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MONDAY   EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 26 No. 16

Middlebury, Vermont

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Monkton  landowners:   9W*DVWDFWLFVÀDZHG Landowners  say  negotiations  stalled

Pop go the ÀUHZRUNV

By  ZACH  DESPART MONKTON  —  In  a  June  19  meet-­ ing  with  legislators  and  the  head  of   the   Department   of   Public   Service,   dozens   of   Monkton   residents   said   they’re  still  nowhere  close  to  signing   easements   with   Vermont   Gas   Sys-­ tems  that  will  allow  the  company  to  

lay  a  new  pipeline  across  the  town. In  the  three  months  since  Monkton   residents  held  a  similar  meeting  with   state   regulators   to   address   Vermont   Gas’  negotiating  tactics  with  regard   to   its  Addison-­Rutland   Natural   Gas   Project,   not   a   single   landowner   at   (See  Monkton,  Page  13)

Monday, June 23, 2014

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32 Pages

75¢

Sessions  is  selected  as   Cornwall  school  leader By  JOHN  FLOWERS CORNWALL  —  The  Cornwall   School   Board’s   search   for   an   in-­ terim  principal  has  ended  virtually   within   shouting   distance   of   the   school. Longtime   Cornwall   resident   and  former  Salisbury  Community   School  Principal  Abi  Sessions  has  

been  picked   to   lead   Cornwall’s   Bingham  Memorial  School  during   the  next  academic  year. “I   am   really   excited   to   work   with  the  Cornwall  School  staff,  to   get  to  know  the  students  and  fami-­ lies,  and  to  help  facilitate  a  smooth   transition  to  a  permanent  principal   (See  Sessions,  Page  31)

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STEVE  SMALL,  DIRECTOR  of  the  Addison  Repertory  Theater  program  at  the  Hannaford  Career  Center,  recently  won  the  inaugural  Herb  Lock-­ wood  Prize,  a  $10,000  award  given  for  artistic  achievement  and  community  enrichment. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

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Small makes a big impression in Vt. theater By  MARY  LANGWORTHY  and   JOHN  S.  McCRIGHT MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   When   it   comes   to   the   world   of   theater,   Steve   Small   is   a   veritable   man   for   DOO VHDVRQV +H LV D ÂżUVWFODVV DF-­ tor,  directs  productions  every  year,   is  a  whiz  with  the  technical  side  of   stagecraft   and   even   knows   how   to   create  prosthetic  zombie  hands. Last   week   the   57-­year-­old   di-­

rector  of   the   Addison   Repertory   Theater   and   active   actor   was   rec-­ ognized   not   only   for   those   skills,   but   more   importantly   for   helping   a   generation   or   two   of   students   to   ¿QGWKHLURZQZD\LQWKHWKHDWHU 6PDOOZDVQDPHGWKH¿UVWUHFLSL-­ ent  of  the  Herb  Lockwood  Prize,  a   $10,000  award  given  to  honor  pas-­ sionate  Vermont  artists  whose  work   shapes  their  Vermont  communities.  

Those  who   know   Smallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   work   werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   surprised   to   hear   of   the   honor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Steve   Small   is   one   of   the   most   talented  and  caring  teachers  I  have   ever   known,â&#x20AC;?   said   Lois   Rood,   one   of   Smallâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  A.R.T.   students,   who   is   now  studying  music  at  the  Wheaton   College   of   Music   in   Illinois.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   more  than  deserves  this  award.â&#x20AC;? The  award,  which  was  presented  

this  past   Tuesday   at   Burlington   City  Arts,  will  be  given  annually  by   Todd  Lockwood  in  honor  of  his  late   brother,  Herb  Lockwood.  Herb  was   a   musician   and   artist   who   died   27   years  ago  in  an  accident  in  Burling-­ ton  at  the  age  of  27. The   Herb   Lockwood   Prize   is   a   celebration  of  artistic  excellence  at   a  level  that  inspires  other  artists  and   (See  Steve  Small,  Page  7)


PAGE  2  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

Vt. Gas, Shoreham come to an understanding

By  ZACH  DESPART SHOREHAM   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Vermont   Gas   Systems   and   the   Shoreham   select-­ board   announced   on   Thursday   that   they   had   agreed   on   a   Memorandum   of   Understanding   related   to   the  Ad-­ dison-­Rutland   Natural   Gas   Project,   a  natural  gas  pipeline  that  would  run   through  the  town. The   agreement   sets   conditions   about  how  and  where  the  natural  gas   transmission   line   can   be   built   and   mandates   emergency   training   and   safety  measures.   In   the   MOU,   Vermont   Gas   also   promises   to   create   a   $100,000   com-­ munity   fund   to   be   used   for   educa-­ WLRQ IHDVLELOLW\ VWXGLHV UHWURÂżWWLQJ municipal   buildings   for   natural   gas,   DQGVXEVLGL]LQJHQHUJ\HIÂżFLHQF\LP-­ provements  to  residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  homes.   The   selectboard   will   administer   the  fund,  which  the  company  said  it   OKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  because  of  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;unique   statusâ&#x20AC;?   of   hosting   the   transmission   line   to   the   International   Paper   plant   in  Ticonderoga,  N.Y.

In  a   statement   issued   by  Vermont   Gas,   selectboard   chair   Paul   Saenger   praised  the  MOU  as  a  good  step  for   the  town. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  agreement  with  Vermont  Gas   is  a  positive  step  forward  that  will  en-­ sure  our  community  and  landownersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   interests,â&#x20AC;?   Saenger   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   com-­ munity   fund,   to   be   managed   by   the   WRZQ ZLOO KHOS WRZQ RIÂżFLDOV ZLWK planning   and   emergency   services.   While  natural  gas  will  be  available  to   some  parts  of  Shoreham,  it  is  our  hope   Vermont  Gas  will  continue  to  work  to   expand  their  service  so  all  of  our  citi-­ ]HQVFDQEHQHÂżWIURPWKHORZHUSULFHV and  emissions  of  natural  gas.â&#x20AC;? Saenger  added  that  he  hoped  Ver-­ mont   Gas   would   extend   service   to   more   citizens   of   Addison   County.   Currently,   the   company   estimates   the   pipeline   could   serve   about   100   homes  and  businesses  in  Shoreham. The  MOU  also  states  that  Vermont   Gas   will   provide   up   to   $40,000   to   convert  municipal  vehicles  to  natural   gas,  and  that  the  company  will,  when  

possible,  hire  and  train  local  workers   to  construct  the  pipeline. It   also   sets   a   number   of   safety   rules,   such   as   the   construction   of   a   7-­foot,  barbed  wire-­topped  perimeter   fence   surrounding   the   gate   station.   The  company  also  promises  to  notify   residents  within  1,000  feet  of  a  con-­ struction  site  a  week  before  construc-­ tion   begins.   Vermont   Gas   will   also   inspect   the   outside   of   the   pipeline   every  two  years,  and  the  inside  of  the   pipeline,   using   a   specialized   device,   every  seven  years. Though   every   member   of   the   se-­ lectboard  signed  the  MOU,  the  project   remains   controversial   in   Shoreham.   On  Town  Meeting  Day,  residents  vot-­ ed  66-­38  against  the  pipeline. Phase   II   of   the   project   would   run   from   Middlebury   through   the   towns   of   Cornwall   and   Shoreham   before   crossing   Lake   Champlain   and   ter-­ minating   at   the   International   Paper   mill   in   Ticonderoga.   It   has   not   yet   been  approved  by  the  Public  Service   Board.

ACTR  bus  drivers  narrowly  turn  down  union MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Addison   County  Transit  Resources  bus  drivers   on  June  11  voted  9-­8  against  union-­ izing  through  Teamsters  Local  597. Nadine   Barnicle,   community   re-­ lations   manager   for  ACTR,   said   the  

organization  is  committed  to  working   with  the  drivers  to  resolve  any  issues   that   prompted   them   to   take   a   union   vote. Âł:HÂśUHUHDOO\FRQÂżGHQWZHFDQDOO work  together,â&#x20AC;?  Barnicle  said.

Teamsters  Local   597   spokesman   Tony  St.  Hilaire  did  not  immediately   return  a  phone  call  seeking  comment. Jim  Moulton,  executive  director  of   ACTR,   was   not   available   for   com-­ ment. GIRLS   AT   THE   SOLA   School   of   Leadership   in   Kabul,   Afghanistan,   make  a  presentation  on  outdoor  sports  at  their  school.  

Local woman brings word from Afghanistan Kerr to share her experiences on June 25 By  WEYLAND  JOYNER FERRISBURGH  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  When  people   asked   about   her   health   last   week,   Ferrisburgh  resident  Mary  Kerr  told   them  she  had  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kabul  cough.â&#x20AC;?   The   condition,   she   explained,   re-­ sults  from  a  mixture  of  air  pollution   from  cars  and  truck  exhaust  and  dust   kicked  up  in  the  dry  areas  in  the  Af-­ ghan  capital.  Kerr  just  returned  from   seven   weeks   teaching   at   a   special   boarding  school  for  girls  there.   Kerr  will  present  a  slideshow  and   give  a  talk  on  her  experience  in  Af-­ ghanistan   this   Wednesday,   June   25,   at   the   Ilsley   Public   Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Com-­ munity  Room  from  5-­6:30  p.m. Kerr  taught  at  the  School  of  Lead-­ ership,   Afghanistan   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   known   as   SOLA  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  from  April  to  June.  SOLA   was  founded  in  2008  by  Ted  Achil-­ les,   an  American,   and   Shabana   Ba-­ sij-­Rasikh,   a   native   of   Kabul   who   attended   Middlebury   College,   as   a   safe   place   to   teach   Afghan   girls.   When   SOLA   was   founded   in   2008,   there  were  four  students.  The  school   has   since   grown   to   include   32   stu-­ dents.   Girls  age  12  to  19,  nominated  for   their   exceptional   academic   ability,   board   at   SOLA.   In   some   ways   it   is   a  traditional  school  with  science  and   other  classes,  but  the  environment  at  

SOLA  stresses   leadership   and   em-­ powerment,   and   emphasizes   speak-­ ing,  reading  and  writing  English.   The  goal  at  SOLA  is  to  place  stu-­ dents   in   international   high   schools   and   colleges,   so   they   can   return   to   (See  Kerr,  Page  3)

MARY   KERR


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  3

ACSU  in  search  of  a  new  business  manager By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Addi-­ son   Central   Supervisory   Union   is   searching   for   a   new   business   man-­ ager  to  replace  Laura  Nassau,  who  is   leaving  this  summer  to  take  a  similar   position   with   the   Chittenden   South   Supervisory  Union. Nassau   provided   some   much   needed   stability   to   the   business   manager   position   when   she   joined   the  ACSU  in  February  of  2012.  Her   immediate   predecessor,   Paula   Van-­

Minos,  had   just   resigned   after   not   reporting  to  work  for  several  weeks   while  dealing  with  a  family  illness.   VanMinosâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  predecessor  was  Sharon   Stearns,   who   had   resigned   in   May   of  2011  after  having  been  placed  on   administrative  leave. Nassau   explained   she   is   leaving   for  reasons  of  geography. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(The   CSSU)   is   closer   to   home   for  me,â&#x20AC;?  Nassau  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  really   the  main  issue  for  me.â&#x20AC;? Prior   to   joining   the  ACSU,   Nas-­

sau  had   been   business   manager   of   the   Chittenden   East   Supervisory   Union  in  Richmond. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  enjoyed  my  time  here,â&#x20AC;?  she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   is   a   really   solid   school   district,   in   terms   of   operations.   There   are   a   lot   of   great,   talented   people  here,  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  going  to  miss   them.â&#x20AC;? She   thanked   her   colleagues   for   making   her   feel   welcome   dur-­ ing   her   two-­and-­a-­half   years   with   the   ACSU,   a   district   that   includes  

erations,  facility  projects  and  special   projects  within  the  ACSU. An   ACSU   advertisement   solic-­ iting   applicants   for   the   job   lists   a   bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree   in   accounting   or   EXVLQHVVUHODWHG ÂżHOG UHOHYDQW Âż-­ nancial   management   experience,   DQG NQRZOHGJH RI ÂżQDQFLDO VRIW-­ ZDUH DV DPRQJ WKH TXDOLÂżFDWLRQV candidates  should  possess. 'LVWULFWRIÂżFLDOVKRSHWRKDYHWKH SRVLWLRQÂżOOHGEHIRUHWKHVWDUWRIWKH next  school  year.

350VT  urges  cyclists   to  bike  throughout  July

Kerr  (Continued  from  Page  2) Afghanistan   and   take   positions   of   leadership  in  their  native  country. Kerr,   81,   went   to   Afghanistan   to   volunteer   as   an   English   teacher   at   SOLA   and   to   found   the   SOLA   Sun,   an   English-­language   student   news-­ SDSHUWKDWLVSUREDEO\WKHÂżUVWRILWV kind  in  the  country. Kerr  arrived  in  Kabul  on  the  heels   of  a  contested  national  election.  As  a   result,  she  reports,  there  was  a  sense   of  tension  in  the  city. One  day  Kerr  went  to  meet  Nancy   Hatch   Dupree,   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;grandmother   of   Afghanistanâ&#x20AC;?   who,   along   with   her   husband,   renowned   archaeologist   Louis   Dupree,   traveled   the   country   in   a   Land   Rover   compiling   guide-­ books   and   discovering   evidence   of   prehistoric  settlements. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nancy  said  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  one  place   to  go  for  lunch  in  Kabul  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Chicken   Street!â&#x20AC;?   Chicken   Street   is   a   market   dis-­ trict  in  the  foreign  sector  of  the  city.   Kerrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   photographs   of   the   place   show  vibrant  storefronts  with  orien-­ tal  rugs  and  exotic  foods.  However,   because   the   area   is   highly   public,   Kerrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   guards   at   SOLA   warned   her   that   it   could   be   dangerous   for   an   American. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   was   told   not   to   go,â&#x20AC;?   Kerr   re-­ counted.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   said,   if   anything   happens  to  you,  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  on  your  own.   $QG,ZDVÂżQH´ The  apparent  intersection  of  beau-­ W\ DQG GDQJHU LQ .DEXO UHĂ&#x20AC;HFWV D centuries-­old  Western  attitude  about   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  East,â&#x20AC;?  Kerr  said.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  an  attitude   she  hopes  to  dispel. Kerrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   interest   in   Afghanistan   dates  back  to  an  undergraduate  jour-­ nalism   thesis   she   wrote   at   North-­ western  University  in  the  1950s.  She   previously   traveled   to   Afghanistan   in  2006,  and  to  Syria  in  2010.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Afghanistan   gets   a   bad   rap   in   the  Western  media,â&#x20AC;?  Kerr  says.  She   mentions   the   slew   of   recent   shoot-­ ings  in  the  United  States  to  make  a   comparison  to  Afghanistan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  calling  Afghanistan  a  vio-­ lent   country.  At   least   with   the   Tali-­ ban,   you   know   where   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   coming   from,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. For  Kerr,  the  situation  in  Afghani-­ stan  looks  hopeful.  She  said  60  per-­ cent   of   Afghanistanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   population   is   25   years   old   or   younger.   Primary   school   enrollment   is   up   from   only   800,000   in   2002,   mainly   boys,   to   8   million   today,   more   than   a   third   girls,  she  says.  

Middlebury  Union  middle  and  high   schools  and  the  elementary  schools   in   Bridport,   Cornwall,   Salisbury,   Shoreham,   Middlebury,   Ripton   and   Weybridge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   be   missed,   and   really   KHOSHG XV HVWDEOLVK VWURQJ ÂżVFDO management,â&#x20AC;?   ACSU   Superinten-­ dent  Peter  Burrows  said  of  Nassau. The   business   manager   assists   in   budgeting   for   district   schools   and   supervises   cash   management,   stu-­ dent  transportation,  food  service  op-­

BURLINGTON  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   350   Vermont   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Participating   in   Just   Bike   is   my   (350VT)   presents   its   second   annual   way   of   doing   my   part   as   an   indi-­ summer   bike   challenge,   Just   Bike.   vidual  to  reduce  my  carbon  footprint   The   month-­long   event   challenges   while   also   contributing   to   a   larger   Vermonters   to   commit   to   goal   of   promoting   an   â&#x20AC;&#x153;just  bikingâ&#x20AC;?  for  the  month   Just Bike organization   which   can   of  July  while  raising  mon-­ celebrates a have   a   bigger   impact   on   ey  for  climate  action.   local   policy   surrounding   low-impact Just   Bike   celebrates   a   climate,â&#x20AC;?   participant   Ra-­ low-­impact   lifestyle   and   lifestyle and chel  Cairns  said.     grassroots   organization.   grassroots Just  Bike  kicks  off  with   Participants   commit   a   organization. a   Bikeapalooza   on   June   biking   goal   and   solicit   Participants 27   for   a   10-­mile   climate   support  from  their  family   commit a ride   around   downtown   and  friends. Burlington,  in  partnership   biking goal â&#x20AC;&#x153;Biking   is   one   grass-­ with   the   Burlington   Bike   roots   solution   to   the   cli-­ and solicit Party.   mate   crisis,â&#x20AC;?   350VT   Co-­ support from On   July   1,   American   ordinator  Maeve  McBride   their family Flatbread   will   sponsor   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   we   can   reorient   and friends. EHQHÂżW EDNHV IRU -XVW RXU OLIHVW\OHV WR ÂżQG IXO-­ Bike   at   its   Middlebury   ÂżOOPHQW ZLWKLQ ZDONLQJ DQG ELNLQJ and   Burlington   locations.   Other   distances   from   our   homes,   we   can   events  include  a  family  ride  to  Aus-­ abandon   car   culture   and   the   fossil   able  Chasm  in  New  York  on  June  12   fuels  that  drive  that  culture.â&#x20AC;? and   a   spot   in   the  Warren   Fourth   of   350VT   supporters   said   they   have   July  Parade.   chosen   to   just   bike   for   a   variety   of   For   a   full   listing   of   events   and   environmental,   health   and   political   group  rides,  visit  the  Just  Bike  web-­ reasons.   site,  JustBike.org.  

MARY  KERR  DRINKS  in  a  dramatic  view  of  the  ancient  legendary  Red   City  in  the  Bamyan  Valley  of  Afghanistan  with  the  peaks  of  Hindu  Kush   rising  in  the  background.  The  white  rock  next  to  her  signals  recent  land   mine  clearance.

SOLA  has  placed  students  at  top-­ tier   colleges   in   the   United   States   including   Tufts,   Middlebury,   Yale   and   Columbia   Law   School.   Kerr   said   the   parents   of   those   girls   are   supportive.   One   mother   told   her   daughter,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  be  able   to  do  what  I  couldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t,â&#x20AC;?  according  to   Kerr.     Despite   the   positive   changes   Kerr   has   noticed,   the   Taliban   is   a   very   real   danger,   even   in   Kabul.   The  exact  location  of  SOLA  is  un-­ disclosed,   and   Kerr   is   unable   to   give  away  photos  of  the  students.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some   of   the   girls   are   under   death  threats,â&#x20AC;?  Kerr  says. Kerr  herself  wore  a  tunic,  a  scarf   and,   often,   dark   glasses   any   time   she   was   in   public.   The   newspaper   she   helped   start,   the   SOLA   Sun,   is   restricted   to   circulation   within   the   school   because   it   contains   photo-­ graphs  and  names  of  students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   even   know   where   SOLA  is,â&#x20AC;?  Kerr  explains,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;because  

SOLA  represents   everything   the   Taliban  is  against.â&#x20AC;?  But,  she  contin-­ ues,  the  threat  of  the  Taliban  should   QRWXQGXO\LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRXUSHUFHSWLRQ of  what  she  sees  as  a  fundamentally   stable  society. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   friends   at   humanitarian   or-­ ganizations   in   Kabul   really   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think  the  Taliban  threat  is  as  bad  as   everyone  thinks.â&#x20AC;? She  smiles,  pointing  to  a  picture   of  the  garden  in  SOLAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  courtyard.   %HKLQG WKH Ă&#x20AC;RZHUV ULVHV D IRRW concrete  wall. â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   my   writing   as   a   journalist,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   always   looked   for   warts   â&#x20AC;Ś   but   when   it   comes   to  Afghanistan,   I  came  away  with  roses.â&#x20AC;? Mary   Kerr   will   give   a   slideshow   and  a  talk  on  her  experience  in  Ka-­ bul   this   Wednesday,   at   the   Ilsley   Public  Library  from  5-­6:30  p.m.  She   will  also  teach  a  series  of  classes  on   humanitarian  organizations  and  ad-­ venture   travel   for   Elderly   Services   Inc.  in  November.

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PAGE  4  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

A DDIS ON   INDE P E NDEN T

Editorial

Two  differing  views  on  U.S.   military  involvement  in  Iraq When   former   U.S.   Secretary   of   State   Condoleezza   Rice   delivered   a   speech  at  Norwich  last  Thursday,  she  stayed  true  to  the  tune  played  during   3UHVLGHQW*HRUJH:%XVKÂśV\HDUVLQRIÂżFHIURPWR²WKDWLWLV our  duty  and  responsibility  to  act  militarily,  if  necessary,  to  make  the  world   a  safer  place  and  establish  democracies  when  possible. As  Iraq  devolves  into  another  military  crisis,  and  Syria  continues  to  be  a   bloodbath  of  Muslim-­against-­Muslim,  Riceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  response  to  the  latest  crisis  in   Iraq  is  to  send  the  troops  back  in.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  to  knock  them  back,â&#x20AC;?  Rice   told  the  crowd  of  nearly  3,000  at  Norwich  University.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  United  States   has  to  step  up.  Why?  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  because  we  are  the  most  powerful  country  in   the  world,  the  most  powerful  military,  the  most  powerful  economy.  But  also   because  we  represent  an  idea,  the  idea  that  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;we  the  peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  can  be  an  inclu-­ sive  concept.â&#x20AC;? Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   nice   theory,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   disappointing   Rice   is   in   denial   of   the   conse-­ quences  of  that  very  strategy  in  Iraq.  Disposing  Iraqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dictator  Saddam  Hus-­ sein  and  trying  to  put  a  democracy  in  its  place  did  not  work.  Rather,  Iraqis   did  not  embrace  Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  presence,  rejected  democracy  and  now  the  coun-­ WU\LVRQWKHEULQNRIFLYLOZDUDJDLQZLWK,UDTLVÂżJKWLQJHDFKRWKHU That  Rice  would  continue  to  espouse  the  very  beliefs  that  got  us  into  this   SUREOHP LQ WKH ÂżUVW SODFH ZLWK D SULFH WDJ RI DERXW  WULOOLRQ  LV D WHOO-­ ing  character  of  the  political  party  she  represents.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  belief  that  military   PLJKW PDNHV ULJKW ,W LV DOVR D EHOLHI WKDW Ă&#x20AC;LHV LQ WKH IDFH RI UHFHQW UHDO-­ ity  that  strongly  suggests  the  presence  of  power  causes  resentment,  which   breeds  animosity  toward  the  occupying  power,  and  which  rarely  succeeds   in  establishing  stable  governments  in  nations  which  do  not  have  a  tradition   of  self-­rule. Vermont-­based  political  columnist  Haviland  Smith,  a  retired  CIA  station   chief  who  served  in  Europe  and  the  Middle  East  and  as  chief  of  the  counter-­ terrorism  staff,  sums  up  the  lessons  learned  very  differently:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make   no   mistake   about   it,   what   we   are   watching   in   Iraq   today   is   the   GLUHFWUHVXOWRIRXULQYDVLRQRIWKDWFRXQWU\LQDQLQYDVLRQWKDWZDV conceived  and  carried  out  either  because  the  Bush  administration  did  not   understand  realities  in  that  country  and  region,  or  because  it  chose  to  over-­ look  them  for  its  own  political  reasons. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Either   way,   uninformed   or   arrogant,   the   result   we   are   watching   today   was  a  foregone  conclusion  from  the  start. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  net  effect  was  that  we  liberated  Iraqâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  inherent  violence. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iraq,  like  so  many  other  countries  that  languished  under  the  boot  of  Eu-­ URSHDQLPSHULDOLVPLQWKHWKDQGWKFHQWXULHVZDVQHYHUDUHDOFRXQWU\ In  fact,  Iraq,  with  its  populations  of  Kurds,  Shiites  and  Sunnis  jammed  into   one  country  without  their  consent,  is  about  as  hopeless  a  choice  for  a  coun-­ try  as  exists  anywhere.  Over  the  centuries,  since  6,000  B.C.,  what  is  now   FDOOHG,UDTKDVEHHQDSDUWRIHPSLUHVPRVWRIWKHPIRUHLJQ Âł6LQFHZKHQLWVPRGHUQERXQGDULHVZHUHHVWDEOLVKHG,UDTKDVEHHQ UXOHG E\ WKH %ULWLVK (PSLUH E\ LWV RZQ PRQDUFK\ DQG WKHQ IURP  E\WKH%DDWK3DUW\GLFWDWRUVKLSXQGHU6DGGDP+XVVHLQ)URP XQWLOWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVZDVWKHHIIHFWLYHUXOHURI,UDTWKURXJKRXURZQ military  establishment. Âł,UDTLV KDYH YLUWXDOO\ QR H[SHULHQFH ZLWK VHOIUXOH )RU URXJKO\  years,   they   have   been   ruled   by   their   own   monarchies   and   dictators   or   by   foreigners.  That  might  be  hopeful  if  they  shared  any  real  harmony  in  their   ethnic  and  religious  makeup  with  their  Muslim  neighbors.  But  they  do  not...   Iraq  is   a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;countryâ&#x20AC;?  at  war  with  itself.  Its  diverse  residents  have  long  been   waiting  for  the  opportunity  to  unify  into  independent  Kurd,  Shia  and  Sunni   groups.  It  is  an  almost  perfect  candidate  for  partition  and  reassembly  into   three  or  more  parts.  The  problem  clearly  is  that  they  all  want  to  rule,  and   none  of  them  wants  to  be  ruled  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  perfect  circumstances  for  the  creation   of  new  countries  in  what  was  Iraq. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  unreasonable  to  believe  there  is  a  future  for  self-­government  in  a   single  Iraq.  The  extraordinary  current  performance  of  the  Iraq  army  in  de-­ serting  en  toto  in  the  face  of  a  vastly  inferior  attacking  force  tells  the  story,   the  outcome  and  the  future.  The  Sunni  private  will  not  take  orders  from  the   Shia  lieutenant. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  will  be  no  peace  between  these  Iraqi  factions  until  all  of  them  can   get  some  sort  of  satisfaction  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  most  probably  in  the  partition  of  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;coun-­ try.â&#x20AC;?  Any  attempt  by  any  entity,  particularly  one  that  is  not  indigenous  to  the   UHJLRQVXFKDVWKH8QLWHG6WDWHVWRWKZDUWRULQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHVXFKDQRXWFRPH by  force,  is  only  going  to  make  the  situation  longer  lasting  and  worse  than   it  already  is. Âł,IWKHUHHYHUZDVDÂżJKWWKDWZDVQÂśWRXUVWKLVLVLWHYHQWKRXJKRXULQYD-­ sion  started  it.â&#x20AC;? Angelo  Lynn

In  the  alley THE  ST.  STEPHENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  Church  steeple  in  Middlebury  rises  up  behind  the  former  Green  Mountain  Shoe   and  Apparel  building  along  Printerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Alley  while  the  evening  sun  casts  a  long  shadow  of  a  power  pole   last  Thursday.  The  metal-­sided  building  is  scheduled  for  demolition  later  this  year. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Letters to the Editor Plentiful  energy  aids  economy  and  bumps  land  values About  the  Vermont  Gas  pipeline   and  the  dreaded  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fâ&#x20AC;?  word  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   fracking: 1.  Fracking Widely  criticized  â&#x20AC;&#x153;frackingâ&#x20AC;?  to   increase  oil  and  gas  production   is  used  worldwide.  Its  use  in  the   U.S.  has  allowed  our  domestic   production  of  oil  to  increase  to   where  it  accounts  for  about  50   percent  of  our  needs. Fracking,  like  any  exploration   or  mining  operation,  can  be  done   in  a  manner  that  minimizes  the   environmental  impact.  To  assure   that  this  is  done  requires  strong  

environmental  oversight.  This  in   turn  requires  a  strong  government   with  a  concerned  citizenry.   The  U.S.  and  Canada  and  most   of  Europe  meet  these  criteria.  The   other  50  percent  of  our  oil  comes   from  countries  like  Venezuela,   Nigeria  and  the  Middle  East  that   have  little  regard  for  the  environ-­ ment  and  cannot  even  provide   their  people  with  basic  human   rights.  To  make  matters  worse   most  of  them  despise  us.   The  next  time  you  buy  gasoline   or  fuel  oil,  remember  that  one-­half   of  your  money  may  go  to  support  

fracking  and  the  other  half  goes  to   support  the  enemy. It  is  true  that  Vermont  Gas   comes  from  Canada  and  some   of  our  money  goes  there.  Thirty   percent  of  our  electricity  comes   from  Hydro  Quebec  and  is  much   touted  as  part  of  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  renew-­ able  energy  portfolio.  Is  paying   our  good  friends  to  the  north  for   natural  gas  any  different  than  pay-­ ing  for  electricity? 2.  Renewable  energy Everyone  wants  more  renew-­ able  energy:  wind  power,  hydro-­ (See  Letter,  Page  5)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  5

PSB Â Poem

Letters to the Editor Alienation  can  lead  to  suffering  and  great  tragedy Elliot  Rodger  was  involved  in   therapy  relationships  (not  neces-­ sarily  therapeutic)  for  14  of  his  22   years,  and  though  practitioners  of   this  gentle  art  of  psychotherapy   are  varied  in  the  traits  and  talents   they  possess,  he  seems  to  have   been  lost  to  those  with  whom  he   worked,  and  however  devastating   this  is  to  his  parents,  at  some  level   of  intimacy  they  too  may  have   been  lost  to  him.

The  gun  issue  will  be  empha-­ sized,  and  rightly  so  because  a  solu-­ tion  must  be  hammered  out  with   both  sides  represented  at  the  table   of  discussion,  but  the  deeper  and   more  compelling  issue  and  concern   is  the  alienation  we  feel  as  individ-­ uals.  We  are  less  and  less  connected   to  each  other  even  as  or  because  we   are  technologically  more  connected   with  one  another.  We  can  make  the   distant  close  but  in  so  doing  are  we  

making  the  close  distant?  I  believe   we  are. These  tragedies  will  continue   XQWLOZHÂżQGRXUZD\LQWRKHDO-­ ing  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  alienation  from  others  is   devastating  to  the  marginalized,   and,  as  we  too  frequently  see,  can   EHKRUULÂżFDQGGHYDVWDWLQJWRWKH public  as  well. Roger  Marum North  Ferrisburgh

This  Canadian  pipeline  will  do  us  no  good And  would  set  us  back  greatly  from  where  we  once  stood A  progressive  state,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  little  engine  that  couldâ&#x20AC;? We  want  to  save  our  land  from  the  corporate  hood! So  Public  Service  Board,  please  listen  to  us  now  â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  offering  our  wisdom,  comment  and  know  how! Climate  change  is  real,  we  must  deal  with  it  right  now Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  disregard  us  by  giving  Shumlin  a  bow! A  Haiku  for  you,  PSB Public  Service  Board Please  save  our  Land  and  The  Lake <RX'HFLGHRXU)DWH

Letter  (Continued  from  Page  4) power  and  solar.  This  is  a  wonder-­ ful  goal,  but  not  easily  obtained   and  has  its  own  environmental   problems.  Wind  power  and  solar   power  are  heavily  subsidized  with   your  tax  dollars.  Wind  power   installation  often  results  in  exten-­ sive  damage  to  the  environment   with  the  construction  of  mountain   top  roads  and  transmission  lines.   The  manufacture  of  solar  panels   requires  large  amounts  of  electri-­ FDOHQHUJ\DQGVLJQL¿FDQWXVHRI chemicals.  As  a  result  most  solar   panels  are  manufactured  in  China   ZKHUHFKHDSFRDO¿UHGHOHFWULFLW\ and  lax  environmental  regulations   reduce  costs. Hydropower  is  one  of  our  oldest   proven  economical  sources  of   renewable  energy  and  is  widely   used.  Its  environmental  impact  is   moderate  providing  you  are  not   a  salmon,  Native  American  or  a   caribou.  The  attractive  nature  of   hydropower  is  that  within  limits  it   is  there  when  you  need  it. Wind  and  solar  power  are   intermittent  sources  of  power.   Solar  only  works  when  the  sun   shines.  Wind  power  is  subject   to  the  variability  of  the  wind,   which  makes  its  introduction  to   WKHHOHFWULFSRZHUJULGGLI¿FXOW To  compensate  for  the  unpredict-­ ability  of  wind  and  solar,  power   companies  are  turning  to  the  use   of  gas  turbine  generators,  which   can  be  quickly  brought  on  line   when  needed.  These  turbines   burn,  you  guessed  it,  natural  gas.   Increasing  use  of  wind  and  solar   may  actually  increase  the  burning   of  natural  gas. 2QHRIWKHEHQH¿WVRIQDWX-­ ral  gas  is  that  it  burns  cleanly   and  easily  meets  environmental   regulations.  Unfortunately  when   natural  gas  is  used  to  generate   electricity  in  a  turbine,  the  laws  of   thermodynamics  limit  its  thermal   HI¿FLHQF\WRDERXWSHUFHQW whereas  natural  gas  burned  in   a  home  or  industrial  furnace  to   supply  heat  easily  gives  a  thermal   HI¿FLHQF\RISHUFHQW,QP\ opinion,  burning  gas  to  generate   peak  demand  electricity  is  a  waste   of  a  valuable  natural  resource. 3.  Heat  and  the  Vermont   economy

Governors  come  and  onto  â&#x20AC;&#x153;DCâ&#x20AC;?  they  may  go ,QĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHGE\PRQH\IURPWKRVHZKRKHOSWKHPÂłJURZ´ But  like  invasive  species,  the  seeds  they  can  sow  â&#x20AC;&#x201D; May  alter  landscapes  in  ways  we  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  want  to  know! Contamination  of  water,  land,  communities, are  often  part  and  parcel  when  power  is  seized. When  corporate  money  reigns  over  the  powers  that  be, Governors  can  forget  their  wise  constituency!

Vermont  industries  require  a   lot  of  energy  for  heat.  Not  only  to   heat  the  buildings  they  occupy  but   for  their  manufacturing  processes.   Brick  making,  cheese  making,   brewing,  chocolate  making,  paper   making,  casting  foundries  are  a   few  examples.  These  industries   are  vital  to  the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  economy   and  provide  good  paying  jobs.   Natural  gas  is  the  ideal  energy   source  for  this  use.  It  burns  with   KLJKHIÂżFLHQF\LVYHUVDWLOHDQG clean  and  competitively  priced.   Homes  in  higher  density  housing   areas  near  gas  lines  may  also  ben-­ HÂżWIURPWKLVKHDWVRXUFH7KRVH Vermonters  that  live  in  rural   areas  unfortunately  are  stuck  with   wood,  oil  or  propane. 4.  Safety The  transportation  of  any  fuel   has  hazards  associated  with  it.   Tank  trucks  go  off  the  road,   railroad  trains  derail.  Pipelines  do   fail  but  the  incidents  are  rare  com-­ pared  to  other  forms  of  transpor-­ tation.  If  the  residents  of  Addison   County  want  a  cause  to  pursue,   they  should  examine  the  potential   for  environmental  disaster  to  Lake   &KDPSODLQIURPWKHFUXGHRLO tank  cars  per  day  that  trundle  lit-­ erally  down  the  shoreline  of  Lake   Champlain.  Not  only  a  dangerous   situation  (remember  Lac  Megan-­ tic  in  Quebec)  but  an  environmen-­ tal  disaster  waiting  to  happen:  The   inadvertent  dumping  of  thousands   of  gallons  of  crude  oil  in  Lake   Champlain  would  dwarf  any  envi-­ ronmental  disaster  that  a  pipeline   carrying  methane  under  the  lake   could  possibly  produce.   5.  Property  values The  installation  of  highways,   power  lines,  pipelines,  wind   turbines  and  solar  arrays  can   and  will  affect  property  values.   Determining  the  effect  is  highly   subjective.  In  the  case  of  a  Ver-­ mont  gas  pipeline,  however,  we   do  have  some  history  to  look  back   RQ,QWKHPLGVWKH)UDQNOLQ County  Regional  Planning  and   Development  Commission  was   tasked  with  producing  a  Regional   Development  Plan.  At  the  same   time  Vermont  Gas  was  installing   WKHLUJDVSLSHOLQHWKURXJK)UDQN-­ lin  County  to  Burlington.  The   installation  of  the  pipeline  was  for  

the  most  part  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;non  event.â&#x20AC;? It  was  a  non  event  for  a  number   RIUHDVRQV)UDQNOLQ&RXQW\DW the  time  was  rural,  agricultural   and  the  economy  was  severely   GHSUHVVHG,QWHUVWDWH,KDG just  been  completed  to  the  border   with  Canada  a  few  years  before   and  was  a  much  more  contentious   project  than  a  little  pipeline.  Own-­ ers  of  the  land  the  pipeline  passed   through  were  generally  pleased   with  the  compensation  allowed  by   Vermont  Gas  and  few  complained. I  am  embarrassed  to  say  that   the  planning  commission  barely   considered  the  pipeline  in  our  Re-­ gional  Plan.  Why?  Because  those   were  the  days  of  cheap  energy.   Gasoline  was  inexpensive  and   home  heating  oil  was  as  I  remem-­ EHUDERXWFHQWVSHUJDOORQDQG people  building  new  homes  were   installing  electric  heat.  Unfor-­ tunately,  those  days  are  past.   7KHIROORZLQJSOXV\HDUVVDZ energy  costs  skyrocket  and  at   the  same  time  industries  started   PRYLQJLQWR)UDQNOLQ&RXQW\ÂśV industrial  parks,  most  of  them,   taking  advantage  of  natural  gas.   7KHHFRQRP\RI)UDQNOLQ&RXQW\ improved  dramatically  and  it  now   has  one  of  the  lowest  unemploy-­ ment  rates  in  the  state. So  what  happened  to  land   values?  Overall  they  went  up   with  the  economy.  Individually   of  course  there  were  variations.   Where  the  pipeline  went  through   IDUPHUVÂśFRUQÂżHOGVDQGKD\-­ ÂżHOGVZKLFKDUHVWLOOFRUQÂżHOGV DQGKD\ÂżHOGVWKHEHQHÂżWWRWKH landowner  aside  from  the  original   compensation  was  just  the  gen-­ HUDOLQFUHDVHLQODQGYDOXHV)RU some  landowners  that  were  lucky   enough  to  own  land  suitable  for   development,  proximity  to  natural   gas  increased  property  values   VLJQLÂżFDQWO\ Will  land  values  change  in   Addison  County  as  a  result  of  the   gas  line?  No  one  can  really  say   for  sure.  Short-­term  land  values   probably  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  change  much.   In  the  long  term  all  we  can  say,   based  on  previous  experience,  is   that  a  good  economy  increases   land  values. William  A.  Mraz Middlebury

Elizabeth  Frank Orwell

ADDISON COUNTY

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Postmaster,  send  address  change  to  Addison  Independent, 0DSOH6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQWÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;)D[Â&#x2021;:HEZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP (0DLOQHZV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRPÂ&#x2021;(0DLO$GYHUWLVLQJDGV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP 3XEOLVKHGHYHU\0RQGD\7KXUVGD\E\WKH$GGLVRQ3UHVV,QF0HPEHU9HUPRQW3UHVV$VVRFLDWLRQ1HZ(QJODQG3UHVV$V VRFLDWLRQ1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ 68%6&5,37,215$7(69HUPRQWÂą0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV2XWRI6WDWHÂą 0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV'LVFRXQWHGUDWHIRU6HQLRU&LWL]HQVFDOOIRUGHWDLOV  7KH,QGHSHQGHQWDVVXPHVQRÂżQDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURUVLQDGYHUWLVHPHQWVEXWZLOOUHSULQWWKDWSDUWRIDQ DGYHUWLVHPHQWLQZKLFKWKHW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURURFFXUUHG$GYHUWLVHUZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\WKHPDQDJHPHQWLPPHGLDWHO\RIDQ\ HUURUVZKLFKPD\RFFXU 7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636


PAGE  6  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

Obituaries

ADDISON COUNTY

Elinor Pike, 101, Pittsford PITTSFORD/MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Elinor   Willard   Pike,   101,   a   lifelong   summer   resident   and   longtime   resi-­ dent   of   Pittsford,   died   Wednesday,   June  18,  2014,  at  the  Lodge  at  Otter   Creek,   Middlebury,   where   she   had   resided   for   the   past   two   and   a   half   years.   Born   in   Boston,   Mass.,   Jan.   24,   1913,  she  was  the  daughter  of  the  late   Harrington   and   Margaret   (Willard)   Pike.    She  was  a  graduate  of  Brookline   High   School,   Brookline,   Mass.,   and   BouvĂŠ   Boston   School   of   Physical   Education,  class  of  1933,  now  a  part   of  Northeastern  University.     She   began   her   teaching   career   at   Science   Hill,   a   highly   respected   college   preparatory   school   for   girls,   located   in   Shelbyville,   Ky.   In   her   words,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   felt   a   need   to   be   near   family  so  I  took  a  teaching  position  at   Bancroft  School  in  Worcester,  Mass.,   for  what  I  thought  would  be  a  year  or   two.   Forty-­three   years   later   I   retired   from  Bancroft.â&#x20AC;?  During  her  teaching   years   she   held   various   positions   at   Bancroft  and,  according  to  her  family,   made   many   lifelong   friends   among   students,  parents  and  faculty. She   did   extensive   world   travels   during   her   teaching   years.   Her   rela-­ tives   say   she   was   an   accomplished   EURRNWURXWÂżVKHUZRPDQDQGHQMR\HG life   in   every   situation.   In   retirement   years   she   enjoyed   volunteering   at   Rutland  County  Humane  Society  and   McClure  Library,  playing  bridge  and   Bingo.   She   was   a   former   member   of   Pittsford   Historical   Society   and   a     member   of   the   former   Pittsford   Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Club.     She   is   survived   by   several   cous-­ ins,   including   Margaret   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Peggyâ&#x20AC;?  

!

Marjorie Little memorial service MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   There   will   be   a  memorial  for  Marjorie  Ann  Little  at   Sanderson  Funeral  Home  at  117  South   Main  St.,  Middlebury,  on  Friday,  the   27th   of   June,   between   5:30   PM   and   8:30   PM   ET.   Burial   Service   will   be  

on  Saturday  the  28th  of  June  at  11:30   AM  ET,  at  the  grave  site  at  St.  Petersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Cemetery  in  Vergennes,  VT. There   will   be   a   celebration   of   Marjorie   Littleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   life   after   the   burial,   at   the  Addison   County   Eagles   Club,  

67  New  Haven  Road,  Vergennes,  VT,   between   12   PM   and   4PM   ET.   The   IDPLO\UHTXHVWWKDWLQVWHDGRIĂ&#x20AC;RZHUV that  donations  go  to  the  Helen  Porter   Healthcare  and  Rehabilitation  Center   in  Middlebury,  VT.

Land  Trust  honors  two  students

ELINOR  W.  PIKE Willard  Armitage  of  Pittsford  and  her   sons,   Marie   Willard   Walton   and   her   husband  Clyde  A.  Walton  of  Pittsford,   Richard   Rand   Willard   and   his   wife   Veronica  of  Somersworth,  N.H.,  John   Harrington   Willard   of   Dover,   N.H.,   and   Barbara   Hillsgrove   of   South   Berwick,  Maine. She   was   predeceased   by   her   cousins;͞   and   a   teacher   friend,   Miss   Katherine   E.   Vanarsdell   of   Mount   Sterling,  Ky.     Relatives   and   friends   were   invited   to   call   Friday,   June   20,   2014,   from   2-­5   p.m.   at   Barnard   Funeral   Home,   Pittsford.   Private   burial   was   at   Evergreen  Cemetery,  Pittsford. Memorial  donations  may  be  made   to   Rutland   County   Humane   Society,   739   Stevens   Road,   Pittsford,   VT   05763.

"

Giacomina Roy graveside service RUTLAND  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  A  graveside  service   Saturday,   June   28,   2014,   in   West   for  Giacomina  Marisa  Roy,  85,  who   Barnet  Cemetery  in  West  Barnet,  Vt. died   Dec.   9,   2013,   at   her   home   in   She  was  the  mother  of  Charles  H.   Rutland,   will   be   held   at   11   a.m.   on   Roy  Jr.  of  New  Haven.

Reader Comments der has to say a bout h a t o n e re a w s â&#x20AC;&#x2122; e us! r e H A reader from Middlebury, VT writes, ´7KLVLVDĂ&#x20AC;QHQHZVSDSHULQWKH9HUPRQWWUDGLWLRQRIJRRG FRYHUDJHRIORFDODQGUHJLRQDOQHZVDVZHOODVVWDWHQHZVÂľ

Quotes are taken from reader comments submitted with subscription renewals.

ADDISON  COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Two   Addison   County   students   were   recently   honored   by   the   Vermont   Land   Trust   for   their   exceptional   commitment   to   land   steward-­ ship   in   agriculture.   Allen   Karnatz,   Champlain   Valley   regional   direc-­ tor   for   the   Vermont   Land   Trust,   presented   the   award   to   Gabe   Smits   on   May   30   and   to   Ethan   Gevry   on   June  3. Smits   graduated   from   Vergennes   Union   High   School   on   June   6.   His   agricultural   instructor,   Bill   Van   De   Weert,   recommended   him   based   on   his   commitment   and   involvement   with   all   aspects   of   the   day-­to-­day   operations   of   his   familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   dairy   IDUP LQFOXGLQJ DQLPDO FDUH ÂżHOG work,  and  crop  management.  Smits   has  also  raised  his  own  beef  herd. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gabeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ability   to   work   hard   and   think   through   land   management   problems,   and   his   remarkable   work   ethic   will   serve   him   well   as   he   pursues  work  in  the  dairy  industry,â&#x20AC;?   Van  De  Weert  said. Smits  has  been  an  active  member   in   the   Future   Farmers   of   America   (FFA),   and   has   achieved   individual   success   in   various   agricultural   competitions.   He   has   also   taken   an   interest  in  learning  about  veterinary   medicine.   He   plans   to   continue   working   in   the   dairy   industry   after   graduation  and  hopes  to  be  an  owner   of  a  dairy  farm  someday. Gevry   is   a   recent   graduate   of   the   Patricia   A.   Hannaford   Career   Center.   His   agricultural   and   natural   resources  instructor,  Cheryl  Werner,   recommended   him   for   this   award   based  on  his  active  participation  on   his   family   farm   raising   beef   cows   and  pigs,  and  growing  hay  and  corn.

GABE  SMITS,   A   2014   graduate   of   Vergennes   Union   High   School,   accepts   the   Land   Stewardship   award   from  Al   Karnatz   of   the   Vermont   Land  Trust  recently.  Not  pictured  is  Ethan  Gevry,  a  recent  graduate  of   the  Patricia  A.  Hannaford  Career  Center,  who  also  received  the  award.

Gevry  plans   to   continue   farming   and  pursue  his  interest  in  auctioneer-­ ing  and  selling  farm  equipment.   Smits  and  Gevry  are  among  eight   outstanding   students   from   around   the  state  to  be  recognized  by  the  land   trust.   They   each   received   a   $250   cash  award  that  is  not  restricted  and   may   be   used   towards   education,   equipment  or  materials. This   is   the   ninth   year   that   the   Vermont   Land   Trust   has   been   giving   this   award   to   students   who   have   demonstrated   an   exceptional   FRPPLWPHQWWRWKH¿HOGVRIIRUHVWU\ or   agriculture.   The   intention   of   the   award  is  to  acknowledge  outstanding  

Neat  Repeats  awards  spring  grants MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   volun-­ teers   at   the   Neat   Repeats   consign-­ ment   shop   in   Middlebury   have   voted   $15,020   in   awards   for   the   spring  2014  grant  cycle.  Grants  were   awarded  as  follows: Payments   of   $3,750   to   Addison   County   Housing   Solutions;Íž   $2,606   in  family  assistance  to  10  recipients;Íž   $1,570  in  education-­related  opportu-­ nities  to  nine  recipients;Íž  and  $1,369   to   various   organizations   including  

the  Hathorne   School,   the   Bristol   Hub  Teen  Center,  Boy  Scout  Troop   543,   Lawrence   Memorial   Library,   the  Vergennes   Fishing   Derby,   Otter   Valley   Union   High   School   Project   Graduation,   Bridge   School   and   Relay  for  Life Also,  $1,500  to  Elderly  Services;͞   $775   to   sports-­related   recipients   including   Green   Mountain   Magic,   Friends   of   Vergennes   Football   and   Middlebury   Area   Little   League;͞  

Peace of mind is knowing your loved one never leaves our care.

Affordable Cremation & Burial Plans Â&#x2021;WKHRQO\RQVLWHFUHPDWRU\LQ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\ Â&#x2021;ORFDOO\RZQHGDQGRSHUDWHGE\:DOWHU'XFKDUPH ADDISON COUNTY

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student  achievement,   encourage   future   land   stewards,   and   increase   the  visibility  of  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  vocational   agriculture   and   forestry   programs,   which  are  vital  to  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   heartened   that   such   talented   students   have   focused   on   agriculture   and   forestry,â&#x20AC;?   Gil   Livingston,  president  of  the  Vermont   Land   Trust,   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;While   we   are   proud   of   our   success   in   conserving   farms   and   forests   across   Vermont,   it   is   equally   important   to   support   the   next   generation   of   working   lands   stewards.   We   thank   Gabe   and   Ethan   for   their   hard   work   and   commitment.â&#x20AC;?  

Sanderson-Ducharme Funeral Home 6RXWK0DLQ6W0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021; sandersonfuneralservice.com

$750  to  Festival  on-­the-­Green;Íž  $500   to  the  New  Haven  Fire  Department;Íž   $500   to   the   Mary   Hogan   School   playground;Íž   $500   to   the   Lincoln   Historical   Society;Íž   $400   to   Leicesterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer   Aliveâ&#x20AC;?;Íž   $400   to   the   Starksboro   Public   Library;Íž   and  $400  to  the  Quarry  Hill  School   summer  playgroup. Grants   are   made   possibly   by   those  who  shop  at,  donate  to,  and/or   volunteer  at  Neat  Repeats.

Funeral, Cremation & Memorial Services, Pre-Planning Services

BROWN-McCLAY FUNERAL HOMES

Bristol 453-2301

Vergennes 877-3321


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  7

STEVE  SMALL  REHEARSES  a  scene  from  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cat  on  a  Hot  Tin  Roofâ&#x20AC;?  with  Middlebury  Actors  Workshop  last   year.

Steve  Small   (Continued  from  Page  1) enriches   the   community.   The   prize   goes   to   one   Vermont   artist   whose   work   demonstrates   a   high   level   of   artistic   achievement   and   innova-­ tion;Íž   whose   creativity,   drive   and   philosophy   inspires   other   artists;Íž   DQGZKRKDVKDGDEHQHÂżFHQWLQĂ&#x20AC;X-­ ence  on  the  community. Steve   Small   grew   up   in   Shore-­ ham  on  his  familyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  apple  orchard.   After   graduating   from   Middlebury   Union  High  School,  where  he  stud-­ ied  welding  at  the  Patricia  A.  Han-­ naford  Career  Center,  he  went  into   the   military   before   enrolling   at   the   North   Carolina   School   of   the  Arts.   He   spent   the   next   few   years   act-­ ing   and   working   in   theater   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   on   stage   and   behind   the   scenes   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   in   New  York   City,   then   in   Los  Ange-­ les,  where  he  met  his  wife,  Shannon   Bohler  Small. He  currently  resides  in  Shoreham  

with  his   wife,   and   two   children,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even  with  some  kids  he  is  a  father   Chenoah   and   Eamon.   He   has   been   ÂżJXUHRIVRUWV the   director   of   the  Addison   Reper-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;At   the   same   time,   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   also   no-­ tory   Theater,   commonly   known   as   nonsense,   very   direct   and   kind,â&#x20AC;?   A.R.T.,  at  the  Career  Center  in  Mid-­ she  added,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  he  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  pull  any   dlebury  for  20  years.   punches.  You  know  where  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  at.â&#x20AC;? After   returning   to   Vermont,   Lourie  said  Small  knows  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  tonâ&#x20AC;?   Small   became   involved   about   theater   tech,   a   key   with   the   initial   proposal   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I love to component   taught   to   for   A.R.T.,   which,   he   A.R.T.  students.  At  Mid-­ said,   was   originally   in-­ watch a dlebury   Actors   Work-­ tended   to   be   a   program   VWXGHQWĂ&#x20AC;QG shopâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer   Shortsâ&#x20AC;?   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;gifted   and   talentedâ&#x20AC;?   a passion; production,   which   opens   high   school   students.   to help them Thursday   at   Town   Hall   Small   advocated   for   a   Theater,  he  will  be  work-­ more   inclusive   program,   get to the ing   with   his   daughter,   whereby   students   with   a   point where Chenoah,   on   prosthetics   true   passion   and   interest   what Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m that   will   tap   one   of   his   in  theater  could  have  the   areas  of  expertise. teaching opportunity  to  hone  their   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  make  a   them skills.   prosthetic   hand   that   can   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  got  gifts,   becomes fall  off  a  zombie,â&#x20AC;?  Lourie   everybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  got  talents,â&#x20AC;?   their own.â&#x20AC;? said. he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   you   have   Small   spent   many   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Steve Small somebody   that   absolute-­ years   at   A.R.T.   working   ly   wants   to   be   there   and   with   longtime   English   has   their   hand   on   the   curtain   rope   and   theater   arts   teacher   Candace   UHDG\WRSXOOLWÂżYHPLQXWHVEHIRUH Burkle.   He   described   Burkle,   who   they   need   to   be   there,   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   some-­ died   in   2011,   as   an   invaluable   role   body  who  works.â&#x20AC;? model  for  him. In  a  2005  interview  in  this  news-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theater   is   such   a   collaborative   paper  about  his  role  as  a  teacher  and   art  form,  no  one  person  is  the  star.   actor,  Small  explained  how  he  came   That  makes  it  a  very  interesting  way   to  teaching to   educate   people,   because   they   Âł, ORYH WR ZDWFK D VWXGHQW ÂżQG have   to   support   each   other,â&#x20AC;?   Small   a   passion;Íž   to   help   them   get   to   the   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Candace  (Burkle)  used  to  say   point  where  what  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  teaching  them   that   the   most   important   person   on   becomes  their  own,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.   stage  is  your  partner,  and  if  you  put   Melissa   Lourie,   artistic   director   your   energy   into   your   partner   and   of   Middlebury   Actors   Workshop,   your   partner   puts   their   energy   into   has  known  Small  for  14  years,  and   you,   you   have   something   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   re-­ directed  him  in  many  local  produc-­ ally  magical.â&#x20AC;? tions.   She   said   she   could   see   how   According   to   Rood,   Small   puts   his   skills   as   an   actor   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   in-­ that  sort  of  energy  into  his  students   credibly  grounded  and  relaxed;Íž  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   every  day. a   very   deep-­feeling   person   and   he   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  blown  away  by  his  incred-­ can  just  evolve  and  transform  into  a   ible   talent   and   ability   to   bring   the   different  character  in  a  natural  wayâ&#x20AC;?   best   out   of   his   students,â&#x20AC;?   Rood   re-­ STEVE  SMALL,  LEFT,  rehearses   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;     could   translate   into   the   class-­ called.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;He  continues  to  show  sup-­ with  Middlebury  Actors  Workshop   port  to  A.R.T.  alumni  after  gradua-­ for   the   2011   production   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of   room.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   students   adore   him,   and   he   tion.â&#x20AC;? Mice  and  Men.â&#x20AC;? ,QGHSHQGHQWÂżOHSKRWRV7UHQW&DPSEHOO is   a   mentor   to   many,â&#x20AC;?   Lourie   said.   In   the   2005   interview,   Small   ex-­

plained  why   it   was   important   for   him  as  a  teacher  to  also  get  on  the   stage  and  act. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   best   way   to   know   if   you   KDYHDVNLOOLVÂżUVWWROHDUQLWWKHQ do  it,  then  teach  it,  then  do  it,â&#x20AC;?  he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Teaching   shows   you   what   you   actually   know.   And   teachers   have  to  be  willing  to  do  what  they   ask  their  students  to  do.  You  have   to   put   it   on   the   line   in   front   of   an   audience   with   all   the   commitment  

you  ask   of   your   students.   And   it   is   uncomfortable.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   supposed   to   be.â&#x20AC;? Small  said  last  week  that  he  was   deeply  honored  and  humbled  to  be   WKHÂżUVWUHFLSLHQWRIWKH+HUE/RFN-­ wood   Prize,   describing   it   all   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;mind-­blowing.â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   hope   that   as   they   continue   to   do   this,â&#x20AC;?   Small   concluded,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;that   more   and   more   people   recognize   the  value  of  the  arts  in  Vermont.â&#x20AC;?

HENRY SHELDON MUSEUM PRESENTS ITS 22ND ANNUAL

POPS CONCERT AND FIREWORKS featuring the

Vermont Philharmonic Friday, June 27th, 7:30 pm Grounds open for picnics at 5:30 pm

On the field behind the Middlebury College Center for The Arts

A Perfect Family Event!

Fireworks + Refreshments +Exciting Music Grab a blanket, bring the family and enjoy the fun!

Early-Bird Ticket Prices In Effect Through June 22nd

Tickets : Adults $20 each; Youth $10 each; Children under 12 free. After June 22nd and at the gate: Adult tickets are $25 each Tickets available at the Henry Sheldon Museum + 388-­2117 and online at www.HenrySheldonMuseum.org

Start Your Summer Season on the Perfect Note!

WWW. addisonindependent.com


PAGE  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

communitycalendar

Jun

24

TUESDAY

Senior  luncheon  in  Middlebury.   Tuesday,  June  24,  11:30  a.m.-­1:30   p.m.,   Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center.   CVAA   sponsors   a   noon   luncheon   of   roast   pork  cutlet  with  white  sauce,  beets,  mashed   potatoes,   sourdough   Italian   bread,   and   carrot   cake   with   cream   cheese   icing.   Suggested   donation   $4.   Please   bring   your   own   place   setting.   Reservations   required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   634.   Free   transporta-­ tion  via  ACTR:  388-­1946.  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Science  of  Soundâ&#x20AC;?  summer  reading  event   in   Orwell.   Tuesday,   June   24,   3-­4   p.m.,   Orwell   Free   Library.   Children   of   all   ages   are   invited   to   experience   sound   like   never   before.   Led   by   Rob   Zollman.   Audience   participation  event.  Info:  948-­2041.  

Jun

25

WEDNESDAY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weed  and   feedâ&#x20AC;?   garden-­ ing   get-­together   in   Monkton.   Wednesday,   June   25,   9:30   a.m.-­1   p.m.,  Willowell  Foundation  (Stoney  Meadow  

Lane  and   Bristol   Road).   Weekly   summer   gathering  for  all  ages  and  levels  of  experience   to   lend   a   hand   at   the   Willowell   Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   teaching  garden  and  farm,  followed  by  a  lunch   of   brick-­oven   pizza.   Produce   harvested   goes   to   the   Walden   Project   and   local   schools   and   food  shelves.  Check  for  weather-­based  deci-­ sions:   www.willowell.org   or   info@willowell. org.   Youth   story   time   in   Shoreham.   Wednesday,   June   25,   1-­2   p.m.,   Platt   Memorial   Library.   Weekly   story   time   for   kids   ages   6   and   up.   Runs   through   July   30.   Info:   897-­2647   or   platt@shoreham.net.   Experiment   and   Explore   workshop   for   kids   in  Bristol.  Wednesday,  June  25,  2-­4:30  p.m.,   Lawrence  Memorial  Library.  A  weekly  summer   workshop  for  kids  8  and  older  on  topics  includ-­ ing  Bottle  Rockets,  Potions  and  More,  Edible   Concoctions,   Toy   Hacking.   Info:   453-­2665.   Runs  through  July  30.   Special   dinner   and   a   show   for   seniors   in   Bridport.   Wednesday,   June   25,   4-­6   p.m.,   Bridport   Grange.   CVAA   sponsors   this   meal   catered  by  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Restaurant  and  the  Grange.   The   ACHHH   Wellspring   Singers   perform   at   4   p.m.,   followed   by   a   5   p.m.   meal   of   baked   ham,  scalloped  potatoes,  fruit  salad  and  cook-­ ies.   Suggested   donation   $5.   Reservations   required:  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  615.   School  of  Leadership  Afghanistan  presenta-­ tion   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   June   25,   5-­6:30   p.m.,   Ilsley   Library.   Author   and   jour-­ nalist   Mary   Kerr,   just   back   from   two   months   LQ.DEXOD62/$$IJKDQLVWDQÂśVÂżUVWERDUGLQJ school  for  girls,  will  share  stories  and  photos   from  the  lives  of  the  30  young  women  study-­ ing  and  living  there.  Refreshments  at  5  p.m.   Mount   Abe   school   tour   and   discussion   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,   June   25,   6-­8:30   p.m.,   Mount   Abraham   Union   High   School.   The   facilities   committee   invites   all   members   of   WKH ÂżYHWRZQ FRPPXQLW\ WR WRXU WKH PLGGOH and  high  schools  and  engage  in  small-­group   discussion  about  the  school  and  its  needs.   Irish   music   session   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,   June   25,   6:30-­8   p.m.,   Recycled   Reading   of   Vermont,   20   Main   St.   Bring   your   instrument   and  join  in  the  jam  or  just  come  enjoy  some   lively  Celtic  music.  Info:  453-­5982.   The   Keating   5   in   concert   in   Brandon.   Wednesday,   June   25,   6:30-­8   p.m.,   Central   Park.   The   Keating   5   play   rock,   reggae,   blues,  ska  and  funk.  Info:  247-­6401  or  www. brandon.org.  Part  of  Brandonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free  summer   concert  series.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Porches  of  North  Americaâ&#x20AC;?  presentation  in   Addison.  Wednesday,  June  25,  7-­8:15  p.m.,   Chimney   Point   State   Historic   Site.   Historic   preservationist   and   author   Thomas   Durant   Visser  presents  an  illustrated  program  on  the   history   and   architecture   of   porches   in   North   America.   Book   signing   and   refresh-­ ments   afterward   on   the   Chimney   Point   porch.   Cold   climate   heat   pump   presentation   in   Middlebury.  Wednesday,  June  25,  7-­9  p.m.,   Ilsley  Library.  The  Acorn  Energy  Co-­op  spon-­ sors  this  event.  Learn  how  to  save  money  on   heating  bills  while  reducing  your  dependence   on   fossil   fuels.   Q&A   to   follow.   Light   refresh-­ ments  served.  Info:  385-­1911.  

Jun

26

Dead  funny HALEY   RICE   PLAYS   a   funeral   director   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   here   with   Mr.   Davis,   a   mourning   zombie   played  by  Leigh  Guptill  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  in  her  own  short  play,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Zombie  Funeral.â&#x20AC;?  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  one  of  six  hilari-­ ous  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer  Shortsâ&#x20AC;?  to  be  staged  by  Middlebury  Actorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Workshop  at  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Town  Hall  Theater  June  26-­28.  

THURSDAY

Preschool  science   story   time   in   Bristol.   Thursday,   June   26,   10:30-­11:30   a.m.,   Lawrence   0HPRULDO/LEUDU\7KH¿UVWLQDZHHNO\VHULHV exploring  the  world  in  stories,  movement  and   songs,   with   puppets   and   hands-­on   activi-­ ties.   Siblings   of   all   ages   welcome.   Themes   include  rockets,  potions,  edible  concoctions,   shadows,   marble   run,   robots.   Picnic   lunch   provided.  Info:  453-­2665.   Strawberry   festival   in   Shoreham.   Thursday,   June  26,  5-­7  p.m.,  Shoreham  Congregational   Church.   Strawberry   shortcake,   strawberry   pie,   strawberry   sundaes,   just   plain   straw-­ berries,   ice   cream,   and   more.  Annual   event   sponsored  by  the  Shoreham  Congregational   Church.  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Ask  an  Herbalistâ&#x20AC;?  in  Lincoln.  Thursday,  June   26,   5:30-­7:30   p.m.,   Lincoln   Library.   Clinical   herbalists   Anna   Blackwell   and   Emily   French   will   hold   15-­minute   one-­on-­one   consultations   with   people   to   answer   their   questions   and   provide   personal   herbal   formulas.   Info:   www. sweetgrassherbals.com.   Social   responsibility   business   network-­ ing   event   in   Bristol.   Thursday,   June   26,   5:30-­7:30   p.m.,   Aqua   Vitea,   74   Munsill   Ave.   Vermont  Businesses  for  Social  Responsibility   invites   forward-­thinking   business   profession-­ als  for  an  evening  of  networking.  Learn  about   Aqua   Viteaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   socially   responsible   business   model   and   taste   the   companyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   kombucha.   Free.  Register  at  http://conta.ccRafYXy.   Concert   band   rehearsal   in   Orwell.   Thursday,   June   26,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Orwell   Village   School   band   room.   Musicians   of   all   ages,   abilities   and  instruments  are  invited  to  join  in.  Weekly   concerts  will  take  place  Thursdays,  July  3-­31,   on   the   Orwell   village   green.   Info:   www.face-­ book.com/OrwellTownBand.   Historical   society   presentation   in   Salisbury.   Thursday,   June   26,   7-­9   p.m.,   Salisbury   Congregational   Church.   The   Salisbury   Historical   Society   welcomes   Bill   Powers   and   %ULDQ/LQGQHUZKRZLOOJLYHÂżUVWKDQGDFFRXQWV of   the   1957   Army   airplane   that   claimed   four   lives   in   Chittenden   and   its   remarkable   redis-­ covery  over  50  years  later.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer   Shortsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   June   26,   8-­9:30   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.   Middlebury   Actors   Workshop   pres-­ ents   an   evening   of   hilarious   new   short   plays   about  love  and  life  at  its  craziest.  Runs  June   26-­29.  Tickets   $20,   available   at   the  THT   box   RIÂżFHRUZZZWRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJ

Jun

27

FRIDAY

Chamber  of   Commerce   Scholarship  Golf  Tournament  in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   27,   12-­6   p.m.,  Ralph  Myhre  Golf  Course,  Middlebury   College.  Annual  event.  Noon  shotgun  start.   Eighteen  holes  of  play  followed  by  BBQ  and   awards   party.   Skills   events.   Tournament   funds   scholarships   to   Hannaford   Career   Center   students.   Info:   388-­7951   or   www. addisoncounty.com.   Senior  luncheon  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  June   27,   12-­2   p.m.,   Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Restaurant.   CVAA   and  Rosieâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  partner  to  offer  a  home-­cooked   PHDORIURDVWWXUNH\VWXIÂżQJPDVKHGSRWD-­ toes,  peas  and  tapioca  pudding.  Suggested   donation   $5.   Reservations   required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  615.   3RSVFRQFHUWDQGÂżUHZRUNVDW0LGGOHEXU\ College.  Friday,  June  27,  5:30-­10  p.m.,  on   the   grounds   behind   the   Mahaney   Center   for   the   Arts.   The   Henry   Sheldon   Museum   welcomes   the   Vermont   Philharmonic   for   LWV DQQXDO FRQFHUW DQG ÂżUHZRUNV GLVSOD\ Grounds   open   at   5:30   for   picnicking,   concert   starts   at   7:30.   Adults   $25   ($20   through   June   22),   youth   $10,   kids   under   12   free.   Tickets   at   the   Sheldon   Museum,   388-­2117   or   www.henrysheldonmuseum. org.  Rain  site:  Nelson  Arena.   Table   of   Grace   free   meal   in   Vergennes.   Friday,  June  27,  5:30-­6:30  p.m.,  Vergennes   Congregational   Church.   Monthly   dinner   sponsored  by  the  North  Ferrisburgh  United   Methodist,  St.  Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Episcopal,  Vergennes   Congregational   and   St.   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   churches.   Free,  but  donations  accepted.  This  monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   menu:  cold  turkey,  salads,  bread,  dessert.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pentecostâ&#x20AC;?   work-­in-­progress   showing   at   Middlebury   College.   Friday,   June   27,   6-­8   p.m.,   Mahaney   Center   for   the   Arts.   The   0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJHDIÂżOLDWHG SURIHVVLRQDO theater   company   PTP/NYC   hosts   a   public   work-­in-­progress  showing  of  David  Edgarâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   award-­winning  play  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pentecost.â&#x20AC;?  Free.  Info:   802-­443-­3168  or  www.middlebury.edu/arts.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Summer  Shortsâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Middlebury.   Friday,   June   27,   8-­9:30   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.   Middlebury   Actors   Workshop   presents  an  evening  of  hilarious  new  short   plays   about   love   and   life   at   its   craziest.   Runs   June   26-­29.   Tickets   $20,   available  


Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  —  PAGE  9

communitycalendar DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RI¿FH  RU ZZZ WRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJ

Jun

28

SATURDAY

Vermont Sun   Triathlon   in   Salisbury. 6DWXUGD\ -XQH   DPQRRQ %UDQEXU\ 6WDWH 3DUN &KRRVH HLWKHU D VSULQW \DUG VZLP PLOHELNHDQGPLOHUXQ RUDWULDWKORQ PLOH VZLP PLOH ELNH DQG PLOH UXQ  5HJLVWUDWLRQ VWDUWV DW  DP ,QIR DQG UHJLVWUDWLRQ ZZZYHUPRQWVXQWULDWKORQ VHULHVFRP Abenaki  Heritage  Weekend  in  Ferrisburgh.   6DWXUGD\ -XQH   DP SP /DNH &KDPSODLQ 0DULWLPH 0XVHXP 0HPEHUV RI DUHD$EHQDNLWULEHVJLYHYLVLWRUVDQ$EHQDNL SHUVSHFWLYHRQOLIHLQWKH&KDPSODLQ9DOOH\ ZLWK GHPRQVWUDWLRQV RI EHDGZRUN GDQF LQJTXLOOZRUNVWRU\WHOOLQJSRWWHU\EDVNHWU\ DQG PRUH 3DUWLFLSDWLRQ LQFOXGHG ZLWK GDLO\ PXVHXP DGPLVVLRQ RU DQQXDO PHPEHUVKLS ,QIRZZZOFPPRUJRU&RQWLQXHV -XQH Green   Mountain   Club   hike   in   Goshen.   6DWXUGD\ -XQH   DP SP *UHDW &OLII RI 0RXQW +RUULG$ %UHDG /RDI 6HFWLRQ RXWLQJ 0RGHUDWH GLI¿FXOW\  PLOHV URXQG WULSZLWKRSWLRQVWRH[WHQGOHQJWKQRUWK&OLII SURYLGHV JUHDW YLHZ RI %UDQGRQ *DS DQG WKH*UHHQ0RXQWDLQVWRWKHVRXWK$OWHUQDWH URXWH RIIHUHG LI FOLII LV FORVHG EHFDXVH RI QHVWLQJ SHUHJULQH IDOFRQV %ULQJ ZDWHU DQG VQDFNV 0HHW DW SDUNLQJ ORW DW WRS RI %UDQGRQJDS5RXWH,QIR$QQH&KULVWLH   RU DFKULVWLH# JPDLOFRP Historical  crafts  and  skills  demonstrations   in   Addison. 6DWXUGD\ -XQH   SP&KLPQH\3RLQW6WDWH+LVWRULF6LWH6LWH LQWHUSUHWHU .DUO &UDQQHOO SUHVHQWV ³%ODVW )URP WKH 3DVW +RZ 7KH\ 0DGH ,W LQ 1HZ )UDQFH´ D KDQGVRQ GHPRQVWUDWLRQ RI WKH FUDIWV DQG VNLOOV SUDFWLFHG E\ WKRVH OLYLQJ KHUH RQ WKH IURQWLHU RI 1HZ )UDQFH ,QIR  “Summer   Shorts”   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   6DWXUGD\ -XQH   SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU0LGGOHEXU\$FWRUV:RUNVKRSSUHV HQWVDQHYHQLQJRIKLODULRXVQHZVKRUWSOD\V DERXWORYHDQGOLIHDWLWVFUD]LHVW5XQV-XQH 7LFNHWVDYDLODEOHDWWKH7+7ER[ RI¿FH  RU ZZZWRZQKDOOWKHDWHU RUJ The   Johannes   String   Quartet   in   concert   in   Rochester. 6DWXUGD\ -XQH   SP 5RFKHVWHU )HGHUDWHG &KXUFK 7KH 5RFKHVWHU &KDPEHU 0XVLF 6RFLHW\ SUHV HQWV WKH TXDUWHW ZKLFK ZLOO SOD\ 0R]DUW¶V 6WULQJ 4XDUWHW 1R  LQ * PDMRU .  %HHWKRYHQ¶V 4XDUWHW 1R  RS  DQG %UDKPV¶ 4XDUWHW LQ & PLQRU 1R  RS  3UHFRQFHUW WDON E\ /DUU\ +DPEHUOLQ DW SPFRQFHUWVWDUWVDWSP)UHHEXW GRQDWLRQVUHTXHVWHG,QIRRU ZZZUFPVYWRUJ “Summer   Shorts”   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   6DWXUGD\ -XQH   SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU 0LGGOHEXU\ $FWRUV :RUNVKRS SUHVHQWVDQHYHQLQJRIKLODULRXVQHZVKRUW SOD\V DERXW ORYH DQG OLIH DW LWV FUD]LHVW 5XQV -XQH  7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RI¿FH  RU ZZZ WRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJ

Jun

29

SUNDAY

L a s t -­ S u n d a y -­ o f -­ t h e -­ m o n t h breakfast  in  Vergennes.6XQGD\ -XQH   DP 'RUFKHVWHU /RGJH6FKRRO6WUHHW7KH'RUFKHVWHU/RGJH ) $0 ZLOO VHUYH LWV UHJXODU DOO\RXFDQHDW EUHDNIDVW ZLWK SDQFDNHV )UHQFK WRDVW EDFRQ VDXVDJH KRPH IULHV VFUDPEOHG HJJVMXLFHDQGFRIIHH Ruff   Ride   motorcycle   fundraiser   in   New   Haven.6XQGD\-XQHDPSP VWDUW IURP &\FOH:LVH 5HJLVWUDWLRQ DW  DP ZLWK FRQWLQHQWDO EUHDNIDVW IROORZHG E\ WKH PRWRUF\FOH ULGH (QG XS EDFN DW

Blues on  Friday THE  BOB  MCKENZIE  Blues  Band  helps  you  “wine  down”  on  Friday,  June  27,  from  6-­8   p.m.  at  Lincoln  Peak  Vineyard  in  New  Haven. &\FOH:LVHIRUD%%4PXVLFSUL]HVJDPHV DQG PRUH (QWUDQFH IHH  LQFOXGHV IHVWLYLWLHVDQG7VKLUW%%4RQO\DGXOWV  NLGV XQGHU  %HQH¿WV +RPHZDUG %RXQG$GGLVRQ &RXQW\¶V +XPDQH 6RFLHW\ ,QIR ZZZKRPHZDUGERXQGDQLPDOVRUJ RU  Green   Mountain   Bicycle   Club   ride   across   the  Lake  Champlain  Bridge.6XQGD\-XQH   DP SP PHHW DW 9HUJHQQHV 8QLRQ +LJK 6FKRRO HDVW SDUNLQJ ORW $ PRGHUDWH PLOH URXWH IURP 98+6 WR &URZQ 3RLQW DQG EDFN $ PLOH RSWLRQ PDNHVDORRSRQWKH1HZ<RUNVLGHWKURXJK 3RUW +HQU\ /HDGHUV -RKQ %HUWHOVHQ DQG .DUOD)HUUHOOL Abenaki  Heritage  Weekend  in  Ferrisburgh.   6XQGD\ -XQH   DP SP /DNH &KDPSODLQ 0DULWLPH 0XVHXP 0HPEHUV RI DUHD$EHQDNLWULEHVJLYHYLVLWRUVDQ$EHQDNL SHUVSHFWLYHRQOLIHLQWKH&KDPSODLQ9DOOH\ ZLWK GHPRQVWUDWLRQV RI EHDGZRUN GDQF LQJTXLOOZRUNVWRU\WHOOLQJSRWWHU\EDVNHWU\ DQG PRUH 3DUWLFLSDWLRQ LQFOXGHG ZLWK GDLO\ PXVHXP DGPLVVLRQ RU DQQXDO PHPEHUVKLS ,QIRZZZOFPPRUJRU VSO   Brass   Quintet   in   Rochester. 6XQGD\ -XQHSP5RFKHVWHUYLOODJHJUHHQ &HOHEUDWLQJ 5&06¶ WK VXPPHU VHDVRQ 5DLQ ORFDWLRQ 3LHUFH +DOO &RPPXQLW\ &HQWHU,QIRRUZZZUFPVYW RUJ “Summer  Shorts”  on  stage  in  Middlebury.   6XQGD\ -XQH   SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU 0LGGOHEXU\ $FWRUV :RUNVKRS SUHVHQWVDQHYHQLQJRIKLODULRXVQHZVKRUW SOD\V DERXW ORYH DQG OLIH DW LWV FUD]LHVW 5XQV -XQH  7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RI¿FH  RU ZZZ WRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJ

Jun

30

MONDAY

Strawberry festival   in   Vergennes. 0RQGD\ -XQH   SP 9HUJHQQHV &LW\ 3DUN +RPHPDGH VWUDZEHUU\ VKRUWFDNH DQG EHYHUDJHV  0XVLF E\ WKH 9HUJHQQHV &LW\%DQG3URFHHGVEHQH¿WWKH&KDPSODLQ 9DOOH\&KULVWLDQ6FKRRO,QIR “History   of   Camp   Keewaydin”   presenta-­ tion   in   Salisbury. 0RQGD\ -XQH   SP 6DOLVEXU\ &RQJUHJDWLRQDO &KXUFK 7KH 6DOLVEXU\ +LVWRULFDO 6RFLHW\ ZHOFRPHV 0LNH 9RUHQEXUJ ZKR KDV ZULWWHQ D ERRN DERXW .HHZD\GLQ ZKHUH KH ZDV D FDPSHU DQGODWHUDFRXQVHORUVWDUWLQJLQ0DQ\ SLFWXUHVZLOOEHVKRZQ

Jul

1

TUESDAY

Foot care   clinic   in   Brandon.   7XHVGD\ -XO\   DPQRRQ )RUHVW 'DOH 6HQLRU &HQWHU 5RXWH  7KH 5XWODQG $UHD 9LVLWLQJ 1XUVH

$VVRFLDWLRQ  +RVSLFH LV RIIHULQJ IRRW FDUH IRUDVXJJHVWHGGRQDWLRQRI Foot care   clinic   in   Brandon. 7XHVGD\ -XO\ DPQRRQ)RUHVW'DOH6HQLRU&HQWHU 5RXWH 7KH 5XWODQG$UHD 9LVLWLQJ 1XUVH $VVRFLDWLRQ  +RVSLFH LV RIIHULQJ IRRW FDUH IRUDVXJJHVWHGGRQDWLRQRI “Ew!   Gross!”   summer   reading   event   in   Orwell. 7XHVGD\ -XO\   SP 2UZHOO )UHH /LEUDU\ 6FKRRODJHG FKLOGUHQ DUH LQYLWHG WR FRPH ZHDULQJ PHVV\ FORWKLQJ DQG SUHSDUHG WR EH GLVJXVWHG E\ VFLHQFH 7KHUHLVHQRXJKVOLPHDQGRR]HIRUDOO,QIR  Art   installation   lecture   at   Middlebury   College. 7XHVGD\ -XO\   SP 0DKDQH\&HQWHUIRUWKH$UWV0DUWLQ%ULGJH KDV DFFHSWHG D FRPPLVVLRQ WR SDLQW DQ RULJLQDO SLHFH WR FRPPHPRUDWH WKH LQDX JXUDO VHVVLRQ RI WKH 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH 6FKRRO RI WKH (QYLURQPHQW %ULGJH ZLOO WDON DERXW WKH SLHFH LWVHOI DQG KRZ LW FRQWULE XWHVWRKLVODUJHUH[SORUDWLRQRIDUWVDQGWKH HQYLURQPHQW

Jul

2

WEDNESDAY

“Weed and   feed”   garden-­ ing   get-­together   in   Monkton.   :HGQHVGD\-XO\DPSP :LOORZHOO)RXQGDWLRQ 6WRQH\0HDGRZ/DQH DQG %ULVWRO 5RDG  :HHNO\ VXPPHU JDWKHU LQJIRUDOODJHVDQGOHYHOVRIH[SHULHQFHWR OHQG D KDQG DW WKH :LOORZHOO )RXQGDWLRQ¶V WHDFKLQJ JDUGHQ DQG IDUP IROORZHG E\ D OXQFK RI EULFNRYHQ SL]]D 3URGXFH KDUYHVWHG JRHV WR WKH :DOGHQ 3URMHFW DQG ORFDO VFKRROV DQG IRRG VKHOYHV &KHFN IRU ZHDWKHUEDVHGGHFLVLRQVZZZZLOORZHOORUJ RULQIR#ZLOORZHOORUJ Observatory   open   house   at   Middlebury   College.:HGQHVGD\-XO\SP 0F&DUGHOO%LFHQWHQQLDO+DOOWRSÀRRU&RPH VHHVWDUVVWDUFOXVWHUVDQGQHEXODH(YHQW RFFXUV RQO\ LI VNLHV DUH PRVWO\ FOHDU LI LQ GRXEW FDOO  DIWHU  SP RU YLVLW KWWSVLWHVPLGGOHEXU\HGXREVHUYDWRU\ )UHH

Jul

3

THURSDAY

“Withdrawal from   Mount   Independence”   history   event   in   Orwell. 7KXUVGD\ -XO\   DP SP 0RXQW ,QGHSHQGHQFH 6WDWH +LVWRULF 6LWH,QWUHSLGUHHQDFWRUVIROORZWKHIRRWVWHSV RI KLVWRU\ UHWUHDWLQJ IURP WKH 0RXQW IRU D PLOH KLNH WR ZLQG XS DW +XEEDUGWRQ WKH GD\EHIRUHWKH%DWWOHRI+XEEDUGWRQ*DWKHU DWWKH0RXQWWRVHQGWKHPRIIRUZDWFKWKHP DORQJWKHURDGVDQGE\ZD\V,QIR Independence   Day   bake   sale   in   Hancock.   7KXUVGD\-XO\DPSP-'¶V4XLFN 6WRS 6DOH FRQWLQXHV XQWLO WKH IRRG UXQV RXW 7R EHQH¿W WKH &RPPXQLW\ &KXUFK RI

+DQFRFNDQG*UDQYLOOH Senior meal   in   Bristol. 7KXUVGD\ -XO\   DP SP )LUVW %DSWLVW &KXUFK RI %ULVWRO 0RQWKO\ PHDO RSHQ WR DQ\RQH  RU ROGHU 2Q WKH PHQX IRU -XO\ KRPH PDGH PDSOH EDNHG EHDQV SRWDWR VDODG EHHWVUROOVDQGLFHFUHDPZLWKVWUDZEHUULHV 6HUYLQJVWDUWVDWQRRQ6XJJHVWHGGRQDWLRQ 5HVHUYDWLRQV Fourth   of   July   celebration   in   Bristol.   7KXUVGD\-XO\SP%ULVWROUHFUHDWLRQ ¿HOG.LFNRIIWKH)RXUWKZLWKIRRGPXVLFDQG IDFHSDLQWLQJIROORZHGDWGXVNE\¿UHZRUNV The  Big  ShaBANG  in  Ferrisburgh.7KXUVGD\ -XO\   SP /DNH &KDPSODLQ 0DULWLPH0XVHXP)RRG¿UHZRUNVDQGIXQ %ULQJ \RXU ODZQ FKDLUV DQG MRLQ XV IRU DQ HYHQLQJ RI IRRG IXQ DQG D IURQWURZ VHDW WR %DVLQ +DUERU &OXE¶V ¿UHZRUNV GLVSOD\ &RRNRXW FDVK EDU EXFNHW SUL]HV ODZQ JDPHV DQG PRUH 0HPEHUV  QRQPHP EHUVNLGVDQGXQGHU5DLQGDWH -XO\ Band   concert   in   Orwell. 7KXUVGD\ -XO\  SP2UZHOOYLOODJHJUHHQ:HHNO\ VXPPHUFRQFHUWV5XQWKURXJKLQWKH2UZHOO 9LOODJH 6FKRRO EDQG URRP SUHFHGLQJ HDFK FRQFHUW DW  SP ,QIR ZZZIDFHERRN FRP2UZHOO7RZQ%DQG Point   CounterPoint   faculty   concert   in   Salisbury. 7KXUVGD\ -XO\   SP 6DOLVEXU\ &RQJUHJDWLRQDO &KXUFK $ FKDP EHUPXVLFFRQFHUWE\WKH3&3&KDPEHU 3OD\HUV0R]DUW6WULQJ4XDUWHWLQ&PDMRU. 5DYHO3LDQR7ULRLQ$PLQRU)UHHZLOO GRQDWLRQV,QIRVDOLVEXU\FKXUFKYWRUJ

Jul

4

FRIDAY

Fourth of   July   celebration   in   Bristol.)ULGD\-XO\DP SP GRZQWRZQ %ULVWRO  DP .URDGUDFHDP*UHDW%ULVWRO2XWKRXVH 5DFHDPSDUDGHEHJLQVQRRQOLYH PXVLFIRRGDQGYHQGRUVRQWKHJUHHQ Fourth   of   July   boat   parade   on   Lake   Dunmore   in   Salisbury. )ULGD\ -XO\   SP VWDUWV LQ 1RUWK &RYH DW .DPSHUVYLOOH %HDFK 3UL]HV IRU EHVWGHFRUDWHG ERDW 6SRQVRUHGE\.DPSHUVYLOOH,QIR Carillon   concert   at   Middlebury   College.   )ULGD\ -XO\   SP 0HDG &KDSHO DQG VXUURXQGLQJ JURXQGV *HRUJH 0DWWKHZ -U FDULOORQQHXU DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH DQG 1RUZLFK 8QLYHUVLW\ SHUIRUPV WKH ¿UVW LQ D VXPPHUORQJ VHULHV RI FDULOORQ FRQFHUWV IHDWXULQJ JXHVW FDULOORQQHXUV IURP DURXQG WKH ZRUOG ,QIR  RU ZZZPLGGOH EXU\HGX Fourth   of   July   street   dance   in   Brandon.   )ULGD\-XO\SP&HQWUDO3DUN.LFN RII WKH ,QGHSHQGHQFH 'D\ ZHHNHQG ZLWK %UDQGRQ¶V DQQXDO VWUHHW GDQFH 0XVLF E\ '--DP0DQ)RRGYHQGRUVVHOOLQJKRWGRJV KDPEXUJHUV SLJ URDVW %%4 EUHDG GRXJK VWUDZEHUU\VKRUWFDNHDQGPRUH,QIRZZZ EUDQGRQRUJ

LIVEMUSIC The Bob   MacKenzie   Blues   Band   in   New   Haven.  Friday,  June  27,  6-­8  p.m.,  Lincoln   Peak  Vineyard.   Zephrus   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   27,   9   p.m.-­midnight,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   Ricardo   Lemvo   &   Makina   Loca   in   New   Haven.   Saturday,   June   28,   8-­10   p.m.,   Tourterelle.

See a  full  listing  of  

O N G O IN G E V E N T S in the  Thursday  edition  of  the

Addison Independent and on  the  Web  at

www.addisonindependent.com


PAGE  10  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

Take part in the tradition, go hear the Pops concert The  Sheldon   Museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   annual   RXWGRRU3RSV&RQFHUWDQGÂżUHZRUNV are  a  Vermont  summer  tradition  for   /DNH &KDPSODLQ DUHD IDPLOLHV DQG tourists.   Celebrate   the   anniversary   RI ,QGHSHQGHQFH 'D\ ZLWK D FRQ-­ FHUW RI %URDGZD\ VWDQGDUGV SRSV and   patriotic   music   performed   by   WKH 9HUPRQW 3KLOKDUPRQLF ,W WDNHV SODFH )ULGD\ LQ WKH PHDGRZ EHKLQG the   Mahaney   Center   for   the   Arts   DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH ZLWK FRP-­ PDQGLQJYLHZV of   the   Green   0 R X Q W D L Q V  IROORZHG E\ D JORULRXV ÂżUH-­ ZRUNV GLVSOD\ BY GREG PAHL The   grounds   ZLOOEHRSHQDW 5:30   p.m.   for   SLFQLFNLQJ ZLWK WKH FRQFHUW EHJLQ-­ ning  at  7:30  p.m.  (Rain  site  is  in  Nel-­ son   Arena   in   the   adjacent   Middle-­ bury  College  athletic  complex.)  The   ÂżUHZRUNV WDNH SODFH UDLQ RU VKLQH %H VXUH WR EULQJ Ă&#x20AC;DVKOLJKWV FKDLUV EODQNHWVDQGDSLFQLF 7KH 9HUPRQW 3KLOKDUPRQLF ZDV IRXQGHG LQ  E\ -RQ %RURZLF] and   is  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   oldest   community   RUFKHVWUD7RGD\WKH3KLOKDUPRQLFÂśV PHPEHUPXVLFLDQV PRUH WKDQ  VWURQJDUHFRPPLWWHGWRWKHRUFKHV-­ WUDÂśV WZRIROG PLVVLRQ RI VKDULQJ WKHLU ORYH RI PXVLF ZLWK DXGLHQFHV of   all   ages   and   encouraging   young   musicians  to  dedicate  themselves  to   their   musical   education.   The   Boro-­ ZLF]6FKRODUVKLSDZDUGHGDQQXDOO\ by   the   orchestra   to   a   Vermont   high   VFKRROPXVLFLDQSURYLGHVWKHRSSRU-­ WXQLW\IRUWKHZLQQHUWRSHUIRUPZLWK the  Vermont  Philharmonic. /HGE\PXVLFGLUHFWRU/RX.RVPD the  Vermont  Philharmonic  performs   varied   programs   in   communities   throughout  central  and  northern  Ver-­ mont.  Kosma  is  presently  a  member  

arts beat

SHELDON  MUSEUM  POPS  CONCERT RIWKH0HWURSROLWDQ2SHUD2UFKHVWUD WHDFKHV SULYDWHO\ DQG LV DQ DGMXQFW GRXEOHEDVVLQVWUXFWRUDW1HZ-HUVH\ &LW\ 8QLYHUVLW\ &XUUHQWO\ .RVPD SOD\V ZLWK WKH 0RVWO\ 0R]DUW )HV-­ tival   at   Lincoln   Center   and   in   2011   ZDVDSSRLQWHGFRQGXFWRURIWKH1HZ Jersey  City  University  Orchestra.   7KLV\HDU.RVPDKDVLQYLWHG0L-­ FKHOH%ROGXFDJLIWHGVRSUDQRIURP

QHLJKERULQJ0RQWUHDODVDVRORLVWWR provide  an   extra   entertainment   bo-­ nus  for  the  audience. 7LFNHWV DUH  DGXOW  \RXWK age   12-­18;Íž   children   under   12   are   DGPLWWHG IUHH 7LFNHWV PD\ EH SXU-­ chased   by   calling   the   Sheldon   at    RQOLQH DW KHQU\VKHOGRQ-­ museum.org  or  in  person  at  the  Shel-­ GRQ  3DUN 6WUHHW LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ 3URFHHGV IURP WKH FRQFHUW EHQHÂżW the  Sheldon  Museum. MAWâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;SUMMER  SHORTSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7KUHH GHGLFDWHG GLUHFWRUV WDNH six  hilarious  plays  and  nine  delight-­ IXODFWRUVDQGVKDNHWKHPXSIRU GD\V WR SURGXFH Âł6XPPHU 6KRUWV´ an   evening   of   six   miniature   theatri-­ cal  confections  guaranteed  to  satisfy   the  appetite  for  a  summer  evening  of   URJXHU\DQGIXQEHJLQQLQJDWSP RQ 7KXUVGD\ DW 0LGGOHEXU\ÂśV 7RZQ Hall   Theater.   Repeat   performances   ZLOO WDNH SODFH DW  SP RQ )ULGD\ DQGSPRQ6DWXUGD\DQGSP on  Sunday. 0LGGOHEXU\ $FWRUV :RUNVKRS established   their   reputation   as   a   lo-­ FDOO\ JURZQ SURIHVVLRQDO FRPSDQ\ ZLWK VKRUWIRUP WKHDWHU EHJLQQLQJ LQ7KLVVXPPHUWKH\DUHEDFN ZLWK VL[ HQWLUHO\ QHZ H[WUHPHO\ IXQQ\ DQG XQXVXDO SOD\V DOO GHDO-­ LQJZLWKUHODWLRQVKLSVDQGWKHWKLQJV WKDWKDSSHQZKHQZHDFWMXVWDOLWWOH QDXJKW\DVKXPDQVWHQGWRGR ,Q Âł%RLVH ,GDKR´ E\ 6HDQ 0L-­ FKDHO:HOFKDFRXSOHLQDORFDOFDIp ÂżQG WKHLU OLYHV EHLQJ QDUUDWHG E\ D P\VWHULRXVVWUDQJHUZLWKOLIHFKDQJ-­ ing  results. ,Q Âł7KH 6FDU\ 4XHVWLRQ´ E\ :D\QH 6 5DZOH\ D \RXQJ PDQ struggles   to   pop   a   question   to   his  

JLUOIULHQGDQGWKDWTXHVWLRQFDWFKHV principal  cellist   of   the   Los  Angeles   her  more  than  a  little  off  guard. 3KLOKDUPRQLF3HWHU6WXPSI Âł=RPELH)XQHUDO´E\ORFDOSOD\-­ 7KHLU FROODERUDWLRQ JUHZ IURP ZULJKW +DOH\ 5LFH SOD\V ZLWK WKH summers  at  the  Marlboro  Music  Fes-­ LGHD RI ZKDW PLJKW KDSSHQ DW WKLV WLYDOLQ9HUPRQWIROORZLQJWKHIRRW-­ PRVWXQOLNHO\HYHQW$VSHUYDVLYHDV steps  of  the  Guarneri  String  Quartet   ]RPELHV DUH LQ RXU PRGHUQ FXOWXUDO ZKR ZHUH LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHG E\ WKH %XGD-­ OLIHZHMXVWFRXOGQÂśWUHVLVWMRLQLQJLQ pest   String   Quartet   decades   before.   the  fun. In   addition   to   its   triumphant   Carn-­ Âł7KH3URSRVDO´E\3DXO6LHPHQV HJLH+DOODQG/LQFROQ&HQWHUGHEXWV LVDPRGHUQDGDSWDWLRQRI&KHNKRYÂśV the   Johannes   has   had   great   success   comic   masterpiece   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   a   hilarious   ZLWK DXGLHQFHV DQG FULWLFV DOLNH LQ ORRNDWRQHQHUYRXV\RXQJPDQÂśVDW-­ %XIIDOR &KLFDJR 3KLODGHOSKLD DQG tempt  at  a  marriage  proposal. :DVKLQJWRQ'&DPRQJRWKHUV 3DUHQWLQJDGYLFHJRHVRXWWKHZLQ-­ The  Johannes  has  been  described   GRZLQÂł1LJKW5XOHV´E\%LOO\$U-­ by  the  Philadelphia  Inquirer  as  per-­ RQVRQZKHQWZRFRXSOHVGHEDWHWKH IRUPLQJ ZLWK ÂłDFFXUDWH LQWRQDWLRQ PHULWVRIDOORZLQJWKHLUFKLOGUHQLQWR vigorous   interaction   and   careful   re-­ their  beds. gard   for   the   details   in   the   score   â&#x20AC;Ś   )LQDOO\WKHHYHQLQJZUDSVXSZLWK WKHSDVVLRQDQGDWWDFNWKDWFKDUDFWHU-­ D SRLJQDQW ORRN DW L]HWKHEHVWRITXDU-­ the  arc  of  a  marriage   WHWSOD\LQJ´ in   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Post   Its:   Notes   Although  the  per-­ RQ D 0DUULDJH´ E\ IRUPDQFHV DUH IUHH Paul   Dooley   and   donations  in  support   :LQQLH +RO]PDQ of   the   series   are   al-­ Escape  the  ordinary.   ZD\V DSSUHFLDWHG â&#x20AC;Ś     Escape   the   rou-­ For   more   concert   tine.   â&#x20AC;Ś   Escape   the   information   call   ]RPELHV  RU YLVLW 7LFNHWV  &RQ-­ rcmsvt.org. tact   the   THT   box   BLUES  AT   RIÂżFH DW  LINCOLN  PEAK RUYLVLWWRZQKDOOWKH-­ The   Bob   MacK-­ ater.org. HQ]LH %OXHV %DQG JOHANNES   brings   their   high-­ STRING   spirited   and   good-­ QUARTET humored   American   The   Rochester   roots   music   to   Lin-­ Chamber   Music   FROQ 3HDN 9LQH\DUG Society   presents   RQ )ULGD\ IURP  the   Johannes   String   to   8   p.m.   The   band   MICHELE  BOLDUC Quartet  at  7  p.m.  on   SOD\VEOXHVFODVVLFV Saturday   at   the   Federated   Church   MXPSVZLQJDQGUK\WKP EOXHV² in   Rochester.   The   evening   program   WXQHV WKDW ZLOO JHW \RX GDQFLQJ RU ZLOOLQFOXGHWKH0R]DUW6WULQJ4XDU-­ VLPSO\ OHW \RX HQMR\ WKH QLJKW OLV-­ WHW 1R  LQ * . %HHWKRYHQ WHQLQJZKLOHWKHEDQGWDNHV\RXEDFN 4XDUWHW1RRSDQG%UDKPV through  decades  of  great  music.  The   4XDUWHWLQ&PLQRU1R2S EDQGLQFOXGHV%RE0DF.HQ]LH YR-­ 4XDUWHW PHPEHUV 6RRYLQ .LP FDOV KDUPRQLFD  'HQQLV :LOOPRWW -HVVLFD /HH &- &KDQJ DQG 3HWHU JXLWDUYRFDOV 'DYLG%DLQ SLDQR Stumpf   are   frequent   performers   on   RUJDQYRFDOV %UDG6RXUGLIIH EDVV  the  RCMS  series  and  have  garnered   and  John  Wallace  (drums). a  faithful  fan  base  in  Vermont.  A  pre-­ $V ZLWK DOO :LQH 'RZQ )ULGD\ FRQFHUWWDONE\/DUU\+DPEHUOLQEH-­ VKRZV WKH ÂłGRRUV´ RSHQ DW  JLQVDWSP SP IRU SLFQLFNLQJ )RRG ZLOO EH The   Johannes   brings   together   the   IRUVDOHE\$OPRVW+RPHDQGZLQH ÂżUVW $PHULFDQ WR ZLQ WKH 3DJDQLQL available  by  the  glass.  Admission  is   9LROLQ&RPSHWLWLRQLQ\HDUV6R-­ IUHH %ULQJ ODZQ FKDLUV RU D SLFQLF ovin   Kim;Íž   a   Concert   Artists   Guild   EODQNHW7KH:LQH'RZQ)ULGD\VH-­ &RPSHWLWLRQZLQQHU-HVVLFD/HHWKH ries  happens  rain  or  shine  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   principal   viola   of   the   Philadelphia   URRPRQWKHZLQHU\SRUFKLQWKHFDVH 2UFKHVWUD &- &KDQJ DQG IRUPHU (See  Arts  Beat,  Page  11)

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PENTECOSTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of June 23 CANCER:  JUNE   22-­JULY   22   Now   is   a   good   the  brakes  on  impulse  buys.  This  week  you  may  be   time  to  travel,  even  if  it  means  just  a  quick  jaunt.   tempted   to   spend   more   money   than   you   have,   and   But   if   a   big   vacation   is   that  will  only  lead  to  long-­ on  the  horizon,  know  that   WHUPÂżQDQFLDOFRQFHUQV you   will   likely   have   a   PISCES:   FEBRUARY   smooth  trip  ahead.   19-­MARCH  20  It  is  time   LEO:   JULY   23-­AU-­ to   rebrand   yourself.   This   GUST   23   Your   powers   may   start   with   a   mini-­ are   magnetic   this   week.   makeover  or  more  signif-­ 2WKHUVÂżQG\RXVLPSO\LU-­ icant  changes  to  your  life   resistible,  which  can  bode   and  career. well  if  you  are  looking  for   ARIES:   MARCH   a  romantic  partner  or  want   21-­APRIL   20   Let   your   to  step  things  up. creative   side   take   over   383  Exchange  Street VIRGO:   AUGUST   this  week.  Your  imagina-­ Â&#x2026;ÂĄÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;¤Â?Â&#x161;­ª¹Ă&#x2C6;kppejjji 24-­SEPTEMBER   22   A   tion  is  ready  to  run  wild,   busy   week   at   work   will   and  this  burst  of  creative   www.cacklinhens.com require  lots  of  cooperation   energy   will   have   long-­ among   you   and   your   co-­ lasting  positive  effects. workers.  If  ever  there  was   TAURUS:   APRIL   21-­ a   time   to   summon   your   MAY   21   Though   you   leadership   abilities,   now   are   known   for   being   a   is  the  time. tad   stubborn,   this   week   LIBRA:   SEPTEMBER   you   are   open   to   any   and   23-­OCTOBER   23   Many   all  suggestions.  You  may   things  are  in  disarray  and   surprise   a   few   people   by   you   may   need   some   help   being  so  open-­minded. JHWWLQJ EDFN WR HIÂżFLHQW GEMINI:   MAY   22-­ living.   Download   an   app   JUNE  21  While  you  may   388-2800 to  help  you  track  expenses   have   natural   leadership   or   keep   tabs   on   your   re-­ abilities,  most  of  the  time   Your Bridal Specialist! sponsibilities.   you   do   not   want   to   pull   SCORPIO:   OCTOBER   rank.  This  week  you  may   Mon.  -­  Fri.  9  -­  5:30,  Sat.  9-­2 24-­NOVEMBER   22   You   need   to   step   things   up   a   ZZZPLGGOHEXU\Ă&#x20AC;RUDODQGJLIWVFRP are  bound  to  be  the  center   bit.   5W6RXWK0LGGOHEXU\ of  attention.  Get  over  any   shyness   early   on   because   FAMOUS you  will  be  spending  time   BIRTHDAYS with   coworkers   for   most   JUNE  22 FINAL of  the  week. Cyndi  Lauper, SAGITTARIUS:   NO-­ Singer-­Songwriter  (61) DAYS! VEMBER   23-­DECEM-­ JUNE  23 BER  21  You  will  do  some   Frances  McDormand, of  your  best  work  at  home   Actress  (56) this   week.   Spend   ample   JUNE  24 time   getting   the   house   in   Mindy  Kaling, order.  A  few  days  working   Actress  (35) from  home  could  kickstart   JUNE  25 plans. Busy  Philipps, CAPRICORN:   DE-­ Actress  (35) CEMBER   22-­JANUARY   JUNE  26 20  Quickly  curb  any  feel-­ Derek  Jeter, ings   of   boredom   by   ex-­ Athlete  (40) ploring  a  new  hobby.  Try   JUNE  27 WDNLQJDQHZÂżWQHVVRUDUWFODVV<RXÂśOOKDYHFKDQF-­ 6DP&ODĂ&#x20AC;LQ$FWRU 

es  to  mingle,  too.   JUNE  28 AQUARIUS:  JANUARY  21-­FEBRUARY  18  Put   John  Cusack,  Actor  (48)

Brighten Your World Learn to Knit!

JOHANNES  STRING  QUARTET

Arts  Beat (Continued  from  Page  10) of  rain.  No  alcohol  may  be  brought   onto   the   grounds,   and   please   leave   your   pets   at   home.   Lincoln   Peak   Vineyard   is   located   at   142   River   Road  in  New  Haven.  More  informa-­ tion  is  at  lincolnpeakvineyard.com. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;PENTECOSTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; 7KH 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH DIÂżOL-­ ated   professional   theatre   company   PTP/NYC   (formerly   known   as   Po-­ tomac   Theatre   Project)   will   host   a   public  work  in  progress  showing  of   'DYLG(GJDUÂśVDZDUGZLQQLQJSOD\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pentecost,â&#x20AC;?  at  6  p.m.  on  Friday  in   the  Seeler  Studio  Theater  at  the  Ma-­ haney  Center  for  the  Arts.   The   New   York   production   will   feature  a  largely  new  company,  one   still   spearheaded   by   Alex   Draper   and   Tosca   Giustini.   The   cast   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pentecostâ&#x20AC;?   will   include   profes-­ sional  Equity  actors  working  along-­ side   Middlebury   College   theater   students.   The   performance,   sponsored   by   PTP/NYC,   is   free.   The   Mahaney   Center  for  the  Arts  is  located  at  72   Porter   Field   Road   in   Middlebury,   just   off   South   Main   Street.   Free   parking   is   available.   For   more   in-­

formation,  call   443-­3168   or   visit   middlebury.edu/arts. TWO  BROTHERS  TAVERN There  will  be  one  live  musical  per-­ formance  this  week  at  Two  Brothers   Tavern   in   Middlebury   when   Zeph-­ rus   takes   to   the   stage,   beginning   at   9   p.m.   on   Friday.   Zephrus,   a   three-­ piece  electric  and  acoustic  ensemble   out   of   Burlington,   features   the   tal-­ ents   of   Corey   Cranston   on   guitar,   Troy   Cyphers   on   drums   and   Scott   McGrath  on  bass.  Their  music  con-­ sists  of  a  mixture  of  epic  instrumen-­ tals,   highly   reimagined   rock   covers   and  deep-­track  originals  with  vocals.   There   is   a   $3   cover.   For   additional   information,  call  388-­0002. VSO  BRASS  QUINTET   In  celebration  of  its  20th  summer   season,  the  Rochester  Chamber  Mu-­ sic   Society   presents   the  VSO   Brass   Quintet  in  concert  at  6  p.m.  on  Sun-­ day  in  Rochester  Park  (rain  location   in   Pierce   Hall   Community   Center,   38  South  Main  St.,  Rochester). Although   the   performances   are   free,   donations   in   support   of   the   series   are   always   appreciated.   For   more   concert   information   call   767-­ 9234  or  visit  rcmsvt.org.

ZEPHRUS


PAGE 12  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

PUZZLES

Sponsored by:

help keep the mind independent and active throughout life.

This week’s  puzzle  is  rated

Easy

1

Across

61. Be  in  debt

34. Mortgage  amounts

1. Consumed

62. In  ___  parts

36. Jellied

4. Shake  up

63. Glimpse

37. Pricker

7. Three  or  more   harmonious  notes

64. Use  an  oar

39. Small  spot

12. Active  struggle 13.  Prodigious 14.  Witty 15.  Looked  into 17.  Seldom 18.  Played  for  a  sap 19.  Retention 20.  ,QVLJQL¿FDQW 23.  Kind  of  patch 24.  No  ___  land 25.  Manufacturing,  e.g. 27.  Road  goo 30.  Belongs  to  something 31.  Torment 32.  Together 35.  Unhurried  ease 37.  Ask  for  a  hand? 38.  Should  know  best 39.  Calorie  count 40.  Crime  organization 41.  Hitherto 42.  Fairway  clubs 44.  Dust,  in  a  way 45.  Dr.  Seuss  character 46.  Follower  of  John 47.  Annually 51.  Headliner 54.  American,  for  one

47. “Uh-­huh”

2. Levy

48. Mollify

3. Generation

49. Matures

4. Summer  month

50. Rapper  turned  actor  Ja   ___

21

13. Pronoun

26

31

32

36

27

28

29

33

34

39 42

40

43

44

45 47

48

49

46

50

51

52

53

55. “Tonight  __  Comes”   Cars  tune

54

55

56

56. Conjunction

59

60

61

62

63

64

58. Tailor

11

37

41

57. Pair

14. Beasts

10

23

38

54. Give  the  OK

9

19

25

35

8

17

53. Do  sums

11. Juiceless

7 14

22

30

52. Ditty

10. Bank

6

16

24

51. Sojourn

9. ___  the  top

57

58

16. Flowers,  for  short 19.  They  are  Blue   in  Vegas 20.   Photographer’s   request

2

6

21. Recently

9

23. Bit  of  butter 25.  Specks 26.  Palter

29. Disneyland   e.g.

33. False!

7

7

8

8

1

5

Each Sudoku  puzzle  consists  of  a  9x9  grid  that  has  been   subdivided  into  nine  smaller  grids  of  3x3  squares.  To  solve  the   puzzle  each  row,  column  and  box  must  contain  each  of  the   numbers  1  to  9.  Puzzles  come  in  three  grades:  easy,  medium   DQGGLI¿FXOW

6

Level: Medium.    

2 6 3

8 9

3 8

5

4

This week’s  puzzle  solutions can  be  found  on  Page  31.

Sudoku

2 9

9 7

5 3

9 4 1

28. Minute

60. What  you  are  dealt

4

6

27. Advice

59. Stands  for  things

3 8

22. Within

31. “Get  on  the   __,  forget  about   us”  ....

55. Scholars

20

1. Overwhelming  emotion

8. Deli  offering

5

18

44. Truth  or  ___

7. Secretive  sort

4 13

15

Down

6. Lobsterlike

3

12

43. 6FL¿NLOOHU

5. Seasoned

2


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  13

Monkton  (Continued  from  Page  1) mont   Gasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   legal   costs   are   built   into   man  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  building  a  work   this  past  Thursday  eveningâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  meeting   the  cost  of  the  project,  which  is  borne   station,   you   should   know   where   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   DW WKH 0RQNWRQ ÂżUHKRXVH VDLG WKDW by   ratepayers,   while   landowners   gonna  be.â&#x20AC;? talks   with   company   representatives   are  left  to  pay  their  legal  fees  out  of   NON-­DISCLOSURE   had  improved. pocket. AGREEMENTS Instead,   landowners   said   Vermont   â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   negotiations   are   about   Landowners   and   legislators   alike   Gas  fails  to  respond  to  their  questions   things  like  route  planning,  safety  is-­ also   objected   to  Vermont   Gasâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   prac-­ in  a  timely  manner,  does  not  address   sues  and  construction  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  those  devel-­ tice  of  making  landowners  sign  non-­ concerns  they  harbor,  is  not  offering   opment   costs   are   being   covered   by   disclosure   agreements,   or   NDAs,   fair   compensation   for   their   land   and   VGS,â&#x20AC;?  Peyser  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  see  any   when  signing  an  easement,  that  pre-­ is   secretive   about   its   reason   why   they   can-­ vent  landowners  from  sharing  details   business  practices. not  be  covered  on  the   of   the   negotiations   with   their   neigh-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have people â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nothing   has   other  side.â&#x20AC;? bors. changed,â&#x20AC;?   landowner   that donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t Peyser  said  that  be-­ NDAs   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   make   easements   or   understand Selina  Peyser  said. cause   many   residents   land   purchases   secret;Íž   those   things   The   meeting   was   easements. (These donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  the  techni-­ are   part   of   the   public   record.   But   chaired  by  Sen.  Chris   easements) are cal  or  legal  knowledge   NDAs   do   conceal   any   damages   the   Bray,   D-­New   Haven,   massive, theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re to  represent  their  own   company  may  have  paid  landowners   and   Department   of   interests   in   easement   in  addition  to  the  easement  price. Public   Service   Com-­ YHU\GLIĂ&#x20AC;FXOW negotiations,   they   Landowners  said  not  knowing  the   missioner   Chris   Rec-­ to deal with, may   unwittingly   sign   full  price  that  their  neighbors  are  be-­ chia.   In   addition   two   (Vermont Gas) deals  they  will  regret. ing   paid   puts   them   at   a   competitive   dozen   landowners,   GRHVQ¡WJLYHGLUHFW â&#x20AC;&#x153;People   simply   disadvantage,   and   allows   Vermont   Rep.   David   Sharpe,   answers and the donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   the   exper-­ *DV WR NHHS WKH PDUNHW DUWLÂżFLDOO\ D-­Bristol,   and   Sen.   tise   to   address   these   low. stuff that goes Claire   Ayer,   D-­Addi-­ issues,   and   unfortu-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   somebodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   giving   a   $2,600   EDFNDQGIRUWKLV nately   son,  also  attended. the   expertise   easement   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   reported   with   the   One  of  the  key  con-­ overwhelming.â&#x20AC;? that  has  been  provided   town,   and   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   getting   a   $5,000   cerns   of   landowners   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; landowner by  VGS  is  simply  not   damages   payment,   that   easement   is   in  March  was  that  the   0DUHQ9DVDWND accurate,â&#x20AC;?  Peyser  said.   actually  selling  for  $7,600,â&#x20AC;?  Vasatka   land  agents  represent-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  do  not  know  that   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  reporting  all  of   ing  Vermont  Gas  were   the  information  that  is   the  payments,  which  allows  them  to   not  employees  of  the  company.  Rath-­ being   presented   to   you,   as   though   it   create  their  own  market.â&#x20AC;? er,   Vermont   Gas   hired   a   third-­party   were  objective  â&#x20AC;Ś  is  inaccurate.â&#x20AC;? Monkton  residents  asked  Vermont   ÂżUP &ORXJK +DUERU $VVRFLDWHV RI INDEPENDENT  SURVEY Gas   to   stop   asking   for   NDAs   at   the   Albany,  N.Y.,  to  handle  the  negotia-­ Peyser  said  either  the  state  or  Ver-­ meeting   in   March,   but   the   company   tions. mont  Gas  should  cover  the  costs  of  an   refused,   saying   it   wanted   to   protect   Vermont  Gas  agreed  to  allow  land-­ independent  survey  and  independent   the  privacy  of  itself  and  landowners. owners   to   speak   directly   with   its   appraisal  for  each  property,  and  also   Bray   said   that   he   believes   the   own  employees,  but  landowners  said   pay  for  a  lawyer  to  help  landowners   NDAs   have   created   a   lopsided   rela-­ these  employees  lack  the  authority  to   negotiate  and  easement. tionship   between   Vermont   Gas   and   amend   easement   drafts,   and   instead   Vasatka  stressed  that  the  landown-­ landowners. must  seek  approval  from  supervisors. ers  in  Monkton  are  not  asking  for  tax-­ Âł,WLVDYHU\XQHYHQSOD\LQJÂżHOG´ â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   was   a   lot   of   the   same,â&#x20AC;?   land-­ SD\HU PRQH\ WR ÂżJKW Bray   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;One   side   owner   Maren   Vasatka   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   was   the  pipeline. has  all  the  knowledge   not   really   what   we   were   asking   for,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   asking   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It is a very of   the   marketplace,   when  we  were  asking  for  answers.â&#x20AC;? for   a   defense   fund,â&#x20AC;?   uneven playing because   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   actu-­ Rep.   Sharpe   questioned   why   the   Vasatka   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   Ă&#x20AC;HOG2QHVLGH DOO\ GHÂżQHG WKH PDU-­ Public   Service   Department   had   not   asking   for   legal   assis-­ ket,  and  the  other  side   taken   up   his   suggestion   to   provide   tance   to   help   negoti-­ has all the has   no   knowledge   of   independent   mediators   to   help   land-­ ate   an   easement,   not   NQRZOHGJHRI the   marketplace   and   owners   navigate   the   complex   nego-­ WRÂżJKWDQHPLQHQWGR-­ WKHPDUNHWSODFH limited  resources.â&#x20AC;? tiations. main  battle.â&#x20AC;? Sharpe   said   he   EHFDXVHWKH\¡YH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Truthfully,  it  was  considered  for  a   But   not   all   requests   DFWXDOO\GHĂ&#x20AC;QHG spoke   with   Vermont   OLWWOHELWDQGZHMXVWFRXOGQÂśWÂżJXUH that   the   landowners   Gas   President   Don   WKHPDUNHWDQG out  how  to  implement  that,â&#x20AC;?  Recchia   had   would   cost   Ver-­ Gilbert   about   the   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  apologize,  but  it  just  got  over-­ mont   Gas   or   the   state   the other side has NDAs.   Sharpe   said   whelmed  with  other  stuff.â&#x20AC;? money.   Greg   Peyser,   QRNQRZOHGJHRI Gilbert   expressed   Sharpe   pressed   Recchia   to   again   the  son  of  Selina  Pey-­ WKHPDUNHWSODFH concern   that   if   land-­ look  into  the  idea. ser,   said   he   just   wants   and limited owners   knew   how   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  understand  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  new  procedure,   Vermont   Gas   to   indi-­ UHVRXUFHVÂľ much   their   neighbors   but  we  have  citizens  that  are  feeling   cate  where  the  changes   were  being  paid,  they   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sen. Chris Bray put-­upon,  and  I  think  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  appropriate   are  when  the  company   would   ask   for   more   that  there  be  an  independent  negotia-­ sends  landowners  new   PRQH\ WKXV LQĂ&#x20AC;DWLQJ tor  involved,â&#x20AC;?  Sharpe  said. easement   drafts   by   using   boldface   costs.  Sharpe  he  said  he  was  not  per-­ Vasatka   said   landowners   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   type  or  other  means. suaded  by  Gilbertâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  argument. need  mediators,  but  legal  representa-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every  time  you  get  an  easement,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  still  feel  pretty  strongly  that  there   tion. itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   brand   new   sheet   of   paper   and   is   no   good   reason   for   a   non-­disclo-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   mediator   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   give   you   legal   you  have  no  idea  what  they  have  or   sure  agreement,â&#x20AC;?  Sharpe  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  my   advice,â&#x20AC;?  Vasatka  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  peo-­ havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   changed,   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   incumbent   conversations,   it   seemed   obvious   to   ple  that  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  understand  easements.   upon   you   to   go   through   it,â&#x20AC;?   Peyser   me  the  reason  they  were  insisting  on   (The  easements)  are  massive,  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   said. them  was  to  keep  their  costs  down.â&#x20AC;? YHU\GLIÂżFXOWWRGHDOZLWK 9HUPRQW Another   common   refrain   from   While   Vermont   Gas   has   said   it   Gas)  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  give  direct  answers  and   landowners  is  that  the  easements  they   plans   to   begin   construction   on   the   the   stuff   that   goes   back   and   forth   is   are  being  presented  with  are  so  vague   pipeline   this   month,   it   has   only   se-­ overwhelming.â&#x20AC;? as  to  allow  the  company  to  move  the   cured   14   of   about   three   dozen   ease-­ Vasatka,  who  earns  her  living  as  a   pipeline  or  work  stations  as  they  see   ments  needed  in  Monkton.  Company   Realtor,   said   that   easement   negotia-­ ÂżW 0LFKDHO $OGHUPDQ VDLG KH KDV spokesman   Steve   Wark   did   not   re-­ tions  are  more  complex  than  standard   been  asking  Vermont  Gas  where  they   spond   to   requests   to   disclose   how   real  estate  transactions. plan  to  site  a  work  station  on  his  prop-­ many   of   the   222   landowners   along   Melanie   Peyser,   the   daughter   of   erty,  but  has  not  received  an  answer. the   entire   Phase   I   pipeline   route   the   Monkton   landowner   Selina   Peyser,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   building   a   house,   you   company  has  secured  land  use  agree-­ said   she   thinks   it   is   unfair   that   Ver-­ know  where  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  going  to  be,â&#x20AC;?  Alder-­ ments  with.

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PAGE  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

River Watch group has some concerns MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  At  its  volunteer   said   that,   despite   the   icy   start   to   the   training   session   in   March,   Addison   season,   sampling   crews   have   done   County   River   Watch   Collaborative   well,  even  the  new  handful  of  people   had   a   standing-­room-­only   collecting   water   from   the   crowd   of   eager   water   sam-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Provisional relatively   pristine   branches   plers,   and,   since   then,   one   results of  the  Middlebury  River  in   morning   per   month   those   from some its  higher  elevations. volunteers   from   many   Ad-­ Addison   County   River   dison   County   communities   sampling Watch   releases   provisional   have   been   venturing   out   to   stations on E.coli  readings  to  the  public   collect  bottles  of  water  from   all six of â&#x20AC;&#x153;because  of  their  relevance   area   streams.   This   year   the   the rivers to   swimming   safety,â&#x20AC;?   Wit-­ river   monitoring   collabora-­ we monitor WHQVDLG7KHÂżUVWSURYLVLRQ-­ tive  established  several  new   show E.coli al  E.coli  results  of  the  year   sampling  sites  on  the  upper   were  recently  posted  by  the   Middlebury   River   in   Rip-­ levels above state.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Provisionalâ&#x20AC;?   means   ton,  and  also  is  still  monitor-­ the Vermont that   the   data   could   still   be   LQJ ÂżYH RWKHU ULYHUV LQ WKH state health- revised  upon  further  analy-­ county,   an   ongoing   effort   based sis.  The  data  from  the  June   designed  to  tease  out  trends   standard.â&#x20AC;? sampling   event   in  Addison   in  water  quality. County  revealed  some  high   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Kristen bacteria  counts. Matthew   Witten,   coordi-­ Underwood nator   for   the   River   Watch   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Provisional  results  from   Collaborative,  said,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are   some   sampling   stations   on   thrilled  to  have  so  many  conscientious   all  six  of  the  rivers  we  monitor  show   and   enthusiastic   volunteers   helping   E.coli  levels  above  the  Vermont  state   collect  water  samples  on  local  rivers.â&#x20AC;?   health-­based   standard,â&#x20AC;?   said   Kristen   Witten  explained  that  there  are  about   Underwood  of  South  Mountain  Con-­ 20  volunteers  who  go  out  simultane-­ sulting  in  Bristol,  also  a  technical  con-­ RXVO\RQWKHÂżUVW:HGQHVGD\RIHDFK sultant  to  River  Watch.  She  said  that,   month   to   collect   containers   of   water   compared  to  June  2013,  this  Juneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  E.   that  then  are  analyzed  by  the  Vermont   coli   readings   were,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   a   number   of   DEC  laboratory  in  Burlington. cases  an  order  of  magnitude  higher.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;April   sampling   this   year   was   a   Witten   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;These   high   levels   of   near   freeze-­out,â&#x20AC;?   Witten   chuckled.   pathogens   may   be   due   to   the   rains   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  had  to  postpone  the  sampling  for   which  immediately  preceded  the  June   a  week  just  for  some  of  our  volunteers   sampling.   Manure   has   been   spread   to  be  able  to  access  open  water!â&#x20AC;?  He   RQPDQ\ÂżHOGVLQWKHSDVWIHZZHHNV

and  fertilizers  have  been  used  on  gar-­ dens  and  lawns.  E.coli  can  also  derive   from  failing  septic  systems  or  wildlife   sources  such  as  beavers,  deer,  and  wa-­ terfowl.â&#x20AC;? Witten   explained   that   the   U.S.   En-­ vironmental  Protection  Agency  (EPA)   KDVXVHGÂżQGLQJVIURPHSLGHPLRORJL-­ cal   studies   to   develop   recommended   criteria   for   water   quality   standards.   By   the   federal   criterion   for   water-­ borne   pathogens,   as   long   as   E.   coli   derived   from   a   single   sample   collec-­ tion  remains  below  235  organisms  per   100   milliliters,   waters   are   considered   safe   to   swim   in.   This   number   corre-­ sponds   to   a   projected   illness   rate   of   eight   swimmers   out   of   a   thousand.   Vermont   has   adopted   a   stricter   water   quality   standard   for   E.   coli   bacteria   for   Class   B   waters,   based   on   a   pro-­ jected   illness   rate   of   four   (instead   of   eight)   swimmers   out   of   a   thousand.   Corresponding   to   that   different   level   of   statistical   probability,   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Class  B  standard  is  77  E.  coli  organ-­ isms   per   100mL   in   a   single   sample.   This  is  the  most  stringent  standard  in   the  nation.  Witten  commented  that  the   strict  Vermont  standard  for  E.coli  may   be  revised  to  match  the  EPA  standard   because  some  studies  have  found  that,   even   under   moderate   rainfall,   waters   running  off  undisturbed,  forested  wa-­ tersheds   may   not   meet   the   Vermont   standard  for  E.  coli. Addison  County  River  Watchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pro-­ visional  data  from  June  4  samples,  said   Witten,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;showed   especially   high   E.   coli  readings  on  Otter  Creek  below  the   falls  in  Vergennes,  on  the  New  Haven   River  just  below  where  Muddy  Brook   runs  into  it,  on  Lewis  Creek  near  the   Starksboro/Monkton   town   line,   the   middle  reaches  of  the  Lemon  Fair,  on   Little  Otter  Creek  where  it  runs  under   Route   7   in   Ferrisburgh,   and   on   the   lower  Middlebury  River  near  its  con-­ Ă&#x20AC;XHQFHZLWK2WWHU&UHHN´7KHVHUHDG-­

BJORN  COBURN,  8,  of  Ripton,  takes  a  sample  from  the  frigid  waters   RIWKHXSSHU0LGGOHEXU\5LYHURQWKH¿UVW5LYHU:DWFKVDPSOLQJHYHQW in  April.

ings  were   all   above   1,000   organisms   per   100mL   on   June   4.  Although   the   readings   are   certainly   cause   for   con-­ cern,  Witten  commented  that  most  of   these  locations  have  for  years  shown   at   least   occasional   signs   of   not   com-­ plying  with  water  quality  standards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  our  eye  on  these  stream   reaches   and   the   watersheds   that   feed   into   them,â&#x20AC;?   said  Witten.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;No   one   in-­ tentionally   pollutes   the   water.   We   as  

a  society  need  to  keep  rooting  out  the   land  practices  that  lead  to  water  qual-­ ity   problems,   and   offer   both   carrots   and  sticks  to  lead  us  all  toward  opti-­ mal   stewardship.   Clean   water   is   the   essence  of  life.â&#x20AC;?   For   more   information   about   water   quality  monitoring  in  Addison  County   rivers   and   streams,   contact   Matthew   Witten   at   (802)   434-­3236   at   mwit-­ ten@gmavt.net.

New  Haven,  VT  Homeowner   Recommends  Bristol  Electronics â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  looked  into  installing  a  solar  system  ten  to  twelve  years  ago.   I  wish  we  had  done  it  back  then.  The  payback  has  been  amazing.   Bristol   Electronics   is   such   a   friendly   company.   The   guys   are   great,  everyone  is  easy  to  work  with  and  so  professional.   :KHQ,EXLOGDQHZKRPHLQWKHIXWXUH,ZLOOGHÂżQLWHO\SODQRQ incorporating  solar  and  using  Bristol  Electronics.â&#x20AC;?                                                  Karen  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  New  Haven,  VT

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Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  —  PAGE  15

ADDISON COUNTY

School News Briefs

Cornwall grad  lands  job  at  Google Taylor  Wood  of  Cornwall  gradu-­ ated   this   spring   from   the   Univer-­ sity   of   Vermont   double   majoring   with   a   BA   in   economics   with   de-­ partmental  honors  as  well  as  BS  in   business   management.   He   will   be  

SPENCER REED

Middlebury teens graduate  from Vt.  Commons SOUTH   BURLINGTON   —   Spencer  Reed  and  Galen  Fastie,  both   of  Middlebury,  graduated  on  June  6   from  the  Vermont  Commons  School   in  South  Burlington. Reed,   the   son   of   Molly   and   Bud   Reed,   will   attend   Washington   Uni-­ versity   in   St.   Louis   in   the   fall   of   2014.   Reed   was   the   recipient   of   the   school’s   top   prize   of   academic   achievement  in  mathematics.  He  de-­ scribed  mathematics  as  being  “like  a   puzzle  that  we  get  to  solve.” Fastie,   son   Andrea   Lloyd   and   Chris  Fastie  of  Middlebury,  was  the   recipient   of   the   school’s   award   for   distinguished   achievement   in   Span-­ ish.   The   faculty   noted   his   true   love   for  learning  and  the  utmost  serious-­ ness  for  each  project  he  presented  in   class.     Reed   and   Fastie   were   among   12   graduating   students   who   altogether   received   a   total   of   $1,275,000   in   merit-­based   academic   scholarships   from   the   colleges   and   universities   offering  them  admission,  an  average   of   $106,250   per   student.   The   merit   scholarships   were   offered   prior   to   UHFHLSW RI WKHLU ¿QDQFLDO DLG SDFN-­ ages.   Each   member   of   the   class   is   planning   to   enroll   in   college   in   the   2014-­2015  academic  year.    

C h a r l e s Swift,  a  2008   g r a d u a t e   of   Middle-­ bury   Union   High  School,   g r a d u a t e d   from   the   New   York   City  Fire  De-­ p a r t m e n t ’s   Fire   Acad-­ SWIFT emy   on   June   3.   He   has   been   assigned   to   Ladder   Truck  No.  35  in  Manhattan,  N.Y. Swift   received   an   associate’s   de-­ JUHHLQ¿UHSURWHFWLRQIURP/DNH5H-­ gion   Community   College.   He   also   served   in  Afghanistan   in   2010   with   the   Mountain   Brigade   of   the   Ver-­ mont  National  Guard.

GALEN FASTIE

2014

July 6th – 12th, 2014

FESTIVAL OFF ON-THE-GREEN This year at the Middebury Rec. Park

Join us for the Stray Birds Monday July 7th 7:00 pm

When The   Stray   Birds   take   the   stage,   the   spot-­ light  falls  on  three  voices   raised  in  harmony  above   the   raw   resonance   of   wood   and   strings.   It   is   a   sound   drawn   from   the   richness  of  American  folk   music   traditions,   spun   with   a   stirring   subtlety   and  grace.   Their full-length debut. The Stray Birds, was lauded by radio stations and listeners across the country and named to the Top 10 Folk/Americana Releases of 2012 by NPR. Passionate live performances led to appearances on NPR’s Mountain Stage, the Philadelphia Folk Festival, the Kerrville Folk Festival, and the Falcon Ridge Folk Festival. “They  are  brilliant  performers  with  an  easy  stage  presence   and  great  audience  rapport...  I  heard  the  comments   ‘phenomenal’,  ‘brilliant’,  ‘amazing’  throughout  the   departing  crowd...”    –  Beth  Duquette,  Ripton  Community                                                                      Coffeehouse,  Ripton,  VT “Five  Stars.”  –  John  Starling,  Founding  Member  of  The                                                    Seldom  Scene  

For a  list  of  all  the  Festival  shows,  visit  festivalonthegreen.org

employed by   Google   in   Mountain   View,  California. Parents   Ben   and   Sarah   Wood   own   Otter   Creek   Bakery   where   Taylor  has  worked  since  the  age  of   10.


PAGE  16  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

SPORTS MONDAY

Multi-­talented  Tiger  leads  baseball  all-­stars Independent  picks  best   among  area  high  schools By  ANDY  KIRKALDY ADDISON   COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   While   softball   stole  most  of  this  springâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  headlines  in  Ad-­ dison  County,  the  local  high  school  baseball   teams   also   enjoyed   high   points   and   excel-­ lent   individual   performances,   the   latter   of   which   are   recognized   here   in   the   2014   Ad-­ dison  Independent  Baseball  All-­Star  Team. Headlining  the  2014  squad  is  Middlebury   Union   senior  Aaron   Smith,   whose   work   on   WKHPRXQGLQWKHÂżHOGDQGDWWKHSODWHPHU-­ its   his   selection   as   the   2014   Addison   Inde-­ pendent  Player  of  the  Year. In  all,  Coach  Charlie  Messengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Tigers   compiled  a  7-­8  regular  season  record  in  the   tough  Metro  Conference,  the  programâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  best   in   several   seasons,   and   one   that   included   wins   over   eventual   Division   I   champion   Rice  and  perennial  power  Essex.  Three  oth-­ er   MUHS   seniors   join   Smith   on   the   Inde-­ pendent  squad. Coach   Tim   Mitchellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Otter   Valley   nine   failed   to   repeat   2013â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   D-­II   dream   season,   EXW ZRQ RQH SOD\RII JDPH DQG ÂżQLVKHG D respectable   10-­8,   including   an   extra-­inning   ZLQ DW 5XWODQG GHVSLWH VLJQLÂżFDQW JUDGXD-­ tion  losses.  Three  OV  seniors  and  one  junior   earned  Independent  recognition. Coach   Jeff   Stetsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Mount   Abraham   squad  picked  up  four  wins  in  the  challeng-­ ing   Metro   league   before   losing   a   one-­run   playoff  game  on  the  road.  Two  seniors  who   enjoyed   productive   seasons   merited   spots   on  the  Independent  team. Selections   were   made   based   on   observa-­ tions,   as   many   statistics   as   were   available,   and  consultation  with  the  coaches.  Congrat-­ ulations  to  the  following: AARON   SMITH,   MUHS   SENIOR,   PLAYER   OF   THE   YEAR.   Notes:   On   the   mound,   used   an   im-­ proved   fastball   and   excellent   breaking   balls   to   compile   a   3-­2  record  with  wins   over  Rice,  Essex  and   Mount   Abe   â&#x20AC;Ś   In   36   innings   pitched   allowed   33   hits,   10   walks,   struck   out   32   and   compiled   an   earned-­run   average   of   1.77   â&#x20AC;Ś   Tossed   a   six-­inning   three-­ hitter   and   allowed   SMITH one   unearned   run   in   1-­0   playoff   loss   â&#x20AC;Ś   Showed   great   range   and   played   errorless   EDOOLQFHQWHUÂżHOGÂŤ)RXU\HDUYDUVLW\SOD\HU compiled   a   .431   on-­base   percentage   batting   leadoffâ&#x20AC;Ś  Hit  .339,  scored  11  runs  and  drove   LQÂżYH Messengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   actually   had   a   little   velocity   this   year.   He   had   a   nice   off-­ speed   pitch,   and   great   location   â&#x20AC;Ś   If   you   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   hit   your   spots,   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   in   trouble   â&#x20AC;Ś   He  also  shut  down  the  running  game,  which   was  key  â&#x20AC;Ś  He  made  some  really  nice  catch-­

MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  senior  Aaron  Smith,  seen  here  making  a  diving  catch  in  a  game  in  late  April,  is  the  2014  Addison   Independent  high  school  baseball  player  of  the  year. ,QGHSHQGHQW¿OHSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO

HV RXW LQ FHQWHU ÂżHOG VRPH SKHQRPHQDO FDWFKHVDQGKHWRRNFRQWUROLQWKHRXWÂżHOG He  was  a  great  leader  â&#x20AC;Ś  Toward  the  end  of   the  season  his  bat  started  to  heat  up.â&#x20AC;? SHANE  QUENNEVILLE,  OV  SENIOR.   Notes:  Batted  .417  for  OV  and  scored  a  local   high   of   19   runs   out   of  the  leadoff  spot  in   the  OV  order  â&#x20AC;Ś  Ex-­ cellent   baserunner   who  put  pressure  on   opposing   defenses   â&#x20AC;Ś   Also   had   some   pop   in   his   bat   and   OLQHG WKH ÂżUVW SLWFK he   saw   this   season   for   an   inside-­the-­ park   home   run   â&#x20AC;Ś   Hard-­working   play-­ er   who   covered   a   tremendous   amount   QUENNEVILLE of   territory   in   cen-­ WHU ÂżHOG DQG DOVR chipped  in  a  pitching  win.   Mitchellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   an   all-­star   FHQWHU ÂżHOGHU DQG OHDGRII EDWWHU ÂŤ +H KDV good  speed  on  the  bases  â&#x20AC;Ś  He  loves  to  com-­ pete   and   play   the   game   â&#x20AC;Ś   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   competi-­ tor  from  day  one.  He  takes  it  as  seriously  and   emotionally   as   anyone   on   the   team,   and   not   just   our   team   either   ...   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   an   overall   great  player.â&#x20AC;?

STEARNS

JOSH  STEA-­ RNS,   MUHS   SE-­ NIOR.   Notes:   Batted   .391   while   getting   on   base   at   a   .462   clip   and   show-­ ing   some   thump   with   three   doubles   and   a   go-­ahead   homerun   vs.   Milton   â&#x20AC;Ś  Drove  in  11  runs   and  scored  15  as  the   Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   No.   3   hitter   â&#x20AC;Ś   Committed   just   two   errors   in   a   sea-­ son   spent   mostly   at  

third  base.   Messengerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   was   a   corner-­ VWRQH , WKRXJKW ÂŤ +H ZDV GHÂżQLWHO\ RQH RI RXU EHVW LQÂżHOGHUV ÂŤ +H MXVW KLW WKH EDOO hard  all  season  â&#x20AC;Ś  He  gave  us  timely  hits  and   good   defense   â&#x20AC;Ś   He   was   a   good   leader.   He   was  quiet,  but  I  think  he  led  by  example  â&#x20AC;Ś   He  worked  hard  â&#x20AC;Ś  He  was  just  a  good  team-­ mate.â&#x20AC;? SAWYER   KAMMAN,   MOUNT   ABE   SENIOR.  Notes:  Pitching  against  the  Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   PRVW GLIÂżFXOW IRHV FRPSLOHG D  UHFRUG with  an  ERA  of  3.90  in  41  innings,  many  of   them  extended  by  defensive  mistakes,  while   allowing   11   walks   and   53   hits   and   striking   out  50  batters  â&#x20AC;Ś  Also  batted  .304  with  two  

KAMMAN

J. Â WINSLOW

doubles,  a   triple,   ÂżYH 5%,V DQG HLJKW runs   â&#x20AC;ŚThree-­year   varsity   team   mem-­ ber.   Stetsonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;He   was   obviously   my   best   pitcher,   and   has   been   for   two   years   â&#x20AC;Ś   He   drew   the   tough   as-­ signments   â&#x20AC;Ś   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been  an  outstanding   player   and   an   out-­ standing   leader   â&#x20AC;Ś   He  really  did  almost   everything   I   could   ask   â&#x20AC;Ś   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   great   competitor  and  gave   his  heart  and  soul  to   everything   he   did   to   baseball   here   for   four  years.â&#x20AC;? JOHN   WIN-­ SLOW,   OV   JU-­ NIOR.   Notes:   Al-­ ready   a   three-­year   varsity  player,  batted   .418   with   plenty   of   pop   and   scored   16   (See  Baseball, Page  17)


Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  —  PAGE  17

Baseball (Continued from  Page  16) runs   this   spring   …   Returned   for   his   second   year  as  the  everyday  shortstop,  but  took  over   as   the   No.   1   pitcher   down   the   stretch   when   injuries   sidelined   two   starting   hurlers   …   In   all,  picked  up  three  pitching  wins,  one  in  the   playoffs. Mitchell’s  Quotes:  “I  can’t  even  remember   an  error.  He  was  steady  at  shortstop  …  He  did   extremely  well  on  the  mound  …  He  picked  up   velocity  as  the  season  went  on.  He  had  a  neat   curveball  and  never  seemed  to  get  into  trouble   …   He   was   certainly   the   premier   power   hitter  on  the  team  …   He’s  a  super  kid.” MIKE   WIN-­ SLOW,   OV   SE-­ NIOR.   Notes:   Pro-­ vided   a   one-­two   punch   with   brother   John   by   batting   .423,  also  with  some   thump,   and   scoring   11   runs   …   Danger-­ ous   baserunner   …   Took  over  at  catcher   M.  WINSLOW this   spring   and   did   well   to   handle   a   variety   of   different   pitchers   as  injuries  struck  …  Worked  hard  to  become  a   good  defensive  catcher.   Mitchell’s  Quotes:  “He  got  thrown  into  the   catching  position  this  year.  I  asked  him  to  step   up,  and  he  did  ...  He’s  a  tough  competitor  …  

He’s solid   behind   three  runs  and  scored   the  plate  …  He  hits   ¿YH UXQV « +LW D the  ball  hard  …  He’s   home   run   vs.   Mis-­ probably   the   fast-­ sisquoi   that   was   the   est  kid  on  the  team.   only  one  hit  at  Mount   He’s   got   incredible   Abe   this   spring   …   wheels.” Made  only  one  error   JOSIAH   BEN-­ ZKLOHVWDUWLQJDW¿UVW OIT,   MUHS   SE-­ base  all  season.   NIOR.   Notes:   Ver-­ Stetson’s   Quotes:   VDWLOH ¿HOGHU ZKR “He   was   very   adept   played   shortstop,   at  hitting  the  ball  the   ULJKW ¿HOG DQG ¿UVW other   way,   moving   base   for   the   Tigers   guys   around   …   He   as   well   as   started   was   one   of   our   top   BENOIT BENWAY ¿YH JDPHV RQ WKH three   guys   all   year   mound  and  relieved  in  another  …  Batted  .345   at   the   plate   …   Defensively   he   did   a   nice   job   with  two  doubles  and  a  triple,  drove  in  13  runs   IRUXVDW¿UVWEDVH«+HNQRFNHGGRZQDWRQ and  scored  six.  Compiled  a  2-­4  pitching  record   of  throws  …  He’s  ab-­ in  41  innings  with  an  ERA  of  4.10,  beating  St.   solutely  a  tremendous   Johnsbury  and  Missisquoi  …  Had  key  hits  in   kid   to   have   on   the   wins  vs.  St.  Johnsbury  and  Rice.   team,  hustling  around   Messenger’s   Quotes:   “He   was   all-­around   in   practice   and   in   the   for  me,  wherever  I  needed  him  ...  He  was  Mr.   games.” Everything   …   He   was   ready   and   willing   to   SAM   MESSEN-­ do   whatever   I   asked   him.   I   thought   that   was   GER,   MUHS   SE-­ a  great  team  attitude  …  All  the  seniors  were   NIOR.  Notes:  Batted   great  leaders,  great  teammates  and  all  worked   .314  with  an  on-­base   hard  and  stuck  together  …  He  had  some  really   percentage   of   .357   nice  performances  out  there.”   …  Drove  in  11  runs,   AARON   BENWAY,   MOUNT   ABE   SE-­ VFRUHG¿YHDQGFDPH NIOR.   Notes:   Batted   .319   with   an   on-­base   up   with   several   key   percentage  of  .372  and  a  slugging  percentage  of   hits   and   big   games   .404  as  the  No.  2  hitter  in  the  order  …  Drove  in   over  the  course  of  the   MESSENGER

MCTV SCHEDULE  Channels  15  &  16 MCTV Channel 15 Tuesday, June 24   1  a.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II   5  a.m.   ACRPC  Hearing  on  Town  Plan   8  a.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   9:30  a.m.   Eckankar   10  a.m.   Selectboard SP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   1:45  p.m.   ACRPC  Hearing  on  Town  Plan   4:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs   6:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   7  p.m.   Selectboard  (LIVE)   11  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II  Wednesday, June 25   2  a.m.   Future  of  Retail  DP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   5:30  a.m.   Future  of  Retail   7:30  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   9  a.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board/Public  Affairs   10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Meetings   4:30  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   5  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios     6  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   6:31  p.m.   Eckankar:  A  Talk  by  Sri  Kemp   7  p.m.   Development  Review  Board  (DRB)   9  p.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs Thursday, June 26 DP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   2  a.m.   The  Future  of  Retail   4  a.m.   ACRPC  Hearing  on  Town  Plan   7:30  a.m.   DRB   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone DP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   Noon   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   4:30  p.m.   The  Way  Home  (GNAT)   5  p.m.   Public  Affairs   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   The  Future  of  Retail   8  p.m.   ACRPC  Meeting  10:45  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast  Friday, June 27   4  a.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9:05  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   10  a.m.   Selectboard  12:15  p.m.   DRB   2:15  p.m.   Public  Affairs

4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   The  Way  Home   6:30  p.m.   Eckankar   7  p.m.   ACRPC  Hearing  on  Town  Plan Saturday, June 28   Midnight   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II   6  a.m.   ACRPC  Hearing  on  Town  Plan   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9:01  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard   1  p.m.   ACRPC  Hearing  on  Town  Plan   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   6:30  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II  SP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   11  p.m.   The  Future  of  Retail Sunday, June 29  DP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   6  a.m.   The  Way  Home  (GNAT)   6:30  a.m.   Words  of  Peace   7  a.m.   Eckankar   7:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   8  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9  a.m.   Catholic  Mass   11  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service  12:45  p.m.   Public  Meetings/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service     5:30  p.m.   Eckankar   6:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   Catholic  Mass   7:31  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   8  p.m.   PSB  Hearing  on  Pipeline  Phase  II   11  p.m.   The  Future  of  Retail Monday, June 30   4  a.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs   8  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   10  a.m.   Selectboard SP 7RZQ2I¿FHVDQG5HF%XLOGLQJ&RPPLWWHH   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   DRB/Public  Affairs   10  p.m.   Eckankar:  A  Talk  by  Sri  Kemp  10:30  p.m.   The  Way  Home   11  p.m.   The  Future  of  Retail METV Channel 16 Tuesday, June 24   5  a.m.   The  Learning  Curve

VHDVRQ « ([FHOOHQW ¿HOGHU DW ¿UVW EDVH ZKR DOVR ¿OOHG LQ DW FDWFKHU IRU WZR JDPHV GXH WR injury …  Son  of  Coach  Messenger.   Messenger’s  Quotes:  “He  did  a  really  good   job  over  there  for  me  …  Sam  gave  me  every-­ thing   he   had   …   He   didn’t   leave   anything   in   the   dugout   …   He   had   some   good   games.   He   had  two  or  three  games  where  he  had  multiple   hits  …  He  had  some   clutch  hits.” WILL   CLAES-­ SENS,   OV   SE-­ NIOR.   Notes:   Slick   ¿HOGHU ZKR EDWWHG .271   and   scored   15   runs   …   Fixture   at   second   base   in   re-­ cent   seasons,   but   moved   to   shortstop   when   John   Winslow   pitched  without  skip-­ ping  a  beat  …  Start-­ ed   the   year   as   OV’s   CLAESSENS closer   but   became   a   starting  pitcher  when   injuries   struck   …   In   all,   tossed   two   complete   games  and  earned  a  win  and  two  saves. Mitchell’s   Quotes:   “He   turned   into   an   all-­ around  great  player  ...  He  had  the  slickest  hands   and  tools  …  You  just  didn’t  expect  him  to  make   an   error.  You   expected   him   to   make   the   play   every  time  …  He  improved  enough  where  he   went  from  the  No.  9  batter  up  to  the  No.  2  …   I  wish  I  could  have  nine  more  just  like  him.”

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please see  the  MCTV  website,  www.middleburycommunitytv.org,  for  changes  in  the  schedule;  MCTV  events,   classes  and  news;  and  to  view  many  programs  online.  Submit  listings  to  the  above  address,  or  call  388-­3062.

5:30  a.m.   Yoga   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0     7  a.m.   Vermont  Board  of  Education  11:15  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   1:12  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert  Chorale   Spring  Concert   2:30  pm..   VYO  Winter  Concert     3:30  p.m.   The  Learning  Curve   5:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   7:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   8:30  p.m.   VYO  Winter  Concert   11  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Wednesday, June 25   5:15  a.m.   François  Clemmons     Sings  Songs  of  Freedom   6:30  a.m.   Yoga  10:17  a.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert  Chorale   Noon   Middlebury  Five-­0  12:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   2:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   3:12  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert  Chorale   4:30  p.m.   VYO  Winter  Concert   6  p.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   7  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  p.m.   MUHS  Football  Championship  2013   8:35  p.m.   Local  Performance   10  p.m.   At  the  Isley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited Thursday, June 26   4:30  a.m.   Yoga   4:55  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Beatrix  Potter  Revisited   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6:30  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education   1:30  p.m.   François  Clemmons     Sings  Songs  of  Freedom   3:30  p.m.   Gardening  in  Vermont   4:30  p.m.   Yoga   5  p.m.   The  Learning  Curve   5:45  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert  Chorale   7:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   8:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board  10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0 Friday, June 27   5:30  a.m.   Yoga   6  a.m.   From  the  VMX   7:30  a.m.   The  Learning  Curve   8  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   10  a.m.   UD-­3  Board     Noon   François  Clemmons  Sings  Songs  of  

Freedom 3  p.m.   Michael  Nerney:  Addison     County  Prevention  Lecture   5  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   5:35  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6  p.m.   From  the  College   7:30  p.m.   ACORN   9:30  p.m.   Michael  Nerney:  Addison     County  Prevention  Lecture  11:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Saturday, June 28   5  a.m.   Yoga   5:30  a.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6  a.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society   9  a.m.   UD-­3  Board   10  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   Noon   The  Learning  Curve  12:30  p.m.   From  the  VMX:  Dear  Pina   1:30  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert  Chorale   6  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6:30  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7  p.m.   VYO  Chorus  and  Youth  Concert  Chorale   8:30  p.m.   MUHS  Football  Championship  2013   10  p.m.   Rumbafrica Sunday, June 29   6:35  a.m.   Yoga   7  a.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  a.m.   At  the  Ilsley   9:25  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   10  a.m.   New  England  Review   1  p.m.   Local  Arts  and  Performance   3:30  p.m.   The  Learning  Curve   4  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   4:30  p.m.   From  the  VMX   7  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  p.m.   New  England  Review  10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   11  p.m.   The  Learning  Curve  Monday, June 30   4:30  a.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   5:35  a.m.   Yoga   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education  12:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   1  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   2  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   4:30  p.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   5:30  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   9  p.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)


PAGE  18  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

WAY!TO!GO!"!OTTERS! WAY!TO!GO!"!OTTERS! So!ball Division ll Champions!

OTTER VALLEY UNION HIGH SCHOOL Taylor Aines Olivia Bloomer Bri!any Bushey Kelli Jerome Megan McKeighan Cortney Poljacik Laura Beth Roberts Margaret Santell Maggie Smith Danielle Eddy Maia Edmunds Amy Jones Hannah Williams Courtney Bushey Coach: Pa!ie Candon

Congratulations

from the Addison Independent & the Reporter ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

The

REPORTER

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Congratulations OV GIRLS! $127+(5<($52)*5($7'($/667$57612: from Wimett Trading Co.

Congratulations! Otter Valley Softball on a great season!

Congratulations to Otter Valley Softball.

2014 DII State Champs! %8,&.&(1785<

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Extended Cab, 4x4, Leather, Loaded, WAS $5,995Â&#x2021;12:

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4WD, Leather, 3rd Seat, NICE! 9:3$66$7*/:$*21 :$6Â&#x2021;12: 2002 VOLVO V70 XC $XWRlike /RDGHGÂ&#x2021;:$6 In honor of your win, Vermont Sun would to award team members a responsible for any inaccuracies, Loaded, Leather, Moon Roof, Heated Seats Dealer not half truths or any other foolishness! 2-­week 12:21/< Complimentary Unlimited Membership!*  WAS $4,995Â&#x2021;12:

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Wimett Trading Company *  Please  start  your  free  membership  by  July  31,  2014

AFFORDABLE, SAFE & RELIABLE $MFWFSMZMPDBUFEBU.BJO4USFFUt.JEEMFCVSZ 75 USED CARS AND TRUCKS Â&#x2021;YHUPRQWVXQFRP at the Big White Barn in Leicester We also buy cars, locate specialty David Wimett, 25 Years Experience orders & consider consignments C. Michael Jackman, 40 Years Experience Call Mike or Dave for an appointment 5RXWHÂ&#x2021;/HLFHVWHU97Â&#x2021;ZLPHWWWUDGLQJFR#JPDLOFRP

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420  Grove  Street,  Brandon 802.247.6305

Front  Row:  Wendy  Andrews,  Practice  Leader;  Becky  McArdle,  MA;  Laura  Rideout,  Medical  Records;  Katelyn  Delo-­ rme,  Receptionist;  Helen  Stanley,  RN;  Robin  Myers,  ANP.  Back  Row:  Gail  Barr,  Receptionist;  Alyssa  Potter,  MA;  Carolyn   Pallescki,  Receptionist;  Susan  Wallin,  RN;  Tammy  Snyder,  RN;  Nancy  Cotnoir,  LNP;  John  Dick,  MD;  George  Fjeld,  MD.

*URYH6WUHHW%UDQGRQ9HUPRQW RU ID[ZZZFKFUURUJ

BRANDON  MEDICAL   CENTER,   formerly   Brandon   Internal   Medicine   and   Otter   Creek   Family   Health,   have   merged   to   form   a   friendly   team   of   providers   to   in-­ clude   John   Dick,   M.D.,   George   Fjeld,   M.D.,   Robin   Myers,   ANP,   and   recently   joining   us   is   Judi   Ellwood,   APRN.  We   are  also  occasionally  joined  by  Dr.  Mark   Mueller  and  Dr.  Brad  Berryhill,  both  from   RXU&DVWOHWRQRI¿FH   Our   new   state-­of-­the-­art   facility   pro-­ vides   a   convenient   location   with   ample   parking.  Brandon     Medical   Center   of-­ fers  a  full  range  of  health  care  services,   including   preventative   health   care   and   management   of   serious   or   chronic   ill-­ nesses.   We   welcome   new   patients   as   well   as  old  friends  to  call  our  friendly  support   staff   to   schedule   an   appointment   at   our   convenient  hours.  We  schedule  appoint-­ ments  between  the  hours  of  8  a.m.  to  8   p.m.   on   Mondays,   8   a.m.   to   5   p.m.   on   Tuesdays,  Wednesdays  and  Fridays,  as   well  as  7  a.m.  to  5  p.m.  on  Thursdays.   Brandon  Medical  Center  is  a  federally   TXDOL¿HGKHDOWKFDUHIDFLOLW\DQGDFFHSWV most  area  insurance  plans.  If  you  do  not   have  insurance,  we  will  assist  you  in  mak-­ LQJ SD\PHQW DUUDQJHPHQWV WKDW ¿W \RXU budget,  to  include  a  sliding  fee  scale.  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  19

VUHS  student  delivers  winning  speech VERGENNES   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The  Vergennes   Lions  Club  has  had  a  very  busy  win-­ ter   and   spring,   donating   thousands   of   dollars   to   area   organizations   and   individuals.   In   order   to   do   this,   the   FOXE KROGV YDULRXV UDIĂ&#x20AC;HV DQG DVNV area  businesses  for  assistance.  Club   3UHVLGHQW6KDQRQ$WNLQVVDLGWKDWLI it  werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  for  the  area  businesses  the   Lions   wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   able   to   help   all   those  that  they  do  now. It  started  off  with  the  club  donat-­ ing   $2,000   to   the   Vergennes   Com-­ munity  Food  Shelf  to  help  purchase   food   for   those   in   need.   Maryanne   Castimore,   representing   the   food   VKHOIWKDQNHGWKHFOXEIRUWKHGRQD-­ tion  and  mentioned  that  the  number   of   households   receiving   food   on   a   monthly  basis  has  nearly  doubled  in   the  past  few  years. The   next   project   was   the   annual   Âł6SHDN2XW´FRPSHWLWLRQ7KLV\HDU four   young   women   from  Vergennes   Union   High   School   presented   speeches   based   on   Lions   Club   In-­ ternational  President  Barry  Palmerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   VORJDQ RI Âł)ROORZ <RXU 'UHDP´ +DQQDK +DWFK ZRQ ÂżUVW SODFH RYHU her  fellow  presenters  Stephanie  An-­ derson,  Julie  Grace  and  Cassi  King.   Hannah  went  on  to  the  district  (Ver-­ mont)   competition   where   she   came   in  second  place.  This  competition  re-­ sults  in  cash  prizes  for  the  top  three   VSHDNHUV$GYLVHU&RRNLH6WHSDQLWLV helps  the  students  prepare  each  year. The   club   also   presented   $500   to   Vergennes   Union   Elementary   School   principal   June   Sargent   to   help  strengthen  the  reading  program  

*UNE  n *ULY  s   DAILY -IDDLEBURY 2ECREATION &IELDS Join us for the 2014 edition of the ever popular Panther Soccer Camp. Campers will receive instruction from Dave Saward, Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Head Soccer coach at Middlebury College and Ron McEachen, Retired Coach of the Skidmore College Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Soccer Team. Standout local high school and college players will also assist in the camp. Open to all children age 6-12 $125 per camper â&#x20AC;&#x201C; includes a camp T-Shirt. Campers must bring a ball. Shin guards are required. Registration forms available in the Middlebury Parks and Recreation office. HANNAH  HATCH,  A  student  at  Vergennes  Union  High  School,  delivers   her  winning  speech  in  the  Lions  Clubâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  annual  Speak  Out  competition;Íž   Hatch  went  on  to  take  second  place  at  the  state  level.  Monetary  prizes   for  the  top  three  speakers  are  among  the  many  contributions  the  Ver-­ gennes  Lions  Club  makes  to  the  community  each  year.

DW WKH VFKRRO 6DUJHQW VSRNH DERXW the  competition  to  read  and  the  tre-­ mendous   success   that   she   has   seen   with   students   surpassing   what   she   had  originally  expected. Elderly   Services   Director   Joanne   &RUEHWWVSRNHWRWKHFOXEDERXWKHU program   and   encouraged   members   WRKHOSLGHQWLI\IRONVLQWKHFRPPX-­ QLW\ WKDW PLJKW EHQH¿W IURP XVH RI the  program.  She  also  mentioned  the   constant  need  for  additional  funding   to   help   meet   the   costs   of   the   pro-­ JUDP$WNLQVSUHVHQWHG&RUEHWWZLWK $1,000  to  help.

In  addition,   the   club   sponsored   the  regular  Red  Cross  Blood  Drives,   made   donations   for   fuel   assistance,   built   handicap-­accessible   ramps   to   homes  in  Bristol  and  Vergennes,  and   made  a  $1,000  donation  to  the  Boys   and  Girls  Club  of  Greater  Vergennes. The   club   also   participated   in   the   American  Legion-­sponsored  Memo-­ ULDO'D\SDUDGHZLWKDĂ&#x20AC;RDWVHOOLQJ Ă&#x20AC;DJV DQG IRRG DQG FRQGXFWLQJ LWV DQQXDOFDUUDIĂ&#x20AC;H7KHZLQQHURIWKH car   was   Sara   Leach.   The   monetary   ZLQQHUV ZHUH 3KLO 2Âś%ULHQ -U DQG Julie  Norton.  

Orton Family Foundation names latest Heart & Soul community MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Laconia,   a   FLW\LQ1HZ+DPSVKLUHÂśV/DNHV5H-­ gion,  has  partnered  with  the  Middle-­ EXU\EDVHG 2UWRQ )DPLO\ )RXQGD-­ WLRQ WR HPEDUN RQ DQ LQWHQVLYH DQG inclusive  effort  to  build  a  better  fu-­ WXUH 2UWRQ ([HFXWLYH 'LUHFWRU 'D-­ YLG/HFNH\DQQRXQFHG Laconia   (pop.   17,060)   will   un-­ GHUWDNHD&RPPXQLW\+HDUW 6RXO program  to  develop  a  new  communi-­ ty  vision  for  a  city  master  plan.  The   18-­month   process   includes   broad   outreach  to  residents  and  businesses   in   partnership   with   NH   Listens,   a   civic   engagement   initiative   of   the   Carsey  Institute  at  the  University  of   New  Hampshire. Âł7KH 2UWRQ )DPLO\ )RXQGDWLRQ

2014 Panther Soccer Camp

is  delighted  to  join  with  Laconia  in   what  will  be  a  transformative  and,  at   times,  challenging  community-­wide   H[SHULHQFH´/HFNH\VDLGÂł%\KLJK-­ lighting   the   strengths   that   give   the   city  its  unique  character  and  identi-­ fying   the   shared   values   that   matter   WKHPRVWWR/DFRQLDQVWKH+HDUW  Soul   process   will   provide   the   city   with  a  road  map  for  the  future  where   actions   and   decisions   are   driven   by   what   residents   most   value   about   WKHLUFLW\´ Laconia  is  the  10th  town  to  engage   LQ D IRUPDO +HDUW  6RXO SURJUDP +HDUW  6RXO LV WKH 2UWRQ )DPLO\ Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   signature   barn-­raising   approach   to   community   planning   and   development.   By   employing   a  

proven  process  that  increases  partic-­ LSDWLRQUHVLGHQWVSOD\DNH\UROHLQ shaping  the  future  of  their  communi-­ WLHV+HDUW 6RXOUHFRQQHFWVSHRSOH with  what  they  love  most  about  their   towns   and   translates   those   personal   and   emotional   connections   into   a   blueprint  for  future  community  deci-­ sions. For  more  information  and  updates   DERXW/DFRQLDœV+HDUW 6RXOSURM-­ ect  visit  www.orton.org.

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PAGE  20  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

State  offers  help  upgrading   home  drinking  water  systems MONTPELIER  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  A  new  program   is   available   to   help   Vermont   home-­ owners  with  the  cost  of  repairing  or   replacing   failed   residential   waste-­ water   and   drinking   water   systems.   The   program,   established   by   the   Vermont  Legislature  in  2012,  assists   9HUPRQWHUV ZLWK OLPLWHG ÂżQDQFLDO resources   to   cope   with   increasingly   expensive  failed  systems. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   On-­site   Revolving   Loan   3URJUDPÂżOOVDFULWLFDOQHHG´DFFRUG-­ ing   to   David   Mears,   Commissioner   of   the   Vermont   Department   of   Environmental   Conservation.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   is   a   program   aimed   at   Vermont   homeowners,  one  that  provides  low-­ FRVW ÂżQDQFLQJ WR WKRVH IDFHG ZLWK a   failing   residential   wastewater   or   drinking   water   system.   It   is   unique   in   that   it   provides   a   viable   option   to  those  who  demonstrate  need,  but   who   have   already   been   rejected   by   WUDGLWLRQDOÂżQDQFLQJLQWKHFRPPHU-­ FLDOPDUNHWSODFH´ The  program  includes  guidelines  to   determine  eligibility.  These  include:   The  system  must  be  failed;Íž  the  loan  

recipient  must  reside  in  the  residence   on   a   year-­round   basis;͞   the   recipient   PXVWKDYHEHHQGHQLHG¿QDQFLQJIRU QHHGHGUHSDLUE\DWOHDVWRQH¿QDQF-­ ing   entity;͞   and   the   gross   household   income  must  be  equal  to  or  less  than   200  percent  of  the  statewide  average   median  income  ($129,260  for  2014). The   standard   term   of   the   loans   is   15   years   but   can   be   extended   to   20   years  where  affordability  is  an  issue,   and  the  interest  rate  is  3  percent.  The   loans   are   secured   by   a   lien   on   the   property.     The   On-­site   Loan   Program   is   funded   and   administered   by   the   Agency   of   Natural   Resources,   Department   of   Environmental   Conservation,   with   loan   under-­ writing   and   servicing   provided   by   the   Opportunities   Credit   Union   in   Winooski. To   learn   more   about   the   program   details,  or  to  apply,  visit  http://drink-­ ingwater.vt.gov/fundingonsiteloan. htm   or   contact   Bryan   Redmond   at   802-­585-­4900  or  by  email  at  bryan. redmond@state.vt.us.

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PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUNDâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; Hi!  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   Tennessee.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   a   fun,  affectionate,  and  playful   fellow  who  would  be  a  great   ÂżWIRUDQ\IDPLO\,ÂśPIULHQGO\ and   entertaining   and   just   a   real  joy  to  have  around! Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   just   a   real   cool   kitty   ZKR ZRXOG ORYH WR ÂżQG D forever   home   where   I   can   snooze   in   the   sun   and   snuggle   with   you   on   the   sofa.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   loyal   and   sweet   and  would  love  to  be  a  part   of  your  family!    

fence, and even I think thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s a pretty dumb thing to do. Then they start to mutter about a pen by the back door, or a tie-out. I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t know what those are, but I donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t think I like the sound of them. However, when we all settle down in the evening to watch TV, and I snuggle up with my head on my masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lap, they forgive me even that misdemeanor, and I know I am loved again. And I did hear someone say that there are no bad dogs, just bad owners â&#x20AC;Ś ? Lindsay and Ian Hart Middlebury

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Hi!  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  Peanut.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  playful   and   loving   and   just   a   real   friendly   fellow!   And   super   cute,  wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  you  agree?   I   am   young   and   very   SOD\IXO DQG ZRXOG EHQHÂżW from   lots   of   good   exercise   and  some  basic  obedience   training.  I  love  to  ride  in  the   car  &  go  for  walks.  Mostly,  I   love  to  be  with  my  people.   Come  say  hello  and  see   how  adorable  I  am!  

Arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  I   just   adorable?   You  should  come  check  me   out!  Me  and  all  of  my  cute,   fun  and  playful  friends!  We   are  ready  to  go  and  would   make   wonderful   additions   to  your  family!  Come  meet   us   today!   Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   fall   head   over  heels  in  love!

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  21

%HQHÂżWVRIKHDWSXPSVWDONVHWDW,OVOH\ MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   There   will   be   a  free  public  presentation  on  cold  cli-­ mate  heat  pumps  at  7  p.m.  on  Wednes-­ day,   June   25,   at   the   Ilsley   Library   Community   Room   in   Middlebury.   This  informative  presentation  will  be   given   by   Gary   Barnett,   member   of   the  Acorn   Renewable   Energy   Co-­op   board,   and   Rick   Shappy   of   Middle-­ buryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Structural  Energy  Corp.   Due   to   some   recent   breakthroughs   in  air  source  heat  pump  technology,  a   whole   new   category   of   cold   climate   heat   pumps   that   really   work   has   hit   the   market   in   cold   northern   climates   (like   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s).   These   heat   pumps   can  save  homeowners  money  on  their   heating  bills  while  reducing  their  de-­ pendence   on   fossil   fuels   at   the   same   time.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mini-­splitâ&#x20AC;?   cold   climate   heat   pumps   can   cut   heating   bills   dramati-­ cally  and  make  a  home  more  comfort-­ able  year  round.  Better  yet,  these  units  

FDQ HDVLO\ EH LQVWDOOHG DV UHWURÂżWV LQ existing  homes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cold   climate   heat   pumps   are   a   relatively   recent   arrival   on   the   mar-­ ket,  so  a  lot  of  people  still  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know   anything  about  them,â&#x20AC;?  says  Greg  Pahl,   Acorn  Energy  Co-­op  president.     For   many   years,   air   source   heat   pumps  have  used  an  electrically  pow-­ ered   refrigeration   cycle   to   move   and   enhance  latent  heat  from  cold  outside   air   into   indoor   living   spaces   during   the  winter.  Recent  advances  in  ASHP   technology   have   improved   perfor-­ mance  levels  under  cold  weather  con-­ ditions  down  to  minus  13  Fahrenheit,   making   cold   climate   heat   pumps   (a   new  ASHP  subcategory)  an  effective   space  heating  alternative  for  Vermont   and  all  northern  U.S.  regions.   In  the  summer,  CCHPs  reverse  the   process   and   cool   a   home   like   an   air-­ conditioner  by  removing  heat  from  in-­

Bristol BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Lawrence  Memorial   Library  at  40  North  St.  presents  Pre-­ school  Story  Times  in  the  Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Room  (but  siblings  of  ALL  ages  are   welcome)   on   Thursdays   from   10:30   to  11:30,  starting  on  June  26.  Science   Story  Times  explore  the  world  in  sto-­ ries,  movement  and  songs  with  pup-­ pets   and   hands-­on   activities.   Story   themes   include   rockets,   potions,   ed-­ ible  concoctions,  shadows,  a  marble   run  and  robots.  A  picnic  lunch  will  be   provided.   Evening   Story   Time   is   back   by   popular  demand  on  Wednesday,  July   16,   from   6:30   to   7:30   p.m.     Bring   along   a   stuffed   animal   or   a   doll   to   stay  for  a  night  of  science  fun  at  the   library.  Next  morning,  they  will  â&#x20AC;&#x153;tellâ&#x20AC;?   you  about  it  in  pictures. Family   Events   at   Holley   Hall   on   Main   Street,   sponsored   by   the   Four   Town   Libraries   of   Starksboro,   Bris-­

door  air  and  expelling  it  to  the  outside.   But  a  CCHP  is  much  quieter  than  the   typical   window-­mounted   air-­condi-­ tioner  and  uses  less  electricity. Over   the   course   of   a   typical   Ver-­ mont   winter,   if   properly   installed,   heat   pumps   can   deliver   up   to   three   units  of  heat  for  every  unit  of  electric-­ LW\ XVHG UHVXOWLQJ LQ VLJQL¿FDQW IXHO cost   savings,   according   to   the   U.   S.   Department  of  Energy.  Consequently,   mini-­split   CCHPs   can   provide   heat   DW KLJKHU HI¿FLHQF\ DQG ORZHU FRVWV than  conventional  electrical  resistance   heating,   oil,   or   propane   heating   sys-­ tems. There   will   be   time   for   Q&A   after   the   presentations.   Light   refreshments   will  be  provided,  and  the  general  pub-­ lic  is  welcome. For  more  information  or  to  join  the   Acorn  Energy  Co-­op,  visit  acornener-­ gycoop.com  or  call  385-­1911.

read  at   www.lawrencelibrary.net   or   call   453-­2366   and   ask   for   Marita   Bathe-­Schine  for  more  details.  Each   book   read   or   workshop   attended   equals  one  punch  and  a  chance  to  win   a  prize.   These   programs   are   supported   by   the  Vermont  Department  of  Libraries,   Five  Town   Friends   of   the  Arts,  Ver-­ mont  Bicycle  Touring,  and  Recycled   Reading. Check   out   the   website   addison-­ countyreaders.org   for   information   about   Dolly   Partonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Imagination   Library,  a  program  that  sends  a  book   each  month  to  the  home  of  each  reg-­ istered  child  (birth  through  5  years  of   age)  at  no  cost  to  the  family.  Children   of   different   ages   receive   different   titles;Íž  the  books  are  carefully  selected   and  are  the  childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  to  keep.  At  the   ZHEVLWH\RXFDQÂżQGRXWKRZWREH-­ come  involved  and  how  to  donate.

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tol,  Lincoln   and   Monkton,   include   Leap,   Slither,   Flap   on   Thursday,   July   10,   at   10:30   a.m.   with   the  Ver-­ mont   Institute   of   Science   and   The   Physics  of  Magic  by  Magician  Tom   Verner  on  Monday,  Aug.  11,  at  2  p.m. Programs  for  youth  include  Week-­ ly  WednesdayWorkshops  from  2  to   4:30   p.m.   starting   June   25   and   run-­ ning  through  July  30  for  ages  8  and   up.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Experiment   and   Exploreâ&#x20AC;?   the   following  topics:  Bottle  Rockets,  the   Marvelous  Marble  Run,  Lego  Robot-­ ics,  Edible  Concoctions,  Potions  and   More,   and   Toy   Hacking.   Sign-­up   is   encouraged   so   there   will   be   enough   room  and  equipment  available. Power   up   with   books.   Come   to   Lawrence  Memorial  Library  and  sign   XS IRU WKH 6XPPHU 5HDGLQJ 5DIĂ&#x20AC;H There   will   be   a   weekly   drawing   for   fun   prizes.   Pick   up   a   punch   card   or   sign  up  online  to  keep  track  of  books  

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PAGE  22  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

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Go  Green  with  us. Call  for  a  FREE  on-­site  evaluation


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  23

Learn  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;How  They  Did  It  in  New  Franceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  at  history  program ADDISON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   At   the   Chimney   Point   State   Historic   Site   in  Addi-­ son  starting  Saturday,  June  28,  site   interpreter   Karl   Crannell   offers   WKHÂżUVWRIWKUHHKDQGVRQPRQWKO\ Fourth   Saturday   programs,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blast   from  the  Past:  How  They  Did  It  in   New   France.â&#x20AC;?   The   program   runs   between   1:30   and   3:30   p.m.   The   June  program  looks  at  the  clothing   of  the  French  soldiers  who  served  

at  the  French  fort  at  Chimney  Point   in   the   1730s   and   what   the   French   settlers  (habitants)  here  until  1759   might  have  worn.   Crannell   will   work   on   a   French   soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   white   coat,   which   was   part   of   the   annual   clothing   allow-­ ance   and   used   on   special   occa-­ VLRQV $ WDLORU ZRXOG ÂżW WKH FRDW to  size.  Last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  coat,  dirty  and   threadbare,   would   be   mended,  

turned  inside  out,  and  used  for  ev-­ eryday.   Crannell   will   demonstrate   the  techniques  used  by  18th-­centu-­ U\WDLORUVWRWUDQVIRUPDQLOO¿WWLQJ coat   into   something   a   French   sol-­ dier  would  be  proud  to  wear. Visitors   will   be   invited   to   try   their   hand   at   hand-­sewing   and   some  might  be  asked  to  try  on  parts   RIWKHFRDWWRVHHKRZLW¿WV&KLO-­ dren  are  invited  to  don  items  in  the  

French  colonial   dress   up   basket.   Crannell  also  will  discuss  some  of   WKH UHFHQW DUFKDHRORJLFDO ¿QGLQJV and   what   they   reveal   about   the   long  and  important  French  history   at  Chimney  Point. Other  Fourth  Saturday  programs   are  July  26  and  Aug.  23. The   Chimney   Point   State   His-­ toric   Site   is   located   at   8149   VT   Route   17,   at   the   foot   of   the   new  

Lake  Champlain   Bridge.   It   pres-­ ents   the   history   of   the   three   earli-­ est  cultures  here  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Native  Ameri-­ can,   French   Colonial,   and   early   American.   Call   802-­759-­2412   for   information.   Admission   is   $5   for   adults   and   free   for   children   under   15.   The   site   is   open   Wednesdays   through  Sundays  and  Monday  hol-­ idays  through  Oct.  13,  9:30  a.m.  to   5  p.m.

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I  will... Call Katie Grocery  Shop 802-388-1254 Run  Errands or Drive  to  appointments kbs10@comcast.net Light  Housekeeping Do  Laundry Let  me  make  your   Mend  &  Sew house  tidy  &  cheerful   Gift  Wrap for  you  to  come home  to! &  more!

TREE SERVICE

MADE TO ORDER                             Available  at  the                                Addison  Independent in  the  Marble  Works,  Middlebury

BROWNâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TREE & CRANE SERVICE Dangerous Trees Cut & Removed Stumps Removed Trusses Set

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ROOFING

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roofing Michael Doran

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TREE SERVICE Daveâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Tree Removal 6WXPS*ULQGLQJ7ULPPLQJ7UHH(YDOXDWLRQ 6WRUP'DPDJH)LUHZRRG /RW&OHDULQJ

As  seen  at  Addison  County  Field  Days!

6HUYLQJ Area /DNHV

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Dangerous trees our specialty!!

Phone (802) 537-3555

SEPTIC

STORAGE Storage  Units  Available! Boat,  Car  &  R.V.  Storage

Full  Excavation Service Middlebury,  VT

Trees Trimmed Crane Service Grain Bins Set

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TANK  &  CESSPOOL  PUMPING ELECTRONIC  TANK  LOCATING TANK  &  LEACH  FIELD  INSPECTIONS CAMERA  INSPECTIONS NEW  SYSTEMS  INSTALLED ALL  SEPTIC  SYSTEM  REPAIRS DRAIN  &  PIPE  CLEANING

FREE  ESTIMATES   FOR  TREE   SERVICES

Climate  Control   Coming  Soon!  

U-­Haul Box  Dealer

NEW  HAVEN SELF  STORAGE

Now  owned  by  Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Auto  &  Towing 2877  ETHAN  ALLEN  HWY.  (RT.7) 1(:+$9(197Â&#x2021;  

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WEDDING Stop in to the Addison Independent office in the Marble Works to view a wonderful selection of

Wedding Invitations for Your Special Day!

388-4944

    For  more  info  call      


PAGE  24  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

E G S A A R L E A G KITS Now Available at ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  25

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Notice

Public  Meetings

DOG  TEAM   CATERING.   Seating   up   to   300,   plus   bar   available,   Middlebury   VFW.   Full   menus.   802-­388-­4831,   www.dogteamcatering.net.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   SATURDAY:   Discussion   Meeting  9:00-­10:00  AM  at  the   Middlebury  United  Methodist   PARTY   RENTALS;   CHI-­ Church.   Discussion   Meeting   NA,   flatware,   glassware,   10:00-­11:00   AM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   linens.   Delivery   available.   Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Be-­ ginnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Meeting   6:30-­7:30   802-­388-­4831. PM.   These   three   meetings   are  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   Cards  of  Thanks Middlebury. ST.  JUDE,  THANK  YOU  for   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   prayers  answered.  M.M. MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   MONDAY:   As   Bill   Sees   It   THANKS  HOLY  FATHER  and   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM.   Big   St.  Jude  for  prayers  answered.   Book  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.   V.B. Both  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Public  Meetings

ADULT  ALL-­RECOVERY   Group   Meeting   for   anyone   over  18  who  is  struggling  with   addiction  disorders.  Tuesdays,   3-­4  p.m.  at  the  Turning  Point   Center.  A  great  place  to  meet   with  your  peers  who  are  in  re-­ covery.  Bring  a  friend  in  recov-­ ery.  For  info  call  802-­388-­4249   or  802-­683-­5569  or  visit  www. turningpointaddisonvt.org.

Services

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   NORTH   FERRISBURGH   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   Daily   Reflections  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   PM,  at  the  United  Methodist   Church,  Old  Hollow  Rd.

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   FRIDAY:  Discussion  Meeting   Noon-­1:00  PM  at  The  Turning   Point   in   The   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   TUESDAY:   11th   Step   Meet-­ ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  ALATEEN   Group.  Both  held  at  Turning   Point,   228   Maple   Street.   12   Step  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   12   Step   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   PM.  Both  held  at  The  Turning   THURSDAY:  Big  Book  Meet-­ Point  Center  in  The  Marble-­ ing   Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   works,  Middlebury. Turning   Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Speaker   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   PM  at  St.  Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,   SUNDAY:   12   Step   Meeting   Main  St.(On  the  Green). 9:00-­10:00   AM   held   at   the   Middlebury  United  Methodist   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Church  on  N.  Pleasant  Street.   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   Discussion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00   WEDNESDAY:   Big   Book   PM  held  at  The  Turning  Point   Meeting   7:15-­8:15   AM   is   Center   in   The   Marbleworks,   held  at  the  Middlebury  United   Middlebury. Methodist  Church  on  N.  Pleas-­ ant  Street.  Discussion  Meet-­ ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   NEW   HAVEN   MEETINGS:   Meeting  5:30-­6:30  PM.  Both   Monday,   Big   Book   Meeting   held   at   The   Turning   Point   7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the  Congre-­ Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   gational  Church,  New  Haven   Middlebury. Village  Green.

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   RIPTON   MEETINGS:   Mon-­ day,   As   Bill   Sees   It   Meet-­ ing  7:15-­8:15  AM.  Thursday,   Grapevine  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   PM.  Both  held  at  Ripton  Fire-­ house,  Dugway  Rd.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   VERGENNES   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.   Friday,   Dis-­ cussion   Meeting   8:00-­9:00   PM.   Both   held   at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church,   Park   St.   Tuesday,   Discussion  Meeting  7:00-­8:00   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   PM,   at   the   Congregational   BRANDON   MEETINGS:   Church,  Water  St. Monday,  Discussion  Meeting   7:30-­8:30   PM.   Wednesday,   ARE   YOU   BOTHERED   BY   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drinking?   Open-­ PM.  Friday,  12  Step  Meeting   ing   Our   Hearts   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   7:00-­8:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   Al-­Anon   Group   meets   each   St.  Thomas  Episcopal  Church,   Wednesday   at   7:15   p.m.   at   RT  7  South. the  Turning  Point  Center  in  the   Marbleworks   in   Middlebury.   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Anonymous   and   confiden-­ BRISTOL  MEETINGS:  Sun-­ tial,  we  share  our  experience,   day,   Discussion   Meeting   strength  and  hope  to  solve  our   4:00-­5:00   PM.   Wednesday,   common  problems. 12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.  Friday,  Big  Book  Meeting,   NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ 6:00-­7:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   BURY:   Mondays,   6pm,   held   Federated  Church,  Church  St. at  The  Turning   Point  Center   located  in  The  Marble  Works.

Services

Services

The Foundation for Alcoholism Research is seeking volunteers to help out in Bristol during the Fourth of July festivities. Choose from any of the following: K]lmh>9Jl]flYf\lYZd]k%/2,-Y&e& KlY^^l`]>9JZggl`^gjY^]o`gmjkYlqgmj[gfn]fa]f[]& K]ddb]o]djqYf\jY^Ă&#x203A;]YZa[q[d]& :j]Yc\gof>9Jl]flYf\lYZd]k%,2((h&e& Hd]Yk][Ydd+00%/(,,lgka_fmh&L`Yfcqgm Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r i s a c o l l a b o rat i o n b e t we e n RSV P a n d t h e Un i te d Way o f Addi s o n C o u n t y. P le a s e c a l l 388-7044 t o f i n d o u t mo re a b o u t t h e doze n s o f v o l u n te e r o pp o r t u n i t ie s t h at a re c u r re n t l y av a i l a ble .

MAKING  RECOVERY  EAS-­ IER  (MRE).  Starting  January   15,   5:30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  7:00   PM   at   The   Turning  Point  Center.  This  will   be  a  facilitated  group  meeting   for   those   struggling   with   the   decision   to   attend   12-­step   programs.   It   will   be   limited   to  explaining  and  discussing   our  feelings  about  the  12-­step   programs   to   create   a   better   understanding   of   how   they   can  help  a  person  in  recovery   on   his  /  her   lifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   journey.   A   certificate  will  be  issued  at  the   end  of  all  the  sessions.  Please   bring  a  friend  in  recovery  who   is  also  contemplating  12-­step   programs.

TEEN  ALL-­RECOVERY   Group   Meeting   for   anyone   15-­18  years  old  who  is  strug-­ gling   with   addiction   disor-­ ders.   Tuesdays,   4-­5   p.m.   at   the   Turning   Point   Center.  A   great  place  to  meet  with  your   NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ peers   who   are   in   recovery.   BURY:  Fridays,  7:30pm,  held   Bring   a   friend   in   recovery.   at   the   Turning   Point   Center   For  info  call  802-­388-­4249  or   located  in  the  Marble  Works. 802-­683-­5569   or   visit   www. turningpointaddisonvt.org.

Services

Services

Â&#x2021; Â&#x201E;SHUZRUGÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPSHUDG Â&#x2021; LQWHUQHWOLVWLQJIRUXSWRLVVXHVÂ&#x2021;PLQLPXPLQVHUWLRQV &DVK LQ RQ RXU IRU UDWHV 3D\ IRU  LVVXHV JHW WK LVVXH IUHH ([DPSOH $ ZRUG DG LV MXVW  $Q DG SODFHG IRU FRQVHFXWLYH LVVXHV 0RQGD\V  7KXUV GD\V  LV UXQ WK WLPH IUHH &RVW LV  IRU  LVVXHV LQFOXGHV   LQWHUQHW FKDUJH 6SHFLDO  IRU  UDWHV QRW YDOLG IRU WKH IROORZLQJ FDWHJRULHV +HOS :DQWHG 6HUYLFHV 2SSRUWXQLWLHV 5HDO (VWDWH :RRG KHDW $WWQ )DUPHUV  )RU 5HQW 

Name: Address: Phone:

Services

plains  that   he   volunteers   simply   because   he  enjoys  helping  people.    For  the  past  25   years,   he   has   volunteered   at   the   Addison   County   Court   Diversion   and   Community   Justice  Projects  where  they  consider  him  to   be   invaluable   for   his   ability   to   work   with   offenders  and  at-­risk  youth.    The  American   Red  Cross  organizers  are  equally  thrilled  to   have  him  as  a  member  of  their  Blood  Drive   registration  team,  explaining:    â&#x20AC;&#x153;David  is  an   exceptional  volunteer  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  not  only  is  he  good   natured,   but   he   is   skillful   with   a   comput-­ er,   and   has   a   wonderful   sense   of   humor!â&#x20AC;?     Thank  you  for  volunteering  ,  David.  

D E A D L I N E S Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

CATEGORIES Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost & Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities

Work Wanted Public Meetings** For Sale Help Wanted For Rent Want to Rent Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals

Spotlight with large $2

** No charge for these ads

Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted Adoption

BOAT  DOCK   REPAIR   and   construction.  Experienced  and   reliable.   Fully   insured.   Call   802-­349-­6579,  Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Prop-­ erty  Management,  Leicester,   Vermont. CHAIN  SAW  CHAINS  sharp-­ ened.  Call  802-­759-­2095.

David  Preble,   of   Middlebury,   ex-­

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

RATES

Public  Meetings

Services

Volunteer for FAR on Independence Day!

Email:

Public  Meetings

CONSTRUCTION:  ADDI-­ TIONS,   RENOVATIONS,   new   construction,   drywall,   carpentry,   painting,   flooring,   roofing,   pressure   washing,   driveway  sealing.  All  aspects   of  construction,  also  property   maintenance.   Steven   Fifield   802-­989-­0009.

ADDISON INDEPENDENT 58 Maple St., Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

The Independent assumes no Ă&#x20AC;QDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUHUURUV LQDGVEXWZLOOUHUXQWKHDGLQ ZKLFKWKHHUURURFFXUHGDWQR FKDUJH1RUHIXQGVZLOOEHPDGH $GYHUWLVHUVZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\XVRI DQ\HUURUVQRWHG

1XPEHURIZRUGV &RVW RIUXQV 6SRWOLJKW&KDUJH ,QWHUQHW/LVWLQJ 727$/




PAGE  26  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

Addison Independent

Help  Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS Services

Garage  Sales

Help  Wanted

H A S  Y O U R   B U I L D I N G   shifted   or   settled?   Contact   Woodford   Brothers   Inc.   for   straightening,  leveling,  foun-­ dation  and  wood  frame  repairs   at   1-­800-­OLD-­BARN.   www. woodfordbros.com.

DEADLINE  REMINDER:   Classified   ads   to   start   on   a   Monday  need  to  be  in  by  the   prior  Thursday  at  noon.  Ads  to   start  on  a  Thursday  must  be  in   by  the  prior  Monday  at  5pm.

ADDISON  COUNTY  COURT   DIVERSION  and  Community   Justice   Projects   Reparative   Board  &  COSA  Program  Co-­ ordinator   Position.   Strength   based  case  manager  to  work   with  clients  who  have  commit-­ ted  crimes,  victims  of  crimes,   volunteers   and   community   partners.   Self-­directed   team   player,   highly   motivated,   strong   interpersonal   skills,   efficient  time  and  case  man-­ agement  skills.  Quality  verbal   and   written   communication   skills.  Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree  and   previous   work   experience   in   related   field.   Computer   capabilities-­Microsoft   Word,   Excel,  Publisher.  Days,  some   evenings  required.  Driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  li-­ cense  and  transportation.  Re-­ sumes  due  by  7/7  addressed   to:  Executive  Director,  ACCD   &  CJP,  PO  Box  881,  Middle-­ bury,  VT  05753.

GARAGE  /  MOVING   SALE.   205   Colonial   Drive,   Middle-­ bury.  June  28+29,  Sat.  &  Sun.   LAWN  MOWING,  LAWN  rak-­ 8am-­5pm.   Lots   of   furniture   ing.   Brush   trimming,   hedge   and  misc.  items. trimming.   Power   washing.   MIDDLEBURY  YARD  SALE.   Light  trucking.  Small  carpentry   94  Woodland  Park.  Sat.,  June   jobs.   Property   maintenance   28  from  8:30  a.m.  Tons  of  trea-­ and  repairs.  Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Property   sures  for  all  ages  and  stages. Management,   Leicester,   VT.   Fully  insured.  Call  for  a  free   MIDDLEBURY,  342  SOUTH   St.,   6/23  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  6/29,   sunny   days   estimate,  802-­349-­6579. only.  Boat  gear,  bike,  antique   LOGGING,   LAND   CLEAR-­ guns  tools,  and  more. ING,   forest   management.   Highest   rate   on   all   timber.   S H O R E H A M ,   6 / 2 3   Double   rates   on   low   grade   THROUGH   6/30,   8am-­6pm   daily.  1050  Rte  74  West.  Fur-­ chip  wood.  518-­643-­9436. niture,  doll  dishes,  and  much,   MISC  GRAPHICS  offers  de-­ much  more. sign   services.   Reasonable   pricing,   references.   8   years   professional   experience.   BA   degree   in   Graphic   Design.   VERGENNES  COMMUNITY   E-­mail  Mandy  at  miscgraph-­ YARD   SALE.   Saturday   and   icsvt@gmail.com. Sunday,  June  28th  and  29th,  





Help  Wanted

ADDISON  COUNTY   HU-­ MANE  SOCIETY  has  imme-­ diate  opening  for  a  p-­t  driver   (1  day  /  wk)  to  do  pick  up  and   delivery  of  animal  cremations.   Position  requires  clean  driving   record,  heavy  lifting,  attention   to  detail  and  good  customer   service.  Please  stop  by  shelter   at  236  Boardman  Street  be-­ tween  12-­5  Tuesday-­Saturday   for  an  application.  No  phone   calls.

HOME  PROVIDER   needed   for   a   49   year-­old   man   who   enjoys   country   music,   going   for  rides  in  the  car,  painting,   working   out   and   watching   TV.   Best   match   could   pro-­ vide  support  for  a  structured   routine  and  some  aspects  of   personal  care  due  to  a  Trau-­ matic  Brain  Injury.  Generous   tax-­free   annual   stipend   plus   room   and   board   payment.   Choices  for  Care,  Adult  Family   Home  funded  with  supportive   AMERICAN  FLATBREAD  IS   team.   Call   Paula   Dougherty   HIRING  a  Dining  Room  Man-­ at   Community   Associates,   ager.  If  you  have  experience   802-­388-­4021. offering   excellent   customer   service,  possess  great  com-­ munication   skills,   work   well   with   a   team,   know   how   to   motivate  others  and  have  an   interest  in  delicious,  local  and   organic  food,  please  forward   your  resume  to  Danielle:  Dani-­ elle@american  flatbread.com   or  drop  it  off  at  the  restaurant.   Help  Wanted 35-­40  hours  /  week,  nights  and   weekends  a  must.  EOE.

CARPENTERS  AND   CON-­ STRUCTION   LABORERS   needed.  Steady  work.  Chitten-­ den  County.  Pay  commensu-­ rate  with  tools  and  experience.   BANKRUPTCY:  CALL  to  find   802-­825-­6510. out   if   bankruptcy   can   help   you.   Kathleen   Walls,   Esq.   802-­388-­1156.

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Garage  Sales

7

Garage  Sales

Garage  Sales

7

$

YOUR AD INFORMATION

77 CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

$$

Deadlines: Thursday Noon for Monday papers Monday 5pm for Thursday papers

DESCRIPTION: (Up to 10 words)

YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION NAME: MAILING ADDRESS:

$7(ad w/out kit) x___#of runs* $10 (ad plus kit) x___#of runs (*Kit comes FREE with 3 runs or more!)

Additional words

Help  Wanted

    Town              of  Shelburne

Apply  by  June  25,  2014  to:  

7

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Blueprint  Practice  Facilitator

Porter  is   now   seeking   a   Blueprint   Practice   Facilitator.   The   candidate   would   work   with   primary   care   medical   practices   participating  in  the  Vermont  Blue  Print  for  Health  initiative.  This   is  a  quality  improvement  position.  Background  in  continuous   quality   improvement   and   medical   practice   environment   desirable.   Excellent   communication   skills   and   ability   to   work   with   teams   required.   Bachelors   Degree   and   health   care   EDFNJURXQGUHTXLUHG3RVLWLRQUHTXLUHVĂ&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\RIKRXUVDQG some  travel.  Submit  applications  no  later  than  June  27,  2014.   Porter  Medical  Center  offers  competitive  pay,  a  comprehensive   EHQHÂżWVSDFNDJHDQGDJHQHURXV E SODQ:HDOVRRIIHU paid   vacation,   tuition   reimbursement,   and   the   opportunity   to   work  with  dedicated  professionals  in  a  dynamic  organization.

PHONE:

Mail in your classified ad with payment to : E-MAIL: 58 Maple Street, For just $3 more, Middlebury VT 05753 OR Email your ad to: classifieds @ come in and pick up an all-inclusive addisonindependent.com GARAGE SALE KIT OR Stop in and drop it with everything at our office in the you need for Marble Works, Middlebury a successful sale.

Help  Wanted

PAINTERS  WANTED.  We  are   looking  to  fill  3  positions  with   3-­5  yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  interior  and  exterior   experience.   Tools,   valid   VT   driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  license,  and  three  ref-­ erences  are  required.  We  offer   excellent   starting   pay   with   room   for   advancement.   Pay   increases   for   motivated   em-­ ployees  who  can  take  charge   and   lead.   Serious   inquiries   only.   Call   802-­453-­5611   for   an  appointment.

Paul  Goodrich,  Highway  Superintendent 420  Shelburne  Rd.,  P.O.  Box  88 Shelburne,  VT  05482 Phone:    (802)  316-­1536 Fax:  (802)  985-­9550

  

STREET ADDRESS:

NIGHT  SHIFT  COMMERCIAL   cleaning   position   available,   Middlebury.  Flexible  schedule.   $12  /  hour.  No  experience  re-­ quired,  will  train.  References,   background   check   required.   518-­681-­1069.

Pay  rate:  $16.00/hr.

TOWN: DATES & TIMES:

MECHANIC  TO  RUN  our  fleet   shop  and  be  responsible  for   our  trucks,  trailers  and  forklifts   at  a  family  owned  lumber  mill.   Supervise  two  other  people,   maintain  parts  inventory  and   work   with   our   mill   mainte-­ nance   manager   as   needed.   Need  an  individual  who  works   well  with  others  and  would  like   a  responsible  position  with  a   fair  amount  of  hands  on  work.   Safety  is  a  top  priority.  Major   repair   to   engines   or   trans-­ missions   normally   sent   out.   Health  insurance,  401(k)  and   competitive  wages.  Send  re-­ sume  to:  The  A.  Johnson  Co.,   995  South  116  Rd.,  Bristol,  VT   05443.  802-­453-­4538,  Ken  or   Dave  Johnson.

Experienced  laborer  needed  for  roadside  mowing  along   Town  roads  and  assistance  with  Highway  Dept.  projects.   Approx.  June  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  September.  Valid  driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  license,  clean driving  record,  and  excellent  past  work  record  required.   Some  mechanical  ability  helpful.  Attention  to  detail,  adherence   to  safety  policies  and  commitment  to  positive  customer  service   required.  Must  have  ability  to  work  independently with  minimal  supervision.

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GARAGE SALE Season... Let us get the word out for you!

$

Help  Wanted

HIGHWAY  DEPARTMENT Seasonal  Help  Wanted

R O T O T I L L I N G  &   9-­3.  Country  Commons  Con-­ BRUSH-­HOGGING.   Ron   dominiums   off   of   Hopkins   Road.   Many   residents   par-­ Stevens  802-­462-­3784. ticipating.

Garage  Sales

Help  Wanted

x # of runs

x 25¢ Total Payment Enclosed

$

To  apply,  please  email  your  cover  letter  and  resume  to:   apply@portermedical.org


Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  —  PAGE  27

Addison Independent

Help Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

MIDDLEBURY UNION  HIGH  SCHOOL Coaching Positions Middlebury Union High School is seeking the following Coaches: .YRMSV:EVWMX](ERGIˆ:EVWMX](ERGI Applicants must possess a strong knowledge of coaching principles with previous coaching experience preferred. Must possess strong organizational skills and the ability to communicate and relate to student athletes. Interested parties should send a resume and letter of interest to: Sean Farrell, Activities Director Middlebury Union High School 73 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 4SWMXMSR3TIRYRXMP½PPIH)3)

MIDDLEBURY UNION  HIGH  SCHOOL Student Information System Manager Middlebury Union High School has a vacancy for an individual to manage student information systems; such as PowerSchool and Naviance; knowledgeable in software and hardware installations and upgrades; complete school census reports and other school reports; data entry, routine maintenance; Diagnostic and troubleshooting, supporting technology needs of designated school personnel; ability to work independently and accurately, excellent communication and documentation skills. Apply by sending a letter of interest, resume, three current reference letters, and complete transcripts to: Dr. Peter Burrows, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 Application deadline: July 25, 2014 E.O.E

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

ADDISON NORTHWEST SUPERVISORY UNION FINANCIAL ASSISTANT (.50 FTE)

Addison Northwest Supervisory Union is seeking qualifed candidate for a .50 FTE Financial Assistant. Responsibilities include General Ledger maintenance and preparation of monthly financial reports for five districts. A qualified candidate should have an Associate’s Degree in Accounting and at least five year’s experience in school accounting. If interested, please apply through SchoolSpring.com or send a resume, cover letter and three current letters of reference by July 3rd to: Business Manager Addison Northwest Supervisory Union 48 Green Street, Suite 1 Vergennes, VT 05491

Help Wanted

MIDDLEBURY UNION  HIGH  SCHOOL Temporary Assistant School Nurse – Long Term MUHS has an opening for a Temporary Licensed RN to assist the School Nurse. The position runs from August 21-October 30, 2014. The position requires working with students with self-care needs. Join a team that focuses on promoting a healthy and educationally supportive environment for students. Apply by sending letter of interest, resume, three current reference letters, complete transcripts and evidence of licensure to: Dr. Peter Burrows, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 Application deadline: June 25, 2014 E.O.E

Lathrop Forest Products Seeking Truck Drivers Forestry Company looking to hire 2 full time truck drivers. Class A-CDL required. Clean driving recored. Must be able to pass drug test and physical via DOT regulations. 24 months’ experience. Local work, no travel, woods experience necessary, but will train the right candidates. Health benefits, paid vacation, federal holidays included. Looking for individuals who want roots with a company. Stop by to fill out an application: Lathrop Forest Products 44 South St, Bristol, VT. No phone calls please.

ADDISON-RUTLAND SUPERVISORY UNION VACANCIES BENSON VILLAGE SCHOOL Custodian This is a full-time position, 40 hours per week with benefits. Maintenance experience preferred. Must have the ability to work independently with a flexible schedule. For additional information, contact the Benson Village School at 802-537-2491 FAIR HAVEN UNION HIGH SCHOOL Coaches Fall 2014 tAssistant Varsity Girl’s Soccer tJV Girl’s Soccer tAssistant Varsity Boy’s Soccer For additional information, contact Activities Director at 802-265-2047 For applications, call 802-265-4905. Mail completed applications with a cover letter, resume, and three current letters of reference to: Addison-Rutland Supervisory Union 49 Main Street Fair Haven, VT 05743 Positions will remain open until filled. EOE.

Addison Natural  Gas  Project  –  Phase  I

JOB FAIR

Tuesday June  24,  2014   4  to  8  PM Hannaford  Career  Center Middlebury,  VT &RPHDQG¿QGRXWDERXW construction  job  opportunities  on  the  Addison  Natural  Gas  Project.     Representatives  from  Over  and   Under,  ECI  and  Frank  Lil  and  Son   will  be  on-­site  to  present  information   about  the  project  and  their  needs.     &RPHDQG¿QGRXWLIWKHUHLVDQ opportunity  for  you.

Help Wanted PART   TIME   HELP   need-­ ed   taking   care   of   gentle-­ man   in   wheel   chair.   Please   call   for   more   information.   802-­771-­7153.



PART-­TIME CAREGIVER  for   14  year  old  disabled  boy,  Mid-­ dlebury.  Applicants  must  have   child  care  experience,  refer-­ ences,  incredible  patience,  a   strong   back.   Flexible   hours.   Criminal   background   check.   Send  resume:  sstone7716@ gmail.com. PART-­TIME  HELP  NEEDED   for   yard   work   and   cleaning   at   Lake   Champlain.   Call   802-­353-­6188. SERVICE   COORDINATOR:   37.5   and   32.5   hour   posi-­ tions.   Develop,   coordinate   and  monitor  supports  for  indi-­ viduals  with  disabilities.  Need   skills  and  experience  (3+  yrs.)   in   this   or   related   field,   good   boundaries,  ability  to  identify   concerns  and  problem-­solve,   excellent  writing  /  documenta-­ tion  skills,  flexibility  and  adapt-­ ability.  Qualifications  also  in-­ clude  a  B.A.  degree  and  good   driving  record.  Benefit  pack-­ age  includes  medical,  dental,   life  insurance,  generous  paid   time-­off.   Respond   to   CSAC   HR,  89  Main  St.,  Middlebury,   VT  05753;  802-­388-­6751,  ext.   425,  or  visit  www.csac-­vt.org. SHARED  LIVING  PROVIDER   sought,  preferably  in  a  village   setting  for  a  21  year  old  man   with  a  mild  autism  spectrum   disorder.  He  has  a  strong  in-­ terest  in  gaming,  role-­playing,   anime   and   film-­making.   He   would  like  to  be  supported  by   someone  with  similar  interests   or  open  to  learning.  Needs  a   home   that   can   provide   sup-­ port   in   daily   living   skills   and   developing  a  social  network.   Generous  annual  tax-­free  sti-­ pend   of   $27,300   plus   room   and  board  payment  of  around   $8,400,   as   well   as   respite   budget.  Call  Mindy  Hammann   at   Community   Associates,   802-­388-­4021. THE   LINCOLN   COOPERA-­ TIVE  PRESCHOOL  is  seeking   an   early   childhood   profes-­ sional   to   assist   our   director   in   the   classroom,   beginning   in  August   for   the   2014/2015   school   year.  We  are  looking   for  an  energetic,  self-­motivat-­ ed   person   who   loves   young   children  and  enjoys  imaginary   play.  An  Associates  Degree,   CDA,  and  /  or  two  years’  experi-­ ence   preferred.  Applications   due   July   1.   Please   submit   a   cover   letter,   resume,   and   3  references  to:  Lincoln  Co-­ operative   Preschool,   Attn:   Teaching  Position,  876  River   Road,  Lincoln,  VT  05443;  or   to  lincolnpreschoolvt@gmail. com,  “attn  teaching  position”   in  the  subject  line.



THE STOVE  DEPOT  in  Ferris-­ burgh  is  looking  for  a  full-­time   Service   Tech  /  Installer   start-­ ing   immediately.   Tech   and   carpentry   skills   a   plus,   but   not  required.  Send  a  resume   to  chad@thestovedepot.com   or  call  802-­870-­3220  and  ask   for  Chad.


PAGE  28  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

AGRICULTURE

All  Regions  Services,  Inc.,  Bossier  City,  LA   is  now  hiring  37  temporary  Farm  Workers   to  work  in  Knox,  Hancock  and  Waldo   ŽƾŜĆ&#x;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Í&#x2022;DĨĆ&#x152;Žžϳ͏ϭ͏ώϏϭϰĆ&#x161;ŽϭϏ͏ϯϏ͏ώϏϭϰÍ&#x2DC; ,ŽƾĆ&#x152;ĹŻÇ&#x2021;Ç Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ŽĨΨϭώÍ&#x2DC;ϹϏĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x2030;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E; ŽĨΨϏÍ&#x2DC;ĎŹĎłĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĹŻÄ?Í&#x2DC;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä?ĹŻĆľÄ&#x17E;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć?Í&#x2022; Ç Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC;tĹ˝Ć&#x152;ĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?Ç Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĨŽĆ&#x152;Ĺľ ĹľÄ&#x201A;ŜƾÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ä?Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä?ĹŻĆľÄ&#x17E;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹśÄ?ĹŻĆľÄ&#x17E;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;ÄŽÄ&#x17E;ĹŻÄ&#x161;Ć?Í&#x2DC;WĆ&#x152;ŽůŽŜĹ?Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161; Ä?Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Í&#x2022;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Í&#x2022;Ç Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĹŹĹ?ĹśĹ?Í&#x2022;ĹŻĹ?Ĺ&#x152;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?ĎŽĎŻĹŻÄ?Ć?Í&#x2DC; and  stacking  trays  repeatedly.  Work  is   ŽƾĆ&#x161;Ć?Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?ĹśÄ?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;ĹľÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ç Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä?ŽŜÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ?Í&#x2DC; dĹ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2039;ĆľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?ŽĨÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ŽĨĎ°ĎŹĹ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ć?Í&#x2DC;ÍŹÇ ĹŹ guaranteed.  Tools,  supplies,  and  equipment   provided  at  no  cost.    Housing  provided  at  no   Ä?Ĺ˝Ć?Ć&#x161;Ĺ?ĨŽƾĆ&#x161;Ć?Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä?ŽžžƾĆ&#x;ĹśĹ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Í&#x2DC;/ĨÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x2030;ĹŻĹ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Í&#x2022; Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśĆ?Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ć?ĆľÄ?Ć?Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2020;Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝ Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹŠĹ˝Ä?Ç Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x2030;ŽŜÄ?ŽžĆ&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x;ŽŜŽĨϹϏК ŽĨĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;ĹľĆ&#x2030;ĹŻĹ˝Ç&#x2021;ĹľÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ĺ˝Ä&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹŻĹ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x2030;ĹŻÇ&#x2021; ĨŽĆ&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć?ĹŠĹ˝Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;ŽĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;ŽĨĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;^t in  the  state  in  which  this  ad  appeared  or   contact  the  Tri-­â&#x20AC;?County  Career  Center   45  Oak  Street,  Bangor,  ME,  04401-­â&#x20AC;?6666   (207)  561-­â&#x20AC;?4050,  JO#  ME  112302.      

IMMEDIATE  OPENINGS ACTR  Bus  Drivers  Wanted Ä&#x161;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ć?ŽŜŽƾŜĆ&#x161;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x203A;Ć?Ä?ŽžžƾŜĹ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x2021;Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśĆ?Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜ provider   is   growing   and   seeks   CDL   Class   B   with   passenger   endorsement   bus   drivers.     Candidates  must  have  clean  driving  record,   Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ć? Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Žž Ä&#x161;Ć&#x152;ĆľĹ? Î&#x2DC; Ä&#x201A;ĹŻÄ?Ĺ˝Ĺ&#x161;Žů Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x;ĹśĹ? Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; background   checks.   Must   be   able   to   work   early   morning,   evening   and   weekend   Ć?Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ĺ&#x152;Ć?Í&#x2DC; Ç&#x2020;Ä?Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161; Ä?Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x17E;ÄŽĆ&#x161;Ć? Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ä?ĹŹÄ&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E; Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E; Ĺ?ĹśÄ?ĹŻĆľÄ&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Í&#x2014;  Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ĺ?ĹśĆ?ĆľĆ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2022; Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ć&#x;ĹľÄ&#x17E; Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ć?Ĺ?Ä?ĹŹĆ&#x;ĹľÄ&#x17E;Í&#x2022;ůŽŜĹ?ͲĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĹľÄ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć?Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ç Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻ as  paid  holidays.    Submit  resume,  references   and  proof  of  CDL  endorsement  including  up   to  date  medical  card  to: Human  Resources  Manager,  ACTR WÍ&#x2DC;KÍ&#x2DC;Ĺ˝Ç&#x2020;ϹϯώÍťDĹ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä?ĆľĆ&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022;sÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;žŽŜĆ&#x161;ϏϹϳϹϯ Or:    shari@actr-­â&#x20AC;?vt.org EĹ˝Ć&#x2030;Ĺ&#x161;ŽŜÄ&#x17E;Ä?Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻĆ?Ć&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; dZĹ?Ć?Ä&#x201A;Ŝ͏KĹľĆ&#x2030;ĹŻĹ˝Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;

For  Rent

For  Sale

WE  ARE  LOOKING  TO  hire   3  to  5  hard  working  people  for   the  summer  months  to  join  our   team  of  professional  painters.   No  experience  necessary,  but   helpful.   This   is   a   temporary   opportunity  which  could  lead   to  full-­time  for  the  right  person.   Excellent   starting   pay.   Fun   working  conditions,  bonuses   and  pay  increases  for  motivat-­ ed  people.  Call  802-­453-­5611   for  an  appointment.

2005  KEYSTONE  COUGAR   5th  wheel  camper.  Model  254.   1/2   ton   series.   Well   main-­ tained.  Slide-­out,  dinette,  sofa,   bunk  beds,  A/C  /  furnace,  re-­ frigerator  /  freezer,  storage,  rear   access  hatch,  awning,  2  TVs,   and   more.   Asking   $11,900,   OBRO,  802-­989-­1796.

Check the Classifieds twice a week in the Addison Independent.

BUYING,  SELLING,   TRAD-­ ING,  repairing:  aluminum  fish-­ ing  boats,  row  boats,  trailers,   canoes,  kayaks,  dinghies,  jon   boats,  small  sail  boats,  used   oars   and   boating   access   at   fair   cash   prices.   Old   retired   boatsmith  802-­453-­4235. CLAW-­FOOT   BATHTUB.   Good  condition.  $600,  OBO.   802-­388-­3331.

For  Sale



H O M E G R O W N ,  PA S -­ TURE-­RAISED   ORGANIC   chicken.   Bridport   $6.25  /  lb.   on-­farm   sales.   Unique   op-­ portunity   to   see   where   your   food   is   coming   from   and   how   it   is   raised.   Call  Adam   at   802-­349-­2804   to   confirm   a   time   to   visit   the   farm   and   pick  up  a  beautiful,  juicy,  fla-­ vorful  bird.

For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

2  BEDROOM  APARTMENT   in  a  quiet  country  setting,  15   min.   from   Middlebury.   $725   plus  utilities  and  $500  deposit.   No   pets   or   smoking   please.   802-­897-­5447.

BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  NEW   SCHOOL   HOUSE  office  suites  located   in   Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Old   High   School   complex  on  the  green  is  now   renting.  Five  separate  one  and   two   room,   newly   renovated,   offices   with   a   common   wait-­ ing   area,   conference   room,   bathroom   and   kitchenette.   Rent  includes  heat,  electricity   and  shared  wi-­fi.  The  5  suites   range  from  377  s.f.  up  to  648   s.f.  Two  of  the  suites  are  single   rooms.  Three   have   an   inner   and   outer   office.   Newly   re-­ finished   floors,   painted   trim,   ceiling  fans  and  lighting.  Ten-­ ants  choose   the   wall   colors.   The   first   year   of   lease   will   have  2  free  months  and  first   tenant   to   sign   a   lease   will   get   a   third   month   free   rent.   Call  802-­453-­4065  or  twells@ wellslaw.com  for  more  info.

M I D D L E B U RY  H O U S E   SHARE.   Furnished,   W/D,   wifi.   Utilities   included.   No   smoking   or   pets.   Referenc-­ es.   First,   last   and   $300   se-­ curity   deposit.   Credit   check.   $600  /  mo.   Month-­to-­month.   802-­989-­3097.

SHOREHAM  VILLAGE.  Very   cute   2   bedroom   apartment.   Washer  /  dryer  hook-­up.  Walk-­ ing  distance  to  school,  $695   /  mo.   plus   utilities.   No   smok-­ ing,  no  pets.  Available  July  1.   802-­388-­5411.

2  BEDROOM,   FIRST   floor   apartment,  with  office,  in  Mid-­ dlebury   at   85   Court   Street.   Full   basement   with   laundry   hook-­ups.  Available   June   1.   $1,000  /  mo.  plus  utilities.  De-­ posit,   credit   check   and   ref-­ erences   required.   No   pets   or   smoking.   No   exceptions.   802-­352-­6678.

2 , 0 0 0  S Q U A R E   F E E T   Professional   office   space   in   Middlebury,   multi-­room.   Ground  level,  parking,  hand-­ icapped-­accessible.  Available   LINCOLN-­STYLE  ROCKING   now.  802-­558-­6092. CHAIR,   approx.   130   years   old,   in   very   good   condition.   AVAILABLE   NOW.   1   BED-­ Upholstery   also   very   good.   ROOM  apartments.  Rent  $666   $300.   or   reasonable   offer.   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  $700,  including  heat.  Great   802-­453-­4597. location,   30   minutes   to   Rut-­ land,  5  minutes  to  downtown   MAXIM   OUTDOOR   WOOD   Brandon.  Call  Chantel  today  at   PELLET  Furnace  by  Central   802-­247-­0165  or  email  cma-­ boiler  adapts  to  existing  heat-­ clachlan@summitpmg.com. ing  systems  and  heats  with  re-­ newable  wood  pellets.  Boivin   BRANDON   1   BEDROOM,   Farm  Supply,  802-­475-­4007. Beaumont  Woods.  $635  /  mo.   with   heat,   snow   and   trash   THE  BARREL  MAN:  55  gal-­ removal.  802-­773-­9107. lon  Plastic  and  Metal  barrels.   Several  types:  55  gallon  rain   BRANDON   2   BEDROOM   barrels   with   faucets,   food   duplex   in   village.   Finished   grade   with   removable   lock-­ basement,   deck,   yard,   stor-­ ing  covers,  plastic  food  grade   age.   $1,100  /  m o.   includes   with   spin-­on   covers   (pickle   heat.  802-­989-­8124. barrels).  Also,  275  gallon  food   grade   totes,   $125   each.   55   BRANDON   ONE   BR.   $650,   gallon   sand  /  salt   barrels   with   one   person;   $700,   two   per-­ PT   legs,   $50   each.   Delivery   sons.   Includes   heat,   snow   and  rubbish  removal.  Damage   available.  802-­453-­4235. deposit,  first  monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  rent,  one   year  lease  required.  No  smok-­ ing  or  pets.  802-­247-­0115.

Vacation  Rentals

ADDISON:  LAKE   CHAM-­ PLAIN   waterfront   camp.   Beautiful   views,   gorgeous   sunsets,  private  beach,  dock,   rowboat  and  canoe  included.   $600.  weekly,  or  call  for  week-­ ends.  802-­349-­4212.

BRISTOL  1  BEDROOM,  2nd   floor  apartment.  Rent  includes   heat,   lights,   hot   water   and   rubbish.  No  pets,  references   required.   $725  /  month   plus   deposit.  No  exceptions.  Call   802-­893-­1234.

NEW  HAVEN  new  one-­bed-­ room   apartment   on   South   Street.   Includes   heat   and   electricity.  Single  occupancy,   $650;  double,  $750.  Country   setting.  No  smoking  on  prem-­ ises,  no  pets.  802-­453-­5826. RESPONSIBLE   HOUSE-­ MATE   WANTED   to   share   a   lovely   old   farmhouse.   Pri-­ vate,  nicely  furnished,  newly   painted   bedroom   with   at-­ tached,   recently   renovated   private   bath,   full   use   of   the   house   including   kitchen   and   washer  /  dryer.  $500  per  month   includes   all   utilities   (includ-­ ing   Wi-­Fi).   Cooperation   on   some   meals   is   negotiable   (and   might   be   fun).   Space   for  a  garden  is  also  available.   Located  on  Snake  Mountain,   near   the   trails,   10   minutes   from  Middlebury  and  one  hour   to  downtown  Burlington.  Avail-­ able  July  1st.  802-­545-­2918  or   802-­363-­5302.

SOUTH  STARKSBORO   2   bedroom   mobile   home   on   owner-­occupied   lot.   $875  /   month  plus  utilities.  Security   deposit   required.   Includes   W/D,   water,   sewer,   trash   removal,   snow   plowing   and   lawn   care.   No   smoking,   no   pets.   References   required.   802-­453-­4856. STORAGE  SPACES,  11â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;.   Large   overhead   doors,   ex-­ tra   high   ceilings.   Will   ac-­ commodate   large   campers,   boats   or   lots   of   stuff.   Call   802-­388-­8394. WEST   ADDISON:   2   story,   furnished  house  on  lakefront.   Washer,   dryer.   No   smoking.   Available  September  through   May.  860-­653-­8112.

BRISTOL  2   BEDROOM   APARTMENT.   One   block   from  downtown.  Upstairs  and   downstairs.  Heat  and  hot  wa-­ ter   furnished.   Available   July   1.   $850  /  mo.   W/D   hookups.   ROOM   FOR   PARTIAL   rent   in  exchange  for  being  a  stud-­ References.  802-­453-­3818. ied   student   of   art   in   order   BRISTOL   2   BEDROOM,   1   to   be   a   helpful   studio   assis-­ bath  apartment.  High  ceilings,   tant  to  a  retired  art  professor.   efficient   gas   heat,   excellent   802-­453-­6975. condition.  Water,  sewer,  and   WiFi  included.  No  pets.  $875   SALISBURY   FURNISHED   STUDIO   apartment.   Nice   /  month.  802-­635-­9716. porch,  like  new  condition.  No   smoking,   no   pets.   Deposit   and   references   required.   In-­ cludes   all   utilities.   $750  /  mo.   HOMESHARERS  WANTED.   802-­352-­9094. Individuals,  couples  welcome.   Ideally,   should   love   garden-­ SELF   STORAGE,   8â&#x20AC;&#x2122;X10â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   ing,  tolerate  housework,  like   units.   Your   lock   and   key,   poetry   and   sewing.   Being   a   $55  /  m onth.   Middlebury,   good  cook  would  help.  $400   802-­558-­6092. /  m o.   plus   some   hours   of   work.   References   required.   802-­475-­2112.



Wood  Heat For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  against  the  law   to  discriminate  when   advertising  housing

DRY  FIREWOOD   $225  /   CORD.  Green  firewood.  Mixed   hardwoods.  $200  /  cord.  $100   /  half   cord.  Also   chunk   wood   available.   Delivery   avail-­ able   at   extra   charge.   Call   802-­545-­2144.

Particularly  on  sites  like  Craigslist. And  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you   might  think.  You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no  childrenâ&#x20AC;?   or  â&#x20AC;&#x153;adults  only.â&#x20AC;?  There  is  lots  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say.   The  federal  government  is  watching  for  such   discrimination. Let  us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities   of  the  Fair  Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the   right  side  of  the  nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Fair  Housing  Law.   Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP



ADDISON  COUNTY   FIRE-­ WOOD.  Premium  hardwoods   cut,  split  and  delivered.  Cus-­ tom   sizes   available.   For   honest,   reliable   service   call   802-­238-­7748.

FIREWOOD;  CUT,   SPLIT   and  delivered.  Green  or  sea-­ soned.   Call   Tom   Shepard,   802-­453-­4285.

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ollege.  For  Rent  Close  to  c TMENT OM  APAR y,  newly  refurbished. 1  BEDRO ur 000. ,  Middleb Main  Street ,  includes  heat.  000-­0 th y $750/mon f  Middlebur T, ile  north  o sit.  000-­0000. TMEN po ubbish,  1  m OM  APAR 1  BEDRO ludes  heat,  electric,  r  $595/month  plus  de ly, upstairs,  inc Available  immediate e .   d  referenc on  Route  7 e  Deposit  an om  MOBILE  h 50/mo.  plus  utilities. M O O R D $6 t.   2  BE .  Private  lo in  Salisbury -­0000. required. 00 eferences   required.  0 DO sement.  R USE/CON  TOWNHO nnes.  Garage  and  ba .  000-­0000. M O O R D ts 2  BE erge  heat.  No  pe ommons,  V Country  C xcluding  utilities  and her,  e y el et atellite,  was pl $1,000/mo. om ERN,  c  internet,  s OM,  MOD e  house.  Hi-­speed ontage.  Very  energy QH O R D BE 2   or WKURXJK-X l,  85â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  lake  fr 678. Lake  Dunm furnished   ed  porch,  drilled  wel QJ$XJXVW s  utilities.  802-­352-­6 UWL lu en dryer,  scre PRQWKUHQWDOVWD tiable.  $1,000/mo.  p go RU g.  Pets  ne HIÂżFLHQW) on-­smokin 26,  2010.  N

FIREWOOD;  MIXED  HARD-­ WOOD.   Beech,   maple,   oak,   cherry,  ash.  Order  early  and   save.   2   cord   loads.   Leave   message  802-­282-­9110. MOUNTAIN   ROAD   FIRE-­ WOOD.   Green   and   partially   seasoned   available.   Oak,   ash,   maple,   beech.   Order   now  and  save  for  next  season.   Cut,  split  and  delivered.  Call   802-­759-­2095.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  29

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Real  Estate 2   BEDROOM   RUSTIC   cabin   on   1.7   acres   in   Salisbury   with   320â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   of   Lake   Dunmore   frontage   across   Route   53   with   sundeck   and   dock   on   water.  Beautiful  swimming   a n d   s u n s e t s .   Q u i e t   and   private.   $249,900.   S e r i o u s ,   q u a l i f i e d   b u y e r s   o n l y   p l e a s e .   802-­352-­6678. 2.12  ACRE  BUILDING  lot   in  Salisbury,  1/4  mile  from   Waterhouses  Restaurant   and   Marina.   1285   West   Shore  Road.  4  bedroom   septic  installed  with  drilled   well.   28â&#x20AC;&#x2122;x40â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   garage   in   place.   $119,900.   Call   802-­352-­6678.



4 5  O C E A N F R O N T   A C R E S   o v e r l o o k i n g   Bay   of   Fundy,   Digby   N e c k ,   N o v a   S c o t i a .   Solar   powered   summer   cabin.  Complete  privacy.   $250,000.   firm.   www. fundygetaway.com FARM   FOR   SALE   in   Hinesburg.   214   acres   includes  60  acres  tillable,   60  acres  pasture,  house   and   barn.   Restricted   by   conservation   easement   and  option  to  purchase  at   ag   value.   Vermont   Land   Trust   seeks   buyers   who   will   farm   commercially.   $310,000.   Contact   Jon   Ramsay  at  802-­533-­7705   or  jramsay@vlt.org.  www. vlt.org  /  lafreniere. FOR  SALE  BY  OWNER.   2 0 5   C o l o n i a l   D r i v e ,   Middlebury.  2,166  sq.  ft.   Split  level  house,  5  BR,  2   baths.  Screened-­in  porch   with  mountain  view.  Large   4   car   garage,   walking   distance   to   town.   Quiet,   s a f e   n e i g h b o r h o o d .   $249,000.  802-­989-­3097. FOR  SALE  BY  OWNER.   65   West   Seminary   St.,   Brandon,   VT.   2   BR,   1   bath  ranch  within  walking   distance   to   downtown.   Fireplace,   wood   floors,   screened-­in   porch   and   one  car  attached  garage.   Full  dry  basement.  Safe,   q u i e t   n e i g h b o r h o o d .   $163,000.  802-­989-­3097. LEICESTER  6.8  ACRES,   $ 5 9 , 0 0 0 .   Ve r y   n i c e   building   site   surveyed,   septic   design   included.   Ready   to   build   on,   with   a l l   p e r m i t s .   O w n e r   financing.   Call   Wayne   802-­257-­7076.

Real  Estate M I D D L E B U RY;   2 0 1 0   1 4 â&#x20AC;&#x2122; X 7 0 â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   h o m e ,   f r o n t   p o r c h ,   r e a r   d e c k ,   2   s t o r a g e   b u i l d i n g s ,   2   bedrooms,   large   living   room   and   kitchen,   1   bathroom.   Central   air,   generator,   washer   and   dryer,   LP   gas   furnace,   all   kitchen   appliances,   fully   furnished   (price   r e d u c t i o n   w i t h o u t   furniture).   John   Deere   riding   mower   included.   $52,500.  In  Lindale  Park.   802-­453-­2682.

Animals



Boats 1999  SKI   NAUTIQUE   196,   closed   bow.   GT40   310h.p.,  1.23  to  1  trans.   ratio,   330   hours.   Bimini   top.   Excellent   condition.   $20,000.   802-­388-­6276,   802-­349-­7375.

Cars 1 9 7 4  C H R Y S L E R   NEWPORT,  400  engine,   original   paint,   no   rust,   mint.   38,000   miles.   4   door.   Perfect   interior.   R e t a i l s   $ 9 , 5 0 0 .   S e l l   $3,995.  802-­349-­4212.



2001  BUICK   LESABRE   LIMITED.   97K   miles,   loaded,   heated   leather   s e a t s ,   h e a t e d   s i d e   mirrors,   well   cared   for   with  maintenance  records   available.   $4,000   OBO.   802-­989-­7073.

ABSOLUTELY  LOVELY,   1 2   w e e k s   o l d ,   m a l e   /  f e m a l e ,   $ 5 0 0 ,   p o t t y   t r a i n e d ,   k i d -­ f r i e n d l y,   AKC   reg.   with   papers,   shots   and   vaccinations.   dhyorkie14@yahoo.com,   2002   JEEP   LIBERTY   802-­865-­5917. Limited,   4x4,   sunroof.   A K C   E N G L I S H   L A B   Good   condition.   Retails   PUPPIES.  Beautiful,  big,   $ 8 , 0 0 0 .   S e l l   $ 3 , 9 9 5 .   blocky  pups,  vaccination,   802-­349-­4212. deworming.   Bred   to   be   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;do   it   all   dogâ&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   2002  MERCURY  SABLE,   hunting,   obedience   and   power   options.   Good   show   champion   stock.   condition.   $1,495.   OBO.   Parents   have   hip,   eye   802-­349-­4212. and  elbow  certifications.   2005   HYUNDAI   SANTA   Ready   for   new   homes   FE   LX.   82,000   MILES.   July  5th.  Serious  inquiries   KBB   $8,900.   Very   good   o n l y.   8 0 2 -­ 3 4 9 -­ 8 7 0 6 .   c o n d i t i o n .   $ 4 , 5 0 0 .   Leave  message. 802-­388-­2886.

Att. Â Farmers

DEMO  CARS  FOR  SALE.   Drive   home.   Call   for   prices.  802-­349-­4212.

HAY  FOR  SALE:  FIRST   cut   and   mulch.   Delivery   a v a i l a b l e .   C a l l   f o r   pricing.   802-­453-­4481,   802-­349-­9281.

V O L K S W A G E N  B E E T L E ,   5 -­ S P E E D   s h i f t   d i e s e l .   4 2 -­ 4 8   m.p.g.   110,000   miles   $4,800.   802-­388-­6276   HAY   FOR   SALE:   First   or  802-­349-­7375. cut   $3   /   square   bale.   First   cut   round   bales   $ 3 0 .   M i k e   Q u i n n ,   Trucks end   of   South   Munger   S t r e e t ,   M i d d l e b u r y.   2009   GMC   SIERRA   1/2   802-­388-­7828. ton.   19,500   miles,   like   n e w.   $ 1 8 , 7 0 0 ,   O B O .   JD  74  RAKE,  purchased   802-­989-­1796. new  in  1999  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one  owner,   stored  undercover  when   not   in   use.   Very   good   Wanted condition  with  very  good   tires.  Operatorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Manual   ANTIQUES   WANTED.   included.  Teeth  are  tripled   Local   3rd   generation   with   approx.   two   thirds   d e a l e r,   f r e e   v e r b a l   rubber   and   one   third   appraisals.   Call   Brian   original   spring   steel.   Bittner  at  802-­272-­7527  or   Asking  $2,500.  Call  Nate   visit  www.bittnerantiques. at  545-­2320. com. WHITNEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   CUSTOM   FA R M   W O R K .   P o n d   agitating,   liquid   manure   h a u l i n g ,   d r a g   l i n e   aerating.   Call   for   price.   Addy Indy 462-­2755,  John  Whitney.

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Motorcycles 1985  HONDA   250   Big   Red  in  good  shape,  $600.   1985   Honda   250   SX,   $400.  Call  802-­453-­3011.

DUHRQOLQH www. addisonindependent. com/classifieds

VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC NOTICE: HERBICIDE SPRAYING

TOWN OF LINCOLN NOTICE

The  Select   Board   meeting   regularly   scheduled  for  July  1,  2012  has  been  re-­ scheduled  to  occur  as  a  special  meeting   on  Monday,  June  30.  The  recheduling  is   solely  to  facilitate  FY14  closeout  items. 6/23,  26

++++++++++++++ TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY REGULAR SELECTBOARD MEETING

78(6'$<-81(Â&#x2021;30 RUSS  SHOLES  SENIOR  CENTER   LOWER  LEVEL     081,&,3$/*<01$6,80Â&#x2021;0$,167 AGENDA 3/$11,1*:25.6+23Âą   Town   Planner   Eric   Blair   will   provide   an   introduction   to   form   based   zoning   regulations   &   the   concept   of   land   use   planning  by  transect. AGENDA   1.  Call  to  Order   2.  *Approval  of  Meeting  Minutes  of   -XQH                3.  *Approval  of  Agenda &LWL]HQ&RPPHQWV                [Opportunity  to  raise  or  address                  issues  that  are  not  otherwise  included                    on  this  agenda]  2IÂżFLDO3URFODPDWLRQRI:KLWH                Cane  Safety  Day  In  Middlebury,   2FWREHU   6.  **Town  Plan  Revisions  from  the                Planning  Commission   7.  **Zoning  By-­Law  Revisions  from                the  Planning  Commission   8.  *Application  for  Hazard  Mitigation                Grant  Program  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Revising  the  Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s                  Request  for  Funding  for  the                Middlebury  River  Flood  Resiliency                  Project  into  Two  Phases  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Phase  I,                  Final  Design,  and  Phase  2,                  Construction  $GRSW+HDOWK +XPDQ6HUYLFHV                Agency  Funding  Policy   10.  **Committee  &  Project  Reports                10.a.    Historic  Powerhouse  Project  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;                Meeting  with  Consulting  Engineer   -XQH                10.b.    Planning  Commission  Meeting RI-XQH                  10.c.    Public  Works  Committee  Meeting RI-XQH$ZDUG3DYLQJ%LG                  Schoolhouse  Hill  Road  Agreement  (if                  available)  and  Wolaver  Request  for                  Water  Service  for  286  Pulp  Mill  Bridge                  Road,  Weybridge G7RZQ2IÂżFHV 5HFUHDWLRQ                Facilities  Building  Committee     0HHWLQJRI-XQH                  10.e.    Economic  Development  Initiative                    Working  Group  Meeting  of  June  20,                   10.f.  Library  Building  Committee   0HHWLQJRI-XQH                10.g.    Main  Street  &  Merchants  Row                  Railroad  Overpass  Bridge                  Replacements                   11.  **Review  revised  Memorandum                    of  Agreement  Between  Town  of                    Middlebury  and  Vermont  Gas                    Systems  for  Addison  Rutland                    Natural  Gas  Project  Phase  2                  (if  available) )<%XGJHW5HSRUW                13.  *Approval  of  Check  Warrants                7RZQ0DQDJHUÂśV5HSRUW D$FFHSW7RZQ0DQDJHUÂśV                Designation  of  an  Acting  Town                  Manager  to  serve  in  her  absence                for  two  long  weekends  in  July                15.  Board  Member  Concerns                16.  *Executive  Session  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  If  Needed                17.  **Action  on  Matters  Discussed  in                    Executive  Session   18.  *Adjourn  If  you  need  special  accommodations  to  attend  this   PHHWLQJSOHDVHFRQWDFWWKH7RZQ0DQDJHUÂśV2IÂżFHDW 388-­8100  x-­202  as  early  as  possible.  Additional  information   about  most  Agenda  items  is  available  on  the  Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   website,  ZZZPLGGOHEXU\JRYRIÂżFHFRP,  on  the  Select   Board  page.  *  Decision  Item    **  Possible  Decision  Item 6/23

    The  Vermont  Agency  of  Transportation  (VTrans)  has  from  the  Secretary  of  Agriculture,   Food  and  Markets,  a  permit  to  apply  the  following  herbicides:  Garlon  4  ULTRA,  Garlon  3A,   Oust   Extra,   Escort,   Krenite   S   and   Rodeo   to   control   unwanted   vegetation   along   all   State   highways  and  airports.  Operations  are  authorized  to  start  approximately  May  1,  2014  but  will   QRWEHJLQXQWLOWKHDSSURSULDWHQRWLÂżFDWLRQUHTXLUHPHQWVDUHFRPSOHWHG7KHDSSOLFDWLRQZLOO EHPDGHE\FHUWLÂżHGSHVWLFLGHDSSOLFDWRUXVLQJPHFKDQLFDOO\FRQWUROOHGHTXLSPHQWDQGKDQG controlled  methods.  The  methods  employed  are  intended  to  avoid  or  eliminate  drift.  Resident   along  the  rights-­or-­way  (ROW)  are  encouraged  to  protect  sensitive  environments  or  water   supplies  within  100  feet  of  the  ROW  limits.  It  is  the  responsibility  of  residents  to  notify  VTrans   of  the  existence  any  water  supply  adjacent  to  the  Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ROW.  Citizens  wishing  to  inform   VTrans   are   urged   to   contact   the   nearest   District   Transportation  Administrator   as   follows:   District  1  -­    Bennington  -­  (802)  447-­2790,  District  2  -­  Dummerston  -­  (802)  254-­5011,  District   3  -­  Rutland  -­  (802)  786-­5826.  District  4  -­  White  River  Junction  -­  (802)  295-­8888,  District  5  -­   Colchester  -­  (802)  655-­1580,  District  6  -­  Berlin  -­  (802)  828-­2691,  District  7  -­  St.  Johnsbury   -­  (802)  748-­6670,  District  8  -­  St.  Albans  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  (802)  524-­5926,  District  9  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Derby  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  (802)  334-­ 7KHFRQWDFWSHUVRQDWWKH6WDWH+LJKZD\'HSDUWPHQW+HDGTXDUWHUVLV$QG\6KLYHO\ Hazardous   Materials   Coordinator,   One   National   Life   Drive,   Montpelier,   VT,   05633-­5001,   (802)  229-­8740.  Contact  can  also  be  made  using  the  VTrans  Internet  Web  page  at  www.aot. state.vt.us/maint/mainthome.htm.       The   appropriate   place   to   contact   with   comments   other   than   VTrans   is   the  Agency   of   Agriculture,   Food   and   Markets,   Agriculture   Resource   Management   and   Environmental   Stewardship,  116  State  Street,  Montpelier,  VT  05602,  (802)  828-­2431.  The  link  to  their  web   SDJHWKDWZRXOGGHVFULEH97UDQVKHUELFLGHDSSOLFDWLRQSHUPLWUHTXHVWFDQEHIRXQGDWwww. VermontAgriculture.com.                                                                              6/23

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 8-­1-­13 Ancv

Citizens  Bank,  N.A.  f/k/a  RBS  Citizens,  N.A.,   Plaintiff   v. Bruce  Donovan,  Administrator  of  the  Estate  of  Linda  T.  Aktins  aka  Linda  Thorpe  Morrison   fka  Linda  Esther  Thorpe,  Lisa  Stockwell,  Patrick  A.  Morrison  and  Occupants  residing  at   219  Cross  Road,  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont,   Defendants   NOTICE OF SALE      By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Hubert  S.  Atkins  (now  deceased)  and  Linda  T.  Aktins  aka  Linda  Thorpe  Morrison  fka   Linda   Esther  Thorpe   (now   deceased)   to   Citizens   Bank,   N.A.   dated   December   12,   2005   and  recorded  in  Volume  119,  Page  438  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh,   of  which  mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of   said  mortgage  and  for  the  purposes  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction   at  9:00  A.M.  on  July  8,  2014,  at  219  Cross  Road,  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont  all  and  singular  the   premises  described  in  said  mortgage:    To  Wit: Being   all   and   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Lisa   Stockwell   and   Patrick  A.   Morrison,  reserving  a  life  estate  for  Linda  T.  Atkins,  by  Quit  Claim  Deed  of  Linda  T.  Atkins   dated  June  2,  2010  and  recorded  June  10,  2010  in  Volume  134,  Page  504  of  the  Land   Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh.    A   certain   piece   of   land   in   Ferrisburgh   in   the   County   of  Addison   and   State   of   Vermont   described  as  follows,  viz,    Being  all  my  right,  title  and  interest  in  and  to  the  following  described  piece  or  parcel  of  land   together  with  all  improvements  thereon;Íž     Being   a   part   of   the   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Linda   Esther  Thorpe,   now   Linda   Thorpe   Morrison,   and   George   Roger   Thorpe,   by   Warranty   Deed   of   Rupert   Thorpe   and   Julia  Thorpe   dated   February   16,   1952,   and   recorded   at   Book   34   Pages   574-­575   in   the   Ferrisburgh  Land  Records,  and  being  more  particularly  described  in  said  Warranty  Deed   as  follows:     â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being   a   piece   on   the   north   side   of   the   road   with   dwelling   house   and   other   buildings   thereon,  said  piece  commencing  at  the  telephone  pole  just  westerly  of  the  house;Íž  thence   in   an   easterly   direction   along   said   road   a   distance   of   313   feet,   more   or   less   to   a   point   PDUNHGE\DFHPHQWPDUNHUVDLGSRLQWDOVREHLQJLGHQWLÂżHGE\DEDUEHGZLUHIHQFHWKHQFH northerly  along  said  barbed  wire  fence  at  an  approximate  90  degrees  angle  to  the  said  road   a  distance  of  236  feet  6  inches,  more  or  less,  to  a  point  marked  by  a  cement  monument;Íž   thence  westerly  in  a  line  parallel  with  the  road  a  distance  of  313  feet,  more  or  less,  to  a  point   marked  by  a  cement  monument;Íž  thence  southerly  a  distance  of  236  feet,  6  inches  more  or   less,  to  the  point  or  place  of  beginning.â&#x20AC;?    Terms  of  Sale:    $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the  time   of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the   Town  of  Ferrisburgh.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.    Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  30  Kimball   Avenue,  Ste.  307,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.    This  sale  may  be  cancelled   at  any  time  prior  to  the  scheduled  sale  date  without  prior  notice.      DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  4th  day  of  June,  2014 Citizens  Bank,  N.A.  f/k/a  RBS  Citizens,  N.A. By:  Joshua  B.  Lobe,  Esq.,  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  PLC 6/9,  16,  23   30  Kimball  Ave.,  Ste.  307    South  Burlington,  VT    05403

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PAGE  30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

TOWN OF LINCOLN PUBLIC NOTICE

 The  Lincoln  Planning  Commission  will  hold   a  SKETCH  PLAN  HEARING  for  Application   #14-­017   on   Thursday,   July   10,   2014   at   30 LQ WKH /LQFROQ 7RZQ 2I¿FH IRU D 2-­lot   subdivision   proposed   by   Bruce   and   Roberta   Goodyear   Parcel   #27070357.2   located   at   123   Geary   Road.   The   FINAL   HEARING   for   the   above   will   be   held   IMMEDIATELY  FOLLOWING  the  SKETCH   PLAN  HEARING.  Information  regarding  the   proposed   subdivision   may   be   seen   at   the   7RZQ2I¿FHGXULQJQRUPDOEXVLQHVVKRXUV Any   interested   persons   must   either   be   present  or  represented  at  the  Sketch  Plan   Hearing  to  receive  party  status.                            6/23

TOWN OF LINCOLN PUBLIC NOTICE

  The  Lincoln  Zoning  Board  of  Adjustment   will  hold  a  public  hearing  for  a  Conditional   Use   (application   #   14-­028),   as   requested   by   Bruce   and   Holly   Catlin,   at   the   corner   of  Isham  Hollow  Road  and  Quaker  Street,   Lincoln,   VT,   Parcel   ID   04040162.     The   hearing   regards   the   proposed   use   of   an   outbuilding  as  a  commercial  shop.      Said  hearing  will  be  held  Monday,  July  14,   DWSPDWWKH/LQFROQ7RZQ2I¿FH Participation  in  the  hearing  is  a  prerequisite   to  the  right  to  take  any  subsequent  appeal.     Information  concerning  the  application  may   EHVHHQDWWKH/LQFROQ7RZQ2I¿FHGXULQJ normal  business  hours.   6/23     Will  Sipsey,  Lincoln  ZBA  Clerk

TOWN OF RIPTON PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

     The   Ripton   Planning   Commission   will   hold   a   public   hearing   in   the   Ripton   Town   2I¿FH RQ 7XHVGD\ -XO\   DW  p.m.   to   consider   an   application   from   6HEDVWLDQ 0LVND   UHTXHVWLQJ D WZRORWVXEGLYLVLRQRIKLVSURSHUW\DW /LQFROQ 5RDG WD[PDS XQGHU 6HFWLRQVDQGRIWKH7RZQ¶V8QL¿HG 'HYHORSPHQW%\ODZ 7KHDSSOLFDWLRQLVDYDLODEOHIRULQVSHFWLRQ LQWKH7RZQ2I¿FH,QWHUHVWHGSDUWLHVZKR wish  to  appeal  or  be  heard  at  the  hearing   PD\GRVRLQSHUVRQRUPD\EHUHSUHVHQWHG E\ DQ DJHQW RU DWWRUQH\ &RPPXQLFDWLRQV UHODWLQJ WR WKH DSSOLFDWLRQ PD\ EH ¿OHG LQ writing   with   the   Commission   either   before   or  during  the  hearing.   1% 3DUWLFLSDWLRQ LQ WKH KHDULQJ LV QHFHVVDU\ WR HVWDEOLVK VWDWXV DV DQ µLQWHUHVWHGSHUVRQ¶DQGWKHULJKWWRDSSHDOD GHFLVLRQUHQGHUHGLQWKDWKHDULQJDFFRUGLQJ WRWKHSURYLVLRQVRI96$6HFWLRQV  E DQG D 3DUWLFLSDWLRQFRQVLVWV RIRIIHULQJWKURXJKRUDORUZULWWHQWHVWLPRQ\ HYLGHQFHRUDVWDWHPHQWRIFRQFHUQGLUHFWO\ related  to  the  subject  of  the  hearing. 5HVSHFWIXOO\VXEPLWWHG :DUUHQ%.LQJFKDLU  Ripton  Planning  Commission

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news@addisonindependent.com Addison Northeast Supervisory Union BRISTOL TOWN SCHOOL DISTRICT-­ BOARD OF SCHOOL DIRECTORS INVITATION TO SUBMIT LETTERS OF INTEREST

The  Mt.   Abraham   Union   Middle/ High   School   Board   is   seeking   a   Bristol   resident   interested   in   serving   on   the   13-­member   school   board   as   a   result   of   a  recent  vacancy.  It  is  the  responsibility   of   the   Town   School   Board   to   appoint   D TXDOL¿HG SHUVRQ WR ¿OO WKLV YDFDQF\ until  an  election  at  a  special  or  the  next   annual  meeting  is  held.  Members  of  the   Bristol   community   are   invited   to   submit   a   letter   of   interest   to   serve   as   a   board   member  by  Monday  July  14th.  The  Board   will   meet   with   interested   individuals   on   Monday,  July  14th  at  5:30  PM  at  a  special   Board   meeting   at   Bristol   Elementary   School,  and  will  appoint  the  new  member   at  that  time. Email   submissions   to:   kwheeler@ anesu.org  or  mail  to  the  address  below. Bristol  Elementary  School  Board c/o  David  P.  Adams,   Superintendent  of  Schools Addison  Northeast  Supervisory  Union 72  Munsill  Avenue,  Suite  601 Bristol,  VT  05443 802-­453-­3657  x  20 6/19,  23

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

TOWN OF FERRISBURGH INVITATION TO BID

  SEALED  BIDS  FOR:     Furnishing   and   placing   bituminous   materials   at   instructed   locations   will   be   UHFHLYHG DW WKH RI¿FH RI WKH )HUULVEXUJK Town   Clerk,   P.O.   Box   6,   3279   Route   7,   Ferrisburgh,   VT   05456   until   3PM   on   July   1st,  2014  and  will  be  publicly  opened  and   read   aloud   at   the   Selectboard   meeting   at   6:30pm  on  July  1st,  2014  at  the  Ferrisburgh   7RZQ&OHUN¶V2I¿FH   6SHFL¿FDWLRQV IRU ELGGHUV DQG ELG IRUPV may   be   obtained   without   charge   at   the   )HUULVEXUJK 7RZQ &OHUN¶V 2I¿FH  Route  7,  Ferrisburgh,  VT.     The   Town   of   Ferrisburgh,   VT   reserves   the   right   to   waive   any   informalities   in,   or   to  reject  any  and  all  bids,  or  to  accept  the   bid  deemed  to  be  in  the  best  interest  of  the   Town  of  Ferrisburgh.                                      6/12

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 14-­1-­13 Ancv

Central  Mortgage  Company,   Plaintiff               v.             Jennifer  Hessel  Smith,  Scott  Smith,  Marion  F.  Hessel  and  Occupants  residing  at  140  Old   Gravel  Lane,  Starksboro,  Vermont,   Defendants  NOTICE OF SALE    By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith,   Scott   Smith   and   Marion   F.   Hessel   to   Mortgage   Electronic   Registration  Systems,  Inc.,  as  nominee  for  CTX  Mortgage  Company,  LLC  dated  August  27,   2008  and  recorded  in  Volume  92,  Page  334,  which  mortgage  was  assigned  from  Mortgage   Electronic   Registration   Systems,   Inc.,   as   nominee   for   CTX   Mortgage   Company,   LLC   to   Central   Mortgage   Company   by   an   instrument   dated   October   1,   2012   and   recorded   on   January  26,  2013  in  Volume  105,  Page  208  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Starksboro,   of  which  mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of   said  mortgage  and  for  the  purposes  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at   10:15  A.M.  on  July  8,  2014,  at  140  Old  Gravel  Lane,  Starksboro,  Vermont  all  and  singular   the  premises  described  in  said  mortgage:    To  Wit:    Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Jennifer  Hessel  Smith,   Scott   Smith   and   Marion   F.   Hessel   by   Quit   Claim   Deed   of   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith   dated   August  22,  2008  and  recorded  September  4,  2008  in  Volume  92,  Page  331  of  the  Town  of   Starksboro  Land  Records  and  being  more  particularly  described  as  follows:     Being   all   and   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   Jennifer   Hessel   Smith     by   Warranty  Deed  of  Michael  Flack  dated  April  25,  2006  and  recorded  May  1,  2006  in  Volume   84   at   Page   563   of   the   Town   of   Starksboro   Land   Records   and   being   more   particularly   described  as  follows:    A  lot  of  land  with  building  thereon  situated  easterly  of  Vermont  Route  17E,  and  situated   on   the   easterly   side   of   the   former   highway   leading   southerly   from   Hanksville,   so-­called,   to  South  Starksboro,  so-­called,  and  land  being  all  and  the  same  described  in  a  Warranty   Deed  from  Floyd  N.  Thompson  and  Sadie  L.  Thompson  to  the  within  Grantors  dated  June   15,  1959  and  recorded  in  Book  25  at  Page  100  of  the  Starksboro  Land  Records.  Said  land   is  more  particularly  described  therein,  in  part  as  follows:     â&#x20AC;&#x153;â&#x20AC;ŚBeginning   at   a   point   in   said   easterly   line   of   above   mentioned   highway   and   at     the   northwesterly  corner  of  land  of  George  and  Eleanor  Spark,  thence  northerly  along  the  said   easterly  line  of  said  highway  165  feet  to  the  old  road  leading  to  a  gravel  pit,  thence  in  a   northeasterly  direction  along  said  road  260  feet  to  the  Huntington  River,  so-­called,  thence   southerly  along  the  westerly  bank  of  said  river  250  feet  to  the  said  northerly  line  of  said   6SHDU/DQGIHHWWRÂżUVWDERYHPHQWLRQHGKLJKZD\DQGWKHSRLQWRIEHJLQQLQJ    Being  part  and  parcel  of  the  so-­called  Ober  lot,  and  is  part  and  parcel  of  the  land  described   in  a  deed  from  Nixon  Thompson  to  Floyd  N.  and  Said  L.  Thompson  as  duly  appears  of   record  in  Starksboro  Land  Records  in  Volume  19  at  Page  120â&#x20AC;Śâ&#x20AC;? 6XEMHFWWRDQGEHQHÂżWWHGE\DOOULJKWVRIZD\HDVHPHQWVFRYHQDQWVSHUPLWVDQGULJKWV of  record.    Reference  is  hereby  made  to  the  above  instruments  and  to  the  records  and  references   contained  therein  in  further  aid  of  this  description.      Terms  of  Sale:    $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the  time   of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the   Town  of  Starksboro.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.    Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  30  Kimball   Avenue,  Ste.  307,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.    This  sale  may  be  cancelled   at  any  time  prior  to  the  scheduled  sale  date  without  prior  notice.   DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  4th  day  of  June,  2014 Central  Mortgage  Company    By:  Joshua  B.  Lobe,  Esq. Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  PLC 6/9,  16,  23   30  Kimball  Ave.,  Ste.  307    South  Burlington,  VT    05403

Contact Your U.S. Senators Sen. Patrick Leahy 1-­800-­642-­3193

5XVVHOO6HQDWH2IÂżFH%OGJ :DVKLQJWRQ'& VHQDWRUBOHDK\#OHDK\VHQDWHJRY

Sen. Bernie Sanders 1-­800-­339-­9834

65&8QLWHG6WDWHV6HQDWH :DVKLQJWRQ'& ZZZVDQGHUVVHQDWHJRY

Contact Your U.S. Congressman 5HS3HWHU:HOFKÂ&#x2021;

/RQJZRUWK+RXVH2IÂżFH%XLOGLQJ:DVKLQJWRQ'& ZZZZHOFKKRXVHJRY

Public Notices Index

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Public Notices for the following can be found in this ADDISON INDEPENDENT on Pages 29, 30 & 31

Addison County Superior Court (3) Addison Northeast Supervisory Union â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Bristol (1) Ferrisburgh (1) Leicester (1) Lincoln (3) Middlebury (1) New Haven (1) Ripton (1) Vermont Agency of Transportation (1)

MORTGAGEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. As  ordered  by  the  Court  set  forth  below  and  in  connection  with  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Kelly  Newton  and  David  Newton  to  National  City  Mortgage  Co  dba  Commonwealth   United  Mortgage  Company,  dated  November  23,  2004  and  recorded  in  Book  60  Page  137   of  the  land  records  of  the  Town  of  Leicester,  of  which  mortgage  the  Plaintiff  is  the  pres-­ ent  holder.    In  accordance  with  the  Judgment  Order  and  Decree  of  Foreclosure  entered   October  30,  2014  in  the  action  entitled  PNC  Bank,  National  Association  v  Kelly  Newton.,   by  the  Addison  Unit,  Civil  Division,  Vermont  Superior  Court,  Docket  No.  162-­7-­12  Ancv  for   breach  of  the  conditions  of  said  mortgage  and  for  the  purpose  of  foreclosing  the  same  will   be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at  2486  Route  7,  Leicester,  Vermont  on  July  7,  2014  at  2:30  pm   all  and  singular  the  premises  described  in  said  mortgage,      To  wit:   Schedule  A Mortgage  Deed  From  David  R.Newton  and  Kelly  G.  Newton  To  National  City  Mortgage Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  to  be  conveyed  to  David  Newton  and  Kelly   Newton  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Rene  Quenneville  and  Lorraine  Quenneville  to  be  recorded   in  the  Town  of  Leicester  Land  Records. Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Rene  Quenneville  and  Lor-­ raine  Quenneville  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Dennis  R  Charron  and  Linda  D  Charron  dated  April   21,  1976  and  recorded  at  Book  31,  Page  435  of  the  Town  of  Leicester  Land  Records  and   being  more  particularly  described  therein,  in  part,  as  follows: â&#x20AC;&#x153;Being   a   portion   of   the   same   lands   and   premises   conveyed   to   the   herein   Grantors   by   Warranty   Deed   of   Jean   Guy   Quenneville   and   Lillian   D.   Quenneville,   dated   July   25,   1973,  recorded  in  Book  31  at  page  179  of  the  Leicester  Land  Records,  the  portion  herein   conveyed  being  more  particularly  described  on  a  Survey  Map  entitled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Portion  of  Property   of  Gene  Guy  Quenneville  et  al,  Addison,  County,  Leicester,  Vermont,â&#x20AC;?  made  by  Lee  H.   Lowell,  dated  September  4,  1972,  as  follows: Beginning  at  a  point  marked  by  a  fence  post  and  iron  pipe  on  or  near  the  westerly  edge   of  the  right  of  way  of  U  S  Route  7,  said  point  being  the  northeasterly  corner  of  lands  of   Howard  Scarborough  and  the  southeasterly  corner  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed, Thence  go  N  77  degrees  03â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  250.00  feet  along  a  wire  fence  and  hedgerow  in  the   northerly  line  of  Scarborough  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe,  said  point  being  the  south-­ westerly  comer  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed; Thence  go  N  29  degrees  07â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  205.00  feet  in  a  blazed  and  painted  line  in  the  easterly   line  of  lands  retained  by  the  herein  Grantors  and  to  be  reconveyed  by  them  to  Jean  Guy   Quenneville  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe  set  in  stones,  said  point  being  the  northwest-­ erly  comer  of  the  lands  herein  conveyed; Thence  go  S  69  degrees  06â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  in  the  southerly  line  of  other  lands  of  the  said  Jean  Guy   Quenneville  four  (4)  distances  as  follows: 1)    83.00  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe,     2)    81.23  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe, 3)    74  39  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  pipe, 4)    4  00  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  a  painted  spot  on  a  stone  on  or  near  the  westerly   edge  of  the  right  of  way  of  said  highway,  said  point  being  the  southeasterly  corner  of   said  other  lands  of  said  Jean  Guy  Quenneville  and  the  northeasterly  comer  of  the  lands   herein  conveyed; Thence  go  S  29  degrees  07â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  170.00  feet  in  a  wire  fence  line  on  or  near  the  westerly   edge  of  the  right  of  way  of  said  highway  to  the  point  of  beginning. Also  hereby  conveyed,  by  quit  claim  only,  is  all  right,  title  and    interest    of  the  herein     Grantors   in     and   to   the   lands   lying   between   the   easterly   boundary   of   the   lands   herein   conveyed  as  described  above  and    the  center  line  of  said  highway.   Reference  is  hereby  made  to  the  above  instruments  and  to  the  records  and  references   contained  therein  in  further  aid  of  this  description.   Terms  of  sale:  Said  premises  will  be  sold  and  conveyed  subject  to  all  liens,  encum-­ brances,   unpaid   taxes,   tax   titles,   municipal   liens   and   assessments,   if   any,   which   take   precedence  over  the  said  mortgage  above  described. TEN  THOUSAND   ($10,000.00)   Dollars   of   the   purchase   price   must   be   paid   in   cash,   FHUWLÂżHGFKHFNEDQNWUHDVXUHUÂśVRUFDVKLHUÂśVFKHFNDWWKHWLPHDQGSODFHRIWKHVDOHE\WKH SXUFKDVHU7KHEDODQFHRIWKHSXUFKDVHSULFHVKDOOEHSDLGLQFDVKFHUWLÂżHGFKHFNEDQN treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  within  thirty  (30)  days  after  the  date  of  sale.        The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  pay-­ ing  the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.   Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale.   DATED:  June  3,  2014 By:  /s/:  Amber  L.  Doucette,  Esq. Amber  L.  Doucette,  Esq. Bendett  and  McHugh,  PC,  270  Farmington  Ave.,  Ste.  151,  Farmington,  CT  06032, (860)  606-­1090,  Fax  (860)  409-­0626 6/9,  16,  23


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  31

REAL ESTATE

Sessions  (Continued  from  Page  1) at  Bingham  Memorial  School,â&#x20AC;?  Ses-­ sions  said  in  a  written  statement  is-­ sued  on  Friday  through  the  Addison   Central   Supervisory   Union.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   an   interim  leader,  my  role  will  be  sup-­ porting   the   great   work   happening   in  Cornwall  and  reaching  out  to  the   community  to  continue  the  tradition   of  integrated,  community-­wide  sup-­ port  for  Cornwall  School.â&#x20AC;? Sessions   will   replace   Bingham   Memorial   Principal   Susan   Hackett,   who   is   stepping   down   in   order   to   help   her   husband   convalesce   from   a   serious   illness.   She   will   continue   to  work  within  the  ACSU  as  a  part-­ time   literacy   specialist.   Meanwhile,   $&68 DQG &RUQZDOO RIÂżFLDOV ZLOO spend  the  next  academic  year  search-­ ing  for  a  permanent  principal  for  the   Bingham  school. Peter   Burrows,   ACSU   superin-­ tendent,  said  Sessions  emerged  as  a   ABI    SESSIONS solid   and   logical   choice   for   the   in-­ terim  job. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  whole  family  has  many  fond   Âł2XU MRE ZDV WR ÂżQG DQ LQWHULP memories   of   learning   and   playing   who  is  familiar  with  the  community   in   the   supportive   Cornwall   School   and  an  administrator  who  knows  the   community,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some  of  our   ACSU   and   our   system,â&#x20AC;?   Burrows   closest  Cornwall  friends  were  made   VDLGRQ)ULGD\Âł$ELLVDSHUIHFWÂżW at   the   time   our   children   were   at   She  has  a  deep  understanding  of  the   school  together.  I  hope  the  same  kind   community   and   the   school   and   will   of   memories   and   close   connections   do   a   great   job   stew-­ are   being   made   today   arding   the   school   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Abi is a perfect in  a  dynamic  and  car-­ we   look   for   the   next   Ă&#x20AC;W6KHKDVDGHHS ing   school   commu-­ principal.â&#x20AC;? nity   where   children   During   her   lengthy   XQGHUVWDQGLQJ are  challenged  to  take   career  in  education  in   RIWKHFRPPXQLW\ risks,   to   learn,   and   to   Vermont,  Sessions  has   DQGWKHVFKRRO make  the  world  a  bet-­ worked  as  a  school  li-­ DQGZLOOGRDJUHDW ter  place.â&#x20AC;? brarian  in  Ripton  and   MREVWHZDUGLQJ Sessions   began   her   Sudbury,   as   an   ele-­ career  as  a  Montessori   WKHVFKRRODVZH mentary  school  teach-­ teacher,   and   said   she   er   in   Shoreham,   as   a   ORRNIRUWKHQH[W VWLOOIHHOVGHHSO\LQĂ&#x20AC;X-­ teacher  trainer  for  the   SULQFLSDOÂľ enced  by  Montessoriâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Vermont   Department   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;6XSHULQWHQGHQW philosophy   of   respect   of   Education,   and   as   3HWHU%XUURZV for  the  dignity  of  each   a   principal   in   Salis-­ childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  unique  path  to   bury,   Roxbury   and   at   learning   and   the   value   of   hands-­on   the  Sustainability  Academy  in  Burl-­ learning. ingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Old  North  End.  Three  years   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beginning   in   late   July,   I   hope   I   ago,   she   retired   from   the   academy,   can  meet  individually  with  each  staff   which   under   Sessionsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   leadership   member  and  with  many  of  the  fami-­ became  a  magnet  school  for  the  city. lies,â&#x20AC;?  Sessions  said  of  her  immediate   She   is   excited   to   help   her   local   plans.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   want   to   know   what   works   school. at  Cornwall  School  and  what  needs   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cornwall   School   has   an   excel-­ attention.  I  want  to  know  how  I  can   lent  reputation,  and  I  anticipate  that   support   each   staff   member   to   do   working  in  my  own  community  will   their  best  work.  I  want  to  know  how   be   a   joy,â&#x20AC;?   Sessions   said,   noting   she   to  best  focus  my  work  in  support  of   and  her  husbandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  three  children  at-­ student  learning.â&#x20AC;? tended  classes  there.  Her  husband  is   Once   her   one-­year   commitment   U.S.   District   Court   Judge   William   LVIXOÂżOOHGVKHSODQVWRUHWXUQWRWKH Sessions. commitments  she  will  have  to  let  go  

Green  Up  Day  a  success  in  Orwell We  would  like  to  thank  all  the   loved  them. people  who  helped  pick  up  the   We  would  also  like  to  thank   roadside  in  Orwell  for  Green  Up   the  Fortnightly  Club  for  donating   Day.  You  guys  did  an  awe-­ money  for  ice  cream  for  all.   some  job  again.  You  picked   We  would  also  like  to  thank   up  0.6  tons  of  garbage,  six   the  town  crew  for  helping   tires  and  one  appliance. of appreciation out,  too.  Great  job  and  thank   We  would  also  like  to   you  again  for  coming  out   thank  Country  Ag,  Bux-­ and  helping  to  make  a  big   tonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  Orwell  Gas  &  Go,  Chris-­ job  a  small  job. tineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  Pamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Country  Kitchen,   Cindy  Watrous  and  Elizabeth   Chipman  Point  Marina,  Ledgehaven   Orr Farm,  Mike  Christian,  and  Red   Green  Up  Chairmen  for  Orwell   Sky  Farm  for  donating  prizes  for   Green  Up  Day WKHNLGVÂś*UHHQ8SUDIĂ&#x20AC;H7KHNLGV Orwell

Notes

for  a  year,  such  as  coordinator  of  the   Everybody   Wins!   reading   mentor-­ ing   program   at   Salisbury   Commu-­ nity  School,  proprietor  of  Good  Life   Gardens,   teacher   of   the   Memories   to   Memoirs   writing   workshop,   and   cheese  packer  at  Blue  Ledge  Farm  in   Salisbury. But  for  now,  her  focus  is  on  Bing-­ ham  Memorial. â&#x20AC;&#x153;One  of  my  retirement  goals  was   to   reconnect   with   my   town,â&#x20AC;?   Ses-­ sions  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  guess  this  will.â&#x20AC;? Cornwall  is  one  of  two  ACSU  el-­ ementary  schools  that  will  function   next  year  with  interim  leaders.  The   other   is   Bridport   Central,   where   former   Mary   Hogan   Elementary   School   Principal   Bonnie   Bourne   and   current   Ripton   Elementary   Principal   Tracey   Harrington   will   co-­manage   the   school   in   the   wake   of   the   departure   of   Principal   Kath-­ leen   Kilbourne,   who   is   taking   the   top  administrative  post  at  Castleton   Elementary  School.

Public  Notices Pages  29,  30  and  31

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All  real  estate  advertising  in  this  newspaper   is   subject     to   the   Federal   Fair   Housing  Act   of   1968   as   amended   which   makes   it   illegal   to   advertise   â&#x20AC;&#x153;any   preference,   limitation   or   discrimination  based  on  race,  color,  religion,   sex,  handicap,  familial  status,  national  origin,   sexual  orientation,  or  persons  receiving  public   assistance,  or  an  intention  to  make  any  such   preference,  limitation  or  discrimination.â&#x20AC;? This  newspaper  will  not    knowingly  accept   any  advertisement  for  real  estate  which  is  in   violation  of  the  law.  Our  readers  are  hereby   informed  that  all  dwellings  advertised  in  this   newspaper  are  available  on  an  equal  opportu-­ nity  basis.    To  complain  of  discrimination,  call   HUD  Toll-­free  at  1-­800-­669-­9777.

48 Mountain Terrace Bristol, VT 05443 0(    s FAX 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: www.wallacere.com www.greenbuiltvermont.com

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Claire

Tom

Please  call  Kelly,  Claire,  or  Tom

NOTICE FROM REALTORS

THE  ADDISON  COUNTY  BOARD  OF  REALTORS  wishes  to  inform  the   SXEOLFWKDWQRWDOO%URNHUVRIUHDOHVWDWHDUH5($/72562QO\TXDOL¿HG Realtors  may  use  this  term.    It  is  a  registered  trademark.  Realtors  must   abide  by  a  strict  code  of  ethics,  take  continuing  education  and  attend  lo-­ cal   monthly   meetings,   annual   state   conferences,   and   yearly  national  conferences,  hence  making  them  better   informed  on  all  aspects  of  real  estate.    Your  REALTOR   appreciates  your  business.

June 23 Puzzle Solutions

TOWN OF LEICESTER PLANNING COMMISSION NOTICE

 The   Town   of   Leicester   is   holding   two   interactive  community  forums  on  July  8th  at   the  Town  Meeting  Hall  at  44  Schoolhouse   Road  as  part  of  the  revision  of  our  zoning   bylaws   (funded   by   a   Municipal   Planning   Grant   from   the   State   of   Vermont).   Light   refreshments  will  be  served.  7KH ÂżUVW IRUXP EHJLQQLQJ DW SP ZLOO DGGUHVV EHWWHU GHÂżQLWLRQ DQG VLWLQJ RI commercial   uses   and   the   conditional   use   review   which   allows   them.   The   second   IRUXPEHJLQQLQJDWSPZLOODGGUHVVKRZ Leicester  can  best  implement  the  recently   passed  Shoreland  Protection  legislation.  A   representative  of  the  Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Department  of   Environmental   Conservation   will   lead   the   workshop. 'RQQD6ZLQLQJWRQ&KDLU  Leicester  Planning  Commission

TOWN OF NEW HAVEN PLANNING COMMISSION PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE

   The   New   Haven   Planning   Commission   will  hold  a  Public  Hearing  on  July  14,  2014   at  6:30  PM  at  the  Town  Hall.  The  purpose   of   the   Public   Hearing   is   to   allow   New   Haven  residents  the  opportunity  to  provide   testimony   on   the   following   proposed   amendments   to   New   Havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   adopted   Zoning  Bylaw  pursuant  to  24  V.S.A.  §4441. The  proposed  amendment  affects  only  and   PRUH VSHFLÂżFDOO\ WKH UHPDLQLQJ SRUWLRQ RI parcel   #0787   on   map   12,   the   southwest   corner   of   Belden   Falls   Road   and   Route   7,   not   currently   designated   as   Highway   Commercial.  The  purpose  of  this  proposed   amendment   is   to   change   the   remaining   portion   of   parcel   #0787   designated   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Rural   Agriculture   District   (RA-­5   and   RA-­ 10)â&#x20AC;?   pursuant   to   sections   1002   and   1003   (NHZB)   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Highway   Commercial   District   (HC)â&#x20AC;?  pursuant  to  section  1005  (NHZB).        Article  II  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  section  220:  Zoning  Map     New   Haven   residents   are   invited   and   encouraged  to  participate.  A  more  detailed   summary   of   the   proposed   amendment   is   available   on   the   Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   website   (www. QHZKDYHQYWFRP DQGDWWKH7RZQ2IÂżFH Francie  Caccavo, 6/23     Planning  Commission  Chair

WALLACE REALTY

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PAGE  32  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  23,  2014

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Motion  Separation   Index

170

June 23 2014  
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