   hit   in   the   fourth.  Taylor  Worcester   hit   a   dribbler   to   the   left   of   the   mound,   but  Aines  made  a  strong  throw  to   QLSKHUDWÂżUVW&KHOVHD%ODQFKDUG followed  with  a  line  shot  at  Jones   at   second,   and   she   knocked   it   down  and  relayed  to  Kelli  Jerome   DWÂżUVW 29 DGGHG LWV ÂżQDO UXQV LQ WKH ÂżIWK RQ VLQJOHV E\ SLQFKKLWWHU Maggie   Smith   and   Bushey,   an   er-­ 277(59$//(<81,21+LJK6FKRROVHQLRU7D\ORU$LQHVSLWFKHGDÂżYHLQQLQJQRKLWWHUDJDLQVW0LOO5LYHU URU D 6DQWHOO LQÂżHOG KLW DQG 3RO-­ last  Friday.  The  Otters  won  the  game,  27-­0. (See  No  Hitter,  page  20) Photo  by  Lee  Kahrs/Brandon  Reporter

In  baseball:  Eagles  win,  Otters  split,  Tigers  lose ADDISON  COUNTY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  In  area   high  school  baseball  action  late  last   week,   Mount  Abraham   won,   Otter   Valley  split  a  pair  of  games,  while   Middlebury  lost  at  home.   EAGLES On  Thursday,  Mount  Abe  pound-­ ed   out   a   14-­8   win   over   visiting   Missisquoi.   Austin   Lafayette   and   Ernie  Brouillard  each  poked  four  

hits  and   Aaron   Benway   launched   D KRPHU WR OHDG WKH (DJOH DWWDFN Josh  Cyr  notched  six  Ks  in  six  in-­ nings  to  earn  the  pitching  win.   7KH  (DJOHVœ 6DWXUGD\ JDPH DW0RXQW0DQV¿HOGZDVSRVWSRQHG until  Monday.   OTTERS On  Wednesday,  OV  defeated  vis-­ LWLQJ /HODQG  *UD\  LQ ¿YH

innings.  Shane   Quenneville   hit   a   three-­run  homer  as  the  Otters  took   the  lead  with  six  runs  in  the  second   inning,  and  also  doubled  twice  and   drove   in   another   run.   Tyler   Allen   drove   in   four   runs   with   a   single,   grounder   and   two   bases-­loaded   walks;͞   Mike   Winslow   had   three   hits  and  drove  in  three;͞  Tyler  Jones   and  winning  pitcher  John  Winslow  

had  two   hits   apiece;͞   and   Emmett   Thurston  singled  home  a  run. On  Thursday,  visiting  Mill  River   improved  to  8-­2  with  its  second  win   of   the   spring   over   OV,   8-­1.   Jones   allowed   only   one   hit   for   OV   over   WKH¿UVWIRXULQQLQJVEXWVWUXJJOHG with   his   control   while   the   Otters   did   not   play   their   usual   crisp   de-­ IHQVH29¿QLVKHGWKHZHHNDW

TIGERS On  Thursday,  visiting  Spaulding   edged   MUHS,   1-­   0,   as   the   Tideâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Josh  Kennison  tossed  a  three-­hitter   to   help   his   team   improved   to   3-­6.   He  outdueled  the  Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Josh  Ben-­ oit.   The   4-­2   Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Saturday   game   DW(VVH[ZDVSRVWSRQHGXQWLO0RQ-­ day.  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  19

Panthers breeze past Endicott, 19-­7 Schedule

By  ANDY  KIRKALDY MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Given   sec-­ ond   life   by   the   NCAA   Division   III   selection   committee   after   losing   an   $SULO  1(6&$& TXDUWHUÂżQDO WKH Middlebury   College   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   la-­ crosse   team   made   the   most   of   that   FKDQFH RQ 6DWXUGD\ ZKHQ WKH 3DQ-­ thers  opened  the  NCAA  tournament   E\WKXPSLQJYLVLWLQJ(QGLFRWW 7KH  3DQWKHUV KHDOWKLHU DI-­ WHU WKHLU WZRZHHN OD\RII EROWHG WR D  OHDG EHIRUH &RDFK 0LVV\ Foote   began   substituting   freely   and   ZDWFKHGKHUWHDPFRDVWSDVWWKH *XOOV Middlebury   will   next   face   Get-­ W\VEXUJ LQ D UHJLRQDO VHPLÂżQDO WKDW ZLOOIHDWXUH7ULQLW\  YV)UHGR-­ QLD  LQWKHRWKHUVHPL7KHVLWH ZDVQRWRIÂżFLDORQ6XQGD\EXW*HW-­ W\VEXUJZDVH[SHFWHGWRKRVW Foote   noted   on   Saturday   Get-­ W\VEXUJ KDV EHHQ RQ WKH 3DQWKHUVÂś VFKHGXOH RYHU WKH \HDUV DQG PRVW RIWKH3DQWKHUVKDYHSOD\HG²DQG ZRQ²DWWKDWVLWH Âł:H NQRZ WKH ÂżHOG´ )RRWH VDLG Âł2QO\ RXU ÂżUVW\HDUV KDYH QRW SOD\HGWKHUH6RZHÂśUHJRRGWRJRWR *HWW\VEXUJ´ Foote   was   pleased   how   her   team   responded   after   their   two-­week   EUHDN â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   a   little   worried   about   the   WZR ZHHNV RII´ )RRWH VDLG Âł%XW they  came  together  and  gained  a  lot   RIFRQÂżGHQFH´ 0LGGLH &DWKHULQH )RZOHU ZKR FRQWUROOHG QLQH ÂżUVWKDOI GUDZV DV 0LGGOHEXU\ GRPLQDWHG SRVVHVVLRQ VDLG WKH 3DQWKHUV WRRN WKH RSSRUWX-­ QLW\QRWRQO\WRKRQHWKHLUVNLOOVEXW also   to   recover   from   nagging   inju-­ ries  that  contributed  to  four  losses  in   WKHLUÂżQDOVL[JDPHV²DOOWR1&$$ WHDPVDQGE\DWRWDORIVHYHQJRDOV â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   were   able   to   get   our   health   EDFN JHW RXU VWUHQJWK EDFN VRPH-­ thing  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  struggling  with  the   ZKROH\HDU´)RZOHUVDLG 0LGGLH/DXUHO3DVFDOZKRVFRUHG IRXUJRDOVRQ6DWXUGD\VDLGWKH3DQ-­ thers  also  used  their  practice  time  to  

IRFXVRQWURXEOHVSRWVQRWDEO\WUDQ-­ sitioning  the  ball  from  defense  to  of-­ fense  and  showing  more  patience  on   WKHDWWDFNHIIRUWVWKDWVKRZHGXSRQ 6DWXUGD\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  working  a  lot  on  our   PLGÂżHOG WUDQVLWLRQ DQG , WKLQN WKDW we   did   an   awesome   job   of   making   VPDUW GHFLVLRQV´ 3DVFDO VDLG Âł2Q DWWDFN ZHÂśYH EHHQ ZRUNLQJ RQ UH-­ ally  moving  the  ball  and  looking  for   WKHFXWVQRWMXVWGULYLQJ´ 3DVFDOVFRUHGWZRRIWKH3DQWKHUVÂś IRXU JRDOV LQ WKH ÂżUVW  RQH RQ a  feed  from  middie  Katie  Ritter  and   RQHIURPDWWDFNHU0DU\2Âś&RQQHOO 2Âś&RQQHOO WZR JRDOV IRXU DVVLVWV  DOVR VHW XS D 0HJDQ *ULIÂżQ VWULNH and  Liza  Herzog  added  a  free  posi-­ tion   shot   as   Middlebury   broke   on   WRS Emily   Whitney   put   the   Gulls   on   WKHERDUGDWEXWWKHQWKH3DQ-­ WKHUVZHQWRQDUXQLQDVSDQRI %HD(SSOHUVWDUWHGWKHVXUJHDW  E\ FRQYHUWLQJ D EHKLQGWKH QHW+HU]RJIHHG$OOL6FLDUUHWWDVDQN the   rebound   of   middie   Chrissy   Rit-­ WHUÂśV VKRW 2Âś&RQQHOO QHWWHG D +HU-­ ]RJIHHGPLGGLH&DW/LQFROQWRVVHG LQDIUHHSRVLWLRQ6FLDUUHWWDVFRRSHG in   her   own   rebound   after   being   set   XSE\.DWLH5LWWHUDQG&KULVV\5LW-­ WHUZHQWVRORDWWRPDNHLW  $W WKH KDOI LW ZDV  DQG WKH Gulls   never   came   closer   than   eight   JRDOVLQWKHVHFRQGKDOI Katie   Ritter   and   Lincoln   were   among   those   scoring   in   the   second   KDOI ZKLOH 6FLDUUHWWD ÂżQLVKHG ZLWK WKUHH JRDOV DQG DQ DVVLVW 6HQLRU $O\VVD 3DORPED VHYHQ VDYHV  DQG sophomore   Katie   Mandigo   (two   VDYHV LQ   VKDUHG WLPH LQ WKH 0LGGOHEXU\JRDO Ellie  Clayman  scored  three  times   IRU (QGLFRWW DQG JRDOLH 5\DQ 6R-­ FRORZVWRSSHGQLQHVKRWV)UHVKPDQ Emily   Cutting   of   Ferrisburgh   saw   WLPHDWDWWDFNIRUWKH*XOOV 7KH 3DQWKHUV NQRZ WKH FRPSHWL-­ WLRQDKHDGZLOOEHWRXJKHUEXWVDLG WKH\DUHUHDG\

ADDISON  COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   In   area   high   school   softball   action   late   last   ZHHN 0RXQW $EUDKDP 9HUJHQQHV and   Middlebury   all   won   games   be-­ fore  rain  washed  out  Saturdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  con-­ WHVWV 2WWHU9DOOH\KRVWHG0LOO5LYHURQ )ULGD\VHHVWRU\ EAGLES 2Q7KXUVGD\WKH(DJOHVNQRFNHG RII 'LYLVLRQ , SRZHU 0LVVLVTXRL 7KH(DJOHVVFRUHGWKUHHUXQVLQ WKH GHFLVLYH VL[WK LQQLQJ Melanie   Rotaxâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   two   hits   included   a   homer   IRU WKH VHFRQG VWUDLJKW JDPH DQG Dani   Forand   also   poked   a   pair   of   KLWVRachael  McCormick  tossed  a   FRPSOHWHJDPH WZRKLWWHU ZKLIÂżQJ HLJKW7KH7%LUGVGURSSHGWR 7KH(DJOHVÂś6DWXUGD\JDPHDW0W 0DQVÂżHOGZDVSRVWSRQHGXQWLO0RQ-­ GD\ 7KH  (DJOHV ZLOO YLVLW 98+6 on  Tuesday  in  a  game  with  not  only  

ORFDO EUDJJLQJ ULJKWV DW VWDNH EXW DOVR',,VHHGLQJLPSOLFDWLRQV COMMODORES 2Q 7KXUVGD\ WKH &RPPRGRUHV WRSSHGYLVLWLQJ0LOWRQDVDani  Brown   earned   the   complete-­game   SLWFKLQJ ZLQ VWULNLQJ RXW  DQG EHOWHGDJUDQGVODPKayla  Charron   and  Tamara  Aunchman  chipped  in   WZRKLWVDSLHFHIRU98+6 7KH  &RPPRGRUHVÂś 6DWXUGD\ JDPHDW6SDXOGLQJZDVSRVWSRQHG TIGERS On   7KXUVGD\ WKH 7LJHUV EURNH through  and  won  a  close  game  after  a   VHULHVRIWRXJKORVVHVMakayla  Fos-­ ter   singled   home   Keri   Richmond   ZLWKWKHZLQQLQJUXQLQWKHÂżIWKLQ-­ QLQJ DQG Krisandra   Provencherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   WKUHHKLWVDOVRVSDUNHG08+6Pay-­ ton  Buxton  came  on  in  relief  to  earn   WKHSLWFKLQJZLQ 7KH7LJHUVÂś6DWXUGD\JDPHDW (VVH[ZDVSRVWSRQHGXQWLO0RQGD\

MIDDLEBURY  COLLEGE  FRESHMAN  Hailey  Cosseboom  stays  a  step   ahead  of  an  Endicott  defender  Saturday  afternoon. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

 â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   so   much   talent   indi-­ YLGXDOO\ LI ZH SXOO WRJHWKHU DV RQH DQGSOD\DVDXQLWOLNHZHGLGWRGD\ ZLWKWKHDWWDFNSXWWLQJJRDOVLQWKH GHIHQVHNHHSLQJWKHPRXW,WKLQNZH FDQGRLW´)RZOHUVDLG

Foote  said  her  team  should  be  able   WREXLOGRQ6DWXUGD\ÂśVHIIRUW â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  thought  they  put  together  a  nice   JDPH´ VKH VDLG Âł7KDW KHOSV XV JR into  the  next  round  of  the  postseason   UHDOO\FRQÂżGHQW´

Softball:  Tigers,  Eagles   In  tennis  action,  both   and  Commodores  all  win Tiger  squads  fall  short MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Middle-­ bury   Union   High   School   boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   and   girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   tennis   teams   both   came   up   VKRUW LQ PDWFKHV ODWH ODVW ZHHN DV GLGWKH2WWHU9DOOH\JLUOV TIGER  BOYS 2Q7KXUVGD\KRVW%)$6W$OEDQV EODQNHGWKH7LJHUV7KHLQGLYLG-­ XDOUHVXOWVZHUH Â&#x2021;$W1RVLQJOHV6DP&RVWHV% GHIHDWHG(OOLRWW$EERWW0 Â&#x2021;$W1RVLQJOHV-DNH5HPLOODUG %GHIHDWHG%R7UDQ0 Â&#x2021;$W1RVLQJOHV*RUGRQ.D\IXV %GHIHDWHG%RE$YHU\0 Â&#x2021; $W 1R  VLQJOHV 7KRPDV $O-­ OHUWRQ % GHIHDWHG 0DUFHOOR +DQWD 'DYLV0 Â&#x2021;$W1RVLQJOHV1LFKRODV6WULJ-­ JRQL%GHIHDWHG-HUU\6WDUHW0  Â&#x2021; $W 1R  GRXEOHV :LOO 7DQQH-­ EHLJHU3KLO0F.D\%GHIHDWHG1LFN +ROPHV(ULF 3RGUD]D 0  

 Â&#x2021;$W 1R  GRXEOHV -DNH 3HONH\ 'DQ%DUURZ%GHIHDWHG0D[0D\-­ RQH%HQ6LOYHU0   TIGER  GIRLS 2Q7KXUVGD\YLVLWLQJ%)$6W$O-­ EDQVEHVWHGWKH7LJHUJLUOV7KH LQGLYLGXDO UHVXOWV PRVW RI ZKLFK ZHUHKLJKO\FRPSHWLWLYHZHUH Â&#x2021;$W1RVLQJOHV0DUYLH$YHU\ 0EHDW&LDUD%DQQLVWHU%    Â&#x2021; $W 1R  VLQJOHV 0DGHOLQH *DQH\ 0 EHDW 6XPPHU$YHULOO %    Â&#x2021;$W1RVLQJOHV6RQLD+RZOHWW 0ORVWWR'LDQQH%HQHGLFWR%  Â&#x2021; $W 1R  VLQJOHV 'RURWK\ 3XQGHUVRQ0ORVWWR/LQGVH\/RZ-­ HOO% Â&#x2021;$W 1R  VLQJOHV &KDUORWWH .H-­ DWKOH\ 0 ORVW WR -DQD 6RPHUR % 

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Lacrosse 5/12  VUHS  Boys  at  OV  .............4:30  p.m. 5/12  MUHS  Girls  at  MMU  ..........4:30  p.m. 5/12  Montpelier  at  Mt.  Abe  Boys  4:30  p.m. 5/13  S.  Burlington  at  MUHS  Boys  ..4  p.m. 5/13  OV  Boys  at  Rutland  ...........4:30  p.m. 5/14  MUHS  Girls  at  Burlington  ..4:30  p.m. 5/15  OV  Boys  at  Mt.  Abe  ................4  p.m. 5/16  Spaulding  at  MUHS  Boys  .......4  p.m. 5/16  VUHS  Boys  at  U-­32  ...............4  p.m. 5/17  CVU  at  MUHS  Boys  .............11  a.m. 5/17  Mt.  Abe  Boys  at  Burlington  ...11  a.m. Softball 0W$EHDW0W0DQVÂżHOG  ....4:30  p.m. 5/12  MUHS  at  Essex  .................4:30  p.m. 5/13  Mt.  Abe  at  VUHS  ...............4:30  p.m. 5/13  Milton  at  MUHS  .................4:30  p.m. 5/13  Fair  Haven  at  OV  ..............4:30  p.m. 5/15  St.  Albans  at  MUHS  ..........4:30  p.m. 5/15  VUHS  at  N.  Country  ..........4:30  p.m. 5/15  Mt.  Abe  at  S.  Burlington  ....4:30  p.m. 5/16  OV  at  Leland  &  Gray  .........4:30  p.m. 5/16  N.  Country  at  MUHS  .........4:30  p.m. 5/17  VUHS  at  St.  Albans  ................3  p.m. Baseball 0W$EHDW0W0DQVÂżHOG  ....4:30  p.m. 5/12  MUHS  at  Essex  .................4:30  p.m. 5/12  Bellows  Falls  at  OV  ...........4:30  p.m. 5/13  Milton  at  MUHS  .................4:30  p.m. 5/14  Burr  &  Burton  at  OV  ..........4:30  p.m. 5/15  St.  Albans  at  MUHS  ..........4:30  p.m. 5/15  Mt.  Abe  at  S.  Burlington  ....4:30  p.m. 5/16  N.  Country  at  MUHS  .........4:30  p.m. 5/16  OV  at  Mt.  Abe  ....................4:30  p.m. Tennis 5/12  Woodstock  at  OV  Girls  ......4:30  p.m. 5/12  Spaulding  at  MUHS  Girls  ..3:30  p.m. 5/12  MUHS  Boys  at  Spaulding  ..3:30  p.m. 5/13  Montpelier  at  MUHS  Girls  . 3:30  p.m. 5/14  MUHS  Girls  at  N.  Country  . 3:30  p.m. 5/14  N.  Country  at  MUHS  Boys  3:30  p.m. 6SULQJÂżHOGDW29*LUOV  .......4:30  p.m. 5/15  OV  Girls  at  Bellows  Falls  ...4:30  p.m. 5/16  Harwood  at  MUHS  Girls  ....3:30  p.m. 5/16  MUHS  Boys  at    .................. Harwood 3:30  p.m. Track & Field 5/13  VUHS/Winooski  at  Mt.  Abe  3:30  p.m. 5/15  Essex/BHS  at  MUHS  ........3:30  p.m. 5/16  Mt.  Abe  at  BFA  ..................3:30  p.m. 5/17  Mt.  Abe  at  S.  Burlington  .......10  a.m. COLLEGE SPORTS Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lacrosse NCAA D-­III Regional 5/17&18  .................... Midd.  at  Gettysburg Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennis NCAA D-­III Tournament 4XDUWHUÂżQDO  ...............................TBA

Â&#x2021; $W 1R  GRXEOHV -HVVH :XOI-­ PDQ-XOLD &OXVV 0 ORVW WR *LQD 1HLGLJ/DXUHQ /D5RVH %     Â&#x2021;$W1RGRXEOHV/LQGVD\:HOOV 6DUD%RH0ORVWWR0LFKHOH0F.-­ D\/DXUHO+HEHUW%   OTTER  GIRLS 2Q)ULGD\YLVLWLQJ%UDWWOHERURGH-­ IHDWHG 29  LQFOXGLQJ WKUHH IRU-­ IHLWHGSRLQWV,QFRQWHVWHGPDWFKHV Â&#x2021; $W 1R  VLQJOHV .DWLH 7VXND-­ PRWR%GHIHDWHG'DQDURVH:HDYHU 29   Â&#x2021;$W 1R  VLQJOHV -HQQLIHU +XW-­ WRQ % GHIHDWHG 6DUDK <RXQJ 29  Â&#x2021;$W 1R  VLQJOHV +DOH\ 0DUFLO % GHIHDWHG &DLWO\Q &XUWLV 29    Â&#x2021;$W1RGRXEOHV$OL]D5DFLQH 'DQL/RRPDQ%GHIHDWHG*DEULHOOH :HOFK-RQQD.HLWK29


PAGE  20  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Both  Tiger  lacrosse  teams  victorious ADDISON   COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   In   lo-­ cal   high   school   lacrosse   action   in   WKH ODWWHU KDOI RI ODVW ZHHN WKH 0LGGOHEXU\ER\V¶DQGJLUOV¶WHDPV NHSW ZLQQLQJ ZKLOH WKH 0RXQW $EUDKDP DQG 9HUJHQQHV ER\V HDFKGURSSHGDSDLU7KH2WWHU9DO-­ OH\ ER\V ZHUH LGOH EXW ZLOO KRVW 98+6RQ0RQGD\ TIGER  BOYS 2Q :HGQHVGD\ WKH 08+6 ER\VZRQDW'LYLVLRQ,¿QDO-­ LVW (VVH[  Sam   Usilton OHG WKH DWWDFN ZLWK IRXU JRDOV DQG DQ DVVLVW Keenan   Bartlett   DQG   Ali   Abdul-­Sater FKLSSHG LQ WKUHH JRDOV DSLHFH DQG Bobby   Ritter   DQG  Seth  WrightDGGHGWZRJRDOV DQG DQ DVVLVW HDFK *RDOLH Nate   Lalonde EDFNVWRSSHG WKH ZLQ ZLWKVDYHV 2Q )ULGD\ WKH7LJHUV LPSURYHG WR  E\ WRSSLQJ &ROFKHVWHU   DIWHU WDNLQJ D  OHDG DW WKH break.  Connor  Quinnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  four  goals   DQG DQ DVVLVW SDFHG WKH RIIHQVH %DUWOHWW UHFRUGHG WZR JRDOV DQG

DQDVVLVW5LWWHUVFRUHGWZLFHDQG /DORQGH EORFNHG  VKRWV DJDLQVW WKH/DNHUV TIGER  GIRLS 2Q:HGQHVGD\WKH7LJHUVUROOHG SDVW KRVW &KDPSODLQ 9DOOH\   Emily   Robinson SDFHG WKH RIIHQVH ZLWK WKUHH JRDOV DQG VL[ DVVLVWV ZKLOH Emma   Best DGGHG IRXU JRDOV DQG Sophia   Abdul   Sater VFRUHG WKUHH JRDOV DQG VHW up  three  scores.  Alexis  Ouellette   Julia  Rosenberg  DQG  Emily  Kier-­ nan DGGHG WZR JRDOV DSLHFH Ki-­ era  KirkaldyUHFRUGHGDJRDODQG DQ DVVLVW DQG Emma   Donahue   VFRUHGRQFH On Thursday, the Tigers edged previously undefeated St. Albans, 16-15, in overtime. MUHS tallied four straight goals after BFAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Leilani King scored to open OT to make it 13-12. Katie Holmes DQG 5RVHQEHUJ VFRUHG Ã&#x20AC;UVW DQG Kiernan netted two straight before WKH HQG RI WKH Ã&#x20AC;UVW WKUHHPLQXWH OT period to make it 16-13. The Tigers held on in the second OT

session. /HDGLQJ WKH 7LJHUV ZHUH .LHU-­ QDQ VL[ JRDOV  5RELQVRQ WKUHH JRDOV DVVLVW  $EGXO 6DWHU WZR JRDOV WZR DVVLVWV  DQG +ROPHV WZR JRDOV DVVLVW  *RDOLH Baily  Ryan   VWRSSHG  VKRWV WZR ODWH LQ UHJXODWLRQ ZKLOH %)$¶V &RUD +DUWPDQDOVRPDGHVDYHV.LQJ UDFNHGXSHLJKWJRDOVDQG¿YHDV-­ sists. 2Q 6DWXUGD\ WKH 7LJHUV HGJHG WKUHHWLPH GHIHQGLQJ FKDPSLRQ 6RXWK %XUOLQJWRQ  DIWHU UDO-­ O\LQJ IURP D  ¿UVWKDOI GH¿FLW 5RELQVRQ¶V IRXU JRDOV LQFOXGLQJ WKH JDPHZLQQHU ZLWK D PLQXWH OHIW +ROPHV DQG .LHUQDQ QHW-­ WHG WZR DSLHFH 5RVHQEHUJ DGGHG RQHDQG$GEXO6DWHUDVVLVWHGWZR VFRUHV 5\DQ VWRSSHG  VKRWV ZKLOH &RXUWQH\ %DUUHWW PDGH  VDYHV IRU WKH  5HEHOV 7KH 7L-­ JHUVDUH EAGLE  BOYS 2Q:HGQHVGD\KRVW5LFHWRSSHG WKH(DJOHV0RXQW$EHWUDLOHG

DWWKHEUHDNE\MXVWEXW&RDFK 3DXO /RZ VDLG WKH (DJOHV IDLOHG WR FDSLWDOL]H RQ WKHLU VHFRQGKDOI chances.  Travis   Bachand VFRUHG IRXU IRU 0RXQW $EH DQG Dylan   Weaver   DQG   Owein   LaBarr   DGG-­ HG D JRDO DSLHFH *RDOLH   Tucker   Paradee  VWRSSHGVKRWV 2Q 6DWXUGD\ WKH (DJOHV IHOO EHKLQG DW WKH KDOI  WR YLVLW-­ LQJ +DUZRRG DQG VDZ D UDOO\ IDOO VKRUWLQDVHWEDFN%DFKDQG VFRUHG¿YHWLPHVGus  Catlin  DQG   Whit   Lower VFRUHG WZR HDFK DQG Lucas   Richter DGGHG RQH 3DUDGHH UHFRUGHG QLQH VDYHV IRU WKH(DJOHV VUHS  BOYS 2Q :HGQHVGD\ KRVW 6WRZH EHVWHG 98+6  Tommy   Lee   Hodsden VFRUHG IRU 98+6 ZLWK an   assist   from   Tucker   Babcock DQGJRDOLH  Broc  Clark  VWRSSHG shots. 2Q 6DWXUGD\ YLVLWLQJ %XUOLQJ-­ WRQEHVWHG98+6'HWDLOVRQ WKDW JDPH ZHUH XQDYDLODEOH 7KH &RPPRGRUHVDUH

$EUDKDP',,¶V¿UVWSODFHWHDP $LQHVVDLGWKH\ZLOOEHFRQ¿GHQW PRYLQJIRUZDUG ³, WKLQN ZKHQ ZH IDFH WKRVH ',WHDPVDJDLQLW¶VJRLQJWREHD OLWWOHGLIIHUHQWEDOOJDPH´VKHVDLG ³:KLFKHYHU WHDP ZH IDFH VKRXOG EHUHDG\IRUXVWRFRPHDWWKHP´ $LQHV DOVR WDONHG DERXW KRQRU-­ ing  the  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  coach  again  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Can-­

GRQZRQKHUWKLQ ³:HZHUHSDUWRIKHUWKZLQ WRRDQGLW¶VDZHVRPHWKDWZHZHUH WKHWHDPWKDWJRWWRVKDUHWKDWZLWK KHU´$LQHVVDLG &DQGRQ SUHIHUV WKLQJV ORZNH\ EXWDSSUHFLDWHGWKHWULEXWH  ³,W PHDQV D ORW WR PH EXW , ZDQWHG LW WR PHDQ VRPHWKLQJ WR WKHNLGV´&DQGRQVDLG³7KDW¶VP\

IRFXV :K\ DP , GRLQJ WKLV" ,¶P GRLQJWKLVEHFDXVH,ZDQWWKHPWR IHHO JRRG , ZDQW WKHP WR KDYH D TXDOLW\IDFLOLW\,ZDQWWKHPWRIHHO JRRG DERXW FRPLQJ RXW KHUH DQG SOD\LQJEDOOWKDWWKH\ZDQWWRSOD\ ball  KHUH´ Andy  Kirkaldy  may  be  reached  at   andyk@addisonindependent.com.  

No  hitter (Continued  from  Page  18) jacikâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  three-­run  shot  over  the  left-­ FHQWHU IHQFH $LQHV WKHQ ¿QLVKHG her   no-­hitter   by   striking   out   the   VLGHLQWKH¿IWK The  Otters  appear  to  be  one  Di-­ vision   IIâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   top   teams.   Their   only   losses   came   early   on   to   strong   ',VTXDGVZKHQWKH\ZHUHVKRUW-­ KDQGHGDQGUHFHQWO\DW0RXQW

Score BOARD

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Lacrosse 5/7  MUHS  Girls  vs.  CVU  ...................18-­8 5/7  Rice  vs.  Mt.  Abe  Boys  .................13-­6 5/7  MUHS  Boys  vs.  Essex  ................15-­7 5/7  Stowe  vs.  VUHS  Boys  .................16-­1 5/8  MUHS  Girls  vs.  BFA  ......... 16-­15  (OT) 5/9  MUHS  Boys  vs.  Colchester  .......14-­10 5/10  MUHS  Girls  vs.  S.  Burlington  ......9-­8 5/10  Burlington  vs.  VUHS  Boys  ........16-­5 5/10  Harwood  vs.  Mt.  Abe  Boys  ......14-­10 Softball 5/8  Mt.  Abe  vs.  Missisquoi  ...................5-­2 5/8  MUHS  vs.  Spaulding  .....................7-­6 5/8  VUHS  vs.  Milton  ..........................13-­3 5/9  OV  vs.  Mill  River  ..........................27-­0 0W$EHDW0W0DQV¿HOG  Ppd.  to  5/12 5/10  MUHS  at  Essex  ............ Ppd.  to  5/12 5/10  VUHS  at  Spaulding  .................. Ppd.   Baseball 5/7  OV  vs.  Leland  &  Gray  .................18-­3 5/8  Mt.  Abe  vs.  Missisquoi  .................14-­8 5/8  Spaulding  vs.  MUHS  .....................1-­0 5/8  Mill  River  vs.  OV  ............................8-­1 0W$EHDW0W0DQV¿HOG  Ppd.  to  5/12 5/10  MUHS  at  Essex  ............ Ppd.  to  5/12 Tennis 5/8  St.  Albans  vs.  MUHS  Girls  ............5-­2 5/8  St.  Albans  vs.  MUHS  Boys  ............7-­0 5/9  Brattleboro  vs.  OV  Girls  ................7-­0 COLLEGE SPORTS Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lacrosse NCAA D-­III Tournament 5/10  Midd.  vs.  Endicott  ......................19-­7 Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennis NCAA D-­III Tournament 5/9  Midd.  vs.  Babson  ...........................5-­0 5/10  Midd.  vs.  Williams  .......................5-­2 Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tennis NCAA D-­III Tournament 5/10  Midd.  vs.  College  of  N.J.    ............5-­0 5/11  Midd.  vs.  Bowdoinâ&#x20AC;¦â&#x20AC;¦â&#x20AC;¦â&#x20AC;¦â&#x20AC;¦â&#x20AC;¦â&#x20AC;¦..2-­5


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  21

Middlebury goes mobile

h e t W f o eek t Pe

Go with it! Featuring all of Addison Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s finest â?&#x2013;Restaurants & Shops â?&#x2013; â?&#x2013;Events & Attractions â?&#x2013; â?&#x2013;News Briefs â?&#x2013; â?&#x2013;Sports Schedules â?&#x2013; â?&#x2013;College News â?&#x2013; â?&#x2013;Nearby Locations â?&#x2013;

Meet

o o D y b Scoo

and his special little friend Halle

Hi, Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Scooby Doo and I live with my human mother, Betty,

or, with any web-enabled smartphone: www.mobimidd.mobi Brought to you by the

Addison Independent Powered  by Powered  by  Route  802

in Lincoln. I am about 14 years old. Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t let my age fool you, though; you should see me run. I am super fast! A big part of my day is spent being on the wrong side of the door. I just canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t make up my mind whether I should be on the outside or inside. We really need a full-time doorman or woman. I love when my little friend and her mom come to visit. Those girls

give me great petting and good loving. I also sneak downstairs to visit my friends Patty and Shorty for extra attention. My best daily routine is loving my mom in her recliner while I rest on the fleece blanket on her lap. Michelle Hall Lincoln

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to include your pet as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pet of the Weekâ&#x20AC;? simply include your petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, gender, addisonindependent.com, or pop a photo in the mail to us at Addison Independent, Pet Page, 58 approximate age (if you know it), and any particular stories or incidents you might like to share Maple St., Middlebury, Vt., 05753, or email a high-resolution jpeg to news@addisonindependent.com. concerning your pet. Email a high resolution digital or scanned photo w ith your story to news@ Just include a return name and address with the submitted photo. All photos will be returned.

PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUNDâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hi!  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   Axel.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   a   young,   handsome,   smart   and   friendly   boy!   Because   of   my   youth   , ZRXOG JUHDWO\ EHQHÂżW IURP lots   of   exercise   and   nice   long   walks.   I   have   the   makings   of   an  awesome  hiking  buddy  who   would  love  to  curl  up  with  you  at   the  end  of  a  nice  long  day. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   simply   a   happy   and   sweet   boy   who   would   happily   welcome   you   home   each   and   every  day!  

Addison Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Humane Society

Hi  there!  We  are  Henry  and   Paco,  a  pair  of  handsome  and   sweet   sounding     3-­year   old   cockatiels.  We  are  stunning  to   look   at   and   make   really   cool   noises.  We  greatly  enjoy  each   others   company   as   well   as   the   company   of   people.   We   are   very   curious   and   enjoy   interacting  with  people.  We  are   really  fun  to  watch!  How  about   adding   some   color   to   your   family?

Hi!  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   Bentley.   Arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   I   handsome?   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   smart   and   affectionate  too!   In   my   previous   home,   I   have  lived  with  dogs,  cats  and   children   6   years   of   age   and   older.   Because   of   my   youth   and   breed,   I   would   greatly   EHQHÂżW IURP ORWV RI H[HUFLVH and   some   basic   obedience   lessons.  I  can  be  a  bit  shy  at   ÂżUVW EXW RQFH , JHW WR NQRZ you,   I   will   make   a   loving   and   loyal  canine  companion.  

%RDUGPDQ6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;&DOORUFKHFNRXUZHEVLWH:HPD\KDYHDSHWIRU\RXZZZKRPHZDUGERXQGDQLPDOVRUJ


PAGE  22  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Woofstock  returns  to  Basin  Harbor FERRISBURGH   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Homeward   Bound:  Addison  Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Humane   Society,   in   partnership   with   Basin   Harbor   Club   in   Ferrisburgh   for   the  second  year  in  a  row,  will  hold   its   largest   annual   fundraiser   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Woofstock   2014   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   on   Saturday,   May  17,  from  9  a.m.  to  3  p.m. The  event,  held  at  Basin  Harbor,   will  begin  with  a  3K  Fun  Run  and   Walk   and   a   5K   Run   and   will   be   followed   by   various   dog   demon-­ strations   (Dock   Dogs,   Disc   Dogs,   K-­9   protection,   doggie   dancing,   Meet   the   Breed,   Water   Rescue   Dogs),   a   doggie   kissing   contest,  

Lake  Champlain  boat  rides,  a  silent   auction,   artists   and   other   vendors,   and   great   food.   The   day   will   be   emceed  by  Addison  Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  own   Bruce   &   Hobbes.   This   will   be   a   full  day  of  family  and  dog  friendly   activities,   and   will   help   support   the   animals   awaiting   their   forever   homes. Homeward  Bound  invites  every-­ one   to   grab   their   pooches   and   pound  the  pavement  to  raise  funds   for   the   animals.   Registration   for   the  runners/walkers  begins  at  7:30   a.m.   and   the   Run/Walk   starts   at   9   a.m.   when   the   festival   opens.  

Walkers  can   pick   up   registration   and   pledge   forms   at   the   shelter.   Walk-­in   registrations   are   also   accepted.   Basin   Harbor   Club   is   a   dog-­friendly   resort   and   is   offer-­ ing   special   room   rates   for   the   Woofstock   2014   weekend.   Find   out  more  at  www.basinharbor.com   or  call  802-­475-­2311. Woofstock   2014   organizers   WKDQN WKH IROORZLQJ ³¿YHSDZ sponsorsâ&#x20AC;?   for   their   support:   The   Dock   Doctors,   Laberge   Insurance   Agency,  the  Addison  Independent,   Lawson   and   Clint   Allen,   PETCO   Foundation  and  WCAX.

JOIN US THESE THURSDAY NIGHTS MAY 15, JUNE 12 JULY 10 & AUGUST 7 $3 OTTER CREEK AND SHED PINTS PLUS DOOR PRIZES

CACKLINâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  HENS  CLASSES Need  a  summer  activity?   Gather  up  your  kids  and  their   friends  and  schedule  a  time  at   Cacklinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Hens:  A  Vermont  Yarn,   Beads  &  Gift  Emporium  at  383   Exchange  Street  in  Middlebury.   Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  teach  the  activity  be  it  a   wrap  bracelet,  a  memory  wire   bracelet,  knitting  or  another   activity!  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  like  school  in  the   summer  but  more  fun.  More   DQGPRUHKHDOWKRIÂżFLDOVDQG teachers  are  supporting  the   learning  of  crafts  to  keep  the   brain  active.  Working  with  your   hands  and  reading  instruction  at   the  same  time  works  both  sides   of  the  brain,  not  to  mention   when  the  project  is  completed,   the  sense  of  accomplishment   one  feels.  Check  out  their   newest  beading  design  that   can  be  adapted  for  bracelets,   necklaces,  children  or  adults!   For  more  information  call   802-­388-­2221  or  visit  www. cacklinhens.com.

Participants  engage  in   multi-­activity  wilderness   adventures  including  canoeing   and  kayaking,  mountain   ELNLQJĂ&#x20AC;\ÂżVKLQJJHRFDFKLQJ river-­tubing,  and  rock  climbing.   Each  of  our  camps  provide   imaginative  and  unforgettable   journeys  in  some  of  the   most  beautiful  backcountry   wilderness  areas  in  and  around   the  Green  Mountains.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   love  to  have  you  join  us  this   summer!  For  all  camps,  a  $100   non-­refundable  deposit  is  due   at  the  time  of  registration.  Day   camps  run  from  9  a.m.  to  4  p.m.   Pick  up/Drop  off  at  Middlebury   Mountaineer,  2  Park  Street   Middlebury,  VT  05753.   www.mmvt.com  for  more   information  or  call  Steve  at  the   Mountaineer  802-­388-­7245.

LAKE  CHAMPLAIN   MARITIME  MUSEUM Starting  on  June  22nd  ten   students  from  the  Champlain   Valley  ages  13-­16  will  build   GREEN  MOUNTAIN   their  own  17â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  sea  kayaks   ADVENTURES and  then  embark  on  a   Now  in  our  16th  season,  Green   10-­day  voyage  of  a  lifetime.   Mountain  Adventures  offers  a   Participants  in  the  Lake   variety  of  outdoor  adventure   Champlain  Maritime  Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   day  camps  uniquely  designed  to   Champlain  Discovery  program   safely  lead  children  and  young   will  paddle  from  Whitehall,   adults  (age  6-­15)  into  the  vast   New  York  transiting  Lock  #12   playground  of  rocks,  rivers,   on  the  Champlain  Canal  and   and  mountains  surrounding  our   paddle  to  Burlington,  Vermont.   (Continued  on  next  page) Central  Vermont  community.  

TAKE A SUMMER CLASS! Round up your friends and schedule a Beading Class! Learn to Knit Saturdays Call for sign-â&#x20AC;?up!  -`KPIVOM;\5QLLTMJ]ZaÂ&#x152;




Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  23

Green Mountain Adventures Kids Camp 2014 (Continued  from  previous  page)

They  will  experience  sites  of   cultural  and  natural  history  as   they  challenge  themselves  in   new  and  positive  ways.  The   program  culminates  when   they  land  in  Burlington  on  the   morning  of  July  26th  and  are   welcomed  back  to  their  worlds   by  family  and  friends.  The   Maritime  Museum  is  accepting   applications  for  the  Champlain   Discovery  program.  Call   802-­475-­2022,  or  email  nickp@ lcmm.org  for  information  and   an  application  or  check  out  the   web-­site  www.lcmm.org.

some  â&#x20AC;&#x153;traditionsâ&#x20AC;?  of  Vermont   and  summer  will  be  honored:   VZLPPLQJÂżHOGWULSVFUDIWV sports,  theatre  and  camping.   Information  can  be  obtained  via   e-­mail  at  schoolage@mjccvt. org  or  by  calling  802-­388-­2853,   and  speaking  with  School  Age   Programs  Coordinator.

OTTER  CREEK  WILDLIFE   RESCUE Hundreds  of  orphaned   and  injured  wild  birds  and   mammals  need  help  each   year.  Licensed  Wildlife   Rehabilitators  are  trained  to   aid  our  feathered  and  furred   MARY  JOHNSON   friends,  and  properly  release   CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  CENTER   them  back  into  the  wild.   School  age  summer  camps  will   Campers  learn  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  involved,   offer  a  wide  range  of  summer   focusing  on  Vermont  species,   experiences.  Relaxing  is   how  we  can  help  them  thrive   combined  with  many  inviting   in  nature,  and  meet  their  needs   choices  on  a  daily  basis.  The   when  in  trouble.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  create   professional  staff  facilitates  a   nurturing  habitats  for  rehab   program  geared  to  the  needs   DQLPDOVSUHSDUHIRRGÂżQGLGHDO of  this  energized  5-­12  year-­old   release  spots  and  enjoy  summer   age  group.  Balancing  the   activities  like  swimming,   kid-­friendly  individual  choices,  

hiking,  gardening,  music,   crafts,  sports,  and  picnics.   Regulations  prevent  contact   with  wildlife  in  rehab.  Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   share  our  days  with  affectionate   domestic  animals,  both  babies   and  adults,  learning  to  raise   and  care  for  them.  (This  is  how   many  top  rehabbers  begin!)   Come  join  us  for  a  grand   adventure!  For  information  &   registration:  jsp@gmavt.net  or   802-­759-­3148.

Paddling Rock Climbing Hiking Mountain Biking Geocaching Tubing Fly Fishing

Sponsored by

Day Camps for kids 6-15 years old

16 years experience bringing kids into the outdoors For more information call Steve 388-7245 or www.mmvt.com

REALITY  BALLET  CAMP:   BALLET  DE-­MYSTIFIED Get  off  on  the  right  foot  with   a  fresh,  grass-­roots,  look   at  Ballet  for  the  budding   ballerina  as  well  as  for  those   who  might  have  once  had  a   dream  but  life  got  in  the  way.   Learn  the  truth  behind  the   shoes,  the  tutu,  the  history,  and   the  practice.  For  beginning   dancers  ages  10  through  adult.   For  more  information  and   registration  call  Patty  Smith  at   802-­623-­6629.

email us:

You can reach us at

news@addisonindependent.com

Mary  Johnson  Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Center www.mjccvt.org

 Celebrate  Summer  2014

Full-­â&#x20AC;?Day  Camps  for  School  Age  Children  and  Youth Licensed  Vermont  Programs  

SUMMER DAY CAMPS

at OTTER CREEK WILDLIFE RESCUE Learn about Vermont wildlife, build animal care skills, and enjoy summer adventures: swimming, hiking, picnics, new friends, etc. Mon-Fri 9-4 in ADDISON (childcare options until 5:30 by request) additional free pick-up/drop-off site in Charlotte

Choose your dates: Ages 6-11: July 14-18 & July 28-Aug 1 Ages 11-14: June 23-27 & July 21-25

For information & registration: jsp@gmavt.net or 802-759-3148

ĹŻĆľÄ?Ć?Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?ĹśÇ&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺ˝Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ä&#x161;ĆľÄ?Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2022;žƾĆ?Ĺ?Ä?Í&#x2022;Ć?Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2022;ŽƾĆ&#x161;Ä&#x161;ŽŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2020;Ć&#x2030;ĹŻĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2022; Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĹľÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ć?Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ć?Í&#x2022;Ä?ŽŽŏĹ?ĹśĹ?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ć?Í&#x2022;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152; within  full-­â&#x20AC;?day  care  programming

Dates:  June  23rd-­â&#x20AC;?August  8th Hours:  7:45  a.m.  through  5:30  p.m.    Monday-­â&#x20AC;?Friday  (no  July  4th) Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x161;ŽůÍ&#x2022;DĹ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä?ĆľĆ&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022;^Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹŹĆ?Ä?Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Í&#x2022;sÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ŜŜÄ&#x17E;Ć? :ĆľĆ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x161;ĨŽĆ&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć?Ä&#x17E;Ç Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ä?ŽžĆ&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ĹŹĹ?ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽƾĹ?Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ĺ?Ç&#x2020; ZÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;dĆľĹ?Ć&#x;ŽŜ^ĆľÄ?Ć?Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ç&#x2021;/ŜĨŽĆ&#x152;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜ â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  available  upon  request  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   ^Ĺ?Ä?ĹŻĹ?ĹśĹ?Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ć?Ä?ŽƾŜĆ&#x161;ŽčÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161; Enrollment/Deposit  Deadline  May  1st &Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹŻĆ?Í&#x2022;Ä?ŽŜĆ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x161;Í&#x2014; ŜŜÄ&#x17E;'ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć?ŽŜÍ&#x2022;^Ä?Ĺ&#x161;ŽŽůĹ?Ä&#x17E;WĆ&#x152;Ĺ˝Ĺ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ?ŽŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152; 802-­â&#x20AC;?388-­â&#x20AC;?2853 E-­â&#x20AC;?Mail:  schoolage@mjccvt.org   D:Ď´Ď­tÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;^Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;DĹ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä?ĆľĆ&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022;sdϏϹϳϹϯ


PAGE  24  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

SALON & SPA To place an ad for your

Spa  at  Indulge

Salon or Spa, please call Sarah at

Body,  Mind  &  Soul

388-4944 or email: sarahf@ addisonindependent.com

Â&#x153;ÂŞĹ&#x192;Â&#x17D;ÂĄÂ&#x201C;Â&#x161;Â&#x2018;á&#x20AC;&#x201C;

Facials Â&#x201C;Â&#x152;ÂĄÂ&#x153;ÂŻÂ&#x153;Â&#x161;Â&#x17D;¤¢Â&#x17D;Â&#x160;¤Â&#x2122;Â&#x17D;Â&#x161;¤£ Â&#x2013;Â&#x201C;Â&#x161;Â&#x160;ÂĄÂ&#x17D;Â&#x153;Â&#x161;ÂŁÂŚÂ&#x2014;¤Â&#x160;¤Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â&#x161;ÂŁ

ALYCEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S

HAIR STYLING

Waxing &  SPRAY  TANNING

Now Open! Looking forward to seeing you!

Contact  Leigh

11  Â&#x160;ÂŁÂ&#x2019;Â&#x201C;Â&#x161;Â&#x2018;ÂĽÂ&#x153;Â&#x161;¤¢Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;¤

Â&#x201C;Â?Â?Â&#x2014;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;ÂŚÂĄÂŽá&#x20AC;&#x2018;

388-­4217

0DH&OLII&RXUWÂ&#x2021;0LGGOHEXU\

FIND US ON

acebook

802-­â&#x20AC;?282-­â&#x20AC;?1903 Â?Â&#x160; Â&#x161;Â?ÂŚÂ&#x2014;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;¨¤á &#x;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2122;Â&#x160;Â&#x201C;Â&#x2014;á&#x20AC;&#x201D;Â&#x152;Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;

facebook.com/ addisonindependent twitter.com/addyindy

Meeting  solicits  input  on   improving  city  experience VERGENNES   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Through   the   Community   Visit   process   Vergennes   community   members   have   settled   on   three   areas   in   which   to   build   new   initiatives   to   improve  the  city. Later  this  month,   some   of   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   top   experts   in   those  areas  will  visit  the  city  for  a   Resource   Meeting,   at   which   they   will   work   with   citizens   to   set   up   action   plans   to   make   these   goals   possible. The   meeting,   scheduled   for   Wednesday,  May  21,  from  6:30  to  9   p.m.  at  the  Bixby  Memorial  Library,   is   the   next   step   in   the   Vermont   Council   on   Rural   Developmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   (VCRD)   Community   Visit   to   Vergennes   that   began   with   public   forums   in   March.   At   the   second   meeting  on  April  18,  over  100  resi-­ dents   whittled   down   a   number   of   opportunities   for   the   community   into  three  task  force  action  areas: Â&#x2021; ,PSURYH WUDQVSRUWDWLRQ DQG parking Â&#x2021; $GYDQFH WKH 9HUJHQQHV HFRQ-­ omy   and   expand   the   community   and  economic  development  capac-­ ity  of  the  city Â&#x2021; 5HGHYHORSWKH9HUJHQQHV)DOOV basin  and  open  a  riverwalk The   Resource   Meeting   repre-­ sents   the   third   phase   in   the   program,   when   action   area   work   plans   are   developed.   On   May   21,   VCRD   will   bring   a   new   team   of  

facilitators  to  work  with  each  task   force.   So   far,   the   members   of   that   team   include   Brian   Searles   of   the   Agency   of   Transportation;Íž   Adam   Lougee   of   the   Addison   County   Regional   Planning   Commission;Íž   Lucy   Leriche   of   the   Agency   of   Commerce   &   Community   Development;Íž   Robin   Scheu   of   the   Addison   County   Economic   Development   Corp.;Íž   Ted   Brady   of   the   USDA   Rural   Development;Íž   Bill   LaBergeManchester   leader   of   the   RiverWalk   development;Íž   7RP%HUU\RI6HQ/HDK\ÂśVRIÂżFH and   David   Raphael,   principle   in   LandWorks,   who   led   the   design   ZRUN IRU WKH 0LGGOHEXU\ )DOOV park. VCRD   Executive   Director   Paul   Costello   said   the   resource   meet-­ ing  will  help  each  task  force  build   a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;concrete  list  of  action  steps  and   LGHQWLI\ ERWK KXPDQ DQG ÂżQDQFLDO resources   available   to   support   those  efforts.â&#x20AC;? All   Vergennes   community   members   are   invited   to   the   meet-­ ing   on   May   21,   whether   or   not   they  have  attended  earlier  sessions   or   to   have   signed   up   in   advance.   Community   members   can   sign   on   WRRQHRIWKH7DVN)RUFHJURXSVLQ advance   by   calling   802-­223-­6091   or   emailing   info@vtrural.org;Íž   or   they   can   come   to   the   meeting   on   the  21st  and  join  a  group  then.


Addison Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  —  PAGE  25


PAGE  26  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

SERVICES DIRECTORY APPLIANCE REPAIR t!

Alexander Appliance Repair Inc. tr

us

v

Se r

yo e ic

n u ca

GAS OR ELECTRIC

Washers Refrigerators Dishwashers Disposals

Dryers Ranges Microwaves Air Conditioners

$FMMt0GmDF

Jack Alexander

#SJHHT)JMMr#SJTUPM 75

BOARDING

Dog Obedience & Agility

MASONRY

DENTISTRY â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  try  our  best  to  give  superior   quality  and  comfort. Our  team  cares  about  your   dental  health.â&#x20AC;?

F��� D�� S���� M������ J���� M��������

Thomas  A.  Coleman,  D.D.S.

C�������� �� ��� D�� S���� W������ A���������� �� G���� B������

Ayrshire  Professional  Building 5  Carver  Street   Brandon,  VT  05733

802-233-4670

(802)  247-­3336

jmasefield@gmavt.net www.jamiemasefield.com

www.drtomcoleman.com

EQUIPMENT RENTALS

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

40  TYPES  OF  RENTAL  EQUIPMENT  TO  CHOOSE  FROM

Dave Ringer

Â&#x2021;PDWHULDOIRUNOLIWV Â&#x2021;H[FDYDWRUV Â&#x2021;EXOOGR]HUV Â&#x2021;PLQLH[FDYDWRUV Â&#x2021;VNLGVWHHUV

Â&#x2021;0DQOLIWVXSWRÂś Â&#x2021;PDQEDVNHWZFUDQH XSWR

Â&#x2021;FRQFUHWHFRPSDFWRUV Â&#x2021;EDFNKRHV

Property Maintenance Lawn Care & Landscaping Driveway Repair Roto-Tilling, Light Excavation Trucking â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Top Soil, Sand & Crushed Stone

Oliver,  Peg  Cobb  and  Ethan

Hand-in-Paw Training & Boarding Kennel

(802) 877-3879

5RXWH&RUQZDOOÂ&#x2021;

www.brownswelding.com 275 South 116, Bristol, Vermont 05443  Â&#x2021;&HOO  

CARPENTRY

FLOOR CARE

PROPERTY MAINTENANCE

Stripping - Waxing - Buffing Carpet Cleaning & Emergency Water Removal

LITTLE VALLEY

17 South Middlebrook Rd. Vergennes, VT 05491

Markâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s R&R

Furniture and Building Repair & Restoration Expertise in restoration of antique wood, stains, paints, and finishes. Careful and fine detail woodworking Attention to original design and function Protection & preservation of original hardware DRESSERS s TABLES s CHESTS s CHAIRS s WINDOWS s DOORS s ARMOIRES s ARCHITECTURAL DETAILS

#ALL FOR ESTIMATES AND FURTHER INFORMATION

802-545-2099 -ARK 3HIFF s 7EYBRIDGE 64 40+ years of experience in historic preservation

DENTISTRY

802-759-2706 phone or fax or

802-349-6050 cell phone

email: cmulliss@gmavt.net 1900 Jersey St., S. Addison, VT 05491

LOCKSMITH

LOCK-­N-­GLASS CRAFTERS Â&#x2DC;1%-41&7%65 Â&#x2DC;'#&$1.65 Â&#x2DC;'8'45n01$5 Â&#x2DC;';'&#.+-'14 -';'&&+(('4'06.;

LANDSCAPING

GENERAL LAWN MAINTENANCE & EXCAVATING

No  job  too  small,  give  us  a  call!

802-­475-­2943 802-­343-­4592 *DU\61RUWRQÂ&#x2021;3DQWRQ97

RENEWABLE ENERGY Soak  Up  The  Sun! Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  spend  your  hard-­earned  money   making  the  hot  water  or  electricity  that   you  use  todayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SOLAR  IS  MORE  AFFORDABLE  THAN  EVER! Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  here  for  you  for  41  years  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   Let  us  help  you  with  your  solar  projects  today.  

Dennis Cassidy 388-­7633 63 Maple Street, Middlebury in the Marble Works

www.middleburysafeandlock.com

Go  Green  with  us. Call  for  a  FREE  on-­site  evaluation


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  27

Energy  (Continued  from  Page  1) The   summit   panel   comes   in   the   1972   and   joined   the   faculty   of   the   wake   of   a   comprehensive   report,   Massachusetts   Institute   of  Technol-­ titled   the   National   Climate  Assess-­ ogy  the  following  year. ment,   released   by   the  White   House   He  served  in  several  science-­relat-­ last   week.   The   report,   comprising   ed   positions   during   the   hundreds   of   pages,   is   Clinton  Administration,   the  culmination  of  years   including   as   the   Under   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have for a of  research  by  scientists   Secretary   of   Energy   long time been across   the   country.   It   from  1997  to  2001. very aggressive posits  that  the  effects  of   Sanders   said   Moniz,   in promoting climate   change   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   such   as   the   Secretary   of   En-­ energy as   rising   temperatures,   ergy,  is  one  of  the  most   increased   precipitation,   LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQWLDO JRYHUQPHQW HIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQF\ more   frequent   droughts   RIÂżFLDOV ZKHQ LW FRPHV In many and  rising  sea  levels  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   to  formulating  policy  to   ways we are are  already  being  felt  in   address  climate  change. FRQVXPLQJOHVV the  United  States. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Along   with   the   energy, despite Sanders,   a   member   director   of   the   Envi-­ of   Senate   committees   HFRQRPLF ronmental   Protection   on   energy   and   the   en-­ Agency,  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  one  of  the   JURZWKÂľ vironment,   said   he   and   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;6HQ Leahy   invited   Moniz   to   most   important   people   Bernie Sanders Vermont   to   showcase   in  the  administration  in   dealing  with  this  issue,â&#x20AC;?   the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  efforts  to  shift   Sanders  said. toward  clean  energy. Moniz   has   said   he   believes   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   for   a   long   time   been   climate   change   is   largely   caused   very  aggressive  in  promoting  energy   my   humans,   and   has   advocated   for   HIÂżFLHQF\´6DQGHUVVDLGÂł,QPDQ\ tighter   regulations   for   greenhouse   ways  we  are  consuming  less  energy,   gas  polluters. despite  economic  growth.â&#x20AC;?

6DQGHUVSUDLVHGWKHZRUNRI(IÂż-­ ciency  Vermont,  a  utility  run  by  the   QRQSURÂżW 9HUPRQW (QHUJ\ ,QYHVW-­ ment   Corp.   that   promotes   energy   HIÂżFLHQF\ WKURXJK WHFKQLFDO DQG Âż-­ nancial  assistance.   Sanders   last   year   guided   federal   funds  to  a  solar  test  center  in  Wil-­ liston,   and   in   2011   helped   secure   $8.5   million   to   install   solar   panels   at  the  Vermont  Air  National  Guard   base  in  South  Burlington. The   senator   said   the   state   has   been   a   leader   in   promoting   solar   energy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anyone   who   drives   around   the   state   sees   an   increasing   number   of   photovoltaic   panels   in   Vermont,â&#x20AC;?   Sanders   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Green   Mountain   Power  has  been  very  aggressive  in   making  Rutland  a  solar  city.â&#x20AC;? Sanders,  along  with  Sen.  Barbara   Boxer,  D-­Calif.,  introduced  legisla-­ tion   in   2013   that   would   fund   im-­ SURYHPHQWVLQHQHUJ\HIÂżFLHQF\E\ implementing  a  tax  on  carbon  emis-­ sions.  Efforts  to  pass  that  and  simi-­ lar  legislation  thus  far  have  failed. Moniz   on   Friday   will   also   visit   Rutland  County.

ORGANIC GREEN HOUSES

9HJHWDEOHDQG)ORZHU3DFNVÂ&#x2021;)LHOG3URYHQ9DULHWLHV

Open Daily 9-5 Â

Herbs,  Hanging  Baskets,  Perennials,   Compost,  Organic  Potting  Mix,  Fertilizer,   Onion  Sets,  Organic  Seed  Potatoes,   and  Johnnyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Seeds

897-7031Â&#x2021;1329 Lapham Bay Rd, Shoreham

www.goldenrussetfarm.com Contact Your U.S. Senators Sen. Patrick Leahy 1-­800-­642-­3193

5XVVHOO6HQDWH2IÂżFH%OGJ :DVKLQJWRQ'& VHQDWRUBOHDK\#OHDK\VHQDWHJRY

Sen. Bernie Sanders 1-­800-­339-­9834

65&8QLWHG6WDWHV6HQDWH :DVKLQJWRQ'& ZZZVDQGHUVVHQDWHJRY

Contact Your U.S. Congressman 5HS3HWHU:HOFKÂ&#x2021;

/RQJZRUWK+RXVH2IÂżFH%XLOGLQJ:DVKLQJWRQ'& ZZZZHOFKKRXVHJRY

SERVICES DIRECTORY ROOFING

STORAGE

roofing Michael Doran

TREE SERVICE Serving  Vermont  &  New  York  for  over  30  years!

BROWNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TREE & CRANE SERVICE Dangerous Trees Cut & Removed Stumps Removed Trusses Set

As  seen  at  Addison  County  Field  Days!

Â&#x2021;6WDQGLQJVHDP Â&#x2021;$VSKDOWVKLQJOHV Â&#x2021;6ODWH )UHHHVWLPDWHVÂ&#x2021;)XOO\,QVXUHG

FREE  ESTIMATES   FOR  TREE   SERVICES

Trees Trimmed Crane Service Grain Bins Set

5HDVRQDEOH5DWHVÂ&#x2021;<HDUURXQG6HUYLFHÂ&#x2021;)XOO\,QVXUHG

 Â&#x2021;&HOO  

Phone (802) 537-3555

+RXU(PHUJHQF\6HUYLFH

%URZQVZHOGLQJFRP

SEPTIC

STORAGE

TREE SERVICE

Storage  Units  Available! Boat,  Car  &  R.V.  Storage TANK  &  CESSPOOL  PUMPING ELECTRONIC  TANK  LOCATING TANK  &  LEACH  FIELD  INSPECTIONS CAMERA  INSPECTIONS NEW  SYSTEMS  INSTALLED ALL  SEPTIC  SYSTEM  REPAIRS DRAIN  &  PIPE  CLEANING Full   Excavation Service Middlebury,  VT

Climate  Control   Coming  Soon!  

U-­Haul Box  Dealer

NEW  HAVEN SELF  STORAGE

Now  owned  by  Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Auto  &  Towing 2877  ETHAN  ALLEN  HWY.  (RT.7) 1(:+$9(197Â&#x2021;  

REACH THE COUNTY, PLACE YOUR AD IN THE ADDISON INDEPENDENT. CALL 388-4944


PAGE  28  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Notice

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

DOG  TEAM   CATERING.   Seating   up   to   300,   plus   bar   available,   Middlebury   VFW.   Full   menus.   802-­388-­4831,   www.dogteamcatering.net.

ADULT  ALL-­RECOVERY   Group   Meeting   for   anyone   over  18  who  is  struggling  with   addiction  disorders.  Tuesdays,   3-­4  p.m.  at  the  Turning  Point   Center.  A  great  place  to  meet   with  your  peers  who  are  in  re-­ covery.  Bring  a  friend  in  recov-­ ery.  For  info  call  802-­388-­4249   or  802-­683-­5569  or  visit  www. turningpointaddisonvt.org.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   NORTH   FERRISBURGH   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   Daily   Reflections  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   PM,  at  the  United  Methodist   Church,  Old  Hollow  Rd.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   WEDNESDAY:   Big   Book   Meeting   7:15-­8:15   AM   is   held  at  the  Middlebury  United   Methodist  Church  on  N.  Pleas-­ ant  Street.  Discussion  Meet-­ ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting  5:30-­6:30  PM.  Both   held   at   The   Turning   Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   NEW   HAVEN   MEETINGS:   Monday,   Big   Book   Meeting   7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the  Congre-­ gational  Church,  New  Haven   Village  Green.

FRENCH  TEENS  NEED  FAM-­ ILIES   now   for   this   summer.   Adopt  a  French  teen  3  weeks   this   summer.   Great   cultural   experience.   Students   bring   own  spending  money  and  are   insured.  Families  are  compen-­ sated  $150  weekly.  Email  Kim   today   at   facehill@comcast. net  or  visit  our  web  site,  www. LEC-­USA.com.  Please  help.   Merci  beaucoup.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   FRIDAY:  Discussion  Meeting   Noon-­1:00  PM  at  The  Turning   Point   in   The   Marbleworks,   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Middlebury. MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   SATURDAY:   Discussion   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Meeting  9:00-­10:00  AM  at  the   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   Middlebury  United  Methodist   THURSDAY:  Big  Book  Meet-­ Church.   Discussion   Meeting   ing   Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   10:00-­11:00   AM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Turning   Point   Center   in   the   PARTY   RENTALS;   CHI-­ Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Be-­ Marbleworks,   Middlebury.   NA,   flatware,   glassware,   ginnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Meeting   6:30-­7:30   Speaker   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   linens.   Delivery   available.   PM.   These   three   meetings   PM  at  St.  Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,   802-­388-­4831. are  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Main  St.(On  the  Green). Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Cards  of  Thanks

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   THANKS  HOLY  FATHER  and   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   St.  Jude  for  prayers  answered.   MONDAY:   As   Bill   Sees   It   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM.   Big   V.B. Book  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.   Both  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Services

Services

Services

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   TUESDAY:   11th   Step   Meet-­ ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  ALATEEN   Group.  Both  held  at  Turning   Point,   228   Maple   Street.   12   Step  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.   12   Step   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   PM.  Both  held  at  The  Turning   Point  Center  in  The  Marble-­ works,  Middlebury. ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   SUNDAY:   12   Step   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   held   at   the   Middlebury  United  Methodist   Church  on  N.  Pleasant  Street.   Discussion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00   PM  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   VERGENNES   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.   Friday,   Dis-­ cussion   Meeting   8:00-­9:00   PM.   Both   held   at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church,   Park   St.   Tuesday,   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Discussion  Meeting  7:00-­8:00   RIPTON   MEETINGS:   Mon-­ PM,   at   the   Congregational   day,   As   Bill   Sees   It   Meet-­ Church,  Water  St. ing  7:15-­8:15  AM.  Thursday,   Grapevine  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   ARE   YOU   BOTHERED   BY   PM.  Both  held  at  Ripton  Fire-­ someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drinking?   Open-­ house,  Dugway  Rd. ing   Our   Hearts   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Al-­Anon   Group   meets   each   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Wednesday   at   7:15   p.m.   at   BRANDON   MEETINGS:   the   Turning   Point   Center   in   Monday,  Discussion  Meeting   the  Marbleworks  in  Middlebury   7:30-­8:30   PM.   Wednesday,   (NEW  LOCATION  beginning   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   February   12th).  Anonymous   PM.  Friday,  12  Step  Meeting   and   confidential,   we   share   7:00-­8:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   our  experience,  strength  and   St.  Thomas  Episcopal  Church,   hope   to   solve   our   common   RT  7  South. problems. ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   BRISTOL  MEETINGS:  Sun-­ day,   Discussion   Meeting   4:00-­5:00   PM.   Wednesday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.  Friday,  Big  Book  Meeting,   6:00-­7:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   Federated  Church,  Church  St.

Services

Services

Services

Front Desk Attendant The Town of Middlebury is seeking a volunteer to serve as a Front Desk Attendant for the Parks and Recreation Department this Summer. Responsibilities include: Answering the l]d]h`gf]$ Ă&#x161;daf_ hYh]jogjc$ j]_akl]jaf_ hjg_jYe hYjla[a% pants, handling cash and organizing recreation equipment. Applicant must be at least 16 years old. Full training, supervision and background checks will be provided. Please call 388-7044 for more information. Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r i s a c o l l a b o rat i o n b e t we e n RSV P a n d t h e Un i te d Way o f Addi s o n C o u n t y. P le a s e c a l l 388-7044 t o f i n d o u t mo re a b o u t t h e doze n s o f v o l u n te e r o pp o r t u n i t ie s t h at a re c u r re n t l y av a i l a ble .

Jen  Lathrop,  of  Bristol,  was   one   of   700   community   members   who  participated  in  the  2013  Days   of  Caring.    Jen,  who  works  at  Coun-­ try  Home  Products  and  also  volun-­ teers  with  the  Scouts,  spent  the  day   at   the   Town   of   Middlebury   Rec   Park  pruning  trees  and  clearing  out   an   interpretive   trail   behind   Mary   Hogan  Elementary  School.    When   asked  what  she  enjoyed  most  about   volunteering,   Jen   replied   that   she   loves   â&#x20AC;&#x153;doing   good   for   others   and   getting   outside.â&#x20AC;?     Thank   you   Jen,   for  helping  out!

RATES

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM Â&#x2021; Â&#x201E;SHUZRUGÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPSHUDG Â&#x2021; LQWHUQHWOLVWLQJIRUXSWRLVVXHVÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPLQVHUWLRQV &DVK LQ RQ RXU IRU UDWHV 3D\ IRU  LVVXHV JHW WK LVVXH IUHH ([DPSOH $ ZRUG DG LV MXVW  $Q DG SODFHG IRU FRQVHFXWLYH LVVXHV 0RQGD\V  7KXUV GD\V  LV UXQ WK WLPH IUHH &RVW LV  IRU  LVVXHV LQFOXGHV   LQWHUQHW FKDUJH 6SHFLDO  IRU  UDWHV QRW YDOLG IRU WKH IROORZLQJ FDWHJRULHV +HOS :DQWHG 6HUYLFHV 2SSRUWXQLWLHV 5HDO (VWDWH :RRG KHDW $WWQ )DUPHUV  )RU 5HQW 

Name: Address: Phone: Email:

D E A D L I N E S Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

CATEGORIES Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost & Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities

Work Wanted Public Meetings** For Sale Help Wanted For Rent Want to Rent Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals

Spotlight with large $2

** No charge for these ads

Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted Adoption

Public  Meetings

MAKING  RECOVERY  EAS-­ IER  (MRE).  Starting  January   15,   5:30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  7:00   PM   at   The   Turning  Point  Center.  This  will   be  a  facilitated  group  meeting   for   those   struggling   with   the   decision   to   attend   12-­step   programs.   It   will   be   limited   to  explaining  and  discussing   our  feelings  about  the  12-­step   programs   to   create   a   better   understanding   of   how   they   can  help  a  person  in  recovery   on   his  /  her   lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   journey.   A   certificate  will  be  issued  at  the   end  of  all  the  sessions.  Please   bring  a  friend  in  recovery  who   is  also  contemplating  12-­step   programs. NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:   Mondays,   6pm,   held   at  The  Turning   Point  Center   located  in  The  Marble  Works. NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Fridays,  7:30pm,  held   at   the   Turning   Point   Center   located  in  the  Marble  Works. TEEN   ALL-­RECOVERY   Group   Meeting   for   anyone   15-­18  years  old  who  is  strug-­ gling   with   addiction   disor-­ ders.   Tuesdays,   4-­5   p.m.   at   the   Turning   Point   Center.  A   great  place  to  meet  with  your   peers   who   are   in   recovery.   Bring   a   friend   in   recovery.   For  info  call  802-­388-­4249  or   802-­683-­5569   or   visit   www. turningpointaddisonvt.org.

Services CHAIN  SAW  CHAINS  sharp-­ ened.  Call  802-­759-­2095. CONSTRUCTION:   ADDI-­ TIONS,   RENOVATIONS,   new   construction,   drywall,   carpentry,   painting,   flooring,   roofing,   pressure   washing,   driveway  sealing.  All  aspects   of  construction,  also  property   maintenance.   Steven   Fifield   802-­989-­0009.

ADDISON INDEPENDENT 58 Maple St., Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

The Independent assumes no Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUHUURUV LQDGVEXWZLOOUHUXQWKHDGLQ ZKLFKWKHHUURURFFXUHGDWQR FKDUJH1RUHIXQGVZLOOEHPDGH $GYHUWLVHUVZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\XVRI DQ\HUURUVQRWHG

1XPEHURIZRUGV &RVW RIUXQV 6SRWOLJKW&KDUJH ,QWHUQHW/LVWLQJ 727$/




Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  29

Addison Independent

Help  Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS Services

Garage  Sales

Help  Wanted

FREE  PREGNANCY  TESTS   AVAILABLE  at  Caring  Hearts   Pregnancy   Center.   Call   802-­388-­7272  for  an  appoint-­ ment.   Located   at   102   Court   Street,  Suite  B  in  Middlebury.   We  are  the  upstairs  office.

W E Y B R I D G E  S T R E E T   TAG   SALE,   Saturday,   May   17,   9am-­3pm.   Weybridge   Street   (Rte   23)   opposite   Otter   Creek   Child   Center.   Great   stuff,   seven   families.   Furniture,  antiques,  bookcase,   books,   foosball   table,   dog   crates,  brand-­name  clothing,   records,  hardware,  tools,  tod-­ dler  clothing  /  toys,  brand-­name   adult  clothes,  quilts,  outdoor   dog   pens,   vintage   clothing,   Amerigo  saddle,  Wintec  sad-­ dle,   horse  /  pony   goods,   crib   bedding,   crib   with   matching   dresser   and   changing   table,   rocking  horse,  kitchenwares,   crock   pot,   tons   of   toddler  /   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clothes   and   toys,   bicycles,  Crate  &  Barrel  dish   set,   new   teen   clothing,   old   kerosene   lamps,   wall   clock,   sail   with   12â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   mast   and   rig-­ ging,  birdseye  maple  rocker,   new   towels   and   sheets,   golf   clubs,  nice  luggage,  toy  stor-­ age   unit,   chest   oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   drawers,   window-­pane   mirrors,   large   rugs,  rocking  horse,  kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  table   and  chair  set,  iron.

ACCEPTING  APPLICATIONS   FOR   the   2014   landscaping   and  lawn  care  season.  Land-­ scape  laborer  and  lawn  care   experience   a   must.   Wage   based  on  skills.  Clean  driving   record,  reliable  transportation.   Please  respond  with  resume   and  contact  information  on  our   website  within  the  contact  sec-­ tion:  rainbowacreslandscape. com

F U L L  S E RV I C E   T R E E   REMOVAL.   Stump   grind-­ ing,   firewood.   In   Leicester.   802-­282-­9110.



LAWN  MOWING  AND  spring   clean-­ups;  lawn  raking,  debris   cleanup   from   snow   plowing.   Brush   trimming,   hedge   trim-­ ming,   power   washing,   light   trucking.   Small   carpentry   jobs,   property   maintenance   and  repairs.  Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Property   Management,   Leicester,   VT.   Fully  insured.  Call  for  a  free   estimate,  802-­349-­6579. LOGGING,   LAND   CLEAR-­ ING,   forest   management.   Highest   rate   on   all   timber.   Double   rates   on   low   grade   chip  wood.  518-­643-­9436.

MB  CONSTRUCTION.   AS-­ PHALT  SHINGLES,  corrugat-­ Work  Wanted ed  metal.  Roof  repairs.  Free   estimates.   Insured.   Michael   RETIRED   DAD   WITH   one   Berard.  802-­324-­2013. ton  pick  up  truck  and  helper   looking  for  truck  hauling  jobs;   R O T O T I L L I N G   &   errands  of  any  kind.  Call  for   BRUSH-­HOGGING.   Ron   more  info,  802-­453-­4235. Stevens  802-­462-­3784.

Free

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

NORTHLANDS  JOB  CORPS  

ADMINISTRATIVE/CLERICAL We  have   ongoing   and   periodic   need   for   a   variety   of   entry   level   administrative/clerical   positions.     All   positions   require   computer   VNLOOV JHQHUDO RI¿FH VNLOOV attention   to   detail,   and   ability   to   work  as  part  of  a  team.   Apply  to:  

northlandshumanresources@ jobcorps.gov  Equal  Opportunity  Employer  Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

NORTHLANDS  JOB  CORPS

Independent  Living  Advisor Counsels   and   guides   students   in   assigned   dorms   on   attitude,   behavior,  and  interpersonal  relations   with  others.    Provides  students  with   training   in   independent   living   and   leadership  skills.    Apply  to:  

northlandshumanresources@ jobcorps.gov  Equal  Opportunity  Employer  Female/Minority/Disabled/Veteran

HIGHWAY  MAINTAINENCE  WORKER The   Town   of   Bristol LV VHHNLQJ WR ¿OO   a   vacancy   in   its   Road   Department.     $SSOLFDQWV PXVW SRVVHVV D YDOLG 9HUPRQW GULYHUœVOLFHQVHDQGKLJKVFKRROGLSORPDRU HTXLYDOHQW$YDOLG&'/OLFHQVHLVSUHIHUUHG RU PXVW EH REWDLQHG ZLWKLQ VL[ PRQWKV RI HPSOR\PHQW  5HVLGHQF\ LQ %ULVWRO RU WKH LPPHGLDWHDUHDLVDOVRUHTXLUHG(VVHQWLDO GXWLHVLQYROYHDOODVSHFWVRIWRZQKLJKZD\ PDLQWHQDQFH LQFOXGLQJ GULYLQJ D GXPS WUXFN RSHUDWLQJ ZLQWHU SORZ HTXLSPHQW RSHUDWLQJKHDY\HTXLSPHQWDQGPDFKLQHU\ PHFKDQLFDO ZRUN DQG JHQHUDO ODERU  7KLV LV D IXOOWLPH \HDUURXQG SRVLWLRQ ZLWK H[FHOOHQW EHQH¿WV DQG ORQJ ZLQWHU KRXUV 6WDUWLQJSD\RIWRGHSHQGLQJ XSRQH[SHULHQFH$SSOLFDWLRQVZLOOEHGXH E\Tuesday,  May  27th.     $Q DSSOLFDWLRQ FDQ EH REWDLQHG RQ RXU ZHEVLWH www.bristolvt.org RU E\ FRPLQJ LQWR WKH 7RZQ 2I¿FH  3OHDVH UHPLW DSSOLFDWLRQVE\PDLOWR7RZQ$GPLQLVWUDWRU 32%R[%ULVWRO97RULQSHUVRQ DW6RXWK6WUHHW%ULVWRO(2(

TRUCK  RACK,   STEEL;   for   full   size   pickup   (off   Dodge).   Call   989-­7334   anytime   after   4pm,  please  leave  message.

Garage  Sales MOVING  SALE.  179  Rolling   Acres,  Middlebury.  Saturday,   May  17  and  Sunday,  May  18,   8-­2pm.  Cash  only. MOVING   SALE.   Saturday,   May  10,  8  a.m.  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  2  p.m.  Fur-­ niture,   collectibles,   dishes,   household   items,   records,   large  vintage  trunk,  antiques.   156   Wild   Turkey   Lane,   Fer-­ risburgh.  Off  Monkton  Rd.  /  Rt.   7  junction,  near  Vergennes. MULTI-­FAMILY   GARAGE   SALE.   466   Mead   Lane   in   Middlebury  rain  or  shine.  Sat.   5/17,   9am-­3pm.   Sun.   5/18,   9am-­2pm.  Household  items,   kids,   outdoor,   clothes   and   more.

Our

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HG $GV:RUN IRU<RX Call 388-4944 to place one!

Vermont Federal Credit Union is a growing financial cooperative in Northwestern Vermont, currently serving over 37,000 members. We are always looking for friendly, selfmotivated individuals who enjoy helping people, have strong communication skills, are detail-oriented and enjoy working as part of a team. If you feel your attributes match our expectations we encourage you to consider a career with us. We offer a competitive compensation and benefits package. Please visit our website for full details of our benefits program. We currently seek to fill the following full-time position(s): Branch Manager â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Middlebury Job Description: This candidate will be responsible for administering all daily operations of assigned branch office(s) in Middlebury and Vergennes, which includes supervising, scheduling, coaching, recruitment, and administering performance evaluations for branch staff. In addition, this candidate will promote and model consultative sales and service culture and is responsible for meeting or exceeding assigned branch deposit and loan goals. As well as ensuring that established policies and procedures are consistently followed and that, members and prospective members are promptly and professionally served. The qualified individual will also be held accountable for ensuring that branch staff successfully build and maintain member relationships by actively uncovering membersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; financial needs and offering solutions to meet those needs. This candidate must be able to handle all functions of the branch office. Lastly, involvement in the community in which the branch office is located is required. Job Requirements: A college degree and two to five years of similar or related experience. A significant level of trust and diplomacy is required, in addition to normal courtesy and tact. Work involves extensive personal contact with others and/or is usually of a personal or sensitive nature. This work may also involve motivating or influencing others. Outside contacts become important and fostering sound relationships with other entities (companies and/or individuals) becomes necessary. Additional skills include proficiency with general office equipment and computers/software.

Red  Mill  Chef Basin   Harbor   Club,   recognized   as   one   of   the   Best   Places   to   Work   in   Vermont  in  2014,  is  currently  accepting  applications  for  a  Red  Mill  Chef.   This  is  a  full-­time  seasonal  position  that  is  available  immediately  and  will   continue  through  October.    Certain  candidates  could  be  eligible  for  on-­ property  housing.     The  Red  Mill  Chef  is  responsible  for  maintaining  operation  of  the  Red  Mill   Kitchen  within  budget.  This  position  reports  to  the  Red  Mill  Manager,  and   is  also  accountable  to  the  Executive  Chef  to  ensure  smooth  operation  of   the  Red  Mill.    This  person  also  serves  as  an  inspirational  role  model  for   KLVKHUVWDIIPHPEHUVDQGLVDWRSSURIHVVLRQDOLQWKH¿HOGZLWKDSDVVLRQ IRUWKHFXOLQDU\DUWV4XDOL¿FDWLRQV\HDUVDWWKHOHYHORI&KHILQDIXOO service,  quality  driven,  volume  restaurant.    Prior  culinary  experience  in   hotels  or  resorts.    Degree  in  culinary  arts  highly  preferred.    Must  be  willing   to  able  to  pass  a  background  check  prior  to  employment.

If you would like to join our growing team, please apply online via our website www.vermontfederal.org

6HDVRQDO (PSOR\HH %HQH¿WV (PSOR\HH PHDOV GXULQJ ZRUN LQ WKH cafeteria  for  $3.00  (includes  hot  buffet,  salad  bar,  sandwich  bar,  dessert,   fruit,  and  drinks).  Free  uniforms.  Employee  discounts  on  lodging,  food,   spa  and  property  activities.    

Vermont Federal Credit Union is an Equal Opportunity Employer

Apply  on  line  at  www.basinharbor.com/jobs Basin  Harbor  Club  is  an  equal  opportunity  employer


PAGE  30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Addison Independent

Help  Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

FAIR  HAVEN  UNION  HIGH   SCHOOL  VACANCY 2014-­2015  SCHOOL  YEAR Special   Education   Teacher/Case   Manager     Full-­time   position   to   work   with   a   diverse   population   of   learners   with   disabilities   in   grades  9-­12.    Experience  working  with  multiple   and   intensive   needs   students,   life   skills   programming   and   familiarity   with   alternative   DVVHVVPHQW SUHIHUUHG   3URSHU FHUWL¿FDWLRQ and   licensure   required.   HQT   requirements   must  be  met.  Start  date  is  August  2014. For  more  information  contact  Chris  Morgan  at   (802)  265-­4966.  Apply  on  www.schoolspring.com 3RVLWLRQZLOOUHPDLQRSHQXQWLO¿OOHG(2( Fair  Haven  Union  High  School  is  a  smoke-­free  environment

  Basin  Harbor  Club,  recognized  as  one  of  the   Best   Places   to   Work   in   Vermont   in   2014,   is   currently   accepting   applications   for   multiple   positions   in   our   Housekeeping   Department.   These   are   full-­time   seasonal   positions   that   will   run   from   May   through   October.     Weekends   and   Holiday   work   is   required.   ,QFOXGHV VHDVRQDO HPSOR\HH EHQH¿WV  $OO positions   require   candidates   to   be   willing   and  able  to  pass  a  background  check  prior  to   employment. Housekeepers:    8AM  to  4:30PM    Responsible  for  the  cleanliness  in  the  guest   rooms,  cottages,  and  Housekeeping  Storage   areas.    Performs  cleaning  tasks  as  assigned   for  the  day,  using  zone  reports  to  determine   the  exact  name  of  the  work  requested  and  to   prioritize  work  assignments. Housepersons:   6:30AM  to  2PM  or  2PM  to  10PM     The   primary   support   of   the   Housekeeping   Department;͞   assists   other   line   staff   in   keeping   the   resort   clean   and   stocked   with   ample  supplies.    Picks  up  and  delivers  linen.   Delivers   supplies   to   housekeeping   work   stations  to  maintain  par  levels.    Delivers  cots   FULEVSRROWRZHOVDQG¿UHZRRG     Both   Housekeepers   and   Housepersons   must  be  cheerful  and  courteous;͞  be  positive   &   up-­beat;͞   be   familiar   with   Basin   Harbor   services  &  programs  and  talk  about  them  at   HYHU\ RSSRUWXQLW\ DQG ZLOO ¿QG DQVZHUV WR any  guest  questions  that  (s)he  is  not  able  to   answer. Room  Inspectors:    8AM  to  4:30PM Room  Inspectors  supervise  the  work  activities   of  cleaning  personnel  to  ensure  clean,  orderly   and   attractive   guest   rooms   and   cottages,   function   rooms   and   public   areas.     This   is   a   hands-­on   position   by   which   one   works   with   departmental   staff   to   accomplish   their   numerous  tasks  and  inspects  completed  work   to   be   sure   it   meets   the   quality   standards   of   the  resort.    Requirements:  HS  diploma/GED,   3   years   hospitality   experience   or   5   years   supervisory  experience.    High  level  attention   to   detail   and   customer   service.   Strong   work   ethic  and  follow  through.     6HDVRQDO (PSOR\HH %HQH¿WV (PSOR\HH meals   during   work   in   the   cafeteria   for   $3.00   (includes  hot  buffet,  salad  bar,  sandwich  bar,   dessert,   fruit,   and   drinks).   Free   uniforms.   Employee   discounts   on   lodging,   food,   spa   and  property  activities.     $SSO\RQOLQHDWwww.basinharbor.com/jobs

Feed Commodities International is ORRNLQJIRUGHSHQGDEOHZRUNHUVWRĂ&#x20AC;OO second shift mill production positions at both our Middlebury and Vergennes mills. Successful candidates must be at least 18 years of age, have the ability to lift 75 lbs. on a regular basis, and should have a valid driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s license. Dairy experience is a plus. 7KHVHDUHIXOOWLPHSRVLWLRQVRĎ?HULQJ competitive wages with a generous EHQHĂ&#x20AC;WV SDFNDJH WKDW LQFOXGHV SDLG WLPHRĎ?KHDOWKDQGOLIHLQVXUDQFHDQG a company matching retirement plan. ,QWHUHVWHGFDQGLGDWHVVKRXOGĂ&#x20AC;OORXWDQ DSSOLFDWLRQDWRXUPDLQRĎ&#x17E;FHORFDWHG at 47 Feed Mill Lane in Middlebury.

COLLEGE STREET CHILDRENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CENTER EARLY CHILDHOOD EDUCATOR The College Street Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center is looking for a nurturing, creative, enthusiastic infant/ toddler teacher to join our team of childcare professionals. The position is guaranteed 20 hours a week, with more hours available, and begins as soon as possible. Person must have flexibility to work varied hours. Infant/Toddler experience and a dgree in Early Childhood Education or related field is preferred. Send resume and 3 letters of reference by May 16th to: Jenne Morton College Street Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Center $PMMFHF4USFFUt.JEEMFCVSZ 75

802-388-2401 E-mail: cscc1@sover.net

RetroWorks,  HOPEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  charity   resale  store,  seeks: SALES   ASSOCIATE   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   29.5   hours   a   week,   with   consistent   schedule.     Must   EH SK\VLFDOO\ ÂżW DEOH WR PXOWLWDVN KDYHJRRGFDVKUHJLVWHUDQGFXVWRPHU service  skills.     WAREHOUSE     ASSISTANT   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   29.5   hours  a  week,  Tuesday  through  Saturday.   0XVW EH PRWLYDWHG PHFKDQLFDOO\ LQFOLQHG DEOH WR OLIW KHDY\ LWHPV DQG KDYH H[FHOOHQW FXVWRPHU VHUYLFH VNLOOV a  valid  driversâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  license  and  clean  record.     Forklift  experience  helpful.     6HQG UHVXPH FRYHU OHWWHU DQG FRQWDFW LQIRUPDWLRQ IRU  HPSOR\PHQW references   to;Íž   dclark@hope-­vt.org   or   Personnel,    P.  O.  Box  165,  Middlebury   Vermont  05753.    No  phone  calls  or  walk   in  inquiries  please.  EOE.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  31

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

CAREGIVER  NEEDED  FOR   ELDERLY   woman   in   wheel-­ chair.   Experience   preferred.   Call  for  details.  802-­382-­4017.

ADMINISTRATIVE  ASSIS-­ TANT.  Seeking  an  organized,   energetic  administrative  pro-­ fessional  for  a  full-­time  posi-­ tion.  We  are  a  small,  support-­ ive  team  providing  services  to   individuals  with  major  mental   health   conditions.   We   need   someone  to  assist  with  com-­ munication  systems  and  other   administrative  tasks  related  to   program  operations.  You  are   a   detail-­oriented   self-­starter   who   has   excellent   com-­ puter   skills,   a   proven   ability   to   juggle   multiple   priorities   and  will  thrive  in  a  non-­profit,   mission-­driven   environment.   Transcription  /  data  entry  skills   preferred.  This  is  a  37.5  hour   /  week  position  with  benefits.   Respond   to   CSAC   HR,   89   Main   Street,   Middlebury,   VT   05753;   802-­388-­6751,   ext.   425,  or  visit  www.csac-­vt.org.

DEVELOPMENTAL  HOME   SOUGHT  in  the  ACSU  school   district  for  19  yr.  old  man  with   mild  intellectual  disability.  He   enjoys  school,  participating  in   the  household,  social  activities   and   chatting.   Focus   of   the   home  is  on  skill  development   as  he  matures.  Needs  a  home   that   can   provide   structured   support   around   daily   activi-­ ties   and   emotional   support   as  he  navigates  adolescence.   Generous  annual  tax-­free  sti-­ pend   of   $23,400   plus   room   and  board  payment  of  around   $8,400,   as   well   as   a   respite   budget.   Call   Sarah   Muss   at   Community   Associates   at   802-­388-­4021.

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

AMERICAN  FLATBREAD   MIDDLEBURY   HEARTH   is   seeking  a  host  for  our  restau-­ rant.  If  you  enjoy  working  in  a   fast-­paced,   fun   environment   and  have  an  upbeat,  positive   attitude  stop  by  for  application.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   located   in   the   Marble   Works,  downtown  Middlebury.   Previous  experience  helpful.   EOE.

MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  SCHOOL Temporary Foreign Language Middlebury Union High School has a vacancy for a temporary 1.0 FTE Foreign Language Teacher (Spanish and French; however, 1 or other is acceptable) beginning August 20, 2014 through approximately January 20, 2015. Successful candidate must have an appropriate 9-12 Licensure. Apply by sending letter of interest, resume, three current reference letters, complete transcripts and evidence of licensure to: Dr. Peter Burrows, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury,VT 05753 Application deadline: May 24, 2014 E.O.E

AUTOMOTIVE  TECHNICIAN   NEEDED.  Must  be  knowledg-­ able   in   all   aspects   of   repair.   ASE-­certified  helpful,  but  not   required.   Techs   are   also   on   wrecker  rotation.  Any  towing   experience   is   helpful.  Apply   in   person   or   send   resume   to   Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Auto,   19A   Elm   St,   Middlebury,  VT.

NOW HIRING:

Part-time Sales Associates & Deli People Apply in person or pick up application at:

Basin  Harbor  Club,  recognized  as  one  of  the   Best   Places   to   Work   in   Vermont   in   2014,   is   getting   ready   for   our   128th   season   on   Lake   Champlain.     We   are   currently   accepting   applications   for   multiple   seasonal   full-­time   positions   for   May   through   October.   Certain   candidates   could   be   eligible   for   on-­property   housing.    

Maplefields â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Shoreham Service Center Corner of Routes 22a & 74 Shoreham, VT EOE

Fine  Dining  Room  Floor  Supervisors/   Captains Fine  Dining  Room  Servers  &  Assistants Banquet  Set-­up  Supervisor  /  Captain Banquet  Set-­up  Staff

Nurses and Nursing Assistants Wanted

6HDVRQDO (PSOR\HH %HQH¿WV (PSOR\HH meals  during   work   in   the   cafeteria   for   $3.00   (includes  hot  buffet,  salad  bar,  sandwich  bar,   dessert,   fruit,   and   drinks).   Free   uniforms.   Employee   discounts   on   lodging,   food,   spa   and  property  activities.    

Porter  Medical   Center   is   looking   for   self   motivated  and  dependable  Registered  Nurses,   Licensed   Practical   Nurses,   and   Licensed   Nursing  Assistants.  Various  shifts  are  currently   available.  Current  VT  licensure  required.

For  full   position   listings   and   to   apply   on   line   got  to  www.basinharbor.com/jobs.  Must  be   willing  and  able  to  pass  a  background  check   prior  to  employment.

Porter  Medical   Center   offers   competitive   SD\ D FRPSUHKHQVLYH EHQH¿WV SDFNDJH D generous  403(b)  plan,  paid  vacation  and  tuition   reimbursement.  

Make room for bicycles Sell your unneeded car in the Addison Independent classifieds.

To apply, please send your resume to: apply@portermedical.org

BLUEBERRY  HILL   INN.   Gardening,   maintenance,   housekeeping,  wait  and  dish   staff  for  summer  and  fall  sea-­ sons,  possibly  longer.  Part  to   full-­time.   Live-­in   opportunity   possible.   Some   hospitality   experience  preferred,  but  will   train.   Wage   commensurate   with  experience  and  commit-­ ment.   Weekends   required.   Please   send   letter   of   inter-­ est  and  /  or  resume  to:  info@ blueberryhillinn.com,  or  call  to   arrange  a  visit.  802-­247-­6735. AWAKE,  THIRD,  WEEKEND   and  per  diem   shift  openings   for   compassionate   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Univer-­ sal   Careâ&#x20AC;?   Staff   in   our   loving   and   family-­oriented   residen-­ tial   care   home,   under   new   management.  We  incorporate   holistic   approaches   through   organic   nutrition,   integrative   medicine   and   a   wide   range   of   community   activities.   Ex-­ perience   with   providing   per-­ sonal   care   required.   If   you   are   a   reliable   team   player   and   enjoy   working   with   our   aging  community,  please  send   your   resume   to   Lori@livin-­ gwellvt.org,   fax   attention   to   Lori   at   802-­453-­6661   or   call   802-­453-­3946. BANKRUPTCY:  CALL  to  find   out   if   bankruptcy   can   help   you.   Kathleen   Walls,   Esq.   802-­388-­1156.

Help  Wanted

PRODUCTION  COOK  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  MID-­ DLEBURY  NATURAL  Foods   Co-­op   seeks   experienced   full-­time  Production  Cook.  Ide-­ al  candidate  has  professional   kitchen  experience  including   food  sanitation  training,  excel-­ lent  customer  service  skills,  fa-­ miliarity  with  natural  foods  and   desire  to  learn  more.  Seeking   staff  with  ability  to  multi-­task,   work   well   as   part   of   a   team   and  lift  50  pounds.  Our  staff   enjoy  the  benefits  of  working   with   great   people   and   great   food,   and   a   generous   store   discount.  Additional   benefits   available.   See   our   website   (www.middleburycoop.com)   for  more  benefit  details  and  for   our  employment  application.   E X P E R I E N C E D   C O O K .   Complete   our   application   to   FRIENDLY   fast-­paced   fam-­ be  considered. ily-­style   restaurant   seeks   full-­time,   team-­oriented   per-­ RESIDENTIAL   INSTRUC-­ son.   Noon  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  8:00   p.m.   shifts   TOR   sought   for   a   home   in   to  include  one  weekend  night.   Middlebury  for  a  woman  in  her   Apply  Halfway  House  Restau-­ 30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  with  mild  developmental   rant,  Shoreham. disability.  Be  a  member  of  a   team  supporting  the  develop-­ ment   of   home   management   skills,   friendships,   interests,   LOCAL   BUSINESS   SEEKS   emotional  regulation  and  good   part-­time  bookkeeper.  Position   communication.  Most  impor-­ will  perform  A/P,  A/R  and  pay-­ tant  skills  are  flexible  thinking   roll  functions.  Position  will  also   and  the  ability  to  maintain  per-­ put   together   bank   deposits,   sonal  boundaries.  Prior  expe-­ and  generate  invoices.  Candi-­ rience  with  community  mental   dates  should  have  prior  book-­ health  is  a  plus.  Full-­time  with   keeping   experience,   strong   1   overnight   and   3   days   off   computer   skills   and   experi-­ per  week.  Annual  compensa-­ ence  with  QuickBooks;  have   tion  in  mid-­$20Kâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  with  com-­ ability  to  multi-­task,  and  have   prehensive  benefit  package.   strong   organizational   skills.   Respond   to   CSAC   HR,   89   Position   works   part-­time,   Main   Street,   Middlebury,   VT   approximately   20   hours   per   05753,   802-­388-­6751,   ext.   month.  Apply   to   dfh05735@ 425,  or  visit  www.csac-­vt.org. yahoo.com. ROOM   AND   BOARD   for   MIDDLEBURY   BEEF   HAS   the   summer.   Available   at   an   opening   for   30-­40   hours   the   shores   of   Lake   Cham-­ per   week.   Some   deli   work,   plain   in   exchange   for   light   along  with  overall  store  duties.   housekeeping   and   yard   Must  be  at  least  18  years  of   work,   plus   pay.   Please   call   age   and   willing   to   work   dif-­ 802-­353-­6188.   Must   have   ferent   shifts.  Available   shifts   drivers  license  and  vehicle. are:  8:00  a.m  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  4:30  p.m.  and   SERVICE   COORDINATOR,   12:00   or   1:00   to   9:00   p.m.   Community  Associates  Pro-­ Nights  and  weekends  a  must.   gram.  30  hrs.  Develop,  coor-­ Pick  up  applications  at  store   dinate  and  monitor  supports   on  Rte.  7  South. for  individuals  with  develop-­ MIDDLEBURY   NATURAL   mental  disabilities,  TBI,  and   FOODS   CO-­OP   seeks   Pre-­ elders.   Potential   work   with   pared   Foods  /  Deli   Manager.   offender   population.   Need   Strong   fiscal,   operational   skills   and   experience   (3+   and   people   skills   needed.   yrs.)  in  human  services,  good   Experience   motivating   20+   boundaries,  ability  to  identify   staff  with  ability  to  model  ex-­ concerns  and  problem  solve,   ceptional   customer   service,   excellent   writing  /  documen-­ knowledge   of   natural,   local   tation   skills,   flexibility   and   and   organic   food   prepara-­ adaptability.   Qualifications   tion.   Full-­time   position   with   also   include   a   B.A.   degree   competitive   compensation   and   good   driving   record.   and  excellent  benefits.  Benefit   Benefit   package   includes   details  and  our  application  are   medical,   dental,   life   insur-­ on  our  website:  www.middle-­ ance,   generous   paid   time   burycoop.com.   Send   letter   off.   Respond   to   CSAC   HR,   of   interest,   resume   and   our   89   Main   Street,   Middlebury,   application   to:   Search   Com-­ VT  05753;  802-­388-­6751,  ext.   mittee,   Middlebury   Natural   425,  or  visit  www.csac-­vt.org. Foods  Co-­op,  1  Washington   SHAWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  SUPERMARKETS   St.,  Middlebury  05753  or  hr@ HAS  an  immediate  need  for   middleburycoop.com. an  Assistant   Produce   Man-­ PRIME,   INC   COMPANY   ager  for  our  Middlebury,  VT   DRIVERS   and   independent   store.   Management   experi-­ contractors   for   refrigerated   ence   necessary.   Supermar-­ tanker   and   flatbed   needed.   ket   experience   preferred.   Plenty  of  freight  and  great  pay.   Weekends,  holidays,  flexible   Start   with   prime   today!   Call   schedule  required.  Please  ap-­ 800-­277-­0212  or  apply  online   ply  online  at  www.shaws.com. at  www.driveforprime.com.




PAGE  32  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Help  Wanted

For  Sale

For  Rent

SUBSTITUTE  POSITIONS   just   for   the   summer   or   be-­ yond.  A  variety  of  work  and   a  variety  of  hours  available   supporting  adults  with  intel-­ lectual   disabilities   in   their   daily  lives.  Ideal  for  college   students,   you   need   good   common   sense   and   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   train   you   on   the   rest.   The   Counseling   Service   of   Ad-­ dison   County   is   a   dynamic   and  prosocial  workplace.  HS   diploma  or  equivalent,  must   pass   background   checks.   Contact  CSAC  HR,  89  Main   St.,   Middlebury,   VT   05753,   802-­388-­6751  or  visit  www. csac-­vt.org.  EOE.

SAWMILLS  FROM   ONLY   $4,897.  Make  and  save  mon-­ ey   with   your   own   bandmill.   Cut  lumber  any  dimension.  In   stock,  ready  to  ship.  Free  info   /  DVD:   www.NorwoodSaw-­ mills.com,  1-­800-­578-­1363,   ext.  300N.

ADDISON  2  APARTMENTS   AVAILABLE.  2-­3  bedrooms.   $1,000   to   $1,500  /  m onth.   Heat   and   electric   included.   No  pets,  no  smoking.  Karla   377-­7445.



SUMMER  HELP  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  CLEAN-­ ING,   LAUNDRY,   errands,   help   out   in   kitchen,   etc.   at   summer  residence  on  Lake   Champlain  just  north  of  Basin   Harbor   Club,   Vergennes.   Three  to  four  days  a  week,  3   hours  per  day  (exact  sched-­ ule   flexible).   Pay   $16  /  hour,   from  July  2  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  September  14.   Send   brief   resume   to   don-­ johnston@hotmail.com

For  Sale 2006  COPPER  CANYON  5th   wheel  camper  (25  ft.).  Green   /  beige  interior.  Swivel  rock-­ ers,   hide-­a-­bed   couch   and   queen   bed.   Large   slide-­out   in  kitchen  /  dining  /  living  room   area.   Private   toilet   w/sepa-­ rate   shower.   A/C.   Lots   of   storage   and   extras.   Excel-­ lent   condition,   a   must-­see!   $15,500.  Call  802-­497-­0945. AFFORDABLE  HEAT  WITH   a  Maxim  Outdoor  Wood  Pel-­ let  Furnace  by  Central  Boiler.   Burns   wood   pellets.   Boivin   Farm  Supply.  802-­475-­4007. EZ   SPORT   RECUMBENT   BICYCLE  for  sale.  $750.  Mint   condition.  802-­759-­3205. GLENWOOD-­N  CAST  IRON   wood  cook  stove.  Still  in  use.   Make  an  offer.  802-­758-­2265. HANG-­UPS   INVERSION   TABLE,   excellent   condi-­ tion,  $130.  NordicTrack  Leg   Shaper,   strengthens   lower   back.  $75.  802-­352-­4314. L AW N   A N D   G A R D E N   EQUIPMENT   in   very   good   condition.   Tillers,   aerator,   shredder  /  grinder,  pole  trim-­ mer,  pole  chainsaw,  wheel-­ barrow,   etc.   21   Crescent   Street,  Bristol,  802-­453-­3593. P R I VA C Y   H E D G E S  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   BLOWOUT  sale  6  foot  arbor-­ vitae  (cedar).  Regular  $129,   now   $59.   Free   installation  /   free  delivery.  Call  today,  lim-­ ited   supply:   518-­536-­1367,   w w w. l o w c o s t t r e e s . c o m .   Beautiful  and  nursery  grown.

A U TO M O T I V E  R E PA I R   S P A C E   A V A I L A B L E .   TORO  RIDING  LAWNMOW-­ D o u b l e   b a y   g a r a g e   o n   ER.  Excellent  condition.  15.5   high-­traffic  Rte.  7  in  Middle-­ hp.  Must  see.  Asking  $750.   bury   for   lease.   Please   call   802-­462-­2366. 518-­572-­2666  for  details.

BRANDON  ONE  BR.  $650,   one  person;  $700,  two  per-­ Lawn  and   sons.   Includes   heat,   snow   and  rubbish  removal.  Dam-­ Garden age   deposit,   first   monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   BARK  MULCH,  BULK.  Natu-­ rent,   one   year   lease   re-­ ral,  black  and  red.  Can  de-­ quired.  No  smoking  or  pets.   liver.  14  Corona  St.  Brandon.   802-­247-­0115. 802-­247-­3144. B R A N D O N   P R I V A T E   ROOM,   bath   and   entrance   for   rent   in   my   home.   $450   For  Rent /  m onth   includes   utilities,   wi-­fi,   laundry   facilities,   gar-­ 2   BEDROOM,   FIRST   floor   bage.  Between  Brandon  and   apartment,  with  office,  in  Mid-­ Middlebury,   off   Rte.   7.   Call   dlebury   at   85   Court   Street.   802-­353-­1144. Full   basement   with   laundry   hook-­ups.   Available   June   BRANDON,   CHARMING   2   1.   $1,000  /  mo.   plus   utilities.   bedroom  apartment,  remod-­ Deposit,   credit   check   and   eled   kitchen  /  bath,   walk-­in   references  required.  No  pets   closets,   private   entry   way   or  smoking.  No  exceptions.   /  laundry   area,   storage   ar-­ 802-­352-­6678. eas,  desirable  parking.  $840   /  mo.  Heat  and  W/S  included.   2   BR   BRANDON   $650   +   802-­352-­4700. utilities.  802-­773-­9107  www. thefuccicompany.com. BRANDON;   3   BEDROOM,   2   bath   1880â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   farmhouse   2 , 0 0 0   S Q U A R E   F E E T   set  amidst  beautiful  scenery   Professional   office   space   in   Brandon.   $1,200  /  month   in   Middlebury,   multi-­room.   +  utilities.  Hardwood  floors,   Ground  level,  parking,  handi-­ large   rooms,   extra   storage   capped-­accessible.  Available   room,  w/d  hookup,  pets  ne-­ now.  802-­558-­6092. gotiable.  References  and  se-­ curity  deposit  required.  Avail-­ able  now.  Call  781-­259-­0229.

For  Rent

For  Rent

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  against  the  law   to  discriminate  when   advertising  housing Particularly  on  sites  like  Craigslist. And  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you   might  think.  You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no  childrenâ&#x20AC;?   or  â&#x20AC;&#x153;adults  only.â&#x20AC;?  There  is  lots  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say.   The  federal  government  is  watching  for  such   discrimination. Let  us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities   of  the  Fair  Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the   right  side  of  the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Fair  Housing  Law.   Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

For  Rent

For  Rent

For Rent

EAST  MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one   bedroom,   includes   heat,   electric  and  hot  water,  $850.   No  pets.  Call  after  4:00  p.m.   802-­388-­7716.

AVAILABLE NOW 2 Bedroom Apartments rent $805 -­ $830 including heat. Great location, 30 minutes to Rutland, 5 minutes to downtown Brandon. Call Chantel today at 802-­247-­0165 or email: cmaclachlan@ summitpmg.com

BRANDON;  LARGE,   SPA-­ CIOUS,   1   bedroom   apart-­ ment,   second   floor,   eat-­in   kitchen.   Plenty   of   storage,   off-­street  parking.  Heat,  wa-­ ter,   power,   snow   plowing   included.   First   month   and   damage   deposit.   $780  /  mo.   Pets   negotiable.   Available   immediately.  802-­989-­9514,   802-­247-­9898. BRISTOL,   DOWNTOWN,   LARGE  2  room  studio;  per-­ fect   for   massage,   dance,   yoga,  artists  and  /  or  writers.   775  sq.ft.  with  private  bath,   hardwood  floors,  ceiling  fans,   lots  of  natural  light.  Ideal  for   classes  of  all  kinds.  $485  /  mo.   Call  802-­989-­1518. BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  NEW   SCHOOL   HOUSE  office  suites  located   in  Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Old  High  School   complex   on   the   green   is   now   renting.   Five   separate   one   and   two   room,   newly   renovated,   offices   with   a   common  waiting  area,  con-­ ference  room,  bathroom  and   kitchenette.   Rent   includes   heat,  electricity  and  shared   wi-­fi.  The  5  suites  range  from   377  s.f.  up  to  648  s.f.  Two  of   the  suites  are  single  rooms.   Three   have   an   inner   and   outer  office.  Newly  refinished   floors,   painted   trim,   ceiling   fans   and   lighting.   Tenants   choose  the  wall  colors.  The   first  year  of  lease  will  have   2  free  months  and  first  ten-­ ant   to   sign   a   lease   will   get   a  third  month  free  rent.  Call   802-­453-­4065   or   twells@ wellslaw.com  for  more  info.

For  Rent

VERGENNES;  273   MAIN   Street,   available   June   1.   Quiet,   sunny   renovated   2   bedroom   apartment.   Full   bath,   laundry   hookups,   large   porch,   parking,   heat   M I D D L E B U RY   H O U S E   and  hot  water  included.  $  920   SHARE.   Furnished,   W/D,   /  month.  Call  only  8am-­8pm.   wifi.   Utilities   included.   No   802-­377-­7135. smoking  or  pets.  References.   First,   last   and   $300   secu-­ WEST   ADDISON:   2   story,   rity   deposit.   Credit   check.   furnished  house  on  lakefront.   $600  /  mo.   Month-­to-­month.   Washer,  dryer.  No  smoking.   802-­989-­3097. Available  September  through   May.  860-­653-­8112. MIDDLEBURY   ON   RT   7   North.   Small   1   bedroom   house.   No   pets,   no   smok-­ Wood  Heat i n g .   $ 9 0 0  /  m o n t h .   C a l l   802-­349-­7557. M I D D L E B U RY,   N E W LY   RENOVATED   3   bedroom   house.  $1,400  /  mth  plus  utili-­ ties.   No   smoking,   no   pets.   388-­6363.



Real  Estate FARM   FOR   SALE   in   New   Haven   and   Waltham.   192   acres  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  includes   165   acres   of  cropland  /  pasture.  Barns,   bunk  silos,  shed.  Restricted   by   conservation   easement   and  option  to  purchase  at  ag   value.   Vermont   Land   Trust   seeks  buyers  who  will  farm   commercially.   $330,000.   Contact   Jon   Ramsay   at   802-­533-­7705  or  jramsay@ vlt.org.   www.vlt.org  /  tracey-­ farm. LEICESTER   6.8   ACRES,   $59,000.   Very   nice   build-­ ing   site   surveyed,   septic   design   included.   Ready   to   build   on,   with   all   permits.   Owner  financing.  Call  Wayne   802-­257-­7076.

ADDISON  COUNTY   FIRE-­ WOOD.  Premium  hardwoods   cut,   split   and   delivered.   Custom  sizes  available.  For   SKYLINE   MOBILE   HOME.   PA N TO N   L A K E F R O N T.   honest,  reliable  service  call   14â&#x20AC;?   x   60â&#x20AC;?,   2   bedrooms,   1   802-­238-­7748. $1,800  /  m onth   plus   utili-­ bath.   Newer   remodel   with   ties.   4   bedrooms,   3   bath-­ FIREWOOD;   CUT,   SPLIT   metal  pitched  roof.  Updated   rooms,  2  car  garage.  A  dog   and  delivered.  Green  or  sea-­ Frigidaire  &  Whirlpool  appli-­ is   negotiable.   No   smoking.   soned.   Call   Tom   Shepard,   ances,   furnace,   A/C,   ther-­ One-­year   lease.   Karla   at   802-­453-­4285. mopane   windows,   berber   802-­377-­7445. carpet.   $17,000,   includes   GREEN  FIREWOOD.  Mixed   transport,   setup,   blocking,   ROOM   TO   RENT   in   Bran-­ hardwoods.  $200  /  cord.  $100   d o n .   $ 1 2 0   p e r   w e e k .   /  half  cord.  Also  chunk  wood   vinyl   skirting,   front   steps.   877-­999-­2555. 802-­417-­4157. available.  Delivery  available.   SELF   STORAGE,   8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Call  802-­545-­2144. units.   Your   lock   and   key,   MOUNTAIN   ROAD   FIRE-­ Att.  Farmers $55  /  m onth.   Middlebury,   WOOD.  Green  and  partially   802-­558-­6092. seasoned   available.   Oak,   HAY   FOR   SALE:   First   cut   $3   /   square   bale.   First   cut   SOUTH   STARKSBORO   2   ash,   maple,   beech.   Order   round  bales  $30.  Mike  Quinn,   now  and  save  for  next  sea-­ bedroom   mobile   home   on   end  of  South  Munger  Street,   owner-­occupied   lot.   $875  /   son.  Cut,  split  and  delivered.   Middlebury.  802-­388-­7828. Call  802-­759-­2095. month  plus  utilities.  Security   deposit   required.   Includes   MULCH   HAY   FOR   SALE:   W/D,   water,   sewer,   trash   Delivery   available.   Call   removal,  snow  plowing  and   for   pricing.   802-­453-­4481,   Real  Estate lawn   care.   No   smoking,   no   8 0 2 -­ 3 4 9 -­ 9 2 8 1 ,   o r   pets.   References   required.   2  BEDROOM  RUSTIC  cabin   802-­989-­1004. on   1.7   acres   in   Salisbury   802-­453-­4856. with   320â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   of   Lake   Dunmore   TORO  LX-­500  LAWNMOW-­ frontage   across   Route   53   ER,  $700.  Locknow  575  mix-­ with   sundeck   and   dock   on   er  wagon  with  stainless  steel   water.   Beautiful   swimming   interior,  $7,500.  Post  pound-­ and  sunsets.  Quiet  and  pri-­ er,  $500.  802-­453-­3870. vate.   $249,900.   Serious,   W H I T N E Y â&#x20AC;&#x2122; S   C U S T O M   qualified  buyers  only  please.   FARM   WORK.   Pond   agi-­ 802-­352-­6678. tating,   liquid   manure   haul-­ 2010   SKYLINE   MOBILE   ing,  drag  line  aerating.  Call   HOME.  Like  new.  14â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X66â&#x20AC;&#x2122;,  3   for   price.   462-­2755,   John   bedrooms,  2  full  baths,  extra   Whitney. insulation,   ceiling   fans   and   WORK   WANTED.   Driving   many   extras.   10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x22â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   insu-­ truck   or   tractor   work   full   or   lated  porch.  Must  be  moved.   part-­time.   802-­877-­6231   or   Available  now.  New,  reduced   802-­355-­5705. price:  $28,500.  Paul  Stone,   Orwell.  802-­770-­9270.

BRISTOL  LARGE  ONE  bed-­ room   apartment.   Walking   distance   to   town.   No   pets.   No   smoking.   $695  /  month   plus  utilities  and  deposit.  Call   802-­388-­0730. S T O R A G E   S P A C E S ,   CLIMATE  CONTROL  STOR-­ 11â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;.   Large   overhead   AGE   now   available   in   New   doors,   extra   high   ceilings.   Haven.  Call  802-­453-­5563. Will   accommodate   large   campers,   boats   or   lots   of   PA N TO N   L A K E F R O N T.   stuff.  Call  802-­388-­8394. $1,500  /  m onth   plus   utili-­ ties.   3   bedrooms,   1   bath.   VERGENNES   COMMER-­ F u l l y   f u r n i s h e d   h o u s e .   CIAL  10-­YEAR  lease.  1,300   Month-­to-­month   lease.   No   sq.   ft.   $1,500  /  month   plus   pets,   no   smoking.   Karla   at   utilities.  Karla  377-­7445. 802-­377-­7445.





Cars

VOLVO  2004,  AWD   4   door   45  OCEANFRONT  ACRES   sedan.   Good   condition.   overlooking   Bay   of   Fundy,   $6,000.  OBO.  802-­388-­6414. Digby   Neck,   Nova   Scotia.   Solar   powered   summer   cabin.   Complete   privacy.   Trucks $250,000.   firm.   www.fun-­ dygetaway.com 2002   CHEVY   SILVERADO   CHANNEL   WATERFRONT   DIESEL  2500  HD  series  ex-­ COTTAGES.   Unique   1,   2,   tended  cab,  short  box,  tow-­ 3+   bdrm.,   kitchens,   sandy   ing,  package,  87,500  miles.   beach,  walk  to  Weirs  Beach,   897-­5127. restaurants,   attractions,   shopping  and  convenience.   Very   clean   and   comfort-­ Wanted able,  A/C,  free  wi-­fi,  docks,   outdoor   fireplace,   tiki   bar   ANTIQUES  WANTED.  Local   with  stereo  and  outdoor  TV,   3rd   generation   dealer,   free   gas   grills,   great   hospitality   verbal  appraisals.  Call  Brian   and  service,  pets  welcome.   Bittner   at   802-­272-­7527   or   Think   summer,   call   now.   visit   www.bittnerantiques. 603-­366-­4673,   www.chan-­ com. nelcottages.com.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  33

 Mt.  Abe  student  charged    +++++++++++++++ TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY SELECT BOARD MEETING with  aggravated  assault   78(6'$<0D\Â&#x2021;30 BRISTOL   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Bristol   police   arrested   a   student   who   they   allege   assaulted  another  student  on  school   grounds  this  past  Wednesday. According  to  police,  Bristol  resi-­ dent  Jacob  True  Lathrop,  18,  was  a   passenger   in   a   car   that   pulled   into   the   Mount   Abraham   Union   High   School   parking   lot   on   May   7.   A   student   who   knew   Lathrop   report-­ edly   called   out   to   him,   allegedly   making   â&#x20AC;&#x153;teasing   remarks.â&#x20AC;?   Police   said   Lathrop   got   out   of   the   car,  

grabbed  the  schoolmate  by  the  neck   and   lifted   the   youngster   off   the   ground.   A   staff   member   who   witnessed   the  incident  commanded  Lathrop  to   let   the   schoolmate   go,   police   said,   and   Lathrop   allegedly   threw   the   other  student  to  the  ground. Police   arrested   Lathrop   the   following  day.  He  is  due  to  answer   the   aggravated   assault   charge   in   Addison   County   Superior   Court,   criminal  division,  at  a  later  date.

Public Notices Pages  33  &  34. Addison (1)

Challenger Ctr. of Vt. (1)

Addison Co. Sup. Court (1)

Leicester (2)

Addison NE Supervisory Union â&#x20AC;&#x201C; M.A.U.H.S. (1)

Middlebury (1)

Addison NE Supervisory Union â&#x20AC;&#x201C; V.U.H.S. (1)

/$5*(&21)(5(1&(5220 72:12)),&(6Âą0$,1675((7

7:00

7:10 7:15

7:25 7:30 7:40

7:55

Patricia Hannaford Career Ctr. (1) Weybridge (1)

8:05 8:15

Bristol (1) TOWN OF LEICESTER NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS

Lister  Grievance  Hearings  will  be  held  on   May  20,  2014  from  9am  -­12pm  and  1pm  -­   SPDWWKH/HLFHVWHU/LVWHUVœ2I¿FHORFDWHG at   44   Schoolhouse   Road   in   the   town   of   Leicester. Leicester  Listers  (802)  247-­5961  x  2 leicesterlisters@comcast.net 5/5,  8,  12,  15,  19

TOWN OF BRISTOL

Dump Truck for Sale The  Town   of   Bristol   will   be   accepting   bids  for  the  sale  of  a  2004  International   Model  7600  tandem  dump  truck  with  side   dump   body,   including   Tenco   plow   and   wing   equipment,   CAT   C12   engine   (385   h.p.),   8   speed   Double   L   transmission,   66,000   GVW,   approximately   106,000   miles,   in   good   condition.   The   Select-­ board  reserves  the  right  to  reject  any  or   all  bids  received.  Minimum  $30,000  bids   only.   Bids   are   due   by   10:00   am   on   Fri-­ day,  May  16th,  2014  and  may  be  mailed   to  PO  Box  249  Bristol,  VT  05443  or  hand   delivered   to   1   South   Street   in   Bristol.   Truck  will  be  available  for  transfer  of  title   on  May  20,  2014.  For  more  information   or  to  schedule   a  viewing,  contact  Road   Foreman   Peter   Bouvier   at   453-­4707,   Monday  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thursday  7  am  to  3  pm. Tractor for Sale The   Town   of   Bristol   will   be   accept-­ ing   bids   for   the   sale   of   a   1985   Kubota   Model  L  2250  tractor  with  a  3  point  hitch,   P.T.O.,   22   h.p.,   with   approximately   910   hours,   snow   blower   in   excellent   shape,   cab   heater,   lights,   wipers   and   tires   in   good   shape,   cab   in   fair   condition.   The   Selectboard   reserves   the   right   to   reject   any  or  all  bids  received.  Minimum  $2,900   bids  only.  Bids  are  due  by  10:00  am  on   Friday,   May   16th,   2014   and   may   be   mailed  to  PO  Box  249  Bristol,  VT  05443   or   hand   delivered   to   1   South   Street   in   Bristol.   Equipment   will   be   available   on   May  20,  2014.  For  more  information  or  to   schedule  a  viewing,  contact  Road  Fore-­ man  Peter  Bouvier  at  453-­4707  Monday   â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Thursday  7  am  to  3  pm. 5/5,  8,  12

CHALLENGER LEARNING CENTER OF VERMONT REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS (RFP)

The  Board  requests  that  interested  parties   submit   a   proposal   for   a   feasibility   study.   Instructions   for   the   RFP   can   be   found   on   our  website:  www.challengervt.org.    Any   questions   should   be   forwarded   to   Tim@ fcidc.com.    All  proposals  must  be  submitted   by  5:00  p.m  on  June  12,  2014.                                  5/12

TOWN OF ADDISON ROAD DEBRIS REMINDER With  the  arrival  of  Spring  comes  the  pos-­ sibility  of  debris  on  the  roads.  The  Town   of  Addison  would  like  to  remind  residents   that  it  is  illegal  and  dangerous  to  leave  de-­ bris  on  the  roads.  Please  take  a  moment   to   clean   up   behind   you   for   the   safety   of   everyone. Addison  Select  Board 5/12

8:35

8:40 8:45 8:50 9:00

TOWN OF LEICESTER PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

  The  Leicester  Zoning  Board  of  Adjustment   will  hold  a  public  hearing  Tuesday,  May  27,    DW WKH /HLFHVWHU 7RZQ 2I¿FH DW  SPWRFRQVLGHUWKHIROORZLQJDSSOLFDWLRQ      (11-­14-­ZBA)  applicant  Elizabeth  Herrmann,   Architect   for   property   owner   Wellarkes   VT   LLC,   for   property   at   91   Catamount   Drive,   Leicester,   VT,   for   setback   waiver   for   a   screened  in  porch  to  be  added  to  residence   on  parcel  #212127  in  Lake  1  Zoning  District.        Application  is  available  for  inspection  at  the   7RZQ &OHUNœV 2I¿FH  6FKRROKRXVH 5G Leicester,   VT   during   regularly   scheduled   hours.   Participation   in   this   proceeding   is   a   prerequisite   to   the   right   to   take   any   subsequent  appeal.     Peter  Fjeld,  ZBA  Chairman 5/12   May  12,  2014

9:10

9:30

AGENDA &DOOWR2UGHU  $SSURYDORI0HHWLQJ0LQXWHVRI $SULO5HJXODU0HHWLQJ  $SSURYDORI$JHQGD &LWL]HQ&RPPHQWV>2SSRUWXQLW\WR raise  or  address  issues  that  are  not   otherwise  included  on  this  agenda]  1RPLQDWLRQRI3ODQQLQJ&RPPLV sion  Alternate  and  Downtown  Improve PHQW'LVWULFW&RPPLVVLRQ0HPEHU  7HUU\0F.QLJKW$GGLVRQ&RXQW\ &RPPXQLW\7UXVWUH1RUWK3OHDV DQW6WUHHW+RXVLQJ5HKDELOLWDWLRQ  5HQRYDWLRQ3URJUDP  8SGDWHRQ3URSRVDOIRU6RODU Pool  Heating  System  for  Municipal   Pool  -DPLH*DXFKHU'LUHFWRURI%XVL QHVV'HYHORSPHQW ,QQRYDWLRQZLWK a  monthly  update  'LVFXVVLRQRI3KDVH,,RIWKH $GGLVRQ5XWODQG1DWXUDO*DV([ pansion  Project,  including  Public   Information  Meeting  held  on  April     $ZDUGRI&RQWUDFWIRU$WWLF,QVX ODWLRQ5RRI5HSODFHPHQW5HSDLUIRU the  Ilsley  Public  Library  &KDUOHV.LUHNHURI0LGGOH5RDG 9HQWXUHVUH5HTXHVWIRU'LVFRQWLQX DQFHRI0LGGOH5RDG6RXWK  &RPPLWWHH 3URMHFW5HSRUWV D3ODQQLQJ&RPPLVVLRQ0HHWLQJ RI$SULOLQFOXGLQJGLVFXV VLRQRI7RZQ2I¿FHV5HFUHDWLRQ Facilities  Project  and  the  Town  Plan E/LEUDU\%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHHRI 0D\ F(QHUJ\&RPPLWWHH0HHWLQJRI 0D\ G5LYHU7DVN)RUFH0HHWLQJRI 0D\LQFOXGLQJUHYLHZRI Public  Information  Meeting  on  Draft   +D]DUG0LWLJDWLRQ3ODQRQ0D\ 'LVFXVVLRQRI3RVVLEOH(FR V\VWHP5HVWRUDWLRQ3URJUDP*UDQW Application H0DLQ6WUHHW 0HUFKDQWV5RZ 5DLOURDG2YHUSDVV%ULGJH5HSODFH ments,  including  proposed  amend PHQWWRFRQWUDFWZLWK9+%IRU$&75 5HORFDWLRQ6HUYLFHV  5HTXHVWIURP9HUPRQW$JHQF\ of  Transportation  for  Input  from  the   7RZQRQ6LWLQJD3DVVHQJHU5DLO Station  in  Middlebury  5HFRPPHQGDWLRQIRU5HYLHZ RI&XUUHQW7RZQ5HF\FOLQJ3URJUDP DQG&RQWUDFWIRU&XUEVLGH5HF\FOLQJ  $QQXDO$GRSWLRQRI5RDG  %ULGJH6WDQGDUGV  )<%XGJHW6WDWXV5HSRUW  'LVFXVV5HVXOWVRI6SHFLDO (OHFWLRQ5HYRWHRQ7RZQ2I¿FHV  5HFUHDWLRQ)DFLOLWLHV%RQG9RWH  1H[W6WHSV LIUHVXOWVDYDLODEOHEH fore  end  of  meeting)  $SSURYDORI&KHFN:DUUDQWV 7RZQ0DQDJHU¶V5HSRUW %RDUG0HPEHU&RQFHUQV  ([HFXWLYH6HVVLRQ±,I1HHGHG  $FWLRQRQ0DWWHUV'LVFXVVHGLQ ([HFXWLYH6HVVLRQ  $GMRXUQ

*  Decision  Item      **  Possible  Decision If  you  need  special  accommodations  to   attend   this   meeting,   please   contact   the   7RZQ 0DQDJHUÂśV 2IÂżFH DW  [DVHDUO\DVSRVVLEOH Additional  information  about  most  Agen da  items  is  available  on  the  Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  web VLWHZZZWRZQRIPLGGOHEXU\RUJRQWKH 6HOHFWERDUGSDJH 5/12

The  Public  Notices  section  appears  every  Mon.   &  Thurs.  in  the

Addison Independent

++++++++++++++ AGENDA PATRICIA A. HANNAFORD CAREER CENTER WED., MAY 14, 2014 5:00PM

1.  Introduction  of  Board  Members 2.  Visitors  Comments   3.  Correspondence 4.  Report  from  the  Chair   Consent Agenda 5.  1.  Minutes  of  April  9,  2014     6.  2.  Monthly  A/P  for  May    a.  Adult  Program  b.  Revolving  c.  Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Orders Action Agenda 7.  Resignation  of  Guidance  Coordinator   8.  Policy  2.1  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Treatment  of  Students 9.  Policy  2.2  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;Treatment  of  Staff 10.  Approve  Art  credit  for  part-­time  A.R.T              students 11.  Approve  embedded  Math  credit  for            Forestry 12.  Ratify  Support  Staff  Contract 13.  Approve  2014-­15  Perkins  Plan                                Informational Agenda 14.  Superintendentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Report 15.  Facility  Committee  Report 16.  Budget/Policy  Report 17.  Executive  Session  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  (If  needed) 18.  Policy  4.1  Governing  Style  -­  Board   5/12            Evaluation

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

ADDISON NORTHWEST SUPERVISORY UNION CHILD DEVELOPMENT INFORMATION DAYS (SCREENING)

 The   Addison   Northwest   Supervisory   Unionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Early   Education   Program   has   set   the   dates   for   the   Spring   2014   Child   Development  Information  Days.  All  children   who  will  be  3  or  4  by  September  1,  2014  in   the  towns  of  Addison,  Ferrisburgh,  Panton,   Vergennes,   and   Waltham   are   invited   to   participate.       All   Information   Days   (screenings)   will   be   held   at   the   Preschool   in   Vergennes.   Screenings  will  begin  on  Monday,  June  2nd   and  run  through  Thursday,  June  5th.     These   child   oriented   days   will   provide   parents   and   preschool   staff   with   the   opportunity   to   observe   each   child   in   a   variety   of   play-­based   activities   in   a   natural   environment.   Each   visit   will   take   approximately   one   hour.   During   this   time   we   will   be   observing   your   childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   play   in   the  following  areas:  motor,  communication,   language,  social  and  concept  development.     If   you   have   a   preschool   age   child   and   would   like   him/her   to   participate,   please   call   877-­2700   between   the   hours   of   8:30   am   and   2:30   pm   during   the   weeks   of   May   5th   and   May   12th   for   an   appointment.   Appointments  are  necessary!                              5/5,  12

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 168-­7-­12 Ancv

EVERBANK  Plaintiff   v. JERRY  W.  RULE  II  A/K/A  JERRY  W.  RULE  JR;Íž  VERMONT  DEPARTMENT  OF  TAXES;Íž   Defendants    NOTICE OF SALE By   virtue   and   in   execution   of   the   Power   of   Sale   contained   in   a   certain   mortgage   given   by  Jerry  W.  Rule  II  a/k/a  Jerry  W.  Rule  Jr  and  Denise  Rule  to  Chittenden  Trust  Co.  d/b/a   Mortgage   Service   Center,   its   successors   and/or   assigns,   dated   March   24,   2003   and   recorded  in  Book  57  at  Page  280  of  the  Town  of  Bridport  Land  Records,  of  which  mortgage   the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder  by  Assignment  of  Mortgage  recorded  on  March  9,   2009  in  Book  73  at  Page  525,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of  said  mortgage  and  for  the   purpose  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at  12:30  p.m.  on  June  9,   2014  at  3274  Route  22A,  Bridport,  VT  05734  all  and  singular  the  premises  described  in   said  mortgage, To  Wit:    Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Jerry  W.  Rule,  Jr.  and  Dennise   Rule  by  Warranty  Deed  from  Lawrence  J.  Kaufmann  and  Patricia  M.  Kaufmann  dated  May   29,  2002,  recorded  in  the  Bridport  Land  Records  in  Book  54  at  Page  157,  and  being  more   particularly  described  therein  as  follows:    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Lawrence  J.  Kaufmann  and   Patricia  M.  Kaufmann  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Stephen  C.  Cooke,  Sr.  dated  July  19,  1996,   recorded  in  Book  43  at  Page  123  of  the  Bridport  Land  Records,  and  being  more  particularly   described  therein  as  follows:    â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises,  together  with  dwelling  house  and  all  other   improvements   now   thereon,   described   in   and   conveyed   by   Warranty   Deed   from   Robert   B.  Taylor  to  Stephen  C.  Cooke,  the  Grantor  and  Laurette  R.  Cooke,  dated  June  8,  1967,   and  of  record  in  the  Town  of  Bridport  Land  Records  in  Book  22  at  Page  397.  In  aid  hereof   reference  is  made  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;PARCEL  5â&#x20AC;?  in  a  Warranty  Deed  from  Laurette  Quesnel  Cooke  to   Stephen  Charles  Cooke,  the  Grantor,  dated  December  20,  1974,  and  of  record  in  the  Town   of  Bridport  Land  Records  in  Book  24  at  Pages  401-­403. Being  a  parcel  of  land  described  and  bounded  as  follows:    Easterly  by  Vermont  Route  22A;Íž  Southerly  by  Park  Avenue  (also  known  as  Bridport  Town   Highway  No.  29);Íž  Westerly  in  part  by  land  of  the  Town  of  Bridport;Íž  and  Westerly  in  part  and   Northerly  by  land  of  the  Roman  Catholic  Diocese.    The  hereby  conveyed  lands  and  premises  are  conveyed  subject  to  any  presently  valid  so-­ called  power  line  and/or  communications  line  easement/right  of  way  of  record  in  the  Town   of  Bridport  Land  Records  that  affect  them.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;    Also  being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Lawrence  J.  Kaufmann  and   Patricia  M.  Kaufmann  by  Quit  Claim  Deed  of  Shaw  Farms,  Inc.  dated  December  4,  1996,   recorded  in  Book  43  at  Page  446  of  the  Bridport  Land  Records.    Subject  to  utility  easements  of  record.â&#x20AC;?    The  public  sale  may  be  adjourned  one  or  more  times  for  a  total  time  not  exceeding  30   days,  without  further  court  order,  and  without  publication  or  service  of  a  new  notice  of  sale,   by  announcement  of  the  new  sale  date  to  those  present  at  each  adjournment  or  by  posting   notice  of  the  adjournment  in  a  conspicuous  place  at  the  location  of  the  sale.  Terms  of  Sale:   WREHSDLGLQFDVKRUE\FHUWLÂżHGFKHFNE\WKHSXUFKDVHUDWWKHWLPHRIVDOH with  the  balance  due  at  closing.  The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the  Town  of   Bridport.    The  Mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale. EverBank,  David  A.  Carlson,  Esq. Shechtman  Halperin  Savage,  LLP     1080  Main  Street,  Pawtucket,  RI    02860 5/12,  19,  26   877-­575-­1400      Attorney  for  Plaintiff


PAGE  34  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Public Notices Pages 33,  34 TOWN OF WEYBRIDGE -­ NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ZONING REGULATIONS

The  Weybridge   Planning   Commission   will  hold  a  public  hearing  at  7:00  on  May   DWWKH:H\EULGJH7RZQ2IÂżFHV 1727  Quaker   Village   Rd,  Weybridge,  VT   to  consider  the  adoption  of  a  general  revi-­ sion  of  the  Zoning  Ordinances.  This  hear-­ ing  is  held  pursuant  to  24  V.S.A.  4441  and   24  V.S.A.  4444(b). The  purposes  of  the  revision  are  to: Â&#x2021;%ULQJWKH=RQLQJLQWRFRQIRUP   ance  with  the  Town  Plan  adopted  in       September  of  2011. Â&#x2021;,QFRUSRUDWHWKHPDQGDWRU\SHUPLW   reform  requirements  of  Act  115  and       the  most  current  legislative   amendments  to  24  VSA  Chapter  117. Â&#x2021;0DNHWKHGHÂżQLWLRQVSURFHGXUHV   review  standards  and  interpretations       consistent  with  recent  decisions. Â&#x2021;7RXSGDWHWKHDSSURYHG]RQLQJPDSRI   the  town  of  Weybridge. The   proposed   regulations   include   the   following  new  provisions  which  the  Plan-­ ning  Commission  feels  are  noteworthy: Â&#x2021;$GMXVWPHQWVRIODQGXVHGHQVLW\   regulations  and  districts  to  encourage       a  more  established  village  center  in       the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weybridge  Hillâ&#x20AC;?  area  and  to        encourage  traditional  compact  growth       patterns  within  this  area  and  in  other       existing  areas  of  population  and       development  within  Weybridge. Â&#x2021;&UHDWLRQRIWKHRSWLRQIRUDGGLWLRQDO   smaller  lots  in  various  parts  of  town  to       encourage  more  affordable  housing       and  greater  diversity  of  population  in       Weybridge Â&#x2021;0DLQWHQDQFHRIWKHUXUDOFKDUDFWHURI   the  town  outside  the  Weybridge  Hill       area  and  other  existing  areas  of       population  and  development. Â&#x2021;8SGDWHGSHUIRUPDQFHVWDQGDUGV Â&#x2021;1HZUHJXODWLRQVDQGDSSURDFKHV  ZLWKLQĂ&#x20AC;RRGKD]DUGDUHDV Â&#x2021;8SGDWHGVWDWHPHQWVDQGUHTXLUHPHQWV   regarding  renewable  energy. The   above   is   a   summary   of   the   princi-­ pal   change   provisions.   The   proposed   regulations  affect  all  of  the  Town  of  Wey-­ bridge.  Copies  of  the  Zoning  Ordinances   with   proposed,   tracked   changes   may   be   obtained  at  or  the  full  document  may  be   YLHZHGDWWKH7RZQ2IÂżFHV4XDNHU Village  Rd,  Weybridge,  VT  during  regular   business  hours. Following  is  the  Table  of  Contents: ZONING $UWLFOH,Âą,QWURGXFWLRQ $UWLFOH,,Âą=RQLQJ'LVWULFWVDQG'LVWULFW      Standards $UWLFOH,,,Âą'HYHORSPHQW5HYLHZ $UWLFOH,9Âą*HQHUDO5HJXODWLRQV $UWLFOH9Âą)ORRG+D]DUG$UHD      Regulations $UWLFOH9,Âą$GPLQLVWUDWLRQDQG        Enforcement $UWLFOH9,,Âą'HÂżQLWLRQV For   further   information   please   call   Jan   Albers   of   the   Planning   Commission   at   (802)   545-­2321   or   Scott   Wales,   Town   Clerk  at  (802)  545-­2450. Weybridge  Planning  Commission %<-DQ$OEHUV&KDLU 5/12,  15,  19,  22

Graduates (Continued  from  Page  1) ding   me,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   was   Shelley   Harrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   reaction   to   the   unfortunate   May   18   trifecta   that   will   prevent   the   two   parents  from  attending  all  three  cer-­ emonies.   Son   Robbie,   24,   will   be   earning  his  diploma  from  the  Boston   University  School  of  Law.  Son  Sean,   22,   will   be   earning   his   undergradu-­ ate   degree   from   Hobart   College   in   Geneva,  N.Y.  And  daughter  Morgan   will   be   earning   her   undergraduate   diploma  from  the  University  of  Ver-­ mont. Of   course   since   the   three   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I think Harrison   sib-­ in a way lings   are   not   they feel triplets,   their   bad about respective   aca-­ demic   roads   not being took   some   de-­ able to be tours   in   con-­ at each cluding   on   the   same  day. othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; ceremonies. All   three   graduated   in   We like to different   years   do things from   Middle-­ bury   Union   as a High   School,   family.â&#x20AC;? just   like   their   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Shelley parents. Harrison Robbie,   the   ÂżUVW WR JUDGX-­ ate,  enrolled  at  Boston  University.  He   earned   a   bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree   in   busi-­ ness   administration,   then   elected   to   stay  on  at  B.U.  to  attend  law  school. Sean   did   a   post-­graduate   year   at   the  Holderness  School  in  Plymouth,   N.H.,  before  enrolling  at  Hobart. Morgan  went  straight  from  MUHS   graduation  to  UVM  in  2010. This  put  all  three  students  on  pace   for  graduation  in  2014,  but  they  nev-­ er  imagined  that  all  three  institutions   would   hold   their   commencement   services  on  the  same  day.

ADDISON NORTHEAST SUPERVISORY UNION REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS INSTRUCTIONAL SERVICES FOR SPECIAL EDUCATION

  ANESU  requests  proposals  from  vendors   wishing  to  provide  contracted  instructional   services   for   special   education   for   2014-­ 15  school  year.    This  annual  procedure  is   being   instituted   for   purpose   of   complying   with   federal   guidelines   for   use   of   grant   funds   often   applied   to   services.     The   supervisory   union   will   receive   sealed   proposals   for   the   following   contracted   services  related  to  the  provision  of  special   education:    Occupational  therapy,  Physical   therapy,   Intensive   behavior   support   services,  Psychological  services.    Period  of  Contract:    ANESU  will  enter  into   written  agreements  through  a  Memorandum   RI 8QGHUVWDQGLQJ IURP D TXDOLÂżHG YHQGRU for  period  of  7/1/2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  6/30/2015.    Copy  of  request  for  proposals  is  available   from   ANESU   website   at   www.anesu.org   DQG DW $1(68 6XSHULQWHQGHQWÂśV 2IÂżFH between   8AM   -­   4PM,   Monday   through   )ULGD\ SULRU WR GDWH VSHFLÂżHG WR VXEPLW proposals.     Service   proposals   should   be   directed   to   the   attention   of:     Susan   Bruhl,   Special   Education   Director,   ANESU,   72   Munsil   Avenue,  Suite  601,  Bristol,  VT  05443  and   must   be   received   no   later   than   4:00   PM   Friday,  May  30,  2014.                                5/12,  15

ROBBIE   HARRISON

MIDDLEBURY  RESIDENTS  JIM  and  Shelley  Harrison  have  three  chil-­ dren  graduating  from  college  this  year,  all  on  May  18. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was   hoping   the   B.U.   School   of   Law   (graduation)   would   be   on   a   Friday   or   Saturday,â&#x20AC;?   Shelley   la-­ mented. Jim   and   Shelley   Harrison   have   often  made  the  approximately  700-­ mile   triangle   trip   between   Boston,   Geneva   and   Burlington   in   the   past   to   see   their   three   children.   But   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   never   had   to   do   it   in   one   day.  The  May  18  ceremonies  are  so   close  together  that  it  would  preclude   D UDSLGÂżUH ÂłWRXU GH FROOHJHV´ IRU the  couple.  So  they  have  decided  to   sort   it   out   diplomatically.   Shelley   will   attend   Morganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   graduation   at   UVM;Íž  Jim  will  see  Sean  get  his  di-­ ploma   at   Hobart;Íž   and   grandparents   Janice   and   Jerry   Munson   will   see  

FIND US ON

For breaking news & updates wherever you are! For breaking

news & updates facebook.com/ addisonindependent wherever you twitter.com/addyindy are!

Robbieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  commencement  ceremony   in  Boston. â&#x20AC;&#x153;All  of  us  were  at  Robbieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  under-­ graduate  ceremony,â&#x20AC;?  Shelley  noted,   reasoning   the   oldest   son   might   not   feel  as  left  out  by  not  having  a  par-­ ent  present  this  time  around. â&#x20AC;&#x153;At   least   we   will   have   all   made   one   (graduation   ceremony   on   May   18),â&#x20AC;?   Jim   Harrison   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Then   we   will   have   one   big   party   for   every-­ one.â&#x20AC;? The   three   siblings   understand   their  parentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  quandary  and  do  not   fault  them  for  having  to  improvise. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   in   a   way   they   feel   bad   about  not  being  able  to  be  at  each   othersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   ceremonies,â&#x20AC;?   Shelley   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  like  to  do  things  as  a  family.â&#x20AC;? And  while  the  family  will  be  di-­ vided  on  May  18,  a  common  bond   of   pride   will   envelop   them   all   on   that   big   day.   Sean   Harrison   ex-­ SODLQHG WKDW WKHLUV LV WKH ÂżUVW JHQ-­ eration  of  siblings  in  the  family  to   all  graduate  from  college. Sean   said   he   knows   what   his   mom   would   be   doing   if   she   were   able  to  be  at  his  graduation. Âł0\ ÂżUVW UHDFWLRQ WR KHDULQJ WKH news   was,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mom   going   to   think?  She  always  wants  pictures,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   he  said. Jim  Harrison  said  he  and  his  wife   will  be  thinking  about  all  three  chil-­ dren  on  May  18. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   were   proud   the   day   they   were  born,  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  still  making   us  proud,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

SEAN   HARRISON

MORGAN   HARRISON


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  35

UVM  fall  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list  announced BURLINGTON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   follow-­ ing  students  have  been  named  to  the   deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list  for  the  fall  2013  semester   at  the  University  of  Vermont: Ashley   Brunet   of   Addison,   a   Medical   Laboratory   Sciences   major   in  the  College  of  Nursing  &  Health   Sciences;Íž  Morgen  Clark  of  Addison,   a   Molecular   Genetics   major   in   the   College   of   Agriculture   &   Life   Sci-­ ences;Íž  Asa  Hunt  of  Addison,  a  Bio-­ logical  Science  major  in  the  College   of  Agriculture  &  Life  Sciences;Íž  Nina   Gage   of   Brandon,   an   Environmen-­ tal   Studies   major   in   the   Rubenstein   School   of   Environment   &   Natural   Resources;Íž   Jenna   Munger   of   Bran-­ don,  a  Medical  Laboratory  Sciences   major   in   the   College   of   Nursing   &   Health   Sciences;Íž   Matthew   Clayton   of  Bristol,  a  Medical  Laboratory  Sci-­ ences  major  in  the  College  of  Nurs-­ ing  &  Health  Sciences;Íž  and  Kensey   Hanson   of   Bristol,   an   Environmen-­ tal   Studies   major   in   the   Rubenstein   School   of   Environment   &   Natural   Resources. Also,   Heath   Hescock   of   Bristol,   an   Electrical   Engineering   major   in   the  College  of  Engineering  &  Math-­ ematical  Sciences;Íž  Adam  Pouliot  of   Bristol,   a   Business   Administration   major  in  the  School  of  Business  Ad-­ ministration;Íž  Katrina  Smith  of  Bris-­ tol,   a   Professional   Nursing   major   in  the  College  of  Nursing  &  Health   Sciences;Íž  Sylvia  Sword  of  Bristol,  a   Theater  major  in  the  College  of  Arts   &   Sciences;Íž   Eliza   Mayer   of   Corn-­ wall,   an   Elementary   Education   K-­6   major   in   the   College   of   Education   &  Social  Services;Íž  Brent  Thomas  of   East  Middlebury,  a  Music  Education   major   in   the   College   of   Education   &   Social   Services;Íž   Brian   Kilbride   of   Ferrisburgh,   a   Mechanical   Engi-­ neering  major  in  the  College  of  En-­ gineering  &  Mathematical  Sciences;Íž   Emily   Magoon   of   Ferrisburgh,   a   English  major  in  the  College  of  Arts   &   Sciences;Íž   and   April   Mentzer   of   Ferrisburgh,  a  Social  Work  major  in   the   College   of   Education   &   Social   Services. Also,   Stephen   Van   Wyck   of   Fer-­ risburgh,   an   Electrical   Engineering   major  in  the  College  of  Engineering   &  Mathematical  Sciences;Íž  Kathleen   VanWyck   of   Ferrisburgh,   a   Dietet-­ ics   Nutrition   &   Food   Sciences   ma-­ jor   in   the   College   of  Agriculture   &   Life   Sciences;Íž   Kelsey   Scarborough   of  Leicester,  a  Dietetics  Nutrition  &   Food  Sciences  major  in  the  College   of  Agriculture  &  Life  Sciences;Íž  Bela   Dobkowski   of   Lincoln,   a   Business   Administration   major   in   the   School   of   Business   Administration;Íž   Sarah   Thomas   of   Lincoln,   a   Professional   Nursing   major   in   the   College   of   Nursing   &   Health   Sciences;Íž   Grace   Buckles   of   Middlebury,   a   Religion   major  in  the  College  of  Arts  &  Sci-­ ences;Íž   Mychaella   Devaney   of   Mid-­ dlebury,   a   Psychology   major   in   the   College   of   Arts   &   Sciences;Íž   Reed   Messner  of  Middlebury,  a  Computer   Science  major  in  the  College  of  En-­ gineering  &  Mathematical  Sciences;Íž   Seth   Jewett   of   New   Haven,   an   Un-­ declared  major  in  the  College  of  En-­ gineering  &  Mathematical  Sciences;Íž   John  Mlcuch  of  New  Haven,  a  Biol-­ ogy  major  in  the  College  of  Arts  &  

Sciences;͞  and   Gerald   Fitz-­Gerald   of   North   Ferrisburgh,   a   Sustainable   Landscape  Horticulture  major  in  the   College   of  Agriculture   &   Life   Sci-­ ences. Also,  Lane  Kessler  of  North  Fer-­ risburgh,   an   Undeclared   major   in   the  College  of  Engineering  &  Math-­ ematical   Sciences;͞   Viscaya   Wagner   of   North   Ferrisburgh,   a   Studio   Art   major  in  the  College  of  Arts  &  Sci-­ ences;͞  Eben  Schumacher  of  Ripton,   an  Undeclared  major  in  the  College   of  Arts  &  Sciences;͞  Hannah  Domas   of   Rochester,   a   Studio   Art   major   in   the   College   of  Arts   &   Sciences;͞   Abigail  Hybl  of  Rochester,  an  Unde-­ clared   major   in   the   College   of  Arts   &   Sciences;͞   Danielle   Mishkit   of   Rochester,  a  Public  Communication   major  in  the  College  of  Agriculture   &   Life   Sciences;͞   Hugh   Randall   of   Rochester,   a   Psychology   major   in   the  College  of  Arts  &  Sciences;͞  Em-­ ily  Martin  of  Roxbury,  a  Elementary   Education   K-­6   major   in   the   Col-­ lege   of   Education   &   Social   Ser-­ vices;͞   Mariko   Totten   of   Salisbury,   a  Mathematics  major  in  the  College   of  Engineering  &  Mathematical  Sci-­ ences;͞  Anna  Waldron   of   Shoreham,   an   Environmental   Engineering   ma-­ jor  in  the  College  of  Engineering  &   Mathematical   Sciences;͞   and   Char-­ lotte   Paul   of   Starksboro,   a   Profes-­ sional  Nursing  major  in  the  College  

of  Nursing  &  Health  Sciences. Also,  Rachael  Zeno  of  Starksboro,   an  Exercise  and  Movement  Sciences   major   in   the   College   of   Nursing   &   Health   Sciences;͞   Mallory   Ketcham   of   Sudbury,   a   Biology   major   in   the   College  of  Arts  &  Sciences;͞  Hannah   Lones   of   Sudbury,   a   Exercise   and   Movement   Sciences   major   in   the   College   of   Nursing   &   Health   Sci-­ ences;͞  Casey  Brinkman-­Traverse  of   Vergennes,   a   Physics   major   in   the   College   of  Arts   &   Sciences;͞   Hilary   Delisle  of  Vergennes,  a  Mathematics   major  in  the  College  of  Engineering   &   Mathematical   Sciences;͞   Alexan-­ dria   Hall   of   Vergennes,   a   English   major  in  the  College  of  Arts  &  Sci-­ ences;͞   Devon   Lane   of   Vergennes,   a   English   major   in   the   College   of   Arts   &   Sciences;͞   Jennifer   Morley   of   Vergennes,   a   Biochemistry   ma-­ jor   in   the   College   of  Agriculture   &   Life  Sciences;͞  Alexander  Newton  of   Vergennes,   an   English   major   in   the   College  of  Arts  &  Sciences;͞  Melissa   Partington   of   Vergennes,   an   Early   Childhood  Special  Education  major   in   the   College   of   Education   &   So-­ cial   Services;͞   Tyler   Sawyer   of   Ver-­ gennes,   a   Computer   Science   major   in   the   College   of   Engineering   &   Mathematical   Sciences;͞   and   David   Viscido   of   Vergennes,   a   Biological   Science  major  in  the  College  of  Arts   &  Sciences.  

Middlebury  Memorial  Day  parade   planners  ready  for  participants MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   American   Legion   Post   27   in   Middlebury   is   planning   its   2014   Memorial   Day   Parade.   The   procession   on   Mon-­ day,  May  26,  begins  at  9  a.m. The  Legion  welcomes  groups  to   participate  and  asks  that  they  con-­ tact  Post  27  at  388-­9311  to  reserve  

May 12 Puzzle Solutions

Over 31 years of personalized, comfortable care in a high-tech dental office!

1FUFS+)PQQFS %%4t"EBN&'BTPMJ %.% #SJBO%$PMMJOT %%4 t.PTU*OTVSBODF8FMDPNFt&NFSHFODJFT8FMDPNF t/FX1BUJFOUT8FMDPNF 133&YDIBOHF4USFFU 4VJUFt.JEEMFCVSZ (802) 388-3553

www.middleburydentalvt.com

a  spot.   When   calling,   prospective   parade   marchers   are   asked   to   de-­ scribe  the  nature  of  their  entry  and   the  number  of  participants. Those   participating   in   the   pa-­ rade  are  asked  to  be  at  the  assem-­ bly  point  on  Field  House  Road  off   of  South  Street  at  8  a.m.

1

5

8

4

1

2

3

9

7

6

6 2

7 9

1 3

5 7

8 6

9 4

3 8

2 5

4 1

4

6

7

2

3

1

5

9

8

3 8

1 5

2 9

9 4

5 7

8 6

4 2

6 1

7 3

1

2

5

3

4

7

6

8

9

9 7

4 3

8 6

6 8

1 9

2 5

7 1

3 4

5 2

A

2

N

3

T

12

R O O

16

C

R

E

4

T E 19

E

23

S

28

T

34

O

39

U

43

T

24

P A U S E

25

I

E L

B

P

60

A

67

V

70

E

E G A N

I G E N T

14

S

T

17

P L I 29

T

H

20

S

L

44

P P

68

E

71

D

31

L A

T

49

T

61

Y

45

S E

R 21

E M P 41

57

A

S

A R

D D E

8

9

L

A

I T

N

L

S

D E R 59

P A

G

P

62

N E

E W

E R

R

R

S

I L

37

R I

E

A

L

L

R

S

T

51

A W H

A

55

I

I

D

T

E

63 69

E

A 72

L

S P

L

50

38

A

47

D T

58

A

T S

54

E

P

46

P A

A 42

11

E

T

27

A

E

22

S

10

R

18

S

36

C

15

E

33

O

S L

A

32

53

O

7

D O O

30

S

T

E

V

T

40

I

R

6

26

W E

L

O

E

35

T

L

56

13

R

N

48 52

5

S

64

A

65

S

66

E

T

E

N

E

A

D


PAGE 36  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  May  12,  2014

Champlain Valley  Properties 101  Court  Street,  Middlebury  VT www.midvthomes.com Outstanding  Agents Outstanding  Results®

‡

LI N ST EW IN G !

NEW HAVEN LAND – Beautiful   views   from   WKLV UHDOO\ QLFH   DFUH ORW RI RSHQ  ZRRGHG ODQG )URQWDJH RQ ERWK 'RJ 7HDP  5LYHU¶V %HQGURDGV6XQQ\VRXWKHUQH[SRVXUHZRXOGEH SHUIHFWIRUVRODU6HSWLF GHVLJQE\/$*RQ¿OH IRU D %5 KRPH &DOO %RQQLH *ULGOH\  RUERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHVFRP$79,900

LI N ST EW IN G !

VERGENNES CONDO ± /RYHO\ FRQYHQLHQWO\ ORFDWHG DQG UHFHQWO\ UHPRGHOHG FRQGR LQ 9HUJHQQHV :DON WR HYHU\WKLQJ DWWDFKHG FDU JDUDJHQHZNLWFKHQUHFHQWO\WLOHGXSGDWHGEDWKV IUHVKO\SDLQWHGLQVLGH0RYHULJKWLQDQGHQMR\ HDV\ OLYLQJ UG ÀRRU ORIW 0%5 ZZDONLQ FORVHW DQG D EDWK RQ HDFK OHYHO  &DOO %RQQLH *ULGOH\  RU HPDLO ERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHV FRP$189,900

RE PR DU IC CEE D

WEYBRIDGE ± $UFKLWHFWGHVLJQHG KRPH Z OLJKW¿OOHG VSDFHV  YLHZV RI 2WWHU &UHHN  WKH SDUN)OH[LEOHÀRRUSODQDOORZVIRURU%5¶V RURI¿FHVSDFHV DUHDVIRUHQWHUWDLQLQJ/DUJH SULYDWH GHFN   VHDVRQ URRP $ YHU\ VSHFLDO KRPH ZLWKLQ ZDONLQJ GLVWDQFH RI WKH FROOHJH  GRZQWRZQ &DOO 1DQF\ )RVWHU  RU QDQF\#PLGYWKRPHVFRP  $399,000

LI N ST EW IN G !

SHOREHAM ± 0LQLIDUP ZLWK QLFH ¿HOGV H[WUD RXWEXLOGLQJ DQG D VSDFLRXV UDQFK ZLWK WHUUL¿F YLHZV*UHDWIRUDOONLQGVRIVPDOOVFDOHDJULFXOWXUDO XVHV MXVWPLQXWHVIURPWKHFHQWHURI6KRUHKDP 9LOODJH7KHKRXVHKDVYHU\QLFHOLJKW¿OOHGRSHQ OLYLQJ VSDFHV DQG ODUJH JODVVHGLQ SRUFK RQ WKH EDFN 7KHUH LV D EUDQG QHZ VHSWLF V\VWHP DUHODWLYHO\QHZERLOHUDQGDODUJHJDUDJHZRUN VSDFH &DOO 1DQF\ )RVWHU DW  RU QDQF\#PLGYWKRPHVFRP  $297,500

RE PR DU IC CEE D

MIDDLEBURY HORSE PROPERTY –   34   x   48   horse  3  stall  barn  w/hay  storage,  2  run-­in  sheds    ORWV RI SDVWXUH 2QHOHYHO KRPH Z¿UHSODFH LQ LR,  a  MBR  suite,  2  BR’s  &  guest  BA  &  oversized   FDU JDUDJH )LQLVKHG ORZHU OHYHO ZUHFRUGLQJ VWXGLR 7KH  DFUHV LQFOXGHV IHQFHG PHDGRZV&RQWDFW%RQQLH*ULGOH\ or  ERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHVFRP    $332,000

LI N ST EW IN G !

MIDDLEBURY ± )DEXORXV ORFDWLRQ EDFNLQJ XS WR %DWWHOO :RRGV (QMR\ WKH GHFN  KRW WXE LQ EDFN\DUG 6KHG IRU JDUGHQ WRROV 5HPRGHOHG NLWFKHQ ZPDUEOH FDELQHWV  /LYLQJVWRQH FRXQWHUV RI¿FH /5 DQG  VSDFLRXV %5¶V  IXOO EDWKXS$WWDFKHGFDUJDUDJHIXOOEDVHPHQW &DOO %RQQLH *ULGOH\  RU HPDLO ERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHVFRP $319,900

LI N ST EW IN G !

MIDDLEBURY ± &KDUPLQJ  KRPH RQ D ORYHO\ORWLQDYHU\QLFHROGHUSDUWRI0LGGOHEXU\ :KLOHWKLVKRPHQHHGVXSGDWHVLWLVLQDZRQGHUIXO ORFDWLRQ DQG KDV WKH FKDUP \RX ZRXOG KRSH WR VHH LQ D YHU\ QLFH ROGHU KRPH7KH SURSHUW\ KDV D IDEXORXV EDFN\DUG ZLWK YLHZV URRP IRU JDUGHQVDQGDYDULHW\RIRXWGRRUDFWLYLWLHV$WUXH 0LGGOHEXU\JHP&DOO1DQF\)RVWHUDW RUQDQF\#PLGYWKRPHVFRP $350,000

LI N ST EW IN G !

LINCOLN ±7ZRVWRU\&RORQLDORQ$RIODQG Z YLHZV RI 0W $EH SDUWO\ ¿QLVKHG ZDONRXW EDVHPHQWIURQWSRUFK DWWDFKHGFDUJDUDJH Z VSDFH DERYH IRU VWRUDJH RU D IXWXUH ¿QLVKHG DUHD%ULJKWVXQQ\ÀRRUSODQZ3DOODGLDQZLQGRZ ORYHO\0%5VXLWHFHQWUDOYDFZKROHKRXVHYHQW V\VWHP ZLUHGIRUDJHQHUDWRU&RQWDFW%RQQLH *ULGOH\  RU ERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHV FRP  $389,900

LI N ST EW IN G !

SHOREHAM LAND ± :RQGHUIXO RSSRUWXQLW\ WR HVFDSH WR /DNH &KDPSODLQ  HQMR\ VXPPHU RQ WKLV DFUH ORW ZLWK ¶ ODNH IURQW D  [  VKHG D  )OHHWZRRG 7HUU\ FDPSHU ZVOLGH RXW DQG VHSWLF V\VWHP ZSRZHU DW ORW 1HHGV D ZHOOZDWHULVQRZIURPWKHODNH&RQWDFW%RQQLH *ULGOH\  RU ERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHV FRP $89,900

RE PR DU IC CEE D

NEW HAVEN ± 5HFHQW UHQRYDWLRQV ZQHZ YLQ\O VLGLQJ LQVXODWLRQ ZLQGRZV NLWFKHQ ÀRRUV FKHUU\ FDELQHWV 66 DSSOLDQFHV EDWK RQ QG ÀRRU FDUSHWRQVWQG UGÀRRUV&RYHUHG IURQW SRUFK SOXV D QLFH EDFN\DUG GHFN 1HZ KLJKHI¿FLHQF\ SURSDQH ERLOHUKRW ZDWHU XQLW &DOO 1DQF\ )RVWHU DW  RU QDQF\# PLGYWKRPHVFRP $246,500

RE PR DU IC CEE D

MIDDLEBURY ± 6SDFLRXV %5 UDQFK RQ D  DFUH ORW FLUFOHG E\ WUHHV IRU SULYDF\  LQ DQ H[FHSWLRQDO ORFDWLRQ DW WKH HQG RI WKH URDG 1LFH XSGDWHV LQFOXGLQJ D VWDQGLQJ VHDP URRI DQG %XGHUXVERLOHU0RWLYDWHGVHOOHU&DOO1DQF\)RVWHU DW  RU QDQF\#PLGYWKRPHVFRP $258,500

RE PR DU IC CEE D

BRISTOL –    3ULYDWHO\ VLWHG FRXQWU\ KRPH RQ DFUHVZYLHZV%5¶VEDWKV RSHQOLYLQJ VSDFH$WWDFKHGEXLOGLQJRQFHDEDNHU\PDNHV IRU H[FHSWLRQDO FRWWDJH LQGXVWU\ SRWHQWLDO VPDOO HQJLQHVKRSEDOOHWVWXGLRPXVLFUHFRUGLQJVWXGLR RUEDNHU\,QFOXGHVJUHDVHWUDSLQVLQNGUDLQ±D PXVWIRUDOOIRRGYHQWXUHV&RQWDFW%RQQLH*ULGOH\  RU ERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHVFRP   $253,000

LI N ST EW IN G !

NEW HAVEN “5 STAR” ENERGY RATED CAPE   ±9LHZVRQDFUHVZLWKDVXQQ\RSHQ/5'5 NLW ZPDSOH FDELQHWV DQG ELUFK ZRRG ÀRRUV VW ÀRRU0%5VXLWHPRUH%5¶VXSZGRUPHUVIRU FKDUP OLJKWEDWKVDQG¿QLVKHG//ZLWKD )5DQGGHQ$ORWRIKRXVHDWDJUHDWYDOXH&DOO %RQQLH*ULGOH\RUHPDLObonnie@ PLGYWKRPHVFRP  $299,500

LI N ST EW IN G !

CORNWALL LAND ± 7KLV SDUFHO RI ODQG KDV SDQRUDPLFPRXQWDLQYLHZVDQGH[FHOOHQWSULYDF\ /RYHO\ RSHQ ¿HOG IRU D YDULHW\ RI DJULFXOWXUDO XVHV/RFDWHGRQDORYHO\JUDYHOURDGEXWQRWIDU IURP5W3HUFWHVWLQJZDVGRQHZKHQFXUUHQW RZQHUSXUFKDVHGODQGDQGVKHZLOOREWDLQDVWDWH SHUPLWIRUWKHVHSWLFV\VWHPIRUDKRPH(OHFWULFLW\ LV DERXW  IHHW IURP QRUWK VLGH RI SURSHUW\ &DOO 1DQF\ )RVWHU DW  RU QDQF\# PLGYWKRPHVFRP  $257,900

LI N ST EW IN G !

MIDDLEBURY ±6SDFLRXVVXQQ\ZHOOPDLQWDLQHG home w/master   BR   suite   &   3   additional   BR’s    EDWK (QMR\ ERWK D /5  )5 IRUPDO '5 HDW LQ NLWFKHQ PXGURRP RYHUVL]HG  FDU JDUDJH VFUHHQHG SRUFK GHFNV ZDONRXW EDVHPHQW DQG WKH QLFHO\ ODQGVFDSHG   DFUH ORW &DOO 1DQF\ )RVWHURUQDQF\#PLGYWKRPHVFRP     $374,900

MIDDLEBURY ± 6SDFLRXV KRPH LQ D IDEXORXV LQWRZQ 0LGGOHEXU\ ORFDWLRQ +RXVH KDV VRPH ZRQGHUIXOIHDWXUHV¿UHSODFHVVRPHZRRGÀRRUV YHU\ ORZ PDLQWHQDQFH EULFN H[WHULRU 9HU\ QLFH DSDUWPHQWLQZDONRXWEDVHPHQWFXUUHQWO\UHQWHG IRU PRQWK /LVWHG EHORZ WRZQ DVVHVVHG YDOXH &DOO 1DQF\ )RVWHU DW  RU QDQF\#PLGYWKRPHVFRP $369,500

LI N ST EW IN G !

WEYBRIDGE LAND –   Beautiful,   fertile   land   w/ extensive   road   &   river   frontage,   a   southerly   H[SRVXUH  FRPPDQGLQJ YLHZV WR WKH *UHHQ 0RXQWDLQV2IIHUHGDV  $ORWDW$189,900   ZVHSWLFGHVLJQRULVSHUPLWWHGIRUORWVZVKDUHG VHSWLFGHVLJQ/RW±$IRU$110,000  &  Lot   ±$IRU$89,900&DOO%RQQLH*ULGOH\DW RUHPDLOERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHVFRP

LI N ST EW IN G !

ADDISON –   Unique   lighthouse-­styled   FRQWHPSRUDU\ KRPH (QMR\ /DNH &KDPSODLQ VXQVHW YLHZV IURP WKH VXQQ\ RSHQ VSDFLRXV LQWHULRU ZUDSDURXQGGHFN'HHGHGODNHDFFHVV IRUVZLPPLQJRUERDWLQJ0%5VXLWHRQQGÀRRU ZDONRXWORZHUOHYHOJDV)3¶VEHDXWLIXOJDUGHQV DJUHHQKRXVH PD]H&DOO%RQQLH*ULGOH\  RU HPDLO ERQQLH#PLGYWKRPHVFRP $297,000

RE PR DU IC CEE D

MIDDLEBURY –   This   4-­BR,   2   ½-­BA   home   is   only   18   years   old,   and   is   privately   sited   on   a   EHDXWLIXO DFUH ORW LQ D YHU\ QLFH GHYHORSPHQW 0DQ\ ORYHO\ IHDWXUHV LQFOXGH DQ RSHQ NLWFKHQ '5)5FDUJDUDJHIDEXORXV0%5ZODUJHEDWK FORVHWIRUPDO/5DQGRI¿FH&DOO1DQF\)RVWHU DW  RU QDQF\#PLGYWKRPHVFRP   $378,500

RE PR DU IC CEE D

WEYBRIDGE – Lovely   4   BR,   2   ½   BA   home   on   DFUH ORW ZLWK ORYHO\ )DPLO\ URRP /5 ZJDV ¿UHSODFHIRUPDO'5HDWLQNLWFKHQPXGURRP  DWWDFKHGFDUJDUDJH:RQGHUIXOORFDWLRQFORVH WR 0LGGOHEXU\¶V GRZQWRZQ DQG FROOHJH &RQWDFW 1DQF\ )RVWHU DW  RU QDQF\# PLGYWKRPHVFRP    $279,000

May 12 2014  
Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you