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READER ATHLETE • 50-PLUS WINTER EVENTS NOT TO MISS! • MEDICAL: THE ART OF HEALING INJURED TENDONS

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BIKING! NEW RACE SERIES REVS UP A GROWING SPORT

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New sporting events to try!

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SLEDDING THE NOTCH & OTHER DOWNHILL THRILLERS!

Top 10 Nordic races of the 2015 season!


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VERMONT

SPORTS NEW ENGLAND’S OUTDOOR MAGAZINE

EDITOR/PUBLISHER Angelo Lynn C publisher@vtsports.com STAFF WRITER Evan Johnson C evan@vtsports.com ART DIRECTION & PRODUCTION Shawn Braley C braley@gmail.com ADVERTISING MANAGER Christy Lynn C ads@vtsports.com ADVERTISING SALES Greg Meulemans C greg@vtsports.com | (802) 366-0689 Dave Honeywell | (802) 583-4653 C dave_golfhouse@madriver.com READER ATHLETE EDITOR Phyl Newbeck C phyl@together.net GEAR AND BEER EDITOR Hilary DelRoss C gear@vtsports.com THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTING WRITERS John Morton, Annie Pokorny THIS MONTH’S CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Herb Swanson

Sledders shoulder their rides for another hike to the top of Smugglers' Notch and the exhilarating ride back down.

EDITORIAL AND PRODUCTION OFFICE Vermont Sports | 58 Maple Street Middlebury, Vt. 05753 | 802-388-4944 We welcome unsolicited material but cannot guarantee its safe return. Materials submitted will become property of Vermont Sports. Vermont Sports is independently owned and operated by Addison Press Inc., 58 Maple Street, Middlebury, Vt. 05753. It is published 10 times per year. Established in 1990. Vermont Sports subscriptions in the U.S.: one year $25. Canada: US funds, please add $5 per year postage. Other international subscriptions, please call 802-388-4944 for information. POSTMASTER: Please send address changes to Vermont Sports, 58 Maple Street, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

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KEEP ON ROLLING New fat biking events across the state boost the sport’s growing popularity!

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PUBLISHER COMMENTARY

MEDICAL: ANATOMY 101

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

READER ATHLETES

Vermont Sports takes a thrilling ride on a Hammerhead Sled down Smugglers' Notch with one of the sport's leading videographers.

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7 WINTER SPORTS YA GOTTA TRY! Ski Vermont

The Green Mountain Club

Ever dared to swim a 50-meter race in icy waters, or do an obstacle race in the dead of winter, or enter a marathon on snowshoes? It’s all going on right here in Vermont. Check it out.

Pages 12-13 3 INN-TO-INN TREKS IN THE BACKCOUNTRY Looking for a backcountry adventure? We outline three multi-day treks along Vermont’s Catamount Trail — from easy to pretty darn tough. ON THE COVER: Ben Mirkin is profiled on the skyline in Lyndonville in the Northeast Kingdom. Photo by Herb Swanson

JANUARY 2015

Page 14 LIKE BAMBI: HOW TO SKATE SKI ON ICE Our resident Nordic expert, Annie Pokorny, gives some pointers on how to skate ski on an icy surface.

ADVERTISERS! The space deadline for the February issue of Vermont Sports is January 21. Contact ads@vtsports.com today to reserve space!

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publisher commentary Let’s talk about guts and glory. As in, do you think you have the former and want to pursue the latter? If you answered yes to either, we present a few opportunities in this issue for those who might want to swim a 100-meter race in the frozen waters of Lake Memphremagog, or ice skate the 25 miles from Newport to Magog, Quebec. Or maybe you’re into snowshoeing? Care to do a half-marathon, marathon or, better yet, slog through the snow for 100-miles on a pair of those not-sonimble shoes, gaining 1,200 vertical feet with each 6-mile loop? If that’s not exactly your cup of tea on a frigid winter’s day, maybe you’d prefer to test your tolerance for cold at Benson’s Shale Hill on Feb. 7, when obstacle course guru Rob Butler hosts his second annual Polar Bear Challenge? It’s many of the same obstacles you have to overcome in any other season — ropes to climbs, walls to surmount, tires to move — only in the snow, mud and ice. The distance? Go ’til you drop. Honors go to the remaining few who complete the most laps. The obvious question, for most of us, is why? The answer is just as obvious: For the same reason Tommy Caldwell and Kevin Jorgeson are trying the first freeascent of the daunting 3,000 foot Dawn Wall route on Yosemite’s El Capitan. If you haven’t been following the exploits of these two world-class climbers, they began their quest on Dec. 27 and figure it will be a couple of weeks before they walk on flat ground again. Interestingly, they do most of their climbing in the late afternoons and early evenings with headlamps, then hang suspended in their bivouacs for the rest of the night on the side of the rock face with temps plunging below freezing. But, again, why? Because much is gained by pushing beyond what we normally do in our routine lives. It breaks the mold we’ve built for ourselves. It shatters perceived barriers. It stirs the soul and ignites our imagination. It reminds us that we have yet to tap our potential, which is always more than we allow ourselves to believe. To achieve that potential, of course, you don’t have to perform daring feats in the pursuit of glory. Getting your first taste of ice climbing at the annual Smugg’s Ice Bash, Jan 23-25 would suffice. Or attending the Winterbike Festival at Kingdom Trails this Feb. 27-March 1 and taking that first ride over the snow on a fat bike works as well. (See details

JANUARY 2015

VERMONT’S WINTER ADVENTURE CENTER

by Angelo Lynn

on Page 10.) If you’re a skier and want to try something new, grab a pair of backcountry skis and participate in any number of randonee races throughout the state, including “The Magic” Randonee Race on March 14 at Magic Mountain Resort, or the Mad River Valley Ski Mountaineering Race on Feb. 1 that goes from the base of Mad River over to Mount Ellen and down to the base of that resort. It’s anything that broadens your horizon, that pushes you a bit and makes you aware of your latent abilities — largely untapped because we get so burdened by the chores of the day we forget to push ourselves in the pursuit of joy. And it is joy. Ask anyone who has run a 10K, half-marathon or marathon what they feel afterwards and it’s almost always a sense of elation, accomplishment, satisfaction, pride, happiness. The experience creates a more acute sense of selfawareness, particularly about our ability to perform tasks beyond the ordinary. And that makes us feel good, optimistic, motivated — which circles back to guts and glory. Because being motivated and staying motivated, no matter what the challenge, is what takes guts. The glory just follows. ••••••••• If you’re an athlete of any sort, you have gear. And if you have gear, you have a favorite store or person from whom you get that gear. You also have favorite businesses that you return to time after time for repairs (bikes or skis), or replacement parts, or tune-ups or just more of it (particularly, climbers). Runners go through shoes like leftover pasta, tennis players wear out balls weekly, golfers lose more balls than they find, and all of us like appropriate clothing that helps us compete better or look better — whichever priority it might be. The point is we couldn’t do what we do without the stores and businesses that provide the gear that fuels our passions. Cheers to those guys! But we want you to take a few moments to do more than a perfunctory cheers: Vote for your favorite sporting good stores, eateries and breweries, and help them win a 2015 Vermont Sports Black Diamond Award. Find the online survey at our website, www.vtsports. com, take a few minutes and support those businesses who support you all year long.

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KEEP ON ROLLING

NEW FAT BIKE EVENTS KEEP CYCLISTS PEDALING THROUGHOUT THE WINTER By Evan Johnson EAST BURKE — Tim Tierney, executive director of Kingdom Trails, is used to seeing the cross-country skiers, snowshoers and lately fat bikers ducking in and out of the woods. It’s the fat biking crowd that’s new to the scene, Tierney said, and it’s a growing part of the winter community. “I just passed my 17th fat bike on the trails and it’s only a Tuesday,” he said in a recent phone interview, adding that Vermont’s biking culture has plenty of room for this new addition to the trails, and that fat bike events are popping up throughout the state. On Dec. 7, the Catamount Outdoor Family Center in Williston hosted the first annual Global Fat Bike Day, kicking off a six-event series that spans the QuebecVermont border. “Le Grand Fat Tour,” as the series has been titled, continues from now until March with events in East Burke, Vt. and Coaticook, Bromont, and Oka in Quebec. Fat bike enthusiasts enjoyed demos, races and a scavenger hunt. “Fat Biking has been exploding in the Northeast,” says Ryan Thibault, founder and co-owner of Mountain Bike Vermont, an online resource for all things mountain-biking related in Vermont. “After our Winterbike event drew over 300 participants last year, many of whom are Canadian, we decided to partner with our Quebecois friends and create a series that spans the border.” The goal of these events, Thibault says, is to promote areas and trail networks that would like to see more bikers, provide opportunities to demo fat bikes through

Mike Mader, above, rides the woods at Kingdom Trails. At right, Orion Campbell-Wolk, catches a ray of sunshine on the same trail system, and, opposite page, catches air off a jump. Photos by Herb Swanson

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local shops, and promote local products. In addition to the rides and races, the events also highlight local breweries and other beverages, and food producers. The events so far have attracted more than just committed cyclists. Many, he says, are simply curious. “People are coming to these events because they feel so intrigued by the bikes,” Thibault says. “They’re like monster trucks, like them or not, they have a gravity to them. The appeal is undeniable.” The upcoming Le Grand Fat Tour events in the Northeast are: Jan. 17: Le Velo Neige de Coaticook - Coaticook, Quebec Jan. 31: Le Jour de la Marmotte - Bromont, Quebec Feb. 15: Oka Festival - Oka Quebec Feb. 28: Winterbike - East Burke, Vt. ********** Other events around the state include: • Weekly group rides with the Fat Wednesday evening group at the Catamount Outdoor Family Center, starting Jan. 7. • On Jan. 10 and 11, fat bike enthusiasts from all over Vermont will gather in Ripton where they will explore Rikert Nordic Center’s 50-kilometer trail system. Rikert director Mike Hussey expects numerous participants this year, noting that the best part of last year’s event was that it attracted winter sport enthusiasts from all corners of the state and beyond. “Right now we have 3 kilometers of pretty good ski trails, but at the same time we have 55 kilometers of really great fat biking terrain,” he says. “Fat biking really helps extend the trail network at times like this

JANUARY 2015

when the snow might not be where you want it.” The interest in these larger bikes started during low snowfall winters when bike riders would rather keep riding than head to the mountain. Bike companies took notice and models like the Pugsly by Surly, or the Farley from Trek were specifically developed to ride through snow-covered trails. Tire treads of 5 inches wide add grip and prevent the wheels from sinking into soft surfaces such as sand and snow. Fat bikes also require lower tire pressure than regular mountain bikes—10-15 psi or even lower. In February, the festivities continue with Ride, Glide & Rawhide, a Valentine’s Day race at Kingdom Trails that celebrates several winter disciplines; and on Feb. 22, fat bikes will make their debut at the 70th edition of the Stowe Derby. One hundred Fat Bike riders will navigate Stowe’s historic Toll Road and sprint down the scenic town bike path before crossing the finish line at the center of Stowe village. As biking becomes a year-round activity, Nordic trail centers around the state have moved to include “fat bikes” as a way to increase the use of their trails. Last year, the Catamount Outdoor Family Center in Williston as well as Kingdom Trails in East Burke officially opened their terrain to riders. “We’ve seen exponential growth in fat bike riders coming to Vermont from all over the East Coast,” says Tierney, in East Burke. “A few years ago, only a few companies made fat bikes. This year, who doesn’t? People want to pedal year round, whether it’s the road or the trail.”

VTSPORTS.COM 7


Looking for

Max Speed By Evan Johnson

STOWE — After nearly an hour of hiking up the steep, snow-covered Smugglers’ Notch Road, I was ready for a break. Lacking both snowshoes and traction spikes to help me through the snow, my lungs felt like they might leap out of my chest and my thighs burned. The camera strapped to my chest now weighed a ton and the waterproofing on my boots had long failed. With only about 100 yards until the summit, I pushed on in my search for Max Speed. At the top, I immediately recognized him by the two video cameras mounted on the sides of his red and silver helmet. His snowsuit had the word “sledneck” emblazoned in red lettering on the pant leg and a helmet with the stars and stripes of the American flag. Two small cameras stuck out from each side like antennae. “You must be Max,” I said, catching my breath. As winter descended on the Green Mountains, I had received video clips of thrilling sled rides down some of Vermont’s mountain roads. The man behind the videos was a soft-spoken guy in a red, white and blue motocross-style helmet who went by the moniker “Max Speed.” Every video he sent featured reports on the latest snow conditions on the hill and then footage of rides down the 2,428-foot Lincoln Gap between Lincoln and Warren or Mount Philo in Charlotte. The rides seemed hellishly fast and the snow conditions unbelievably good, so I had hiked out see for myself. It turns out Max Speed is actually the nickname of Tony Telensky of Jericho. Telensky is a maintenance worker at IBM in Essex Junction and works 12-hour shifts. This, he explained, gives him lots of time for sledding, in addition to skiing and snowboarding, which he does at neighboring Smugglers’ Notch Resort.

Tony Telensky – also known as Max Speed – steers his Hammerhead Sled through a turn on The Smugglers' Notch Road. Below, Telensky shows the array of cameras he uses to record his sledding expeditions. Photos by Evan Johnson

“Twelve-hour days are pretty long, but it’s worth it for all the days off,” he said. “It’s like being semiretired.” With an elevation of 2,170 feet, Route 108 traverses Smugglers’ Notch with hairpin turns winding around boulders the size of small houses. When the snow piles up, the road is closed until spring, creating an irresistible playground for cross country skiers, snowshoers, fat-bikers, ice climbers and of course, the sledders, who were ready to go. Today, I joined a group of about 10, who launched themselves one by one, headfirst down the hill. As they darted past me and smoothly entered the first turn, they looked like sliding penguins. Suddenly they were all gone, leaving me at the top with Tony’s wife, Pam

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Telensky, who caught me up on some of their recent excursions. In addition to Smugglers’ Notch, they also regularly head to Mount Philo in Charlotte and the more advanced Lincoln Gap Road, which connects the towns of Lincoln and Warren by way of a seasonal road that includes the steepest mile of pavement in the United States. “Min Speed” (her own sledding nickname, indicating her preference for slower speeds) told me the Lincoln side receives more sunlight and was softer, while the Warren side was hard and fast. “It was total, sheer panic for me,” she said, recounting the descent into the Mad River Valley. “I took off and I couldn’t turn. I just kept picking up speed and I had to go with it until I could stop. I was scared to death and my legs were shaking when I got off. We’ve been riding these sleds since 2008 and yesterday was the most frightened I’ve been.” But sledding, she said, is not just for the younger crowd. “It turns old men back into little boys,” she said with a laugh. In preparation for my first ride of the day, Pam graciously loaned me her helmet, which was bright yellow and featured pink and purple flowers. I took a running start and launched myself down the hillside. All that hiking suddenly became worth it as the trees and boulders passed in a black and grey blur. Fortyfive minutes of hiking made for just under a minute of an exhilarating descent, but I lacked the fine sense of control needed to maintain both speed and control through some dramatic turns. The bright yellow sled nearly dumped me twice as I whipped around the crags, startling hikers and causing their dogs to chase

JANUARY 2015


Diane, Emily and Bill Telensky, of Connecticut, are regular sledders at Smugglers’ Notch, along with Bill’s brother, Tony — an apt testimony to the wide draw of the sport. Photo by Evan Johnson

my heels. But I somehow maintained control until my ride crawled to a stop as the road leveled out, a short distance from where Tony waited alongside Wayne Pierce, a co-worker and friend of Tony’s. “Nice helmet,” Pierce said, “It’s just your color.” Telensky first saw the Hammerhead Sled in a catalog for Eastern Mountain Sports in 2008. The sleds were designed in Shelburne, Vt. and resemble the Flexible Flyer sleds popular in the early 1900s. But unlike the wooden and steel models of years ago, these sleds feature lightweight aluminum, durable plastic runners, comfortable mesh seating and sensitive steering. Telensky and his wife first got to try these sleds at a winter carnival in Barre in 2008. Then they went out and bought their own. “In a week, we bought two, because why would you want one?” he said. It was after this that the alter ego Max Speed was created. Not long after, Telensky and Pierce competed in a series of time trials at Tenney Mountain, a former ski area in Plymouth, N.H.; and the two were hooked on the sport. On his days off, Telensky heads to hills in the central and northern part of the state with his wife, friends and co-workers, where they explore forest roads like the ones in Lincoln and Stowe, as well as Mount Philo, which he says is particularly good for beginner sledders because it features a big, graceful hairpin turn. At all of these locations, the sledders record their adventures and the conditions with a collection of mounted GoPro cameras pointing in all directions. The regular snow reports of their outings are posted on YouTube and other media outlets. “We do the videos to show people where to sled and what the conditions are,” Pierce said. “On some days like this, you would never expect the snow to be any good if you looked at the forecast, but the snow’s

JANUARY 2015

good if you go out and find it.” I decided to take a break from the action and crouched on top of a boulder located at the apex of a turn, snapping away with my camera as they flew past. Most made graceful arcs with a few making skittering turns on the hard-packed snow. There were also a few wipeouts. While hiking back up the hill, I caught up with Telensky for some tips on the finer points of sled control and conditions. Here are a few: When the forecast calls for poor skiing, that’s when the sledding’s likely to be best. On our day in the Notch, the group’s original plans had been to explore Mount Philo, but when a December thaw swung through the state, they knew they would have to find more snow elsewhere. “Bad skiing means good sledding,” Telensky said. “That also goes vice versa – when weather calls for a big dump of snow, it gets too deep for the sleds.” As for control, in order to maximize your speed, adjust your body position. For greater speed, slide back on the sled; for more control, stay forward. It also helps to sled in the tracks made by someone else. Another tip Telensky offered: don’t be the first person down the hill. All of this sounded good, but I decided I needed some more practice and Telensky assured me the season would allow for plenty of that. Just the night before, Telensky and Pierce sledded Smugglers’ Notch in the dark, lighting their way with headlamps. “It’s actually more fun than in the daytime,” he said. “It makes the fear factor go up by about a thousand percent because you can only see about a foot in front of you.” It was a hike back to the top, but it went quickly as I pondered the thrill of a nighttime descent — all the while assuring myself that the ride down in daylight was definitely worth it.

VTSPORTS.COM 9


7

WINTER EVENTS

YA GOTTA TRY By Evan Johnson

If you’re looking to test your mettle or just try something new, here are seven winter sporting events that deserve a second look.

THE SMUGGS ICE BASH: JAN. 23 – 25 WHERE: Smugglers’ Notch, Stowe/ Jeffersonville, Vt. For ice climbers, the annual Smuggs Ice Bash is an opportunity to compete, learn, meet other climbers and experience the thrilling sport of ice climbing. The weekend kicks off with a dry-tooling competition at Petra Cliffs Climbing Center in Burlington and then heads to Smugglers’ Notch (accessed from the Stowe or Jeffersonville side of Vermont 108 for clinics, demos and multimedia presentations. This year, climber Will Mayo will present a talk on growing up in Vermont, climbing in the Northeast, and how finding a local climbing community helped prepare him for many climbing milestones. For more information, see www.smuggsicebash.com.

NORTH AMERICAN MARATHON DISTANCE SKATING:

JAN. 31 – FEB. 2 WHERE: Newport, Vt. If ice skating is more to your liking, consider going the distance with this marathon event in the Northeast Kingdom. This winter, Kingdom Games and Marathon Skating International will maintain a 700-meter track on Lake Memphremagog for races from 1K, 5K, 25K and 50K. The weekend wraps up with a 25-mile skate the length of the lake to Magog, Quebec. These are long skates, not hockey skates, so be sure to check it out at www.marathonskating.org.

POLAR BEAR CHALLENGE AT SHALE HILL: FEB. 7 WHERE: Benson, Vt. Ever thought of doing an obstacle race, but didn’t because you wanted something tough, but lower key? Then consider a 10K race with over 65 obstacles in the dead of a Vermont winter. The Polar Bear Challenge at Shale Hill in Benson, Vermont is one of the tougher winter races in the state. Founder and owner Rob Butler has put together a course that will be as much a mental challenge

as a physical one. In addition to walls to surmount, ropes to climb and carrying challenges to complete, you can look forward to freezing temperatures, snow, mud and lots of ice to add to the challenge. Bragging rights this year go to whoever can complete the most laps. For more information, go to www. shalehilladventure.com.

SWIM IN A FROZEN LAKE: FEB. 21 – 22 WHERE: Newport, Vt. The folks at Kingdom Games have been coming up with biking, swimming and running events since 2010 and refuse to take winters off. This winter, the United States Winter Swimming Association and Kingdom Games have partnered to host the Inaugural United States Winter Swimming Championships in Newport on Lake Memphremagog in two 25-meter swimming lanes cut in the ice. The water temperature of the lake is expected to be around 32 degrees Fahrenheit, and the likely air temperature will range from 0 to 25 degrees. The organizers plan to offer championship races over the following distances: 25, 50 and 100 meters. Interested? You can learn more at www.uswsa.org.

WINTERBIKE FESTIVAL AT KINGDOM TRAILS: FEB. 27 – MARCH 1 WHERE: East Burke, Vt. Just because there’s snow on the ground doesn’t mean the bikes have to go away. Take the knobby 5-inch wide tires of a fat bike for a spin at the fourth annual Winterbike at Kingdom Trails in East Burke. As in years past, this event will include demos, local products and brews, group rides, fat tires, fresh tracks and hot toddies. New for 2015, the festival has been expanded to a full weekend of fun. It starts Friday, Feb. 27, for a pre-

registration party, ride and race; then ride all day Saturday before the Winterbike Dinner Gala that evening; then stay an extra day for Sunday morning group rides. This event is part of Mountain Bike Vermont’s Le Grand Fat Tour, a series of fat biking rallies in Vermont and Southern Quebec. For more information on this and the rest of the series, see www. legrandfattour.com.

PEAK 2015 NATIONAL SNOWSHOE CHAMPIONSHIP: MARCH 7 WHERE: Pittsfield, Vt. The Aimee Farm in Pittsfield is home to some of the hardest races in the country in every season of the year. The National Snowshoe Championship in March is no different. This winter, the weekend of snowshoe races will include distances of 6 miles, half-marathon, marathon and 100 miles on a rugged 6.5-mile loop course with a gain of 1,200 vertical feet. The 100-mile race has a 34-hour time limit – no exceptions. For more info, see www. peak.com.

“THE MAGIC” RANDONNÉE RACE – MARCH 14 WHERE: Magic Mountain Ski Resort, Londonderry, Vt. Here’s a ski race that tests your speed going both up and down the mountain. Randonnée – or simply “rando” – ski racing hearkens back to skiing’s early years, when skiers challenged the mountain both up and down, without the help of chairlifts. Using climbing “skins” with alpine touring, telemark bindings or even split-boards, racers start at the base of the mountain at Magic Ski Resort, ascend, then descend on marked trails. This race at Magic gains and loses over 6,000 vertical feet. For more info see www.nerandorace.blogspot.com.

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news briefs TEXAS COMPANY, ACTIVE NETWORK, TO REFUND VERMONT ATHLETES Over 1500 Vermont consumers may receive more than $160,000 from Active Network, LLC, a Texasbased company that provides an online platform for individuals to register for races and other recreational activities. The refunds stem from Active’s deceptive method of signing consumers up for its discount membership program – ActiveAdvantage – during online registration for races. Vermonters who registered for races were often later charged between $59 and $65 annually for ActiveAdvantage. Active charged the credit cards that consumers used when they registered for a race or event. Less than 10 percent of these consumers ever utilized the “benefits” of ActiveAdvantage. Consumers who were charged for ActiveAdvantage told state authorities that the charges were: “a complete surprise;” “I had not joined knowingly;” and “I was forced to sign up when I paid for the race,” according to Vermont Attorney General Bill Sorrell. Sorrell noted that “businesses may not deceptively enroll

consumers in programs with recurring charges when their credit card information has been collected for a different purchase.” He also advised consumers to “carefully read the terms of anything that they purchase online and vigilantly examine credit card statements for unexpected charges.” Under the terms of the settlement, Active will: (1) offer a full refund of all amounts paid by each Vermonter who was charged for ActiveAdvantage; (2) pay $25,000 to the State; and (3) going forward, clearly distinguish registrations for discount membership programs from the registration for events or the purchase of other goods and services. All consumers entitled to a refund will receive an email from Active before the end of the year. To receive a refund, consumers must respond to that email with their name and address (where a check can be sent). Consumers who have questions should contact the Consumer Assistance Program at 1-800-649-2424 or 802-656-3183.

SUGARBUSH RESORT UPDATES UPHILL TRAVEL POLICY Warren — Sugarbush Resort has made significant changes to its uphill travel policy this season. This winter, skiers and riders are permitted to hike or skin before and after operating hours at both mountains on designated trails. Those interested will be required to pick up a free uphill travel pass from Guest Services prior to the first time they skin or hike. The pass will be valid all season. On Saturday, Jan. 11, Sugarbush will host a community forum in Castlerock Pub to share the policy with the community, answer any questions about the new policy, and to issue uphill travel passes. To coincide with the resort’s grooming schedule, both mountains have specific designated routes for uphill and downhill travel depending on the time of day. At Lincoln Peak, uphill travel is permitted on Easy Rider to Lower Pushover to Pushover to Birch Run between the hours of 5:00 p.m. to 10:00 p.m. and Racer’s Edge to Lower Snowball to Snowball to the top of the Valley House chair between the hours of 4 a.m. to 7 a.m. Due to plowing, parking for hiking and skinning is provided at Lincoln Peak in the heli-lot, located to the right of The Schoolhouse. Hikers and skinners must

ski or ride down the same designated routes. At Mt. Ellen, uphill travel is permitted on Easy Does It to Straight Shot to Cruiser to Lower Rim Run to Rim Run between the hours of 4 a.m. to 7 a.m. and 5 p.m. to 10 p.m. Due to plowing, parking is provided in the lot next to the Sunny Double lift. There will be times when uphill travel is closed due to weather conditions. Skinners and hikers are asked to check the Sugarbush snow report before proceeding. Once the resort ceases operation for the winter season, hiking and skinning will be permitted. Those who are looking to boot pack uphill are asked to not hike directly in skinning tracks. Hiking and skinning during operating hours may still be authorized under special circumstances, including mechanical failure, weather hold, ski school instruction, or special events. A day ticket or season pass is required and is only permitted when specifically authorized by the resort. For a full description of what to know before skinning or hiking at Sugarbush and to review the rules that skinners and hikers must adhere to, please visit the winter trail use policy on Sugarbush’s website, www.sugarbush.com.

HARRIS HILL SKI JUMP IN BRATTLEBORO TO BE HELD FEB. 14 – 15 BRATTLEBORO, Vt. — The Harris Hill Ski Jump, the only Olympic-sized, 90-meter ski jumping hill in New England, will play host to its annual two-day ski jumping event Feb. 14 and 15, 2015. In addition to its traditional jumps, this year’s event will include a Men’s and Women’s International Skiing Federation (FIS) Cup. This will be the first-ever women’s FIS event in the U.S. The weekend’s events will also serve as a stop on the United States American Ski Jumping (USASJ) series. Founded in 1922, the annual jumping competition held on Harris Hill attracts several thousand spectators each year not only to watch local jumpers reach great

JANUARY 2015

heights, but also to view world renowned jumpers soar in the sport of ski jumping. The three major competitions, merged with the annual Pepsi Challenge and Fred Harris Memorial Tournament, will draw the best male and female ski jumpers from across the globe to Brattleboro. Competition each day will start at 11 a.m. and will conclude by 4 p.m.  Regular ticket pricing is $20 adults, $15 youth (age 6-12 years). Age five and younger are always free.  For details on the event see www.HarrisHillSkiJump.com.

VTSPORTS.COM 11


3

Skiers head out on the 300-mile Catamount Trail, which offers a wide variety of excursions varying from single-day jaunts to several two- and three-day treks going inn to inn.

Vermont — This winter, take a break from your normal routine and make some time for a foray into the backcountry. From short outings to weekend getaways, there are plenty of adventures to be had beyond the ski trails at area resorts. The following three tours, located on Vermont’s 300-mile long Catamount Trail, run two-to three days and involve spending nights at a number of inns and bed-and-breakfasts in close proximity to the trailhead. Skiers should be forewarned that route-finding may be problematic in the backcountry; that weather is uncertain and treacherous in the winter; and skiing in the backcountry is not for

Inn-to-inn Treks to Test Your Backcountry Skills By Evan Johnson

the uninitiated. AT gear with climbing skins, not Nordic skis, is recommended for ungroomed trails and for any trails not within a Nordic touring center. We recommend carrying snowshoes for terrain that is too rough to ski. All routes described below are very general in nature, and not to be used for route-finding. For maps and more detailed route descriptions, as well as tips on preparing for a trip into the Vermont backcountry, go to www.catamountrail. org and research the trips outlined below for where to start, more detailed route descriptions, and average time required per section of trail. For general purposes, a competent backcountry

skier should average at least 2 mph with a light daypack. Allow five to six hours, therefore, for a 12-mile trek.

KILLINGTON TO RIPTON Days: 3 Total distance: 30 miles, plus skiing at cross-country centers

DAY 1

Itinerary: Sherburne Pass parking lot on Route 4 to Mountain Top Cross-Country Ski Center (Catamount Trail Section 13); 10 miles. Route description: Access the Catamount Trail from the Long Trail/

12 VTSPORTS.COM

Photo by Greg Maino

Appalachian Trail/Catamount Trail parking lot, located off Route 4 at the top of Sherburne Pass. This section of the trail features 10 miles of intermediate skiing through varied terrain with views of the Chittenden Reservoir. Along the way, you’ll ski a variety of trail types, including ungroomed backcountry, snowmobile trails, and the groomed trails of Mountain Top Cross-Country Ski Center. Once arriving at Mountain Top, explore their cross-country trails or relax at the inn and enjoy the views of the Green Mountains. Transportation tip: Leave a car at one end of the destination and have someone drop you off at the other terminus. We suggest traveling south to north, but it works either way.

Lodging first night: Mountain Top Resort, 195 Mountain Top Rd., Chittenden, Vt 05737 1-800-445-2100, 802-483-2311 www.mountaintopinn.com

DAY 2

Itinerary: Mountain Top Cross-Country Ski Center to Brandon Gap (Catamount Trail Section 14) to Blueberry Hill Inn, Goshen; 14 miles. Route description: From Mountain Top Inn and Resort, ski 10 miles of the Catamount Trail along groomed ski trails and VAST snowmobile trails to Brandon Gap. Cross Route 73 and head up steep terrain to Horrid Mountain. The first

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4 miles traverse intermittent streams and gullies along the Catamount Trail, requiring good ski control (or snowshoes). Once across the streams and gullies, drop down onto the rolling terrain of the Blueberry Hill Nordic Center. These are ungroomed trails, but well marked and cut. At Blueberry Hill, you’ll have access to 50km of ungroomed skiing. At the end of this long day, stay the night at Blueberry Hill Inn. Be sure to get an early start.

Lodging night two: Blueberry Hill Inn, 1245 Goshen Ripton Rd., Goshen, VT, Vt. 05733 802-247-6735, www.blueberryhillinn.com

While trekking involves getting from point-to-point, there’s always time for a few runs down silky smooth openings in the backcountry. Emily Johnson gets first tracks down a pitch. Photo by Brian Mohr/EmberPhoto

DAY 3

Left, a woman treks on the trails above Bolton Valley Ski Resort. Photo by Greg Maino

itinerary: Blueberry Hill Inn to Chipman Inn in Ripton, 7 miles. Route description: After a long day-two, enjoy a leisurely breakfast at Blueberry Hill Inn and enjoy this special place in the midst of the Moosalamoo National Recreation Area on the edge of the Breadloaf Wilderness. Explore the 50 km of ungroomed trails, then work your way 7 miles to Rikert Touring Center in Ripton, just five minutes from the Chipman Inn in Ripton. (A community bus makes a routine stop at the touring center every 30 minutes 9 to 4, to provide transportation to the inn.) Spend the night here and arrange for transportation in the morning, after heading up the road to the Rikert Touring Center on Middlebury College’s Bread Loaf campus and enjoy spectacular skiing at this fully groomed touring center.

Lodging: Edson Hill Manor, 1500 Edson Hill Rd., Stowe, Vt. 05672 1-800-621-0284, 802-253-7371 www. edsonhillmanor.com

EDEN/CRAFTSBURY LINE TO LOWELL VILLAGE Days: 2 Total distance: 20.6 miles

DAY 1

Itinerary: Eden/Craftsbury Town Line to Lodging: Trapp Family Lodge, 700 Trapp Hill Rd., P.O. Box 1428, Stowe, VT 05672 1-800-826-7000, 802-253-8511 www.trappfamily.com

BOLTON VALLEY TO STOWE Days: 1 or 2 Total distance: 12-19 miles

DAY 1

Itinerary:

12 MILES

Bolton Valley to Trapp Family Lodge Cross Country Ski Center (Catamount Trail Section 22) Route description: Your first day follows 12 miles of advanced backcountry skiing. The trail is challenging and ungroomed, with views of the Worcester range. It begins at the Nordic Center at Bolton Valley Ski Area and heads north over the Long Trail and Catamount Trail to the Nebraska Valley in Stowe. Once at the top of the ridge line, descend several miles to Nebraska Valley Road, then head uphill a hundred yards to Old County Road (following the ski trail just below the road) as it parallels Old County Road to the Trapp Touring Center. Once you hit the Trapp Trails, descend to the Trapp Family Lodge, home to the nation’s first cross-country center, for a well-deserved night with excellent dining. (Snowshoes not required on this section.)

DAY 2

EASY 5-7 MILES

Itinerary: Trapp Family Lodge to Topnotch Nordic Center (Catamount Trail Section 23) Route description: From Trapp Family Lodge, ski 7 miles of intermediate backcountry trail on the Trapp Trails. From there, ski over the backside toward Stowe to the Topnotch Trail system and finish out the day exploring the trails at the Topnotch Nordic Barn Adventure Center, or stop first at the Stowe Mountain Resort Ski Center to ski their trails. Topnotch has access to 30km of groomed and backcountry skiing, while Stowe’s Nordic center boasts 45km of groomed trails and 30km of backcountry trails. (Nordic skis will suffice on this day of travel.)

Lodging: Topnotch Resort & Spa, 4000 Mountain Rd., Stowe 05672 1-800-451-8686, 802-253-8585, www. topnotchresort.com.

DAY 3

OPTIONAL

Itinerary: Topnotch Nordic Center into Stowe Village

JANUARY 2015

Route description: Spend the morning exploring the variety of Nordic terrain offered by Topnotch and/or Stowe Resort. Afterwards, finish out your tour with an easy 5-mile ski down the Stowe Recreation Path into the village of Stowe. (Nordic skis only.) Lodging: Inn at the Mountain at Stowe, Mountain Road, Stowe, Vt. 05672 www.stowe.com

STOWE’S EDSON HILL (extra day in Stowe) Days: 1 Total distance: 6 miles, plus skiing at cross-country ski centers

Craftsbury Outdoor Center (Catamount Trail Section 27) Route description: From the town line parking lot on Eden Mountain Road, travel about 100 yards and intersect with the Catamount Trail. This 7.6-mile section offers a combination of rolling, ungroomed terrain through the woods, and the groomed trails of the Craftsbury Outdoor Center.

Lodging: Craftsbury Outdoor Center, 535 Lost Nation Rd., Craftsbury Common, Vt. 05827 802-586-7767, www.craftsbury.com

DAY 2

Itinerary: Craftsbury Outdoor Center to Lowell Village

DAY 1

Route description: Your second day

Itinerary: From Topnotch in Stowe, continue on ski trails to Stowe CrossCountry Ski Center and then on to Edson Hill Manor (Catamount Trail Section 23) Route description: Access the Catamount Trail via the Stowe Recreational Path. From there, follow 6 miles of intermediate backcountry and groomed trails. While this section of the Catamount Trail involves steep climbs and steep descents, much of it runs through trails maintained by cross-country ski centers. Spend the rest of the afternoon enjoying the Edson Hill Manor trail system, containing 25km of groomed trails. (Nordic skis will suffice.)

travels 13 miles from the Craftsbury Outdoor Center to Lowell Village. This section crosses the Lowell Mountains and travels through open fields on the historic Bayley-Hazen Road along the way. The route is groomed cross-country trail, part snowmobile trail and part ungroomed backcountry trail and ends at the Lowell town offices on Route 100. From here, you will need to arrange transportation to your lodging.

Lodging: The Rendezvous Bed & Breakfast, 2507 Vermont 100, Lowell, Vt. 05847 802 744 2085, www.rendezvousbandb.com

VTSPORTS.COM 13


Like Bambi: How to Skate Ski on Ice The first time I ever skate skied on ice, I was a freshman on the Middlebury Ski Team and had recently graduated from a childhood of skiing on the hard packed, dry snow of the Rocky Mountains. Clipping into my bindings and stepping onto the course, I “advanced” across the wind blown stadium at Stowe. “Advanced” is a gross exaggeration of my movement because, in truth, I only made it about two strides before I pushed my ski into the icy floor to gain no response other than the terrifying realization that I had no control over my skis and that when I hit the ground, which I would, I would hit hard. The day proceeded in a similar fashion: me gaining the courage to take another step, only to be punished for my naivety with a frozen burn. I’ll spare you the details on the down hills, but those weren’t pretty, either. By the end of the day I was in tears, trying to hide it from my coach while simultaneously apologizing for the massive disappointment I would be as an Eastern skier. It would be my retirement, the ice, and I saw no way around that. That day was three years ago and to this day the first icy outing of the season brings back too-real images of its struggles, but, despite their downfalls (liter-

“If you can navigate it, an icy course will give you the swiftest, smoothest, most exhilarating ride you can find, and you won’t even need edges.” ally), icy conditions have broken through, so to speak, to find a place in my heart. If you can navigate it, an icy course will give you the swiftest, smoothest, most exhilarating ride you can find, and you won’t even need edges. The most important, and most counterintuitive, part of skate skiing on icy conditions is committing to your ski. In the name of self-preservation, our instincts tell us to shorten our stride and not shift weight too far to either side, for fear of tipping over. Unfortunately, all that instinct does is keep your skis from flattening out across the ice, making them more squirrely and harder to control. Rather than sitting in the middle and using your (nonexistent) edges to navigate the ice, try to shift all of your weight onto

each ski, so that you’re entire base touches the ice, giving you more stability and glide (because more glide means that you’ll get past the icy spots with fewer strides!) A good visual cue to help you get your weight all the way shifted is seeing that your nose, hip, (bent) knee and toe line up in the same vertical plane. When all of those are stacked, you’ll be in a strong, athletic position over the ski — whether or not it feels that way. “Well,” you say, incredulous of my analysis, “if my ski is flat on the snow so I’m not using my edges, how do I push off of it to get across to the ice onto the other ski?” Excellent question. You don’t use those edges. Ever. Cross-country skis don’t have edges because edges are heavy. Although they would be nice for carving icy down hills, their weight would drastically slow you down getting up (the hill). They also don’t have edges because you simply don’t need them. Skate skiing is not all that different from classic skiing in that it involves a kick and a glide. People mistake skating skis to be more like ice skates, and try to kick from the inside of their knee laterally, but if you’re fully committed to your weight

by Annie Pokorny shift, you’ll get a stronger, more efficient motion if you drop your hips and push down and back, rather than trying to use your edges as start blocks. You’re already moving, you don’t need to crash your momentum and collapse your stability by digging in sideways. For that same reason, if you’re going to scrub (reduce) speed on the downhills, slide sideways rather than going into full, knee knocked pizza. “Sounds good in theory,” you say, “but what about practice?” That’s the caveat. Skiing well on ice takes a lot of practice. Go out and ski without poles, feeling what it’s like to get over your skis. Balance as long as you can, keeping your knees and ankles bent with strong legs. And, if you fall, get back up and try again; it’s worth figuring it out and gliding with confidence over the ice.

Annie Pokorny is a writer from Spokane, Wash., who skis professionally for SMS T2 at Stratton Mountain, Vt.

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JANUARY 2015 1/6/15 2:46 PM


By David K. Lisle, M.D.

sports medicine

Treatment for Chronic Injuries with Platelet Rich Plasma Platelet rich plasma or PRP has been used for decades by plastic surgeons and maxillofacial surgeons to augment healing and improve the quality of their patient outcomes. It was not until 2006 when Mishra and Pavelko, et al. introduced a study using PRP for tendon injuries. They investigated the use of PRP for tennis elbow (lateral epicondylosis) and noted a significant improvement in those treated with PRP compared to those treated with an anesthetic injection. From that study, multiple investigations have been done looking at the effect of PRP on all types of tendinoses – degenerative changes to the substance of tendons due to maladaptive response to stress and overuse.

WHAT IS PRP? First, we should ask what is a platelet? Most know that platelets aid in coagulation to stop bleeding. Platelets do much more. They are powerful cell signalers that are activated at the time of injury. This leads to the initiation of a healing response as growth factors rush to the area and begin to fix what is wrong. The platelet is critical in initiating the first of three stages of healing, inflammation. Platelet rich plasma is any platelet concentration that is higher than normal physiologic levels. Typically, this level is greater than 5 times what is found in the body, however the true definition of platelet rich plasma has not been clarified. Platelet rich plasma used

for injection can be found from our own blood and, for many, the idea of using one’s own blood to help heal a chronic injury is very appealing.

the area. For most, this is a successful treatment option, but should only be considered when other treatments have failed.

COMMON USES FOR PRP

WHAT ARE THE RESULTS?

As mentioned before, PRP was first used to help with healing during surgery. It was much later that PRP was used for chronic tendon injuries. Now, PRP is used for many common tendinopathies that have failed to heal with typical first-line treatments such as rest, said medications and physical therapy. PRP can be used for lateral epicondylosis (tennis elbow), medial epicondylosis (golfer’s elbow), Achilles tendinosis, patellar tendinosis (jumper’s knee), gluteus medius tendinosis (outer hip pain) as well as ligament injuries and chronic muscle injuries. For most of these chronic tendon problems, the underlying pathology is one of tendon “disrepair” where the tendon with relatively poor blood supply has undergone multiple small injuries from overuse and thus has become stagnant in a non-healing state. This can cause pain and disability in the area of concern. The theory behind using PRP is to jump start the healing response by introducing platelets to create inflammation in an area of chronic injury. By causing inflammation, the healing cascade may begin and the platelets can start the process of signaling for reparative cells to come to

The literature is very promising regarding the success rates for platelet rich plasma with percentages between 60 percent and 80 percent success rate. Success is typically gauged by lessening pain and improved functioning of the injured area. However, PRP does not work for everyone. It is not clear how many platelet treatments are needed to maximize the healing response. It is also not clear how concentrated PRP should be, however recent studies reveals that more is not necessarily better and that a concentration that is six times the physiologic (normal) level seems to be ideal. Platelet rich plasma injections can be done in the office and should be performed using ultrasound to guide the injection to the area of tendinosis or injury. The most common posttreatment concern is pain given that the platelet creates an inflammatory response. The area that is treated is immobilized for a few days to allow the platelet injection to remain undisturbed. After a few days, every day activities with no additional heavy use are typically fine to introduce. All patients should start a focused physical therapy protocol at about two weeks.

HEALING TIME & COST Tendon healing from PRP takes time and the response is not often noticed until 6 – 12 weeks after the treatment. On occasion, a second treatment is performed at 12 weeks. Some physicians have used a series of two or three treatments at the beginning, however this can be costly and there is no evidence at this point to suggest this is more helpful. Unfortunately, at this time, only Worker’s Compensation insurance covers PRP so most platelet treatments are self-pay. The cost can vary depending on where one lives between $500 and $3,000. This cost typically covers the entire procedure, including blood draw, centrifugation, ultrasound evaluation and PRP injection. Platelet rich plasma is a promising treatment for chronic overuse injuries, especially those involving tendons. There is still much that needs to be understood and more well-designed studies are necessary to help clarify how best to optimize the use of PRP.

David K. Lisle, M.S., CAQSM, is an assistant professor at UVM’s Division of Sports Medicine in the Department of Orthopaedics and Rehabilitation and with the Orthopaedic Specialty Center in Burlington, Vt.

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When the outdoors is unkind, we’re here to help. For care from providers who understand your drive to get back to the sports you love, call today. Sharon Health Center

To schedule an appointment call (802) 728-2777 12 Shippee Lane, Sharon, VT | www.giffordmed.org

JANUARY 2015

VTSPORTS.COM 15


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Discover confidence, power and grace in your skiing ability. North American Telemark Organization provides the most complete Telemark and Backcountry ski instruction in North America. We offer a full winter calendar of Telemark instructional workshops, primers, adventure tours, camps, instructor training, and the worlds “biggest” Telemark Festival.

January/ February Jan 3-4, Telemark Workshop - Mad River Glen / Camels Hump, VT Jan 10-11, Backcountry Skiing Instructor Training - Mad River Valley, VT Jan 17-18, Telemark Workshop - Whitegrass / Timberline, Canaan Valley, WV Jan 17-18, Womens Telemark Workshop - Mad River Glen / Camels Hump, VT Jan 24-25, Telemark Workshop - Bromley Resort, Bromley, VT Jan 31- Feb 1: Telemark Workshop, Mad River Glen / Camels Hump, VT Jan 31- Feb 1: Telemark Adventure Tour, Whitegrass STC / Dolly Sods, WV Feb 7-8: Telemark Adventure Tour, Mt Mansfield, Camels Hump, VT Feb 14-15: Bumps & Trees Telemark Workshop, Mad River Glen /Camels Hump, VT Feb 21-22: Tele-Naturalist-Tour with famed brewer and Mad River Glen Naturalist Sean Lawson, Central VT North American Telemark Organization PO. Box 44, Waitsfield , VT 05673 1-802-496-4387 (phone) • 1-802-496-5515 (fax) • info@telemarknato.com For a complete winter calendar along with rates and registration information, visit www.telemarknato.com

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JANUARY 2015


gear and beer GEAR: DPS Wailer 105 T2

New this season, DPS introduces Hybrid T2 construction in two models: the mixed-snow Wailer and all-mountain Cassair. The Wailer 105 T2 is a stable and balanced choice for the East. It carves up groomers and cuts through choppy, variable conditions with ease due to the stiff metal laminate and race base. This ski nods to traditional shape with a small amount of rocker in the tip, extended 24m sidecut and flat tail. It’s designed for variable turning in variable conditions at fast speeds. The flat tail demands more aggressive riding through the snow instead of over it. Look out for additional models rolling out in Hybrid T2 construction in the future. $949

GEAR: Vermont Smoke and Cure RealSticks

Made in Vermont from humanely raised, antibiotic-free meats, RealSticks are a great snack to keep on hand for everyone in the family. RealSticks are made from quality meats and spices and comply with many dietary restrictions without sodium nitrates, wheat, MSG, soy, dairy or preservatives. Nutritionally, they are a healthier protein source with less fat, sugars and carbs than conventional meat snacks. RealSticks are tasty, too! The six flavors available offer a range spiciness including Turkey Ancho, Beef BBQ, Beef-Pork Chipotle, Beef-Pork Cracked Pepper, Turkey Honey Mustard and Turkey Pepperoni. RealSticks are widely available at convenience stores, country stores, co-ops, natural food stores, base area markets at ski resorts, and also available for order online. Each one ounce portion comes packaged individually in an easy to

by Hilary DelRoss

peel plastic sleeve making them handy to throw in a backpack before heading out on an adventure, in lunchboxes for school and work or in pockets for a day on the snow. $1.69 per stick or $29.95 for a box of 24.

BEER: Long Trail Sick Day IPA

Snow too good to miss, but you’re trapped at the office? Long Trail Brewery’s Sick Day IPA offers one suggestion for treating this common ailment – call out sick! An ode to the powder flu, there is no excuse not to pick up Sick Day IPA to celebrate an epic day on the slopes. Sick Day has a slightly flushed, medium brown hue, almost reminiscent of an amber or brown ale. Aromas are stuffed with light hops and sweet, toasty malt. Flavors of yeast and bread with fruit and pine come through right away but as the aftertaste settles in, I ache for just a little more bitterness. Hoppiness, spiciness and sweetness are light, well balanced and smooth. This beer is easy to drink and at 65 IBUs and 6.8% alcohol, you can grab a 6- or 12pack to share with your crew or enjoy a pint of Sick Day IPA at après at your favorite watering hole.

Hilary grew up in southern New England where she developed her love of nature and outdoor recreation, including learning to ski at Rhode Island's only ski hill. After exploring the Rocky and Cascade Mountain ranges, she transplanted to the Green Mountain State where she snowboards, skis, hikes, bikes, kayaks and stokes campfires from her home base in Montpelier.

Each month we review outdoor gear and local beer. Want us to review something in particular? C Send a note to gear@vtsports.com. JANUARY 2015

VTSPORTS.COM 17


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GEAR SHOPS . SKI SLOPES . BIKE FITTERS, EVENTS & RACES CLIMBING GYMS, INSTRUCTORS & TRAINERS . FOOD & DRINKS AND MUCH MORE! PLUS, THIS YEAR'S OUTDOOR PERSON OF THE YEAR! WINNERS TO BE ANNOUNCED IN THE FEBRUARY/MARCH ISSUE OF VERMONT SPORTS


news briefs VERMONT LAND TRUST PURCHASES 5,600 ACRES OF WORCESTER WOODS ELMORE, VT. — The Vermont Land Trust (VLT) purchased 5,600 acres of forestland that has been owned for more than 60 years by the Deer Lake Timber Company, a family-owned company with deep ties to Vermont. The purchase has sparked an extensive effort to conserve more than 19,000 acres through both easement donations from private landowners and funding from the federal Forest Legacy program. “Opportunities like this don’t come along very often,” said Gil Livingston, President of VLT. “We feel fortunate to be able to help Vermont make the long-term protection of important forestland possible.” The land, known locally as Worcester Woods, is located along both sides of Route 12 between Worcester and Elmore. In addition to its value to the timber economy, the conservation of this forestland will protect a large block of internationally significant habitat that connects the Green Mountains to the Northeast Kingdom and Quebec’s Gaspe Peninsula. “It is the combination of the forethought by the former owners of Deer Lake Timber and conservation tools like the Federal Forest Legacy program and the generosity of easement donors that make something of this scale remotely possible,” said Livingston. The land includes more than 800 acres of wetlands and 96 miles of undeveloped frontage on ponds and streams, located within the Winooski and Lamoille River Basins, which flow into Lake Champlain.

This makes the land important for migratory birds and eastern brook trout, as well as for water quality and flood resilience in the Winooski and Lamoille watersheds. This project protects more than 42 miles of land along roads that have provided recreational access for hunting, hiking, canoeing and kayaking. The purchase was made with financing from Yankee Farm Credit, the High Meadows Fund and the Vermont Community Foundation. VLT will own the land temporarily. The land trust plans to protect it with a conservation easement before selling to a private forestland buyer. The easement will allow for timber management and help ensure sound stewardship and continued recreational access to the property. Most of Vermont’s forestland is privately owned and in relatively small parcels. This creates a greater risk for fragmentation. When forests are sub-divided, clearing and development is more likely. Smaller patches of forest are also harder to manage for timber and other resources. “With the aging demographic of private forestland owners in Vermont, we face a tidal-wave of working forestland sales in the coming years,” said Livingston. “While we do not expect large-scale development of our forest interiors, the division of large parcels into small pieces will reduce the availability of forestland to abate climate change through carbon storage, and will make it harder for this land to contribute to Vermont’s forestry and wood products businesses.”

On the 700 meter speedskating oval: Saturday Morning: 1 km and 5 km races for youth and novices.  Free Saturday Afternoon: 25 km race Saturday Evening:  Seafood “Skaters” Buffet at The EastSide Restaurant, Newport, VT Sunday: 50 km race 

On the 6 mile Nordic skating trail: Free skating, any distance, both days

The Great Skate:

Monday, Feb. 2nd, we skate or ski, or sled the length of the lake between Newport and Magog, if the lake and the ice favor us again this year.

24HoursofGreatGlen.com

GRAFTON PONDS OUTDOOR CENTER TO OFFER DOG SLEDDING GRAFTON, VT. — Two southern Vermont outdoor businesses, Grafton Ponds Outdoor Center and Husky Works Mushing Company (HWMC), have teamed up to offer Dog Sledding experiences throughout the winter at Grafton Ponds. Dog sled tours take place at 4, 5 and 6 p.m. on Wednesdays, Fridays and Saturdays. Guests ride in a hand-made twoseated sled, with a musher as a guide, and the opportunity to witness working sled dogs on the run. These late-afternoon/ear-

ly evening tours will be led with high-powered headlamps, or by moonlight and will travel along Grafton Ponds’ trail network. The sleds are designed for two adults, or two children (age five and older) with one adult. The combined weight cannot exceed 330 lbs. HWMC’s kennel is made up of purebred Siberian huskies, and the ride lasts one hour at $175 per ride. For more information call Grafton Ponds at 802843-2400.

August 8-9, 2015 A 12 & 24-hour mountain bike race wrapped into a weekend-long mountain bike festival.

WATERBURY HYDRO PROJECT MAINTAINS SUMMERTIME FLOWS MONTPELIER, Vt. — The Vermont Department of Environmental Conservation issued a water quality certification Dec. 11 regarding the future operations of Green Mountain Power’s Waterbury Hydroelectric Project. Under this decision, the Waterbury Reservoir will be maintained at the current summertime level year-round, and flows will be managed to more closely mirror the natural flow of the Little River. The Department’s water quality certification ensures that dam operations are conducted in a manner that protects fishing, swimming, boating and other

JANUARY 2015

recreational uses of both the Waterbury Reservoir and Little River. The decision also ensures that the dam will continue to serve its primary purpose of flood control. “We are pleased to be issuing a water quality certification that meets our obligations to protect water quality, while ensuring continued access for the recreational uses of the Waterbury Reservoir and the Little River that are loved by many thousands of Vermonters,” said Department of Environmental Conservation Commissioner David Mears.

Great family atmosphere including the 24 Minutes of Great Glen for Kids!

SAT, JULY 11, 2015 www.newtonsrevenge.com

1 Mount Washington Auto Road, Gorham, NH

VTSPORTS.COM 19


reader athlete By Phyl Newbeck

GLEN FINDHOLT

Age: 66 | Residence: Underhill | Family: Sons, Erik and Colin; dog, Mia | Occupation:Ski instructor/patroller, boat captain Primary sport: Skiing and sailing

FRIENDS SAY GLEN FINDHOLT IS LIVING THE GOOD LIFE. HE SKIS IN THE WINTER AND SAILS IN THE SUMMER, BUT IF YOU DIG A BIT DEEPER THERE’S A LOT MORE TO THOSE ACTIVITIES. FINDHOLT SPENDS A LOT OF TIME ON THE SLOPES BECAUSE HE’S A VOLUNTEER MEMBER OF THE SMUGGLERS’ NOTCH SKI PATROL AND HAS BEEN A SKI INSTRUCTOR THERE FOR DECADES. AS FOR SAILING THROUGHOUT THE SUMMER, HE DOES SO IN MEMORY OF HIS LATE WIFE MARIE, ON BEHALF OF A NON-PROFIT CALLED HEALING WINDS VERMONT, WHICH PROVIDES LAKE CHAMPLAIN OUTINGS FOR CANCER PATIENTS AND THEIR FAMILIES. VS: How long have you been a skier? GF: More years than I want to admit. I started skiing in my backyard in Connecticut when I was five. It seemed very steep at the time. In 1974, I decided a good way to pay for my skiing habit would be to get involved with teaching. That’s when I started working at Smugglers’ Notch on weekends.

VS: When did that become a full-time job? GF: I served 30 years of a 30-to-life sentence in corporate America and was paroled in 2000. That year IBM decided they needed to get smaller and any employee, regardless of age, who had worked there for 30 years could retire with a full pension. That’s when my Saturday/Sunday job became a Monday through Friday job.

VS: Is it rewarding? GF: It’s dealing with people who are at their best because they’re on vacation. They’re out of their element and away from home and getting rid of the stresses of their normal Monday through Friday lives and sharing that joy with you. I have quite a few people who come back year after year. Some have been skiing with me for over a decade.

VS: Recently you decided to add ski patroller to your resume. How did that happen? GF: According to my friends, in 2004 I failed retirement. I bought a business called the Whistling Man Schooner Company and began taking people out on Lake Champlain on a boat called the Friend Ship Sloop every day during the summer for two to three hours at a

time. It was a lot like teaching people to ski because you’ve got people either on vacation or out of the office for a day so they’re at their best. It occurred to me that although the Coast Guard does a fine job of responding to emergencies, there is a time delay and my first responder skills were not very good. One of my patroller friends suggested that a good way to fix that would be to take the ski patrol’s Outdoor Emergency Care course which was 10 to 12 Sundays over the summer. I had no intention of actually patrolling. I just wanted to improve my skills, but when I was done they suggested I take the on-snow training so I could help out at the mountain. I did and I was accepted as a volunteer patroller and found that I kind of liked it.

VS: You temporarily gave up the sailing life in 2012. Tell us about that. GF: When I bought the business I promised my wife it would be a five-year project and I milked it for eight years. When I bought it, it was more a hobby that was losing money than a business and it took about five years for me to get it in the black by doing almost everything myself. Even though we had been married for a long time, Marie said she still liked having me around. I enjoyed the work but it made for long days so I sold it in May of 2012. That gave me a year with Marie before her cancer diagnosis in April, 2013. She died that September.

VS: And that brought you to a new life on the water, didn’t it? GF: In January, a ski patroller who had been asked to be on the board of directors of Healing Winds Vermont talked

to me about that non-profit since I had sailing experience. Healing Winds Vermont offers free sailing trips to cancer patients and their families. He hoped I could do some consulting work and review their business plan. A month later as I was sitting in a bar at my annual ski trip to Revelstoke I got a text message from another friend telling me I’d been elected to the Board of Directors. I did some research and thought it was a great organization and a great way for me to do something in Marie’s memory, so I agreed to join them.

VS: Your involvement doesn’t stop with the board, does it? GF: I started attending board meetings and when the donated boat arrived from Maryland, I realized it wasn’t in really good condition. I also discovered that the other people on the board all had lives and responsibilities and since I was the retired guy who knew something about boats, I dove into getting the boat ready and usable. I had help from volunteers and Suzanne Johnson who is the founder of Healing Winds Vermont, a breast cancer survivor, a single mom and a very driven individual. She’s a full-time realtor, as well as working full-time for Healing Winds. Part of the reason I was invited to join the board is that she has cancer patient experience but we also want to pay attention to the caregiver side where I have experience. We got the boat ready and had our first sail on June 26. My job is twofold: I’m chair of the board of directors since nobody else wanted the job, and I’m the lead captain. We went out 30 times this summer with 114 guests and I was the captain on almost all of them. We made

20 VTSPORTS.COM

a decision in the spring to only employ licensed captains although the Coast Guard doesn’t require it since no money changes hands. That cut the cost of our insurance but it also gives the people who sail with us more confidence. We’ve tried to run the boat as though it’s a Coast Guard inspected vessel. I even brought on a Coast Guard inspector to give us a drill and inspect the boat unofficially.

VS: What has your experience with Healing Winds Vermont been like? GF: It’s been incredibly rewarding. These patients and their caregivers are very life affirming. Our target is people who are in treatment and those who have been told they are terminal. Perhaps the most uplifting people are the terminal patients. They say, “Hey, I might not have much time so I better make the best of every day I’ve got,” so they’re wonderful to be with. People are very appreciative, but I always say to them “you don’t need to thank me. You’ve given me an excuse to go sailing.” I really enjoy doing this. I come home tired at night, but feeling really good.

Phyl Newbeck lives in Jericho with her partner, Bryan, and two cats. In the winter she alternates skiing with Nordic skating, while the summers find her on her road bike, swimming or kayaking. She is the author of Virginia Hasn’t Always Been for Lovers: Interracial Marriage and the Case of Richard and Mildred Loving.

JANUARY 2015


JENNIFER VAUGHAN

reader athlete By Phyl Newbeck

Age: 56 | Residence: Williston | Family: Husband, Richard; dogs, Daisy and Olive | Occupation: Retired English and literature teacher Primary sport: Hiking, rock climbing, running and cycling

JENNIFER VAUGHAN HAS ALWAYS BEEN AN ACTIVE, OUTDOORS PERSON, BUT THESE DAYS HER ATHLETICISM IS BEING USED FOR A HIGHER GOAL. ALTHOUGH HER DOG DAISY AND A PREVIOUS DOG NAMED ELLIE WERE THERAPY DOGS, VAUGHAN HAS BEGUN TRAINING WITH HER YOUNGEST DOG, OLIVE, TO DO SEARCH AND RESCUE.

search and rescue operation with seven other K9 teams and have been called for two others where the person was found before we got there and that has been very exciting. On the training exercises Olive has been really good and as she’s learning, I’m learning.

VS: This isn’t the first time you’ve worked with your dogs, is it?

VS: For a while you were doing sprint triathlons, weren’t you?

JV: My older dog Daisy was a therapy dog. She worked five years at the hospital and two years at the prison, but she’s retired. My previous dog Ellie was also a therapy dog.

VS: How did you get started with canine search and rescue?

VS: So what makes a good search and rescue human?

VS: How often do you train with Olive?

JV: My first two golden retrievers were therapy dogs, but when I was in Utah I saw avalanche dogs on the chairlift and was intrigued. I had read about search and rescue dogs and the work they did on 9/11 and I had heard their handlers talk on NPR. Two years ago I went to Pet Food Warehouse and the folks from Vermont Search and Rescue K9 (VSARK9) were there. I was curious and they told me to bring Olive over so they could test her. I did and she passed and one thing led to another.

JV: There’s a lot to learn. There is wilderness first aid, canine first aid, and land navigation. First you learn it in the daytime and then you have to do it at night. Since Olive does scent training, I have to be good at reading the air. I’ve also learned about the different types of searches which depend in part on the terrain. I’ve learned about lost person behavior and also about crime scene preservation, although in those situations in Vermont you probably have the police with you. When we go out we carry a radio, a GPS and a backpack for first aid. I watch Olive and I know her body language. As soon as she gets a new scent she becomes animated and leaves me and I have to mark the spot so I can come back to it. When she finds the person she comes back to me and jumps up and puts two feet on my front which is the indicator. I tell her to show me the person and when she gets there she lies down so I can tend to them. She can’t get her party – that’s what we call it – until I tend to the person, but then she gets her treat and gets to play. She really loves it. She knows what she’s doing and it’s so amazing to work with her. I love it, too. It’s so exciting and addictive.

JV: About six years ago I was introduced to a young man who was in his second year of medical school. He had started a triathlon company with coaches and nutritionists across the country and was trying to juggle that and medical school. I took over management for him and decided that I needed to do some triathlons so I would understand it. Running was my best discipline. My swimming wasn’t very good because I used the breast stroke. It’s not the fastest stroke, but it’s good for people who are timid in the water because you can see where you’re going. We sold the company when he graduated from medical school and now he’s a resident in South Carolina.

VS: What makes a good search and rescue dog? JV: The first test is whether they have a drive for something. It’s usually food or a toy and Olive is motivated for both. She has a tug toy that has food in it which we use as her training toy. Olive is certified for search and rescue by the International Police Work Dog Association. She’s had exposure to cadavers and to water searches but her certification is in wilderness air scent. I take her out and have her sniff for a new smell. She’s so focused; she doesn’t go looking for scat or chasing bunnies. She’s focused on finding that new human scent. It took a year and a half for Olive to be certified. We’ve taken part in one

JANUARY 2015

JV: We train twice a week. I also practice my navigation skills on my own, both during the day and at night. This year I did two competitions, the Iron Dog and the Bitter Pill, in order to be more competent at navigation. The Iron Dog is run by the Vermont Police Canine Association. The Bitter Pill is run by the Green Mountain Adventure Racing Association and I did it with my search and rescue partner. We came in last, but we had a great time. There was bushwhacking, kayaking and mountain biking. You start in the dark on the backside of Camel’s Hump with a map, a headlamp and a pack in which you have to carry your life preserver and your helmet among other things. It was a great race.

VS: Does this take up all of your spare time or do you still have time to run and bicycle? JV: I still run. I like running because I can do it anywhere and by myself. I still do the occasional half marathon. I also like to bicycle with my friends and every year I do the Kelly Brush Century. I’m really more of a solo person when it comes to sports although I have a few friends that I do things with. I do running, hiking and cycling for cardio and I do yoga once a week because stretching is critical.

VS: You recently picked up a new sport didn’t you? JV: It’s interesting that at my age I’ve jumped into some new sports and become really passionate about them. I started rock climbing two years ago in Oregon. I loved it and wished I was still in my twenties. I started doing it outdoors but now I do it indoors twice a week. What I like about rock climbing and search and rescue is that they require both physical power and brain power. —Phyl Newbeck

VTSPORTS.COM 21


Event organizers! Listing your event in this calendar is free and easy. Visit vtsports.com/submit-event, and e-mail results to editor@vtsports.com.

calendar of events

by gender and age group to compete for

FEATURED EVENTS:

25 or 50 km on January 31 at the Craftsbury Outdoor Center.  It is on a 12.5K-loop with three aid stations. The Craftsbury Marathon online registration is open. The fee starts at $60 and goes up in $20 increments to $120 on race day. Students starting at age 14 enter at half the adult rate and children under 14 may enter at $5. Vermont high school students may register separately with their team at a special rate of $5. www. craftsbury.com

JANUARY 25 SKI FOR HEAT The Ski for Heat is a statewide fundraiser at Nordic and Alpine Resorts across the state. Proceeds help those struggling to stay warm and are in need of emergency fuel assistance. Proceeds go to the heating fuel assistance programs at Vermont’s Community Action Agencies. Go to www.skiforheat.com for a list of participating resorts and the specifics of each event.

FEBRUARY 7 – 8 CANADIAN SKI MARATHON A weekend of Nordic ski tours from Lachute to Gatineau, Quebec. Skiers may opt for the shortest 12K option, a series of tour loops, a half marathon or the longest 160K tour. www.csm-mcs.com

JANUARY 31 CRAFTSBURY MARATHON A classic technique wave start cross-country ski race of

ALPINE SKIING

medals in each category. In addition to the race, prizes are given away throughout the day at a mountain. www.skiverticalchallenge.com

7 MOUNTAIN DEW VERTICAL CHALLENGE AT CATAMOUNT Catamount hosts a free ski race open to the public. Skiers and snowboarders are divided by gender and age group to compete for medals in each category. In addition to the race, prizes are given away throughout the day at a mountain. www. skiverticalchallenge.com

21 UNCONVENTIONAL TERRAIN COMPETITION

As part of MRG’s Triple Crown Series, the

25 MOUNTAIN DEW VERTICAL CHALLENGE AT Q

Terrain

Competition

Can” steeps, cliffs, jumps, and rocks, as they

BURKE Q Burke hosts a free ski race open

Unconventional

challenges skiers with signature “Ski It If You plunge the lift line course on the Paradise Trail.

January

to the public. Skiers and snowboarders are

This event is part of the Ski The East Freeride

divided by gender and age group to compete

Tour. www.madriverglen.com

10 USASA SKIER/BOARDER CROSS Jay Peak hosts a USASA-sanctioned race with bumps, jumps, berms, and turns. www.jaypeakresort.com 24 MOUNTAIN DEW VERTICAL CHALLENGE AT JAY PEAK Jay Peak hosts a free ski race open to the public. Skiers and snowboarders are divided by gender and age group to compete for medals in each category. In addition to the race, prizes are given away throughout the day at a mountain. www.skiverticalchallenge.com 25 SKI FOR HEAT This annual fundraiser supports heating assistance throughout Vermont. Go to www.skiforheat.com for a list of participating Nordic centers and alpine resorts.

for medals in each category. In addition to the

race, prizes are given away throughout the

22 HOPE ON THE SLOPES Jay Peak hosts an eight-hour ski and snowboard event that

day at a mountain. www.skiverticalchallenge.

raises money to support the American Cancer

com

Society. Participants can compete in teams

30 – 2/1 NASTAR CHAMPIONSHIPS Recreational skiers

or as individuals in fundraising or vertical feet

compete at Okemo Mountain Resort for a

challenge. Contact: Bryan Smith, 802-327-

chance to qualify for the Nature Valley NASTAR National Championships at Snowmass, Co. www.okemo.com

30 MOUNTAIN DEW VERTICAL CHALLENGE AT CANNON MOUNTAIN Cannon Mountain hosts

2154 or bsmith@jaypeakresort.com. www.jaypeakresort.com/HOPE

28 SOUTHERN VERMONT FREESKIING CHALLENGE

Competitors tackle Black Magic, riddled with technical cliff bands at the top of the course

a free ski race open to the public. Skiers and

and a wide-open pitchy section towards the

snowboarders are divided by gender and age

bottom, to find the best skier on the mountain.

group to compete for medals in each category.

The event is the second stop in the Ski The

In addition to the race, prizes are given away

East Freeride Challenge. www.magicmtn.com

throughout the day at a mountain.

Your Four Seasons Complete Bike Shop

Back to school, K-College SALE!

JANUARY SERVICE SPECIALS: Commute around campus or to school! • Major 15% $OFF bicycle Select Racks, bags, tune-up:

45

fenders, locks, bells, mirrors & lights, including NEW Monkey Lights! • Complete Select Fitness, hybrid & bicycle $ kids bikes reduced! overhaul: (was $60)

(was $180)

140

With this ad, take $5.00 off helmet of your choice!

20% Off WE STOCK THULE RACKS All Snowshoes We Service All Brands in-stock! www.ClaremontCycle.com - 603-542-BIKE(2453) 12 Plains Road, Claremont, NH Hours: M-TH 10-5:30, Fri. 10-7, Sat 9-5, Sun Closed

We stock

Racks • We Service All Brands

www.ClaremontCycle.com • 603-542-BIKE (2453) 12 Plains Road • Claremont, NH Winter Hours: Tues-Thur 10-5:30, Fri 10-7, Sat 9-5

www.skiverticalchallenge.com

March

February

1 MOUNTAIN DEW VERTICAL CHALLENGE AT PATS PEAK

7 CASTLEROCK EXTREME CHALLENGE Sugarbush Resort Hosts the third stop of the Ski The East

Pats Peak hosts a free ski race open to the

Freeride Tour on the challenging Castlerock

public. Skiers and snowboarders are divided

trail. Competitors pick the best line for a piece of the $1,000 cash purse. www.skitheeast.net

Ethan Allen Biathlon Club 2015 Winter Race Series DATES

Jan 8, 15, 22, & Feb 5, 12, 19

TIMES

5:30 pm - Registration & novice clinic 5:30 to 6:15 pm - rifle zeroing 6:30 pm - race start

Ethan Allen Biathlon Club Ethan Allen Rd., Jericho, VT $10 per race or $50 for the six race series Bring a race volunteer and race for FREE!

WHERE

21 – 22 SKI THE EAST FREERIDE TOUR CHAMPIONSHIPS Jay Peak hosts the final round of the Ski the East Freeride Tour over two days. The preliminary runs will be on Saturday on Green Beret or Upper River Quai trail (depending on conditions) where the competitors will get a chance for 1 run to win over the judges. The finals will be on Sunday down The Face Chutes, where overall standings are judged based off of two runs. www.skitheeast.net

Info: www.eabiathlon.org

22 VTSPORTS.COM

JANUARY 2015


calendar of events BACKCOUNTRY/TELE/AT

group will explore easier backcountry trails in

January

24 BERKSHIRE EAST RANDO RACE Using climbing

www.nerandorace.blogspot.com 25 TELEMARK TURN CLINIC The Catamount Trail

skills. The clinic will be held at Pico Resort.

OVERLAND

1 INTERMEDIATE

OVERLAND

techniques, etc. www.catamounttrail.org

8 INTERMEDIATE

OVERLAND

TOURING

Intermediate Overland Touring Course will take the form of a teaching tour where the

JANUARY 2015

series on Thursday evenings under the

will take the form of an instructional tour and

5 to 7K freestyle technique. Safety clinic,

will cover layering strategies, what it means to

instruction and shared rifles are available for

be prepared, navigation, efficient touring and

novices. Awards are given at the end of the

uphill techniques, etc. www.catamounttrail.org

series. www.eabiathlon.org

28 BACKCOUNTRY BASH AT MOUNT GREYLOCK

22 ETHAN ALLEN WINTER BIATHLON SERIES

Using climbing “skins” with alpine touring or

EABC holds a six-race winter biathlon race

telemark bindings (or even splitboards), racers

series on Thursday evenings under the

start at the base of Mount Greylock, ascend,

lights throughout January and February.

then descend (on marked in-bounds ski

These races are open to beginners as well

area trails), as fast as possible, over multiple

as experienced biathletes for distances of

laps. www.nerandorace.blogspot.com

5 to 7K freestyle technique. Safety clinic, instruction and shared rifles are available for

March

novices. Awards are given at the end of the series. www.eabiathlon.org

14 MAGIC

MOUNTAIN

RANDO

RACE

Using

climbing “skins” with alpine touring or

February

telemark bindings (or even splitboards), racers

and riders who are new to exploring the

uphill

EABC holds a six-race winter biathlon race

as experienced biathletes for distances of

This track is intended for expert level skiers

and

15 ETHAN ALLEN WINTER BIATHLON SERIES

These races are open to beginners as well

8 INTRODUCTION TO MOUNTAIN TOURING

touring

new to exploring the backcountry. This course

along the Long Trail. www.madriverglen.com

efficient

These races are open to beginners as well

clinic for expert level skiers and riders who are

and skiing from Mad River Glen to Sugarbush

navigation,

Resort. www.catamounttrail.org

lights throughout January and February.

Resort. www.catamounttrail.org

strategies, what it means to be prepared,

lights throughout January and February.

22 INTRODUCTION TO MOUNTAIN TOURING

skills. The clinic will be held at Bolton Valley

of an instructional tour and will cover layering

series on Thursday evenings under the

skills. The clinic will be held at Bolton Valley

The Catamount Trail Association holds a

skiers looking to develop and refine their

backcountry. This course will take the form

skiers looking to develop and refine their

event’s Facebook page.

8 ETHAN ALLEN WINTER BIATHLON SERIES EABC holds a six-race winter biathlon race

Association. Details are available on the

for the beginning and intermediate telemark

equipment and skiing skills while skinning up

for the beginning and intermediate telemark

series. www.eabiathlon.org

Association hosts an introductory level class

Race tests the competitor’s endurance,

January

novices. Awards are given at the end of the

search of teachable moments. The emphasis

RACE The Mad River Valley Ski Mountaineering

BIATHLON

is a fundraiser for the Vermont Alzheimer’s

group will explore easier backcountry trails in

1 MAD RIVER VALLEY SKI MOUNTAINEERING

on

Vermont’s third-tallest mountain. The event

take the form of a teaching tour where the

1 TELEMARK TURN CLINIC The Catamount Trail

terrain

instruction and shared rifles are available for

Intermediate Overland Touring Course will

www.catamounttrail.com

backcountry

5 to 7K freestyle technique. Safety clinic,

TOURING

during this track will be learning by doing.

other

loop traversing around Camel’s Hump,

introduction-level clinic at the Bolton Valley

touring equipment. www.catamounttrail.org

or

Nordic Ski Area hosts an annual backcountry

The Catamount Trail Association holds an

backcountry terrain on lightweight Nordic

laps. www.nerandorace.blogspot.com

as experienced biathletes for distances of

TOURING

Resort on traveling the Catamount Trail or other

an introduction-level clinic at the Bolton

15 CAMEL’S HUMP CHALLENGE Camel’s Hump

February TO

trails), as fast as possible, over multiple

OVERLAND

Association hosts an introductory level class

skiers looking to develop and refine their

1 INTRODUCTION

descend (on marked in-bounds ski area

TO

15 TELEMARK TURN CLINIC The Catamount Trail

for the beginning and intermediate telemark

www.catamounttrail.org

TOURING

The Catamount Trail Association holds

catamounttrail.org

Association hosts an introductory level class

at the base of the mountain, ascend, then

lightweight Nordic touring equipment. www.

trails), as fast as possible, over multiple laps.

bindings (or even splitboards), racers start

Trail

descend (on marked in-bounds ski area

during this track will be learning by doing.

Valley Resort on traveling the Catamount

at the base of Berkshire East, ascend, then

“skins” with alpine touring or telemark

15 INTRODUCTION

bindings (or even splitboards), racers start

21 BROMLEY RANDO RACE Using climbing

www.catamounttrail.org “skins” with alpine touring or telemark

search of teachable moments. The emphasis

5-8 2015 NORTH AMERICAN BIATHLON CUP RACE

start at the base of the mountain, ascend,

then descend (on marked in-bounds ski area

The Ethan Allen Biathlon Club in Jericho

trails), as fast as possible, over multiple laps.

hosts the 2015 North American Biathlon

www.nerandorace.blogspot.com

Cup Race. The North American Biathlon Cup

15 CATAMOUNT TRAIL CLASSIC FUN-RAISING

races are sponsored by United States Biathlon

TOUR A classic tour designed for the

Association and Biathlon Canada. The

experienced skier with a sense of adventure

competition will include official training on

prepared for the unexpected runs from Bolton

Friday, a Sprint race on Saturday, and Pursuit

Valley Resort to the Trapp Family Lodge. This

style race on Sunday. www.skireg.com

event raises funds for the CTA’s Ski Cubs Youth Ski Program. www.catamounttrail.org

(Continued on next page)

VTSPORTS.COM 23


calendar of events

12 ETHAN ALLEN WINTER BIATHLON SERIES EABC holds a six-race winter biathlon race series on Thursday evenings under the lights throughout January and February. These races are open to beginners as well as experienced biathletes for distances of 5 to 7 kilometers freestyle technique. Safety clinic, instruction and shared rifles are available for novices. Awards are given at the end of the series. www.eabiathlon.org

19 ETHAN ALLEN WINTER BIATHLON SERIES EABC holds a six-race winter biathlon race series on Thursday evenings under the lights throughout January and February. These races are open to beginners as well as experienced biathletes for distances of 5 to 7K freestyle technique. Safety clinic,

CLIMBING/MOUNTAINEERING January 17 DARK HORSE SERIES - BURLINGTON As part of the annual Dark Horse Series, MetroRock’s Essex Junction location hosts a day-long bouldering competition with over $10,000 in prizes and $1,000 in raffle prizes. www. darkhorseseries.com 23 – 25 SMUGGS ICE BASH The 9th Annual Ice Bash includes Ice Climbing, Mountaineering and Avalanche Clinics, the Friday Night Drytooling Competition, speakers and athlete presentations, public demos of ice climbing equipment, raffles and support for local Access Fund Affiliate, CRAG-VT. www. smuggsicebash.com

instruction and shared rifles are available for novices. Awards are given at the end of the series. www.eabiathlon.org

BIKING/CYCLING January 10 -11 RIKERT FAT BIKE ROUND UP The Rikert Touring Center holds a full day of fat bike riding with tours, games and a cookout. www.rikertnordic.com 17 LE VELO NEIGE DE COATICOOK As part of the Le Grand Fat Tour’s winter series of fat-biking events, Parc de la Gorge de Coaticook hosts a day of group rides, demos a race, bonfire and party. www.legrandfattour.com 31 GROUNDHOG DAY The National Cycling Center of Bromont, Les Amis des Sentiers de Bromont in collaboration with the Town of Bromont host the third edition of “Groundhog Day,” with group rides, demos, races, bonfire and party. This event is part of Le Grand Fat Tour’s winter series of fat-biking events. www. legrandfattour.com

February 15 OKA As part of the Le Grand Fat Tour’s winter series of fat-biking events, Oka National Park in Quebec hosts a day of group rides, demos a race, bonfire and party. www.legrandfattour. com 27 – 3/1 WINTERBIKE Kingdom Trails celebrates fatbike culture with a full day of fatbike demos and events including races, games and group rides at the Kingdom Trails headquarters in East Burke. www.kingdomtrails.com

NORDIC SKIING January 10 ZAK CUP SERIES: BOGBURN CLASSIC A classic-style 13K men’s and 7k women’s race with an interval start in Pomfret, Vt. NENSA membership at the time of race is required for Zak Cup scoring. www.nensa.net 10 RACE TO THE CABIN A 5K classic point-to-point beginning at the Trapp Family Lodge Outdoor Center and ending at the Slayton Pasture Cabin. The race is mass start and self-seeded. http://www.trappfamily.com/ 10 LADIES NORDIC SKI EXPO The Catamount Trail Association hosts their annual ladies Nordic skiing event at the Trapp Family Lodge in Stowe for a day of lessons and demos in classic and skate styles of skiing. www.catamounttrail.org 11 STOWE NORDIC MINI MARATHON A longdistance, non-competitive ski event at Stowe Mountain Resort’s Cross Country Center gives children an opportunity to acknowledge their own abilities. Distances include 22k, 15K and 5K. Terrain is best suited for classic skiing. www.stowenordic.org 17 – 18 WOMEN’S WINTER ESCAPE An all-women’s weekend at Great Glen Trails Outdoor Center in Gorham, N.H. offers a variety of classic and skate ski clinics, yoga, equipment demos and preparation lessons. www.greatglentrails.com 17 – 18 NENSA EASTERN CUP/BATES CARNIVAL@ BLACK MOUNTAIN Black Mountain in Rumford, Me. hosts the Bates Winter Carnival on Friday and Saturday along with the NENSA Eastern Cup both Saturday and Sunday. Friday NCAA Carnival will be a mass start 15/20K classic event open to college athletes only. Saturday combined Eastern Cup and Carnival event will be a 5/10K

24 VTSPORTS.COM

interval start free technique event. Women and U16 will do 5K with the 10K for the men. Sunday will be an Eastern Cup only Classic 1.4K sprint race with heats. www.nensa.net 19 ZAK CUP SERIES: 41ST GESCHMOSSEL CLASSIC The 41st Geschmossel is a 15K (3x5K laps) classic ski race held on the Ammonooosuc Trail System of the Bretton Woods Nordic Center. www.brettonwoods. com 24 ZAK CUP SERIES: WHITE MOUNTAIN CLASSIC 30K The Jackson Ski Touring Foundation in Jackson, N.H. hosts a 30K classic race and the NENSA club championships. www. jacksonxc.org 25 14TH WOMEN’S XC SKI DAY The Rikert Nordic Center hosts a day of women’s-only day of tours and demos for skiers of all abilities. www.rikertnordic.com 29 – 31 US MASTERS CHAMPIONSHIPS 2015 The US National Masters Championships 2015 are in conjunction with the 34th Craftsbury 25/50K Marathon taking place on Jan. 31. The national championships will be scored based on placement within age/gender class. There are no membership requirements. All skiers who complete both of the designated races will be scored automatically. Master m7 and higher will be scored on the basis of the 25K distance for the marathon. 31 34TH ANNUAL CRAFTSBURY MARATHON This classic New England ski marathon starts and finishes at the Craftsbury outdoor Center winding through open fields and wooded hillsides, showcasing quintessential Vermont countryside. There are 25K and 50K options for those just trying a marathon for the first time or returning marathoners who are ready to go the distance. www.craftsburysupertour. com 31 – 3/1 5TH ANNUAL NANSEN MILAN WINTER FESTIVAL The Festival will feature 1-14K classic ski races (interval start) on Sunday, Feb. 1st for adults and kids at the Milan Hill State Park. Race routes will take skiers past vistas of the Presidential and Mahoosuc Mountain Ranges and under white pine canopies. www.nensa. net

February 1 MOUNTAIN TOP PAINTBALL BIATHLON The Mountain Top Inn & Resort hosts their tenth annual biathlon at their snowshoe center. www.mountaintopinn.com 7 – 8 CANADIAN SKI MARATHON The Canadian Ski Marathon (CSM) is North America’s longest and longest running Nordic ski tour. Each skier can select distances of 12 km or the maximum of 160K over the weekend.http:// csm-mcs.com/en/

JANUARY 2015


calendar of events 7- 8 NENSA EASTERN CUP/DARTMOUTH CARNIVAL The Craftsbury Outdoor Center hosts the third weekend of Eastern Cup competition February 7 and 8. This event is part of the larger USSA SuperTour Festival happening in Craftsbury Jan. 29 – Feb. 8. Saturday’s freestyle individual race will be combined with both the Dartmouth Carnival and USSA SuperTour, while the classic mass start Sunday will also be a SuperTour. Prior to the Eastern Cup races, there will be a joint Carnival/SuperTour freestyle sprint on February 6 in Craftsbury. www. craftsburysupertour.com 7 FLYING MOOSE CLASSIC The Gould Academy Competition Trails in Bethel, Me. hosts a classic technique, mass start and finish at field adjacent to Gould Academy Field House with most of the 10K or 22K timed race course on the Pine Hill Competition Trails. Youth/Bill Koch League events include lollipop, a 2.25K timed race or a 10K untimed mini-marathon. www.bethelouting.org 13 STOWE DERBY RECON For a donation to Stowe Nordic, take a sneak peak at the course for the 2015 Stowe Derby down Stowe’s Toll Road. One ride per person. www.stowederby.com 14 NENSA EASTERN CUP SILVER FOX TROT The Oak Hill Nordic Trails in Hanover, N.H. hold freestyle, individual starts at 15-second intervals for all. Eastern Cup/JNQ races, U16 boys followed by U16 girls and women: 5k, U18 and older men: 10K. www. fordsayre.org/nordic/silver-fox-trot/ 14-15 NENSA EASTERN CUP FINALS The Holderness School hosts the second day of the February Eastern Cup weekend and final race of this year’s series. Racers under age 16 will race 5K while men’s and women’s divisions race 10K. www.nensa.net 22 STOWE DERBY This annual event races down the Stowe Toll Road on cross-country skis into the village of Stowe. This year features a fatbike division. www.stowederby.com 27 – 3/1 LAKE PLACID NORDIC FESTIVAL Throughout the three-day festival there will be ski, waxing and orienteering clinics, demonstrations, dinners and parties, discounts on demos, rentals and merchandise, sales and touring all culminating on Sunday, March 1, at the Mt. Van Hoevenberg Cross Country Ski Center with the running of the 33rd annual Lake Placid Loppet 50K and Kort Loppet 25K. www.whiteface.com

March 1 SKI & SHOE TO THE CLOUDS A 10k Cross Country Ski and snowshoe race at Great Glen Trails and the Mt Washington Auto Road. 4K at the base then 6K up the Mt.

JANUARY 2015

Washington Auto Road with a 2,200 feet elevation gain. www.skitotheclouds.com 7 BRETTON WOODS NORDIC MARATHON The Bretton Woods Nordic Marathon is a classic technique x-c marathon for recreational and competitive skiers at the Omni Mount Washington Resort in Bretton Woods, N.H. The event is a major fund-raiser for the New England Ski Museum. The event includes full and half-marathon distances (timed and untimed). Course: a 21-kilometer loop, 2 laps for 42K marathon, four feed/aid stations per lap. All participants are invited to post-race awards banquet in resort grand ballroom. www.skireg.com 14 TRAPPS WINTER MARATHON This Classic Mass Start 2 lap race is one of the most challenging courses in New England; featuring a designated ski change “pit” on the second lap area. This is evolving in the area of Nordic Marathon racing and will add an additional technical aspect to an already specialized and challenging course. http://www.trappfamily.com/ 21 RELAY FOR LIFE NORDIC-STYLE At Relay For Life NordicStyle, teams camp out overnight and take turns cross country skiing or snowshoeing while raising funds for the American Cancer Society. Register www. relayforlife.org/nordicstylevt or contact Danielle Woolsey, 802-872 6306 or danielle. woolsey@cancer.org

OBSTACLE RACING January 16 – 18 WINTER DEATH RACE Much like the summer Death Race, but colder, Peak Races hosts a wintertime obstacle race with unpredictable obstacles to challenge both body and mind. www.peak.com

18 LAKE MOREY SKATE-A THON The day revolves around skating laps on the 4.5-mile Lake Morey Skating Trail, the longest groomed trail of its kind in the country. The entry fee, which ranges between $10 and $25, comes with free Nordic skate rentals (on a first-come, first-served basis), hot chocolate, soup, lunch and a raffle ticket. Skaters get an additional raffle ticket for each lap they complete.

February 1 THE GREAT SKATE Kingdom Games hosts a 25-mile skate between Newport, Vt and Magog, Qc. Participants may use skates, dogsleds or any other means of non-motorized transportation. http://www. marathonskating.org/NAMLM2015

SNOWSHOEING January 17 COCK-A-DOODLE SHOE SNOWSHOE RACE

A 5K and 10K snowshoe race to benefit the New Land Trust, Saranac, NY. This race is a qualifier for the USSSA National Championships.

25 SIDEHILLER SNOWSHOE RACE A four-miler snowshoe race in Sandwich, N.H qualifies for the USSSA National Championships. www.acidoticracing.com

February

7 SNOWSHOE SHUFFLE Walk or run on snowshoes at beautiful Camel's Hump Nordic Ski Area to benefit the American Lung Association. Participants can complete one loop (about 4K) or two loops (about 8K) on groomed trails. www.action.lung.org

8 NORTHERN

SNOWSHOE

and Snowshoe Adventure Center hosts a

SKATING

VERMONT

CHALLENGE Smugglers’ Notch Nordic Ski

February 7 BENSON POLAR BEAR OBSTACLE CHALLENGE Shale Hill Obstacle Course in Benson, Vt. hosts a 10K race with over 65 obstacles in addition to hills, mud, snow and ice. www.shalehilladventure.com

/www.cockadoodleshoe.

com/

series of ½K, 3 ½K and 8K runs for varying ability levels. The 8K is a qualifying run for the USSSA National Championships.

March

7 PEAK 2015 SNOWSHOE CHAMPIONSHIP An ultra-distance snowshoe race includes 100 mile, marathon, half marathon, and six-

January

mile options.   The course will be a rugged

31–1 NORTH AMERICAN SPEEDSKATING CHAMPIONSHIPS Kingdom Games, in partnership with Marathon Skating International (MSI), has been selected by U.S. Speedskating to host the North American Marathon (NAM) on Jan. 31 and Feb. 1, 2015, on Northeast Vermont’s Lake Memphremagog. Distances include 1K, 5K, 25K and 50K. www.marathonskating.org/ NAMLM2015

6.5-mile loop in the Green Mountains of Vermont. Each loop has 1200 vertical. The snowshoe marathon is the National Snowshoe Championship; there will be a prize purse. www.peak.com

VTSPORTS.COM 25


out & about When I think about it, I’m aware that I seem to anticipate the New Year with a combination of renewed optimism and underlying misgivings. I’m reminded of the reoccurring Peanuts cartoon in which Lucy offers to hold the football for Charlie Brown, then inevitably, snatches it away at the last instant. Every year, in spite of his previous experience, Charlie becomes convinced that THIS YEAR, Lucy might actually hold the ball in place so that he can kick it, yet every year she tricks him. I’ve come to feel that way about New Year’s resolutions. Every year I think about a few aspects of my life that could be improved and resolve to make some changes. Inevitably, I get a few days or weeks into the new year, forget or simply ignore my resolutions, then abandon the whole effort as a failure. This recurring scenario is especially frustrating because for many years I was a competitive athlete, followed by a couple of decades of fairly high-level coaching. Goal-setting is a vital skill for successful athletes and coaches and was an important aspect of my competitive and coaching philosophy. What makes it even more embarrassing is that back in 1992, I wrote a book about Nordic skiing in which

2015 20

By John Morton

NEW YEAR'S RESOLUTIONS, REVISITED

I included a section devoted to the importance of goal-setting. Even though I haven’t competed for a while, it was helpful to glance back at what I had written 23 years ago for some help in setting New Year’s resolutions that might stick. It is important for elite athletes to establish goals that are appropriate, possible, but also, not easily within reach. As a college ski coach, I frequently had athletes express their ultimate objective as skiing in the Winter Olympics. While for some, this might have been a reasonable, ultimate goal, for most of them a more appropriate immediate target might have been missing only one workout a week. On the other hand, I remember a very talented incoming freshman who, as an Alaskan high school student, had represented the forty-ninth state with impressive results in four, successive Junior National Championships. I was surprised and a little chagrinned when he informed me (with the independence and self-confidence typical of Alaskans) that his goal for his first year at college was to return to the Junior Nationals for a fifth time, rather than to compete at the NCAA Championships.

Since positive feedback is an important factor in the successful achievement of any goal, I’m a big believer in multiple goals. While only a few, elite athletes can realistically aspire to win the events they enter, most avid or even weekend runners can tell you their P.R.’s (personal records) at various distances. I spent years trying to improve my marathon PR of 2:43:05, but the many races where I fell short of that goal were not failures. Thankfully, most running and skiing events are divided into 10-year-age increments so even if you finish well back from the winners, you still may place very well in your age group. Since we have no control over other competitors, I resist setting goals related to other athletes, even if we seem to be battling it out with the same age-group rival every weekend. A better approach would be to estimate a finish time that would assure us placing ahead of the rival and focus on that time as the goal. An additional characteristic of successful goal-setting is specificity. All too often, I heard skiers say, “I just want to go faster,” or “I want to finish higher on the results sheets.” The more specific and clearly articulated the goal, the more likely

it will be achieved. When President Kennedy stated in the early 1960’s that “we will land a man on the moon and return him safely to Earth before the end of the decade,” there was nothing wishy-washy about the objective. So, in 2015 I resolve to: #1, lose weight, #2, get more exercise and #3, reestablish a healthier balance between work obligations and family activities. Specifically, that means: #1, taking smaller portions and avoiding desserts, #2, scheduling at least an hour of outdoor, physical activity at least five days each week and #3, committing to at least one day per week focused exclusively on family activities and free of work-related obligations. Another powerful enhancement to any goal or resolution is to actually write it down and post it where it can be easily viewed. “So, Lucy, are you really going to hold the football in place this time…?”

John Morton is a former Olympic biathlete and Nordic ski coach. He lives in Thetford Center where he designs Nordic ski trails. You can reach him through his website, mortontrails.com.

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JANUARY 2015


SuperTour Festival

Jan. 29 to Feb. 8 7 races in 11 days : Jan 29: US Masters Nationals - 10k FS Jan 30: USSA Supertour - 20/30k CL Jan 31: US Masters Nationals - 25/50k CL Feb 1: USSA Supertour - CL Sprint Feb 6: USSA SuperTour - FS Sprint Feb 7: USSA Supertour - 10k FS Feb 8: USSA SuperTour - 5k CL

craftsburysupertour.com

On-site lodging | 105k of trails | Top-flight facilities © John Lazenby

CAMEL’S HUMP CHALLENGE H U N T I NG TON , V E R M ON T

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aDrIaN cOiRiEr/rEvElStOkE jAcKeT/ AlTa, uT

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Photo: Fredrik Marmsater

FEBRUARY 15, 2015


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11/4/13 9:30 AM

Vermont Sports, January 2015  
Vermont Sports, January 2015  

The January issue of Vermont Sports features sledding in Smugglers' Notch, fat biking, backcountry skiing adventures, seven winter events to...