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Addison County Guide to

Local Food and Farms 2012

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An  Addison  County  Relocalization  Network  (ACORN)  publication,  produced  in  partnership  with  the  Addison  Independent.


Page 2 — 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

What’s inside? Eat  local  —  on  a  budget! Page  5

Local  group  forges  path  to   food  access Page  5

The  2012  Addison  County   Guide  to  Local  Food  and  Farms

Institutions  buy  local

Publisher:  ACORN  Network

Page  8

The  Lay  of  the  Land Page  9

So,  why  should  I  eat  local? Page  13

Learn,  buy,  grow

Project  Editor:  Andrea  Suozzo Contributing   Writers:   Andrea   Suozzo,   Andrew   Stein,   Christian   Woodard  &  Kyle  Finck   Directory  compiled  by:  Susan  Smiley   &  Hannah  Mueller Map  by:  Claire  Tebbs  &  Kevin  Behm

Page  14

Design  by:  Andrea  Suozzo  &  Andrew   Stein

Food  and  Farm  Directory

Cover  adapted  from  a  Charlie  Hohn   illustration

Page  15

Wild  and  wacky  crops   Page  25

3URGXFHUSUR¿OHV Bobcat  Cafe  and  Brewery Page  33

To  make  sure  your  farm  is  included   in  the  next  Addison  County  Guide  to   Local   Food   and   Farms,   call   Susan   Smiley   at   (802)   388-­6601.   For   a   statewide  listing,  register  your  farm   at  vermontgrowersguide.com. For  more  details  about  ACORN  and   to  receive  our  member  e-­newsletter,  

Eagle’s  Flight  Farm Page  34

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Come savor the experience 0W,QGHSHQGHQFH5G 2UZHOO97 ZZZHIIDUPFRP  


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms — Page 3

Letter from ACORN President Jonathan Corcoran Welcome to the third edition of our prize-­winning Guide! It’s hard to believe how much has happened in the last 12 months. The local food economy is truly budding and entering an exciting new spring of growth. Consider the following: ‡ The Addison County Local Food Index reached $2.85 million in 2011. ACORN launched the Local Food Index to track the wholesale value of local foods (Vermont + 30 miles) purchased by Middlebury College, Por-­ ter Medical Center, Middlebury Natural Foods Co-­op, Greg’s Meat Market and Addison Northeast Foodservice. ‡ Green Mountain Organic Creamery to open soon: Cheryl and JD Devos of Kimball Brook Farm in North Ferrisburgh will be bottling their organic milk at their new facility in Hinesburg this spring. ‡ Grass-­fed beef, pastured meats and eggs are on a roll: Local beef producers are organizing to increase processing capacity in the county. 7KH0DG5LYHU9DOOH\)RRG+XELQ:DLWVÀHOG just opened and will be processing premium meats. VT Heritage Grazers is growing its wholesale production of pastured pork. The Hannaford Career Center is organizing train-­ ings for meat cutters. Rockville Market Farm and Doolittle Farm are scaling up pastured egg production. ‡ ACORN has been involved in a pilot to evalu-­ ate the functionality of a transactional plat-­ form for wholesaling local foods in the county, in Vermont and beyond in partnership with FoodEx, an information technology and logis-­ tics company from Boston. ‡ Farm-­to-­School is taking root: School gardens and greenhouses, local food feasts, taste-­ testings, iron chef competitions, composting programs and local food ingredients on school menus are popping up across all three of our county’s school districts.

‡ Bristol Bakery is launching its wholesale baking business to supply local institutional accounts with fresh, scratch-­baked goods. ‡ More restaurants are showcasing local: Pio-­ neers like Mary’s Restaurant started featur-­ ing local growers and local foods decades ago. Basin Harbor Club, the Bobcat CafÊ, Bar Antidote, Tourterelle, the Storm CafÊ and the Shoreham Inn have stepped it up in the last few years. Ramunto’s, Green Peppers and A&W now source more fresh and tasty locally-­ grown ingredients for their menus. ‡ HOPE is exploring the feasibility of contracting production of storage crops with local growers to process into frozen winter meals for distribu-­ tion to its clients. ‡ Matchmaking: ACORN and Middlebury Col-­ lege have co-­hosted three matchmakers between local growers and value-­added producers and buyers. ‡ Sunrise Orchards launched a frozen food line: Sunrise partnered with the Neighboring Food Co-­op Association and Fletcher Allen Hospi-­ tal to release a frozen line of organic, locally sourced, frozen broccoli, sweet corn, blue-­ berries, and green beans which can now be found at 20 co-­ops throughout Vermont and New England. :HKDYHORWVRIJUHDWVWRULHVSURÀOHVDQGUHFLSHV for you in addition to our growing directory of lo-­ cal producers. Write us at info@acornvt.org with your comments and suggestions! A special thanks to Angelo Lynn, Andrea Suozzo, Andrew Stein, Vicki Nolette and Anna Osborne at the Independent, to Claire Tebbs and Kevin Behm at the Addison County Regional Planning Commission for their help with mapping, and to ACORN stalwarts Susan Smiley and Hannah Muel-­ ler! And thank YOU for supporting our advertisers: ev-­ ery dollar you spend locally is an investment in our community, our health and our future! — Jonathan Corcoran ACORN Network


Page 4 — 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms Photos,  top  to  bottom: Jams,  preserves  and   dried  herbs  all  ready  for  a   long  winter Photo  by  Kate  Gridley Drying  garlic  in  July Photo  by  Barbara  Ganley A  jar  of  Addison  County   pickles  was  among  the  top   contestants  at  the  2012   Vermont  Farm  Show Photo  by  Andrea  Suozzo

Gleason’s Grains Whole Wheat Bread ‡ 3/4 cup honey ‡ 1/4 cup molasses ‡ 3 cups boiling water ‡ 1 cup cold water ‡ 3 packages yeast

‡ 1/4 cup olive oil ‡ FXSVZKROHZKHDWà RXU ‡ FXSVZKLWHà RXU ‡ 1 tsp salt

Place honey and molasses in large bowl. Stir in hot water, and then add cold water. When liquid is lukewarm (105 to 115 degrees), sprinkle yeast evenly over mixture to activate. Use your hands to help mix it in and dissolve. Then add RLODQGJUDGXDOO\VWLULQà RXUDQGVDOW .QHDGRQDZHOOà RXUHGEUHDGERDUGIRUPLQXWHV3ODFHLQXQJUHDVHG bowl and cover with plastic wrap or damp towel. Set in warm place (80 degrees) to rise until double, about 45 minutes to 1 hour. Gently punch down, and let rise again (about 30 minutes). Round the dough and shape into three loaves (8� by 4� pan). Let rise at 90 GHJUHHVXQWLOLWLVDUFKHGRYHUWKHWRSRIWKHSDQV DERXWPLQXWHV  Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Put bread in oven and DO NOT OPEN the RYHQGRRUIRUPLQXWHV Check it at 30 minutes, but it will probably require 40 to 45 minutes. Recipe courtesy Ben and Theresa Gleason


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms — Page 5

On a food budget? Think simple, local

One  of  the  hesitations  many  have  with  buying  local  food  is  the  price  tag,  which,   DWÂżUVWJODQFHORRNVWREHKLJKHUWKDQWKHIRRGRQ\RXUDYHUDJHVXSHUPDUNHWVKHOI hailing  from  the  midwest,  California,  Florida  or  from  some  more  exotic  locale. To  Robin  McDermott,  however,  those  prices  can  be  deceiving.  McDermott  brought   the  concept  of  “peasant  foodâ€?  to  the  Mad  River  Valley  Localvore  Project,  a  group  she   co-­founded,  and  she’s  written  about  it  in  several  publications  since  then. As  she  describes  it,  the  “peasant  dietâ€?  is  one  that  was  widespread  before  the  rise   of  the  industrialized  food  system:  local  because  it  was  the  easiest,  cheap  because  the   expensive  options  were  prohibitive,  and  nutritious.  While  some  in  the  world  still  eat   a  similar  diet  today,  we  Americans  no  longer  do. The  classic  combination  of  rice  and  beans  is  a  cheap,  nutritious  example  of  the   peasant  diet. +HUHLQWKH&KDPSODLQ9DOOH\ZHFDQWDNHPDQ\RI0F'HUPRWWÂśVUHFRPPHQGDWLRQV to  heart.  She  presents  six  rules  to  eat  locally  on  a  budget:

1.  Let  the  “royaltyâ€?  eat  high  on  the  hog Cuts  “high  on  the  hogâ€?  are  both  more  tender  and  more  expensive.  McDermott   suggests  buying  the  cheaper  cuts  of  meat,  which  are  tougher  but  can  be  more   Ă€DYRUIXO&RRNE\EUDLVLQJVORZURDVWLQJRUPDNLQJDVRXSRUVWHZWKHQPL[ with  other  ingredients  —  vegetables,  beans,  grains  —  to  round  out  the  dish.

2.  Never  throw  food  away

Local group forges a path to food access By  ANDREA  SUOZZO ADDISON  COUNTY  —  Among  the  fertile   ÂżHOGVDQGYLEUDQWDJUDULDQFXOWXUHRI$GGLVRQ County  lives  a  portion  of  the  population  that   cannot   afford   to   buy   food   produced   just   down  the  road. “One  of  the  disconnects  has  been  that  we   have  so  many  farms  in  this  community,  and   we’ve  got  so  much  food  being  produced  here,   but  it’s  not  available  to  the  people  who  need   the   food   the   most,â€?   said   Jeanne   Montross,   executive   director   of   Middlebury-­based   Helping  Overcome  Poverty’s  Effects. While   federal   and   state   organizations   OLNH :,& DQG 6TXDUHV97 GR SOD\ D SDUW in   addressing   hunger,   providing   food   and   ÂżQDQFLDOKHOSWRSHRSOHVWUXJJOLQJWRDIIRUG meals,  Montross  said  that  there’s  a  growing   understanding  that  local  efforts  must  play  a   role  as  well. 0RQWURVVVDLGDPRYHDW+23(WRVHHNRXW fresh,  unprocessed  foods  and  local  produce  in   the  past  years  has  been  a  struggle,  especially   with  limited  resources  and  high  demand  for  

WKHRUJDQL]DWLRQœVUHVRXUFHV%XWVKHœVEHHQ ZRUNLQJZLWKORFDOVWRUHVWRDFFHVVWKHLUROGHU produce,  and  Montoss  has  been  able  to  get  a   supply  of  more  plain  canned  and  dried  foods   that  offer  more  nutritional  value  than  many   processed  foods. Starting   last   year,   the   organization   also   PDLQWDLQVDFRPPXQLW\JDUGHQRXWEDFNRI LWV%RDUGPDQ6WUHHWKHDGTXDUWHUV$FRXQW\ gleaning   project   started   several   years   ago   by   a   Middlebury   College   student   allows   +23( WR DUUDQJH ZLWK IDUPV WR FOHDU ¿HOGV RISURGXFHWKDWZRXOGQRWVHOODWWKHPDUNHW From  October  2010  through  September  2011   WKHRUJDQL]DWLRQFROOHFWHGSRXQGVRI VTXDVKSRWDWRHVDSSOHVDQGRWKHUSURGXFH through  gleaning. 0RQWURVV LV QRW DORQH LQ WDNLQJ VWHSV toward   a   more   inclusive   food   system.   She   LV ZRUNLQJ ZLWK D JURXS WU\LQJ WR GHYLVH new   ways   to   include   all   members   of   the   community  in  the  local  food  system.   Just   this   year,   Rep.   Will   Stevens,   (See  HOPE,  Page  9)

Use  bread  scraps,  cheese  ends  and  scraps  of  meat  in  creative  ways:  McDermott   VXJJHVWVVWXI¿QJIULHGULFHEUHDGSXGGLQJRUDIULWWDWDZLWKVPDOODPRXQWVRI leftovers.  Worse  comes  to  worst,  compost  it!

3.   Adapt  recipes  to  what  you  have  seasonally  available  

and  on  hand

'RQœWEHDIUDLGWRVXEVWLWXWH\RJXUWIRUEXWWHUPLONYLQHJDUIRUOHPRQMXLFH polenta   for   pasta.   Alternatives,   says   McDermott,   can   be   more   inexpensive   DQG PD\ EH HDVLHU WR ¿QG ORFDOO\ )RU H[DPSOH LI LWœV IDOO DQG \RX FDQœW JHW blueberries,  try  using  apples  instead.

4.  Make  inexpensive  proteins  the  cornerstones  of  your   diet 'ULHG EHDQV WDNH WLPH WR PDNH EXW 0F'HUPRWW VXJJHVWV FRRNLQJ ODUJH batches   at   one   time   and   freezing   small   portions.   Eggs   are   another   protein   bargain:  they  come  by  the  dozen,  and  even  the  more  expensive  local  ones  tend   to  be  cheaper  than  meat.

5.  Grow  some  of  your  own  food ,I\RXGRQœWKDYHD\DUG¿QGDSORWLQDFRPPXQLW\JDUGHQ²%ULVWRO9HUJHQQHV and  Middlebury  all  have  these  available.  Raise  a  laying  hen.  Grow  produce,  join   D&6$ FRPPXQLW\VXSSRUWHGDJULFXOWXUH RUEX\LQEXONVHDVRQDOO\6WRUHURRW YHJHWDEOHVLQDFRROGU\GDUNVSDFHDQGPDNHVHDVRQDOSURGXFHLQWRVDXFHV SLFNOHVUHOLVKHVMDPVRUFKXWQH\V&DQIUHH]HRUGHK\GUDWHSURGXFH

6.  Take  advantage  of  modern  day  peasant   conveniences Freezers  are  handy  ways  to  preserve  food  for  long  periods  of  time,  allowing   us   to   continue   eating   locally   throughout   the   winter.   The   Internet   is   full   of   LQIRUPDWLRQRQFRRNLQJWHFKQLTXHVIRRGSUHVHUYDWLRQDQGJDUGHQLQJ Visit  vermontlocalvore.org  for  McDermott’s  writing  and  recipes.

Sunday, September 16, 2012 Shoreham, VT

Providing design and installation services in VT, NY and NH 802-759-3033 email: lindenlandscaping@gmavt.net www.lindenlandscaping.com


Page 6 — 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

Croutons  you  would  make  yourself, if  you  had  the  time.

Olivia’s  Crouton  Company,  Inc.,  New  Haven,  VT 7ROOIUHH‡ZZZROLYLDVFURXWRQVFRP


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms — Page 7

We grow the corn that‌ Feeds the cows that‌ Makes the milk that‌ Support Addison County farms:

Buy Local!

Blue  Meadow  Farm Blue  Stone  Farm Champlain  Orchards Douglas  Orchards Elmer  Farm Flower  Power Foote  Street  Farm Garden  Art Gildrien  Family  Farm

Golden  Russet  Farm Kingsley’s  Farm  Stand Lalumiere  Farmstand Lewis  Creek  Farm Lower  Notch  Berry  Farm Maple  Wind  Farm Marble  Rose  Farm Mountainyard  Farm New  Leaf  Organics Nola  Kevra’s  Farm Norris  Berry  Farm Orb  Weaver  Farm

Quarry  Hill  Garden Rockville  Market  Farm Scott’s  Greenbush  Gardens Singing  Cedars  Farmstead Stoney  Lonesome  Farm Thanksgiving  Farm The  Last  Resort Vermont  Herb  &  Salad  Co. Vermont  Off-­Season        Organics Weybrige  Gardens Woods  Market  Gardens

We bottle Fresh for you Everyday!

Local Milk at its Best

MONUMENT FARMS DAIRY -$0(652$':(<%5,'*(Â&#x2021;


Page 8 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

*QONWWLJ]aMZ[NIZUMZ[Ă&#x2026;VLU]\]ITQV\MZM[\QVSMMXQVOQ\TWKIT By  KYLE  FINCK

IRRG SURGXFHUV WR EHQHÂżW RXU FKLOGUHQ´ Despite  several  years  of  budget-­slashing   said  Alexander.     The   amount   of   local   food   in   ANeSU   and   belt-­tightening,   institutions   in   Addison  County  are  reaching  out  to  local   school   meals   ranges   depending   on   the   farms   small   and   large   in   an   attempt   to   season,  with  upwards  of  25  percent  in  the   buy  closer  to  home  and  support  the  local   fall  and  15  percent  in  the  winter.   Alexander  has  approximately  $400,000   economy.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   a   growing   commitment   to   a  year  to  spend  on  food  for  the  six  schools,   making   sure   we   have   really   healthy   food   DQGVDLGWKDWLQWKHÂżUVWKDOIRIWKHVFKRRO with   as   much   local   product   as   possible,â&#x20AC;?   year,  $25,000  to  $30,000  of  that  went  to   said   Kathy   Alexander,   president   of   the   local  producers.   One   recipient   of   School   Nutrition   Association   Alexanderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   push   for   of   Vermont   and   director   more   local   foods   was   the   of   the   Addison   Northeast   Bristol   Bakery,   who   began   Supervisory   Union   (ANeSU)   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students  get   bagels   to   the   Food  Cooperative.   to  not  only  see   supplying   cooperative   in   December   The   countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   largest   institutional   buyers   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   where  their  food   2011.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  different  than  buying   Addison   County   schools,   Porter   Medical   Center   and   comes  from,  but   from   a   farmer,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   Middlebury   College   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   all   also  take  part  in   same   idea:   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Well,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   buying   bagels,   and   we   live   pour   big   money   into   local   in   a   town   with   a   store   that   foods. the  growing.â&#x20AC;? produces   bagels,   letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   see   Some,   like   Shorehamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   -­  Chris  Cantlin what  we  can  do,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  she  said.   Champlain   Orchards,   supply   Fresh  Picks  CafĂŠ Kevin   Harper,   co-­owner   all  three.  In  2011,  the  orchard   of  the  Bristol  Bakery,  called   sold  280  pounds  of  apples  to   the  relationship  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  big  hit.â&#x20AC;? Porter  Medical  Center  and  15,480  pounds   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  whole  idea  of  the  program  is  to  get   to   various   schools   in   Addison   County,   as   well   as   4,630   pounds   of   applesauce   kids  eating  healthier  foods  that  taste  good   and   2,300   pounds   of   sliced   apples   to   and   here   we   are,   right   down   the   street,   able  to  deliver  that.â&#x20AC;? Middlebury  College. The   bakery   devised   a   unique   bagel   for   The   power   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   the   potential   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   that   institutions   have   when   buying   locally   the  cooperative  with  a  particular  balance   prompted  the  Northeast  Organic  Farming   RI ZKROH JUDLQ Ă&#x20AC;RXU DQG D VPDOOHU WZR Association   of   Vermont   (NOFA-­VT),   and-­a-­half   ounce   size   to   accommodate   in   partnership   with   Vermont   Food   school  nutrition  requirements  on  portion   Education   Every   Day   (VT   FEED),   to   size.   Harper   said   that   both   sides   had   to   undertake  a  nine-­month  research  project   starting   in   January   of   this   year   on   the   compromise  when  it  came  to  price.   Âł:HÂśUH QRW PDNLQJ TXLWH WKH SURÂżW demand   from   institutions   for   local   foods   and  the  existing  infrastructure  in  the  state   margin   we   would   like   and   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   (the   cooperative)  not  getting  it  quite  as  cheap   to  provide  it.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   keystone   to   this   increase   in   farm   as   they   might   a   frozen,   lower   quality   production   and   sales   is   the   wholesale   product.   But   they   recognize   that   the   marketplace,   particularly   the   sector   that   raw   materials,   hand   made   aspects   and   includes   large-­volume   purchasers   such   freshness  of  the  product  are  worth  paying   as  institutions,â&#x20AC;?  said  the  organizations  in   a  little  bit  more  for.â&#x20AC;?   Fresh   Picks   CafĂŠ,   a   foodservice   a  letter  sent  to  their  community  partners. The   Addison   County   Relocalization   company  based  out  of  Londonderry,  N.H.,   Network   (ACORN)   is   also   developing   has   provided   food   for   Middlebury   Union   a   web-­based   platform   for   farm-­to-­ Middle   and   High   Schools,   Mary   Hogan   institution   sales   within   the   county,   with   Elementary   and   Vergennes   Union   High   the  aim  of  enabling  farms  and  institutions   School  for  more  than  ten  years.     Field  Supervisor  Chris  Cantlin  said  that   to  better  connect. up   to   70   percent   of   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   produce   Addison  County  Schools is   local   in   the   fall   and   up   to   50   percent   Across   the   county,   elementary,   is   local   in   the   winter.   Fresh   Picks   works   middle   and   high   schools   use   different   with  13  farms  to  help  supply  their  schools   food   providers   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   some   based   within   with   local   products,   spending   $37,610   in   the   schools,   some   members   of   larger   Addison  County  last  academic  year.   foodservice  companies.  Across  the  board,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  try  and  involve  the  educational  piece   however,   growing   emphasis   on   serving   by   bringing   in   grow   carts   to   the   schools,   local  food  is  a  common  thread.   where  a  class  will  have  the  responsibility   The   ANeSU   Food   to   grow   something   like   Cooperative   was   born   basil,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students  get   18   months   ago   with   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  great  to   to   not   only   see   where   their   Mount   Abraham,   Bristol   food   comes   from,   but   also   Elementary   and   Monkton   have  those  kids   take  part  in  the  growing.â&#x20AC;?   Central   schools,   but   has   Ben   Gleason,   owner   of   eating  quality   added   Beeman   Elementary,   Gleason   Grains   in   Bridport,   Robinson   Elementary   and   products  that   supplies   13   local   schools   Lincoln   Community   schools   (including  Fresh  Picks  CafĂŠ)   are  grown  right   ZLWKZKROHZKHDWĂ&#x20AC;RXU since.   Alexander  said  she  has  set   here  in  Addison   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Five   years   ago,   I   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   three   main   priorities   for   the   sell   to   any   schools   other   schools  in  her  cooperative.   County.â&#x20AC;? than   Middlebury   College,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;First   and   foremost,   we   the   30-­year   grain   -­  Bridport  grain   said   have   to   be   smart   about   farmer.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Now   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   quite   farmer  Ben  Gleason a   few   â&#x20AC;Ś   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   great   to   have   ÂżQDQFHV6HFRQGLVFKDQJLQJ the   culture   of   food   and   the   those   kids   eating   quality   community.   Third   is   creating   strong   products   that   are   grown   right   here   in   connections  with  the  community  through   Addison  County.â&#x20AC;?   farm-­to-­school  and  purchasing  from  local   Gleason   credited   the   increase   to   a  

KATHY  ALEXANDER,  COORDINATOR  of  the  Addison  Northeast  Foodservice  Cooperative,   chats  with  Deb  Preston  and  Anne  Coolidge,  cooks  at  Monkton  Central  School.  The   cooperative  seeks  to  incorporate  local  foods  into  school  lunches  and  to  create   community  connections  to  the  farmers. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

greater   demand   for   healthy   school   food   and  the  rise  of  the  local  foods  movement.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   are   certain   numbers   of   people   in  food  services  who  are  really  starting  to   question   the   quality   of   the   food   they   are   serving.   The   local   foods   movement   has   also   had   a   impact.   There   are   a   lot   more   people  now  who  are  saying,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  to   support  our  local  businesses,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   While   Gleason   approximated   that   less   than   10   percent   of   his   business   came   from   local   schools   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Mary   Hogan   buys   100   pounds   of   grain   a   month   while   the   Red   Hen   Baking   Company   in   Middlesex   buys   one-­and-­a-­half   tons   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   he   said   his   relationship   with   local   schools   goes   beyond  business. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   had   students   come   visit   the   farm   and   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   to   talk   at   schools,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   good   that   these   students   get   a   connection   between   where   their   food   is  

grown  and  the  local  farmer.â&#x20AC;?  

Porter  Medical  Center

In   2011,   Porter   Medical   Center   spent   10.5  percent  of  its  food  budget  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  $23,946   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  on  locally  produced  food.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  started  tracking  the  amount  we  spend   on   local   food   last   year   because   I   wanted   to   see   where   we   were   and   how   we   could   improve   the   on   the   number,â&#x20AC;?   said   the   centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Director  of  Food  Services,  Laura   Brace.   Brace   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   the   budget   to   buy   locally  all  the  time,  but  said  she  tries  to  as   much  as  possible.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes  it  boils  down  to  the  fact  that   I  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  do  this  everyday,  but  at  least  I  can   do  it  on  holidays  to  make  it  special,â&#x20AC;?  said   Brace,  who  has  been  director  since  2002.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   can   buy   tomatoes   locally   for   $25   a   (See  Local  business  on  Page  32)

Swiss Chard and Goat Cheese Tart Â&#x2021; Unsweetened tart crust (with pe-­ cans, preferably) Â&#x2021; 1/2 pound swiss chard Â&#x2021; 1 bunch scallions (or wild ramp) Â&#x2021; 1 splash olive/grapeseed oil

Â&#x2021; 1/3 cup milk Â&#x2021; 2 large eggs Â&#x2021; 4 ounces goat cheese Â&#x2021; Nutmeg Â&#x2021; Salt & pepper

Gather the dough into a ball, wrap in waxed paper, and place in fridge for about half an hour. Preheat oven to 375. Gently roll out the crust dough and line your tart pan. Place pie weights on the crust (or use a sheet of foil and place about half a cup of dried beans on top), and bake for about 20 min-­ utes until lightly golden. Remove from oven, take off the weights and place the tart pan on a cooling UDFNZKLOH\RXPDNHWKHĂ&#x20AC;OOLQJ5HGXFHRYHQWHPSHUDWXUHWR Rinse the chard, drain well, then separate the leaves from the stems. Roughly chop the leaves, cut the stems into 1/2 inch slices. Slice the white and light green parts of the scallions. Heat a skillet for about a minute, add a splash of your oil and, when it shimmers, add the onions and sautee until transparent. Next add the chard stems and cook over medium heat until they begin to soften. Next add the chopped chard leaves. Cook, stirring to prevent scorching, until the liquid that will seep from the leaves has run out and the mixture is no longer water. Be sure to press the mixture while you cook it to coax the liquid out. Remove pan from heat. In a medium sized bowl or using a food processor, beat the eggs very well. Add the milk, a pinch of salt, pepper, and a small grinding of fresh nutmeg. Add the goat cheese, in small pieces, and mix until smooth. Place the chard mixture in the tart crust, then pour the custard mixture over the top. Bake for about 45 minutes, until a knife inserted comes out clean, and the custard is browned. Let tart cool slightly on a rack. For a perfect meal, serve immediately with French bread and your favorite salad with a light vinaigrette. Recipe courtesy Jeanne Montross


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 9

Lay of the land: A closer look at Addison County soil

STUDENTS  FROM  WHITING  Elementary  School  harvested  more  than  250  pounds  of  potatoes  at  Golden  Russet  Farm  in  the  fall  of   2009.   Second-­   and   third-­grade   students   took   the   cartons   of   potatoes   to   the   Whiting   Community   Food   Shelf   to   deliver   their   harvest   and  complete  the  cycle  of  farm  to  school  to  dinner  table.  Thanks  to  Will  and  Judy  Stevens  and  all  Whiting  students,  families  in  need  of   support  of  the  Community  Food  Shelf  got  fresh  vegetables  on  their  table.

HOPE â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  we  really  want  to  do  is  to  change  the   (Continued  from  Page  5) whole  paradigm  of  how  we  feed  people  who   I-­Shoreham   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   also   a   vegetable   farmer   at   Golden  Russet  Farm  and  a  major  supporter   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   food,â&#x20AC;?   said   Montross.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Instead   of  the  gleaning  project  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  convened  a  group   of   saying,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   bag   of   food,   you   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   to  discuss  ways  that  those  in  agricultural  and   know  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  in  it,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  what  we  want  to  do  is  start   getting  people  involved  in  deciding  what  kind   food  professions  can  address  hunger  issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   wanted   to   see   if   we   could   deal   with   of  food  they  eat  and  making  connections  with   some   of   the   issues   with   hunger   through   the  farmers.â&#x20AC;? Food  systems  scholar  Jesse  McEntee  taught   the   farm   economy   we   have   now,â&#x20AC;?   said   a   course   at   Middlebury   College   this   winter   Jay   Leshinsky,   who   runs   the   garden   at   examining   local   and   Middlebury   College   and   national   food   systems   serves   as   the   president   Food insecurity by and   emergency   of   of   the     board   at   food   distribution   percent of population: Middlebury   Natural   strategies.   He   said   Foods   Co-­op,   which   inclusive   approaches   pledged   to   help   fund   United  States:   14.5% to   changing   eating   a   project   the   group   habits   tend   to   be   Vermont:     13.8% undertakes. more   effective   than   Though   the   project   is   Addison  County:   12.8% simply  giving  nutrition   still  in  its  nascent  stages,   instructions,   since   HOPE  plans  to  contract   U.S.,  Vermont:  2008-­2010  average,     there  are  more  factors   with   local   farmers   to   United  States  Department  of  Agriculture to  what  people  choose   provide   produce,   then   Addison  County:  2009  data,  Feeding   to   eat   than   knowing   process  the  produce  into   America what   foods   are   soups   and   stews   to   be   â&#x20AC;&#x153;healthy.â&#x20AC;? served  at  the  food  shelf.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Food   is   a   very   Montross  said  one  goal  of  this  project  will  be   complex   subject   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   just   a   metabolic   involving  food  shelf  users  in  as  many  aspects   need.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   also   a   really   important   symbolic   as  possible,  and  in  delivering  the  soups  and   resource,â&#x20AC;?   h e   s aid. stews   with   recipes   for   learning.   Eventually,   One   of   the   persistent   questions   that   his   she   hopes   to   extend   the   processing   and   students   had,   said   McEntee,   was   how   to   storage   capacity   of   the   food   shelf,   and   to   reconcile   t he  emerging  local  foods  movement   be  able  to  offer  opportunities  for  food  shelf   across   the   state   with   the   persistent   issue   of   users   to   participate   in   the   harvesting   and   hunger   a nd   malnourishment. processing  of  their  own  food. McEntee   said   this   question   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   a   new   Montross  said  these  sorts  of  contracts  are   one,   but   that   many   Vermont   organizations   the  best  way  to  go:  to  get  food  with  local  roots   are   leading   the   nation   in   their   efforts   to   to  the  food  bank  and  to  make  sure  the  grower   incorporate  those  affected  by  food  insecurity   is  compensated  for  it.

issues  into  the  solutions.  The  Vermont  Food   Bank,  for  example,  has  a  working  farm  that   creates   jobs   for   the   organizationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clients   and  brings  in  fresh  food  during  the  growing   season. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   really   about   reframing   this   as   not   so   much   a   hunger   issue,   but   a   food   justice   issue,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  idea  of  a  grassroots   response   to   hunger   by   the   people   who   are   experiencing  hunger.â&#x20AC;? This,  said  Montross,  is  what  she  hopes  to   move   toward:   involving   people   in   the   food   system,   and   giving   them   the   skills   and   the   inspiration  they  need  to  make  sure  they  are   eating  a  healthy  diet.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  problem  here  in  Addison  County  is  not   so  much  starvation  as  it  is  malnourishment,â&#x20AC;?   she  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   you   look   at   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   available   for   SHRSOHÂśV IRRG GROODUV WKHUHÂśV D ÂżQDQFLDO incentive   and   a   physical   comfort   to   buying   LQH[SHQVLYH IRRG WKDW ZLOO ÂżOO \RX XS´ Montross  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  not  the  food  you  want   to   be   feeding   children   whose   organs   and   brains   are   developing.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   the   kind   of  food  that  you  want  working  people  to  be   eating  so  that  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  prepared  to  go  to  work   and  be  productive.â&#x20AC;? As   HOPE   embarks   on   its   new   journey,   Montross   said   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   already   heard   good   feedback  from  food  shelf  users  on  the  wider   range   of   produce   and   gleaning   programs   already  in  place.  And  she  said  she  is  optimistic   that   more   and   more   people   throughout   the   community   will   help   to   make   local   foods   available  to  all. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   as   long   as   we   keep   bringing   attention   to   the   issues   they   will   start   to   change,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.

By  ANDREW  STEIN   ADDISON   COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   From   the   high   ridges   of   the   Green   Mountains   down   to   Lake   Champlain,   Addison   County   sits   on   a  range  of  different  soil  types.   George  Tucker,  a  forester  and  wetlands   reserve  specialist  at  the  Natural  Resources   Conservation   Service,   outlined   the   lay   of   the  land. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  further  west  you  get,  the  heavier  the   clay   gets.   From   Route   22A   (to   the)   west,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pretty  heavy  clay  with  some  pockets  of   loamy   soil.â&#x20AC;?   Loamy   soil   is   composed   of   a   mix  of  sand,  soil  and  clay.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  between  22A  and  Route  7,  you  have   a  lot  of  heavier  clay,  and  the  closer  you  get   to   route   7   the   loamier   it   gets,   with   sand   soil   and   clay,â&#x20AC;?   said   Tucker.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   you   get   eastward  you  get  more  into  gravels,  sands   and  other  glacial  till  type  soils.â&#x20AC;? While   grasses   that   can   be   used   for   hay   grow   well   in   clay,   lighter   soils   are   better   for   growing   higher   value   crops.   Those   lighter  soils,  said  Tucker,  are  concentrated   in   pockets   of   East   Middlebury,   Bristol,   Starksboro,   Monkton   and   New   Haven.   Farms   sitting   on   loamy   soils   near   Lake   Champlain   are   quite   fruitful   too,   take   Shorehamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Champlain   Orchards,   known   for   its   succulent   fruit   or   Golden   Russet   Farm,   also   of   Shoreham,   known   for   its   wide  range  of  produce.     But  with  help  from  local  businesses  that   specialize  in  organic,  soil  fertility  products,   farmers   and   home   gardeners   can   adapt   most  soil  types  to  match  their  needs. One  option  for  local  farmers  is  Bridportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Soil  Builders,  run  by  Thomas  Vanacore.  Soil   Builders   is   dedicated   to   remineralization   of  soil  using  crushed  stone  resources  and   minerals  from  New  England  down  to  New   Jersey   and   Pennsylvania.   Such   resources   include   granites,   basalts,   volcanic   rock   and  glacial  rock  deposits,  said  Vanacore.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anything   that   has   a   broad   elemental   spread   is   suitable   for   remineralization   and   you   get   a   well   balanced   material,â&#x20AC;?   said   Vanacore.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   broad   spectrum   minerals   do   everything.   They   balance   ph   and  put  back  micro-­  and  macro-­nutrient-­ trace  elements  that  have  been  gone  since   the   ice   age.   So   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   revitalizing   depleted   soils.â&#x20AC;? Another   popular   option   for   local   soil   fertility   is   Moo   Doo,   a   line   of   organic   soils  and  composts  produced  by  Vermont   Natural   Ag   Products   in   conjunction   with   the   Foster   Brothers   dairy   farm   in   Middlebury.  The  Moo  line  of  soil  products   is  derived  from  bovine,  poultry  and  horse   manures,   which   are   generated   right   here   in  the  Champlain  Valley.  Vermont  Natural   Ag  also  offers  other  soil  fertility  products,   and   the   organization   swears   that   their   compost  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;udderly  the  best!â&#x20AC;?   But  even  without  all  of  theses  products,   Addison   County   on   the   whole   is   a   great   place  to  farm,  said  Vanacore. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Addison   County   is   blessed   with   great   reserves   of   clay   and   other   mineral   rich   materials  and  limestone  bedrock,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  really  have  a  great  reserve  of  fertility   here,   and   it   would   serve   us   well   to   use   more  sustainable  practices,  which  I  think   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  starting  to  do.â&#x20AC;?   For  more  information  on  Soil  Builders,   head  to  Rockdustlocal.com.  For   more   on   Moo   Doo   and   other   Vermont   Natural   Ag   Products,   check   out   moodoo.com.   Reporter   Andrew   Stein   is   at   andrews@ addisonindependent.com.  


Page 10 — 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

Sheldon Museum

A  Family  Farm  in  Orwell producing  delicious  turkeys  since  1987 Turkey  and  Turkey  products, Ground  Turkey  and  Sausages,  Boneless  and    Boneless  Skinless  Breast

All  our  products  are  available  at  the Middlebury  Natural  Food  Co-­op

(802)  948-­2277

Garden Tour Sunday June 10 12-5 pm

Reception 4-6 pm

Six Gardens! Including: Sheldon Museum’s garden Planned, planted and maintained by the Middlebury Garden Club to complement the Museum’s 1829 Judd-Harris House.

One Park Street, Middlebury

Tickets $25

call 388-2117 or www.henrysheldonmuseum.org Proceeds to benefit the Henry Sheldon Museum


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms — Page 11

Serving house-brewed beer and homemade food 5 Main Street Bristol, Vermont 453.3311 w Reservations suggested

OPEN 7 NIGHTS A WEEK

Garland Goat Soap of Vermont, LLC Beautiful Handcrafted Goat Milk Soap that Smooths, Soothes, & Softens...Naturally!

Our collection of molds ranges from cute critters to elegant flowers; from lighthouses to pine cones, all scented exclusively with essential oils. Visit us at www.garlandgoatsoap.com or call 802-247-9249

Try some Goat Milk Soap today!

A third generation family owned company, Champlain Valley Apiaries has been producing and packing high quality naturally crystalized, unheated and unfiltered honey since 1931. With 1200 honey bee colonies in the Champlain Valley we are as local as your back yard.  

 

 

 

 

 

 

Charles Mraz 1905-1999

Champlain Valley Apiaries

Washington Street Ext. Middlebury 388-7724 www.champlainvalleyhoney.com


Page 12 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

DOUGLAS ORCHARDS & CIDER MILL Pick-Your-Own Apples thru Mid-October or enjoy ready-picked apples at our Farm Stand 4HJZÂ&#x2039;,TWPYLZÂ&#x2039;*VY[SHUKZÂ&#x2039;/VUL`*YPZWZ 9LKHUK.VSKLU+LSPJPV\ZÂ&#x2039;4HJV\UZ 5VY[OLYU:W`Â&#x2039;:X\HZOÂ&#x2039;*VYU Â&#x2039; 7\TWRPUs Cider Â&#x2039;4HWSL:`Y\W 9[:OVYLOHT=;Â&#x2039;  TPSL^LZ[VM[OL]PSSHNL

Support the Addison County Emergency Food Shelf at HOPE. Give local so we can buy local.

Helping to overcome povertyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s effects in Addison County since 1965. %RDUGPDQ6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;ZZZKRSHYWRUJ

Browse our GIFT SHOP... Wall Hangings E Table Toppers E Candle Mats E Handmade Baby Gifts Polar Fleece Blankets E Pillows E Outerwear & Many other handmade items! Bedding & Vegetable Plants E Hanging Baskets E Perennials Pumpkins & other Fall Favorites E Christmas Trees E Wreaths

E E

Fall Mums Kissing Balls

Maple Syrup E Honey E Jams plus, Homemade Ice Cream, Jams, Maple

Syrup, Honey & Quality Vegetables

www.redskyfarm-queenbee.com    at a reasonable price

RED SKY FARM

Ed & Paula Barnes Rte 73, East of Or well V illage Just past the Fire House


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 13

So, why should I buy local foods? By  VERN  GRUBINGER   (University  of  Vermont   Extension  vegetable  and  berry   specialist)

3)   Local   food   preserves   genetic   diversity.   In   the   modern   agricultural   system,   plant   varieties   are   chosen   for   their   ability   to   ripen   uniformly,   withstand   harvesting,  survive  packing  and  last  a  long   time  on  the  shelf,  so  there  is  limited  genetic   diversity  in  large-­scale  production.  Smaller   local   farms,   in   contrast,   often   grow   many   different   varieties   of   crops   to   provide   a   long  harvest  season,  an  array  of  colors,  and   WKHEHVWĂ&#x20AC;DYRUV/LYHVWRFNGLYHUVLW\LVDOVR higher   where   there   are   many   small   farms   rather  than  few  large  farms.

8)     Local   food   keeps   taxes   down.   According   to   several   studies   by   the   American   Farmland   Trust,   farms   contribute  more  in  taxes  than  they  require   in   services,   whereas   most   development   contributes   less   in   taxes   than   the   cost   of   required  services.  Cows  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  go  to  school,   tomatoes  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  dial  911.

Vermont   has   a   wide   variety   of   farms.   While   known   for   our   dairy   production,   there  also  many  farms  that  raise  fruits  and   YHJHWDEOHVĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVDQGKHUEVDQGDQLPDO products   of   all   kinds.   Our   farmers   are   dedicated   to   stewardship   and   committed   to  quality.  And  while  they  love  what  they   do,  they  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  doing  it  for  entertainment.   They   need   to   make   a   living.   Consumers   that   value   fresh   food   and   a   working   landscape   should   support   local   farmers   4)  Local  food  is  safe.  Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  unique   by   buying   their   products.   Here   are   ten   kind  of  assurance  that  comes  from  looking   reasons  why. a  farmer  in  the  eye  at  farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  market  or   GULYLQJE\WKHÂżHOGVZKHUH\RXUIRRGFRPHV IURP /RFDO IDUPHUV DUHQÂśW DQRQ\PRXV and   they   take   their   responsibility   to   the   consumer  seriously.

5)   Local   food   supports   local   families.  The  wholesale  prices  that  farmers   get  for  their  products  are  low,  often  near  the   FRVW RI SURGXFWLRQ /RFDO IDUPHUV ZKR VHOO direct  to  consumers  cut  out  the  middleman   and  get  full  retail  price  for  their  food  -­  which   helps  farm  families  stay  on  the  land.

1)     Locally  grown  food  tastes  and   looks   better.   The   crops   are   picked   at   their   peak,   and   farmstead   products   like   cheeses   and   are   hand-­crafted   for   best   Ă&#x20AC;DYRU/LYHVWRFNSURGXFWVDUHSURFHVVHGLQ nearby   facilities   and   typically   the   farmer   has   direct   relationship   with   processors,   overseeing   quality   -­   unlike   animals   processed  in  large  industrial  facilities. 2)   Local   food   is   better   for   you.   The   shorter   the   time   between   the   farm   and   your   table,   the   less   likely   it   is   that   nutrients   will   be   lost   from   fresh   food.   Food  imported  from  far  away  is  older  and   has  traveled  on  trucks  or  planes,  and  sat  in   warehouses  before  it  gets  to  you.

9)   /RFDO IRRG EHQH¿WV WKH environment   and   wildlife.   Well-­ managed   farms   provide   ecosystem   services:  they  conserve  fertile  soil,  protect   water  sources,  and  sequester  carbon  from   the  atmosphere.  The  farm  environment  is   D SDWFKZRUN RI ¿HOGV PHDGRZV ZRRGV ponds   and   buildings   that   provide   habitat   for  wildlife  in  our  communities.

6)   Local   food   builds   community.   When  you  buy  direct  from  a  farmer,  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   engaging   in   a   time-­honored   connection   between   eater   and   grower.   Knowing   farmers  gives  you  insight  into  the  seasons,   the   land,   and   your   food.   In   many   cases,   it   gives   you   access   to   a   place   where   your   children  and  grandchildren  can  go  to  learn   about  nature  and  agriculture. 7)   Local   food   preserves   open   space.   When   farmers   get   paid   more   for   their   products   by   marketing   locally,   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   less   likely   to   sell   farmland   for   development.  When  you  buy  locally  grown   food,   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing   something   proactive   to   preserve   our   working   landscape.   That   landscape   is   an   essential   ingredient   to   other  economic  activity  in  the  state,  such   as  tourism  and  recreation. 10)  Local  food  is  an  investment  in   WKHIXWXUHBy  supporting  local  farmers   today,   you   are   helping   to   ensure   that   there   will   be   farms   in   your   community   tomorrow.  That  is  a  matter  of  importance   for  food   security,   especially   in  light   of   an   uncertain   energy   future   and   our   current   reliance  on  fossil  fuels  to  produce,  package,   distribute  and  store  food. Adapted  from  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Growing  For  Marketâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   newsletter Photo  credits,  clockwise  from  left:  Trent   Campbell,  Trent  Campbell,  Andrea  Warren,     Eugenie  Doyle,  Trent  Campbell

Vermont Victory Greenhouses

Custom  Built  Polycarbonate  Greenhouses .BLFBRVBMJUZPG MJGFJOWFTUNFOU UIBUJTQSBDUJDBM BOEBGGPSEBCMF MFUVTIFMQ ZPVTUBSU QMBOOJOHZPVS 7FSNPOU7JDUPSZ (SFFOIPVTF UPEBZ +POBUIBOBOE,JN)FTDPDLr IFTDPDL!TIPSFIBNOFUrXXXWFSNPOUWJDUPSZHSFFOIPVTFTDPN


Page 14 — 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

Eat what’s in season! Blueberries, Raspberries, Corn, Lettuce, Tomatoes Strawberries

Melons

Asparagus

Beets, Carrots, Turnips Broccoli, Radishes Cabbage Apples, Pears, Onions, Cucumber, Eggplant, Peppers, Winter Squash, Pumpkins

Peas Potatoes, Summer Squash, Beans Rhubarb Spinach Ducklings  huddled  under  a  heat  lamp  at   Paris  Farmers  Union  last  spring.

May

Jun

Jul

Aug

Sep

Oct

Nov

Data from the Vermont Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets

Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Connect with your local farmers! Middlebury Farmers’ Market Marble Works Wednesdays, mid-June - mid-Oct. Saturdays, May - Oct. 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 a.m. Accepts Farm-to-Family coupons Vergennes Farmers’ Market City Green Thursdays, early May-Sept. 3 p.m. - 6:30 p.m.

Brandon Farmers’ Market Central Park Fridays, end of May- early Oct. 9 a.m. - 2 p.m. Accepts Farm-to-Family coupons Bristol Farmers’ Market Town Green Saturdays, June - Oct. 11 a.m. - 2 p.m. Accepts Farm-to-Family coupons

Grow your own fruits and veggies! Middlebury  Area  Community   Garden   info@middleburygarden.org

Find  resources  online: Northeast  Organic  Farming   Association  -­  Vermont   Gardening  Resources Bristol  Community  Gardens   nofavt.org/programs/gardener-­ lilyhinrichsen@gmail.com education Vergennes  Community  Garden   University  of  Vermont  Master   Gardener  Program (802)  377-­8693 uvm.edu/mastergardener

Locally  grown  hops  for  the  Vermont  brewer. Taking  orders  beginning  Sept.  2012. www.addisonhopfarm.com

(802) 897-2737


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 15

Addison County Food and Farm Directory Addison

1. Addison Hop Farm

Kris Anderson | 3250 Townline Road, Addison | 989 4214 addisonhopfarm.com Hops and hop pellets Availability: Farm direct and through website

2. Garden Art

Paul Mahan | 1357 Route 17, Addison 759 2294 Organic vegetable transplants, Ă RZHULQJSODQWV Availability: Local Retailers

3. Harrisonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Home Grown

Melanie and Patrick Harrison | 8180 Route 22A, Addison | 759 2605 | ptpatrick@gmavt.net Milk fed veal, pork, beef, retail cuts, bulk milk Availiability: Farm direct

4. Harwood Farm

Alden Harwood | 1582 Route 17, Addison | 989 0479 aldenh@gmwireless.net Vegetables, compost, hay Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, farm direct

10. Foggy Meadow Farm

Sally Beckwith and Paul Horton 2494 Lake Road, Benson | 537 4754 foggymeadowfarm@shoreham.net Vegetables Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Rutland Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

11. Fresh Pickins

Kari Lussier | 5442 Route 22A, Benson 537 2435 Vegetables, bedding plants, eggs, maple syrup, Christmas trees, canned goods, honey Availability: Farmstand

12. Over the Hill Farm

John and Shelbie Wing | 502 Stage Road, Benson | 537 2811 shelbie.wing@yahoo.com Meat processing, organic

13. Vermont Natural Beef Bob and Pati Stannard | 1943 Stage Road, Benson | 537 3711 vermontnaturalbeef.com Beef Custom Cut and Delivered, Retail Cuts Availability: Farm direct, web site

Brandon

pickles Availability: Farmstand, CSA, Rutland Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market and wholesale

Hannah Davidson | 142 Steinberg Road, Brandon | 310 8534 neshobecsa@gmail.com Vegetables, organic, farmstand Availability: Farm Direct, CSA, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Rutland Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Middlebury A&W, American Flatbread

Bridport

15. Neshobe River Winery

19. Champlain Valley

14. Neshobe Farm

Patrick Foley | 79 Stone Mill Dam Road, Brandon | 247 8002 neshoberiverwinery.com :LQHDQGZLQHUHODWHGSURGXFWV Availability: Tasting room, winery

16. Otter Valley Winery

Ursula Zahn | 1246 Franklin Street, Route 7, Brandon | 247 6644 ottervalleywinery.com :LQHDQGZLQHUHODWHGSURGXFWV Availability: Tasting room

17. Woods Market Garden Jon and Courtney Satz | 93 Wood Lane, Brandon | 247 6630 woodsmarketgarden.com Vegetables, CSA, baked goods,

Henry and Donna Lawton | 5235 Lake Street, Bridport | 758 2396 lawtonfamily@gmavt.net 2UJDQLFJUDLQKD\VLODJHZKHDW Availability: Farm direct

Alpacas

Les and Jenny Foshay | 152 Merino Lane, Bridport | 758 3276 alpaca@wcvt.com Grapes, beef, grass fed, alpacas, ZHGGLQJEDUQ Availability: Farm Direct

20. Gleasonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Grains

Theresa and Ben Gleason | 2076 East Street, Bridport | 758 2476 tgleason@gmavt.net 2UJDQLFZKHDWVLIWHGDQGZKROH ZKHDWĂ RXU Availability: Midd Nat Food Coop, Mountain Greens, Rutland Coop, Dirtworks Mail Order, City Market

21. Hemenway Hillbillies of

5. Lakeway Farm

Vermont

Beth and Charlotte Pratt | 3057 Lake Street, Addison | 349 6100 Vegetables, Sweet Potatoes, Popcorn, USDA Inspected Beef; &DJHIUHHFKLFNHQVKDUHVRIFRZV retail cuts, eggs Availability: Farm direct

Cindy Myrick | Hemenway Hill, Bridport | 758 2436 myrick@middlebury.edu Angus beef, eggs, maple syrup, KRQH\EUDQG\ZLQHJLQJHUMDPMHOOLHV Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

6. Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farm

22. Vermont Heritage

Mike Eastman | 435 Town House Road, Addison | 759 2764 *URXQGEHHIRUJDQLFEXONPLONUDZ milk at farm Availability: Farm direct

Grazers, LLC

Alethea Bahnk | 2175 East Street, Bridport | 758 5040 alethea@gmavt.net 8 Sausage varieties, Ham, bacon, SLJVZKROHDQGKDOIUHWDLOFXWVHJJV Availability: Middlebury Natural Fods Coop

7. Vermont Green

Meadows

Lisa and Tim Davis | 3051 Route 22A, Addison | 759 3374 vtgreenmeadows@yahoo.com Vegetables, honey Availability: Farm direct, Vergennes Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

23. Wood Creek Farm

Chip and Kathy Morgan | 560 Lake Street, Bridport | 758 2909 chip@woodcreekfarmbeef.com Beef Availability: Wholesale

Benson

Bristol

8. Falkenberry Farm

Bob and Jacki Ambrozaitis | 1520 Park Hill Road, Benson | 537 2979 jojoerobert@shoreham.net 5DEELWVJRDWVWXUNH\EHHIUDZPLON at farm, eggs, farm stays Availability: Farm direct

24. Bristol Community

Gardens

1 South Street, Bristol lilyhinrichsen@gmail.com Community Garden Sites

25. Hillsboro Sugarworks

9. Flew the Coop Farm

Bob and Carol Draper | 5871 Stage Road, Benson | 537 3717 Eggs Availability: Farm direct, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Champlain Orchard Farm Store

18. Champlain Acres

&RUQVWDONVVWDQGWDOOLQDQ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\ÂżHOG ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO

Dave and Sue Folino | 270 Rounds Road, Bristol | 453 5462 hillsborosgarworks.com Organic maple syrup Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Mountain Greens


Page 16 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

Addison County Food and Farm Directory 26. Lower Notch Berry Farm Al and Linda Lunna | 1946 Lower Notch Road, Bristol | 453 4220 lowernotchberryfarm@gmail.com Blueberries, raspberries, PYO Availability: Farm Direct, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Mountain Greens, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

27. Mountain Warrior Farm

Galen Helms and Sara-­Paule Koeller 2886 Mountain Road, Bristol | 989 2783 galenhelms@gmail.com Fresh ramps, fall vegetables, garlic, eggs, winter CSA, pickles, wild chaga, medicinal mushrooms, Noahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Arc beehives, top-­bar beehives

Merchants Row, Open farm days

Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

35. Mountain Meadows

39. Sunset Hill Garden and

Brian Kemp and Amiel Cooper 2711 Route 30, Cornwall | 989 0514 briankemp@earthlink.net Beef, wholesale and retail cuts Availability: Whole Foods

36. Pine Meadow Farm

David and Sharon Reising | 440 Route 30, Cornwall | 462 3582 Pork, Eggs, Maple Syrup, Farmstand Availability: Farm Direct

37. Rowe Crest Farm

28. South Hardscrabble

Daniel Rowe | 123 Lambert Lane, Cornwall | 462 2609 *UDVVIHGEHHIKD\VWHHUVIRUĂ&#x20AC;QLVKLQJ Availability: Farm direct

Farm

38. Sunrise Orchards

Joan Cook | 93 Choiniere Road, Bristol | 453 2290 sohardscrabblefm@gmavt.net Vegetables, strawberries, blueberries, baked goods, pickles, farmstand Availability: Farmstand, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

Barney Hodges | 1287 N. Bingham Street, Cornwall | 462 3500 sunriseorchards@shoreham.net Frozen corn, broccoli, green beans, apples, cider, frozen blueberries Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Middlebury and Vergennes

Nursery

Nancy Edson | 2771 Route 74, Cornwall | 462 2497 alsdairy@shoreham.net Vegetable plants, annuals, perennials, baskets, strawberries, blueberries Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Farmstand

40. Twig Farm

Michael Lee and Emily Sunderman 2575 South Bingham Street, Cornwall 462 3363 | twigfarm@shoreham.net Goat and mixed raw milk cheeses Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Vergennes Laundry

41. West Street Dairy

Randy Quesnel | 2367 West Street, Cornwall | 349 8520 Grass-­fed Beef Availability: Farm direct, mail order

29. Yore Fare Farm

Anthony Myrick | 67 East Street, Bristol 453 6616 yorefarefarm@hotmail.com Pastured chicken, turkey, pork Availability: Bristol Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, farm direct

Lucille Williams | 5283 Route 30, Cornwall | 462 2470 wmsmaple@shoreham.net Maple Syrup, Maple Products Availability: Farm direct, mail order

43. Windfall Orchard

Bradley Koehler | 1491 Route 30, Cornwall | windfallorchardvt.com Apples, pears, plums, ice cider Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market; Coop, Lincoln Peak Vineyard

44. Robin Falta

231 Bourdeau Road, Cornwall | 462 2331 Eggs, duck and chicken Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods Coop

East Middlebury 45. Elmer Farm

Spencer and Jennifer Blackwell 885 Case Street, East Middlebury 388 3848 | elmer.farm@yahoo.com 9HJHWDEOHVĂ RZHUVZKHDWEODFN beans Availability: CSA, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, American Flatbread, Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s market, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop and Vergennes Laundry

Ferrisburgh

Cornwall

46. Good Companion

30. Hibernia Farm

Bakery

Rene and Donna Audet | 188 Audet Road, Cornwall | 462 2434 Organic hay Availability: Farm direct

Erik and Erica andrus | 276 Burroughs Farm Road, Ferrisburgh | 877 1396 erik@goodcompanionbakery.com Beef, pork, bread, pastries, porridge, rice Availability: Middlebury, Bristol and Vergennes Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Markets, Red Clover Market

31. Lemon Fair Honey

Works

Kristin Bolton and Andrew Munkres 2703 West Street, Cornwall | 462 3722 ajmunkres@yahoo.com Raw honey, comb honey from untreated bees, nucleus colonies Availability: Farm direct, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, City Market

47. Kimball Brook Farm

Cheryl and JD DeVos | 2263 Greenbush Road, Ferrisburgh | 425 3618 kbfVermont@gmail.com Organic milk products Availability: Graze, Middlebury Natural Food Coop, Mountain Greens Market, Lantmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s in Hinesburg, Shelburne Supermarket

32. Lemon Fair West Farm Sean and January Stearns | 2181 Route 30, Cornwall | 462 2341 sjcj@together.net Beef Availability: Farm direct

48. Alâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Farm Fresh Eggs

Helen Cobb | 777 Hawkins Road, Ferrisburgh | 877 3797 Eggs Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Farm direct

33. Meeting Place Pastures

Cheryl and Marc Cesario | 1368 West Street, Cornwall | 462 3759 marc@meetingplacepastures.com Pork, ham, bacon, sausage, organic beef, meat birds, retail cuts Availability: CSA, farmstand

49. Dakin Farm

Sam Cutting | 5797 Route 7, Ferrisburgh | 425 3971 dakinfarm.com Maple syrup Availability: Retail store, mail order

34. Moonlit Alpacas

Carol and Cass Tillman | 2170 Route 125, Cornwall | 462 3510 moonlitalpacas.com $OSDFDEUHHGLQJVWRFNDQGĂ&#x20AC;EHU Availability: Retail shop at 32

42. Williams Farm

50. Earth House Farm A  small  amount  of  sap  trickles  out  of  one  of  14,000  taps  at  Hillsboro  Sugar-­ works  in  early  February,  beginning  the  early  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  short  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  season. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Finn and Katherine Yarbrough | 4215 Sand Road, Ferrisburgh | 877 6288 Ă&#x20AC;QQ#HDUWKKRXVHSURGXFWLRQVFRP


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 17

Addison County Food and Farm Directory Lamb, organic Availability: Farm Direct

Organic vegetables, herbs, organic eggs, goats Availability: Farmstand, local schools

51. Flowerpower VT

64. Breault Family Farm

-HVVLFDDQG.HYLQ%UHDXOW_ French Settlement Road, Lincoln 453 6792 Greens, potatoes, garlic, lettuce, chickens Availability: Farm direct

Anne Flack Matthews | 991 Middlebrook Road, Ferrisburgh | 877 3476 à RZHUSRZHUYW#FRPFDVWQHW Organic vegetables, hops and herbs, RUJDQLFFXWà RZHUVDQGGLVSOD\V organic blue eggs from Auracana hens, Belgian sheep dogs (Tervuren) Availability2QIDUPVHOIVHUYLFHVWRUH and retail greenhouse, Shelburne )DUPHU¡V0DUNHWYDULRXV%XUOLQJWRQ stores

65. Isham Brook Farm

:LOOLDP%RQQLHDQG7UHQW5ROHDX :5LYHU5RDG/LQFROQ _LVKDPEURRNIDUPFRP 9HJHWDEOHV%HHISRUNUHWDLOFXWV 0DSOH6\UXS Availability)DUPGLUHFW%ULVWRO Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Lincoln Store

52. Garden Goddess

Michele Racine | 399 Quaker Street, Ferrisburgh | 425 4433 VPETXHHQLH#JPDYWQHW 9HJHWDEOHVWDUWVĂ RZHUVDQQXDOVDQG SHUHQQLDOVZHGGLQJĂ RZHUV Availability: Farm direct

66. Meetinghouse Farm

5XWK6KHSKHUGDQG.HQ3RKOPDQ ,VKDP+ROORZ5RDG/LQFROQ _PKIDUP#JPDYWQHW Lamb, beef, retail cuts Availability)DUPGLUHFW%ULVWRO Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Middlebury Natural )RRG&RRS

53. LaLumiere Farmstead

and Greenhouse

Karolyn Lalumiere | 3747 Sand Road, Ferrisburgh | 349 7782 Vegetables, bedding plants and seedlings, soups, baked goods Availability: Farmstand Shelburne, %ULVWRO+LQHVEXUJ)DUPHUV¡0DUNHWV Wholesale to area schools

67. Twin Maple Sugar Works 'RQDQG-RGL*DOH_5LYHU5G West, Lincoln | 453 2785 0DSOHV\UXS Availability$W6XJDUKRXVH6KLS

68. Weed Farm

54. SMB Cattle Co.

6XH%RUJDQG5DVKL1HVVHQ_ Quaker Street, Lincoln | 453 7395 ZHHGIDUP#JPDYWQHW +HUESODQWV PHGLFLQDODQGFXOLQDU\  fresh herbs, eggs, PYO Availability: Mountain Greens, Farm Direct

6FRWW0LFKHOOHDQG&DUVRQ%DUQHV_ Quaker Street, Ferrisburgh | 425 2862 VPEFDWWOHFRFRP Hereford feeders, breeding stock Availability: Farm Direct

55. VT Livestock Slaughter

Middlebury

and Processing Co.

&DUO&XVKLQJ_'HSRW5RDG Ferrisburgh | 877 3481 USDA inspected meat processing, retail cuts, beef, pork, roaster pigs and cookers

Huntington

56. Maple Wind Farm

%UXFH+HQQHVVH\DQG%HWK:KLWLQJ_ &DUVH5RDG+XQWLQJWRQ _PDSOHZLQGIDUPFRP Grass-­fed beef and lamb, pastured SRUNSRXOWU\DQGHJJVHHWDLOFXWV HJJVPDSOHV\UXS&6$ Availability: Middlebury Natural )RRGV&RRS6KHOEXUQH6XSHUPDUNHW Middlebury and Shelburne Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Markets

Leicester

57. Depot Farm Supply

Rick Oberkirch | 2681 Leicester Whiting Road, Leicester | 247 6700 Organic and non-­organic animal feed Availability'LUHFWVDOHVGHOLYHU\

58. Garland Goat Soap

Greg, Linda and Nathaniel Moore

69. Champlain Valley Apiaries $GLUWURDGZLQGVLWVZD\DORQJWKHHGJHRIDGLUWÂżHOGLQ:DOWKDP

,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO

671 Ferson Road, Leicester | 247-­9249 JDUODQGJRDWVRDS#JPDLOFRP *RDWPLONVRDSVZLWKHVVHQWLDORLOVOLS balm Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods &RRS6KHOEXUQH&RXQWU\6WRUH *RXUPHW3URYHQFH&DUUV)ORULVW 5XWODQG)RRG&RRS

61. Stoney Lonesome Farm

59. Gildrien Farm

62. Taconic End Farm

Caitlin and Jeremy Gildrien | 490 Delorme Road, Leicester | 989 7723 JLOGULHQIDUP#JPDLOFRP 9HJHWDEOHVIUHVKJLQJHU&6$SLFNOHV Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Middlebury Natural Foods &RRS$PHULFDQ)ODWEUHDG&6$

60. Mt. Pleasant Sugar

Works

$QG\DQG'RQQD+XWFKLQVRQ_ Shacket Road, Leicester | 247 3117 0DSOH6\UXSPDSOHHTXLSPHQW Availability)DUPGLUHFW,QVLGH6FRRS

James Ellefson and Lesley Wright 588 Fern Lake Road, Leicester _FHKS#JPDYWQHW 9HJHWDEOHVDVSDUDJXVĂ&#x20AC;QJHUOLQJ potatoes Availability: Farm Direct, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

Annie Claghorn and Catlin Fox | 1395 Leicester Whiting Road, Leicester | _IR[FODJ#JPDYWQHW Availability: Farm Direct

Lincoln

63. Blue Meadow Farm Kristin Andrews | 696 Forge +LOO5RDG/LQFROQ_ EOXHPHDGRZIDUP#JPDYWQHW

&KDUOHV(0UD]_:DVKLQJWRQ 6WUHHW([W0LGGOHEXU\_ FYD#WRJHWKHUQHW +RQH\EHHSURGXFWV Availability: Retailers including 0LGGOHEXU\1DWXUDO)RRGV&RRS Prattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Meat Market, Mountain Greens

70. Champlain Valley

Creamery

&DUOHWRQ<RGHU_0DLQHOOL'ULYH Middlebury | 877 2950 FKHHVHJX\#FYFUHDPFRP 2UJDQLFFUHDPFKHHVH&KDPSODLQ 7ULSOHTXHVRIUHVFR Availability: Middlebury Natural )RRGV&RRS$PHULFDQ)ODWEUHDG 6KHOEXUQH6XSHUPDUNHW2WWHU&UHHN %UHZLQJ

71. Happy Valley Orchard 217 Quarry Road, Middlebury _KYR#VRYHUQHW

Map  produced  by  the  Addison  County  Regional  Planning  Commission  (ACRPC),  in  collaboration  with  the   Addison  County  Relocalization  Network  (ACORN).  To  get  a  spot  in  next  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  directory,  call  Susan  Smiley  at   (802)  388-­6601


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Page 20 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

Addison County Food and Farm Directory cherries, apricots, seconds for canning Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Buxtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Store

109. Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flight Farm

Elizabeth Frank | 212 Mt. Independence Road, Orwell | 948 2840 | effarm.com Workshops, events, farm stays, permaculture cultivation center, organic gardens

110. Hall and Breen Farm

Louis and Jennifer Hall | 177 Route 73, Orwell | 989 9247 Bulk organic milk

111. LaDuc Acres

Robby LaDuc | 32 Royce Hill Road, Orwell | 948 2681 sugarman54@live.com Maple syrup, maple products Availability: Farm Direct

112. Lake Home Farm

Gerry and Cheryl Audet | 399 Mt. Independence Road, Orwell 948 2888 | lakehome2@yahoo.com *UDVVIHGEHHIUHWDLOFXWVVXQĂ RZHU seeds for bird feed Availability: Farm Direct

113. Ledge Haven Farm

Tom and Mike Audet | Mt. Independence Road, Orwell 948 2545 | tmaudet@shoreham.net Maple syrup and products

Availability: Farm direct, mail order

114. Red Sky Farm

Ed and Paula Barnes | 613 Route 73, Orwell | 948 2566 pfarmer@shoreham.net Vegetables, dried ornamentals Availability: Farmstand, Buxtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Store

115. Royce Hill Farm

Brian Orleans | 237 Royce Hill Road, Orwell | 948 2254 cdpbro@shoreham.net 2UJDQLFEXONPLONUDZPLONDWIDUP eggs Availability: Farm Direct, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop (Eggs)

116. Singing Cedar

Farmstead

Scott Greene | 30 Black Snake Lane, Orwell | 948 2062 singingseeders@gmail.com Vegetables, chicken, turkeys, beef, retail cuts, eggs, prepared foods, VSHFLDORUGHUZKROHVDOHOLPLWHG delivery Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Middlebury Natuaral Foods Coop, Buxtons Store, Vergennes Laundry

117. Singing Cedars Farm James and Louise Carlotto | 15 Wicker Lane, Orwell | 948 2382 Beef, veal, organic hay Availability: Farm direct

118. Stonewood Farm

Paul Stone | 105 Griswold Lane, Orwell | 948 2277 stone@stonewoodfarm.com Turkeys, Turkey products, retail cuts Availability: MNFC, City Market, Healthy Living, Lantmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Best Yet Market.

Panton

119. Bebes Table

Beef, grass fed, purebred polled +HUHIRUGVVKRZSURVSHFWV Availability: Farm direct

Pittsford

123. Groundworks Farm

Kevin Brown and Magaret Evans Pittsford | 310 4951 groundworksfarm.com Vegetables, pastured chicken, pork, retail cuts, cheese, eggs, CSA

Heidi Mahoney | 280 Adams Ferry Road, Panton | 475 2401 bebestable.com Farm to table catering

Ripton

120. Farmhouse Table

Freeman and Mia Allen | 1676 Natural Turnpike Road, Ripton 388 7394 | mtydfm@together.net Organic vegetables, greenhouse tomatoes Availability: Farm Direct, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Ripton General Store

Theresa Smith | 21 Fisher Lane, Panton | 345 5360 madhunter@gmavt.net Beef, poultry, retail cuts Availability: Vergennes Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Farm Direct

121. Otter Creek Farm

Annie Henderson | 354 Basin Harbor Road, Panton | 475 2940 edhenderson@gmavt.net Organic vegetables, eggs Availability: Vergennes Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, farm direct

122. Roads End Cattle Co. Richard Jackson | 464 Jackson Road, Panton | 759 2050 | roadsendcattleco.com

124. Mountainyard Farm

125. Nolaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Secret Garden

Nola Kevra | 2936 National Forest Route 49, Ripton | 388 6107 Organic greens, herbs, vegetables, and plants, agriculture education activities Availability: Farm direct, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop

126. North Branch Farm

Sebastian Miska and Kate Corrigan 1652 Lincoln Road, Ripton | 388 2059

Photos  clockwise  from  top  left:  Eggplants,  by  Barbara  Ganley;  One  cow  at  Hall  and  Breen  Farm  in  Orwell  prepares  for  her  close-­up,  by  Andrea  Warren;  Swiss   chard  at  the  Middlebury  Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Market,  by  Andrea  Warren.


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 21

Addison County Food and Farm Directory greenmountaingrown.com Lacto fermented vegetables, chickens, pork, ducks, turkeys, retail cuts, CSA Availability: Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

Grass-­fed beef, retail cuts Availability: Yourfarmstand.com, Champlain Orchard store, Rochester Hardware Store, Farm direct

141. Madison Dairy Farm

George and Joann Madison | 2806 Smith Road, Shoreham | 897 2024 jojoselixir@yahoo.com Bulk milk, eggs, garlic, tincture for livestock Availability: Farm direct

Rochester

127. Sunshine Valley Berry

Farm

142. Millborn Dairy

Rob Meadows and Patricia Rydle | 129 Ranger Road, Rochester | 767 3989 | vermontberries.com Organic blueberries, raspberries, blackberries, PYO Availability: Farm direct

Gert Schut | 322 Shoreham Depot Road, Shoreham | 897-­2737 millborn@shoreham.net Drinkable yogurt Availability: Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Meat Market, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop

Salisbury

143. Sentinel Pine Orchard

128. Blue Ledge Farm

Whitney and Roberta Blodgett | P.O. Box 268, Shoreham | 897 7931 Apples, tours Availability: Orchard direct

Hannah Sessions | 2001 Old Jerusalem Road, Salisbury | 247 0095 sales@blueledgefarm.com Goat Cheese, fresh, aged Availability: Middlebury and Rutland Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Markets, Middlebury and Rutland Coops, Mountain Greens, Woods Market

144. Shoreham Winery

Pat and Greg Borah | 1460 School Street, Shoreham | 897 7126 Wine, ice cider Availability: Tasting room, Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Meat Market

129. Four Family Farm

Alex Wylie | 8 Shard Villa Road, Salisbury | 352 4452 fourfamilyfarm@gmail.com Grass-­fed lamb, beef, pastured pork and poultry, retail cuts

145. Tio Grain Farm

Ken VanHazinga | 32 Doolittle Road, Shoreham | 897 2423 Organic grain Availability: Farm Direct

130. Maple Meadow Farm

146. Vermont Refrigerated

Jackie and George DeVoid | 518 Maple Street, Salisbury | 352 4241 jdevoid@myfairpoint.net Eggs, maple syrup Availability: Farm direct, Shaws, Hannaford, Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s, Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Bristol Discount Beverage, Buxtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Store, Prattâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Store, Panton General Store, Addison 4 Corners Store, Ripton Store, Big Wheel Store, Champlain Discount Foods

Hannaford  Career  Center  student  Saddle  Roy  picks  up  a  rooster  inside  a  chick-­ en  hoop  house  built  by  fellow  students  to  house  chickens  that  agri-­business   students  are  raising  for  sale  later  this  summer. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

131. Salisbury Angus

134. Cream Hill Farm

Paul and Chris Heudorfer | 195 Leland Road, Salisbury | 352 4586 Beef, whole animals, wholesale

Shoreham

132. Blue Stone Farm

John Reynolds and Edwina Ho | 869 Watchpoint Road, Shoreham 897 5333 | clayman@shoreham.net Organic vegetables, garlic, grass-­fed beef Availability: Farm direct

133. Champlain Valley

Orchards

Bill Suhr and Julianna White | 2955 Route 74, Shoreham | 897 2777 julianna@champlainorchards.com Fresh apples, cherries, plums, raspberries, PYO, pasteurized and unpasteurized sweet and hard ciders, apple pies, cider donuts, fresh apple

Storage

sauce, jarred apple butter Availability: Markets throughout Vermont, restaurant, groceries, year-­ round farmstand. Paul Saenger | P.O. Box 205, Shoreham Beef

135. Danzahn Farm

Julie Danyew | 44 Hemenway Hill Road, Shoreham | 948 2852 zahn1@shoreham.net Artisanal Goat Cheese Availability: Farm direct

136. Doolittle Farm

Bay and Hilary Hammond | 1078 Doolittle Road, Shoreham | 897 2121 bkhammond@shoreham.net Blueberries, apples, pastured organic Chicken and turkeys, retail cuts, eggs, hatching eggs, wool products, maple syrup Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods Coop for eggs, Middlebruy Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Healthy Living, Yourfarmstand.com, farmstand

137. Douglas Orchard

3442 Route 22A, Shoreham | 897 7400 Refrigerated and frozen storage warehouse primarily for apples

147. Vermont Tradewinds

Farm

Scott Douglas | 1050 Route 74, Shoreham | 897 5043 ssview@shoreham.net Squash, apples, strawberries, raspberries, cherries, PYO Availability: Farmstand

Tim and Loraine Hescock | 1674 Route 74, Shoreham | 897 5447 | vermonttradewinds.com Pumpkins, maple syrup, maple products, Christmas trees and wreaths, self-­guided maple tour Availability: Year-­round farmstand

138. Elysian Fields

148. Wagner Ranch

Kathleen, Joseph and Tirza Hescock 3658 Route 74, Shoreham | 897 7484 Beef and pork by the half or whole, organic milk, bulk Availability: Farm Direct

139. Golden Russet Farm

Will and Judy Stevens | 1329 Lapham Bay Road, Shoreham | 897 7031 wstevens@shoreham.net Organic vegetables, bedding plants: KDQJLQJEDVNHWVSRWWHGKHUEVĂ&#x20AC;HOG dug perennials, vegetable starts, CSA Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods Co-­op, American Flatbread, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, Ramuntos, Shoreham Inn, farmstand

140. Harvey Park Farm

Susan Harvey | 372 Lapham Bay Road, Shoreham | 897 5051

Phil Wagner | 314 N. Cream Hill Road, Shoreham | 758 2912 | wagnerranchvt.com Angus beef, pork, chicken, turkey, retail cuts Availability: Farm Direct

149. Wood Notch Farm Gail Wood | 5866 Route 22A, Shoreham | 897 8201 Bulk milk

Starksboro

150. LaFayette Farmstand

Rick and April Lafayette | Starksboro 453 4217 Maple syrup


Page 22 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

Addison County Food and Farm Directory 151. Norris Sugarworks

Kelly Norris | 745 Robert Young Road, Starksboro | 453 4753 norrissw@gmavt.net Maple syrup, maple candy Availability: Jerusalem Store, New Haven Jiffy Mart, Norris Berry Farm

152. #15 Schoolhouse

Maple

David and John Adsit, Kurt Kling | 198 Brown Hill Rd West, Starksboro | 425 3624 david@northernedgeassociates.com Maple syrup Availability: Mail order

153. Bee Happy Vermont

Pedro Salas | 258 Big Hollow Road, Starksboro | 453 7996 beehappy@madriver.com Honey, Christmas mead, honey comb, honey cream, beeswax candles Availability: Direct sales, Bristol, Hinesburg and Burlington Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

154. Brace Sugarhouse

Mary Brace and Henry Emmons | 160 Sugarhouse Lane, Starksboro | 434 2382 Maple syrup

155. Dunham Family Maple

Jeff and Betsy Dunham | 3702 Ireland Road, Starksboro | 453 4219 Maple syrup Availability: Direct sales

156. Hallock Brook

Farmstand

Robert Lang and Roxanne Smith | 1901 Robert Young Road, Starksboro 453 3378 | hallockbrookfarm@yahoo. com 9HJHWDEOHVĂ RZHUVKHUEVSDVWXUHG poultry, pork, turkeys, retail cuts, eggs, maple syrup Availability: Farmstand, Mountain Greens

Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods Coop

160. Mountain View Farm Erin Buckwalter and Mike Shepard 101 Mountain View Farm Lane, Starksboro | 349 5785 southstarksboro@hotmail.com Pastured pork, chicken, eggs Availability: Farm direct

161. Mountain View Farm

Larry and Sue Shepard | 40 Mountain View Farm Lane, Starksboro | 453 4217 Beef, sides and quarters Availability: Farm direct

162. Rockville Market Farm

Eric and Keenan Rozendaal | 205 Cemetery Road, Starksboro 453 5628 | rockvillemarketfarm@ yahoo.com Organic vegetables, whole and peeled winter squash, Raspberries, Pork, eggs, CSA Availability: Restaurants and stores in Chittenden and Addison counties

163. Rockwell Family

Farmstand

Rick and April Rockwell | 12 Ireland Road, Starksboro | 453 7848 Maple syrup Availability: Farm direct

164. Russell Farm

David Russell | 1248 Route 116, Starksboro | 453 2208 DP\PDQVĂ&#x20AC;HOG#JPDYWQHW Sweet corn, winter squash, bulk milk, maple syrup, christmas trees, horsedrawn carriage rides Availability: Farm direct

Sudbury

165. Ruppâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Custom Cutting Rupert Larock | 2015 Willowbrook Road, Sudbury | 247 4570 Meat processing

Vergennes

166. Green Street Gardens Margaret Lowe | 150 Green Street, Vergennes | 877 3783 margaret.lowe150@gmail.com Vegetables, Pickles, Jams, Jellies, Homemade Bread Availability: Vergennes Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, yourfarmstand.com

167. Vadeboncoeur

Nougat

Didier Murat | 247 Main Street, Vergennes Confectionary nougat Availability: Vergennes Laundry

168. Vergennes Community

Garden

Rhonda Williams | Vergennes | 377 8693 Community Garden Plots

169. Woodman Hill Orchard David Ambrose | 175 Plank Road, Vergennes | 989 2310 davidambrose1@gmail.com Apples, PYO Availability: Orchard Direct

Weybridge

170. Duclos and Thompson

Tom Duclos and Lisa Thompson | 1026 Sheep Farm Road, Weybridge

545 2230 Pork, Lamb, beef and turkeys, retail cuts Availability: Farm store, Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Meat Market

171. Ledge Hill Farm

Violet LaFountain | 58 La Fountain Lane, Weybridge | 545 2104 springviolet@gmavt.net 9HJHWDEOHVEHGGLQJSODQWVĂ RZHUV hanging baskets, fruits, jams, goat, chickens by the piece, retail cuts, raw goats milk, eggs, baked goods Availability: Farm direct, Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market

172. Lilaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Milk

Audra Oulette | 5607 Weybridge Road, Weybridge | 989 3807 aoullette@gmavt.net Raw milk from family cow Availability: Farm Direct

173. Monument Farms

Robert James | 2107 James Road, Weybridge | 545 2119 Milk, bottled cream, half and half, chocolate milk, tours Availability: Stores and restaurants in Addison and Chittenden counties

174. Crawford Family Farm

Jim Crawford | 165 Sawyer Needham Road, Whiting | 623 6600 crawfordfamilyfarm@shoreham.net Farmstead Ayrshire cheese Availability: Middlebury Natural Foods Coop, Shelburne Supermarket, City Market

175. Old Wooster Farm

Paul and Doris Seiler | 438 Wooster Road, Whiting | 462 3140 Bulk milk, organic

157. Lewis Creek Farm

Hank Bissell | 3071 Route 116, Starksboro | 453 4591 lcfarm@gmavt.net Vegetables, pickles, Flower and Vegetable Plants, Lamb, Eggs, CSA Availability: Stores and restaurants in Middlebury and Burlington; CSA; at farm; Black River Produce; Burlington Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market, year-­round farmstand

158. Maggie Brook

Sugarworks

John and Rita Elder | Ruby Brace Road, Starksboro | 453 3625 elderita@gmail.com Maple syrup Availability: Direct sales

159. Monarch Gardens Kelly Lathrop | 2197 Route 17, Starksboro | 453 5593 monarch@gmavt.net Flowers

.HYLQ7KRPSVRQĂ&#x20AC;LSVDVKUXEEHGVRIWULSHQHGFKHHVHLQWKHFKHHVHFDYHDW%OXH/HGJH)DUPLQ6DOLVEXU\ ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 23

Visit our new website at rockvillemarketfarm.com Start a membership for as little as $100. Create an account and choose your amount.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a new way to CSA! X Spring Share (Starts February 22nd) X Summer Share X Fall/Winter Share X Pasture to plate Meat Share X Egg Share

802-­355-­0059

Local, Healthful, and Simply Good Choose what goes into your bodyâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;and into your milk, Kimball Brook Farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s premium milk and cream isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t just certified organic: itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s certified delicious. We LFFQDMPTFUPUIFMBOECZVTJOHQSPDFTTFT UIBUSFTQFDUUIFFOWJSPONFOUBOEPVSIFSE ,*.#"--#300,'"3.milk is bo!led at Green Mountain Organic Creamery, 10516 Route 116, Hinesburg, Vermont 05461

(SFFOCVTI3Es/'FSSJTCVSHI 7Us LCGWFSNPOU!HNBJMDPNsLJNCBMMCSPPLGBSNDPN

AUGUST 7-11

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S LARGEST AGRICULTURAL FAIR Annual County Fair with amusement park rides, nightly entertainment, livestock competitions, tractor pulls, draft horse shows and demolition derbies!

Tractor Pulls Friday & Saturday

Farm Products â&#x20AC;˘ 4-H Shows Antique Equipment Demos Rides â&#x20AC;˘ Games Demolition Derbies Arts & Crafts â&#x20AC;˘ Livestock Tractor Pulls â&#x20AC;˘ Horse Pulling

Route 17, New Haven (between Rtes. 7 & 22A) www.AddisonCountyFieldDays.com

A FAMILY AFFAIR - JOIN THE FUN!

Come Taste Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Finest:

t$PC4NPLFE)BNt1VSF.BQMF4ZSVQ t"HFE$IFEEBS$IFFTFPUIFS7FSNPOU4QFDJBMJUJFT FREE4BNQMFT &YIJCJUT MPUTUPTFFBOEEPXJUIUIFGBNJMZ 0QFOEBZTBXFFL Route 7 in Ferrisburgh (9.5 miles south of the Shelburne Museum) 100 Dorset St., in S. Burlington (Next to Barnes and Noble, Exit 14E off I89)

FREE CATALOG 800-993-2546

www.dakinfarm.com


Page 24 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

VERMONT LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER & PROCESSING VLS&P  is  a  family-­owned  business  whose  goal   is  to  provide  our  customers  with  the  best  quality   and  service  possible.  Our  USDA-­inspected   facility  is  equipped  to  butcher  and  process  beef,   ODPEDQGSRUNDFFRUGLQJWR\RXUVSHFL¿FDWLRQV Whether  you  are  a  private  individual  with  a  few   head  each  year  or  a  commercial  producer  who   requires  multiple  animals  processed  on  a  regular   basis,  our  professional  and  experienced  staff   are  dedicated  to  giving  each  of  you  the  personal   attention  you  deserve.  We  are  conveniently   located  just  off  of  Route  7  in  Ferrisburgh. Private  labeling  is  now  available  as  part  of   Vermont  Livestock  Slaughter  &  Processing   services  so  let  us  help  you  bring  your  federally   inspected  meat  directly  to  market  with  your  own   custom  label  for  resale.

VERMONT LIVESTOCK SLAUGHTER & PROCESSING CO. LLC 76 Depot Road Ferrisburgh, VT 05456 802-877-3421

Â&#x2020;7PKSWGYGFFKPIHNQYGTU Â&#x2020;1TICPKECNN[ITQYPDGFFKPIRNCPVU Â&#x2020;1TICPKEXGIGVCDNGUCPFDGTTKGU Â&#x2020;%5# Find our products at our Farm Stand (Monkton-â&#x20AC;?Bristol Road, 3.5 miles north of Bristol),

the:DLWVĂ&#x20AC;HOGDQG%ULVWRO)DUPHUV0DUNHWV City Market & Middlebury Natural Foods Co-â&#x20AC;?Op.


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 25

The wild and exotic side of Addison County agriculture Ginger  root  is  a  tropical  spice,  most  likely  to  be  found  in  steamy  climates   like  Southeast  Asia  or  Hawaii. As  of  last  year,  however,  the  spicy  root  can  also  be  found  growing  in  the   ¿HOGVDW/HLFHVWHUœV*LOGULHQ)DUPV &XOWLYDWLQJWKHURRWLQ9HUPRQWœVWHPSHUDWHFOLPDWHUHTXLUHVVRPHRXWRI WKHER[WKLQNLQJ²RULQ-HUHP\DQG&DLWOLQ*LOGULHQœVFDVHLQWKHER[7KH two  devised  a  special  solar  chamber  used  to  germinate  the  seed  roots  and   heat  the  soil.   ³,WœVJURZQMXVWOLNHSRWDWRHV:HVSURXWWKHVHHG rhizome  in  the  greenhouse,  then  we  plant  it.  You  hill   it  twice,  and  keep  it  watered,  fertilized,  and  warm.  As   long  as  the  soil  temperature  is  55  degrees  when  you   SODQWLWDQGLWNHHSVULVLQJLWœOOEH¿QH´ &RPSDUHGWRJLQJHUœVQDWXUDOKDELWDWZKHUHWKHVRLOWHPSHUDWXUHVFDQEH DVKLJKDV¹GHJUHHV)DKUHQKHLW9HUPRQWLVDUHIULJHUDWRU %XWZLWKWKH*LOGULHQœVVSURXWLQJSURFHVVLWœVRQO\PRQWKVEHIRUHWKH\œUH UHDG\WRVHOO³EDE\JLQJHU´WKHWHQGHUURRWWKDWœVXVHGIRUFU\VWDOOL]HGDQG SLFNOHGJLQJHU7KHIDPLOLDU¿EURXVURRWXVHGIRUFRRNLQJDQGVSLFLQJWDNHV ORQJHUWRJURZDERXWPRQWKV ³/DVW \HDUœV FURS HQGHG XS VRPHZKHUH LQ EHWZHHQ EDE\ DQG UHJXODU JLQJHU´-HUHP\VDLG $IWHUD\HDURIKHXULVWLFVKHœVUHDG\WRKDUYHVWPRUHDQGEHWWHUJLQJHUWKLV time  around. 7KH *LOGULHQV SODQWHG  SRXQGV RI JLQJHU UKL]RPHV ODVW \HDU DQG  SRXQGVWKLV\HDU)RUHYHU\SRXQGSODQWHGWKH\H[SHFWWRKDUYHVWEHWZHHQ DQGOEVRIJLQJHU 7KHLUJLQJHUDQGRWKHUYHJHWDEOHVDUHIRUVDOHDWWKH0LGGOHEXU\)DUPHUœV 0DUNHWRUWKURXJKWKHLU&6$

By: CHRISTIAN WOODARD

Ginger

:KDW ORRNV OLNH D VPDOO JQDUOHG KXPDQ EHLQJ DQG LV ZRUWK PRUH SHU SRXQG WKDQ VROLG VLOYHU" +HUHÂśV D KLQW ,W JURZV LQ $GGLVRQ&RXQW\DQGEHOLHYHLWRUQRWLWÂśVDOHJDOVXEVWDQFH ,WÂśV$PHULFDQJLQVHQJSDQD[TXLQTXHIROLXV7KHURRWLVQDWLYH WR9HUPRQWÂśVURFN\VRLOVDQGVKDGHGKDUGZRRGIRUHVWVZKHUHLW grows  in  small  colonies.   &KULV.LHO\²KHDGLQVWUXFWRUDFXSXQFWXULVWDQGKHUEDOLVWDW )DOOLQJ:DWHU7DL&KL&KXDQLQ0LGGOHEXU\²XVHVJLQVHQJIRU medicinal  treatments  and  sources  most  of  it  locally. Âł*LQVHQJ LQFUHDVHV HQHUJ\ $Q\ WLPH WKHUHÂśV H[KDXVWLRQ RU IDWLJXH LQYROYHG JLQVHQJ KHOSV  ,WÂśV EHVW WR JHW LW ORFDOO\´ KH said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sometimes   I   buy   from   China,   but   I   SUHIHU9HUPRQWJLQVHQJ´ 7KH QDPH ÂłJLQVHQJ´ LV D WUDQVOLWHUDWLRQ RI WKH&KLQHVHZRUGÂłMHQVKHQ´ZKLFKWUDQVODWHV OLWHUDOO\ DV ÂłKXPDQ URRW´ /LNH WKH PRUH IDPRXV PDQGUDNH JLQVHQJURRWVRIWHQUHVHPEOHDKXPDQERG\ZLWKIRXUOLPEOLNH rootlets. (YHU\ \HDU PRUH WKDQ  SHUPLWWHG FROOHFWRUV GLJ  SRXQGVRIWKHUHFOXVLYHURRWLQ9HUPRQW0XFKRIWKDWKDUYHVWLV VROGDWDQDQQXDODXFWLRQLQ%HWKHOZKHUHH[FHSWLRQDOVSHFLPHQV FRPPDQG RYHU  SHU SRXQG /DVW \HDU 9HUPRQW ZLOG ginseng  brought  around  $525  per  pound.   $V LWV SULFH LQGLFDWHV ZLOG JLQVHQJ LV D UDUH FRPPRGLW\ WKH URRW FDQ JR GRUPDQW IRU XS WR  \HDUV DQG LWÂśV DOUHDG\ EHHQ KDUYHVWHGWRDQHDUHQGDQJHUHGVWDWXV A   local   ginseng   hunter   said   that   collectors   are   very   secretive   about  their  plots.  State  law  forbids  collecting  on  state  or  federal   land,  and  getting  permission  from  property  owners  can  be  tough.   Indiscriminate  harvesting  can  wipe  out  a  population  of  ginseng.   But,   with   proper   care,   a   wild   spread   can   continue   to   produce   IRU \HDUV 0DQ\ 9HUPRQW JLQVHQJ KXQWHUV GLJ WKHLU URRWV IURP FDUHIXOO\ JXDUGHG DQFHVWUDO SORWV WKDW WKH\ÂśYH PDLQWDLQHG IRU

Chaga

decades.   ³,WœVDEDFNZRRGVORW7KH\OHDUQHGLWIURPWKHLUUHODWLYHV+RZ to  pick  it,  how  to  dry  it,  when  to  look.  Every  year  they  pick  it  and   VRZLWVVHHGVEDFNZKHUHWKH\JRWLWIURP,WœVZLOGIDUPLQJ´ 7KH%HWKHOJLQVHQJDXFWLRQZKLFKVKDUHVWHQWVSDFHZLWKWKH DQQXDO IXUWUDGHUVœ JDWKHULQJ LV WKH FOHDULQJKRXVH RI 9HUPRQW JLQVHQJ/LFHQVHGEX\HUVDFTXLUHHQRXJKVWRFNWRVHOOLQEXONWR the  thriving  Asian  wild  ginseng  market.       5RRWVDUHFRQVLGHUHGYLDEOHDVPHGLFLQHDIWHU\HDUVLQWKH ground,  dated  by  their  crown  scarring,  with  older  roots  fetching   higher  prices. Kiely  said  that  wild  ginseng  is  so  superior  to   IDUPJURZQ WKDW WKH\ FRXOG EH FRQVLGHUHG WZR separate  medicines.   ³,WœV QRW DV SRWHQW´ .LHO\ VDLG RI WKH IDUP JURZQYDULHW\³7KHURRWVORRNIDWDQGWKLFNDQGELJDQGWKHZLOG RQHVDUHVPDOOHUDQGVKULYHOHG´ Kiely  says  that  Americans  tend  to  think  of  ginseng  as  a  weaker   YHUVLRQRIFDIIHLQHEXWWKHURRWDFFRUGLQJWR&KLQHVHWH[WVPD\ boost   immunity,   regulate   metabolism   and   endocrine   systems,   increase  cognitive  functioning  and  treat  stress  and  fatigue. ³*LQVHQJ IRFXVHV RQ UHSDLULQJ WKH ¿YH RUJDQV DQG FDOPLQJ WKHPLQG´KHWH[WUHDGVLQWUDQVODWLRQ³,WRSHQVWKHKHDUWDQG increases   wisdom.   If   taken   over   a   long   period   of   time   it   will   OLJKWHQWKHERG\DQGOHQJWKHQRQHœV\HDUV´ 7KRXJKJLQVHQJGRHVQœW¿WQHDWO\LQWR:HVWHUQPHGLFLQH.LHO\ VDLGLWœVDPRGHOIRUDPRUHEDODQFHGDSSURDFKWRKHDOWK ³,QVWHDGRISRXQGLQJDWRQLFXQWLOZHœUHEXUVWLQJZLWKKHDOWK JLQVHQJUHTXLUHVXVWREHPRGHUDWH7KHURRWLVSRZHUIXOLQLWV VSDUHQHVV,WœVDVZLWFKKRZZHDSSURDFKPHGLFLQH´ 7R PDNH JLQVHQJ WHD .LHO\ UHFRPPHQGV VOLFLQJ RU EUHDNLQJ DIHZSLHFHVRIURRWLQWRZDWHUDQGERLOLQJIRUPLQXWHV7KH resulting  brew  is  delicate  and  energizing,  with  a  sweet  taste.  

Ginseng

:KHQ *DOHQ +HOPV RI 0RQNWRQÂśV 0RXQWDLQ :DUULRU)DUPVGHVFULEHV&KDJDWRWKHOD\DXGLHQFH KH FDOOV LW D ÂłPHGLFLQDO PXVKURRP´ %XW ZLWK D OLWWOH SURYRFDWLRQ KHÂśOO H[SRXQG RQ WKH PLUDFOH mycelium  he  forages. 7KRXJK LWÂśV RIWHQ UHIHUUHG WR DV D PXVKURRP chaga   looks   more   like   a   hunk   of   charcoal   than   a   portabella.   It   often   grows   at   wounds,   like   frost   VSOLW RU VXUURXQGLQJ EURNHQ OLPEV 7KH IXQJXV LV also  known  by  the  descriptive  names  Cinder  Conk,   %ODFN0DVVDQG%LUFK&DQNHU Unlike   cooking   mushrooms,   the   edible   portion   RI FKDJD LVQÂśW LWV IUXLWLQJ ERG\ 7HFKQLFDOO\ WKH SDUWWKDWIRUDJHUVKDUYHVWLVDQÂłDHULDOVFOHURWLD´RU a  hardened  mass  of  mycelium  that  the  fungus  uses   for  food  and  energy  storage. &KDJD JURZV RQ ELUFK WUHHV  HVSHFLDOO\ \HOORZ ELUFK 7KRXJK WKH IXQJXV DSSHDUV SDUDVLWLF DQG +HOPV VD\V KHÂśV VHHQ WUHHV NLOOHG E\ KHDY\ infestations,   it   often   grows   symbiotically   with   a   stand  of  birches.  Chaga  may  even  provide  energy   storage  for  the  tree. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   can   walk   into   a   birch   grove,   and   even   if   WKHUHÂśV QR IUXLWLQJ FKDJD LW FRXOG VWLOO EH WKHUH LQ WKH WUHHV´ VDLG +HOPV ZKR UDLVHV IUHHUDQJH chickens,   winter   vegetables,   garlic   and   medicinal   herbs   like   echinacea.   Helms   is   also   the  only  raw  chaga  provider  in   Vermont.   /LNH DOO ZLOG PXVKURRPV FKDJD LV IRUDJHG QRW IDUPHG:KHQ+HOPVKDUYHVWVFKDJDKHORRNVIRU ODUJHJURZWKVWKDWSURMHFWDZD\IURPWKHWUHHLQD FRQH VKDSH 7KH ULSHVW VSHFLPHQV FDQ EH EURNHQ off  by  hand,  but  Helms  often  uses  a  hatchet.  Chaga   will  grow  back  on  the  same  host  tree,  slightly  above   the  last  harvest.   Âł7KDWÂśVWKHEHDXW\RIFKDJDDQGDOOPXVKURRPV <RXÂśUH QRW KDUPLQJ LWV DELOLW\ WR UHSURGXFH +DUYHVWLQJ MXVW VWLPXODWHV PRVW PXVKURRPV WR SURGXFHPRUH´ After   harvesting,   Helms   sells   the   raw   chaga   to   a   supplier   in   Burlington,   where   it   is   ground   and   distributed  to  local  health  and  herb  stores. &KDJD +HOPV VDLG KDV DQWLLQĂ&#x20AC;DPPDWRU\ properties,   and   modulates   the   immune   system   WR UHVSRQG WR LOOQHVV PRUH HIIHFWLYHO\ 0\FRORJLVW 3DXO 6WDPHWV FODLPV WKDW FKDJD KDV DQWLWXPRU properties   owing   to   betulinic   acid,   incorporated   from  the  birch  trees  that  play  host  to  the  plant.   &KDJD ,QRQRWXV REOLTXXV KDV EHHQ D VWDSOH of   Eastern   European   folk   medicine   since   the   5HQDLVVDQFH ,WÂśV RQO\ UHFHQWO\ EHJXQ WR JDLQ DFFHSWDQFHLQ:HVWHUQPHGLFLQHDVDWUHDWPHQWIRU psoriasis,  diabetes  and  some  types  of  cancer.     Helms   says   he   always   has   a   pot   of   chaga   tea   VLPPHULQJ²MXVWJULQGLWXSDQGVWHHSLWOLNHWHD Unlike  most  medicine,  Helms  said  chaga  tea  tastes   good. Âł'HSHQGLQJ RQ WKH VRLO LWÂśV JURZQ LQ LW FDQ EH VZHHW,WÂśVDOLWWOHOLNHUDZFRFRDEXWZLWKDELUFK\ Ă&#x20AC;DYRU´


Page 26 — 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

An Unexpected, 7iVœ“ˆ˜}] restaurant and cocktail lounge.

ÎxÊÀii˜Ê-ÌÀiiÌÊÊUÊÊ œÜ˜ÌœÜ˜Ê6iÀ}i˜˜iÃ

Quality, Service, Value We are a locally owned family business, and we take great pride in supporting our community.

3 Elm Street, Middlebury, Vermont 388-2162 Established 1981

GREG’S

Meat Market

Where Qualil ty and Service Co me First!

www.gregsmeatmarket.com


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 27

VFN is proud to celebrate Addison Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s bounty of Farmer and Chef Partnerships. Addison Morningside Inn Whitford House Bridport Gleason Grains Vermont Heritage Grazers, LLC Bristol Inn at Baldwin Creek and Mary's Restaurant Mountain Greens Market & Deli Cornwall Meeting Place Pastures Sunrise Orchards, Inc. Twig Farm Windfall Orchards Leicester Blue Ledge Farm Lincoln Songbird Farm Middlebury American Flatbread at Marbleworks Champlain Valley Apiaries Fire & Ice Restaurant Green Peppers Restaurant Happy Valley Orchard Jackson's On the River LedgEnd Farm

Middlebury -â&#x20AC;? conâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Middlebury College Dining Service Middlebury Natural Foods Co-â&#x20AC;?op & Cafe Noonie Deli Otter Creek Bakery Otter Creek Brewing & Wolavers Pub Porter Medical Center Swift House Inn The Lodge at Otter Creek Senior Living, LLC The Middlebury Inn The Storm Cafe Two Brothers Tavern Woodchuck Hard Cider N. Ferrisburgh Kimball Brook Farm Lewis Creek Catering New Haven Lincoln Peak Vineyard, LLC Misty Knoll Farms Tourterelle Restaurant & Inn Salisbury Maple Meadow Farm Shoreham Champlain Orchards Inc.

Shoreham -â&#x20AC;? conâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Golden Russet Farm Sentinel Pine Orchard Shoreham Inn Works and Days Farm Starksboro Hillsboro Sugarworks Lewis Creek Farm Rockville Market Farm Vergennes 3 Squares Cafe Antidote Basin Harbor Club Graze Weybridge Monument Farms Dairy Whiting Crawford Family Farm

find participating restaurants and farms at www.VermontFresh.net

Organic Stone-Ground Whole Wheat Flour

Producing local wheat and flour since 1982 Try our new products:

Lemon Fair Sifted Pastry Flour Snake Mountain Sifted Bread Flour Gleason Grains Bran

Grown and Milled in Addison County! &BTU4USFFU #SJEQPSU 7FSNPOUt Vermont Organic Certified

CZUIF7FSNPOU0SHBOJD'BSNFST10#PY #SJEHF4U 3JDINPOE 75


Page 28 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

Sunrise Orchards isâ&#x20AC;¦ Â&#x2021;*UHDWWDVWLQJDSSOHV Â&#x2021;&RROUHIUHVKLQJDSSOHFLGHU Â&#x2021;7KLUGJHQHUDWLRQDSSOHIDUPHUV Â&#x2021;$GYDQFHGLQWHJUDWHGSHVWPDQDJHPHQW

â&#x20AC;¦ Committed to growing quality food for our neighbors in Addison County and Vermont

1RUWK%LQJKDP6W &RUQZDOO9HUPRQW   ZZZVXQULVHRUFKDUGVFRP


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 29

Walk our Maple Trail and take our self-guided Sugarhouse Tour!

Frog Run Granola

Maple Walnuts

Maple Syrup

Syrup On-Tap

* Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget to bring your jug to fill up with Syrup-On-Tap!

3PVUF 4IPSFIBN 7FSNPOUt'BSNTUBOEPQFO.BSDIUP%FDFNCFSEBZTBXFFL BNQN XXXWFSNPOUUSBEFXJOETDPNt802-897-2448

Experience outdoor fun in our Sugarbush Maze!

Specializing in Heirloom Apple Varieties, Ice Cider & Fresh Pressed Cider. - Saturdays at Middlebury Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Market - Farmstand at the Orchard Sunday Afternoons in October 1491 Route 30, Cornwall, VT www.windfallorchardvt.com

The Beauty of Simplicity in the Vermont Countryside We serve French-inspired cuisine, made with fresh local products in unique preparations Weddings, rehearsal dinners and catering also available.

New Haven, Vermont XXXUPVSUFSFMMFWUDPNt


Page 30 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

30 Supporting local farms for over 30 years.


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms — Page 31

93rd

T

he Nutrition Services Department at Porter Hospital is proud to serve locally produced foods on our menus in order to provide the freshest foods for our patients and staff, support our local businesses and honor our commitment to the Healthy Food in Health Care Initiative.

www.portermedical.org

388-­4701 Middlebury,  Vermont For your conventional bag or bulk feed needs call Depot Farm Supply in Leicester Junction, Vermont 802-247-6700 For your organic bag and bulk feed needs call Green Mountain Feeds in Bethel, Vermont 802-234-6278 We are proud to support the Addison County Relocalization Network.


Page 32 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

Local business (Continued  from  Page  8) case,  but  through  my  primary  distributor,   they  could  be  $16  a  case  or  $30  a  case  if   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  frost,  so  if  it  averages  out.  If  the   prices  are  close,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  fresher  and  better   quality  locally,  why  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  you?â&#x20AC;?   Maple   Meadow   Farm   in   Salisbury   provides  Porter,  local  schools,  the  college   and   Vermont   correctional   facilities   with   eggs.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   try   to   give   them   the   best   possible   price  and  they  get  to  buy  local.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  really   a  win-­win  situation,â&#x20AC;?  said  Jackie  Devoid,   who   has   run   the   farm   with   her   husband   George  for  31  years.   Devoid   estimated   that   the   farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clientele   is   split   equally   between   institutions  and  retail  stores,  but  said  that   the   institutional   side   of   the   business   has   grown  during  her  years  in  business. 6KHVDLGLWLVIXOÂżOOLQJWREHDEOHWRVHOO eggs  to  the  local  community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   local   people   know   us,   they   know   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   putting   out   a   decent   product.   We   wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  sell  them  anything  we  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  eat   ourselves,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   great   selling   to   your  friends,  family  and  neighbors.â&#x20AC;?   And   Brace   said   that   patients   notice   when  more  local  food  is  served.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Vermont   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   you   have   to   serve   local   maple   syrup,   and   we   have   gotten   comments   about   it,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   a   small   community   hospital,   we   should   be   making  an  effort.â&#x20AC;?  

Middlebury  College  

At  Middlebury  College,  buying  locally  is   ingrained  in  the  institution,  said  Director   of  Dining  Services  Matthew  Biette.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   has   a   lot   to   do   with   Vermont   and   the   fact   that   Vermont   supports   its   own   DQGLVÂżHUFHO\OR\DOWRKHOSLQJHDFKRWKHU out,â&#x20AC;?  said  the  Middlebury  resident.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;More   people   are   asking,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Why   are   we   shipping   it   from   so   far   when   I   can   make   it   right   here?â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   The   college   is   one   of   the   largest   institutions   in   Addison   County,   with   a   total  food  budget  of  over  $3.2  million.  In   the   2010-­2011   academic   year,   21   percent   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;    $714,420  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  of  the  collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  food  budget   was  spent  on  food  produced  in  Vermont.   In   Addison   County   alone,   the   college   spent  close  to  $400,000  on  local  products   last  academic  year.   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   local   food   budget   makes   it   a   major   client   to   many   local   farms.   Last   academic   year,   Biette   bought   1,800   bushels   of   apples   from   four   different   farms,   1,860   gallons   of   apple   cider   from   Happy   Valley   Orchard,   533,520   eggs  

from   Maple   Meadow   Farm   and   4,500   gallons  of  ice  cream  from  Wilcox  Dairy  in   Manchester.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  in  a  great  agricultural  area.  This   is  ground  zero,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  thankful   that  we  have  a  lot  of  the  food  right  here.â&#x20AC;? Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Monument   Farms   provides  the  college  with  milk  and  cream   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  32,450  gallons  last  academic  year.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  college  used  to  have  their  own  farm   behind   Shawâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,   but   when   they   lost   that,   our   grandfather   got   the   account,â&#x20AC;?   said   Bob  James,  one  of  the  co-­owners.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Milk-­ wise,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  always  done  a  lot  of  business   with  them.â&#x20AC;?   James   said   that   Middlebury   College   is   their   largest   single   customer,   which   he   credits   to   convenience   and   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   desire  to  buy  local.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  ever  short  of  something  (milk   or   cream),   they   can   have   it   within   20   minutes,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermonters  especially   are   really   keen   on   supporting   local   businesses.â&#x20AC;?      

Looking  to  the  future

The   Addison   Northeast   supervisory   cooperative  is  still  less  than  two  years  old,   but  Alexander  has  big  plans  for  expanding   the  use  of  local  foods  in  her  schools.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   the   impact   on   our   local   farmers   has   been   huge   yet   because   I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   organized   our   menus   ZHOOHQRXJKEXWZHÂśUHGHÂżQLWHO\ZRUNLQJ towards   that,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Last   year   was   ÂżQGLQJ RXW ZKDW ZRUNV DQG EXLOGLQJ relationships  and  now  we  are  at  the  point   where  we  can  start  to  make  commitments   to  different  farmers  for  different  produce.â&#x20AC;?   %ULVWRO %DNHU\ ZDV WKH ÂżUVW IXOO UDQJH wholesale  bakery  in  the  state,  and  Harper   said  he  plans  to  have  his  local  bagels  in  all   local  institutions  soon.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   new   Bristol   Bakery   wholesale   operation  is  just  getting  started,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   we   expect   to   be   selling   to   all   of   the   institutions   up   and   down   the   Champlain   Valley,  whether  it  be  hospitals,  schools  or   colleges.â&#x20AC;?   While   the   nascent   cooperative   and   EDNHU\KRSHVWRVHHVLJQLÂżFDQWH[SDQVLRQ Biette   and   Brace   have   more   modest   growth  expectations.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Buying   local)   may   not   always   be   feasible   because   we   have   a   price-­point,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   working   to   process   and   preserve   food   for   later   in   the   year.   This   year  we  did  tomatoes  and  basil.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  would  like  to  buy  more  local  produce,â&#x20AC;?   said   Brace.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Just   trying   to   do   a   little   bit   more  of  a  little  bit  of  everything.â&#x20AC;?  

6XQĂ&#x20AC;RZHUVVRDNXSWKHLUVXUURXQGLQJVDWWKH0LGGOHEXU\)DUPHUVÂś0DUNHW ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO

Stand  off 7ZRDGMDFHQWVLORVULVHIURPIURPEHKLQGDQ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\EDUQ ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO

Bobcat CafĂŠ BBQ Braised Misty Knoll Turkey Â&#x2021; 1 Misty Knoll turkey, broken down into 6 pieces Â&#x2021; 4 spanish onions, julienned Â&#x2021; 4 cups whole garlic cloves Â&#x2021; 3 T chili powder Â&#x2021; 2 T ground cumin Â&#x2021; 2 T ground coriander Â&#x2021; 2 T smoked paprika

Â&#x2021; 1 can chipotles in adobo Â&#x2021; 5 cups cider vinaigar Â&#x2021; 1 cup brown sugar Â&#x2021; 4 cups ketchup Â&#x2021; ½ cup worcestishire Â&#x2021; ½ cup molasses Â&#x2021; 6 cups Bobcatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Lincoln Lager Â&#x2021; 1/3 cup kosher salt

Preheat oven to 350 degrees Generously season turkey pieces with salt and pepper. Grill turkey over low heat until evenly browned. Saute onions and garlic in a large rondeau until soft. Add spices and cook until fragrant. Add turkey and remaining ingredients. Bring to a boil. Cover with foil and cook in oven for 3-­4 hours or until turkey is falling off the bone. Remove turkey from liquid. Pull meat off the bone when it is cool enough to handle. Puree braising liquid until smooth and pour over pulled turkey meat. We serve this turkey on nachos. It would be equally delicious on a sandwich or in a quesadilla! Enjoy!


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 33

8ZWL]KMZ8ZWĂ&#x2026;TM" Bobcat Cafe and Brewery

If  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  searching  for  the  man  behind  the  brews  at  the  Bobcat  Cafe  and  Brewery,   look  no  further  than  the  guy  with  the  biggest  grin.   The  gregarious  Bristol  brewmaster,  Mark  Magiera,  is  often  by  the  bar  telling  jokes,   talking  hops  or  detailing  the  history  of  a  particular  beer  on  tap.  Look  past  the  bar   and  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  see  where  the  malty  magic  happens:  there  stand  two  217-­gallon  stainless   steel  fermenting  tanks  behind  glass  doors.   The  Bobcat  is  known  for  its  traditional  ales  and  lagers,  like  its  bold  Baltic  porter   and  smooth  German  Märzen,  and  its  innovative  India  Pale  Ales  featuring  Vermont   hops.   With  a  wide  array  of  house-­brewed  beers  on  tap,  you  might  not  realize  the  Bobcatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   brewery  is  run  by  only  one  man  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Magiera.   A   1997   graduate   of   the   oldest   brewing   school   in   the   nation,   Chicagoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Siebel   Institute   of   Technology,   Magiera   has   been   around   the   block   once   or   twice.   After   starting  a  brewery  in  Bermuda  to  holding  the  lead  brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  position  at  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Otter  Creek  Brewery,  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  settled  in  happily  at  the  Bobcat,  where  he  can  focus  on   making  the  best  brews  that  he  can  imagine.   On  a  recent  Friday  afternoon,  Magiera,  beer  in  hand  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  after  a  hard  dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  work   because  he  swears  he  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  drink  on  the  job  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  opened  up  the  door  to  his  downstairs   brew  den.   Like  a  jolly  scientist,  he  clambered  through  bags  of  barley  and  wheat,  showing  off   DZLGHUDQJHRIEHHUVDJLQJLQYDULRXVFDVNV1RWEHIRUHVWRSSLQJWRÂżOOXSKLVJODVV again,  he  headed  to  the  back  corner  of  the  dark,  cold  room.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  like  this,â&#x20AC;?  said  the  brewer  with  an  ear-­to-­ear  grin.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  hop  chest.â&#x20AC;?   $VKHRSHQHGWKHLFHER[GRRUWKHĂ&#x20AC;RUDOFLWUXVVPHOORIKRSVFDPHSRXULQJRXW

Many  of  the  green  cone-­shaped  herbs  in  the  chest  come  from  Vermont,  and  some   even  come  from  just  behind  the  Bobcat. When  former  brewmaster  Ron  Cotti  left  the  Bobcat,  Magiera  acquired  the  rhizomes   from  eight  different  hops.  It  took  the  climbing  perennial  two  years  to  establish  itself,   but  now  these  hop  varieties  grow  on  the  east-­facing  wall  of  the  Bobcatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  red-­brick   building.   Two  of  the  breweryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  most  famous  IPAs  are  appropriately  named  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Lil  Brick  and   Brick  Wall  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  tribute  to  the  hops  used  from  that  wall.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   year   and   last   year   (the   Lil   Brick   and   Brick   Wall   IPAs)   were   all   Vermont   grown  hops,â&#x20AC;?  said  Magiera. And   the   Vermont   hops   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   stop   on   the   east   wall.   Magiera   gets   hops   from   New   Haven,  Bristol  and  Addison  farms.  He  uses  a  hop  from  the  Addison  Hop  Farm  (see   directory)  called  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Brewerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Goldâ&#x20AC;?  in  his  Belgian-­style  Saison,  and  the  Cascade  hops  that   pump  up  Prayerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Rock  Pale  Ale  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  named  after  Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  famous  Lordâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Prayer  Rock  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   come  from  a  farm  in  New  Haven. When   asked   about   the   Vermont   climate   for   growing   hops,   Magiera   was   unequivocal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  perfect.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Andrew  Stein Photos:  Eager  patrons  enjoy  a  brew  at  the  Bobcat.  Inset,  Mark   Magiera,  the  brewmaster,  enjoys  a  German  Märzen  beer  atop  barley   and  wheat.

Independent  photos/Angela  Evancie  and  Andrew  Stein


Page 34 â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

8ZWL]KMZXZWĂ&#x2026;TM" Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Flight Farm

Elizabeth  Frank,  at  right,  explains  her  permacul-­ ture  philosophy.  Inset,  Franks  shows  the  master   plan  for  Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Flight  Farm.

Independent  Photos/Andrew  Stein

Nestled  along  the  edge  of  Lake  Champlain,  Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Flight  Farm   sits   in   breathtaking   view   of   the   Adirondacks.   With   its   1800â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   barn  and  house,  the  54-­acre  farmstead  is  a  colorful  patch  in  the   historic  quilt  that  makes  up  Orwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  rich  agricultural  fabric. (OL]DEHWK )UDQN D FHUWLÂżHG SHUPDFXOWXUDOLVW HVWDEOLVKHG the   farm   as   a   training   ground   for   permaculture.   At   its   roots,   permaculture   is   a   form   of   organic   agriculture   that   seeks   to   PLPLFSDWWHUQVLQQDWXUH,WÂśVRIWHQFKDUDFWHUL]HGE\GLYHUVLÂżHG crop   production,   soil   building   and   environmentally-­healthy   ways  of  living. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;sustainable,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   said   Frank   about   the   permaculture   approach   to   agriculture.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   regenerative.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   about   giving   back   more   to   the   land   than   you   take   from   it   ...   permanent   agriculture  that  leads  to  permanent  culture.â&#x20AC;? Fundamental  to  Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  crop  production  is  a  no-­till  method   of   soil   cultivation   that   she   calls   â&#x20AC;&#x153;lasagna   bed   gardening.â&#x20AC;?   The   method  employs  a  layering  of  brown  and  green  organic  matter.   She  starts  with  a  base  layer  of  cardboard  and  uses  alternating   layers   of   manure,   grass   clippings,   aged   sawdust,   dead   leaves   and  other  compostable  waste  on  hand. :KHQ )UDQN ÂżUVW SXUFKDVHG WKH ROG GDLU\ IDUP RQ 0RXQW Independence  Road  12  years  ago,  it  only  had  one  small  garden   growing  out  of  a  lonely  tractor  tire.  Now,  after  years  of  studying   permaculture   practices,   her   homestead   features   12   sizable   gardens   in   different   microclimates,   where   Frank   tests   the   ability  to  grow  a  wide  range  of  fruits,  vegetables  and  herbs. Her   gardens   are   dense   with   diverse   crops   growing   in   and   around  each  other,  like  the  butternut  squash  and  kale  that  grow  

up  through  her  rose  bush.  Eventually,  said  Frank,  these  dense   gardens  will  turn  into  little  food  forests. 2QDWULSWR(DJOHÂśV)OLJKW)DUPRQHFDQH[SHFWWRÂżQGKDUG neck   garlic,   blueberries   and   strawberries   growing   alongside   kale,   mustard   greens,   asparagus   and   many   other   vegetables   and  herbs.  Some  of  Frankâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  gardens  also  feature  aronia,  a  plant   well  suited  for  the  northeast  climate  that  produces  small  berries   packed  full  of  Vitamin  C  and  antioxidants.  Although  the  berries   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  usually  eaten  raw,  due  to  their  astringency,  they  can  be   used   to   make  wine,  juice,  jam  and  syrup,  among  other  value-­ added  concoctions.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  grow  oranges  here,â&#x20AC;?  said  Frank.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  aronia,  which   has  more  vitamin  C,  can  thrive.â&#x20AC;? 0DQ\ RI WKH YDOXHDGGHG SURGXFWV )UDQN SURGXFHV ² OLNH UHOLVKHV SHVWRV DQG KXPPXV ² DUH DYDLODEOH DW KHU farmstand.   She   also   sells   produce,   much   of   which   ends   up   at   FRPPHUFLDOORFDWLRQVOLNH5DPXQWRV3L]]DLQ0LGGOHEXU\ This   summer,   Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Flight   Farm   will   host   a   number   of   workshops:   how-­to   classes   on   the   lasagna   method   of   soil   building,  planting  diverse  nutrient-­dense  gardens,  and  possibly   sustainable   home-­construction   classes.   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   also   planning   to   bring  in  experts  to  teach  classes  in  identifying  and  foraging  for   wild  edibles.  As  a  regional  leader  for  Vermont  Slow  Food,  which   coins  itself  as  the  anti  fast  food  movement,  Frank  said  that  Eagleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Flight  Farm  will  host  some  slow  food  events  and  offer  farmstays,   where  families,  groups  of  people  or  individuals  can  stay  onsite   and  partake  of  the  many  opportunities  the  farm  offers. â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Andrew  Stein

Greek Kale Salad Â&#x2021; Kale Â&#x2021; Red onion Â&#x2021; Tomato Â&#x2021; Cucumber Â&#x2021; Kalamata olives Â&#x2021; Feta cheese Â&#x2021; Garlic/garlic

scapes Â&#x2021; Vinaigrette: Red wine vinegar Olive oil Garlic Honey Salt & Pepper

Wash kale and cut into thin strips, then cut into 2-­3 inch pieces. Steam the kale until light green and just wilted, then chill. Squeeze to remove excess water. Once kale is chilled, cut remaining produce. Add halved olives and crumbled feta. Toss with red wine vinaigrette and serve. This salad should come into season by the end of June or early July through the fall until frost. Enjoy!

Recipe courtesy Elizabeth Frank


2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Page 35

            " !        

       ! 

Yankee Farm Credit           

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Sample Room and Growler Shop

Fine Wine & Delectable Deli 382-TOGO

Worldly Beers with Vermont Character

610 Route 7 South

a

Middlebury, Vermont

Local Folks Carolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Hungry Mind CafĂŠ Middlebury, Vt. 388-0101 carolshungrymindcafe.com


Page 36 — 2012 Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms

The roots of American music and the freshest songs in the land

#HAMPLAIN 6ALLEY %QUIPMENT Come  see  why  the  Vermont  Farm  Community  has  trusted  us  for  over  41  years!

3  Great  Locations for  all  your  farm  equipment  needs. 453  Exchange  Street Middlebury,  VT 802-­388-­4967

7  Franklin  Park  West St.  Albans,  VT 802-­524-­6782

2506  Route  5 Derby,  VT 802-­766-­2400

www.champlainvalleyequipment.com Not all products are available at all locations.


Addison County Guide to Local Food and Farms 2012  

The Addison County Relocalization Network and the Addison Independent present our third annual Guide to Local Food and Farms, featuring a pr...

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