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River watch

Petition effort

Dream team

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ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT Vol. 68 No. 14

Middlebury, Vermont

â—†

Thursday, April 3, 2014 â—† 46 Pages

75¢

VUHS  board  OKs   School consolidation: cost vs. benefit reduction  in  staff Superintendents weigh in on pivotal issue District  unsure  where  cuts  will  come  from By  ZACH  DESPART VERGENNES   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Vergennes   8QLRQ +LJK 6FKRRO ERDUG RQ 0RQ-­ day  moved  to  adopt  a  new  spending   plan,   which   would   bring   spending   below   the   current   level   and   cut   the   HTXLYDOHQWRIÂżYHIXOOWLPHVWDIISR-­ VLWLRQV ,W ZDV D PRYH ERDUG PHP-­ bers   said   was   necessary   to   rein   in   FRVWV DIWHU YRWHUV UHMHFWHG WKHLU ÂżUVW proposal  by  more  than  200  votes  on   0DUFK Board  member  Neil  Kamman  said   WKLV EXGJHW LV WKH PRVW GLIÂżFXOW KH has  ever  worked  on,  but  he  supported   FXWWLQJVWDII Âł,W PDNH PH KHDUWVLFN WR GR WKLV EXW ,ÂśP JRLQJ WR KDYH WR YRWH IRU WKLV´.DPPDQVDLGÂł,WUXO\EHOLHYH LWÂśVWKHRQO\ZD\ZHFDQJHWSDVWQH[W \HDUDQGJHWRQHYHQIRRWLQJ´ Faculty   at   Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   meeting   of-­ fered   a   different   perspective   on   re-­ GXFLQJWKHVFKRROÂśVVWDII Âł<RXÂśUHDVNLQJXVWRWKURZÂżYHRI our   colleagues   under   the   bus   to   cut   what   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing   here   to   make   our  

jobs  harder,â&#x20AC;?   teacher   Steve   Orzech   VDLG Âł7KH\ÂśUH QRW JRLQJ WR VXSSRUW WKLVDQG,FDQÂśWLQJRRGFRQVFLHQFH VD\WKDWWHDFKHUVZLOOVD\ÂľWKURZÂżYH RIXVRXWϫ By  a  vote  of  4-­1,  the  board  moved   to   accept   a   proposed   budget   of   7KDWÂżJXUHLV OHVV WKDQ WKH SURSRVHG  budget   voters   shot   down   on   Town   0HHWLQJ'D\ 7KDW ÂżJXUH LV DOVR DERXW  less   than   the   current   budget   of   URXJKO\PLOOLRQ The   school   board   plans   to   for-­ mally  warn  the  new  budget  proposal   DWWKHLUQH[WPHHWLQJRQ$SULOLQ order   for   the   public   to   have   time  to   review   the   new   plan   before   a   vote   that  could  be  scheduled  later  in  April   RUHDUO\0D\ The  budget  reduction  will  require   WKH OD\RIIV RI ÂżYH IXOOWLPH HTXLYD-­ lent   positions,   Addison   Northwest   6XSHUYLVRU\ 8QLRQ 6XSHULQWHQGHQW 7RP 2Âś%ULHQ FRQÂżUPHG $W 0RQ-­ (See  VUHS,  Page  14A)

College  student  seeks   Addison-­1  House  seat By  JOHN  FLOWERS current   sophomore   at   0 , ' ' / ( % 8 5 < â&#x20AC;&#x153;I believe by Middlebury   College,   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Calvin   McEathron   eliminating the ,ÂśP GHHSO\ DIIHFWHG should   be   pretty   well   cloud computing by   the   issues   facing   set  up  to  pursue  a  career   our   state,â&#x20AC;?   McEathron   as  a  politician  if  he  suc-­ tax as well as VDLGÂł)URPWKHH[RGXV cessfully  earns  a  bache-­ making tax of   our   young   profes-­ lorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree  in  political   credits available sionals   to   our   declin-­ science   and   economics   ing   school   enrollment   for private from   Middlebury   Col-­ and   waning   dairy   in-­ investment in OHJHLQ dustry,   Vermonters   But   McEathron,   a   Vermont, we QHHGVRPHRQHLQRIÂżFH 20-­year-­old   sopho-­ can see some who  has  grown  up  fac-­ more,   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   plan   on   LQJWKHVHFKDOOHQJHV´ waiting   another   two   changes.â&#x20AC;? And  McEathron  said   years   before   making   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Calvin McEathron he   has   been   affected   his  mark  in  the  legisla-­ by   many   of   the   issues   WLYH DUHQD7KH (DVW 0RQWSHOLHU QD-­ he   hopes   to   tackle   as   an  Addison-­1   WLYHFRQÂżUPHGRQ7XHVGD\KHSODQV +RXVHUHSUHVHQWDWLYH+HMRLQVDUDFH to   run   for   one   of   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   two   WKDW RIÂżFLDOO\ LQFOXGHV LQFXPEHQW seats  in  the  Vermont  House,  a  cam-­ 5HS %HWW\ 1XRYR '0LGGOHEXU\ paign  he  will  pursue  as  an  indepen-­ and   fellow   Democrat   Donna   Dona-­ GHQW KXH 'HPRFUDW $P\ 6KHOGRQ KDV (See  McEathron,  Page  19A) â&#x20AC;&#x153;As   a   lifelong   Vermonter   and   a  

By the way Eight  local   youngsters   will   be   among  the  76  bright  students  from   across  Vermont   who   will   compete   on  Friday  in  the  state-­level  compe-­ tition   of   the   26th   annual   National   Geographic   Bee   at   Middlebury   College.   The   winner   here   will   represent  the  state  in  the  national   competition   in   May   in   Washing-­ ton,  D.C.  The  preliminary  rounds   VWDUWDWSPDQGWKH¿QDOVEHJLQ at  3.  Good  luck  to  Thomas  Carr  of   Bristol  (Mount  Abe  seventh-­grad-­ er),  Danny  Wiles  of  Brandon  (Ne-­ shobe   sixth-­grader),   Fyn   Fernan-­ dez  (MUMS  eighth-­grader),  Colby   (See  By  the  way,  Page  6A)

Index Obituaries $ &ODVVL¿HGV %% Service  Directory %% Entertainment 17A Community  Calendar $$ Sports 1B-­4B

Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  note:   Vermont   is   going   but   the   educational   needs   of   today   through   a   remarkable   change   in   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  meet  the  idyllic  models  from   the  way  it  delivers  education  to  its   WKHSDVW%DURQHVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most   New   Englanders   would   children,  a  change  that  could  be  on   say   if   it   ainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   par  with  the  end  of   EURNH GRQÂśW Âż[ one-­room   school   LW´ KH VDLG Âł2XU houses.   As   law-­ system   is   broken,   makers   in   Mont-­ and   it   needs   to   be   pelier   wrestle   with   Âż[HGDQGZHQHHG what   this   change   to  keep  in  mind  al-­ will   encompass,   ways   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best   newspapers   in   the   IRUNLGV´ Champlain   Valley   For   years,   Ver-­ Newspaper   Group   02173(/,(5²$ELOO mont  has  discussed   are   seeking   per-­ working   its   way   through   the   pros   and   cons   spective   on   school   the  Vermont  House  of  Rep-­ of   school   consoli-­ consolidation   from     resentatives  would  dramat-­ dation,   and   now   key  players  in  Ver-­ ically  alter  the  way  primary   the   Legislature   is   mont   education.   and   secondary   schools   in   considering   an-­ This   week,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   the   Green   Mountain   State   RWKHU ELOO + talked   with   super-­ DUHJRYHUQHG to  eliminate  super-­ intendents,   who   %LOO+Âł$Q$FW5H-­ visory   unions   in   play   a   pivotal   role   ODWLQJ 7R ([SDQGHG 3UH-­ favor   of   a   number   as   intermediary   kindergartenâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;Grade   12   of  large  school  dis-­ between   students   School  Districts,â&#x20AC;?  would,  if   WULFWV 7KH JRDO LV and  teachers  on  the   (See  Bill,  Page  12A) to   improve   educa-­ one  hand  and  regu-­ tion  while  address-­ lators   and   policy-­ ing   its   ever-­rising   cost   in   the   face   makers  on  the  other.   of  declining  student  enrollment  (see   By  CHAMPLAIN  VALLEY   VLGHEDU $IWHUEXGJHWVIDLOHGRQ NEWSPAPER  GROUP  STAFF VERMONT  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  A  Norman  Rock-­ Town  Meeting  Day,  there  seems  to   well   painting   depicting   children   EHVRPHPRPHQWXPEHKLQG+ ,I SDVVHG WKH ELOO ZRXOG UHGXFH playing   in   front   of   a   one-­room   schoolhouse   adorns   Milton   Super-­ by  the  year  2020  the  number  of  mu-­ LQWHQGHQW-RKQ%DURQHÂśVRIÂżFH,WÂśV QLFLSDOVFKRROGLVWULFWVIURPWR a   traditional   scene   that   could   have    HOLPLQDWH WKH VWDWHÂśV  VXSHU-­ been  modeled  after  many  Vermont   visory   unions   and   require   the   for-­ PDWLRQRIUHJLRQDOVFKRROGLVWULFWV WRZQVQRWVRPDQ\\HDUVDJR School   buildings   are   still   the   7KRVHH[SDQGHGGLVWULFWVZRXOGRS-­ RUTLAND   NORTHEAST   SUPERINTENDENT   John   Castle   said   the   hubs   of   our   communities   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   the   erate  under  one  board,  a  minimum   VFKRROVKHRYHUVHHVWDNHDGYDQWDJHRIDQ\HIÂżFLHQFLHVWKH\FDQEXW sites   of   town   meetings,   concerts,   of  1,200  students  in  pre-­kindergar-­ he  believes  the  current  school  consolidation  plan  on  the  table  would   QRWEHQHÂżWVPDOOVFKRROVDQGFRPPXQLWLHV potlucks   and   other   gatherings   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   (See  Consolidation,  Page  12A) Photo  by  Lee  J.  Kahrs/Brandon  Reporter

Bill would cut dramatically the number of districts, boards

Porter  CEO  Jim  Daily  announces  retirement Will  leave  in  2016   following  32  years By  JOHN  FLOWERS 0,''/(%85< ² 7KH SDVW WKUHH decades  have  brought  myriad  changes   to   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   health   care   landscape,   but   one   thing   has   remained   constant:   James   Daily   and   his   stewardship   of   3RUWHU0HGLFDO&HQWHU 30&  But   the   sun   must   inevitably   set   on  

Dailyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  tenure   as   CEO   and   president   RI WKH 0LGGOHEXU\ LQVWLWXWLRQ 'DLO\ last  week  announced  he  will  retire  by   HDUO\  HQGLQJ ZKDW KDV EHHQ D legendary  run  at  the  helm  of  Addison   &RXQW\ÂśVFRPPXQLW\KRVSLWDO Âł,ÂśYHEHHQLPPHQVHO\OXFN\´'DLO\ VDLG Âł7R EH DEOH WR FRPH WR D SODFH OLNHWKLVDQGVHUYH\HDUV²E\ WKHWLPH,OHDYH²\RXFDQÂśWFRPSODLQ 3RUWHUKDVEHHQJRRGWRPH0LGGOH-­ EXU\ KDV EHHQ JRRG WR PH 7KLV KDV

EHHQDQH[FHOOHQWH[SHULHQFHIRUPH´ 'DLO\KDVVSHQWPRUHWKDQKDOI KLVOLIHDWWKHKHOPRI30&+HVLJQHG RQLQDVSUHVLGHQWDQGFKLHIH[HF-­ XWLYHRIÂżFHURIZKDWZDVWKHQDVROLG but  very   basic,   community   hospital   with   limited   technology,   few   capital   assets  and  a  limited  capacity  to  take  on   WKHWRXJKHVWFDVHV Âł:KHQ , FDPH WKLV SODFH ZDV UH-­ ally  just  some  clay,â&#x20AC;?  Daily  said  with  a   FKXFNOHÂł:HKDGWRGRDORWRIZRUN

on  basic  infrastructure,  for  starters,  be-­ fore  we  could  do  anything  that  people   ZRXOG LGHQWLI\ XV ZLWK , KDG D JUHDW front-­row   seat   to   see   a   place   come   from  a  very  basic  community  hospital   to  a  critical  access  hospital  with  as  so-­ phisticated   an   imaging/X-­ray   depart-­ PHQWDV\RXÂśOOÂżQG:HKDYHDPRGHUQ birthing   center,   a   surgical   suite   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   DVJRRGDVDQ\WKLQJ\RXÂśOOÂżQGLQWKLV state,  region  and  probably  in  this  coun-­ (See  Daily,  Page  20A)

Lawmakers  debate  shorelands  protection,  GMO  bills By  ZACH  DESPART %5,'3257 ²7ZR LVVXHV GRPL-­ nated   the   conversation   at   the   an-­ nual  legislative  luncheon  Monday  in   Bridport:   bills   in   the   Legislature   to   mandate   the   labeling   of   genetically   PRGLÂżHGIRRGVDQGSROOXWLRQUHJXOD-­ WLRQVDIIHFWLQJ/DNH&KDPSODLQ Farmers,   community   members   and   legislators   packed   the   Bridport   Community   Hall   Monday   for   the   luncheon   devoted   to   agriculture   is-­ VXHV 6WDWH 5HSV +DUYH\ 6PLWK 5 New  Haven,  Diane  Lanpher,  D-­Ver-­ gennes,   Willem   Jewett,   D-­Ripton,   DQG:LOO6WHYHQV,6KRUHKDPZHUH on  hand  to  discuss  agricultural  issues   IDFLQJ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\IDUPHUV Ed   Payne   of   Bridport   said   he   did   not  think  a  law  that  mandates  label-­ LQJ RI JHQHWLFDOO\ PRGLÂżHG IRRGV RIWHQ FDOOHG JHQHWLFDOO\ PRGLÂżHG organisms,  or  GMOs)  was  necessary,   since  food  producers  can  label  their   SURGXFWVDVRUJDQLF Âł,IHHOZHKDYHUHDOO\DGGUHVVHGLW because  people  who  were  interested   LQ IRRGVWXIIV H[FOXGHG RI WKHVH DG-­ ditives   already   have   the   solution,   ZLWK RUJDQLF ODEHOLQJ´ 3D\QH VDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Legislature  should  stop  fooling   around  with  all  this  stuff,  and  get  on   ZLWKLW´ Addison   resident   John   Ball   dis-­ agreed   with   Payne,   and   argued   that   GMOs  were  a  danger  to  both  humans   DQGOLYHVWRFN Âł,ÂśPRQWKHRSSRVLWHVLGHRIWKHLV-­ REP.  HARVEY  SMITH  responds  to  a  question  during  the  annual  Ag  Lunch  in  the  Bridport  Community  Hall  Monday  afternoon.  Legislators  focused   VXHRQWKLVRQH´%DOOVDLGÂł,ZDQWWR on  the  GMO  and  shoreline  protection  bills  during  the  lunch. (See  Ag  Lunch,  Page  18A) Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell


PAGE 2A  —  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

Ooh argh! THE FERRISBURGH  CHILDREN’S  Theater   cast  took  to  the  high  seas  last  week  for  their   production  of  “Jolly  Roger  and  the  Pirate   Queen”  at  the  Vergennes  Opera  House.   Pictured  here,  from  a  show  for  local  school-­ children  last  Friday  morning,  are,  clockwise   from  top,  Rory  Patch,  Brianna  Billings,  Leah   Croke,  Trudy  Cosgrove,  Martika  Blair-­Parizo   and  Maria  Malaney;;  Cosgrove;;  Harriet  An-­ derson,  Emma  Jackman,  Sophia  Davis  and   Hannah  Kelly;;  Gage  Lalumiere;;  and  Adrian   Chamberlain,  Croke,  Billings  and  Patch.

Independent photos/Trent  Campbell


Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  3A

Petitioners  near  goal   IRUWRZQRIÂżFHUHYRWH 230  signatures  were  needed  by  April  3 By  JOHN  FLOWERS debate   among   supporters   and   op-­ MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  A  revote  on  a   SRQHQWVVLQFHLWZDVÂżUVWĂ&#x20AC;RDWHGODVW proposal   to   build   new   Middlebury   June.  Supporters  said  it  would  allow   WRZQ RIÂżFHV DQG D UHFUHDWLRQ FHQ-­ WKH WRZQ WR UHSODFH LWV GHWHULRUDW-­ WHU ZDV VWLOO KDQJLQJ LQ WKH EDODQFH LQJ WRZQ RIÂżFHV DQG J\P ZLWK WZR as   the   Addison   Independent   went   new  buildings  and  a  park  at  a  mod-­ to   press   on   Wednesday,   though   the   HVWFRVWRIDSSUR[LPDWHO\PLOOLRQ OHDGHU RI WKH SHWLWLRQ GULYH WR IRUFH LQWD[HVIRUDSURMHFWYDOXHGDW WKH UHIHUHQGXP ZDV RSWLPLVWLF KH PLOOLRQ FUHDWH D QHZ UHFUHDWLRQDO would  gather  the  minimum  230  sig-­ FHQWHU ZLWK PRUH SDUNLQJ DQG VHUYH natures   required   by   the   Thursday,   DGXDOUHFUHDWLRQDOQHHG YLDDQDGGL-­ April  3,  deadline. tion   to   the   building   paid   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   working   hard   IRUE\WKHVFKRROGLVWULFW  DQG ZHÂśUH SUHWW\ FRQÂż-­ It is clear at   Middlebury   Union   dent   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   do   it,â&#x20AC;?   How-­ that +LJK 6FKRRO ODFURVVH ard   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Skipâ&#x20AC;?   Brush   said.   DQG VRFFHU ÂżHOGV SOXV As  of  Wednesday  morn-­ opponents FUHDWH QHZ WRZQ RIÂżFHV ing,   Brush   and   his   ap-­ of the $6.5 WKDW ZRXOG DOORZ FRP-­ proximately   15   helpers   million PRQVSDFHZLWKWKH,OVOH\ KDGJDWKHUHGDFRPELQHG proposal Library   to   meet   future   total   of   208   signatures   QHHGV FUHDWLQJ JUHDWHU on  a  petition  seeking  re-­ will have to value  for  town  taxpayers.   FRQVLGHUDWLRQ RI $UWLFOH work hard 2SSRQHQWVFLWHRQVLWH  ZKLFK ZDV DSSURYHG to turn out SDUNLQJ FRQFHUQV WKH by   Middlebury   voters   potential   that   the   new   like-minded by  a  915-­798  margin  on   WRZQ RIÂżFH EXLOGLQJ voters to the PLJKW SUHFOXGH IXWXUH 0DUFK 7KDW DUWLFOH FDOOV IRU polls. expansion   of   the   adja-­ WKH FRQVWUXFWLRQ RI D FHQW ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ DQG QHZ PXQLFLSDO EXLOGLQJ SRWHQWLDO LQFRQYHQLHQFHV DW0DLQ6WDQGDQHZUHFUHDWLRQ DUHFUHDWLRQFHQWHUORFDWHGRXWVLGHRI FHQWHU RII &UHHN 5RDG ,W DOVR FDOOV WKHFRUHGRZQWRZQPLJKWSUHVHQW IRU 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH WR DFTXLUH %UXVK LV KRSLQJ WKHWRZQ YDFDWHV WKH FXUUHQW WRZQ RIÂżFHJ\P VLWH DW LWV0DUFKGHFLVLRQDQGLQVWHDGFRQ-­ 0DLQ6W DQGWXUQLWLQWRDSXEOLF siders  his  proposal  to  build  new  town   park)  as  well  as  another  town-­owned   RIÂżFHVDQGDVHQLRUFHQWHUDW SDUFHODW&URVV6WWRZKLFKWKHLQ-­ &RXUW 6W DQG IRU D QHZ J\P WR EH stitutionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Osborne  House  would  be   HUHFWHGDVDQDGGLWLRQWRWKH0HPR-­ UHORFDWHGIURP0DLQ6W ULDO 6SRUWV &HQWHU DW  %XWWROSK 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH KDV DJUHHG Drive. WR XQGHUZULWH  PLOOLRQ RI WKH %UXVKÂśVSODQDOVRFDOOVIRUWKHFXU-­  PLOOLRQ FRQVWUXFWLRQ FRVWV LQ UHQW PXQLFLSDO EXLOGLQJ DQG J\P H[FKDQJHIRUWKH0DLQ6WDQG SURSHUW\ DW  0DLQ 6W WR EH FRQ-­ &URVV6WSDUFHOVSOXVSD\XSWR YH\HG WR WKH FROOHJH +H SODFHV WKH PLOOLRQ LQ FRVWV WR UD]H WKH FXUUHQW FRVWRIKLVSODQDWDVXP PXQLFLSDOEXLOGLQJDQGJ\PDQGFUH-­ KHVDLGFRXOGEHHQWLUHO\FRYHUHGIRU ate  a  park  on  the  site. FRQVLGHUDEO\OHVVWKDQWKHPLO-­ ,WÂśV D SURSRVDO WKDW GUHZ ÂżHUFH OLRQ WKH FROOHJH KDV DJUHHG WR DOORW

Toddler badly hurt after being struck by SUV By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURYâ&#x20AC;&#x201D;   A   two-­and-­a-­ KDOI\HDUROGJLUOUHPDLQHGLQFULWLFDO FRQGLWLRQ DW 'DUWPRXWK+LWFKFRFN 0HGLFDO&HQWHURQ:HGQHVGD\DIWHU EHLQJ VWUXFN E\ DQ 689 RQ :H\-­ EULGJH6WUHHWDWDURXQGSPRQ Tuesday,  April  1. 0LGGOHEXU\ SROLFH VDLG WKHLU SUH-­ liminary   investigation   reveals   the   FKLOG ZDV VWDQGLQJ ZLWK KHU PRWKHU along   the   driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   side   of   the   ve-­ KLFOH SDUNHG RQ WKH QRUWK VLGH RI :H\EULGJH 6WUHHW GLUHFWO\ DFURVV IURP WKH 2WWHU &UHHN &KLOG &HQWHU 2&&& 7KHFKLOGLVDQHQUROOHHDW WKHFHQWHUDQGKHUPRPLVDWHDFKHU WKHUH2&&&RIÂżFLDOVFRQÂżUPHGRQ Wednesday. 3ROLFH EHOLHYH WKH FKLOG VDZ D WHDFKHUDWWKHFHQWHUDQGUDQLQWRWKH 0,''/(%85<5(6,'(17+2:$5'Âł6NLS´%UXVKFRXQWVVLJQDWXUHVRQKLVSHWLWLRQWRIRUFHDUHYRWHRQWKH street   and   into   the   path   of   a   south-­ SURSRVHGWRZQRIÂżFHVUHFUHDWLRQFHQWHUSURMHFWGXULQJDVLJQLQJJDWKHULQJDWWKH$PHULFDQ/HJLRQ0RQGD\ ERXQG 689 EHLQJ GULYHQ E\ =DFK-­ DIWHUQRRQ2Q:HGQHVGD\%UXVKZDVDURXQGYRWHVVKRUWRIWKHYRWHVKHQHHGVWRÂżOHZLWKWKHWRZQE\ DU\%UXFKPLOOHURI6DQ$QWRQLR Thursday,  April  3. 7H[DV%UXFKPLOOHULVOLVWHGDVDVH-­ ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWR7UHQW&DPSEHOO QLRUVWXGHQWDW0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJH Turnout,   therefore,   will   be   key   WR WKH SURMHFW YRWHUV DSSURYHG RQ DVSHFLDOYRWHLQPLGRUODWH0D\ 3ROLFH VDLG WKH FKLOG ZDV LPPH-­ ,W LV FOHDU WKDW RSSRQHQWV RI WKH IRU RSSRQHQWV RI $UWLFOH  LI WKH diately  taken  to  Porter  Hospital  and   0DUFK  0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH RIÂż-­ FLDOVKRZHYHUKDYHDOUHDG\LQGLFDW-­ $6.5   million   proposal   will   have   to   measure   is   to   be   overturned.   It   VXEVHTXHQWO\WUDQVIHUUHGWRWKHFULWL-­ HGWKDWWKHLURIIHURIPLOOLRQLQ work   hard   to   turn   out   like-­minded   should  be  noted  that  the  turnout  of   FDO FDUH XQLW DW 'DUWPRXWK+LWFK-­ YRWHUVRQ0DUFKZDVPXFK FRFNLQ/HEDQRQ1+ ÂżQDQFLQJ LV QRW WUDQVIHUUDEOH WR WKH voters  to  the  polls. %DVHG RQ HOHFWLRQ VWDWXWHV IRU UH-­ higher  than  usual  for  Town  Meeting   Brush  proposal. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   prayers   are   with   the   family   The  Brush  proposal  would  not  be   FRQVLGHUDWLRQ LQLWLDWLYHV :HEVWHU 'D\DFFRUGLQJWR:HEVWHU6KHVDLG and   everyone   involved,â&#x20AC;?   said   Dou-­ ÂżHOGHGDVSDUWRIDUHYRWHRQDUWLFOH VDLGSURMHFWRSSRQHQWVZLOOQRWRQO\ W\SLFDOO\WRYRWHUVFDVWEDO-­ PLQD1RRQDQWUHDVXUHURIWKH2&&& 6.   Rather,   the   question   put   to   vot-­ KDYHWRVFRUHDZLQEXWPXVWH[FHHG lots  in  Middlebury  on  Town  Meet-­ board,   who   was   helping   out   at   the   ers   will   simply   be   a   yes   or   no   vote   two-­thirds   of   the   number   of   votes   ing  Day. FHQWHU RQ :HGQHVGD\ Âł:H ZDQW WR 1RQHWKHOHVV %UXVK DQG KLV VXS-­ UHVSHFWWKHSULYDF\RIWKHIDPLO\´ RQ$UWLFOH  MXVW DV WKDW DUWLFOH ZDV WKDWZHUHFDVWin  favorRIWKHSURMHFW EDFNRQ0DUFK7ZRWKLUGVRIWKH porters  pledged  to  work  hard  to  de-­ worded  for  the  previous  vote. 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH 'LUHFWRU RI ,I %UXVKÂśV UHFRQVLGHUDWLRQ SHWL-­ prevailing   915   tallies   registered   on   liver   more   than   enough   signatures   Media   Relations   Sarah   Ray   issued   WLRQLVVXEPLWWHGRQWLPHDQGLVFHU-­ 0DUFKHTXDWHVWRDWOHDVWYRWHV to   Webster   by   the   end   of   the   busi-­ the   following   statement   about   the   WLÂżHG E\ 0LGGOHEXU\ 7RZQ &OHUN that  the  opponents  will  have  to  mar-­ ness   day   on   Thursday,   April   3,   to   LQFLGHQW Ann  Webster  as  having  enough  sig-­ VKDORQWKHLUVLGHWRYDFDWHWKHSUHYL-­ IRUFHWKHSHWLWLRQWRDYRWH Âł2XU WKRXJKWV DUH ZLWK WKH FKLOG â&#x20AC;&#x153;People   are   really   passionate   and   her   family,   and   we   hope   very   QDWXUHV D VSHFLDO $XVWUDOLDQ EDOORW RXVYRWHDFFRUGLQJWR:HEVWHU 6RHYHQLISURMHFWRSSRQHQWVHDUQ about   this   issue,â&#x20AC;?   said   Brush,   who   PXFKWKDWVKHZLOOKDYHDFRPSOHWH HOHFWLRQZLOOQHHGWREHKHOGZLWKLQ GD\V,WLVSRVVLEOHWKDWWKHVHOHFW-­ DPDMRULW\ZLQ²OHWÂśVVD\DUWLFOH DGGHG KLV RQO\ UHDO KLQGUDQFH LQ DQG VSHHG\ UHFRYHU\ IURP WKLV WHU-­ ERDUGFRXOGGLVFXVVWKHSHWLWLRQDQG ORVHV  WR  ² WKH UHFRQVLG-­ JDWKHULQJVLJQDWXUHVKDVEHHQÂżQG-­ ULEOH DFFLGHQW´ VKH VDLG Âł:H ZLOO OD\ RXW D WLPHWDEOH IRU WKH VSHFLDO HUDWLRQVWLOOIDLOV DQG$UWLFOHLVDI-­ ing  people  at  home  during  the  day. DZDLWWKHUHVXOWVRIWKHSROLFHLQYHV-­ Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   tigation   before   making   any   further   vote  at  its  next  meeting,  on  Tuesday,   ÂżUPHG EHFDXVHWKHÂľQRÂśVLGHZRXOG $SULO7KDWVFKHGXOHFRXOGOHDGWR QRWKDYHUHFRUGHGDWOHDVWWDOOLHV johnf@addisonindependent.com. VWDWHPHQWDERXWWKHDFFLGHQWLWVHOI´

3ROLFHDUUHVWÂżYHIRUDUPHGUREEHU\EXUJODU\ By  ZACH  DESPART %5,672/²3ROLFHPDGHDVOHZ RI DUUHVWV LQ FRQQHFWLRQ ZLWK WZR thefts   in   Bristol   over   the   weekend,   LQFOXGLQJ D EUD]HQ DUPHG UREEHU\ RI D 5RXWH  6RXWK FRQYHQLHQFH store. ,Q WRWDO SROLFH WRRN LQWR FXVWRG\ ÂżYH SHRSOH RQH RQ VXVSLFLRQ RI FRPPLWWLQJ WKH DUPHG UREEHU\ WKH same   man   and   one   other   on   suspi-­ FLRQ RI EUHDNLQJ LQWR D KRPH DQG WKUHH RWKHUV KHOSLQJ SODQ DQG FDUU\ out  the  armed  robbery. $FFRUGLQJ WR 9HUPRQW 6WDWH 3R-­ OLFH %ULVWRO UHVLGHQW -RVKXD 0DUWHOO ZDONHG LQWR WKH %LJ :KHHO 9DULHW\ 6WRUHDWSPRQ6XQGD\ZLWKD â&#x20AC;&#x153;large   knifeâ&#x20AC;?   and   demanded   money   from   the   owner.   After   the   owner   FKDVHG0DUWHOORXWRIWKHVWRUH 0DUWHOOĂ&#x20AC;HGLQWRWKHZRRGV 3ROLFH RIÂżFHUV IURP %ULVWRO 9HU-­ JHQQHVDQGWKHVWDWHSROLFHEDUUDFNV LQ1HZ+DYHQFRUGRQHGRIIWKHDUHD 8VLQJFDQLQHXQLWVDXWKRULWLHVIRXQG Martell  three-­quarters  of  a  mile  into   WKHZRRGVDQGDUUHVWHGKLP$FFRUG-­ LQJWRSROLFH0DUWHOOVDLGKHQHHGHG the  money  from  the  theft  for  heroin.   3ROLFH VDLG WKH\ DOVR IRXQG VWROHQ property  from  a  previous  burglary  in   0DUWHOOÂśVSRFNHW

$FFRUGLQJ WR SROLFH WKH DUPHG robbery  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  the  only  time  Martell   ran  afoul  of  the  law  last  weekend  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   WURRSHUV VDLG KH DOVR EXUJODUL]HG D UHVLGHQFHRQ/RZHU1RWFK5RDGRQ 6DWXUGD\0DUFK 9HUPRQW 6WDWH 3ROLFH DOOHJH 0DU-­ tell  and  Starksboro  resident  Kyle  Lit-­ WOH  HQWHUHG WKH XQORFNHG KRPH and  stole  jewelry  and  an  Apple  iPod.   3ROLFHVDLGWKHSDLUWRRNWKHMHZHOU\ ZKLFK SROLFH HVWLPDWHG WR EH ZRUWK DQGSDZQHGLWIRUFDVKDWWKH Blue  Mall  in  South  Burlington. ,QDGGLWLRQSROLFHVDLG0DUWHOOLV responsible  for  a  theft  of  a  home  on   *DS5RDGLQ/LQFROQ After  further  investigation,  Bristol   SROLFH RQ 0RQGD\ DUUHVWHG %ULVWRO UHVLGHQWV 1DWKDQ 3HFRU  DQG KLV ZLIH &KDVWLW\ 3HFRU  DV ZHOO DV /LQFROQ UHVLGHQW .LPEHUO\ -LPPR  RQ VXVSLFLRQ RI DLGLQJ LQ WKH FRPPLVVLRQRIDIHORQ\ 7KLV ZDV QRW WKH ÂżUVW FRQWDFW SR-­ OLFH KDYH KDG ZLWK 0DUWHOO -LPPR DQG&KDVWLW\3HFRULQUHFHQWPRQWKV %ULVWROSROLFHDUUHVWHG0DUWHOO-DQ  RQ VXVSLFLRQ RI UHWDLO WKHIW IURP 5LWH$LG,QWKDWLQFLGHQWDXWKRULWLHV VDLG 0DUWHOO WXUQHG RYHU WR SROLFH D ZDWFK EDWWHU\ WKDW KDG EHHQ WDNHQ from  the  store.  Martell  also  pleaded  

CORRECTION: In  last   Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   edition,   the   Independent   gave   the   wrong   town   RIUHVLGHQFHIRU1RUWRQ/DWRXUHOOH

LQ WKH FDSWLRQ IRU D VWRU\ RQ *RY EXWKLVWRZQRIUHVLGHQFHLV2UZHOO 6KXPOLQœV DSSHDUDQFH DW WKH /HJ-­ :HVKRXOGKDYHFDOOHGKLPDQ2U-­ LVODWLYH/XQFKHRQ7KHPDLOLQJDG-­ well  resident.   dress   for   his   studio   is   Shoreham,  

JXLOW\ WR DWWHPSWLQJ WR HOXGH SROLFH LQDQGWRWKHVDOHRIQDUFRWLFV LQDFFRUGLQJWRFRXUWUHFRUGV Jimmo  was  previously  arrested  on   VXVSLFLRQ RI VHOOLQJ KHURLQ LQ 1R-­ YHPEHUDQGFLWHGIRUGULYLQJXQGHU WKH LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFH LQ WKDW VDPH PRQWK &KDVWLW\ 3HFRU ZDV DUUHVWHG LQ )HE DIWHUSROLFHVDLGVKHVWROHDZDO-­ OHW IURP D YHKLFOH SDUNHG RXWVLGH D %ULVWROFKXUFKDQGWRRNIURPLW %ULVWROSROLFHVDLGWKHWULRZDVÂłLQ-­ YROYHGLQWKHSODQQLQJSDUWLFLSDWLRQ and   operation   related   to   the   armed   robbery,â&#x20AC;?   adding   that   the   investiga-­ WLRQSURGXFHGLQIRUPDWLRQUHODWHGWR RWKHUSURSHUW\FULPHVLQWKHQRUWKHUQ SDUWRIWKHFRXQW\ %ULVWRO 3ROLFH &KLHI .HYLQ *LEEV VDLG0DUWHOOWROGSROLFHWKDWWKH3H-­ FRUVZDLWHGIRUKLPLQDJHWDZD\FDU QHDUWKHVFHQHRIWKHDUPHGUREEHU\ 7KDW SODQ ZDV IRLOHG ZKHQ SROLFH TXLFNO\ DUULYHG IRUFLQJ 0DUWHOO WR Ă&#x20AC;HHLQWRWKHZRRGV *LEEV DGGHG WKDW SURSHUW\ FULPHV VXFK DV WKLV DUH RIWHQ PRWLYDWHG E\ H[SHQVLYHGUXJDGGLFWLRQV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Most   of   the   burglaries   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   dealing   with   are   related   to   drugs,â&#x20AC;?   Gibbs   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   stealing   what-­ HYHU WKH\ FDQ IRU FDVK RU WUDGH IRU heroin  or  other  drugs.

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Martell  pleaded   not   guilty   to   the   DUPHG UREEHU\ FKDUJH LQ $GGLVRQ &RXQW\6XSHULRU&RXUW0RQGD\DQG LVEHLQJKHOGDW0DUEOH9DOOH\&RU-­ UHFWLRQDO)DFLOLW\LQOLHXRI EDLO-LPPRDQGWKH3HFRUVSOHDGQRW guilty  Tuesday  and  are  being  held  in   lieu  of  bail.

Real  Estate   and  You by  Ingrid Punderson  Jackson

THE  EXCLUSIVE-­AGENCY   BUYER  AGREEMENT One   of   the   main   types   of   EX\HU DJUHHPHQWV GHÂżQLQJ your   agreementâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   exclusivity   is   the   exclusive   buyer   agency   agreement,   which   binds   the   broker   exclusively   to   the   buyer   without   obligating   the   buyer   to   pay   the   broker   commission.   In   an   EBA   agreement,   brokers   are   entitled   to   payment   only   if   they   locate   the   property   that   their   buyer   eventually   purchases.   If   the   buyer   independently   locates   their   purchase   property,   no   broker   commission   is   due,   yet   the   buyer   still   receives   the   EHQHÂżW RI IXOO UHSUHVHQWDWLYH from   an   agent   legally   bound   to   advocate   their   best   interests.     7KH SULPDU\ EHQHÂżW RI DQ (%$ agreement  is  that  buyers  receive   the   same   representation   that   sellers   have,   with   no   upfront   cost   involved.   Signing   an   EBA   agreement  costs  buyers  nothing,   as  any  commissions  due  are  paid   after  closing.  An  EBA  agreement   makes   the   broker   their   buyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   advocate  and  legally  accountable   to   the   buyer.   Without   a   signed   EBA   agreement,   the   broker   is   simply   working   as   a   facilitator,   not   legally   bound   to   either   the   buyer   or   the   seller.   Additional   EHQHÂżWV WR DQ (%$ DJUHHPHQW include   the   broker   being   ERXQG E\ FRQÂżGHQWLDOLW\ 1R LQIRUPDWLRQ ÂżQDQFLDO RU otherwise,   may   be   divulged   to   a   seller,   sellerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   agent,   any   real   estate  agency,  mortgage  lender  or   insurance   company   without   the   EX\HUÂśVVSHFLÂżFSHUPLVVLRQ(%$ agreements   also   allow   brokers   to   assist   buyers   with   locating   properties   using   a   number   of   sources,   advising   buyers   on   fair   market   prices,   evaluating   and   previewing   properties,   considering   comparable   local   properties   and   their   values,   and   suggesting   reputable   appraisers,   lawyers  or  mortgage  providers.   Ingrid  Punderson  Jackson Real  Estate Â&#x2021;FHOO WROOIUHH www.middvermontrealestate.com

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PAGE  4A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

A DDIS ON   INDE P E NDEN T

Letters

Editorials

to the Editor

Sen.  McCain:  Supreme  Court   ruling  will  lead  to  more  scandal Sen.  Bernie  Sanders  may  have  had  the  quote  of  the  week  when  he   said:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Freedom  of  speech,  in  my  view,  does  not  mean  the  freedom   to  buy  the  United  States  government.â&#x20AC;?  Then  added:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  world  are   WKHÂżYHFRQVHUYDWLYH6XSUHPH&RXUWMXVWLFHVOLYLQJLQ"7RHTXDWH the  ability  of  billionaires  to  buy  elections  with  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;freedom  of  speechâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   is  totally  absurd.  The  Supreme  Court  is  paving  the  way  toward  an   oligarchic  form  of  society  in  which  a  handful  of  billionaires,  like   the  Koch  brothers  and  Sheldon  Adelson,  will  control  our  political   process.â&#x20AC;? Sen.  Sanders  was  referring  to  the  ruling  Wednesday  in  which  the   U.S.  Supreme  Court  struck  down  limits  on  the  total  amount  of  money   an  individual  could  spend  on  political  candidates.  The  court  ruled  it   was  a  violation  of  free  speech  rights.   7KHGHFLVLRQZDVDORQJSDUW\OLQHVZLWKWKHÂżYHFRQVHUYDWLYHV DGGLQJDQRWKHUGDJJHULQWRWKHKHDUWRIFDPSDLJQÂżQDQFHODZVWKDW have  been  used  to  tap  down  the  amount  of  big  money  in  campaigns   from  single  sources  since  Buckley  v.  Valeo,  in  1976.  That  decision   (defending  a  law  passed  by  congress  in  the  wake  of  the  Watergate   scandal)  limited  campaign  contributions  to  $2,600  per  election  per   federal  candidate,  but  allowed  unlimited  contributions  to  political   action  committees  (PACs),  which  had  to  spend  its  money  independent   of  parties  or  candidates.  The  decision  recognized  the  corrupting   LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRIPRQH\LQFDPSDLJQVDQGGUHZDGLVWLQFWLRQEHWZHHQ contributions  to  a  candidate  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  which  the  court  said  should  be   restricted  to  prevent  corruption  or  the  appearance  of  corruption  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and   expenditures,  which  the  court  equated  to  a  personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  right  to  political   expression. Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ruling  comes  on  the  heels  of  Citizens  United  v.   FEC,  in  which  the  court  ruled  that  corporations  should  be  treated  as   individuals  and  be  allowed  to  spend  freely  in  elections. Wednesdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  decision  did  not  change  the  limit  on  how  much  an   individual  can  give  to  any  one  candidate,  which  remains  at  $2,600   per  two-­year  election  cycle,  but  struck  down  a  provision  in  the  case,   McCutcheon  v.  FEC,  that  capped  contributions  to  all  candidates  at   $48,600,  and  to  political  parties  and  committees  at  $74,600. 2SSRQHQWVRIWKHUXOLQJFRQWHQGLWFUHDWHVDJLDQWORRSKROHWKDW ZLOODOORZVXSHUVL]HGMRLQWIXQGLQJFRPPLWWHHVWKDWFRXOGVROLFLW checks  for  millions  of  dollars  and  pour  the  funding  into  competitive   campaigns. The  decision  sparked  sharp  dissent  from  the  courtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  more  liberal   MXVWLFHVÂł,I&LWL]HQÂśV8QLWHGRSHQHGDGRRUWRGD\ÂśVGHFLVLRQZHIHDU ZLOORSHQDĂ&#x20AC;RRGJDWH´ZURWH-XVWLFH6WHSKHQ*%UH\HULQKLVGLVVHQW noting  that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;when  money  calls  the  tune,  those  ideas  representing  the   voices  of  the  people  will  not  be  heard.â&#x20AC;? **********   Whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  interesting  about  Chief  Justice  John  Robertsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Jr.  ruling   LQWKHFDVHLVKRZKHUHFRJQL]HVWKHFRUUXSWLQJLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHRIPRQH\ in  campaigns,  yet  opens  the  door  for  such  corruption.  Rather,  he   argues  that  efforts  to  regulate  contributions  to  candidates  had  to   EHVSHFLÂżFDOO\WLHGWRÂłTXLGSURTXR´FRUUXSWLRQPHDQLQJDGLUHFW correlation  to  money  given  for  an  action  delivered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spending  large  sums  of  money  in  connection  with  elections,   but  not  in  connection  with  an  effort  to  control  the  exercise  of  an   RIÂżFHKROGHUÂśVRIÂżFLDOGXWLHVGRHVQRWJLYHULVHWRVXFKTXLGSURTXR corruption,â&#x20AC;?  Roberts  wrote  in  his  decision. That  ignores,  of  course,  the  very  power  of  money  in  politics  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFLQJDFRQJUHVVPDQÂśVYRWHDWDODWHUGDWHRQLVVXHVKHRUVKH knows  the  donor  expects  allegiance  for  the  money  given.  Vote  against   those  wishes  and  the  money  will  be  used  against  them  in  subsequent   elections. In  his  ruling,  Roberts  sets  the  bar  of  corruption  to  an  outright  bribe   as  in  the  criminal  sense  of  that  transaction.  Politics  is  more  subtle  than   that,  as  he  surely  knows,  which  is  why  the  ruling  is  so  appalling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  deeply  disappointed  (by  the  ruling),  but  it  is  what  it  is,â&#x20AC;?  said   Sen.  John  McCain,  R-­Ariz.,  on  Wednesday.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  predict  again  there  will   EHPDMRUVFDQGDOVLQFDPSDLJQÂżQDQFHFRQWULEXWLRQVWKDWZLOOFDXVH UHIRUPÂŤ7KHUHZLOOEHVFDQGDO7KHUHÂśVWRRPXFKPRQH\ZDVKLQJ around.â&#x20AC;? When  a  leading  statesman  and  former  presidential  candidate  of  the   Republican  Party  admits  the  shortcomings  of  the  decision,  you  know  it   ZDVQÂśWWKHFRXUWÂśVÂżQHVWKRXU Angelo  S.  Lynn

H.833:  A  step  toward  reform? This  year  the  Legislature  has  successfully  crafted  a  viable  bill,  H.883,   that  focuses  the  publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  attention  on  education  reform  without  a  knee-­ MHUNUHDFWRQWKDWGRRPVWKHLQLWLDWLYH7KDWÂśVQRHDV\WDVNDQGLWÂśVWRWKH credit  of  the  House  Education  Committee  chaired  by  Rep.  Johannah   Donovan,  D-­Burlington,  and  its  counterpart  in  the  Senate. H.833  focuses  on  consolidating  school  governance,  not  schools.  The   initiative  would  consolidate  the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  current  273  school  districts  into   roughly  50  by  2020.  The  change  would  also  prompt  discussion  about   larger  issues:  Consider  that  between  2004  and  2013,  student  enrollment   dropped  9  percent,  teachers  and  para-­educators  increased  slightly,  and   per  pupil  spending  from  2002  to  2012  went  from  $9,806  to  $18,571    â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  an  89  percent  increase.  With  numbers  like  that,  the  status  quo  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   work  much  longer. The  Addison  Independent,  along  with  its  sister  newspapers  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  St.   Albans  Messenger,  the  Milton  Independent,  Essex  Reporter,  Colchester   Sun,  Brandon  Reporter,  and  Mountain  TimesRI.LOOLQJWRQ²ÂżOHWZR VWRULHVLQWRGD\ÂśVLVVXH ZULWWHQMRLQWO\E\VHYHUDOUHSRUWHUV RQKRZ superintendents  in  our  coverage  areas  perceive  H.883  and  the  need  for   educational  reform.   We  encourage  readers  to  spend  the  time  to  pore  over  the  concerns   and  support  of  these  superintendents,  and  to  weigh  in  with  your  own   comments.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  timely  and  critical  issue  with  huge  implications  that   can  only  be  successful  with  the  publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  understanding  and  approval  of   ZKDWHYHUÂżQDOPHDVXUHVPHHWOHJLVODWLYHDSSURYDO Angelo  S.  Lynn

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT Periodicals  Postage  Paid  at  Middlebury,  Vt.  05753

Postmaster,  send  address  change  to  Addison  Independent, 0DSOH6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQWÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;)D[Â&#x2021;:HEZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP (0DLOQHZV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRPÂ&#x2021;(0DLO$GYHUWLVLQJDGV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP 3XEOLVKHGHYHU\0RQGD\7KXUVGD\E\WKH$GGLVRQ3UHVV,QF0HPEHU9HUPRQW3UHVV$VVRFLDWLRQ1HZ(QJODQG3UHVV$V VRFLDWLRQ1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ 68%6&5,37,215$7(69HUPRQWÂą0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV2XWRI6WDWHÂą 0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV'LVFRXQWHGUDWHIRU6HQLRU&LWL]HQVFDOOIRUGHWDLOV  7KH,QGHSHQGHQWDVVXPHVQRÂżQDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURUVLQDGYHUWLVHPHQWVEXWZLOOUHSULQWWKDWSDUWRIDQ DGYHUWLVHPHQWLQZKLFKWKHW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURURFFXUUHG$GYHUWLVHUZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\WKHPDQDJHPHQWLPPHGLDWHO\RIDQ\ HUURUVZKLFKPD\RFFXU 7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636

Shumlin  skirts   pipeline  answers

Doorstop  seats FOLDING  CHAIRS  REST  against  a  door  at  the  back  of  the  stage  in  the  Bridport  Community  Hall  Mon-­ day  afternoon. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

College-­town  collaboration  is  a  winner Every   year   after  Town   Meeting   Day,  Vermonters   get   head   spinning,   consider   now   that   the   college   and   town   an   interesting   glimpse   at   what   we   â&#x20AC;&#x153;reallyâ&#x20AC;?   think   about   have   agreed   to   that   new   deal,   in   which   the   college   do-­ some  controversial  statewide  issues.  That  glimpse  comes   nated  riverfront  land  behind  the  library  to  the  town.   courtesy   of   State   Sen.   William   Doyleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   survey   distrib-­ 7DNHDPRPHQWWRUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWRQWKHVFRSHRIWKLVJLIW7KH uted  at  many  town  meetings. 1.4  acres  in  the  parcel  (of  which  the  college   7KLV \HDUÂśV ÂżQGLQJV DUH ZRUWK QRWLQJ RQ owned   78   percent   and   the   town   owned   22   several   counts,   from   legal   weed   to   wind   percent)   are   valued   at   $1   million.   The   land   power.   But   before   we   consider   those   state-­ overlooks   and   reaches   down   to   a   lovely   ZLGH LVVXHV OHWÂśV ÂżUVW WXUQ WR VRPH ORFDO VWUHWFK RI ULYHU ,W KDV VLJQLÂżFDQW GHYHORS-­ ones. ment   potential.   Indeed,   the   agreement   be-­ During  the  run-­up  to  the  town  of  Middle-­ tween   town   and   college   contemplated   the   bury  vote  on  a  sweeping  proposal  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  to  relo-­ college  working  with  a  developer  to  take  ad-­ FDWHWKHWRZQRIÂżFHVEXLOGDQHZJ\PDQG vantage  of  that  potential.   tear  down  the  old  municipal  building  to  cre-­ With  this  new  deal,  control  of  the  land  be-­ ate  a  park  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  there  was  a  lot  of  grousing  from   hind  the  library  now  resides  where  it  should,   opponents  about  Middlebury  Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pur-­ with  the  town  itself.  Rather  than  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ported  interest  in  controlling  the  downtown.   having   to   consider   a   college-­developer   pro-­ It   will   be   interesting   to   see   what   those   posal  for  the  land,  the  town  will  be  in  a  posi-­ folks   have   to   say,   now   that   the   college   has   tion  to  completely  control  the  process  itself. made  a  substantial  gift  of  land  to  the  town. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  critical  of  the  college  for  its  ir-­ The   critics   claimed   that   the   proposal   to   responsible   failure   to   divest   out   of   the   fos-­ have   the   site   of   the   old   municipal   building   sil  fuels  that  are  choking  the  planet.  But  on   WXUQHGLQWRDSDUNZDVMXVWPRUHHYLGHQFHRI by Gregory Dennis these   local   issues,   I   believe   the   college   has   creeping  college  domination.  Another  exam-­ acted  responsibly  and  with  both  its  own  and   ple,  in  their  view,  was  a  recently  completed   the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  interests  at  heart. agreement   that   gave   the   college   complete   control   over   Widening  the  lens  now  to  statewide  issues  and  one  of   VRPHULYHUIURQWODQGEHWZHHQWKH,OVOH\/LEUDU\DQG2W-­ Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  prized  political  traditions:  the  annual  survey   ter  Creek.   distributed  at  town  meetings  by  Sen.  Doyle.   The  diehard  opposition  lives  on,  in  the  form  of  an  ill-­ He  started  this  tradition  in  1970,  the  year  after  he  was   conceived   petition   drive   that   would   force   a   revote   on   ÂżUVWHOHFWHGWRWKH/HJLVODWXUH7KLV\HDUÂśVVXUYH\ZDVDV WKH WRZQ RIÂżFHSDUNJ\P SODQ :HÂśOO NQRZ WKLV ZHHN ZLGHUDQJLQJDQGTXLUN\DVDQ\WRXFKLQJRQPDULMXDQD whether  there  are  enough  petition  signatures  to  force  the   ODEHOLQJ JHQHWLFDOO\ PRGLÂżHG IRRG ZLQG SRZHU FHOO town  to  go  through  another  vote. phones  and  spying  by  the  federal  government. And  if  those  political  permutations  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  yet  have  your   (See  Dennis,  Page  5A)

Between The Lines

Scheuermann  steps  up  for  GOP Rep.   Heidi   Scheuermann   of   Stowe   told   reporters   last   week   that   she   is   seriously   considering   entering   the   race   for  governor  as  a  Republican. Scheuermann   was   born   in   Burlington,   grew   up   in   Stowe,  and  attended  the  Stowe  public  schools.  After  re-­ ceiving  a  degree  in  education  from  Saint  Louis  Univer-­ sity,   she   spent   three   years   in   the   Peace   Corps,   teaching   English  as  a  second  language  in  Poland.  She  served  two   stints   on   the   staff   of   Sen.   James   Jef-­ IRUGV¿UVWIURPWRZKHQKH was  a  Republican,  and  then  from  2003   to  2006  after  he  had  become  an  inde-­ pendent.  Scheuermann  was  elected  to   the   Legislature   in   2006,   and   is   com-­ pleting  her  fourth  term  in  the  Vermont   House. If  Scheuermann  were  to  be  the  Re-­ By  Eric  L.  Davis publican   candidate   for   governor   this   fall,  she  would  appeal  to  independent   and   moderate   voters   more   than   the   *23¶VFDQGLGDWH5DQG\%URFN6FKHXHUPDQQ¶VH[-­ perience  with  Jeffords  taught  her  that  Republicans  have   WREHPRGHUDWHVLQRUGHUWRZLQLQ9HUPRQW2YHUWKHODVW two  years,  Scheuermann  has  been  associated  with  the  ef-­ forts  of  Lt.  Gov.  Phil  Scott  and  others  to  move  the  Ver-­ mont  Republican  party  toward  a  more  centrist  approach   less  tied  to  the  national  party.  In  2009,  Scheuermann  was   one  of  only  eight  Republican  legislators  to  vote  in  favor   of  the  marriage  equality  bill. Scheuermann  recognizes  that  even  a  moderate  Republi-­ FDQZRXOGIDFHJUHDWGLI¿FXOWLHVEHLQJHOHFWHGJRYHUQRURI

Politically Thinking

Vermont,  especially  when  running  against  an  incumbent.   She  told  the  press  last  week  that,  if  she  were  to  become  a   candidate,  she  would  face  daunting  challenges.   A  Vermont  governor  has  not  been  defeated  in  a  re-­elec-­ tion  bid  since  1962.  Vermont  is  one  of  the  two  or  three   most  strongly  Democratic  states  in  the  entire  nation.  Any   5HSXEOLFDQ FDQGLGDWH IRU VWDWHZLGH RI¿FH LQ 9HUPRQW starts   the   campaign   with   a   10-­   to   20-­percentage   point   KDQGLFDS2YHUFRPLQJWKLVGLVDGYDQ-­ WDJHZRXOGEHHVSHFLDOO\GLI¿FXOWIRU D ¿UVWWLPH VWDWHZLGH FDQGLGDWH ZKR has   much   lower   name   recognition   than   Peter   Shumlin,   and   who   would   OLNHO\ ¿QG LW GLI¿FXOW WR UDLVH PRUH than  half  of  the  more  than  $1  million   that  Shumlin  already  has  in  his  cam-­ paign  war  chest. If  Scheuermann  becomes  a  declared   gubernatorial  candidate,  would  she  be   able   to   win   the   Republican   nomina-­ tion   unopposed,   or   would   she   face   a   more   conservative   candidate  in  the  August  Republican  primary?  Some  of  the   old  guard  in  the  Vermont  Republican  Party  do  not  agree   with   the   direction   that   Scott,   Scheuermann,   and   others   ZDQW WR WDNH WKH *23 ,W LV SRVVLEOH WKDW D FRQVHUYDWLYH candidate  would  seek  the  gubernatorial  nomination  as  a   representative   of   Republican   orthodoxy   and   maintain-­ ing  close  ties  with  the  national  party.  Any  resources  that   Scheuermann  would  have  to  devote  to  winning  a  contest-­ ed  primary  would  not  be  available  for  the  general  election   (See  Davis,  Page  5A)

I  left  the  Legislative  Luncheon   in  Middlebury  on  March  24  with   an  upset  stomach.  It  had  little  to  do   with  the  great  goulash  and  brownie   meal  that  the  American  Legion   provided.  The  trouble  seemed  to   originate  from  the  keynote  speaker.   What  the  press  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say  is  what   the  governor  avoided  answering.   And  how  could  they?  He  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  say   anything.  Sound  confusing?  Well   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  how  I  felt. I  simply  wanted  to  know  about   the  $45  million  that  Steve  Wark  of   Vermont  Gas  says  Vermonters  will   be  saving  by  approving  Phase  2  of   the  pipeline.  The  $45  million  that  IP   is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;bankrollingâ&#x20AC;?  is,  according  to  the   Facilities  Development  Agreement   between  IP  and  Vermont  Gas,  to  be   paid  back  over  a  55-­year  payment   period.  This  would  be  no  windfall   for  Vermonters.  And,  what  would   happen  if  IP  were  to  go  out  of  busi-­ ness?  Who  would  end  up  paying  for   the  pipe?  Vermont  ratepayers? And  why  isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  Vermont  Gas  being   clearer  on  how  they  are  going  to   use  the  Systems  Expansion  Fund   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  fund  they  set  up  that  charges   WKRVHUDWHSD\HUVWRÂżQDQFHIXWXUH pipeline  expansion?  And  how  about   DOWHUQDWLYHÂżQDQFLQJE\2P\DDQG other  Rutland  companies  that  have   WKHPHDQVWRKHOSÂżQDQFHDSURMHFW LQZKLFKWKH\ZLOOJUHDWO\EHQHÂżW from? And  why  is  a  stream  alteration   permit  so  simple  a  procedure  that  it   cruises  through  the  DEC?  Why  are   our  Legislature  and  governor  taking   such  a  passive  role?  Do  they  care   about  the  lake?  Shouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  we  be   taking  a  more  in-­depth  look  at  the   risks,  such  as  the  possible  eruption   of  a  directional  drill  in  the  toxic   sludge  bed  in  front  of  the  plant,   or  the  negative  effects  of  methane   OHDNVRQRXUÂżVKDQGRXUWRXULVP industry?  And  what  about  small   earthquakes  that  could  happen  from   the  still  occurring  effects  of  glacial   rebound?  Remember  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  this  has   pipe  to  be  safe  for  the  next  75  years. Also,  what  about  Senate  Bill   246,  the  law  signed  by  Jim  Doug-­ las  to  forbid  the  taking  by  eminent   domain  for  corporate  gain?  Why  is   the  intent  of  this  law  to  be  ignored?   Could  the  endless  insertions  of   loopholes  have  made  this  possible?   Is  the  governor  to  be  as  hypocriti-­ cal  on  this  issue  as  he  is  on  frack-­ ing?  Boy,  I  sure  ran  up  against  a   pro  at  Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  luncheon.  I  got   bulldozed.  He  seemed  to  talk  about   whatever  he  wanted.  Well,  it  was  his   birthday. I  posed  all  of  these  issues  to  the   governor;Íž  not  one  was  addressed.   Phase  2  is  not  the  same  as  Phase  1.   We  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  use  the  same  old  argu-­ ments.  Phase  2  is  not  in  anybodyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   good  but  Vermont  Gas  and  IPâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.   When  the  pipeline  crosses  the  center   line  of  the  Lake,  the  state  of  Ver-­ mont  and  its  people  will  not  have   a  say  in  the  development  that  gas   might  bring  to  New  York.  By  let-­ ting  them  dig  up  our  farmland  and   drill  under  Lake  Champlain,  are  we   simply  assisting  them  in  developing   something  that  might  not  be  in  our   best  interests  here  in  Vermont? If  only  our  Lake  could  speak  for   herself. Norton  Latourelle Orwell

Shoreland  bill   fails  to  deliver These  comments  on  some  of  the   issues  regarding  the  H.526  Lake   Shoreland  Protection  Standards  Bill   as  passed  by  the  Vermont  Senate  are   based  on  my  understanding  of  what   appears  would  or  could  be  the  case   given  what  it  says.  The  bill  is  pro-­ posed  to  go  into  effect  July  1,  2014. The  bill  lacks  an  exemption  stat-­ ing  existing  habitable  structures  and   other  impervious  surfaces  can  be   maintained. The  bill  lacks  an  exemption  stating   all  existing  cleared  or  open  areas  can   be  maintained.   The  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maintenance  of  Lawnsâ&#x20AC;?   exemption  is  only  for  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;mainte-­ nance,  but  not  the  enlargement,  of   lawns,  gardens,  landscaped  areas,   and  beaches  in  existence  as  of  July  1,   2014.â&#x20AC;?  This  is  much  more  restrictive   than  the  Maine  and  New  Hampshire   shoreland  laws  that  respectively   allowed  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Legally  existing  noncon-­ forming  cleared  openings  may  be   PDLQWDLQHG´DQGÂł2ZQHUVRIORWVÂŤ WKDWZHUHOHJDOO\GHYHORSHGÂŤPD\ maintain  but  not  enlarge  cleared   areas.â&#x20AC;?   Assume  the  following  example:  A   landowner  on  July  1,  2014,  has  on  a   (See  Letter,  Page  5A)


Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  5A

Learn  about  ID-­4,  vote  on  budget

Letters to the Editor

I  invite   you   to   the   ID-­4   School   ture  will  be  accessible  and  safe  for   District   Annual   Meeting   at   7:30   all   students,   and   paid   for   entirely   p.m.  on  Wednesday,  April  9,  in  the   with  educational  reserve  funds,  and   Mary   Hogan   School   gymnasium.   potential  gifts  and  grants.  There  will   The  meeting  will  be  an  opportunity   be   no   property   tax   increase   associ-­ and  over  $1  million  in  wages  and   discussions  about  the  merits  of  the   for   Middlebury   residents   to   vote   ated  with  this  project. EHQHÂżWVSDLGWR9HUPRQWHUVZRUNLQJ Addison-­Rutland  Natural  Gas  Proj-­ on   the   proposed   2014-­2015   budget   We   are   committed   to   improving   at  the  mill. ect,  as  cited  in  the  Addison  County   and  playground  project,  and  to  learn   our  food  service  program,  and  have   The  additional  economic  impact   Regional  Planning  Commissionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   about  school  initiatives. been   working   with   outside   orga-­ of  the  Ticonderoga  mill  in  Vermont   obligation  to  neighboring  communi-­ Over  the  past  year,  the  board  has   nizations,   including   ACORN   and   LVPRUHGLIÂżFXOWWRFDOFXODWHEXWRQH WLHVXQGHU9HUPRQWODZKWWSÂżOHV focused   on   sustaining   and   improv-­ Shelburne   Farms.   The   Safe   Routes   QHHGVRQO\WRVHHWKHWUDIÂżFFURVVLQJ DFUSFRUJE\ODZVĂ&#x20AC;LSERRN7KH ing   the   Mary   Hogan   to   School   Commit-­ the  Crown  Point  Bridge  from  New   role  of  the  commission  to  include  the   School  through  a  period   tee,   with   support   from   York  to  Vermont,  to  appreciate  the   greater  region  is  further  articulated  in   of  much  change.  A  sig-­ the   board,   updated   commerce  from  the  many  Interna-­ 24  V.S.A.  Section  4335a(4). QLÂżFDQW VKLIW LQ VFKRRO its   school   travel   plan,   tional  Paper  mill  employees  that   I  will  be  speaking  on  behalf  of  the   leadership   occurred   in   and   promotes   walking   Ă&#x20AC;RZVLQWR9HUPRQW)URPVKRSSLQJ Addison-­Rutland  Natural  Gas  Project   This   weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   writer   and   biking   to   school   July,   as   Tom   Buzzell   to  professional  service,  the  impact   with  my  colleagues  on  the  Essex   became   full   principal   is   East   Middlebury   through  regular  events.   of  the  money  these  employees  spend   County  (N.Y.)  Board  of  Supervisors   and   Steve   Lindemann   resident   Ruth   Hardy,   Mary   Hogan   School   LQ9HUPRQWLVVLJQLÂżFDQW,QVKRUW at  our  next  meeting  and  engaging   assistant   principal.   In   chair   of   the   ID-­4   has   almost   reached   WKH7LFRQGHURJDPLOOLVDVLJQLÂżFDQW them  in  advocating  for  the  project   addition,   the   Addison   school  board. the   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;platinumâ&#x20AC;?   economic  driver  for  our  entire  region. EDVHGRQLWVVLJQLÂżFDQWUHJLRQDOHFR-­ Central   Supervisory   SRTS   standard,   and   It  is  my  understanding  that  Ver-­ QRPLFDQGHQYLURQPHQWDOEHQHÂżWV Union   welcomed   new   Superinten-­ has   received   statewide   recognition   mont,  New  York  and  International   We  will  also  be  engaging  in  discus-­ dent  Peter  Burrows. for  its  efforts. Paper  share  common  greenhouse  gas   sions  with  the  Essex  County  Indus-­ Thus,   our   primary   goal   has   been   :HDUHFRQVFLRXVRIWKHÂżQDQFLDO reduction  goals.  Achieve  results  will   trial  Development  Agency  and  the   to  support  our  new  leaders  and  en-­ constraints   on   many   people   in   our   be  good  for  all  of  us  in  the  Cham-­ North  Country  Regional  Economic   sure   their   success   as   they   work   on   community.  A   growing   percentage   plain  Valley  and  for  future  genera-­ Development  Council  since  both  of   behalf   of   our   students.   Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   also   of   children   at   the   school   are   eli-­ tions.  The  estimated  greenhouse  gas   these  entities  have  a  vested  interest   been  working  on  a  number  of  issues   gible   for   free-­   and   reduced-­priced   reduction  that  will  be  realized  by   in  the  economy  and  future  of  our  re-­ we  hope  will  have  a  positive  impact   lunches   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   rising   from   26   percent   converting  the  power  boiler  and  lime   gion.  Please  afford  us  the  courtesy  to   on  our  students  and  community. in   FY01   to   43   percent   this   year.   kiln  at  the  mill  from  No.  6  fuel  oil  to   be  involved  in  your  ongoing  discus-­ The   board   is   pleased   with   the   The   dual   challenge   of   this   trend   cleaner-­burning  natural  gas  is  esti-­ sions  and  to  have  a  voice  before  you   FXOPLQDWLRQ RI ÂżYH \HDUV RI ZRUN is   the   need   to   provide   a   quality   mated  to  be  between  25-­30  percent.   decide  on  your  recommendations.  In   on   a   new   structure   for   our   school   education   for   children   who   may   Certainly,  this  is  something  we  need   the  interest  of  being  inclusive  in  your   playground.   While   we   recognize   be  struggling  due  to  poverty,  while   to  give  important  consideration  as  we   proceedings,  I  respectfully  request   the   sadness   some   feel   about   the   also   maintaining   a   school   budget   ORRNDWWKHEHQHÂżWVRIWKLVSURMHFW that  the  timeline  for  your  commission   replacement   of   the   Kidspace   struc-­ and   tax   rate   that   is   affordable   for   Lastly,  I  would  urge  you  to  extend   to  vote  be  extended. ture,   after   27   years   and   much   use   our  community. the  opportunity  for  me,  the  Ticond-­ I  look  forward  to  working  with  you   and  repairs,  the  structure  is  no  lon-­ Our   proposed   budget   for   the   eroga  town  board  and  other  interested   on  this  important  regional  project. ger  viable.  The  proposed  new  struc-­ 2014-­2015   school   year   contains   parties  in  the  Champlain  Valley  re-­ William  Grinnell,  Supervisor gion  to  have  a  voice  in  your  ongoing   Town  of  Ticonderoga,  N.Y.

7LFRQGHURJDRIÂżFLDOEDFNVQDWXUDOJDVSLSHOLQHSODQ Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  note:   The   Ticonderoga,   1<RIÂżFLDOZURWHWKLVOHWWHUWR$GDP Lougee   of   the   Addison   County   Re-­ gional   Planning   Commission   and   copied  the  Independent.  Also,  the  Ti-­ conderoga  Town  Council  on  Monday   approved   a   resolution   with   similar   wording   as   this   letter   that   supports   the   natural   gas   pipeline   to   Interna-­ tional   Paper   and   encourages   the   re-­ gional  planning  commission  to  do  the   same. My  name  is  Bill  Grinnell  and  I   serve  as  the  elected  supervisor  for  the   town  of  Ticonderoga.  Like  Vermont-­ ers,  we  in  New  York  have  a  high   level  of  interest  in  the  Addison-­Rut-­ land  Natural  Gas  Project.  As  part  of   the  Champlain  Valley  region  that  we   share,  we  are  keenly  interested  in  the   regional  economy  and  the  environ-­ ment.  As  you  review  the  Addison-­ Rutland  Natural  Gas  Project,  I  would   ask  that  you  please  give  due  consid-­ eration  to  our  mutual  interests. The  economic  impact  of  Interna-­ tional  Paperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Ticonderoga  mill  in   RXUUHJLRQLVVLJQLÂżFDQWDQGGLUHFWO\ supports  600  jobs  at  the  mill  and   some  600  individual  landowners   and  loggers  who  earn  their  living  by   SURYLGLQJÂżEHUWRWKHPLOOLQFOXG-­ ing  more  than  100  Vermonters.  The   mill  spends  more  than  $3  million   on  goods  and  services  provided  by   Vermont  businesses,  in  addition  to   PLOOLRQVSHQWIRUZRRGDQGÂżEHU

Community

Forum

Dennis

Letter  (Continued  from  Page  4A) part  of  their  land  within  the  protected   shoreland  area  of  250  feet  from  mean   water  level,  a  house  and  open  area   from  it  to  the  lake  that  is  their  only   view  of  the  lake  from  the  house.  In   the  open  area,  there  is  lawn,  land-­ scaping  and  a  garden  near  the  house   and  then  an  unmowed  area  down   to  the  beach.  The  unmowed  area   consists  of  grasses  and  maybe  some   woody  vegetation  like  shrubs  or   trees  but  so  few  that  the  area  is  still   considered  to  be  an  open  area.  From   time  to  time,  the  landowner  may   have  entirely  removed  or  trimmed   woody  vegetation,  whether  to  main-­ tain  their  view  of  the  lake  or  for  other   reasons.  The  unmowed  area  does  not   come  within  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maintenance  of   Lawnsâ&#x20AC;?  exemption.   At  least  any  part  of  the  unmowed   area  within  the  100  feet  of  mean   water  level  zone  would  presum-­ ably  be  subject  to  the  requirement   that  basically  says  there  can  be  â&#x20AC;&#x153;no   vegetative  cover  removed.â&#x20AC;?  Without   any  other  relief,  this  means  the  land-­ owner  would  need  to  let  any  shrub,   tree  or  other  vegetative  cover  grow   up  over  the  years  and/or  decades   at  least  until  there  were  certain   numbers  and  sizes  of  trees  (mini-­ mum  tree  points)  for  any  particular   25-­by-­25-­foot  area.  At  that  time,   the  landowner  presumably  could  re-­ move  vegetative  cover  three  or  more   feet  in  height  while  maintaining  the   minimum  tree  points,  including  a  

a  modest   3.56   percent   increase   in   spending,  or  a  0.75  percent  increase   per  pupil.  This  translates  to  a  $0.03   increase  per  $100  of  equalized  val-­ ue   in   our   homestead   property   tax   rate.  We  propose  to  add  a  grade  1-­2   teacher   to   serve   our   largest   class   of   students   to   maintain   appropriate   class   sizes.   Our   enrollment   contin-­ ues  to  grow  modestly,  but  this  is  the   ÂżUVWFODVVURRPWHDFKHUDGGHGDIWHUD cumulative   enrollment   increase   of   over  35  students. Finally,   we   would   like   to   honor   retiring   Principal   Bonnie   Bourne.   Bonnie   started   at   Mary   Hogan   School  in  1987,  became  principal  in   1995,  and  in  2007,  was  honored  as   the  Vermont  National  Distinguished   3ULQFLSDO%RQQLHEHOLHYHVÂżUPO\LQ opportunities   for   all   â&#x20AC;&#x153;youngstersâ&#x20AC;?   and   has   always   been   willing   to   go   the   extra   mile   to   support   parents   and  children.  We  wish  Bonnie  well   in  her  retirement. I   hope   to   see   you   at   our   annual   meeting,  where  there  will  be  ample   time  to  ask  questions  and  discuss  is-­ sues  of  importance  to  our  students,   school  and  community.  Come  early   to  meet  board  members,  administra-­ tors  and  teachers,  and  view  our  chil-­ drenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  art  work,  learn  about  our  new   science   programs,   and   see   details   of  the  playground  project  and  other   initiatives   at   the   school.   Childcare   will  be  provided.  The  Mary  Hogan   School  is  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  school,  and  we   thank  you  for  your  interest  and  sup-­ port.

ÂżYHVDSOLQJUHTXLUHPHQWIRUVXFK an  area. The  meaning  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;cleared  areaâ&#x20AC;?   needs  to  be  better  explained.  The   ÂżUVWVHQWHQFHRILWVGHÂżQLWLRQVD\V it  â&#x20AC;&#x153;means  an  area  where  existing   vegetative  cover,  soil,  tree  canopy,   or  duff  is  permanently  removed  or   altered.â&#x20AC;?  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  afraid  it  could  be  inter-­ preted  fairly  broadly  and  inclusively,   such  as  possibly  even  including  the   removal  of  a  tree  limb,  a  tree  or  a   shrub  as  at  least  a  permanent  altera-­ tion  of  the  tree  or  shrub  (both  being   at  least  a  part  of  the  existing  vegeta-­ tive  cover)  in  an  area. I  understand  there  are  intended   to  be  vegetative  cover  management   requirements  for  the  remaining  150-­ foot  zone,  but  the  bill  fails  to  dis-­ close  them.  For  example,  the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   guidelines  on  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Best  Management   Practices  for  Lakeshore  Vegeta-­ tionâ&#x20AC;?  says  â&#x20AC;&#x153;within  100  to  250  feet  of   shore  there  should  not  be  more  than   40  percent  of  cleared  native  vegeta-­ tion.â&#x20AC;?  If  this  is  imposed,  it  appears   to  be  in  direct  contradiction  to  the   billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  provision  that  basically  says   â&#x20AC;&#x153;no  more  than  40  percent  of  the  pro-­ tected  shoreland  area  of  the  parcel   shall  consist  of  cleared  area.â&#x20AC;?  Under   the  bill,  the  more  the  100-­foot  zone   contains  less  than  40  percent  of   cleared  area  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  more  the  150-­ foot  zone  could  contain  more  than   40  percent  of  cleared  area. The  billâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Removal  of  vegetation   for  recreational  purposesâ&#x20AC;?  exemp-­

tion  that  only  allows  for  the  removal   of  vegetation  less  than  three  feet  in   height,  needs  to  be  changed  to  also   allow  removal  of  vegetation  three  or   more  feet  in  height. The  ability  to  install  a  rock  toe   or  rip  rap  to  prevent  erosion  from   waves  is  unfairly  limited  by  the  bill,   particularly  within  25  feet  of  mean   water  level. The  bill  lacks  and  should  at  least   have  provisions  allowing  the  state  to   LVVXHDSHUPLWIRUUHTXHVWHGPRGLÂż-­ cations  of  vegetative  cover  manage-­ ment  requirements  and  of  restrictions   otherwise  against  creation  of  cleared   area  or  impervious  surface  if,  and   upon  such  conditions  as,  the  state   determines  the  result  would  be  func-­ tionally  equivalent  to  that  otherwise   provided  for.  This  would  at  least   add  the  potential  for  providing  more   Ă&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\WRWKHSUHVHQWO\SURSRVHG PRVWO\RQHVL]HÂżWVDOODSSURDFK The  bill  fails  to  state  that  its   exemptions  also  apply  to  vegetative   cover  management  requirements  and   its  registration  provisions  concerning   creation  of  cleared  areas  or  impervi-­ ous  surfaces.   In  my  opinion,  the  bill  fails  to   IXOÂżOOLWVVWDWHGSXUSRVHWKDWUHVWULF-­ tions  are  to  be  imposed  â&#x20AC;&#x153;in  a  manner   that  allows  for  reasonable  develop-­ ment  of  existing  parcelsâ&#x20AC;?  and  needs   to  be  appropriately  changed  if  it  is  to   pass  at  all. David  Bronson   Bridport

Davis

(Continued  from  Page  4A) ,QGHHGZHFDQQRZFRQÂżUPWKDW a  large  majority  of  Vermonters  (at   least   among   those   answering   the   paper  survey)  feel  that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;the  federal   government   collect(s)   too   much   information   on   usâ&#x20AC;?   (69   percent   agreeing). As   for   labeling   GMOs   in   our   food,   76   percent   favored   it.   The   survey  also  saw  huge  majorities  for   increasing  the  statewide  minimum   wage  (71  percent),  the  importance   of   cell   and   broadband   service   (87   percent),   the   unsustainable   nature   of   rising   education   costs   (69   per-­ cent),   and   concern   about   the   use   of   opiates   (89   percent,   no   doubt   showing  the  impact  of  Gov.  Shum-­ OLQÂśV KLJK QDWLRQDO SURÂżOH RQ WKLV issue). Another   huge   majority   (74   per-­ cent)  emerged  for  prohibiting  driv-­ ers  from  using  cell  phones.   I  wonder  if  all  those  people  driv-­ ing   while   talking   on   their   cells   were   just   too   busy   to   chime   in   on   this   one.   While   it   would   improve   road   safety   to   prohibit   talking   on   the   phone   while   driving,   an   out-­ right  ban  would  surely  bring  howls   of   protest   from   drivers   who   are   accustomed   to   multitasking   at   the   wheel. One   survey   surprise   was   the   level   of   support   for   reducing   the   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   prison   population   through  

alternatives  for   non-­violent   of-­ fenders.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   good   idea   in   the   eyes  of  72  percent  of  respondents.   Doyle  said  he  included  this  ques-­ tion   at   the   request   of   Sen.   Dick   Sears,   who   chairs   the   Senate   Ju-­ GLFLDU\&RPPLWWHH6RWKLVÂżQGLQJ might  well  have  a  political  impact   on  how  we  treat  some  of  those  peo-­ ple  we  are  now  sending  to  prison. Critics  carp  that  the  Doyle  poll  is   XQVFLHQWLÂżF DQG LQGHHG LW LV ZLWK respondents   self-­selecting   rather   than   being   somewhat   randomized   by  phone  polling. But   its   results   continue   to   in-­ trigue   anybody   interested   in   how   Vermonters  feel  about  some  of  the   big  issues.   For   example,   Addison   County   residents  who  have  fought  so  hard   against   the   natural   gas   pipeline   ZRQÂśW ÂżQG PXFK WR FKHHU LQ WKH survey.   Asked,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Is   natural   gas   an   important   part   of  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   econ-­ omy,â&#x20AC;?  54  percent  said  yes  and  only   21  percent  said  no.  Many  (25  per-­ cent)  said  they  were  unsure.   Asked  if  Vermont  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;moving  in   the  right  direction  on  health  care,â&#x20AC;?   41  percent  said  yes  and  37  percent   said   no.   An   additional   22   percent   said   they   werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   sure   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   another   indication   that   Gov.   Shumlin   has   got  his  work  cut  out  for  him. As  for  marijuana,  when  it  comes   to  legal  weed  it  seems  we  just  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  

make  up  our  minds:  While  44  per-­ cent  in  the  survey  supported  legal-­ ization   of   marijuana,   another   44   percent  opposed  it,  with  12  percent   unsure.   I  suppose  we  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  need  a  state-­ wide  survey  to  tell  us  that  marijua-­ na  confuses  things. Gregory   Dennisâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   column   ap-­ pears   here   every   other   Thursday   and  is  archived  on  his  blog  at  www. gregdennis.wordpress.com.   Email:   gregdennisvt@yahoo.com.   Twitter:   @greengregdennis.

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(Continued  from  Page  4A) campaign  against  Shumlin. There   is   a   long   history   in   Ver-­ mont   of   candidates   who   lose   their   ¿UVW VWDWHZLGH UDFH DQG WKHQ JR RQ to   win   senior   elected   positions.   For   example,  Lt.  Gov.  Madeleine  Kunin   lost   the   gubernatorial   election   to   Gov.  Richard  Snelling  in  1982,  when  

Snelling  was  re-­elected  to  his  fourth   term.  Even  though  Democrat  Kunin   lost  the  1982  race  by  11  points,  she   came   back   two   years   later   and   won   an  open-­seat  race  for  governor  in  the   same   year   in   which   Ronald   Reagan   won  the  presidential  race  both  nation-­ ally   and   in   Vermont.   Scheuermann   might  not  come  as  close  to  Shumlin  

as  Kunin  did  to  Snelling,  but  even  if   Scheuermann  were  to  run  for  gover-­ nor  and  lose  in  2014,  she  could  still   have   a   future   as   a   statewide   candi-­ date  in  another  election  cycle. Eric  L.  Davis  is  professor  emeritus   of   political   science   at   Middlebury   College.

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PAGE  6A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

ADDISON COUNTY

Eileen Wilson, 99, formerly of Salisbury

Obituaries Delia Masterson, 98, Lincoln

LINCOLN  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Delia  G.  Masterson,   98,   died   peacefully  Thursday,   March   27,  2014,  surrounded  by  loving  family   in  her  Lincoln  home. She   was   born   July   27,   1915,   in   Lincoln,   the   daughter   of   Clayton   Lathrop   and  Anna   May   Hutchins   of   Lincoln. She   was   born,   raised,   married   and   made  a  family  in  Lincoln.  Her  family   VD\VVKHHQMR\HGZRUNLQJLQKHUĂ&#x20AC;RZHU garden   and   spoiling   her   grandchil-­ dren.   She   worked   at   Van   Raalte   over   30  years  to  its  close,  as  well  as  at  the   Dog   Team,   and   was   the   custodian   of   the  Lincoln  Church  and  Burnham  Hall.   She   was   a   member   of   the   Starlight   Riderâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Snowmobile  Club,  and  a  long-­ time   member   of   the   Lincoln   Ladiesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Aid  and  Lincoln  Church.   She   was   married   to   Clifford   Masterson   for   32   years   and   was  

widowed  Aug.  4,  1965. She   is   survived   by   her   children,   Patricia   and   her   husband   Howard   Grimes,   Thelma   and   her   husband   Donald   Grimes   Sr.,   and   Vilas   Masterson   and   his   wife   Walterine,   all   of   Lincoln;Íž   10   grandchildren;Íž   18   great-­grandchildren;Íž   four   great-­great   grandchildren;Íž  and  several  nieces  and   nephews. She   was   predeceased   by   her   husband,   Clifford;Íž   her   parents;Íž   and   her  siblings. A   celebration   of   her   life   was   held   at   United   Church   of   Lincoln,   Wednesday,   April   2,   at   10   a.m.   A   burial  will  take  place  in  the  spring,  at   Maple  Cemetery,  in  Lincoln.  In  lieu  of   Ă&#x20AC;RZHUV FRQWULEXWLRQV PD\ EH PDGH to   Addison   County   Home   Health   &   Hospice,   PO   Box   754,   Middlebury,   VT  05753.

DELIA Â MASTERSON

MANCHESTER,  Conn.   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Eileen   (Whitney)   Wilson,   99,   of   Manchester,   Conn.,   beloved   wife   of   the   late   Russell   W.   Wilson,   died   March   26,   2014,   at   St.   Francis   Hospital  in  Hartford,  Conn. She   was   born   April   6,   1914,   in   Salisbury,   Vt.,   daughter   of   the   late   George   M.   and   Mabel   C.   (Strong)   Whitney.   She   was   a   resident   of   Manchester,  Conn.,  since  1951.  She   attended   school   in   Middlebury,   Vt.,   and   graduated   from   Middlebury   College,  class  of  1937.   Following   graduation,   she   was   employed   by   Aetna   Life   Insurance   Co.   in   Hartford   for   10-­and-­a-­ half   years.   While   working   at   the   Aetna,   she   met   her   husband,   and   they   married   in   1943.   After   rais-­ ing   her   family,   she   taught   math   at   Manchester   High   School   for   16   years,  retiring  in  1979.  She  received   both   her   masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree   and   sixth   year  of  study  from  the  University  of   Connecticut.   She   was   a   longtime   active   member   and   former   deacon   of   Center   Congregation   Church   in   Manchester.   She   was   a   member   of   the   Retired   Teachersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Association   of   Manchester,   a   member   of   the  

Association  of   Retired   Teachers   of   Connecticut,   a   member   of   both   the   Manchester,   Conn.,   and   Salisbury,   Vt.,  Historical  Societies,  and  served   several  years  in  the  income  tax  prep-­ aration   program   at   the   Manchester   Senior   Citizen   Center,   as   well   as   served   on   the   Manchester   Visiting   Nurse  and  Home  Health  Care  Board. Those   who   knew   her   say   she   was  very  devoted  to  her  family  and   enjoyed   traveling   with   them,   espe-­ cially   to   her   former  Vermont   home.   She   enjoyed   reading,   sewing,   rug   hooking,   and   playing   bridge   in   the   Manchester  Senior  Center  Duplicate   Bridge  Club.   She  is  survived  by  her  son,  Roger   Wilson  and  his  wife  Judith  of  Bolton,   Conn.;͞  her  daughter,  Janet  Prior  and   her   husband   Jack   of   Manchester,   Conn.;͞  two  grandchildren;͞  and  many   nieces  and  nephews. In   addition   to   her   husband,   she   was   predeceased   by   her   brother,   Harold   Whitney;͞   foster   brother   Lt.   Col.   Kendall   Baker   USAF;͞   and   her   niece  Nancy  (Wilson)  Maltez.   Funeral  services  were  held  March   31,  2014,  in  Manchester,  Conn.,  with   a  burial  in  East  Cemetery.  Memorial   donations  may  be  made  to  the  Center  

Catherine Bailey, 92, Bristol BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Catherine   Hayes   Bailey   died   peacefully   at   her   home   on   Saturday,   March   29.   She   is   now   with   her   Lord   and   Savior.   Catherine   was   born   on   May   9,   1921,   in   New   Brunswick,   N.J.,   the   daughter   of   H.   Gordon  and  Hettie  Bailey.  She  earned   a  B.A.  from  Douglass  College  and  a   Ph.D.   from   Rutgers   University.   She   also  received  a  diploma  from  Prairie   Bible  Institute  in  Canada. Catherine   was   a   plant   geneti-­ cist,   fruit   breeder   and   professor   at   Rutgers   University;Íž   she   spent   her   career   developing   new   varieties   of   fruits  and  received  numerous  awards   and   honors,   including   being   named   RQH RI ÂżYH (DVWHUQ SHDFK EUHHGHUV and   being   listed   in   American   Men   and   Women   of   Science.   Catherine  

was  the  sole  recipient  of  the  Wilder   Medal  for  peach,  nectarine  and  apple   breeding  in  1989.  She  also  authored   PRUH WKDQ  VFLHQWLÂżF DUWLFOHV RQ fruit   breeding,   and   lectured   exten-­ sively   in   Europe   and   the   former   Soviet  Union. Upon   retirement,   Catherine   moved   from   New   Jersey   to   Bristol   and   resided   there   for   nearly   28   years,   until   her   death.   Her   passion   was   birdwatching;Íž   she   spent   many   hours   observing   and   recording   her   sightings.   Catherine   enjoyed   many   aspects   of   creation   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   appreciating   and  photographing  birds,  ferns,  wild-­ Ă&#x20AC;RZHUVDQGRWKHUQDWXUDOEHDXW\6KH often  walked  the  Bristol  Ledges  trails   near  her  home. Catherineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  faith  meant  a  great  deal  

to  her.  She  was  a  member  of  the  Valley   Bible   Church   in   East   Middlebury.   She  also  supported  many  Bible-­based   organizations  and  had  taught  Sunday   School  and  Vacation  Bible  School. Catherine  leaves  behind  two  sisters,   Elizabeth  Wood  of  Jericho  and  Sallie   Ferguson   of   Belle   Mead,   N.J.   She   also   leaves   behind   a   brother,   Edwin   Bailey,  and  his  wife  Elsie,  of  Lincoln,   Delaware.   She   was   predeceased   by   her   brother   Robert   Bailey,   and   his   wife,   Doris.   Catherine   also   leaves   behind   several   nieces   and   nephews,   and  other  extended  family  members. A  time  of  remembrance  will  be  held   at   Catherineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   home,   71   Mountain   Terrace   in   Bristol,   from   1-­3:30   p.m.   on  Saturday,  April  5.  A  time  of  shar-­ LQJZLOOEHDWSP¸

Jean Bedard, 54, Bristol BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Jean  Adams  Bedard,   54,  of  Bristol  died  Thursday,  March   27,  2014,  at  Porter  Medical  Center   in  Middlebury. She   was   born   May   7,   1959,   in   Barre,   the   daughter   of   Wayne   and   Rita  Benoit  Adams. She   was   a   member   of   Bristol   American   Legion   Auxiliary   Post   No.  19.  She  ran  a  daycare  business   for   several   years   and   she   loved   all   the  children  she  took  care  of.   In   1996,   she   and   her   husband,   Bradley,   adopted   Tiffany   and   Shawn,  whom  she  loved  dearly. She   is   survived   by   her   husband,   Bradley;Íž   two   children,  Tiffany   and   Shawn;Íž   a   granddaughter,   Kaliegh;Íž   three   brothers,   Dennis   (Judy)   Adams   of   Tennessee,   Tom   (Peg)   Adams   of   Starksboro,   and   Mark   (Sarah)  Adams   of   Starksboro;Íž   four  

sisters,  Diane   Orvis   of   Starksboro,   Janet   Orvis   of   Lincoln,   Laura   Bouvier   of   Bristol,   and   Lee   Anne   Butler   (Larry)   of   New   Haven;͞   several   nieces   and   nephews;͞   several   great   nieces   and   nephews;͞   four   brothers-­in-­law,   Don   and   Bev   Bedard   of   Reno,   Nev.,   Robert   and   Pauline   Bedard   of   Oklahoma,   Michael   Bedard   of   Starksboro,   and   David   and   Bonita   Bedard   of   Starksboro. A   memorial   service   was   held   on   Monday,   March   31,   at   Bristol   American  Legion  Post  No.  19,  and   a  reception  followed.   Contributions   may   be   made   to   Bristol  American   Legion  Auxiliary   Post   No.   19,   PO   Box   292,   Bristol,   VT   05443,   or   Addison   County   Home   Health   &   Hospice,   PO   Box   754,  Middlebury,  VT  05753.

JEAN  ADAMS  BEDARD

Grace Burt, 82, Bristol BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Grace   G.   Burt,   82,   died   peacefully   at   the   home   of   Kirk   and  Linda  Roscoe  in  Bristol  on  March   29,  2014. She   was   born   on   March   23,   1932,   in   Bristol.   She   was   the   daughter   of   the   late   Glenn   and   Alta   (Rockwell)   Aldrich.  She  was  a  graduate  of  Bristol   High   School.   She   also   achieved   an   associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   degree   in   business   from   Champlain  College. She   worked   as   the   head   reception-­ ist   at   the   Vocational   Center   (now   the   Hannaford   Career   Center)   in   Middlebury  for  a  number  of  years.  She   then  worked  at  Simmonds  Precision  in   Vergennes  doing  receiving  and  inspec-­ tion,  retiring  about  20  years  ago. Her   family   says   she   loved   to   read;Íž  

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her  favorite   novels   were   mysteries   and   up   until   her   death   she   was   read-­ ing  about  10  books  a  month.  She  also   enjoyed   eating   lunch   at   the   A&W   in   Middlebury.   They   say   she   was   very   fond   of   chocolate   and   she   had   poked   at   hundreds   of   chocolates   in   her   life-­ time  leaving  behind  the  ones  she  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   like.  She  was  a  private  and  intellectual   person   and   she   also   enjoyed   a   good   joke. She   is   survived   by   her   children,   Rodney   Burt   and   wife   Marie   of   Port   Henry,  N.Y.,  Sharon  Burt  of  Fullerton,   Calif.,   Kathi   Long   of   Whittier,   Calif.,   John   Burt   and   wife   Phyllis   of   Goffstown,   N.H.,   and   Jim   Burt   and   wife   Tabatha   of   Bristol;Íž   and   a   sister,   Sheila   Charron   of   Burlington.   She  

is  also   survived   by   eight   grandchil-­ dren,   several   great-­grandchildren   and   numerous  nieces  and  nephews. She  was  predeceased  by  her  siblings   Max,   Leonard,   Ronnie,   Donald,   Lila,   Violet,  Betty,  Anna  and  Theresa. Memorial   contributions   may   be   made   to   Libanus   Lodge   Police   Body   Camera   Fund   and   mailed   to   P.O   Box   124  Bristol,  VT  05443.  This  is  a  fund   to   purchase   body   cameras,   and   other   items   if   the   goal   is   exceeded,   for   the   Bristol  Police  Department.   At  her  request  there  will  be  no  call-­ MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   John   B.   ing   hours   or   service.   The   family   will   Higgins,   77,   died   Tuesday,   April   1,   meet   at   the   Libanus   Lodge   on   the   2014,   at   his   home   in   the   care   of   his   corner   of   North   and   Elm   streets   in   wife,  Mary,  and  his  family. Bristol  on  Saturday,  April  12,  at  1  p.m.   A  Mass  of  Christian  burial  will  be   for  a  private  celebration  of  her  life. celebrated   at   10:30   a.m.   Saturday,  

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She  also   leaves   three   sisters,   Lorraine   Audet,   Thelma   Buxton   and   husband   Richard,   and   Mary   Esther   MacFarlane,   all   of   Orwell;Íž   two   brothers,   Robert   Brisson   of   Shoreham   and  Armond   Brisson   and   wife   Ramona   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pediâ&#x20AC;?   of   Salisbury;Íž   her   sister-­in-­law   Eleanor   Brisson   of   Shoreham;Íž   seven   grandchildren;Íž   12   great-­grandchildren;Íž  and  three  great-­ great-­grandchildren;Íž  as  well  as  many   nieces  and  nephews. She   was   predeceased   by   her   husband,  sister  Gertrude  Farman  and   brother  Eugene  Brisson. A  Mass  of  Christian  burial  will  be   held  at  11  a.m.  on  Saturday,  April  5,   2014,   at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Catholic   Church,   Orwell,  with  a  reception  following  at   Brandon  American  Legion. Burial   will   be   held   at   1   p.m.   on   Wednesday,   April   9,   at   Agawam   Cemetery   Annex,   Wareham,   Mass.   There  will  be  no  public  calling  hours. Those   who   wish   may   make   a   memorial  contribution  to  a  charity  of   oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  choice  or  extend  an  act  of  kind-­ ness  her  memory.

Justin Crocker, 63, Middlebury MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Justin   Crocker,   63,   died   of   natural   causes  in  his  Middlebury  home  on   Tuesday,  April  1,  2014.   He  was  born  in  August  1950,  the   son   of   George   and   Betty   Crocker.   He   graduated   from   Williams   College  in  1972. His  friends  say  they  will  remem-­ ber   him   as   a   man   with   a   lifelong   passion  for  cycling,  whether  riding   alone   or   with   his   beloved   friends.   They   say   he   was   a   caring   and   gentle  man  who  was  well-­read  and   knowledgeable   and,   most   impor-­ tantly,  had  a  story  to  share.   He   leaves   behind   a   brother   and   two  nieces.   A   memorial   gathering   will   be   announced  at  a  later  date.

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The Family of Bill Hanson would like to extend a special thanks to his daughters Mary and Marlaine and son-in-law Jona. Without their care, he would not have been able to remain at home. We also want to thank Addison Home Health and Hospice for their care and compassion, especially Ann, Laura, Sara, Heather, Courtney, Alex and many others. Also, Oliver, for his Monday visits with Bill and the Wellspring Hospice Singers.

April  5,  2014,  at  St.  Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,   Middlebury,   with   the   Rev.   William   R.  Beaudin,  pastor,  as  celebrant.   The  full  obituary  will  be  published   in   a   future   edition   of   Addison   Independent.

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Congregational  Church   Memorial   Fund,   11   Center   St.,   Manchester,   CT   06040,   or   to   the   Manchester   Scholarship  Fund,  20  Hartford  Road,   Manchester,   CT   06040.   The   online   register  book  may  be  signed  at  www. holmes-­watkinsfuneralhomes.com.

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Marion Provost, 93, native of Shoreham RUTLAND  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Marion  E.  Provost,   93,  of  Rutland  died  Monday  evening,   March   31,   2014,   at   Mountain   View   Nursing  Home  following  an  extended   period  of  failing  health. She   was   born   Sept.   29,   1920,   in   Shoreham,   to   Wilfred   and   Laura   (Yandow)  Brisson.  She  was  the  eldest   of  eight  children. She   graduated   from   Newton   Academy  in  Shoreham,  class  of  1938.   She   attended   Bishop   de   Goesbriand   Hospital  School  of  Nursing. She   married   Lawrence   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Buddyâ&#x20AC;?   Provost   on   July   4,   1942;Íž   they   had   been  married  58  years  at  the  time  of   his  death. She   retired   from   the   Wareham   (Mass.)   Public   School   system   as   a   cafeteria  employee. She  was  a  lifetime  member  of  the   American   Legion   Post   Auxiliary   Unit  220. She   is   survived   by   two   sons,   Wilfred   L.   Provost   and   wife   Janet   of   Wareham,   Mass.,   and   Lawrence   D.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Larryâ&#x20AC;?   Provost   Jr.   and   compan-­ ion   Connie   Connors   of   Shoreham.  

EILEEN Â WILSON

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(Continued  from  Page  1A) Hammond  of  Middlebury  (Mary   +RJDQ ÂżIWKJUDGHU  +HQU\ %ODFN 5LSWRQ (OHPHQWDU\ IRXUWKJUDGHU  7KDWFKHU 7UXGHDX 6DOLVEXU\ VL[WK JUDGHU  %HQMDPLQ &XUWLV 9HUJHQQHV 8QLRQ VL[WKJUDGHU  DQG'DYLG/LHERZLW] :H\EULGJH ÂżIWKJUDGHU  The   Middlebury   College   Community   Chorus   and   the   Champlain  Philharmonic  will  join   together  for  two  public  concerts  on   Saturday   and   Sunday.   Conducted   by   Jeff   Rehbach,   these   special   collaborative   performances   will   explore   the   idea   of   text,   poetry,   and   drama   through   music.   The   concerts   will   take   place   on   Saturday  at  Grace  Congregational   Church  in  Rutland,  and  on  Sunday   at  Middlebury  Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Mahaney   Center   for   the  Arts.   Rehbach   said   he   is   particularly   excited   because   this   collaboration   is   rare   (perhaps   WKHÂżUVWWLPH WRKDYHSHUIRUP-­ ers   on   stage   in   the   Concert   Hall   at   the   college.   He   said   it   really   is   special   and   exciting   to   have   so   many  people  from  all  walks  of  life   and  all  parts  of  the  region  involved   in   a   classical   music   performance   that   includes   â&#x20AC;&#x153;classicsâ&#x20AC;?   such   as   Verdi   opera   excerpts,   Gilbert   &   Sullivan,  Brahms  orchestral  music,   and   music   written   especially   for   this  collaboration  by  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Peter  Hamlin.   7HDPVRIEUDLQLDFVIURP0RXQW $EUDKDP DQG 0LGGOHEXU\ XQLRQ KLJK VFKRROV FRPSHWHG LQ WKH 9HUPRQW1($ 6FKRODUV %RZO DW 890 ODVW 6DWXUGD\ %RWK VFKRROV FRPSRUWHG WKHP VHOYHV ZLWK GLVWLQFWLRQ EXW IHOO LQ WKH TXDUWHUÂżQDO URXQG 08+6 ORVW WR &98 DQG 0RXQW $EHERZHGWR6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ (VVH[ +LJK 6FKRRO FDSWXUHG LWV VHFRQG VWUDLJKW VWDWH KLJK VFKRRO DFDGHPLF FKDPSLRQVKLS E\GHIHDWLQJ6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQLQ WKHÂżQDO Speaking   of   Q&As,   we   noticed   several  competitors  from  Bridport   at  the  State  4-­H  Dairy  Quiz  Bowl,   which   took   place   in   Randolph   Center   on   March   15.   Rachel   Burt   ZDVDWRSÂżQLVKHULQWKHVHQLRU division,   Courtney   Curler   was   second   in   the   10-­and-­11-­year-­old   category,  and  Michael  Plouffe  was   fourth   among   8-­   and   9-­year-­olds.   Congratulations  to  all.

Obituary  Guidelines The Addison Independent consid-­ ers obituaries community news and does not charge to print them, as long as they follow certain guidelines. These guidelines are published on our web site: addisonindependent. com. Families may opt for unedited paid obituaries, which are designat-­ ed with â&#x20AC;&#x153;šâ&#x20AC;? at the end.

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Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  7A

Pare down your burden of choices I  am   fairly   confident   that   my   are   new   opportuni-­ Perhaps   commit-­ to-­do  list  is  normative  for  my  peer   ties   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   bright,   shiny   ting   to   do   less   group.   Although   my   eyes   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   new   topics   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   that,   would   increase   my   great,   I   can   still   see   my   friends   magpie-­like,   I   regu-­ creativity  and  effec-­ and   colleagues   traversing   their   larly   add   to   the   list.   tiveness?   There   is   days,  weeks,  and  academic  years,   This  accretion  leaves   a   growing   body   juggling   ideas,   manuscripts,   me   with   more   inter-­ of   psychological   teaching,   committees,   household   esting,   rewarding,   research   indicating   chores,   dentist   appointments,   important  opportuni-­ that   stress   signifi-­ dogs,  kids,  and  sheep.  I  am  awed   ties  than  I  can  possi-­ cantly  reduces  both   by  how  they  seem  to  manage  their   bly   complete.   They   cognitive   function-­ to-­do   lists   effortlessly,   and   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   are  all  great  options.   ing   and   creativity.   concerned   that   I   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   figured   I   feel   I   ought   to   do   Perhaps   my   habit   out  how  to  manage  my  own  list  as   them   all   but   I   am   of   thoughtlessly   I  feel  I  ought. stressed   trying   to   do   adding   more   to   Perhaps  I  feel  this  way  because   so.   my   to-­do   list   may   some   of   the   things   on   my   list   This   bounty   fills   be   reducing   my   have  hung  on  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  not  for  weeks  or   my  leisure  time,  too.   own   contentment   months  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  but  for  years  (honestly   Here   in   Addison   and   my   ability   to   I  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  had  an  empty  to-­do  list   County,  on  any  given   By Michelle McCauley respond   in   a   flex-­ since   1993).   I   am   beginning   to   night,   I   can   find   at   ible,   mindful   way   suspect  that  my  biggest  challenge   least   two   events,   to  the  world  around   is   not   the   list   itself,   but   what   I   talks,   performances   or   shows   I   me.  Perhaps  less  really  is  more. choose  to  put  on  it.   would   be   interested   in   attend-­ The  irony  of  course  is  that  this   Some   items   on   my   to-­do   list   ing.  My  kids  are  each  involved  in   is  a  First  World,  modern  problem.   are   easily   categorized   and   easily   multiple  extra-­curricular  activities   My   grandmother   gracefully   dealt   assessed.  These  items  are  urgent,   and,  we  (like  many  other  parents)   with  the  survival  stress  of  feeding   repeated   tasks   that   must   be   spend   a   lot   of   time   moving   them   two   children   as   a   single   mother   finished   by   a   deadline.   I   must   from   activity   to   activity.   They,   without   formal   employment   write   the   lecture   for   Tuesday,   and   I,   enjoy   everything   we   do.   during   the   Depression.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   not   grade   the   exam   by   Friday,   and   Having  all  this  bounty  right  there   sure   she   would   sympathize   with   get  food  for  dinner  tonight.  These   for   the   taking   makes   us   feel   we   my   inability   to   cross   a   few   fun   obviously   belong   on   the   list   and   ought   to   enjoy   it   all.   But   would   things  off  my  list.  But  it  is  still  a   they   must   be   we   better   off   challenge;Íž  the  oughts  haunt  me.   done.   doing   less?   What   So,   this   spring,   I   am   adding   ere in But   the   long-­ do   the   long   to-­do   one  more  goal  to  my  to  do  list:  to   Addison term   projects   list   and   the   ever-­ review   the   list   carefully,   weigh-­ vex   me.   Many   running  weekends   ing   both   the   potential   upside   of   County, of   these   items   cost  us?   keeping   items   on   the   list   against   must   be   impor-­ on any given I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   the   opportunity   cost   associated   tant   to   me,   but   QLJKW,FDQĂ&#x20AC;QG the   answers,   but   with  doing  so.  I  am  going  to  pay   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   like   others,   I   special   attention   to   those   bright,   on   my   list   for   a   at least two am   beginning   to   shiny,   new   possibilities   and   very   long   time   events, talks, suspect   that   this   consider   them   a   little   more   care-­ because   I   have   inclination  to  grab   fully   before   adding   them   to   my   found   it   difficult   performances or it   all   and   avoid   list.  And,  on  the  home  front,  I  am   to   do   the   last   20   shows I would choosing   may   taking   â&#x20AC;&#x153;dust   weeklyâ&#x20AC;?   completely   percent  of  the  job   underlie   many   of   off   my   to   do   list.   I   honestly   feel   be interested in and   scratch   them   my   personal   and   better  already. off   the   list   (e.g.,   attending. our   societal   chal-­ Michelle  McCauley  is  a  faculty   cleaning   out   my   lenges.   Could   member   at   Middlebury   College   email,   finishing   one   manuscript   doing,   and   consuming,   fewer   who  lives  in  New  Haven  with  her   in   particular,   putting   a   gate   on   things  allow  more  opportunity  for   husband,  two  amazing  kids,  a  few   the  garden  fence).  And  then  there   enjoyment   and   contemplation?   chickens,  and  a  very  full  Bobcat.  

Ways of Seeing

SEN.  BERNIE  SANDERS  addresses  a  crowd  of  more  than  100  at  Middlebury  Union  High  School  and  more   in  other  towns  via  teleconference  on  Sunday  morning  after  a  screening  of  a  documentary  on  increasing  eco-­ nomic  inequality  in  the  United  States. Independent  photo/Evan  Johnson

Bernie  rallies  against  inequality 6FUHHQV¿OPDQG ¿UHVXSFURZGDW 08+6DXGLWRULXP

the  decades   following   the   Great   Depression   until   the   recession   of   2008.   Spanning   a   period   of   more   than   60   years,   Reich   investigates   why   the   once-­prosperous   middle   FODVV KDV VHHQ LWV ÂżQDQFLDO VWDWXV By  EVAN  JOHNSON MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Of   all   the   seriously   decline   as   the   cost   of   issues  facing  our  country,  the  issue   living   continuously   rises.   In   addi-­ of   wealth   inequality   is   the   most   tion   to   telling   the   stories   of   indi-­ profound,â&#x20AC;?  U.S.  Sen.  Bernie  Sanders   vidual  blue-­  and  white-­collar  work-­ told   an   audience   of   more   than   a   ers,   the   documentary   also   features   hundred   people   at   the   Middlebury   scenes   of   millionaire   venture   Union   High   School   auditorium,   capitalists   alongside   working-­class   and  many  more  around  the  state  via   families  and  university  students.   The  anecdotes  and  illustrated  data   teleconference  on  March  30. The   crowds   of   Vermonters   had   provided   in   Reichâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   narration   drew   come   out   on   a   Sunday   morning   to   gasps   of   disbelief   as   well   as   deri-­ hear   the   second-­term   Independent   sive  laughter  from  the  MUHS  audi-­ senator   deliver   some   memorable   ence.  In  one  scene,  Reich  presented   data   showing   the   messages   regard-­ median   income   ing   economic   for   the   average   disparity   in   this   â&#x20AC;&#x153;$50 million is American   male   country   that,   for them what a worker   in   2010   though   familiar,   was   $33,000,   still  found  a  recep-­ cup of coffee is which   is   $15,000   tive  audience.   for you. It is a less   than   in   1978   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are  we  content   when   adjusted   to   live   in   a   nation   total attack on the IRU LQĂ&#x20AC;DWLRQ that   in   the   recent   American democMeanwhile,   the   years   has   had   a   uppermost   tier   huge   increase   in   racy and weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re of   society   grows   the   number   of   seeing it unfold ever   wealthier   millionaires   and   right now.â&#x20AC;? while   garner-­ billionaires   as   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Sen. Bernie Sanders ing   more   than   the   middle   class   20   percent   of   all   disappears   and   income   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   close   more   people   live   in   poverty   than   any   other   time?â&#x20AC;?   to  triple  what  they  earned  in  1970.   )ROORZLQJ WKH ÂżOP 6DQGHUV Sanders  asked. In   addition   Sanders,   the   osten-­ elaborated   on   the   implications   of   sible   draw   to   MUHS   and   sites   in   immense   economic   disparity   and   Bennington,   Brattleboro   and   St.   responded   to   remarks   in   rotating   Johnsbury   that   were   connected   via   order   from   each   of   the   connected   live  Internet  stream  was  the  screen-­ towns   and   the   audience   gathered   ing   of   a   new   documentary   titled   before  him.   Sanders   voiced   support   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Inequality  for  All.â&#x20AC;? The   screening   was   the   second   extending   long-­term   unemploy-­ hosted   by   Sanders,   who   hosted   a   PHQWEHQHÂżWVZKLFKH[SLUHGHDUOLHU screening  at  the  Palace  9  Cineplex  in   this   year,   and   suggested   a   state-­ Burlington  in  January.  Five  hundred   owned   bank   that   would   use   taxes   and  returns  for  public  improvement   people  attended  that  screening.   The   documentary,   which   won   projects  in  Vermont,  an  idea  that  has   plaudits   at   the   Sundance   Film   gained   popularity   in   some   states.   Festival,   was   directed   by   Jacob   He  also  responded  to  questions  and   Kornbluth  and  presented  by  econo-­ comments   about   transitioning   to   mist   Robert   Reich,   a   professor   of   renewable   energy   and   adapting   the   public  policy  at  U.C.  Berkeley  and   nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   workforce   to   an   increas-­ Secretary   of   Labor   in   the   Clinton   ingly  globalized  economy. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   serious   about   leaving   Administration.   It   highlighted   the   growing  gap  between  the  very  rich   this  planet  in  reasonable  shape  for   and   the   very   poor   in   the   United   our   kids   and   grandchildren,   we   have  to  be  incredibly  aggressive  at   States. 7KH IHDWXUHOHQJWK ÂżOP LV DQ changing   our   energy   system,â&#x20AC;?   he   analysis   of   economic   trends   in   said.  

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Sanders  offered   the   most   elabo-­ ration  on  the  political  implications   of   immense   economic   disparity   and   pointed   to   the   approaching   presidential   election   as   an   exam-­ ple,   with   both   Republican   and   Democratic   candidates   competing   not   only   for   votes,   but   also   for   millions   of   dollars   in   campaign   contributions   from   a   handful   of   wealthy  donors. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For   these   guys,   50   million   (dollars)  is  for  them  what  a  cup  of   coffee  is  for  you,â&#x20AC;?  Sanders  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   is   a   total   attack   on   the   American   democracy   and   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   seeing   it   unfold  right  now.â&#x20AC;?   When   asked   what   he   would   propose   to   prevent   the   influx   of   massive   amounts   of   private   funds   into   U.S.   elections,   Sanders   urged   the   overturning   of   the   U.S.   Supreme  Courtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Citizens  Unitedâ&#x20AC;?   decision  and  passage  of  legislation   that   would   require   public   funding   of  elections.   Sanders  acknowledged  that  these   ideas  would  not  be  popular.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   going   to   have   any   Republican  support  for  these  ideas,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;And   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   going   to   have  every  Democrat  on  board.  But   it   is   important   to   raise   these   issues   DQGWRÂżJKWIRUWKHPVRWKDWVRRQHU than  later,  we  can  pass  them.â&#x20AC;? Middlebury   resident   Jill   Charbonneau   was   in   the   audience.   She   is   president   of   the   Vermont   State  Association  of  Letter  Carriers,   which  represents  some  300  members   in  the  state.  She  connected  with  the   PHVVDJHRIWKHÂżOPDQGVDLGZRUN-­ ing  harder  for  less  is  an  experience   that  new  employees  in  the  state  are   coming  to  terms  with. In   an   interview   after   the   film,   Charbonneau   said   that   when   she   started  working  for  the  post  office   years   ago,   a   post   office   employee   who   became   a   career   appointee   would   received   a   slate   of   bene-­ fits   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   paid   leave,   retirement   and   health   insurance   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   whether   they   worked  two  hours  per  week  or  60   hours  per  week.  But  now  the  way   new   employees   are   treated   has   changed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;For   the   new   people,   not   only   are   their   wages   scaled   down,   their   KHDOWK EHQHÂżWV DUH VFDOHG GRZQ and   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   virtually   no   retirement   plan   for   them   as   new   hires,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  see  that  as  a  product  of  this   economy.â&#x20AC;?  

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Student

BRIEFS

Rachel  Orr   of   Orwell   and   Katherine   Ripley   of   Leicester,   both   students   at   Castleton   State   College,   are   members   of   faculty-­ student   groups   that   have   received   grants   for   collaborative   research   projects   for   the   2013-­2014   academic  year.   Orr   is   working   with   faculty   adviser   Cynthia   Moulton   in   the   Natural  Sciences  Department  on  a   project  titled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Growth  Rate  Trends   in  Holstein  Dairy  Calves  Aging  0-­8   Weeks  Fed  a  Free  Choice  Diet.â&#x20AC;?   Ripley   is   working   with   fellow   student   Jess   Cameron   and   faculty   adviser  Gail  Regan  in  the  Physical   Education   Department   on   a   proj-­ ect  titled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Castletonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Community   Adult   Physical   Activity   Program:   A  Closer  Look  at  Effectiveness.â&#x20AC;?   The  grants,  which  were  awarded   to   18   faculty-­student   groups,   range   from   $500   to   $2,000   each.   In   addition   to   presenting   their   work   at   the   Castleton   Scholarship   Celebration   in   May,   many   of   the   groups   will   present   their   work   at   national   conferences   this   spring   and  summer.

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PAGE  8A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

VERMONT TEEN CHALLENGE

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calendar

40 VOICE MENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CHOIR will be singing at Victory Baptist Church on Sunday, April 6th @ 11 a.m.

Victory Baptist Church Pastor Tim Taylor

865WÂ&#x2021;9HUJHQQHV97Â&#x2021;

Infant Child Care Openings We would love to be part of your childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s crucial developing years. In-home daycare openings beginning July 1 or sooner. Monday through Friday 7:30 a.m. - 4:30 p.m. Meals and snacks included. Heaps of care and cuddling to go around!! Conveniently Located in Middlebury. Call 388-1164 and ask for Molly. ZFBSTPGFYQFSJFODFs"CVOEBOUSFGFSFODFTBWBJMBCMF

and  the  Middlebury  Rec  Department  host  an  evening   of   mud   season   fun   for   all   ages.   Free.   Grass-­track   bicycle   race,   tug-­of-­war   against   Middlebury   police   Matisse   lecture   at   Middlebury   RIÂżFHUV GRGJHEDOO DQG PXVLF ZLWK '- 'L]]OH +RW College.   Thursday,   April   3,   4:30-­6:30   dogs,  hamburgers  and  mac  and  cheese  for  sale  at   p.m.,   Mahaney   Center   for   the   Arts,   Room   the  Warming  Hut.   221.   John   Klein,   associate   professor   of   art   history   Readings   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hear   Me,   See   Meâ&#x20AC;?   at   Middlebury   at   Washington   University,   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Matisseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   College.   Saturday,  April   5,   4-­5:30   p.m.,  Axinn   229.   Decoration   as   Postwar   Remedy.â&#x20AC;?   Free.   Info:   www. Readings  by  seven  of  the  women  authors  featured   middlebury.edu  or  802-­443-­5258.   in  a  new  book,  titled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hear  Me,  See  Me;  Incarcerated   Auditions   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunset   Boulevardâ&#x20AC;?   in   Brandon.   Women   Write.â&#x20AC;?   Event   opens   with   a   short   perfor-­ Thursday,  April  3,  6-­9  p.m.,  Brandon  Town  Hall.  The   mance  by  the  a  cappella  group  Womensing.   Merchants   Hall   Stage   Series   in   Rutland   and   Town   Ham  dinner  in  Brandon.  Saturday,  April  5,  5-­7  p.m.,   Hall  Theater  in  Middlebury  are  seeking  actors,  sing-­ Brandon  United  Methodist  Church.  Menu:  ham,  scal-­ ers  and  dancers  17  years  and  older  to  audition  for  a   loped  potatoes,  baked  beans,  green  beans,  rolls  and   July  production  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunset  Boulevard,â&#x20AC;?  to  be  staged   dessert.  Adults   $10,   children   under   12   $5,   children   at   the   THT.   For   details,   email   info@merchantshall. under  6  free.   com.   Addison   County   Right   to   Life   dinner   meeting   in   Creative  writing  workshop  in  Vergennes.  Thursday,   Vergennes.   Saturday,  April   5,   6-­8   p.m.,   St.   Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   April  3,  6-­8  p.m.,  Bixby  Memorial  Library.  First  class   Parish   Hall.   Full   course   of   roast   pork   or   vegetarian   in  a  six-­week  series.  Writer  and  editor  Annie  Downey   (please  specify),  $10  adults,  $5  student.  Make  reser-­ will   lead   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring   Forward,â&#x20AC;?   a   workshop   for   begin-­ vations  by  March  28.  Send  checks  payable  to  ACRTL   ning  and  advanced  writers.  Classes  will  meet  each   to  Lee  or  Sandi  Comly,  2012  Carlstrom  Road,  Bristol,   Thursday  through  May  8.  Info:  877-­2211.   VT  05443.  Info:  453-­6302.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Raising   Kids   in   the   Digital   Ageâ&#x20AC;?   King   Pede   party   in   Ferrisburgh.   Saturday,   April   5,   presentation   in   Ripton.   Thursday,   6:30-­8:30  p.m.,  Ferrisburgh  Community  Center  and   April   3,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Ripton   Town  Hall.  Sandwich  supper  followed  by  an  evening   Elementary  School  library.  Middlebury   of  fun  and  card  games.  Come  planning  to  play  King   Union   Middle   School   technology   Pede   or   bring   your   own   favorite   teacher   Jan   Fraga   leads   a   commu-­ card  game.  Requested  donation:   MIDDLEBURY STUDIO SCHOOLAdult: Weds. AM Int/Adv. nity-­wide  discussion  on  â&#x20AC;&#x153;10  Things  You   $2.50.   Painting with Richard Weinstein, Apr. 16- May 14, Mary Lowerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Need   to   Know   About   Your   Kids   and   Rotary   fundraiser   in   Technology.â&#x20AC;?   First   50   attendees   will   Mon. PM Beg. Oils April 28-June 2, Thurs. AM Beg. Oils May Vergennes.   Saturday,   April   5,   get   a   free   copy   of   James   P.   Steyerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   7-­11   p.m.,   Vergennes   American   1-29, Thurs. Night Drawing May 1-22, Children: Draw, Paint book   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Talking   Back   to   Facebook.â&#x20AC;?   A   Legion.   The   Vergennes   Rotary   & Build in Leonardoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Workshop on Weds., Mon. & Weds.Wheel, four-­week   book   discussion   series   will   Club   holds   a   fundraiser   for   Thurs. Hand Building, Contact Barb at 247-3702, ewaldewald@ follow  on  Thursdays,  May  1,  8,  15,  and   Rotary   charities,   with   blackjack,   poker,  craps,  bingo  and  other  fun   22.  Contact  the  Ripton  school  for  more   aol.com, middleburystudioschool.org activities.   Tickets   are   $10   each,   information.   CRUSH THE TEST â&#x20AC;&#x201C; SAT Prep Open House: Saturday, April available   at   Classic   Stitching   in   Family   contra   dance   in   Salisbury.   Vergennes.   Thursday,  April  3,  6:30-­8  p.m.,  Salisbury   5th, 9-noon at 11 S. Maple ST, Vergennes. Meet Dr. Matt, â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much   Ado   About   Nothingâ&#x20AC;?   Community  School.  Chad  Chamberlain   talk turkey about the SAT, get a free CrushTheTest prep book. on   stage   in   Vergennes.   and   Mary   Barron   will   be   the   callers.   Website: www.crushthetest.com. Phone: 282-2763. Email: Saturday,  April  5,  7:30-­9:30  p.m.,   There   will   be   a   live   band.   Salisbury,   Vergennes   Opera   House.   The   matt@crushthetest.com. Leicester,  Whiting  and  Sudbury  schools   Little   City   Players   present   their   are  sponsoring  this  free  event.  No  expe-­ ÂżUVW 6KDNHVSHDUH SURGXFWLRQ rience   needed.   Refreshments   will   be   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much  Ado  About   Nothing.â&#x20AC;?   Director   Jeffrey   Fox   of   served.   Arts.   British   pianist   Lewis   returns   to   Middlebury   Charlotte  sets  the  comedy  in  the  Hamptons  of  today.   Twist  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Wool  Spinning  Guild  meeting  in  Middlebury.   to   perform   a   program   including   Bach   chorales,   Tickets  $12,  $10  students  and  seniors,  available  at   Thursday,  April  3,  7-­9  p.m.,  American  Legion.  General   Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Moonlightâ&#x20AC;?  Sonata,  and  Mussorgskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Classic  Stitching  in  Vergennes.  Runs  through  April  6.   meeting  followed  by  a  spin-­in.  All  are  welcome.  Info:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pictures   at   an   Exhibition.â&#x20AC;?  Admission   $25,   $20   for   453-­5960.   Middlebury  College  faculty,  staff,  alumni,  emeriti  and   'RXJ3HUNLQVDQG-DPLH0DVHÂżHOG'XRLQ%UDQGRQ   Saturday,   April   5,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Brandon   Music.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Performance   Nowâ&#x20AC;?   screenings   at   Middlebury   parents;   and   $6   for   students.   Tickets:   443-­6433   or   3HUNLQV DQG 0DVHÂżHOG ZKR KDYH EHHQ SHUIRUPLQJ College.   Thursday,   April   3,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Axinn   go.middlebury.edu/arts.   together  off  and  on  for  25  years,  play  jazz  and  blue-­ 232.  Showing  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Music  of  Regretâ&#x20AC;?  (2006)  by  Laurie   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land   Without   Wordsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   grass  on  mandolin  and  acoustic  guitar.  Tickets  $15,   Simmons   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Untitledâ&#x20AC;?   (working   title   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Kids   and   Friday,   April   4,   10   p.m.-­midnight,   M   Gallery,   Old   available   at   802-­465-­4071   or   info@brandon-­music. Dogsâ&#x20AC;?)  (2007)  by  Nathalie  Djurberg  and  Hans  Berg.   Stone  Mill.  Dea  Loherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  play  is  an  exploration  of  the   net.   7KHÂżUVWLVDPLQLPXVLFDOLQWKUHHDFWVPLQXWHV potential  of  art  in  our  everyday  lives.  An  artist,  after   7KHVHFRQGLVDÂłFOD\PDWLRQ´ÂżOPLQZKLFKDQDUP\ witnessing  great  human  suffering  in  a  war-­ridden  city,   Red   Tail   Ring   in   concert   in   Ripton.   Saturday,  April   5,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Ripton   Community   House.   The   of  children  on  the  streets  of  a  large  city  is  at  war  with   questions  the  purpose  of  art  in  society.  Senior  work   Ripton   Community   Coffee   House   welcomes   Red   a  pack  of  dogs.  33  minutes.  Free.  Info:  www.middle-­ by   Middlebury   College   student   Mari   Vial-­Golden,   Tail  Ring,  the  duo  of  Michael  Beauchamp  and  Laurel   bury.edu  or  802-­443-­5258.   Tickets   $4,   available   at   www.middlebury.edu   or   Premo.  Open  mike  at  7:30,  followed  by  the  featured   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land   Without   Wordsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   802-­443-­5258.   performers.  Call  ahead  to  reserve  an  open-­mike  spot.   Thursday,  April   3,   10   p.m.-­midnight,   M   Gallery,   Old   5HIUHVKPHQWV WR EHQHÂżW 2WWHU &UHHN &KLOG &HQWHU Stone  Mill.  Dea  Loherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  play  is  an  exploration  of  the   Community  house  is  wheelchair  accessible,  but  the   potential  of  art  in  our  everyday  lives.  An  artist,  after   bathrooms   are   not.  Admission   $10,   $8   seniors   and   witnessing  great  human  suffering  in  a  war-­ridden  city,   Trinkets   and   Treasures   Rummage   teens,  $3  children.  Info:  388-­9782.   questions  the  purpose  of  art  in  society.  Senior  work   Sale   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,   April   5,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fruitvale   Stationâ&#x20AC;?   screening   at   Middlebury   by   Middlebury   College   student   Mari   Vial-­Golden,   8   a.m.-­2   p.m.,   VUHS   middle-­school   gym.   College.   Saturday,   April   5,   8-­10   p.m.,   Dana   Tickets   $4,   available   at   www.middlebury.edu   or   Annual   fundraiser   hosted   by   the   Commodore   Auditorium.   This   contemporary   tragedy   recount-­ 802-­443-­5258.   Parents  Teacher  Group.  Household  goods,  furniture,   ing   the   BART   police   shootings   in   Oakland   on   New   ERRNV FROOHFWLEOHV ÂżVKLQJ DQG VSRUWLQJ JHDU DGXOW Yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Day  2009.  Winner  of  two  awards  at  the  2013   and   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clothing,   toys,   games,   jewelry   and   Sundance  Film  Festival.  Free.  Info:  www.middlebury. more.   Proceeds   fund   the   VUHS   Grant   Enrichment   edu  or  802-­443-­5258.   Senior  luncheon  in  Middlebury.  Friday,   Program.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land   Without   Wordsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   April  4,  11  a.m.-­1  p.m.,  Middlebury  VFW.   Book  sale  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  April  5,  11  a.m.-­3   Saturday,  April  5,  10  p.m.  -­  Sunday,  April  6,  midnight,   CVAAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  monthly  First  Friday  Easter  luncheon   SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ $OO SURFHHGV EHQHÂżW OLEUDU\ M   Gallery,   Old   Stone   Mill.   Dea   Loherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   play   is   an   includes   hand-­card   honey-­Dijon   glazed   ham,   programs.  Info:  388-­4095.   exploration   of   the   potential   of   art   in   our   everyday   oven-­roasted  yams  and  red  potatoes,  Caesar  salad,   The   Met   Operaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;La   Bohèmeâ&#x20AC;?   live   in   HD   in   lives.  An  artist,  after  witnessing  great  human  suffering   green  beans,  dinner  roll  and  apple  pie.  Reservations   Middlebury.   Saturday,  April   5,   1-­4   p.m.,   Town   Hall   in  a  war-­ridden  city,  questions  the  purpose  of  art  in   required  by  April  2:  1-­800-­642-­5119.  Free  transporta-­ Theater.   The   Metropolitan   Opera   presents   Franco   society.  Senior  work  by  Middlebury  College  student   tion  by  ACTR:  388-­1946.   =HIÂżUHOOLÂśV PDVVLYH DQG FRORUIXO YHUVLRQ RI 3XFFLQLÂśV Mari   Vial-­Golden,   Tickets   $4,   available   at   www. Tai  Chi  for  Arthritis  follow-­up  class  in  Middlebury.   famous   opera,   broadcast   live.   Tickets   $24/$10   middlebury.edu  or  802-­443-­5258.   Friday,  April   4,   11   a.m.-­noon,   EastView   Community   VWXGHQWVDYDLODEOHDWWKH7+7ER[RIÂżFH Room.  A  series  of  eight  classes  for  those  who  have   www.townhalltheater.org,  or  at  the  door.   completed   the   beginner   series.   Meets   Fridays   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Finding   Your   Feetâ&#x20AC;?   anatomy   workshop   at   through  May  23.  Sponsored  by  CVAA  for  anyone  50   Middlebury   College.   Saturday,   April   5,   2-­4   p.m.,   or   older.   Register   at   1-­800-­642-­5119   or   visit   www. Mahaney  Center  for  the  Arts.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Place  of  Danceâ&#x20AC;?   cvaa.org.   authors   Caryn   McHose   and  Andrea   Olsen   lead   an   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Revitalizing   the   Robert   Frost   Cabinâ&#x20AC;?   talk   at   experiential  anatomy  workshop  focusing  on  ease  of   Middlebury   College.   Friday,   April   4,   12:15-­2:15   movement  through  alignment  and  orientation  skills.   p.m.,   Middlebury   College   Museum   of   Art.   At   this   Size  limited  to  30;  preregister  at  dance@middlebury. Off  the  Wall  Lunch,  Rebecca  Hartje  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;14  talks  about   edu.   plans   to   turn   Frostâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   nearly   forgotten   cabin   at   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much  Ado  About  Nothingâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.   edge   of   the   Homer   Noble   farm   into   a   unique   and   Saturday,  April  5,  2-­4  p.m.,  Vergennes  Opera  House.   useful   resource   for   the   college   and   the   community.   7KH /LWWOH &LW\ 3OD\HUV SUHVHQW WKHLU ÂżUVW Enjoy  further  conversation  over  the  provided  lunch.   Shakespeare  production,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much  Ado  About   Suggested  donation  $5;  free  to  college  ID  cardhold-­ Nothing.â&#x20AC;?  Director  Jeffrey  Fox  of  Charlotte   ers.  Info:  www.middlebury.edu  or  802-­443-­5258.   sets   the   comedy   in   the   Hamptons   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  Spyâ&#x20AC;?  after-­school  event  in  Brandon.  Friday,  April   today.   Tickets   $12,   $10   students   and   4,   3:15-­4:15   p.m.,   Neshobe   School.   The   SOAR   seniors,   available   at   Classic   Stitching   in   Rocking   with   the   Rec   program   will   host   an   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   Spyâ&#x20AC;?   Vergennes.  Runs  through  April  6.   event,   featuring   an   hour   of   carnival   activities   and   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fruitvale   Stationâ&#x20AC;?   screening   at   spaghetti  dinner  with  delicious  loaves  of  bread  baked   Middlebury   College.   Saturday,   by   Neshobe   School   students.   Free,   but   donations   April   5,   3-­5   p.m.,   Dana   accepted   for   relief   efforts   from   Typhoon   Haiyan   in   Auditorium.   This   contempo-­ the  Philippines.  Planned  and  run  by  a  group  of  5/6   rary   tragedy   recounting   students  from  Neshobe.  Info:  247-­3721,  ext.  105,  or   the   BART   police   nbird@rnesu.org.   shootings   in   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land   Without   Wordsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   O a k l a n d   Friday,  April  4,  4-­6  p.m.,  M  Gallery,  Old  Stone  Mill.  Dea   on   New   Loherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  play  is  an  exploration  of  the  potential  of  art  in   Y e a r â&#x20AC;&#x2122; s   our   everyday   lives.  An   artist,   after   witnessing   great   D a y   human   suffering   in   a   war-­ridden   city,   questions   the   2 0 0 9 .   purpose  of  art  in  society.  Senior  work  by  Middlebury   W i n n e r   College  student  Mari  Vial-­Golden,  Tickets  $4,  avail-­ of   two   able  at  www.middlebury.edu  or  802-­443-­5258.   awards   at   Exhibit   opening   reception   in   Bristol.   Friday,   April   the   2013   4,   4-­5:30   p.m.,   Walkover   Gallery,   15   Main   St.   Six   S u n d a n c e   students  in  the  Mount  Abraham  Union  High  School   Film  Festival.   Advance  Placement  Studio  Art  class  will  exhibit  work   Free.   Info:   from  their  portfolios.  On  exhibit  through  April  25.  Info:   www.middle-­ 453-­3188  or  453-­2333,  ext.  2010.   bury.edu   or   .QLJKWVRI&ROXPEXVÂżVKIU\LQ9HUJHQQHV  Friday,   802-­443-­5258.   April  4,  5-­6:30  p.m.,  St.  Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Parish  Hall.  Battered   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land   Without   baked  haddock,  fries,  macaroni  and  cheese,  green   Wordsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   beans,   coleslaw,   rolls,   punch,   milk,   coffee.   Adults   in   Middlebury.   $10,   ages   6-­12   $6,   $30   family   maximum.   Please   Saturday,  April   5,   4-­6   bring  a  dessert  to  share.  Info:  877-­2367.   p.m.,   M   Gallery,   Old   :RRGÂżUHGSL]]DVDOHLQ5LSWRQ  Friday,  April  4,  5-­6:45   Stone   Mill.   Dea   Loherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   SP5LSWRQ(OHPHQWDU\6FKRRO:RRGÂżUHGLQFK play  is  an  exploration  of  the   pizzas  made  on  site.  Dine  in  or  take  out.  Cost:  $12   potential  of  art  in  our  every-­ cheese,  $15  pepperoni,  $17  harvest  special  (roasted   day   lives.   An   artist,   after   beets   and   winter   squash,   onion,   Vermont   chevre   witnessing   great   human   DQG KHUEV  3URFHHGV EHQHÂżW )ULHQGV RI 5LSWRQ suffering  in  a  war-­ridden  city,   School.  Please  pre-­order  by  3  p.m.  on  Friday,  April  4:   questions  the  purpose  of  art  in   388-­2208  or  wleeds@addisoncentralsu.org.   society.  Senior  work  by  Middlebury   Baked  potato  bar  in  Cornwall.  Friday,  April  4,  5:30-­7   College   student   Mari   Vial-­Golden,   p.m.,   Cornwall   Congregational   Church,   Route   30.   Tickets  $4,  available  at  www.middle-­ $GPLVVLRQSHUSHUVRQ$OOSURFHHGVEHQHÂżW+DELWDW bury.edu  or  802-­443-­5258.   for  Humanity  of  Addison  County.  Info:  452-­2012.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Muddy   Grasâ&#x20AC;?   in   Middlebury.   Open   mic   night   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   April   4,   Saturday,  April  5,  4-­7  p.m.,  Middlebury   6:30-­8:30  p.m.,  Carolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Hungry  Mind  CafĂŠ.  Addison   Recreation  Park.  Addison  Central  Teens   Central  Teens   hosts   this   evening   for   teens   and   the   young  at  heart  to  play  music,  read  poems,  tell  stories,   perform   skits   and   share   other   talents.   Those   who   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   perform   are   encouraged   to   come   listen   and   RED  TAIL  RING,  the  acoustic  duo  of  Michael  Beauchamp  and  Laurel  Premo,  takes  the  stage   support.  Light  refreshments  will  be  available.   at  the  Ripton  Community  Coffee  House  on  Saturday,  April  6,  at  7:30  p.m. Poetry   slam/open-­mike   night   in   Brandon.   Friday,  

Apr

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THURSDAY

April  4,   7-­9   p.m.,   Compass   Music   and  Arts   Center.   Part  of  CMACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poetry  Rocksâ&#x20AC;?  celebration  in  April.   Open   to   all   poets,   spoken-­word   artists,   musicians,   dramatists   and   listeners.   Light   refreshments   avail-­ able.   Free,   but   donations   are   welcome   to   support   the   opening   of   the   CMACâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Green   Mountain   Poets   House   and   kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   reading/activity   room.   Info:   www. cmacvt.org.  Info:  www.cmacvt.org.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Comfort   in   the   Stumbleâ&#x20AC;?   one-­woman   show   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   April   4,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Town   +DOO 7KHDWHU &LQG\ 3LHUFH SHUIRUPV WR EHQHÂżW the   Addison   County   Parent/Child   Center.   Tickets   $30/$25   students,   available   at   the   THT:   388-­1436.   See  more  at  www.cindy-­pierce.com.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much  Ado  About  Nothingâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.   Friday,   April   4,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Vergennes   Opera   +RXVH 7KH /LWWOH &LW\ 3OD\HUV SUHVHQW WKHLU ÂżUVW Shakespeare  production,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much  Ado  About  Nothing.â&#x20AC;?   Director  Jeffrey  Fox  of  Charlotte  sets  the  comedy  in   the  Hamptons  of  today.  Tickets  $12,  $10  students  and   seniors,  available  at  Classic  Stitching  in  Vergennes.   Runs  through  April  6.   Pianist  Paul  Lewis  in  concert  at  Middlebury  College.   Friday,  April   4,   8-­10   p.m.,   Mahaney   Center   for   the  

Apr

5

Apr

4

SATURDAY

FRIDAY

Old-­time  originals


community

calendar

Going  Places   +($7+48$57(721LWV¿UVW86WRXUZLOOPDNHDVWRSDW0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJHœV0DKDQH\ &HQWHUIRUWKH$UWVRQ:HGQHVGD\$SULOWRSOD\%HHWKRYHQœV6WULQJ4XDUWHWRSDPRQJ other  works.  Three  days  later,  the  quartet  will  debut  at  Carnegie  Hall. Photo  by  Sussie  Ahlburg

Apr

6

SUNDAY

All-­you-­can-­eat  breakfast  in  Monkton.   Sunday,   April   6,   8-­11   a.m.,   Monkton   Volunteer  Fire  Department.  Annual  breakfast   featuring   egg   casserole,   scrambled   eggs,   bacon,   sausage,   plain   and   blueberry   pancakes   with   pure   maple  syrup,  coffee,  tea,  doughnuts  and  cookies.  To   EHQHÂżWWKHÂżUHGHSDUWPHQW,QIR Family  Breakfast  in  Hancock.6XQGD\$SULO a.m.,  Hancock  Town  Hall.  Offered  by  the  Community   Church  of  Hancock  and  Granville.  Scrambled  eggs,   bacon,   pancakes,   Vermont   maple   syrup,   orange   juice,  coffee  and  tea.  Donations  appreciated.  Also  on   $SULO â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much  Ado  About  Nothingâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.   6XQGD\$SULOSP9HUJHQQHV2SHUD+RXVH 7KH/LWWOH&LW\3OD\HUVSUHVHQWWKHLUÂżUVW6KDNHVSHDUH production,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much   Ado   About   Nothing.â&#x20AC;?   Director   Jeffrey   Fox   of   Charlotte   sets   the   comedy   in   the   +DPSWRQV RI WRGD\ 7LFNHWV   VWXGHQWV DQG seniors,  available  at  Classic  Stitching  in  Vergennes.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Place   of   Danceâ&#x20AC;?   celebration   and   perfor-­ mance   at   Middlebury   College.   Sunday,   April   6,   SP0DKDQH\&HQWHUIRUWKH$UWV&HOHEUDWLRQ of  Andrea  Olsenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  new  book,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Place  of  Dance.â&#x20AC;?   Ten  artists  featured  in  the  book  will  perform,  includ-­ ing  Middlebury  College  faculty,  staff,  emeriti,  alumni,   VWXGHQWVDQGVSHFLDOJXHVWV6HDWLQJLVOLPLWHG,QIR ZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXDQG Orchestral   and   choral   concert   at   Middlebury   College.6XQGD\$SULOSP0DKDQH\&HQWHU for   the   Arts.   The   Middlebury   College   Community   Chorus   and   the   Champlain   Philharmonic   join   forces  for  a  collaborative  concert  conducted  by  Jeff   5HKEDFK )HDWXULQJ Âł5HĂ&#x20AC;HFWLRQV RI WKH 6N\´ E\ Vermont   composer   and   Middlebury   College   music   SURIHVVRU 3HWHU +DPOLQ Âś DV ZHOO DV D ZRUN E\ Brahms,  selections  from  two  Verdi  opera  choruses,   excerpts   from   two   Gilbert   &   Sullivan   operettas   DQG D SLHFH E\ WKFHQWXU\ $PHULFDQ FRPSRVHU $DURQ &RSODQG 7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW RUZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXDUWV Author  appearance  and  book  reading  in  Middlebury.   6XQGD\$SULO   SP 9HUPRQW %RRN 6KRS Launch   party   for   local   author   Marcia   Wellsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   new   PLGGOHJUDGHQRYHOÂł(GGLH5HG8QGHUFRYHU0\VWHU\ RQ0XVHXP´6LJQLQJUHIUHVKPHQWV,QIR Hot   Club   of   Cowtown   in   concert   in   Middlebury.   6XQGD\$SULO   SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU The   After   Dark   Music   Series   presents   the   most   globe-­trotting,   hardest-­swinging   Western   swing   trio   RQ WKH SODQHW (ODQD -DPHV RQ ÂżGGOH DQG YRFDOV Whit  Smith  on  guitar,  and  Jake  Erwin  on  double  bass.   'RRUVRSHQDWSP7LFNHWVLQDGYDQFHDW WKHGRRU,QIRDQGWLFNHWVZZZDIWHUGDUNPXVLFVHULHV FRP RU  7LFNHWV DOVR DYDLODEOH DW 0DLQ Street  Stationery  in  Middlebury.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land   Without   Wordsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   6XQGD\$SULOSP0*DOOHU\2OG6WRQH0LOO Dea  Loherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  play  is  an  exploration  of  the  potential  of   art   in   our   everyday   lives.  An   artist,   after   witnessing   great   human   suffering   in   a   war-­ridden   city,   ques-­ tions   the   purpose   of   art   in   society.   Senior   work   by   Middlebury   College   student   Mari   Vial-­Golden,   7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW ZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGX RU  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Land   Without   Wordsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   6XQGD\$SULOSP0RQGD\$SULOPLGQLJKW M   Gallery,   Old   Stone   Mill.   Dea   Loherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   play   is   an   exploration   of   the   potential   of   art   in   our   everyday   lives.  An  artist,  after  witnessing  great  human  suffering   in  a  war-­ridden  city,  questions  the  purpose  of  art  in   society.  Senior  work  by  Middlebury  College  student   0DUL 9LDO*ROGHQ 7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW ZZZ PLGGOHEXU\HGXRU

Apr

7

MONDAY

Legislative  breakfast   in   Shoreham.   0RQGD\$SULO   DP 2UZHOO )LUH 'HSDUWPHQW %UHDNIDVW DW  DP SURJUDP 7KHSXUFKDVHRIEUHDNIDVWLVQRWUHTXLUHG but  it  helps  the  hosts  to  defray  the  costs  of  opening   their  hall.   Garden   talk   and   tea   in   Middlebury.   Monday,   April     SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU 0DVWHU JDUGHQHU Katherine   Astor,   owner   of   Kirby   House,   Berkshire,   U.K,   will   talk   about   the   history   of   the   famed   Astor   family  and  Kirby  House  and  its  garden.  Then  she  will   discuss  English  gardens  and  how  they  have  evolved.   )ROORZHG E\ GHOLFDFLHV DQG WHD 7LFNHWV  IUHH to   garden   club   members,   available   at   the  THT   box   RIÂżFHRUZZZWRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJ Auditions   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunset   Boulevardâ&#x20AC;?   in   Middlebury.   0RQGD\$SULO   SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU 7KH Merchants   Hall   Stage   Series   in   Rutland   and   Town   Hall  Theater  in  Middlebury  are  seeking  actors,  sing-­ HUVDQGGDQFHUV\HDUVDQGROGHUWRDXGLWLRQIRUD July  production  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sunset  Boulevard,â&#x20AC;?  to  be  staged   at   the   THT.   For   details,   email   info@merchantshall. com.  

Apr

8

TUESDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Middlebury.   7XHVGD\ $SULO   DP SP Russ  Sholes  Senior  Center.  CVAA  sponsors   a  luncheon  of  shepherdâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pie,  green  beans,  oatmeal   bread  and  carrot  cake.  Please  bring  your  own  place   VHWWLQJ 6XJJHVWHG GRQDWLRQ  5HVHUYDWLRQV UHTXLUHGH[W)UHHWUDQVSRUWD-­ WLRQYLD$&75 Tai   Chi   for  Arthritis   class   in   New   Haven.   Tuesday,   $SULO   SP 1HZ +DYHQ &RQJUHJDWLRQDO &KXUFK6SRQVRUHGE\&9$$IRUDGXOWVDQGROGHU ,PSURYH EDODQFH VWUHQJWK DJLOLW\ DQG Ă&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\ 0HHWV 7XHVGD\V DQG 7KXUVGD\V WKURXJK 0D\  )UHH5HJLVWHUDWH[W

Brain  injury  support  group  meeting  in  Middlebury.   Tuesday,  April  8,  6-­8  p.m.,  Hannaford  Career  Center,   URRP  7KH PRQWKO\ 0LGGOHEXU\ %UDLQ ,QMXU\ 6XSSRUW *URXS PHHWLQJ )URP  SP (PPD Kitchen  and  Sierra  Stites  of  the  Middlebury  College   &RQFXVVLRQV 6SHDN QRQSURÂżW RUJDQL]DWLRQ ZLOO MRLQ WKHJURXS,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;From   Page   to   Stageâ&#x20AC;?   Strega   Nona   play   adapta-­ tions   in   Middlebury. 7XHVGD\ $SULO   SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU 0RUH WKDQ  FKLOGUHQ LQ the  THT  Kids  group  and  the  Bridport  Central  School   fourth-­grade  present  stage  adaptations  of  two  classic   Tomie   dePaola   stories,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strega   Nonaâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strega   Nona   Meets   Her   Match.â&#x20AC;?   Directed   by   Nikki   Juvan.   Free.  Donations  accepted  

Apr

9

WEDNESDAY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Travels  to   Liberiaâ&#x20AC;?   illustrated   talk   in   Lincoln. :HGQHVGD\ $SULO   a.m.-­noon,   Lincoln   Library.   Lincoln   resident   Mary  Gemignani  will  give  a  talk  and  slideshow  about   her  January  trip  to  Liberia,  West  Africa,  as  a  return   Peace  Corps  volunteer.  Refreshments  served.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Poets   as   Historiansâ&#x20AC;?   reading   in   Middlebury.   :HGQHVGD\ $SULO   SP 6KHOGRQ Museum.   Five   area   poets   will   celebrate   Poetry   Month   and   Vermont   history   by   reading   from   new   work  inspired  by  a  broad  range  of  historical  people,   events   and   ideas.   Poets   are   Ray   Hudson,   Nancy   Means  Wright,  Deanna  Shapiro,  Janice  Miller  Potter   DQG'DYLG:HLQVWRFN)HHIRUQRQPHPEHUVIUHH IRUPHPEHUV,QIRRUZZZKHQU\VKHOGRQ-­ museum.org.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Investing   for   the   Greater   Goodâ&#x20AC;?   lecture   in   MIddlebury. :HGQHVGD\ $SULO   SP ,OVOH\ Library.   Hear   from   expert   panelists   and   consider   the   range   of   socially   responsible   community-­based   investment   activities.   Sponsored   by   the   Acorn   (QHUJ\&RRS,QIR Architecture   lecture   with   William   Massie   at   Middlebury  College.:HGQHVGD\$SULOSP -RKQVRQ 0HPRULDO %XLOGLQJ 5RRP  0DVVLH speaks  about  his  work  and  the  work  of  his  students   in   the   architecture   department   at   the   renowned   &UDQEURRN$FDGHP\RU$UWLQ%ORRPÂżHOG+LOOV0LFK )UHH,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXRU Historical   society   meeting   in   New   Haven.   :HGQHVGD\$SULOSP1HZ+DYHQ&RPPXQLW\ Library.  The  New  Haven  Historical  Society  welcomes   librarian  Deborah  Lundbech,  who  will  speak  on  old   photos,  including  how  to  identify  what  kinds  they  are   and  other  useful  information.  Bring  a  few  of  your  own   old  photos.  All  are  welcome.   Historical   society   presentation   in   Ferrisburgh.   :HGQHVGD\$SULOSP)HUULVEXUJK+LVWRULFDO 6RFLHW\5RXWH6LODV7RZOHUZLOOUHYLHZWKHGLVFRY-­ HULHVEXULHGZLWKLQDQFUHGLWDFFRXQWERRNIRU the  Kimball  Cushman  Store,  which  once  stood  on  the   Ferrisburgh  town  green.  Free.  All  are  welcome.   The  Heath  String  Quartet  in  concert  at  Middlebury   College. :HGQHVGD\ $SULO   SP Mahaney   Center   for   the   Arts.   The   quartet   gives   a   preview   of   their   Carnegie   Hall   debut   program   of   Beethoven,   Bartok   and   Mendelssohn.   Preconcert   lecture  with  Music  Department  Chair  Greg  Vitercik  at   SPLQ5RRP7LFNHWVDYDLODEOHDW ZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXRU â&#x20AC;&#x153;An  Evening  with  Dougie  MacLeanâ&#x20AC;?  in  Middlebury.   :HGQHVGD\$SULO   SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU The   After   Dark   Music   Series   presents   Dougie   MacLean.  The  Scottish  singer-­songwriter  has  devel-­ oped   a   unique   blend   of   lyrical,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;roots-­basedâ&#x20AC;?   song-­ ZULWLQJDQGLQVWUXPHQWDOFRPSRVLWLRQ7LFNHWVLQ DGYDQFH DQG  DW WKH GRRU 'RRUV RSHQ DW  SP,QIRDQGWLFNHWVZZZDIWHUGDUNPXVLFVHULHVFRP RU

Apr

10

THURSDAY

Lenten  concert   in   Middlebury.   7KXUVGD\$SULO   SP 6W Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church.   Piano   recital   by   Cynthia   Huard.  Free.  Brown  bagging  encouraged.  Part  of  St.   Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Lenten   concert   series,   every   Thursday   WKURXJK$SULO Technology   Drop-­in   Day   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   $SULOSP,OVOH\/LEUDU\*HWKHOSZLWKDOO\RXU technology   questions,   from   word   processing   and   printing  to  handling  e-­mail  and  downloadable  books.   ,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;First   Time   Investingâ&#x20AC;?   workshop   in   Orwell.   7KXUVGD\ $SULO   SP 2UZHOO )UHH Library.  Celebrate  Money  Smart  Week  at  the  library   E\OHDUQLQJEDVLFWLSVDQGWULFNVIRUÂżUVWWLPHLQYHV-­ tors.  Bryan  Young  of  the  First  National  Bank  of  Orwell   ZLOOKRVW4XHVWLRQVDUHZHOFRPH,QIR or  www.orwellfreelibrary.org.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Performance   Nowâ&#x20AC;?   screening   at   Middlebury   College. 7KXUVGD\$SULO   SP$[LQQ  6FUHHQLQJV RI Âł9pURQLTXH 'RLVQHDX´ DQG Âł$ Family  Finds  Entertainment,â&#x20AC;?  in  conjunction  with  the   current  Middlebury  College  Museum  of  Art  exhibition,   Âł3HUIRUPDQFH1RZ´)UHH,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGX RU â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   Clockwork   Orangeâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   at   Middlebury   College.7KXUVGD\$SULOSP:ULJKW Memorial   Theater.  A   new   adaptation   of   the   contro-­ YHUVLDOQRYHOODE\$QWKRQ\%XUJHVVIDPRXVO\ SURGXFHGIRUÂżOPE\6WDQOH\.XEULFNLQ7LFNHWV  0DWXUH DXGLHQFHV RQO\ ,QIR DQG WLFNHWV  RU ZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXDUWV$OVR RQ $SULODQG

Apr

11

FRIDAY Community  recycled   art   event   in   Middlebury.)ULGD\$SULOSP

,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ 7KH OLEUDU\ ZLWK 2WWHU &UHHN &KLOG Center,  will   celebrate   the   Week   of   the   Young   Child   with  a  community  recycled  art  event.  Basic  supplies   such  as  paper,  glue  and  markers  will  be  provided,  but   families  are  welcome  to  bring  their  own  materials  and   recyclables.   Fiber   arts   exhibit   opening   reception   in   Brandon.   )ULGD\$SULOSP&RPSDVV0XVLFDQG$UWV &HQWHU &HOHEUDWLQJ WKH RSHQLQJ RI Âł)DEULFDWLRQV Fabric   &   Fiber,â&#x20AC;?   an   exhibit   of   textile   arts   from   tradi-­ tional   to   contemporary   quilts,   fashion,   home   decor,   one-­of-­a-­kind  accessories  and  sculpted  companions.   2QH[KLELW$SULO-XQH,QIRZZZFPDFYWRUJ /HQWHQ ÂżVK IU\ LQ %ULVWRO )ULGD\$SULO   SP St.   Ambrose   Church.   Fifteenth   annual   Lenten   DOO\RXFDQHDWÂżVKIU\0HDOLQFOXGHVIULHGRUEDNHG haddock,   French   fries,   coleslaw,   beverage   and   GHVVHUW$GXOWVFKLOGUHQXQGHULPPHGLDWH IDPLO\RIÂżYH,QIR Home  Energy  Challenge  celebration  in  Weybridge.   Friday,   April   11,   6-­8   p.m.,   Weybridge   Elementary   School.   Celebrate   the   townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   successful   comple-­ tion   of   the   Vermont   Home   Energy   Challenge.   Family-­friendly   event,   childcare   provided.   Free   and   open   to   all   Weybridge   residents.   Bring   a   salad   or   PDLQGLVK,QIR Spring  Fling  auction  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  April  11,    SP 0LGGOHEXU\ $PHULFDQ /HJLRQ 7ZHOIWK DQQXDO VLOHQW DQG OLYH DXFWLRQ WKDW LQFOXGHV VXSSHU GHVVHUW EDU DQG EHYHUDJHV 3URFHHGV EHQHÂżW WKH Champlain  Valley  Christian  School  Capital  Campaign   )XQG ,WHPV LQFOXGH JLIW FHUWLÂżFDWHV DUW ODZQ DQG garden,  recreation  and  technology,  farm  and  automo-­ tive,  maple  syrup,  jewelry,  many  â&#x20AC;&#x153;premiumâ&#x20AC;?  items  and   PRUH7LFNHWVLQDGYDQFH  DW WKHGRRU,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Dreamâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   April     SP *UDFH %DSWLVW &KXUFK  Merchants   Row.  A   family-­friendly   play   about   a   rich   \RXQJJLUOIURP1HZ<RUNZKRÂżQGVDUDJJHGWURRS of  young  children.  Written,  directed  and  produced  by   WKJUDGH KRPHVFKRROHU 5RVH &XUUDQ RI :KLWLQJ 7LFNHWVDGXOWVFKLOGUHQIUHHIRUFKLOGUHQXQGHU  6WXGHQWV FDQ JHW D  UHIXQG DW WKH GRRU ZLWK the   donation   of   a   nonperishable   food   item   for   the   Middlebury  Community  Lunch  program.   Board   game   night   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   April   11,    SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ 7KH $GGLVRQ &RXQW\ Gamers  invite  everyone  to  come  play  tabletop  board   JDPHVVXFKDV6HWWOHUVRI&DWDQ:RQGHUVRU7LFNHW WR5LGH$Q\RQHXQGHUPXVWEHDFFRPSDQLHGE\ DQDGXOW,QIRRUFKXFN#EXUNLQVQHW Fly   Fishing   Film   Tour   on   screen   in   Middlebury.   )ULGD\$SULO   SP7RZQ +DOO7KHDWHU )LOPV E\DPL[RISRSXODUUHWXUQLQJÂżOPPDNHUVDQGWDOHQWHG up-­and-­comers.   This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   tour   features   a   greater   GLYHUVLW\ RI ORFDWLRQV DQG VSHFLHV RI ÂżVK WKDQ DQ\ SUHYLRXV WRXU 7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW 0LGGOHEXU\ 0RXQWDLQHHU3DUN6W'RRUVRSHQDWIRUDSURG-­ XFWVVKRZFDVH,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;1   Man,   1   Canoe,   750   Milesâ&#x20AC;?   presentation   in   Salisbury. )ULGD\ $SULO   SP 6DOLVEXU\ Public   Library.   Peter   Macfarlane   of  Addison   shares   WKHVWRU\RIKLVPRQWKORQJDGYHQWXUHLQVSULQJ paddling  solo  on  the  Northern  Forest  Canoe  Trail  from   Old  Forge,  N.Y.,  to  Fort  Kent,  Maine,  in  a  self-­made   wooden  canoe.  Slide  show  and  discussion  followed   by  Q  &  A.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   Clockwork   Orangeâ&#x20AC;?   and   post-­performance   discussion   at   Middlebury   College.   Friday,   April     SP :ULJKW 0HPRULDO 7KHDWHU $ QHZ DGDSWDWLRQ RI WKH FRQWURYHUVLDO  QRYHOOD E\$QWKRQ\%XUJHVVIDPRXVO\SURGXFHGIRUÂżOPE\ 6WDQOH\ .XEULFN LQ  7LFNHWV  0DWXUH DXGLHQFHV RQO\ ,QIR DQG WLFNHWV  RU ZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXDUWV $ GLVFXVVLRQ ZLWK WKH company  will  take  place  after  the  show.  Also  on  April    Spring   Fling   dance   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   April   11,   8-­11   p.m.,   Middlebury   Municipal   Gymnasium.   Addison  Central  Teens  hosts  is  annual  spring  dance   IRU NLGV LQ JUDGHV  0XVLF E\ '- 'L]]OH EODFN OLJKWVDQGJORZVWLFNV(QWUDQFHIHH

Apr

12

SATURDAY

Green  Mountain   Club   walk   in   Ferrisburgh. 6DWXUGD\ $SULO  %XWWRQ Bay   State   Park.   A   Bread   Loaf   Section   RXWLQJ (DV\ &RQWDFW &ODLUH 5LYHUV IRU VWDUW WLPH  Access   trail   design   workshop   in   Bristol.   Saturday,   $SULO   DPQRRQ 7KH :DWHUZRUNV SURSHUW\ Plank  Road.  Conservation  forester  David  Brynn  and   hydro-­geologist  Kristen  Underwood  will  teach  partici-­ pants   how   to   design,   construct   and   maintain   forest   DFFHVVWUDLOV)UHH1RSUHUHJLVWUDWLRQUHTXLUHG,QIR DQG GLUHFWLRQV  RU GDYLG#IDPLO\IRU-­ ests.org.   Attic  sale  in  New  Haven.6DWXUGD\$SULODP p.m.,   New   Haven   Congregational   Church.   Games,   books,   plants,   food   table,   Rada   cutlery,   furniture,   NLWFKHQLWHPVHWF,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Dreamâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  April     SP *UDFH %DSWLVW &KXUFK  0HUFKDQWV Row.   A   family-­friendly   play   about   a   rich   young   JLUO IURP 1HZ <RUN ZKR ÂżQGV D UDJJHG WURRS RI young   children.   Written,   directed   and   produced   by   WKJUDGH KRPHVFKRROHU 5RVH &XUUDQ RI :KLWLQJ 7LFNHWVDGXOWVFKLOGUHQIUHHIRUFKLOGUHQXQGHU  6WXGHQWV FDQ JHW D  UHIXQG DW WKH GRRU ZLWK the   donation   of   a   nonperishable   food   item   for   the   Middlebury  Community  Lunch  program.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Loreâ&#x20AC;?   screening   at   Middlebury   College.   Saturday,   $SULO   SP 'DQD $XGLWRULXP 7KH VWRU\ RI ÂżYH*HUPDQVLEOLQJVOHGE\\HDUROG/RUHVHHN-­ LQJ UHIXJH DV WKH$OOLHV DUULYH LQ *HUPDQ\ LQ  ,Q *HUPDQ ZLWK (QJOLVK VXEWLWOHV )UHH ,QIR ZZZ PLGGOHEXU\HGXRU Roast   turkey   supper   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,   April   SP9HUJHQQHV8QLWHG0HWKRGLVW&KXUFK $ EXIIHW RI URDVW WXUNH\ PDVKHG SRWDWRHV VWXIÂżQJ vegetable,   cranberry   sauce,   dessert   and   beverage.   &RVWDGXOWVFKLOGUHQ7DNHRXWDYDLODEOH,QIR  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Dreamâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  April     SP *UDFH %DSWLVW &KXUFK  0HUFKDQWV Row.   A   family-­friendly   play   about   a   rich   young   JLUO IURP 1HZ <RUN ZKR ÂżQGV D UDJJHG WURRS RI young   children.   Written,   directed   and   produced   by   WKJUDGH KRPHVFKRROHU 5RVH &XUUDQ RI :KLWLQJ 7LFNHWVDGXOWVFKLOGUHQIUHHIRUFKLOGUHQXQGHU  6WXGHQWV FDQ JHW D  UHIXQG DW WKH GRRU ZLWK the   donation   of   a   nonperishable   food   item   for   the   Middlebury  Community  Lunch  program.   Contradance   in   Cornwall. 6DWXUGD\$SULO   p.m.,   Cornwall   Town   Hall.   Featuring   Fern   Bradley   FDOOLQJWROLYHPXVLFE\5HG'RJ5LOH\&RVWSHU SHUVRQ$OODUHZHOFRPH,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   Clockwork   Orangeâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   at   Middlebury   College. 6DWXUGD\$SULO   SP :ULJKW Memorial   Theater.  A   new   adaptation   of   the   contro-­ YHUVLDOQRYHOODE\$QWKRQ\%XUJHVVIDPRXVO\ SURGXFHGIRUÂżOPE\6WDQOH\.XEULFNLQ7LFNHWV  0DWXUH DXGLHQFHV RQO\ ,QIR DQG WLFNHWV RUZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXDUWV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pop-­up   Playsâ&#x20AC;?   in   Middlebury. 6DWXUGD\ $SULO   SP 7RZQ +DOO 7KHDWHU 6L[ SOD\ZULJKWV choose   some   actors,   stay   up   all   night   writing   and  

Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  9A


PAGE  10A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

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deliver  a  10-­minute  script  before  breakfast  the  next  morn-­ ing.  Six  directors  then  take  over,  rehearsing  with  the  actors   over  the  course  of  the  day,  and  then  present  the  plays  to   an  audience,  for  a  fun  and  expected  evening  on  the  stage.   7LFNHWV  DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  www.townhalltheater.org,  or  at  the  door.   The   Patrick   Fitzsimmons   Trio   in   concert   in   Lincoln.   6DWXUGD\$SULOSP%XUQKDP+DOO3RSDQGIRON SDUWRIWKH%XUQKDP0XVLF6HULHV7LFNHWVDGXOWVIRU VHQLRUVDQGFKLOGUHQDYDLODEOHDWWKHGRRU,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;Loreâ&#x20AC;?   screening   at   Middlebury   College.   Saturday,   April   SP'DQD$XGLWRULXP7KHVWRU\RIÂżYH*HUPDQ siblings,   led   by   14-­year-­old   Lore,   seeking   refuge   as   the   $OOLHVDUULYHLQ*HUPDQ\LQ,Q*HUPDQZLWK(QJOLVK VXEWLWOHV)UHH,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXRU

Apr

13

14

17

SUNDAY

All-­you-­can-­eat  pancake   breakfast   in   Addison. 6XQGD\$SULO   DP$GGLVRQ )LUH 6WDWLRQ 3ODLQ DQG EOXHEHUU\ SDQFDNHV sausage,   bacon,   home   fries,   coffee,   hot   chocolate   and   RUDQJHMXLFH$GXOWVNLGVXQGHU)XQGVUDLVHGZLOO be  used  to  purchase  equipment  for  the  Addison  Volunteer   )LUH'HSDUWPHQW,QIR Family   Breakfast   in   Hancock. 6XQGD\ $SULO   a.m.,   Hancock   Town   Hall.   Offered   by   the   Community   &KXUFKRI+DQFRFNDQG*UDQYLOOH6FUDPEOHGHJJVEDFRQ pancakes,  Vermont  maple  syrup,  orange  juice,  coffee  and   WHD'RQDWLRQVDSSUHFLDWHG Pancake  breakfast  in  Salisbury.6XQGD\$SULODP 6DOLVEXU\&RPPXQLW\6FKRRO7LFNHWVDGXOWVFKLOGUHQ DQGXQGHUDYDLODEOHDWWKHGRRU3URFHHGVEHQHÂżWWKH 6DOLVEXU\9ROXQWHHU)LUH'HSDUWPHQW Scrapbooking   club   meeting   in   Middlebury.   Sunday,  April     DP SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ 3DSHU FUDIWV LQFOXGLQJ scrapbooking  and  card  making.  Share  ideas,  work  on  proj-­ HFWV%HJLQQHUVZHOFRPH,QIRRUWLQDFKHVOH\# gmavt.net.   St.  Peterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Parish  breakfast  in  Vergennes.6XQGD\$SULO DP6W3HWHUÂśV3DULVK+DOO7KH.QLJKWVRI&ROXPEXV host   this   breakfast   of   eggs,   omelets,   hotcakes,   French   WRDVW EDFRQ VDXVDJH DQG PRUH $GXOWV  VHQLRUV  NLGVNLGVXQGHUIUHHIDPLOLHVRIÂżYHRUPRUH 6WDWHFKDULW\UDIĂ&#x20AC;H'RQÂśWIRUJHWWREULQJ\RXUUHWXUQDEOHVWR VXSSRUWWKH<RXWK0LQLVWU\ERWWOHGULYH Poetry   Unplugged   event   in   Brandon. 6XQGD\ $SULO   SP &RPSDVV 0XVLF DQG$UWV &HQWHU$OO DUH invited  to  share  their  favorite  poem  or  just  come  and  listen.   Free,  but  donations  are  welcome  to  support  the  opening  of   WKH&0$&ÂśV*UHHQ0RXQWDLQ3RHWV+RXVHDQGNLGVÂśUHDG-­ LQJDFWLYLW\URRP,QIRZZZFPDFYWRUJ 6WXGHQW Ă&#x20AC;XWH UHFLWDO DW 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH   Sunday,   $SULO   SP 0DKDQH\ &HQWHU IRU WKH$UWV %RJKRV 7DVODNMLDQÂśSOD\VWKHĂ&#x20AC;XWHDFFRPSDQLHGE\$IÂżOLDWH$UWLVW &\QWKLD +XDUG RQ SLDQR 'RQDWLRQV DW WKH GRRU EHQHÂżW &KDUWHU+RXVH,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXRU

Apr

Apr

MONDAY

Legislative  breakfast  in  Weybridge.0RQGD\ $SULODP:H\EULGJH&RQJUHJDWLRQDO &KXUFK %UHDNIDVW DW  DP SURJUDP  The  purchase  of  breakfast  is  not  required  but  it  helps  the   hosts  to  defray  the  costs  of  opening  their  hall.   Book   club   meeting   and   author   appearance   in   Bridport.   0RQGD\$SULOSP&DUO1RUWRQ+LJKZD\'HSDUWPHQW FRQIHUHQFHURRP/RFDODXWKRU$OEHUW%RXGUHDXZLOOEHRQ KDQGWRGLVFXVVKLVQHZQRYHO³7KH*ROGHQ1HHGOH´%RRN VHOHFWLRQIRU0D\LV³7KH&RORU3XUSOH´E\$OLFH:DONHU$OO LQWHUHVWHGUHDGHUVDUHZHOFRPH,QIR

From  page  to  stage THE  THT  KIDS  group  and  students  from  the  Bridport  Central  Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  fourth-­grade  class  will  put  on   plays  based  on  two  Tomie  dePaola  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strega  Nonaâ&#x20AC;?  books  on  Tuesday,  April  8,  at  6:30  p.m.  at  the  Town  Hall   Theater  in  Middlebury. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Midd  Winds   in   concert   at   Middlebury   College. 0RQGD\ $SULO   SP 0DKDQH\ &HQWHU IRU WKH $UWV 7KH 0LGGOHEXU\ &RPPXQLW\ :LQG (QVHPEOH PDGH RI DUHD VWXGHQWV DQG FRPPXQLW\ PHPEHUV LQFOXGLQJ 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJHDOXPQLDQGVWDIISHUIRUPV)UHH,QIRZZZPLGGOH-­ EXU\HGXRU

Apr

15

TUESDAY

Senior  luncheon   and   presentation   in   Middlebury.7XHVGD\$SULO   DP SP Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center.   CVAA   sponsors   a   OXQFKHRQRIURDVWWXUNH\JUDY\FRUQEUHDGVWXIÂżQJPDVKHG FDXOLĂ&#x20AC;RZHU JUHHQ VDODG FUDQEHUU\ PXIÂżQ DQG ZKRRSHH SLHV.DWKOHHQ:DOOVRI0LGGOHEXU\ZLOOHQWHUWDLQWKHFURZG ZLWKVWRULHVDQGSKRWRVIURPKHUUHFHQWWULSWR,WDO\3OHDVH bring   your   own   place   setting.   Suggested   donation   $4.   5HVHUYDWLRQV UHTXLUHG  H[W  )UHH WUDQVSRUWDWLRQYLD$&75 Gensler   Symposium   lecture   at   Middlebury   College.   7XHVGD\ $SULO   SP 5REHUW $ -RQHV Âś &RQIHUHQFH 5RRP 1LNNL <RXQJ DVVLVWDQW SURIHVVRU RI ZRPHQÂśV DQG JHQGHU VWXGLHV DQG UHOLJLRQ DW %XFNQHOO 8QLYHUVLW\ SUHVHQWV Âł, DP 127 7KDW +XQJU\ &UHDWLYH 5HVLVWDQFH %ODFN 4XHHUV DQG )DPLO\´ 0RUH LQIR RQ WKH V\PSRVLXPLVDWVLWHVPLGGOHEXU\HGXJHQVOHU VANR  public  comment  meeting  in  Orwell.7XHVGD\$SULO SP2UZHOO)UHH/LEUDU\7KH9HUPRQW$JHQF\RI 1DWXUDO5HVRXUFHVLQYLWHVWKHSXEOLFWRRIIHUFRPPHQWVDQG suggestions   on   the   draft   South   Lake   Champlain   Tactical   %DVLQ3ODQ7KHSODQOD\VRXWWKHFXUUHQWFRQGLWLRQVRIWKH

surface  waters   and   aquatic   habitat,   problems   with   water   quality  and  strategies  to  be  taken  by  the  agency  to  improve   ZDWHUTXDOLW\,QIR

Apr

16

WEDNESDAY

CCV  Information   Session   in   Middlebury.   :HGQHVGD\$SULODP0HUFKDQWV Row.   Find   out   about   Community   College   of   9HUPRQWÂśVFODVVHVVWDUWLQJLQVXPPHU$QDFDGHPLF adviser   will   go   over   the   process   of   enrolling   and   discuss   FRXUVHVDQGSURJUDPVDYDLODEOHDW&&9,QIR Community   meeting   in   Vergennes. :HGQHVGD\$SULO  SP9HUJHQQHV2SHUD+RXVH7KHVHFRQGPHHWLQJ in  the  Vergennes  Community  Visit  process  of  bringing  the   community  together  to  set  common  goals.  This  meeting  is   DIROORZXSWRWKH0DUFKPHHWLQJZKHUHRYHUUHVL-­ dents  shared  their  thoughts  on  topics  of  relevance  to  the  city.   Residents  are  invited  to  come  vote  on  what  issues  should   EH IRFXVHG RQ LQ WKH FRPLQJ \HDU ,QIR  RU LQIR#YWUXUDORUJ Cello   and   piano   concert   at   Middlebury   College.   :HGQHVGD\ $SULO   SP 0DKDQH\ &HQWHU IRU WKH $UWV &HOOLVW 'DYLG )LQFNHO DQG SLDQLVW :X +DQ 0XVLFDO $PHULFDÂśV  0XVLFLDQV RI WKH <HDU ZLOO SOD\ D SURJUDP WLWOHG Âł5XVVLDQ 5HĂ&#x20AC;HFWLRQV´ IHDWXULQJ ZRUNV E\ 3URNRÂżHY 6KRVWDNRYLFK 6FULDELQ DQG 5DFKPDQLQRY 7LFNHWV  7LFNHWV SXUFKDVHG IRU WKH &KULVWLDQQH Stotjin  concert  originally  scheduled  for  this  date/time  will  be   KRQRUHG ,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGRU

THURSDAY

Senior  luncheon  in  Vergennes.  Thursday,  April   DPSP6W3HWHU¶V3DULVK+DOO&9$$ sponsors  this  special  senior  meal  with  live  folk  music   E\ 1HZ 0RRQ (DVW &UHHN &DWHULQJ VHUYHV D OXQFKHRQ RI baked   stuffed   chicken   with   rice   pilaf   and   cheese   sauce,   %UXVVHOV VSURXWV DQG EDFRQ GXFKHVV SRWDWRHV GLQQHU UROO and   tapioca   pudding   with   blueberries   and   sweet   cream.   6XJJHVWHGGRQDWLRQ3OHDVHEULQJ\RXURZQSODFHVHWWLQJ 5HVHUYDWLRQVUHTXLUHGE\$SULOH[W )UHHWUDQVSRUWDWLRQWKURXJK$&75 Lenten  concert  in  Middlebury.7KXUVGD\$SULO SP6W6WHSKHQ¶V&KXUFK³2UJDQ3UD\HUV´DSURJUDPRI RUJDQPXVLFRI+RO\:HHNSOD\HGE\*HRUJH0DWWKHZ-U 6W 6WHSKHQ¶V RUJDQLVW )UHH %URZQ EDJJLQJ HQFRXUDJHG )LQDOSHUIRUPDQFHLQ6W6WHSKHQ¶V/HQWHQFRQFHUWVHULHV Otter  Creek  Poets  meeting  in  Middlebury.7KXUVGD\$SULO SP,OVOH\/LEUDU\3RHW$SULO2VVPDQQIRUPHUGLUHFWRU RI$OLFH-DPHVERRNVQRZDSXEOLVKLQJFRQVXOWDQWZLOOEHWKH IHDWXUHGJXHVW,QIRRUZZZLOVOH\SXEOLFOLEUDU\RUJ Technology  Drop-­in  Day  in  Middlebury.7KXUVGD\$SULO  SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ *HW KHOS ZLWK DOO \RXU WHFKQRORJ\ questions,   from   word   processing   and   printing   to   handling   HPDLODQGGRZQORDGDEOHERRNV,QIR Gensler   Symposium   lecture   at   Middlebury   College.   7KXUVGD\ $SULO   SP 5REHUW $ -RQHV ¶ &RQIHUHQFH5RRP6X]DQQD:DOWHUVGLUHFWRURI:RPHQ¶V *HQGHU DQG 6H[XDOLW\ 6WXGLHV DQG SURIHVVRU RI VRFLRORJ\ DW 1RUWKHDVWHUQ 8QLYHUVLW\ SUHVHQWV ³7KH 7ROHUDQFH 7UDS +RZ *RG *HQHV DQG *RRG ,QWHQWLRQV $UH 6DERWDJLQJ *D\(TXDOLW\´)RUPRUHLQIRRQWKHV\PSRVLXPJRWRVLWHV PLGGOHEXU\HGXJHQVOHU NER   Vermont   Reading   Series   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   $SULOSP&DURO¶V+XQJU\0LQG&DIp7KH1HZ (QJODQG 5HYLHZ ZHOFRPHV 9HUPRQW ZULWHUV (PLO\ &DVH\ 'RQ 0LWFKHOO $SULO 2VVPDQQ DQG 5RVV 7KXUEHU ZKR ZLOO read  from  their  work.  Free.  

Apr

18

FRIDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   April     DP SP 7KH *ODVV 2QLRQ +DQQDIRUG&DUHHU&HQWHU:RRG\'DQIRUWKDQGKLV VWXGHQWV VHUYH FXOLQDU\ GHOLJKWV 0HQX WR EH DQQRXQFHG 6SRQVRUHGE\&9$$6XJJHVWHGGRQDWLRQ5HVHUYDWLRQV UHTXLUHG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jesus   Filmâ&#x20AC;?   screening   in   Leicester. )ULGD\ $SULO   SP/HLFHVWHU&KXUFKRIWKH1D]DUHQH)UHH Good  Friday  concert  in  Middlebury.)ULGD\$SULOSP 6W6WHSKHQÂśV(SLVFRSDO&KXUFK-RVHSK+D\GQÂśVVHWWLQJRI Âł7KH6HYHQ/DVW:RUGV´ZLOOEHSUHVHQWHGE\DSURIHVVLRQDO RFWHW IRXUYRFDOLVWVDQGDVWULQJTXDUWHW 'LUHFWHGE\/LQGD Radtke.  

L I V EM U S I C Cooper  and   LaVoie   in   Middlebury. 7KXUVGD\$SULO   SP0DLQ Sound   Investment   Jazz   Ensemble   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   $SULOSP0DLQ

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Addison Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  —  PAGE  11A

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The politician & the artist share thoughts on women

Kunin and Musick address crowd at Edgewater Gallery By EVAN  JOHNSON 0,''/(%85<²(QYLURQPHQWDO DUWLVW 3DW 0XVLFN DQG 9HUPRQW VWDWHVZRPDQ 0DGHOHLQH .XQLQ FRPHIURPIDLUO\GLIIHUHQWZRUOGV 0XVLFN RI 0DQFKHVWHU KDV D VXFFHVVIXOFDUHHUWKDWVSDQV\HDUV LQ ZKLFK VKH KDV FUHDWHG LQVWDOOD WLRQVDQGH[KLELWVDOORYHUWKH8QLWHG 6WDWHV .XQLQ VHUYHG DV OLHXWHQDQW JRYHUQRU RI 9HUPRQW IURP  WR JRYHUQRUIURPWR DQG DPEDVVDGRU WR 6ZLW]HUODQG LQ WKH ¶V VKH LV QRZ D SURIHVVRU DW ODUJHDWWKH8QLYHUVLW\RI9HUPRQW 7KLV SDVW 6DWXUGD\ HYHQLQJ WKH WZR ZRPHQ IRXQG VRPH FRPPRQ JURXQG LQ GLVFXVVLRQ RI LVVXHV LPSRUWDQWWRZRPHQZKHQWKH\ERWK GHOLYHUHG OHFWXUHV DW 0LGGOHEXU\¶V (GJHZDWHU*DOOHU\DVWKHFRQFOXVLRQ RI WKH JDOOHU\¶V :RPHQ¶V +LVWRU\ 0RQWK/HFWXUH6HULHV ,W DOVR ZDV DQ RSSRUWXQLW\ IRU WKH JDOOHU\ WR VKRZFDVH VRPH RI 0XVLFN¶V ZRUN DQG WR XQYHLO D SRUWUDLW RI .XQLQ E\ QRWHG SDLQWHU 7-&XQQLQJKDPRI$GGLVRQ 0XVLFN VDLG KHU FXUUHQW LQVWDOOD WLRQDWWKH(GJHZDWHU*DOOHU\ZKLFK ZLOOUXQXQWLOWKHHQGRIWKHPRQWK LV LQVSLUHG E\ WKH SURFHVV RI DJLQJ 7KHFROOHFWLRQLVWLWOHG³7KH,QVWDQW RI ,W $OO´ DQG IHDWXUHV VFXOSWXUHV DQGGUDZLQJVFRPSRVHGRI-DSDQHVH ULFHSDSHUFKDUFRDOSHQFLOGUDZLQJV EUDVVDQGPDSOH ,Q DQ LQWHUYLHZ SULRU WR KHU WDON 0XVLFN VDLG WKH FROOHFWLRQ ZDV LQVSLUHG E\ WKH SRHWU\ RI 5XVVLDQ DXWKRU%RULV3DVWHUQDNDQGKLVSRHP ³7KH:HGGLQJ´ ³,W VSHDNV RI WKH IUDJLOH QDWXUH RI OLIH DQG WKH VKRUWQHVV RI LW´ VKH VDLG³,QKLVSRHPKHVD\Vµ)RUOLIH LVRQO\DQLQVWDQWWKHGLVVROYLQJRI RQH¶V VHOI LQWR WKH VHOYHV RI RWKHUV DVLIEHVWRZLQJDJLIW¶,WKLQNRIP\ OLIH DV WKDW DQG WKH LPDJH RI D WUHH UHÀHFWV WKDW DV ZHOO SDUWLFXODUO\ LI LW¶VDIUXLWEHDULQJWUHH´ ,Q KHU PLQXWH WDON EHIRUH DQ DXGLHQFH RI DERXW  0XVLFN GHVFULEHG FRPPRQ WKHPHV LQ WKH ZRUNRIVRPHRIKHUIDYRULWHIHPDOH DUWLVWV+HUOHFWXUHWLWOHG³&RPPRQ /DQJXDJH %RXUJHRLV &RQQHOO 7DNDH]XDQG3DW0XVLFN´DVVHUWHG WKDW KXPDQV SRVVHVV DQ DELOLW\ WR FUHDWH D FRPPRQ VXEFRQVFLRXV XQGHUVWDQGLQJ HYLGHQW WKURXJKRXW KLVWRU\ 'HVSLWH EHLQJ VHSDUDWHG E\ WKRXVDQGV RI \HDUV FDYHGZHOOLQJ KXPDQV SURGXFHG QHDUO\ LGHQWL FDO SLHFHV RI FDYHDUW 0XVLFN VDLG $VWURQDXW FUHZV RQ VHSDUDWH PLVVLRQV IURP VHSDUDWH FRXQWULHV GHVFULEHG WKH YLHZ RI WKH SODQHW (DUWK XVLQJ WKH VDPH ZRUGV DQG WHUPVLQWKHLURZQODQJXDJHV ³7KH\ORRNHGDWWKHZRUOGDURXQG WKHPVDZLWDVVLPLODUDQGSRUWUD\HG LW LQ WKHLU RZQ LQWHUSUHWDWLRQ´ VKH

FORMER VERMONT   GOV.   Madeleine   Kunin   unveiled   a   new   portrait   of   her,   painted   by   Vermont   artist   TJ   &XQQLQJKDP EHIRUH GHOLYHULQJ D OHFWXUH WLWOHG ³7KH 8Q¿QLVKHG :RUN RI WKH :RPHQ¶V 0RYHPHQW´ DW WKH Edgewater  Gallery  in  Middlebury  this  past  Saturday. Independent  photo/Evan  Johnson

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Letter of Appreciation Thanks to family and friends for nearly 50 cards and best wishes on my 80th. Two cards stood out – Amy’s was huge with a hand written “Love You.” Clara’s was small and said “I wouldn’t call you old when there are so many other things to call you.” Special thanks to Deanna for 58 years of love, understanding, and truly great food. Can we do it again in 2024? Bill Steadman

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REWARD

Reward offered for a stolen Husqvarna 372XP chainsaw with 20 inch bar. Have serial number and bill of sale to identify. $300 reward for its return. Call 802-545-2642.

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PAGE  12A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

Area  supervisory  unions  vote  to  reject  H.833 By  LEE  J.  KAHRS Brandon  Reporter BRANDON   /   FAIR   HAVEN     â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Rutland   Northeast   and   Rutland   $GGLVRQVXSHUYLVRU\XQLRQVRQ0DUFK  ERWK SDVVHG UHVROXWLRQV RIÂżFLDOO\ rejecting  H.833,  the  school  consolida-­ tion  bill.   The  RNeSU  resolution  reads  as  fol-­ lows: â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  RNeSU  Full  board  hereby  re-­ MHFWV %LOO + :H EHOLHYH WKDW WKH HOLPLQDWLRQRIORFDOVFKRROERDUGJRY-­ HUQDQFHLVQRWFRQGXFLYHWRSURPRWLQJ our  democratic  ideals,  fostering  social   FDSLWDODQGWKHHIIHFWLYHOHDGHUVKLSRI our   community   schools.   We   encour-­ age   the   legislature   to   work   with   the  

Vermont  Superintendents  Association,   the   Vermont   School   Boards  Associa-­ tion   and   the  Agency   of   Education   to   LGHQWLI\VSHFLÂżFVWDWXWRU\DGMXVWPHQWV WKDWZRXOGVWUHQJWKHQWKHHIIHFWLYHFR-­ ordination   and   management   authori-­ WLHVRIVXSHUYLVRU\XQLRQERDUGVZKLOH maintaining  local  district  boards.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  also  call  for  adequate  funding   to  restore  the  capacity  of  the  Agency  of   (GXFDWLRQWRSURYLGHPHDQLQJIXOVXS-­ port   and   technical   assistance   to   sup-­ SRUWWKHHIIHFWLYHSUDFWLFHVDWDOOOHYHOV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Furthermore,  we  pledge  to  partici-­ pate   with   the  VSBA,  VSA   and  AOE   in  promoting  best  practices  to  attract,   support  and  retain  superintendents  and   principals.â&#x20AC;?

51H68 6XSHULQWHQGHQW -RKQ &DV-­ tle  said   the   resolution   will   be   sent   to   the   House   Education   Committee,   Vermont  Education  Secretary  Rebec-­ FD+ROFRPEHDQG*RY3HWHU6KXP-­ lin,   as   well   as   the   Senate   Education   Committee,   which   will   take   up   the   bill  next. 2Q WKH VDPH GD\ LQ )DLU +DYHQ the  board  that  includes  members  rep-­ resenting   the   Orwell   Village   School   DSSURYHGDUHVROXWLRQDORQJWKHVDPH line.   Like   RNeSU,   the   Addison-­ Rutland   board   called   for   cooperation   among   statewide   associations   of   su-­ perintendents   and   school   boards,   as   ZHOODVVWDWHJRYHUQPHQWWRLPSURYH coordination   of   resources   within   the  

existing  education  framework.   The   Addison   Rutland   resolution   reads,  in  part: Âł7KH$GGLVRQ5XWODQG6XSHUYLVRU\ Union   School   Board   hereby   rejects   %LOO + ÂŤ 7KH ERDUG  EHOLHYHV that   eliminating   local   school   board   JRYHUQDQFH LV QRW FRQGXFLYH WR SUR-­ moting   our   democratic   ideals   and   fostering   social   capital.   And   â&#x20AC;Ś   (the   ERDUG  EHOLHYHV WKDW %LOO + ZLOO increase  costs  not  limited  to  legal  fees,   consolidating   personnel   and   merging   salary  structures. 7KH ERDUG DOVR ÂłEHOLHYHV WKDW FRQ-­ VROLGDWLQJWR3UH.WR6FKRROGLV-­ tricts   will   ultimately   put   pressure   on   small  schools  to  close.â&#x20AC;?

Bill Â

Consolidation  (Continued  from  Page  1A) ten   through   grade   12,   and   at   least   four  municipal  districts. Ned   Kirsch,   superintendent   of   Franklin   West   in   Georgia,   says   our   education   system   is   not   preparing   students  for  employment  in  this  day   and  age.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   well   into   the   21st   century   and  I  think  one  of  the  issues  that  con-­ fronts  us  is  schools  are  built  on  the  in-­ dustrial  age  model,â&#x20AC;?  Kirsch  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Are   ZHFORVHUWRWKHSRVWRIÂżFHRUDUHZH closer  to  Amazon  as  a  system? â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   know   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   closer   to   the   post   RIÂżFH´KHVDLGÂł,ÂśGUDWKHUKDYHRXU school  systems  be  closer  to  Google.â&#x20AC;? .LUVFK EHOLHYHV VFKRRO GLVWULFW FRQVROLGDWLRQ ZRXOG SURYLGH DQ RS-­ portunity   for   larger   communities   to   discuss  what  type  of  education  they   ZDQW DQG FRPH XS ZLWK D FRKHVLYH YLVLRQUDWKHUWKDQWKHFXUUHQWPRGHO ZKHUHVPDOOHULQGLYLGXDOFRPPXQL-­ WLHV RIWHQ SXUVXH GLIIHUHQW LPSURYH-­ ment   agendas   than   neighboring   towns. +HGRHVQÂśWKDYHDOOWKHDQVZHUVIRU how  schools  should  change,  but  with   consolidation,   Kirsch   said,   schools   FRXOGQÂśW GHOLYHU HGXFDWLRQ LQ WKH same  old  style.   Âł:HÂśOO UHDOO\ KDYH WR KDYH WKDW KXJH FRQYHUVDWLRQ´ .LUVFK VDLG Âł, think  it  would  lead  to  a  different  kind   of  schooling.â&#x20AC;? FUNDAMENTAL  CHANGE Franklin  Northeast  Superintendent   Greenhouse

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MILTON  SUPERINTENDENT   JOHN  BARONE -D\ 1LFKROV LQ 5LFKIRUG VHHV D IX-­ ture   where   consolidated   school   dis-­ WULFWV FDQ RIIHU PRUH LQGLYLGXDOL]HG learning   opportunities   for   children.   In  fact,  they  could  open  up  more  op-­ portunities   in   general   for   students,   by  enabling  districts  to  set  up  magnet   schools,  and  free  up  resources  to  of-­ IHUPRUHGLYHUVHFRXUVHV â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  need  to  focus  on  the  big  con-­ cepts   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   critical   thinking,   problem   VROYLQJ FROODERUDWLRQ´ 1LFKROV VDLG Âł2XU JRYHUQDQFH V\VWHP WKDW ZHKDYHULJKWQRZVRPHWLPHVJHWVLQ the  way  of  that. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   locked   into   these   tradi-­ tional  buildings  and  traditional  struc-­ tures.â&#x20AC;? Nichols  is  a  fan  of  school  choice,   and   he   says   bigger   school   districts   could   allow   students   to   attend   a   school  that  better  meets  their  needs.   He   pointed   to   Enosburg   Falls   High   6FKRROZKLFKRIIHUVQLQH$GYDQFHG 3ODFHPHQWFODVVHVZKLOH5LFKIRUGLQ WKH VDPH VXSHUYLVRU\ XQLRQ RIIHUV two.   In   a   consolidated   system   stu-­ dents  might  not  be  allowed  to  attend   only   the   school   in   their   hometown.   In   some   cases,   that   school   may   not   HYHQEHWKHFORVHVWWRWKHLUUHVLGHQFH Nichols  pointed  out. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Students  should  be  able  to  decide   where  they  go  to  school,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.

One  need   only   look   at   the   way   information   technology   is   shrinking   distances  and  breaking  down  barriers   around  the  world  to  understand  that   todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   youngsters   are   growing   up   to   become   global   citizens.  As   such,   they  will  be  competing  against  work-­ ers  in  other  countries.  They  also  may   work   for   foreign   companies   while   QHYHUOHDYLQJWKHLURZQKRPHLQ9HU-­ mont,  Nichols  said.   Âł7KHVWUXFWXUHVZHKDYHULJKWQRZ can  stand  in  the  way,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. 6RPH VXSHUYLVRU\ XQLRQ KHDGV note  that  efforts  to  coordinate  educa-­ WLRQ DFURVV VFKRROV LQ D VXSHUYLVRU\ union   are   already   under   way,   but   PDQGDWLQJ LW WKURXJK JRYHUQDQFH consolidation   could   speed   things   along. As  an  example,  Rutland  South  Su-­ SHULQWHQGHQW 'DQD &ROH/HYHVTXH points   to   the   Orange   South   Super-­ YLVRU\ 8QLRQ LQ 5DQGROSK ZKHUH the  superintendent  has  all  the  towns   in   the   union   working   together;Íž   they   UHFHQWO\FDPHZLWKLQDIHZYRWHVRI FRQVROLGDWLQJ WKH JRYHUQDQFH XQGHU a  Regional  Education  District.   Âł7KH\KDYHXQLIRUPLW\RIFXUULFX-­ lum,  sharing  of  resources,  and  shared   facilities   management,â&#x20AC;?   said   Cole-­ /HYHVTXH And  as  a  result,  he  added,  the  su-­ perintendent  there  was  able  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;put  a   lot  of  focus  on  student  learning  out-­ comes,   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   able   to   support   princi-­ pals  in  instituting  best  practices  and   LQVWUXFWLRQ KHÂśV DEOH WR KDYH WKHP VKDUH DPRQJVW WKHPVHOYHV ZKDW those   best   practices   are,   and   how   GR \RX KDYH WKH JUHDWHVW LPSDFW LQ classroom   instruction   and   thereby   LPSURYHVWXGHQWOHDUQLQJRXWFRPHV´ )RU &ROH/HYHVTXH LQ &ODUHQGRQ FRQVROLGDWLRQZRXOGEULQJHIÂżFLHQF\ ZKLFK ZRXOG VHUYH QRW MXVW WKH WD[-­ payers,  but  also  the  students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  could  share  resources  more  eas-­ ily   and   I   could   focus   on   what   I   see   as   my   responsibilities,   which   are   HGXFDWLRQDO OHDGHUVKLS DQG LPSURY-­ ing  outcomes  for  students.  I  could  do   WKDWPRUHHIIHFWLYHO\LI,GLGQRWKDYH to   spend   my   time   getting   ready   for   the   next   board   meeting,â&#x20AC;?   said   Cole-­ /HYHVTXH ZKR VDLG KH DWWHQGV 

meetings  a  year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   getting   ready   for   the   next   board   meeting   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   time  you  could  be  spending  looking   at   how   well   kids   are   performing   in   classes  or  how  better  I  could  support   instructional   practices,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   see   from   a   systemic   standpoint   the   potential   to   be   better   educators   by   bringing   all   of   our   schools   under   a   single  district.â&#x20AC;? $V D VXSHUYLVRU\ XQLRQ 5XWODQG South   has   already   consolidated   its   WHFKQRORJ\ VXSSRUW VHUYLFHV DQG

RUTLAND  SOUTH SUPERINTENDENT DANA  COLE-­LEVESQUE

busing,  and   this   year   it   is   bringing   special  education  into  the  central  of-­ ÂżFH â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing   a   lot   of   centraliza-­ WLRQ EXW \HW ZH VWLOO KDYH WR JR RXW and  meet  with  each  board,  which  still   KDV MXULVGLFWLRQ RYHU LWV VFKRRO´ KH said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  takes  a  lot  of  time,  it  takes   a   lot   of   energy   and   it   takes   a   lot   of   resources  to  do  that.â&#x20AC;? Barone   in   Milton   agrees.   He   for-­ PHUO\ZRUNHGLQWKH%DUUH6XSHUYL-­ VRU\ 8QLRQ FHQWUDO RIÂżFH ZKHUH KH RYHUVDZ WKUHH VFKRRO GLVWULFWV WZR faculty  contracts,  three  school  boards   and  three  sets  of  policies.  The  system   PDGHLWGLIÂżFXOWWRVKDUHVWDIIYLVLRQ and  costs,  he  said. +DYLQJRQHVFKRROGLVWULFWIRUVHY-­ HUDO VFKRROV UDWKHU WKDQ VHYHUDO GLV-­ WULFWV ZRXOG VDYH WLPH DQG PRQH\ particularly   in   negotiating   contracts   for  teachers,  transportation  and  food   VHUYLFH%DURQHVDLG0DVVSXUFKDV-­ LQJFRXOGVDYHGROODUVWRRKHDGGHG CURBING  SPENDING 0DNH QR PLVWDNH DERXW LW VDY-­ ing   money   is   certainly   a   part   of   the   school  consolidation  debate. 2EVHUYHUV SRLQW RXW WKDW 9HUPRQW RYHU WKH ODVW  \HDUV KDV VHHQ GH-­ clining   enrollments   but   not   a   com-­ PHQVXUDWHGHFOLQHLQVWDIÂżQJRUHGX-­ (See  Spending,  Page  13A)

(Continued  from  Page  1A) passed,  reduce  by  the  year  2020  the   number   of   municipal   school   dis-­ tricts  from  282  to  45,  eliminate  the   VWDWHÂśV  VXSHUYLVRU\ XQLRQV DQG require   the   formation   of   regional   school   districts.   Each   of   those   ex-­ panded   districts   would   encompass   a   minimum   of   1,200   students   in   pre-­kindergarten   through   grade   12   and   at   least   four   municipal   dis-­ tricts,  and  would  operate  under  one   school  board. The  bill  has  been  proposed  in  or-­ GHU WR LPSURYH HGXFDWLRQDO HTXLW\ for   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   schoolchildren   and   SRVVLEO\VDYHPRQH\E\VWUHDPOLQ-­ LQJ RSHUDWLRQV FUHDWLQJ HIÂżFLHQ-­ cies   and   sharing   resources   within   the  larger  districts. 'LVWULFWVZRXOGKDYHXQWLO-XO\ 2016,  to  create  plans  outlining  con-­ solidation   to   create   an   expanded   GLVWULFW7KHYRWHUVRIHDFKGLVWULFW and   the   State   Board   of   Education   ZRXOGKDYHWRDSSURYHWKHFRQVROL-­ GDWLRQSODQVE\-XO\ School   districts   that   do   not   at   OHDVWKDYHDSODQVKRZLQJWKHLQWHQW WRFRQVROLGDWHE\WKHGHDGOLQH ZRXOGEHVXEMHFWWRVWDWHLQWHUYHQ-­ tion  by  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;design  teamâ&#x20AC;?  that  would   create   a   plan   for   that   district.   All   new,   consolidated   districts   would   EH XS DQG RSHUDWLRQDO E\ -XO\  2020. A   single   school   board   would   RYHUVHH WKH FRQVROLGDWHG PXOWL town   district,   rather   than   the   cur-­ rent   system   in   which   each   indi-­ YLGXDO WRZQ KDV D VFKRRO ERDUG (DFK VFKRRO ZRXOG KDYH DQ DGYL-­ sory   committee   that   would   work   ZLWKWKHWRZQUHSUHVHQWDWLYHWRWKH school  board. Vermont   has   the   lowest   student   to  school  board  member  ratio  in  the   nation:   One   school   board   member   IRUVWXGHQWV The  House  Committee  on  Educa-­ tion  OKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  H.883  on  March  21  and   it  was  referred  to  the  House  Com-­ mittee   on   Ways   and   Means   last   week. Also,  last  week,  the  State  Board   RI(GXFDWLRQYRWHGWRVXSSRUW H.883.


Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  13A

Spending (Continued  from  Page  12A) cational  costs. Vermont   Agency   of   Education   statistics   show   that   statewide   pub-­ lic  school  enrollment  was  94,623  in   ÂżVFDO \HDU  DQG  LQ ÂżV-­ FDO \HDU  ² D  SHUFHQW GURS Over   that   same   period   the   number   of   teachers   and   paraeducators   went   IURPWR$QGWKH1D-­ tional  Center  for  Educational  Statis-­ tics  shows  that  per-­pupil  spending  in   9HUPRQW URVH IURP  LQ ÂżVFDO \HDU  WR DQ HVWLPDWHG  LQÂżVFDO\HDU²DQSHUFHQW increase. Promoters   of   school   consolida-­ tion   say   that   if   cutting   the   number   of   districts   and   boards   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   cut   spending   on   education,   it   will   at   least   slow   or   halt   its   growth.   Rep.   Johannah   Donovan,   D-­Burlington,   IRULQVWDQFHKDVVDLGWKDW+ZLOO â&#x20AC;&#x153;bend  the  curve  in  education  spend-­ ing.â&#x20AC;? Âł1RRQHLVVD\LQJZHÂśUHJRLQJWR save  money  right  off  the  bat,  the  ef-­ ÂżFLHQFLHVZLOORQO\EHUHDOL]HGGRZQ the  road,â&#x20AC;?  Cole-­Levesque  said. He  pointed  to  an  example  in  Rut-­ land   South.   When   he   came   to   the   supervisory   union   four   years   ago,   school   buses   were   owned   by   indi-­ vidual   school   districts.   They   each   had  their  own  bus  replacement  fund,   did  their  own  maintenance  and  hired   their  own  drivers.  During  his  second   year  they  consolidated  the  buses  into   the  supervisory  union  and  as  a  result   upgraded  all  of  the  buses,  cut  down   on   maintenance   costs   and   consoli-­ date  some  routes. Three   years   in,   the   supervisory   union   is   spending   the   same   even   though  fuel  costs  have  doubled. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   dramatic   or   instanta-­ QHRXV EXW LWÂśV HIÂżFLHQF\´ &ROH Levesque  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  also  saves  boards   a   whole   lot   of   time   from   having   to   address  those  issues. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Systemic  improvement  improves   HIÂżFLHQF\ RI RSHUDWLRQV´ KH VDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;Over  time,  it  has  the  most  dramatic   potential   to   bend   the   cost   curve   to   better   match   education   spending   with   student   populations,   and   that   obviously  has  to  happen.â&#x20AC;? LOCAL  CONTROL But  consolidating  resources  across   schools  can  only  go  so  far,  some  su-­ perintendents   say.   And   doing   away   with  many  local  boards  that  can  sell   VFKRROEXGJHWVWRFLWL]HQVFRXOGEHD recipe  for  disaster. 5XWODQG1RUWKHDVW6XSHULQWHQGHQW John   Castle   in   Brandon   has   created   HIÂżFLHQFLHV DQG VDYHG PRQH\ E\ contracting   with   the   Abbey   Group   IRUIRRGVHUYLFHDWDOOVHYHQ51H68 schools,   and   by   consolidating   bus-­

NED  KIRSCH SUPERINTENDENT  OF   FRANKLIN  WEST LQJ +H VDLG DGPLQLVWUDWRUV 51H68 look   at   ways   to   save   money   and   streamline  services  every  year. 1HYHUWKHOHVV KH ZRXOGQÂśW ORRN forward  to  putting  a  single,  consoli-­ dated   budget   before   voters   in   the   seven   towns   in   the   union.   He   said   consolidating   all   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   bud-­ gets  into  one  would  result  in  a  spend-­ LQJSODQRIPLOOLRQJLYHRUWDNH â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   got   to   be   honest   with   you,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   QRWVXUH,ZDQWWRSXWDPLOOLRQ budget   forward   that   people   have   a   disconnection   to,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;With   FHQWUDOL]HG EXUHDXFUDFLHV WKHUH LV DW the   very   least   a   healthy   skepticism   of   us;Íž   and   the   potential   for   a   very   removed   public,   that   actually   could   create   a   level   of   distrust,   and   that   would  concern  me.â&#x20AC;? According   to   numbers   crunched   E\ WKH 51H68 %XVLQHVV 2IÂżFH EH-­ cause  of  the  shift  in  accounting  and   spending   under   a   consolidated   bud-­ get,   the   tax   rate   in   Brandon,   which   failed  on  Town  Meeting  Day,  would   actually  go  up.   Many   Vermonters   like   to   make   decisions  for  themselves  and  simply   trust  decisions  made  closer  to  home.   As  a  result,  school  consolidation  is  a   tough  sell  to  many. An  example  of  local  control  in  ac-­ tion  occurred  last  month  at  the  Whit-­ ing  annual  school  meeting,  where  all   WKH YRWLQJ ZDV GRQH IURP WKH Ă&#x20AC;RRU MXVW DV LW KDV IRU RYHU  \HDUV :KLWLQJ SRSXODWLRQ URXJKO\  serves  39  students  in  grades  kinder-­ garten-­6. When   discussion   at   the   March   4   meeting   turned   to   the   local   school  

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budget,  School   Board   Chair   Carol   Brigham   explained   that   the   federal   funds   used   to   pay   for   the   Whiting   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   preschool   program   dried   up.   The   school   board   debated   the   issue   and   decided   not   to   include   WKH  LQ WKH :KLWLQJ 6FKRRO budget   to   pay   for   the   program.   The   Whiting  preschoolers  could  go  to  the   1HVKREH 6FKRRO SUHVFKRRO SURJUDP in  Brandon. Instead,   the   Whiting   community   on   Town   Meeting   night   voted   from   WKH Ă&#x20AC;RRU WR DGG URXJKO\  WR the  budget  to  fund  the  preschool  pro-­ gram  themselves. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   perfect   example   of   local   control,â&#x20AC;?   Castle   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   I   could   see   some   people   say   that   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  wrong  with  our  system.   Should   decisions   about   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best   for   our   children   be   made   by   people   closest  to  our  children?â&#x20AC;? While  the  Vermont  School  Boards   Association  is  working  with  the  Leg-­ LVODWXUH WR FUDIW + VRPH ORFDO school  boards  are  already  set  against   it  because  members  say  they  will  lose   control   of   their   schools.   Last   week,   WKH 5XWODQG 1RUWKHDVW DQG 5XWODQG Addison   supervisory   union   boards   both   passed   resolutions   rejecting   + LQ SDUW EHFDXVH WKH\ VDLG LW pressures  small  schools  to  close. While   some   backers   of   school   consolidation   say   it   would   offer   a   greater   breadth   of   educational   op-­ tions   to   students   in   small   schools,   Castle  said  small  schools  already  of-­ fer   more   than   some   larger   schools.   For  example,  he  said,  in  the  realm  of   technology,   a   small   school   may   not   have  a  computer  lab,  but  will  have  a   one-­to-­one   technology   teaching   en-­ vironment   and   computers   for   each   student. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Some   of   our   small   schools   pro-­ vide   as   strong   if   not   better   learning   opportunities   at   times   than   large   schools,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Castle   said   often   what   small   schools  lack  in  resources,  they  make   up   for   in   making   connections   with   students  and  support  systems  within   the  school. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   value   thing   at   times,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone  may  value  language,   and  someone  else  may  want  more  so-­ cial  studies  time.â&#x20AC;? 6XSHULQWHQGHQW 1LFKROV LQ )UDQN-­ OLQ 1RUWKHDVW VDLG VFKRRO FRQVROL-­ dation   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   to   mean   small   schools  would  close. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   close   any   of   our   schools,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Instead,   he   suggested   that   small   schools   could   become   centers   for   certain  specialties. But   when   it   comes   to   consolida-­ tion   leading   to   fewer   board   mem-­

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FRANKLIN  NORTHEAST SUPERINTENDENT JAY  NICHOLS EHUV1LFKROVLVDOOIRULW+HSRLQWHG out   that   too   much   local   control   can   OHDG WR FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWV RI LQWHUHVW 2Q HY-­ ery  board  in  his  supervisory  union  at   least  one  board  member  is  related  to   a  school  employee.  With  larger  con-­ solidated  boards  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  less  likely  to   occur,  he  suggested. OTHER  DOWNSIDES Even   consolidation   advocates   acknowledge   that   changing   the   le-­ gal   ownership   of   school   buildings,   adding   infrastructure   and   merging   SROLFLHV ² QRW WR PHQWLRQ WHDFKHU FRQWUDFWV ² FRXOG EH D ORJLVWLFDO nightmare. And   given   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   geography,   with  rivers  and  mountains  that  isolate   some  communities,  Miltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Barone   said  consolidating  schools  would  not   work  everywhere.  It  might  not  be  in   studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  best  interest  to  shuttle  them   on  buses  to  a  central  school,  he  said,   and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  costly. And  a  central  school  would  mean   bigger   classes   for   some.   Research   VKRZVVPDOOHUFODVVVL]HVOHQGWKHP-­ selves   to   one-­on-­one   attention   and   better  results. Castle   observed   that   Vermont   is   going   through   a   socio-­cultural   change,   and   he   said   Vermonters  

must  balance   the   need   to   modern-­ L]HVWUHDPOLQHDQGVWD\FXUUHQWZLWK the   rush   of   technology   and   educa-­ tion  policies  while  staying  true  to  the   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  rural  roots. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  a  society  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  at  a  cross-­ roads,   and   I   think   Vermont   is   at   a   junction  between  being  a  rural  state   and   trying   to   operate   within   the   FRQWH[W RI WKH VW FHQWXU\ DQG WKH conventions   of   a   more   suburban-­ L]HG HQYLURQPHQW´ KH VDLG Âł:HÂśUH not  willing  to  accept  our  identity  as   a  rural  state  with  rural  communities.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  sense  that  we  need  to  mod-­ HUQL]HWKDWELJJHULVEHWWHU â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   identity,   the   town-­ ships,   the   rural   character,   has   per-­ sisted   a   sense   of   community   that   is   LGHQWLÂżHG ZLWK WKH ORFDO WRZQ PRUH so  than  with  other  states  in  our  coun-­ try,â&#x20AC;?   Castle   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   we   should  reject  that,  I  think  we  should   embrace  that.â&#x20AC;? 1LFKROVWDNHVDGLIIHUHQWWDFN â&#x20AC;&#x153;Local   control   is   very   important,   but  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  think  local  control  at  the   level   we   have   it   in   Vermont   makes   any  sense,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  need  to  re-­ GHÂżQHZKDWORFDOPHDQV´ 1LFKROVSRLQWHGRXWWKDWWKHUHDUH IHZHU WKDQ  VWXGHQWV SHU VFKRRO board  member  in  Vermont. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  got  to  get  away  from  this   barely   post-­Civil   War   structure   we   have  in  place,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Barone   likes   the   Rockwell   paint-­ ing   on   his   wall   in   Milton.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   comfortable   image   of   school   days   steeped  in  nostalgia.  But  he  sees  the   image   for   what   it   is   and   wonders   if   Vermont  schoolsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  fondness  for  small   classes   and   low   student-­teacher   ra-­ tios  is  sustainable. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   have   to   have   a   real  hard  look  at:  Can  the  taxpayers   of   the   state   of   Vermont   continue   to   ÂżQDQFLDOO\VXVWDLQWKRVHVPDOOVFKRRO districts?â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Note:   This   story   was   reported   by   Courtney   Lamdin   of   the   Milton   Independent,   Michelle   Monroe   of   the   St.   Albans   Mes-­ senger,   Polly   Lynn   of   the   Moun-­ tain  Times  and  Lee  J.  Kahrs  of  the   Brandon   Reporter,   and   edited   by   John   McCright   of   the   Addison   In-­ dependent.  Other  newspapers  with-­ in  the  group  are  the  Essex  Reporter   and  Colchester  Sun.

Brandon man  cited for  arson %5$1'21 ² 2Q 0RQGD\ evening   Vermont   State   Police   cited   Ethan   McArdle,   33,   of   %UDQGRQ IRU ÂżUVWGHJUHH DUVRQ and   reckless   endangerment.   Police   said   McArdle   started   a   ÂżUH DW KLV &DUYHU 6WUHHW KRPH in  Brandon  that  morning.   $W DSSUR[LPDWHO\  DP RQ0DUFKWKH%UDQGRQ)LUH Department  responded  to  a  re-­ SRUWHGÂżUHDW&DUYHU6W7KH Pittsford   Fire   Department   also   UHVSRQGHGWRWKHÂżUH8SRQDU-­ ULYDO ÂżUHÂżJKWHUV IRXQG KHDY\ ÂżUHRQWKHVHFRQGĂ&#x20AC;RRUDQGDG-­ GLWLRQDOÂżUHRQWKHÂżUVWĂ&#x20AC;RRU )LUHÂżJKWHUV VXFFHVVIXOO\ VXSSUHVVHG WKH ÂżUH DQG VXEVH-­ TXHQWO\ UHTXHVWHG D ÂżUH LQYHV-­ tigation   from   the   Department   of   Public   Safety.  This   was   the   VHFRQG ÂżUH DW WKLV ORFDWLRQ in   24   hours;Íž   there   had   been   a   VPDOO ÂżUH LQ WKH EDVHPHQW RQ Sunday.   The   VSP   accelerant   detec-­ tion  K-­9,  Biscuit,  was  brought   to  the  scene. Authorities   said   an   investi-­ gation   by   state   police,   Divi-­ sion   of   Fire   Safety   staff   and   the   Brandon   Fire   Department   UHYHDOHG WKDW 0RQGD\ÂśV ÂżUH ZDV ÂłDQ LQWHQWLRQDOO\ VHW ÂżUH and  not  related  to  the  previous   VPDOOEDVHPHQWÂżUHRIWKHSULRU day.â&#x20AC;? As   they   began   focusing   on   ZKR PLJKW KDYH VHW WKH ÂżUH detectives   that   evening   met   with   the   homeowners,   Ethan   and   Rebecca   McArdle.   Then   they   took   Ethan   McArdle   into   custody,   processed   him   at   the   Rutland   State   Police   barracks   and  released  him.  He  is  due  in   court   to   answer   the   charge   on   June  9.   Anyone   with   any   informa-­ WLRQ RQ WKLV ÂżUH LV DVNHG WR contact  Det.  Sgt.  Sutton  at  the   Vermont   State   Police   barracks   LQ5XWODQGDWRU the   Vermont  Arson   Tip  Award   3URJUDPDW$5621


PAGE  14A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

VUHS (Continued  from  Page  1A) dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   meeting,   VUHS   Co-­principal   Stephanie   Taylor   said   these   cuts   could   come   in   the   form   of   a   library   media  specialist  and  a  middle  school   transition   literacy   specialist,   but   did   QRW VSHDN VSHFLÂżFDOO\ DERXW ZKHUH WKHRWKHUOD\RIIVZRXOGFRPHIURP ,Q DQ LQWHUYLHZ :HGQHVGD\ 2Âś%ULHQ VDLG KH FRXOG QRW VD\ ZKR ZRXOGEHWDUJHWHGIRUOD\RIIVEHFDXVH administrators   are   still   evaluating   WKHLURSWLRQV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   moving   target,â&#x20AC;?   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien   VDLG Âł, GRQÂśW ZDQW WR VD\ DQG WKHQ KDYHLWEHGLIIHUHQW´

7KH GLVWULFW¶V FRQWUDFW ZLWK WHDFK-­ HUV PDQGDWHV WKDW$1Z68 E\$SULO PXVWHLWKHURIIHUQHZFRQWUDFWVRU send  reduction-­in-­force  letters  to  fac-­ XOW\2¶%ULHQDFNQRZOHGJHGWKDWWKH district  must  decide  on  cuts  to  faculty   E\WKDWGHDGOLQH The   board   also   unanimously   DJUHHG WR XVH WKH QHZ EXGJHW LI passed,  to  pay  off  all  of  the  debt  re-­ PDLQLQJ IURP WKH  ¿VFDO \HDU ZKLFK WRWDOV DURXQG  6FKRRORI¿FLDOVVDLGWKDWGHEWLVGXH to  much  higher  than  expected  special   HGXFDWLRQFRVWV But  despite  the  decrease  in  spend-­

LQJ $1Z68 EXVLQHVV PDQDJHU SURJUDPPLQJ EXW ZRXOG UHVXOW LQ D â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  colleague  said  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  get  rid   Kathy   Cannon   estimated   the   school   VOLJKWLQFUHDVHLQFODVVVL]HVVKHVDLG RI \RXU VHHG FRUQ´ .DPPDQ VDLG WD[UDWHLQFUHDVHXQGHUWKHQHZEXG-­ The   motion   the   board   adopted,   Âł7KRVH WKLQJV DUH WKH :DOGHQ SUR-­ JHW SURSRVDO WR EH  SHUFHQW ZKLFK ZDV PDGH E\ -HII *ODVVEHUJ JUDPWKDWÂśVPRQH\LQWKHEDQN´ over  last  yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  budget,   ZHQW EH\RQG WKH FXWV :HEEOH\VDLGWKH:DOGHQ3URMHFWLV GRZQ IURP DQ  Taylor   advocated   by   EHFRPLQJÂłPRUHOHDQDQGDJLOH´ percent   increase   in   the   ´2QFH\RXVWDUW PRUH WKDQ  5HVLGHQW.ULVWLQD0DF.XOLQXUJHG ÂżUVWSURSRVHGEXGJHW WRKDFNDZD\ for  the  total  reduction   WKHERDUGWRÂżQGDPLGGOHJURXQGRQ A   hike   in   the   state-­ at programs, it RI UHGXFLQJWKHGHÂżFLWDQGPDNLQJFXWV ZLGH SURSHUW\ WD[ UDWH 'XULQJ GHEDWH WRIDFXOW\DQGSURJUDPV QRZ H[SHFWHG WR EH  will be a death board   members   said   Âł2QFH \RX VWDUW WR KDFN DZD\ DW cents)   and   higher   per-­ VHQWHQFHIRUWKLV they   heard   from   con-­ SURJUDPVLWZLOOEHDGHDWKVHQWHQFH pupil   costs   because   of   school.â&#x20AC;? VWLWXHQWVWKDWORZHULQJ IRU WKLV VFKRRO´ 0DF.XOLQ VDLG the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   declining   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Resident the  property  tax  rate  is   Âł<RXU GHFLVLRQ WRGD\ ZLOO LPSDFW enrollment   are   increas-­ Kristina MacKulin DSDUDPRXQWFRQFHUQ VWXGHQWVDQGIXWXUHVWXGHQWV:KDWLV ing   the   rate,   as   is   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   tried   to   talk   JRLQJ WR EH KHUH LQ ÂżYH WR  \HDUV H[WUDGHEWORDG to  people,  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   for  the  elementary  school  students?â&#x20AC;? 7KH ERDUG LV DOVR QRZ ORRNLQJ DW more   interested   in   the   property   tax   3DUHQW /RX 0F/DUHQ ZKR KDV VWDUWLQJ D  FDSLWDO IXQG WR rate  than  anything  else,â&#x20AC;?  board  chair-­ WZR FKLOGUHQ LQ WKH GLVWULFW VDLG WKH help   pay   for   future   VUHS   mainte-­ PDQ.XUW+DLJLVVDLG school   has   improved   immeasurably   QDQFHQHHGVDSURSRVDOQDU-­ %RDUG PHPEHU /DXULH *XWRZVNL since   she   moved   to   the   district   13   URZO\ORVWRQ7RZQ0HHWLQJ'D\ said   that   educating   children   in   the   \HDUVDJR Âł7KHQHZSURSRVHGUDWHÂŤIRUÂżV-­ community  is  a  costly  but  necessary   Âł:KHQ,JRWKHUHWKHKLJKVFKRROÂśV FDO\HDULQFOXGHVWKHIXOOGHÂżFLW expense  that  saves  money  in  the  long   UHSXWDWLRQ ZDVQÂśW WKDW VWURQJ´ a  reduced  capital  improvement  fund   UXQ ZKHQ ZHOOHGXFDWHG VWXGHQWV 0F/DUHQ VDLG Âł2YHU WKH ODVW  DSSURSULDWLRQRIDQGXWLOL]HV FRQWULEXWH WR VRFLHW\ DV DGXOWV 6KH \HDUV ,ÂśYH ZDWFKHG WKH KLJK VFKRRO DEDVHUDWHRI´&DQQRQZURWH ZDV WKH RQO\ ERDUG PHPEHU WR YRWH LPSURYH´ LQDQHPDLO DJDLQVWWKHQHZEXGJHW 0F/DUHQ VDLG VKH BUDGET  DISCUSSION SURSRVDO ZRXOG FRQVLGHU PRY-­ 'R]HQVRIIDFXOW\DQGFRPPXQLW\ â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   put   money   in   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re asking LQJWRDGLIIHUHQWWRZQ PHPEHUVZHUHRQKDQGDW0RQGD\ÂśV the   front   end,   and   get   us (teachers) LI  LQ FXWV PHHWLQJ DW 98+6 WR ZHLJK LQ RQ it  out  on  the  back  end,â&#x20AC;?   WRWKURZĂ&#x20AC;YHRI ZHUHPDGH ZKDWWKHQHZEXGJHWSURSRVDOVKRXOG *XWRZVNL VDLG Âł,I ZH Âł7KDWÂśVZKHQ,ORRN ORRNOLNH'HEDWHZKLFKZDVDWWLPHV HGXFDWHWKHPZHOOWKH\ our colleagues to  take  my  kid  to  CVU   WHQVHVWUHWFKHGIRUQHDUO\WZRDQGD arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   going   to   be   on   under the bus to RUWROHDYH´0F/DUHQ half  hours  before  board  members  ad-­ ZHOIDUH WKH\ÂśUH JRLQJ cut what weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re VDLGÂł,GRQÂśWIHHOOLNH RSWHGWKHQHZEXGJHWSURSRVDO WREHWKHEXVLQHVVRZQ-­ ZH VKRXOG EH FXWWLQJ doing here to At   the   beginning   of   the   meeting,   HUV´ to   the   bone   for   a   sin-­ &DQQRQ GLVWULEXWHG WZR VKHHWV RI *ODVVEHUJ FDXWLRQHG make our jobs JOHGLJLW WD[ LQFUHDVH SDSHU WKDW GHWDLOHG KRZ D QXPEHU against   not   addressing   harder.â&#x20AC;? ,W ZLOO FRPH EDFN WR RIVFHQDULRVIURP]HURFXWVWRVRPH the   outstanding   debt   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; VUHS teacher KDXQWXV´  LQ FXWV ZRXOG DIIHFW SHU IURP  LQ WKH QHZ Teacher   Beth   Ad-­ 6WHYH2U]HFK pupil   spending   and   the   school   tax   budget,   noting   that   the   UHRQ ZKR DOVR KDV D UDWH school   anticipates   an   child   in   the   district,   &RSULQFLSDO(G:HEEOH\VDLGWKDW DGGLWLRQDO GHÂżFLW RI  DW WKH H[SUHVVHGDVLPLODUVHQWLPHQW making   the   most   severe   cuts   being   HQGRIWKHFXUUHQWÂżVFDO\HDU Âł0\ KXVEDQG DQG , PDGH D FRQ-­ GLVFXVVHGZKLFKZRXOGFXWWKHEXG-­ Âł,IZHUROOKDOIRILWIRUZDUGQH[W scious   effort   to   move   to   this   district   JHWE\DQGUHGXFHWKHHVWL-­ \HDUZKHQZHVLWGRZQWRGRWKLVH[-­ so  my  daughter  could  go  here,â&#x20AC;?  Ad-­ PDWHG WD[ UDWH LQFUHDVH WR  SHU-­ HUFLVH ZHÂśOO EH ORRNLQJ DW D GHÂżFLW UHRQVDLGÂł,PLJKWKDYHWRVHQGKHU FHQWZRXOGEHGHYDVWDWLQJ LQ H[FHVV RI ´ *ODVVEHUJ VRPHZKHUHHOVH´ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   like   to   point   out   that   the   VDLG Âł$OO ZHÂśOO GR LV SXVK WKH SDLQ :HEEOH\VDLGLQWKHQLQH\HDUVKH  FXWV DUH GUDFRQLDQ 7KDW IRUZDUG´ KDVZRUNHGLQWKHGLVWULFWWKHVFKRRO FXWVWKHKHDUWRXWRIZKDWZHFDQGR´ Community   member   Tim   Buskey   has  eliminated  staff  positions  in  tune   :HEEOH\ VDLG Âł:HÂśOO EH VHYHUHO\ VDLGKHDJUHHGZLWK*ODVVEHUJ ZLWK HQUROOPHQW GHFOLQH ([FHV-­ handicapped  in  carrying  out  our  (ed-­ Âł:H QHHG WR UHWLUH WKH GHÂżFLW´ VLYHFXWVKHZDUQHGZRXOGKXUWWKH ucational   improvement   plans),   and   %XVNH\ VDLG Âł:H KDYH D ORRPLQJ VFKRROLQWKHIXWXUH ZHÂśOOEHFXWWLQJGUDVWLFDOO\LQWRFRP-­ GHÂżFLWQH[W\HDUDQGZHQHHGWRUH-­ â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;FAULTY  METRICSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; munity  employment  and  the  commu-­ WLUHWKLVWKLQJ´ Âł,I\RXGLGJUDSKZRUNRQWKDWWKH QLW\OLDLVRQ´ The   board   and   community   mem-­ number  of  faculty  cuts  is  outstripping   Taylor   discussed   a   budget   cut   of   EHUV EULHĂ&#x20AC;\ GLVFXVVHG PDNLQJ FXWV VWXGHQW GHFOLQH´ :HEEOH\ VDLG Âł,I ZKLFKZRXOGHOLPLQDWH WRWKH:DOGHQ3URMHFWEXWPDQ\VDLG \RXFXWWKHZKROHHQFKLODGD\RXÂśUH IXOOWLPH HTXLYDOHQW SRVLWLRQV 7KDW the  program  is  too  valuable  an  asset   doing  it  based  on  faulty  metrics,  and   EXGJHWZRXOGQRWUHGXFHDQ\VFKRRO WRWKHVFKRROWRHOLPLQDWH youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   probably   going   to   be   hurting  

RXUNLGVDQGRXUSURJUDPV´ :HEEOH\VSRNHRQHÂżQDOWLPHEH-­ fore  the  board  voted  on  a  motion  to   VXSSRUW WKH PRUH WKDQ  LQ FXWV+HDUJXHGWKDWWKHVFKRROERDUG administration   and   community   need   WRIXQGDPHQWDOO\DOWHUKRZWKH\GLV-­ cuss  school  budgets,  as  simply  mak-­ ing   decisions   based   on   the   student-­ WHDFKHUUDWLRLVDQWLTXDWHG Âł:HÂśOO ORVH HYHU\ EXGJHW WKH QH[W \HDUVLIZHGRQÂśWFKDQJHWKHODQ-­ JXDJH DERXW VFKRRO EXGJHWV´ :HE-­ EOH\ VDLG Âł,I ZH FRQWLQXH WR WDON about  funding  schools  based  on  stu-­ GHQWWHDFKHUUDWLRVDORQHZHDUHVSL-­ UDOLQJWRZDUGVEHLQJREVROHWH´ :HEEOH\ VDLG WKH JRYHUQRU DQG Legislature  have  failed  to  adequately   fund  education  needs  in  the  state,  and   WKDWLWZLOOEHGLIÂżFXOWIRU98+6WR DFFRPSOLVKLWVHGXFDWLRQDOJRDOVZLWK IHZHUWHDFKHUVQH[W\HDU Âł,WÂśVJRLQJWREHDORWKDUGHUZLWK-­ RXWWKRVHÂżYHSHRSOH´:HEEOH\VDLG Âł, MXVW ZDQW WR PDNH D FRPPLWPHQW WRUHHGXFDWHWKHSXEOLFRQZKDWZH NQRZQRZEHFDXVHLWLVQRWKLQJFORVH WRKRZZHHGXFDWHGLQWKHV´ After  approving  the  motion,  board   members  said  it  is  important  to  artic-­ XODWHWRYRWHUVWKDWWKHQHZSURSRVHG budget   is   the   best   possible   plan   for   IXQGLQJWKHVFKRROQH[W\HDU Âł:KDWHYHU ZH DJUHH WR LQ WKLV URRPZHKDYHWRVSUHDGWKHZRUG´ +DLJLVVDLGÂł,WKLQNWKHFRPSURPLVH ZHFRPHWRKDVWREHGLVVHPLQDWHGWR HYHU\RQH´ Haigis   declined   to   comment   for   this   story,   and   referred   all   questions   WR2Âś%ULHQ Kamman  said  the  board  must  dem-­ onstrate  to  the  public  that  the  budget   process  has  been  an  open  and  delib-­ HUDWLYHRQH Âł,I FLWL]HQV VHH D IRUWKULJKW HIIRUW WR FXW WKH GHÂżFLW WUDQVSDUHQF\ DQG a  forthright  effort  to  account  for  de-­ clining   enrollment,   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   reason-­ DEOH DVN RI WKH FLWL]HQV´ .DPPDQ VDLG *ODVVEHUJVDLGWKHERDUGQHHGVWR EHFDXWLRXVZLWKWKHUKHWRULFLWXVHV WRVHOOWKHEXGJHWWRWKHSXEOLF â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   a   member   serving   KHUH ZKR KDV DQ LQWHUHVW LQ GHQL-­ JUDWLQJ WKH TXDOLW\ RI ZKDW JRHV on   here,   or   the   reputation   of   the   VFKRRO´ *ODVVEHUJ VDLG Âł:H KDYH to  be  careful  about  the  language  that   LVXVHGVRZHDUHQRWRXURZQZRUVW HQHP\´

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Addison Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  —  PAGE  15A


PAGE  16A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

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Health  Matters

Caffeine: It is the new buzzword

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Time  was,   a   person   looking   for   a  caffeine  buzz  headed  for  a  cup  of   coffee   or   can   of   soda.   These   days,   all   kinds   of   things   are   being   caf-­ feinated.   There   are   drinks   such   as   Monster   energy   drink,   concentrat-­ ed   drinks,   such   as   5-­hour   Energy   Shot,  and  even  inhalable  caffeinated   products,   such   as   AeroShot.   Frito-­ Lay,  the  makers  of  that  caramelized   popcorn  with  the  toy  inside,  Cracker   Jacks,   recently   released   a   new   line   of  caffeinated  snacks,  called  Crack-­ er  Jackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d.  A  popular  product  in  this   line   is   Perky   Jerky,   a   caffeinated   beef  jerky.   Is   there   really   a   need   for   these   products  by  our  body?  The  answer  is   no.  Caffeine  is  a  stimulant  drug  with   an   addictive   quality   that   can   vary   greatly  among  people  based  upon  ge-­

ĹŻĹŻWĹ˝Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;,Ĺ˝Ć?Ć&#x2030;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹŻWĆ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć? throughout  Addison  County  and  Brandon  are EĹ˝Ç Ä?Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x;ĹśĹ?EÄ&#x17E;Ç WÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ć?Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; dĹ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć?Ä&#x17E;>Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹ˝Ç Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;KÄŤÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?EÄ&#x17E;Ç Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ç&#x2020;Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;,ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć?Í&#x2DC; dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä¨Ĺ˝ĹŻĹŻĹ˝Ç Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ć?ĹśĹ˝Ç ŽčÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹŻÇ&#x2021;žŽĆ&#x152;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ? ŽĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ĺ&#x161;ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć?ĨŽĆ&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä?ŽŜÇ&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;ŽĨŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ć?Íś

Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĹŻĨŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ĺ?ĹśĆ&#x161;ĹľÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Í&#x2DC; Addison  Family  Medicine  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  388.7185 DŽŜÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;dĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ&#x161;ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć?ƾŜĆ&#x;ĹŻĎ´Í&#x2014;ĎŹĎŹĆ&#x2030;Í&#x2DC;ĹľÍ&#x2DC;

Bristol  Internal  Medicine  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  453.7422

netic  differences.  In  addi-­ tion  to  being  a  stimulant,   caffeine  blocks  a  chemi-­ cal   that   helps   calm   the   brain.   When   this   chemical   is   blocked,   stress   hormones   in-­ crease.   Increased   stress   hormones   can   increase   insulin   resistance   and   fat   storage,   suggest-­ ing   a   link   to   obesity   and  diabetes.  Caffeine   also   increases   water   loss   from   the   body,   increasing   risk   for   de-­ hydration.   Sleep   depri-­ vation   is   also   linked   to   caffeine   use   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   we  all  always  looking  for   more  sleep?   These  caffeinated  products   create   the   need   for   more   caffeine,   HQVXULQJ D TXLWH SURÂżWDEOH GHPDQG curve   for   manufacturers.   Unfortu-­ nately,  this  â&#x20AC;&#x153;needâ&#x20AC;?  for  a  buzz  is  be-­ ing  created  in  younger  and  younger   children.   According   to   the   Journal   of   Pediatrics,   at   least   75   percent   of   children   surveyed   consumed   caf-­ feine   on   a   daily   basis.   Researchers  

at  the   University   of   Buffalo   have   been  studying  the  effects  of  caffeine   on   adolescents   and   their   studies   have  shown  that  teens,  particu-­ larly  teenage  boys,  can  quickly   become   â&#x20AC;&#x153;addictedâ&#x20AC;?   to   caffeine   even  after  being  exposed  to  it  for   a   short   period   of   time.   They   have   found   that   it   was   not   the   marketing  or  taste  of  caf-­ feinated   products   that   drew   teen-­ agers  in  but  the   caffeine   itself.   Once   exposed   to   caffeine,   re-­ searchers   found   that   teens   were   some-­ times  so  motivated  to  get   more   that   they   resorted   to   behaviors  including  lying  and   stealing.   The   Food   and   Drug   Administra-­ tion   does   not   require   the   caffeine   content   to   be   stated   on   the   pack-­ age,   raising   concern   about   the   total   amount  of  caffeine  being  consumed   daily,  particularly  with  the  new  surge   in  caffeine-­containing  food  products.   Consumers,  particularly  children,  are   often  unaware  of  how  much  caffeine  

Way to Go! Commuter Challenge set May 12 MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   seventh   annual  weeklong  Way  to  Go!  Com-­ muter  Challenge  will  kick  off  Mon-­ GD\ 0D\  %XVLQHVVHV DQG LQGL-­ vidual   commuters   can   sign   up   now   at  www.waytogovt.org  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;curb  their   carbonâ&#x20AC;?  for  one  week  to  save  money   and  reduce  air  pollution. ACTR   is   partnering   with   the   statewide  Way  to  Go!  event  to  raise   awareness   of   transportation   options   among   commuters   by   encouraging  

them  to   travel   in   ways   other   than   driving  alone.  Participants  pledge  to   take  the  bus,  bike,  walk,  rideshare  or   telecommute  during  the  week  of  the   challenge.   Prizes   will   be   awarded,   LQFOXGLQJJLIWFHUWLÂżFDWHVWRDUHVWDX-­ rant  of  their  choice,  iPads  and  iPods,   transit   passes   and   more.   Businesses   with   the   most   behavior   change   for   the  week  will  be  rewarded  with  pres-­ tigious  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Carbon  Cupâ&#x20AC;?  trophies. To   make   it   more   fun,   businesses,  

DĹ˝Ć?Ć&#x161;dĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;tÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ć?ƾŜĆ&#x;ĹŻĎłÍ&#x2014;ĎŹĎŹĆ&#x2030;Í&#x2DC;ĹľÍ&#x2DC; Î&#x2DC;dĹ&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ć?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;žŽĆ&#x152;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ć?Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?Ĺ?ŜŜĹ?ĹśĹ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĎłÍ&#x2014;ĎŹĎŹÄ&#x201A;Í&#x2DC;ĹľÍ&#x2DC;

Porter  Internal  Medicine  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  388.8805 DĹ˝Ć&#x152;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ĺ?ĹśĆ&#x161;ĹľÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ć?Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?Ĺ?ŜŜĹ?ĹśĹ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĎłÍ&#x2014;ĎŹĎŹÄ&#x201A;Í&#x2DC;ĹľÍ&#x2DC;

Tapestry  Midwifery  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  877.0022

APRIL  Choices    bring   Summer    R ESULTS

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Middlebury  Pediatric  and  Adolescent  Medicine  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  388.7959

Join  our  April  Choices  Wellness  Program   and  start  healthy  habits  that  will  make  you   feel  GREAT  t   his  summer.

Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ&#x161;ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć?Í&#x2014;DŽŜÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ƾŜĆ&#x;ĹŻĎ´Ć&#x2030;Í&#x2DC;ĹľÍ&#x2DC;Í&#x2013;tÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Î&#x2DC;dĹ&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ć?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;ƾŜĆ&#x;ĹŻĎ´Í&#x2014;ĎŻĎŹĆ&#x2030;Í&#x2DC;ĹľÍ&#x2DC;

>Ĺ?ĆŠĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x2021;&Ä&#x201A;ĹľĹ?ĹŻÇ&#x2021;WĆ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x;Ä?Ä&#x17E;Í´ϴϳϳÍ&#x2DC;ϯϰϲϲ  DŽŜÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ&#x161;ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć?ƾŜĆ&#x;ĹŻϲÍ&#x2014;ĎŻĎŹĆ&#x2030;Í&#x2DC;ĹľÍ&#x2DC;

Í&#x2122;Í&#x161;ÇŚÂ&#x2122;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â?Â&#x2019;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2030;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â?Â&#x2122;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2013;Â&#x160;Í&#x17E;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2026;Â&#x192;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â? Goal  Setting,  Nutrition,  Exercise,  and  Consistency.

Â?Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;ÇŁÂ&#x2039;Â? Â&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201E;Â&#x2022;ÇĄÂ&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;ƤÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x201D;Â&#x192;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D; ĆŹÂ&#x2021;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;ÇĄÂ&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â?Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2022; 12  Week  Membership;  

Â&#x201D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2018;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2020;Â?Â&#x2021;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2020;Â&#x192;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2022;Í&#x;ÇŚÍ&#x;ÇŁÍ&#x153;Í?Â&#x2019;Â?Ǥ Č&#x2039;Â&#x2019;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x17D;ÍĄÇĄÍ&#x2122;Í&#x17E;ÇĄÍ&#x161;Í&#x203A;ÇĄÍ&#x203A;Í&#x2DC;ÇĄÂ&#x192;Â&#x203A;Í&#x;ÇĄÍ&#x2122;Í&#x153;Č&#x152; Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;ÇŁÍ&#x2020;Í&#x2122;ÍĄÍĄČ&#x20AC;Â&#x2019;Â&#x2021;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2018;Â?

Neshobe  Family  Medicine  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  247.3755  DŽŜÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;tÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĹ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ&#x161;ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć?Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x;ĹśĹ?Ĺ?Ĺś^Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹľÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2DC;

Â&#x192;Â&#x17D;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2019;Â&#x201E;Â&#x203A;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;ƤÂ?Â&#x2020;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2014;Â&#x2013;Â?Â&#x2018;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Ǩ Â

Check  Out  the  Class  Schedule at  edgevtwellness.com

www.PorterMedicalCenter.org

Í&#x2122;Í&#x153;Â&#x2026;Â&#x160;Â&#x2018;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Â&#x2013;Â&#x201D;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;Â&#x2013;ÇĄÂ&#x201D;Â&#x2039;Â&#x2022;Â&#x2013;Â&#x2018;Â&#x17D;Č&#x2C6;Í&#x153;Í?Í&#x203A;ÇŚÍ?Í&#x161;Í&#x2DC;Í?

A Tradition of Caring Combined with State-of-the-Art Medical Services PROVIDING COMPLETE CARE FOR WOMEN AT ALL STAGES OF LIFE. At Addison Associates in Obstetrics and Gynecology, Doctors James Malcolm & Alan Ayer have provided sound and sensitive, patient-centered care for more than thirty years. The entire team, which now includes Doctors Anna Benvenuto, Katherine Wagner and David Turner, continues to foster that proud tradition, combining empathetic care with optimal, state-of-the-art gynecological and surgical treatments.

GYNECOLOGY

Compassionate care with a commitment to excellence Â&#x2021;Wellness exams, preventive screenings & contraceptive management Â&#x2021;Menstrual problems, individualized treatment of gynecologic disorders Â&#x2021;Infertility evaluation & treatment, Pelvic Ultrasounds Â&#x2021;STD screening and treatment, Management of abnormal Pap smears Â&#x2021;Incontinence & pelvic organ prolapse, menopause & aging

SURGERY

State-of-the-art care and minimally invasive surgical techniques Â&#x2021;Laparoscopy for endometriosis, ovarian cysts, sterilization Â&#x2021;Hysterectomy & pelvic reconstruction Â&#x2021;Hysteroscopy & endometrial ablation Â&#x2021;Vulvar, vaginal and hymeneal procedures Â&#x2021;TVT urethral sling

Meet our providers. Each doctor is certified by the American Board of OB/GYN. Additionally, Dr. Turner is certified by American Board of Family Medicine.

For more information about the practice and individual doctors, please visit the website at: addisonob-gyn.org Dr. Alan D. Ayer, MD UVM College of Medicine

James A. Malcolm, III, MD University of Virginia College of Medicine

Anna Bevenuto, MD UVM College of Medicine

they  are  ingesting.  Consider  the  caf-­ feine  (in  mg)  in  these  few  products: Â&#x2021;  R] 126 +LJK 3HUIRUPDQFH Energy  Drink:  357  mg Â&#x2021;  R] 0RQVWHU (QHUJ\ 'ULQN PJ Â&#x2021;  R] 6WDUEXFNV )UDSSXFFLQR PJ Â&#x2021; R]FRIIHHPJ Â&#x2021; R]$PSHQHUJ\GULQNPJ Â&#x2021; R]0RXQWDLQ'HZPJ Â&#x2021; R]6QDSSOH SHDFK PJ Â&#x2021; R]&RFD&RODPJ Â&#x2021; R]KRWFRFRDPJ Talk   to   your   kids   about   caffeine.   Teach   them   that   it   is   a   drug   with   an  addictive  effect.  If  nothing  else,   talk  to  your  teens  about  the  dangers   of   drinking   caffeinated   alcoholic   drinks,   products   which   have   re-­ sulted  in  numerous  hospitalizations.   And,  while  talking  about  all  this,  try   not   to   do   so   while   snuggling   with   your  own  cup  of  Starbucks. Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   note:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Health   Mattersâ&#x20AC;?   is   a   series   of   community   education   articles   contributed   by   members   of   the   Porter   Medical   Center   profes-­ sional/clinical  staff  on  health  topics   of   general   interest   to   our   commu-­ nity.

Katherine Wagner, MD, FACOG UVM College of Medicine

3RUWHU'ULYHÂ&#x2021;0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;

David Turner, MD Dartmouth Medical School & Brown University School of Medicine

schools  and   other   organizations   can   sign  up  to  compete  with  each  other  in   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;throw   downâ&#x20AC;?   mini-­contest   to   get   FRPSHWLWLYHMXLFHVĂ&#x20AC;RZLQJ ACTR   is   offering   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fare-­Free   Fri-­ GD\´RQ0D\DQGRQFHDJDLQZLOO donate  all  fares  during  Way  to  Go!  to   the  United  Way  of  Addison  County. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Each   year   the   Way   to   Go!   Com-­ muter  Challenge  gives  us  an  excuse  to   remind   folks   to   try   something   new,â&#x20AC;?   1DGLQH %DUQLFOH FRPPXQLW\ UHOD-­ tions   manager   of  ACTR,   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   year  people  can  also  sign  up  for  Way   WR*RDW$&251ÂśV6XVWDLQDEOH/LY-­ LQJ([SRDW0LGGOHEXU\8QLRQ+LJK 6FKRRO6DWXUGD\0DUFK´ ACTR   is   a   sustaining   sponsor   of   the  Expo  and  will  be  hosting  a  work-­ shop   at   the   event   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Curbing   carbon,   one   ride   at   a   time.â&#x20AC;?  Way   to   *RRIÂżFLDOVDQG$&75ZLOOKDYHWD-­ bles  at  the  event  with  more  informa-­ tion  on  Way  to  Go!,  Smart  Commute   programs   and   alternative   commute   options. For   more   information   on   curbing   carbon,  go  to  actr-­vt.orgRUFDOO $&75  

State reports first case of swine disease 02173(/,(5 ² 7KH 9HUPRQW Agency  of   Agriculture,   Food,   and   0DUNHWV 9$$)0  LV UHSRUWLQJ WKH ÂżUVW FDVH RI SRUFLQH HSLGHPLF GLDU-­ rhea   virus   (PEDv)   in   the   state.   The   positive   diagnosis   occurred   on   a   swine   operation   in   Rutland   County   RQ0DUFK PEDv  is  a  coronavirus  that  affects   pigs   only   and   is   similar   to   trans-­ missible   gastroenteritis.   It   does   not   make  people  sick  and  it  does  not  af-­ fect  other  species  of  livestock.  PEDv   does  not  affect  pork  safety  and  pork   remains  completely  safe  to  eat. 7KHÂżUVWGHWHFWLRQRIWKLVGLVHDVH in  the  U.S.  occurred  approximately   one  year  ago,  and  since  then  it  has   LPSDFWHGRYHUSUHPLVHVLQ VWDWHV7KH9HUPRQWFDVHUHSUHVHQWV WKHÂżUVWFRQÂżUPHGSRVLWLYHSUHPLV-­ HV LQ 9HUPRQW 7KH PRVW FRPPRQ sign   of   PEDv   in   swine   is   severe   diarrhea,   and   mortality   rates   in   SUHZHDQLQJ SLJOHWV DSSURDFK  percent.   Older   animals   generally   survive   the   infection   but   can   shed   the  virus  in  their  feces  and  through   their   respiratory   tracts   for   an   ex-­ tended  period.   6WDWH 9HWHULQDULDQ .ULVWLQ +DDV LV encouraging   swine   farmers   to   insti-­ tute   strict   disease   prevention   mea-­ sures  to  cut  down  risk  of  introducing   the  disease  to  their  herds.  She  recom-­ mends   that   producers   take   a   proac-­ tive  stance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Farmers  should  take  steps  to  min-­ imize  the  chance  of  introducing  PED   YLUXV LQWR WKHLU KHUGV´ VWDWHG +DDV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Swine   owners   should   consult   with   their  veterinarians  to  develop  disease   prevention   plans   tailored   to   their   swine  herd  needs.â&#x20AC;? Swine   producers   are   encouraged   to   monitor   for   information   com-­ ing   from   national   industry   groups   such  as  the  American  Association  of   6ZLQH9HWHULQDULDQV $$69 DQGWKH 1DWLRQDO 3RUN %RDUG 13%  0RUH information   on   disease   prevention   and   other   facts   about   PEDv   can   be   found   online   at   www.pork.org/Re-­ VHDUFK3('95HVRXUFHVDVS[ or  www.aasv.org. As  always,  producers  who  see  any   signs   of   illness   in   their   pigs   should   notify  their  herd  veterinarian  imme-­ diately  to  address  the  issue.


Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  17A

Mt.  Abe  art show  opens at  Walkover

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Much  Adoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; TWO  ADDISON   COUNTY   youngsters   will   perform   in   the   Vermont   Commons   Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   production   of   William  Shakespeareâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Much  Ado  About  Nothingâ&#x20AC;?  on  Friday,  April  4,  and  Saturday,  April  5,  at  7  p.m.  in   the  Contois  Auditorium  in  Burlingtonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  City  Hall.  Fiona  Oldham  of  Lincoln  and  Galen  Fastie  of  Ripton  are   both  students  at  Vermont  Commons  in  South  Burlington.

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Enemyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; will leave you full of wonder Enemy;Íž  Running   time:   1:30;Íž   Rat-­ LQJO\VORZMRXUQH\WRÂżQGKLP7KDW would   be   Anthony,   a   bit   part   actor   ing:  R   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enemyâ&#x20AC;?   is   a   movie   that   aspires   who  lives  with  Helen  (Sarah  Gadon). If  that  sounds  interesting,  trust  me,   to  art.  Many  critics,  as  quick  to  praise   the  unintelligible  as  they  are  to  dump   the  audience  is  given  no  clues  to  pon-­ der  during  the  dull  process   on   the   obvious,   love   this   of   two   men   engaged   in   a   movie.   They   anoint   direc-­ wordless   dance   of   shock   tor   Denis   Villeneuve   as   a   at  their  joint  identity  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  all   brilliant   independent   (â&#x20AC;&#x153;In-­ this  in  semi-­darkness  to  an   cendies,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Prisonersâ&#x20AC;?)   and   ominous  soundtrack.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Turn   compare   his   fashionable   on   the   lights,   pull   up   the   discomfort   to   that   given   shades!â&#x20AC;?   is   what   we   want   us  so  generously  by  David   to  howl,  but  no,  they  stare   Lynch   and   Roman   Polan-­ endlessly  in  the  meaningful   ski.   They   call   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Enemyâ&#x20AC;?   a   dark.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;mindbenderâ&#x20AC;?  and  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;study   Our  impatience  is  eroded   in   psychosexualityâ&#x20AC;?   while   further   by   the   confusion   passing   conveniently   over   of   a   cast   that   consists   of   the  fact  that  it  is  dishonest.   By Joan Ellis one   man   playing   two,   and   But   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   ahead   of   myself.   two   tall   beautiful   blondes   Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  start  at  the  beginning   ZKRDUHGLVWLQJXLVKDEOHDVWKH\Ă&#x20AC;RDW and  work  up  to  the  dishonest. 7KH ÂżOP RSHQV ZLWK VFHQHV RI through   the   menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lives   only   by   the   stone-­faced   men   arriving   at   a   mem-­ pregnancy  of  one  of  them.  We  are  re-­ bers-­only   underground   club   where   GXFHGWRWU\LQJWRÂżJXUHRXWZKHWKHU they  ogle  a  parade  of  women  and  spi-­ we   are   watching   Adam   or   Anthony   ders.  The  spiders,  we  expect,  will  be   according  to  the  clothes  each  is  wear-­ ing  at  the  moment  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Adam  in  profes-­ RIVLJQLÂżFDQWV\PEROLFLPSRUWDQFH Without   explanation,   the   camera   sorial  tweed,  Anthony  in  motorcycle   jumps   to  Adam   (Jake   Gyllenhaal),   a   garb.  When  they  decide  to  trade  iden-­ withdrawn   college   professor   whose   tities   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   clothes   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   return   dullness   deadens   his   students   into   each  to  the  otherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  woman,  I  gave  up.   Normally,   it   would   be   a   compli-­ glassy-­eyed   stillness.   Adam   goes   home  to  Mary  (MĂŠlanie  Laurent).  Af-­ ment   to   say   that   Jake   Gyllenhaal   ter  spotting  his  clone  while  watching   plays   Adam/Anthony   with   subtle   a   movie,   he   embarks   on   an   agoniz-­ changes   of   expression,   but   just   try  

Movie Review

watching  two   guys   move   slowly   through   prolonged   silence   that   promises   much   and   produces   noth-­ ing.  And   that   is   the   dishonesty.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   at  this  point  that  we  are  supposed  to   admit  that  our  need  to  understand  is   a  prosaic  reaction  to  art.  But  there  I   go  being  ordinary  again.   Any   three   people   will   give   three   different  versions  of  what  this  movie   is  about.  Is  it,  as  Adamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mother  (Isa-­ bella  Rossellini,  in  a  far  too  brief  ap-­ pearance)   suggests,   simply   her   sonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   twisted  fantasy,  his  futile  desire  to  be   an  actor  instead  of  a  teacher?  Or  is  it   that   artistically   creative   mind-­bend-­ ing  study  of  psychosexuality  hinted  at   LQWKDWÂżUVWVH[FOXEVFHQH",I\RXVHH this  movie,  and  I  would  suggest  you   not,  ask  yourself  if  you  got  a  square   GHDOIURPWKHÂżOPPDNHUV

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Theaterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  esteemed  education  direc-­ tor. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Haley   Rice   is   new   to   THT   and   she  brings  a  lot  of  fresh  ideas,â&#x20AC;?  says   Anderson.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   all   wondering   what   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   gotten   ourselves   into,   but  given  the  talent  that  Haleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lined   up  I  have  a  feeling  this  will  be  a  ter-­ ULÂżFHYHQLQJLQWKHWKHDWHU´ Tickets   are   $10   and   may   be   pur-­ chased   at   www.townhalltheater. org,  802  382-­9222,  at  the  THT  Box   2IÂżFH 0RQGD\6DWXUGD\ QRRQ p.m.)  and  at  the  door.

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Cindy Pierceâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s rollicking one-woman comedy show. A Benefit for the Addison County Parent-Child Center

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TOWN HALL THEATER Middlebury, Vermont seeks a1pm

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Technical director/ facilities manager

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Applicants for this full-time, year round position should have the ability to maintain and operate all theatrical The most James Levine systems (lighting, sound, projection), and have experience with set performed directs a construction. Other responsibilities include: facilitateopera load-ins, runs, in sexy young strikes and turnarounds; provide tech history. create cast. for meetings and MET receptions; internship program in technical Sat 4/5 Sat 4/26 theater; maintain building by making repairs or hiring contractors. A janitorial service will clean the but this individual will  building, Sun 4/6 7:30pm $30 advance/$35 door make sure that the theater, studio and gallery are ready each day for After Dark Music Series public use. This historic theater will re-open in July, 2008, so the position ZLOO EH ÓžOOHG DV VRRQ DV SRVVLEOH /LPLWHGEHQHÓžWV6HQGFRYHUOHWWHU and resume to: Douglas Anderson, Executive Director Austinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s swing trio. Townsparkling Hall Theater PO Box 128 Middlebury VT 05753 or email materials to   danderson@townhalltheater.org Mon 4/7 2pm $15 802-388-1436

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KATHERINE ASTOR GARDEN TALK AND TEA A history of the English garden from the master gardener.

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Friday,  April  4th  at  7:30  PM MIDDLEBURY  TOWN  HALL  THEATER WREHQH¿WWKH Addison  County  Parent/Child  Center Tickets:  $30/$25  Students

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â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Pop-­Up  Plays,  to  be  performed  at the  Town  Hall  Theater  on  April  12 MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Six   play-­ wrights   choose   some   actors,   stay   up   all   night   writing,   and   deliver   a   10-­minute  script  before  breakfast  the   next  morning.  Six  directors  then  take   over,  rehearsing  with  the  actors  for  a   single  day. Twenty-­four  hours  since  the  start  of   the  process,  six  brand-­new  10-­minute   plays  are  presented  to  the  world. The   event   is   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pop-­Up   Plays,â&#x20AC;?   and   the   plays   will   debut   at   Town  Hall  Theater  in  Middlebury  on   Saturday,  April  12,  at  7:30  p.m. No   one   has   any   idea   what   the   shows   will   be.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   could   end   up   with   a   comedy   about   three   hitmen,   or  a  romance  between  singing  wait-­ ers  or  it  could  be  about  Vladimir  Pu-­ tinâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dog  â&#x20AC;Ś  or  all  of  the  above.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   all   up   for   grabs,â&#x20AC;?   says   Haley   Rice,   producer.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   short   time   period   is   DQLQ\RXUIDFHGHDGOLQHWKDWÂżUHVXS the   imagination   and   provokes   cre-­ ative  action.  It  should  feel  a  little  like   watching  NASCAR,  but  funnier.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pop-­Up  Playsâ&#x20AC;?  will  feature  some   ÂżQH ZULWHUV LQFOXGLQJ -HVVLH 5D\-­ mond,   columnist   from   the   Addison   Independent;Íž   Kevin   Commins,   a   screenwriter  from  Los  Angeles;Íž  and   Susan   Weiss,   a   novelist   based   in   Burlington.   Also   featured   are   three   funny   Vermont   playwrights:   Chris   Caswell,  Macarthur  Stine  and  Mari-­ anne  DiMascio. The   Pop-­Up   directors   include   Doug   Anderson,   executive   director   of  Town  Hall  Theater  and  artistic  di-­ rector  of  Opera  Company  of  Middle-­ bury;Íž   Melissa   Lourie,   artistic   direc-­ tor  of  Middlebury  Actors  Workshop;Íž   Susan  Palmer,  who  will  be  directing   at  Vermont  Stage  this  spring;Íž  Wendi   Stein,   founder,   producer   and   co-­ director   of   Theatre   Kavanah;Íž   New   York   and   Vermont   actor   and   direc-­ tor  Cyrus  Moore;Íž  and  Lindsay  Pon-­ tius,  formerly  with  Shakespeare  and   Company,   who   is   now   Town   Hall  

BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Walkover   Gal-­ lery   in   Bristol   will   host   the   Mount   Abraham   High   School   Advanced   Placement   Studio   Art   Show   from   April   4-­25.   The   public   is   invited   to   attend   an   opening   reception   on   Fri-­ day,  April  4,  from  4-­5:30  p.m. This   year   the   exhibit   recognizes   the   hard   work   of   six   talented   stu-­ dents:   Brittany   Atkins,   Katelyn   Bartlett,   Iris   DuPont,   William   Kit-­ tredge,   Reed   Martin   and   Morgan   Salter.  These  students  follow  a  rigor-­ ous  curriculum  in  their  AP  Studio  Art   class  and  are  responsible  for  meeting   demanding   criteria   in   the   areas   of   quality,   breadth   and   concentration.   Rather   than   preparing   for   an   AP   exam,   AP   Studio   Art   culminates   in   the  creation  of  an  extensive  portfolio   of  at  least  24  pieces  of  artwork.  Sev-­ eral  of  those  pieces  will  be  displayed   at  the  art  show. Added   to   the   challenge   of   doing   college-­level   artwork   these   art   stu-­ GHQWVKDYHVWUHWFKHGWRÂżQGWKHLURZQ subjects,  create  their  own  individual   challenges   and   draw   from   personal   inspiration.   By   participating   in   this   gallery  show  they  are  sharing  pieces   of  their  lives  that  offer  a  glimpse  into   their  personal  worlds. The   Walkover   Gallery   is   located   at  15  Main  St.  in  Bristol,  in  the  old   First   National   Bank   building   with   the   arched   window.   The   show   will   remain  up  until  April  25,  and  all  are   welcome   to   visit   the   exhibit   during   that  time.  Gallery  hours  are  (usually)   from  8:30  a.m.  to  5  p.m.  Call  the  gal-­ lery  at  453-­3188  or  art  teacher  Elise   Cleary   at   453-­2333,   ext.   2010,   for   more  information.

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Fri 4/11 7pm $15

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Ever  wonder  about  the   healing  wonders  of  oatmeal?   Could  you  ever  imagine  feminist   wisdom  being  gleaned  backstage   at  a  strip  club?  Ever  struggle   WR¿QGODG\FORWKHVWKDWVHW\RX free?  Answers  to  these  and  other   gems  from  the  Incident  Magnet   herself,  Cindy  Pierce!

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POP-UP PLAYS

6 new ten-minute plays written, rehearsed and performed in 24 hours. Adults  only.  Contains  explicit  sexual  language  &  graphic  descriptions.


PAGE  18A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

Ag  Lunch   (Continued  from  Page  1A) be  able  to  know  whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  in  my  foods   when  I  purchase  them  at  the  store.â&#x20AC;? Stevens   said   the   issue   has   been   a   divisive  one  both  inside  and  outside   the  capitol,  but  that  a  large  majority   Vermonters  support  GMO  labeling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  not  going  to  try  to  convince   anyone   of   the   rightness   or   wrong-­ ness   of   labeling,   because   I   think   peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   minds   are   made   up,â&#x20AC;?   Ste-­ vens  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  heard  that  for  the   last  20  years,  at  least  through  UVM   research,   that   more   than   90   percent   of  people  are  looking  for  labeling.â&#x20AC;? Stevens   said   the   state   must   pro-­ ceed  cautiously,  lest  legislators  craft   a   bill   that   leaves   Vermont   open   to   SPENCE   PUTNAM   OF   Wey-­ lawsuits  from  food  producers. bridge  listens  as  State  Rep.  Willem   Smith  also  said  GMO  labeling  was   Jewett  answers  a  question  at  Mon-­ a   hot-­button   issue   in   the   agriculture   dayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Ag  Lunch  in  Bridport. community. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   any   of   us   are   op-­ posed   to   knowing   whatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   in   your   food,â&#x20AC;?   Smith   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yet,   the   Euro-­ pean  nations  have  been  studying  and   looking   for   something   wrong   with   these   products,   but   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   found   one  example  of  where  it  has  harmed   the  environment.â&#x20AC;? Ball  said  Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  point  did  not  il-­ lustrate  the  whole  story  on  GMO  la-­ beling. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every   single   country   in   the   EU   requires  GMO  labels  on  their  food,â&#x20AC;?   Ball   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   that   speaks   loud   and  clear.â&#x20AC;? *HQHWLFDOO\ PRGLÂżHG VHHGV which   are   less   susceptible   to   dis-­ HDVHZHUHÂżUVWDSSURYHGIRUXVHLQ the  United  States  in  1994.  The  vast   majority   of   this   countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   corn   and   soybean  crops  are  grown  using  such   seeds. The   GMO   labeling   bill   currently   being   debated   in   the   Legislature   is   BRIDPORT   RESIDENT   BILL   .H\HVĂ&#x20AC;DVKHVDVPLOHDW0RQGD\ÂśV currently   in   the   Senate   Judiciary   Ag   Lunch   in   Bridportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Commu-­ Committee.   Senators   there   have   sought  the  opinion  of  Attorney  Gen-­ nity  Hall.  

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PEOPLE  CONTINUE  TO  talk  even  after  all  the  tables  and  chairs  have  been  put  away  after  the  Ag  Lunch  in  Bridportâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Community  Hall  Monday  afternoon. Independent  photos/Trent  Campbell

eral  Bill   Sorrell   on   whether   the   bill   would  generate  legal  challenges. SHORELANDS  BILL Legislators  and  community  mem-­ bers  also  discussed  proposed  legisla-­ tion  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  referred  to  as  the  Shorelands   Bill  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;    that  would  limit  the  amount   of  pollution  that  makes  its  way  into   Lake   Champlain   from   manufactur-­ ers,  landowners  and  farmers. Jewett   said   there   was   broad   con-­ sensus   among   citizens   and   legisla-­ tors  that  something  must  be  done  to   clean   up   the   lake   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   but   the   details   on   who   should   bear   that   burden   re-­ main  murky. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   breadth   of   support   of   the   concept   that   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   got   to   do   something,â&#x20AC;?   Jewett   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   good   news  is  that  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  consensus  that   we  need  to  move  forward,  but  I  sus-­ pect   there   will   be   all   kinds   of   dis-­ agreement  about  the  money.â&#x20AC;? Smith   said   the   state   is   getting   mixed   signals   from   the   U.S.   Envi-­ ronmental  Protection  Agency. Âł2QHRIWKHPRVWGLIÂżFXOWWKLQJVLV the  EPA  is  telling  us  to  do  something   based  on  a  new  Total  Maximum  Dai-­ ly   Load   (TMDL),   but   they   havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   issued  it,â&#x20AC;?  Smith  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  trying   to   develop   a   plan,   but   we   wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   by   the  March  31  deadline.â&#x20AC;? Smith   said   that   one   way   the   state   can   limit   pollution   in   Lake   Cham-­ plain   is   by   enforcing   best   farming   practices  outlined  in  the  1990s. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Back   20   years   ago,   we   adopted   accepted   agricultural   practices,   which   if   every   state   followed   them   would  improve  water  quality,â&#x20AC;?  Smith   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  a  good  share  of  the  farm-­ ing   community   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   know   those  

JOHN  BALL   OF   Addison   visits   with   other   attendees   at   Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Ag  Lunch  in  Bridport.

rules  existed.â&#x20AC;? Smith  said  the  Vermont  Farm  Bu-­ reau   should   redouble   its   efforts   to   educate   farmers   on   the   accepted   agricultural  practices. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  have  seen  an  increase  in  the   amount   of   phosphorus   going   into   the  lake,â&#x20AC;?  Smith  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  havenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   been   able   to   get   the   outcomes   we   have  been  looking  for.â&#x20AC;? The  EPA  divides  the  country  into   10   separate   regions   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Vermont   and  the  rest  of  New  England  are  in   Region  1,  while  New  York  is  in  Re-­ gion   2.   People   at   Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lunch   expressed  concern  that  for  this  rea-­ son,  New  York  and  Vermont  would   be   subject   to   different   pollution   regulations  for  Lake  Champlain. â&#x20AC;&#x153;New   York   state   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   to  play  by  the  same  rules,â&#x20AC;?  Ferris-­ burgh   resident   Mary   Martin   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There   should   be   some   coming   together  and  acceptance  of  a  same   standard.â&#x20AC;? Phil   Wagner,   a   farmer   in   Brid-­ port,   said   he   was   concerned   with   the   shorelands   protection   legisla-­ tion   currently   before   the   agricul-­ ture  committee. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   original   TMDL   meeting   had  stats  about  contributors  to  pol-­

STATE  REP.  DIANE  Lanpher  gets  a  laugh  after  being  interrupted  by  a   musical  cell  phone  ringtone  during  Mondayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Ag  Lunch  in  Bridport.

lution  in  the  state  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one  third  each   for   agriculture,   construction   and   highways,â&#x20AC;?  Wagner  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  bill   I  read  was  90-­95  percent  weighted   towards  agriculture.â&#x20AC;? Smith   said   this   disproportionate  

burden  on   agriculture   in   the   draft   was  due  to  the  fact  that  the  agricul-­ ture  committee  only  dealt  with  the   ag  part  of  the  bill,  and  other  limits   would  be  added  later. Bill  Moore,  the  new  lobbyist  for   the  Vermont  Farm  Bureau,  said  the   bill   may   not   help   the   state   meet   EPA   regulations,   since   the   bill,   in   LWVÂżQDOIRUPPD\QRWDGGUHVV7R-­ tal  Maximum  Daily  Load.  The  EPA   could  also  pass  new  regulations  the   state  must  adhere  to. An   added   problem,   Moore   said,   is  the  dearth  of  funds  the  state  has   appropriated  to  help  polluters  meet   TMDL  standards. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   the   reality,   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   no  money,â&#x20AC;?  Moore  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   currently   have   a   funding   mecha-­ nism   for   what   the   EPA   is   going   to   require  of  us,  I  just  want  to  be  very   clear  about  that.â&#x20AC;? 6WHYHQV SDLQWHG D ÂżQDQFLDO SLF-­ ture  of  what  the  state  needs  to  meet   federal   TMDL   standards.   He   said   the  Shorelands  Bill  would  increase   taxes  on  rooms,  meals  and  alcohol   by  a  quarter  of  a  percent,  and  1  per-­ cent  on  car  rental  taxes. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  total  sum  of  that  proposal  is   $4  million  annually,â&#x20AC;?  Stevens  said. Stevens   said   the   state   will   need   $15   million   annually   for   the   next   10   years   to   meet   federal   pollution   standards,  meaning  funding  gener-­ ated  by  the  Shorelands  Bill  will  be   woefully   inadequate   for   the   task.   Smith   added   that   the   rest   of   the   funds  will  likely  have  to  come  from   the  USDA. The   state   Department   of   Envi-­ ronmental  Conservation  sent  a  new   TMDL   plan   to   the   EPA   Monday,   a   day   before   the  April   1   deadline.   The   agency   previously   rejected   STATE  REP.  WILL  Stevens  listens  to  a  discussion  during  the  Ag  Lunch   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   water   quality   plan   in   in  Bridport  Monday  afternoon. 2011.


Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  19A

McEathron  (Continued  from  Page  1A) Montpelier,  on  legislation  related  to   also  declared  an  interest  in  running.   the  Vermont  Yankee   nuclear   power   Incumbent   Rep.   Paul   Ralston,   D-­ plant. Middlebury,   has   announced   he   will   McEathron   noted   the   20   percent   not  be  seeking  another  two-­year  term   decline   in  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   student   popu-­ this  fall. lation  since  2000. â&#x20AC;&#x153;After  Rep.  Ralston  announced  he   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   means   less   resources   for   would  not  be  running  for  re-­election,   the   students   as   schools   have   to   I   saw   it   as   an   oppor-­ think   about   shrink-­ tunity   to   make   (my   ing  and  cutting  staff,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It will be a candidacy)   happen,â&#x20AC;?   McEathron  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But   bipartisan McEathron  said. by   doing   administra-­ He  added  he  is  run-­ campaign, tive   consolidation,   ning   as   an   Indepen-­ where I can as   well   as   (reducing   dent  so  as  to  not  have   the   number   supervi-­ an   obligation   to   the   focus on issues sory   unions),   we   can   that I want to major  parties. offer   students   more   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  will  be  a  biparti-­ focus on and through  the  sharing  of   san   campaign,   where   not what one resources.â&#x20AC;? I   can   focus   on   issues   For   example,   that  I  want  to  focus  on   party is pushing. McEathron   believes   and  not  what  one  par-­ Running as an multiple   schools   ty  is  pushing,â&#x20AC;?  McEa-­ independent, could   share   language   thron   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Running   teachers. you can build as   an   Independent,   McEathron   favors   you   can   build   your   your own current   legislative   ef-­ own  platform.â&#x20AC;? platform.â&#x20AC;? forts   to   consolidate   The   young   student   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Calvin McEathron public   school   gover-­ has   already   cleared   nance   and   reduce   the   his  campaign  with  his   number  of  school  dis-­ Middlebury   College   professors   and   WULFWV +H VSHFLÂżFDOO\ VXSSRUWV ELOO advisers.   He   realizes   that   if   he   is   H.883,   which,   among   other   things,   elected,   it   will   require   him   to   tem-­ would   abolish   supervisory   unions   porarily  withdraw  from  classes  and   and  realign  school  districts  into  ex-­ thereby   prolong   his   scholastic   ca-­ panded   pre-­K-­12   school   districts   reer.  McEathron  has  also  consulted   that   would   be   responsible   for   the   with   former   Gov.   James   Douglas,   education   of   all   resident   children.   an  executive  in  residence  at  Middle-­ This   change   would   take   effect   in   bury   College   (and   an   alum)   who   2020.   The   bill   is   currently   being   launched   his   political   career   as   a   reviewed   by   the   House   Ways   and   Middlebury  House  representative. Means  Committee. McEathron  spent  summers  work-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   need   to   look   at   how   we   can   ing  on  his  grandparentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  sheep  farm   bring  the  education  system,  particu-­ in  Chelsea,  where  he  attended  pub-­ larly   the   administrative   side   of   it,   lic   schools.   He   noted   the   state   has   seen   its   student   population   decline   from  104,000  in  2000  to  the  current   80,000.   McEathron   is   a   graduate   of   U-­32   High   School   and   got   his   ÂżUVWWDVWHRIVWDWHSROLWLFVDVDWHHQ working   with   Rep.   Tony   Klein,   D-­

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CALVIN   MCEATHRON into   the   21st   century,â&#x20AC;?   McEathron   said.   He  believes  the  state  has  too  many   supervisory   unions   (64)   and   noted   Vermont   has   one   of   the   highest   administrator-­teacher   ratios   in   the   country. â&#x20AC;&#x153;By   building   bigger   districts,   I   think  we  can  bring  better  resources   to   the   students   as   well   as   possibly   save   some   money   for   the   taxpay-­ ers,â&#x20AC;?  McEathron  said. Vermont   must   also   do   more   to   retain   its   young   people   after   they   graduate,   according   to   McEathron.   Young   graduates   continue   to   leave   the   state   in   large   numbers   to   pur-­ sue  economic  opportunities  in  other   states.

â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  number   of   21-­   to   44-­year-­ olds   has   fallen   by   23,000   between   the   year   2000   and   the   last   census   in   2010,â&#x20AC;?   McEathron   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   problem.â&#x20AC;? Vermont   can   help   reverse   the   trend   through   a   more   aggressive   economic   development   policy,   ac-­ cording  to  McEathron. â&#x20AC;&#x153;With  the  importance  of  the  Inter-­ net   and   the   importance   of   technol-­ ogy  in  todayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  world,  Vermont  has  a   chance  to  be  a  leader  in  telecommu-­ nication,  as  well  as  tech  companies   willing  to  set  up  shop  here,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. He   referred   to   Dealer.com   and   SchoolSpring   as   examples   of   suc-­ cessful   Internet-­based   companies   that   have   thrived   in   the   Green   Mountain  State. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  potential  is  there,â&#x20AC;?  McEath-­ ron   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   believe   by   eliminating   the  cloud  computing  tax  as  well  as   making  tax  credits  available  for  pri-­ vate  investment  in  Vermont,  we  can   see  some  changes.â&#x20AC;? Doing   nothing   would   keep   Ver-­ montâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   status   as   one   of   the   grayest   states  in  the  union,  said  McEathron. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Vermont  has  a  great  college  edu-­ cation   system.  Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   no   doubting   that,â&#x20AC;?   McEathron   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   no   question   people   want   to   come   here   for  an  education.  But  it  seems  more   and   more   they   are   getting   their   di-­ ploma   and   immediately   heading   out.  I  love  Vermont.  But  as  a  young   person,  you  want  to  be  around  other   young   people.   Having   a   chance   to   keep   them   here   is   one   of   the   main   reasons   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   running   for   the   Legis-­ lature.â&#x20AC;? Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

Contact Your U.S. Senators Sen. Patrick Leahy 1-­800-­642-­3193

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Sen. Bernie Sanders 1-­800-­339-­9834

SRC-­2  United  States  Senate Washington,  D.C.  20510 www.sanders.senate.gov

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PAGE  20A  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Thursday,  April  3,  2014

Daily  (Continued  from  Page  1A) try  for  a  hospital  of  our  size.â&#x20AC;? Indeed,   Daily   acknowledges   that   Porter   Medical   Center   would   not   be   where   it   is   today   without   the   many   health  care  professionals  and  admin-­ istrators   that   have   shared   in   the   vi-­ sion  for  the  hospital  and  Helen  Porter   Healthcare  &  Rehabilitation. â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  is  a  proverb  that  states,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Of   the   best   leaders,   when   he   or   she   is   gone,   the   people   will   say   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   we   did   it  ourselves,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Daily  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Coaching   and   leadership   are   kind   of   the   same   thing.  You  try  to  help  people  do  things   they  might  not  otherwise  do.â&#x20AC;? Under   Dailyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   watch,   PMC   of-­ ÂżFLDOV VHW D KLJK EDU ² DQG KDYH cleared  it  almost  every  year.  Most  of   the   stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   small   hospitals,   including   3RUWHU KDYH H[SHULHQFHG ÂżQDQFLDO challenges   in   an   era   dominated   by   dwindling   Medicaid   and   Medicare   reimbursement   and   the   uncertainties   of   health   care   reform.   But   PMC   has   been  able  to  make  strides  in  program-­ ming  throughout  the  years  while  add-­ ing  buildings  to  its  South  Street  cam-­ pus  and  primary  care  physicians  to  its   growing  roster. Back  when  Daily  took  the  reins  at   Porter,  there  were  essentially  the  main   hospital   building   and   a   connector   to   what  was  then  the  Helen  Porter  Nurs-­ ing  Home  (50  beds)  located  in  what  is   now  the  Collins  building. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pretty   quickly,   I   learned   we   had   to   bring   our   basic   infrastructure   up   to   speed   to   be   able   to   accommodate   what   I   was   pretty   sure   was   going   to   be   a   fairly   rapid   growth   in   medical   staff,â&#x20AC;?  Daily  said. He   based   his   growth   expectations   for  the  hospital  on  a  variety  of  factors,   not   the   least   of   which   was   the   qual-­ ity  of  life  the  Middlebury  area  had  to   offer   to   prospective   physicians   and   nurses. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Champlain  Valley  is  an  attrac-­ tive  place  in  Vermont;Íž  Middlebury  is   a  college  town,â&#x20AC;?  Daily  noted. He  saw  the  active  medical  staff  at   Porter  grow  from  around  23  in  1984   to  pushing  70  today. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  clear  that  this  was  a  place   that  was  going  to  be  really  attractive   for  practitioners,  and  that  if  we  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have  a  hospital  with  the  basic  services   to  accommodate  that,  that  was  going   to  be  problematic,â&#x20AC;?  Daily  said. BRICKS  AND  MORTAR Initial   capital   projects   focused   on   upgrading   the   hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   boil-­ ers,   electrical   system   and   roof   over   the   hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   medical-­surgical   unit,   Daily  recalled.  After  making  repairs,  

30&RIÂżFLDOVIRFXVHGRQDGGLQJQHZ ticing  medicine  and  not  have  to  tend   bricks   and   mortar.   Successful   multi-­ as  much  to  the  related  administrative   million-­dollar  fundraising  campaigns   health  care  chores. led   to   construction   of   new   facilities   â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  slowly  came  to  the  conclu-­ to  host  the  medical/surgical  unit,  the   sion  that  this  was  better,â&#x20AC;?  Daily  said.   emergency   and   radiology   depart-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   come   to   an   emergency   depart-­ ments,  the  birthing  center  and  rehabil-­ ment  and  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  already  a  doctor  to   itation  center,  and  Helen  Porter.  Then,   see  me,  instead  of  them  having  to  call   just   a   few   years   ago,   Porter   worked   somebody  who  is  a  professional  mak-­ cooperatively   with   developers   and   ing  their  living  across  town.â&#x20AC;? Middlebury  College  to  establish  East-­ Daily   has   also   led   PMC   through   view   at   Middlebury   off   South   Street   various  state  and  federal  health  care   Extension.   Eastview   is   reform  initiatives,  some   one  of  two  substantial  re-­ of   them   ongoing.   Ver-­ tirement   communities   to   â&#x20AC;&#x153;There is a mont   is   setting   up   its   lay   down   roots   in  Addi-­ proverb that health   insurance   ex-­ son  Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  shire  town. states, â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Of the change   as   mandated   Daily  remains  particu-­ best leaders, through   the   Affordable   larly   proud   of   the   1996   Care   Act.   And   plans   â&#x20AC;&#x153;south   projectâ&#x20AC;?   that   re-­ when he or call  for  the  state  to  tran-­ sulted   in   construction,   she is gone, sition  to  a  single-­payer   for   around   $4   million,   the people will health   care   system   by   of  the  new  radiology  and   say â&#x20AC;&#x201D; we did 2017. emergency   department   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   matter   it ourselves.â&#x20AC;&#x2122; headquarters. if   you   have   100   pay-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;That   was   a   quantum   Coaching and ers  or  a  single  payer,  it   leap,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  our  old   leadership are really   comes   down   to   building,   the   Emergency   how   they   are   going   to   Department   was   on   the   kind of the pay   (the   hospital),   and   main   thoroughfare,   so   same thing. how  much  they  are  go-­ there   was   little   privacy   You try to ing  to  pay,â&#x20AC;?  Daily  said.   to   speak   of.   X-­ray   was   help people â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  certainly  what  I   back   in   a   nook,   and   our   have  spent  a  lot  of  time   equipment  was  outdated,   do things they talking  to  Green  Moun-­ G.E.   stuff.  We   had   great   might not tain   Care   Board   mem-­ people,   so   the   thing   that   otherwise do.â&#x20AC;? bers   about   â&#x20AC;Ś   What   I   bothered   you   was   you   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jim Daily think   the   state   should   ought   to   give   them   â&#x20AC;Ś   GRLVÂżQGRXWKRZWKH\ something  better  to  work   pay  hospitals  like  Porter   with.â&#x20AC;? that  are  really  important  to  the  com-­ Porter,   particularly   during   the   munities   they   serve,   and   that   do   it   1990s,   would   gradually   add   more   ULJKWDQGÂżJXUHRXWKRZWRSD\WKHP personnel   to   keep   up   with   the   coun-­ so  they  can  continue  to  do  it  right  and   tyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   growing   demand   and   need   for   not  squeeze  them  into  emaciation.â&#x20AC;? physicians  and  specialists. CHANGING  TECHNOLOGY When   Daily   joined   the   fold   three   Technological   advances   in   the   decades  ago,  Porter  Hospital  did  not   PHGLFDO ÂżHOG KDYH DERXQGHG GXULQJ employ   any   physicians.   That   soon   Dailyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   tenure.   Among   them:   A   shift   changed. to   electronic   recordkeeping.   Hospi-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;When   I   got   here   in   1984,   the   di-­ tals  throughout  the  region  are  switch-­ rection   the   board   wanted   me   to   take   LQJ IURP SDSHU ÂżOHV WR GLJLWL]HG UH-­ was   clear,â&#x20AC;?   Daily   recalled.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   had   cords  that  allow  physicians  to  access   physicians   that   were   on   call   for   the   a  patientâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  medical  background  with  a   Emergency  Department.  When  some-­ few  key  strokes. one   came   in   who   needed   emergency   The  hope,  Daily  said,  is  that  elec-­ care,  there  was  always  that  lag  time   tronic   recordkeeping   leads   to   better   or   waiting   period.   The   thought   was,   and  more  timely  care,  along  with  cost   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  get  some  practitioners.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;? savings   through   greater   administra-­ That   hiring   process   quickly   made   WLYH HIÂżFLHQF\ 'DLO\ EHOLHYHV 3RUWHU a   positive   difference   in   patient   care.   will   see   some   of   those   savings   and   There   are   currently   12   primary   care   HIÂżFLHQFLHV DURXQG WKUHH \HDUV IURP practices   under   the   PMC   umbrella.   now.   In   the   meantime,   the   transition   The   association   has   not   only   been   is  proving  somewhat  arduous  and  ex-­ a   boon   to   PMC   and   patients,   it   has   pensive,  he  said. provided   valuable   support   to   physi-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   message   to   the   Legislature   cians,  who  are  able  to  focus  on  prac-­ and  the  Green  Mountain  Care  Board  

is,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;This   will   be   a   large   investment   area  going  forward,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not   only  the  capital  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  hardware  and  soft-­ ware   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   but   people.   I   think   we   have   doubled  the  size  of  our  IT  department   over  the  last  year  and  a  half.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  go-­ LQJ WR WDNH VLJQLÂżFDQW LQYHVWPHQWV in  capital  and  operations,  in  terms  of   people.â&#x20AC;? Looking   back   at   his   career   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which  still  has  21  months  left  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Dai-­ ly   considers   himself   very   fortunate   to  have  worked  with  his  associates  at   PMC.  He  said  he  has  also  very  much   enjoyed  â&#x20AC;&#x153;working  and  developing  re-­ lationships  with  legislators  and  regu-­ lators  over  the  years.â&#x20AC;?   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   be   the   only   (hospital)   CEO   this   year   who   will   have   presented   a   budget   to   every   incarnation   of   Ver-­ montâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   regulatory   hierarchy,   begin-­ ning   in   1984   with   the   Vermont   Hos-­ pital   Data   Council;Íž   then   the   Health   Care  Authority;Íž  Vermont  Department   of   Banking,   Insurance,   Securities   &   Health  Care  Administration;Íž  the  Pub-­ lic   Oversight   Commission;Íž   and   the   Green  Mountain  Care  Board. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Probably  95  percent  or  98  percent   of   the   budget   requests   that   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   made  to  our  regulators  have  been  ap-­ proved,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Somebody,   in   a   regulator   sense,   believes   that   Porter   must   be   doing   some   things   the   right   way.â&#x20AC;? He  added  he  is  immensely  proud  of   PMCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   current   leadership   team   and   believes  he  will  be  leaving  the  orga-­ nization  in  very  good  hands  when  he   steps  down. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  young  personâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  business,â&#x20AC;?  he   said,  with  a  smile.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  the  old  days,  I   could  do  a  12-­hour  day  starting  at  7:30   a.m.  and  have  a  board  meeting  end-­ ing  at  8:30  p.m.  or  9  pm.,  and  be  sort   of  bouncy  out  of  the  bed.  In  a  couple   months  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  60.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  here  for   30  years.  I  was  a  CEO  for  three  and   a  half  years  in  Maine.  More  than  half   of   my   life,   I   have   been   a   community   hospital   CEO.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   time   for   someone   else  to  share  some  of  the  fun.â&#x20AC;? Daily   has   been   mapping   out   his   retirement   for   the   past   two   or   three   years.  While  he  will  be  leaving  PMC,   Daily   does   not   believe   he   will   have   made  his  last  career  stop. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   not   going   to   do   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;golf,   golf,   travel,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?  Daily  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Right  now,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   telling  my  colleagues  to  let  me  know   if  I  am  getting  a  little  drifty,  because  I   need  to  keep  my  head  in  the  game.  If   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  anything  you  want  to  do  after   SOXV\HDUVLQWKHJDPHLWÂśVÂżQLVK strong.  My  legacy  â&#x20AC;Ś  will  be  to  make   sure  I  have  a  critical  role  in  helping  at-­

PORTER  MEDICAL   CENTER   President   and   CEO   James   Daily   an-­ nounced  he  will  retire  some  time  in  2016  from  the  job  he  has  held  since   1984.  Daily  took  some  time  last  week  to  reminisce  about  the  hospitalâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   accomplishments  during  his  watch. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

tract,  to  a  community  that  has  a  lot  go-­ ing  for  it,  the  best  possible  candidates   for  board  consideration.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  role   and  a  challenge  I  take  seriously.â&#x20AC;? BIG  SHOES  TO  FILL Whoever  succeeds  Daily  will  have   VRPH ELJ VKRHV WR ÂżOO DFFRUGLQJ WR VWDWHDQGORFDORIÂżFLDOV â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jim   is   the   balance   between   the   aspects  that  make  our  current  system   great,  and  the  voices  for  reform,â&#x20AC;?  said   Al   Gobeille,   chairman   of   the   Green   Mountain   Care   Board,   or   GMCB.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jim  embodies  the  leadership  needed   to  run  an  amazing,  high-­quality  orga-­ nization  over  a  long  period  of  time.â&#x20AC;? Dr.  Allan  Ramsay,  one  of  Gobeilleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   colleagues  on  the  GMCB,  agreed. â&#x20AC;&#x153;His  willingness  to  give  us  such  a   long   period   of   succession   planning   is  just  another  testament  to  the  value   he   has   brought   to   the   community   of   Middlebury   and   Porter   Hospital,â&#x20AC;?   Ramsay   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In   his   retirement,   he  

will  be   equally   revered   for   all   the   time   he   spent   here   developing   this   program.  I  know  of  some  of  the  really   GLIÂżFXOW XSV DQG GRZQV WKDW KH ZDV able  to  navigate.â&#x20AC;? Bill   Townsend,   chairman   of   the   PMC   board,   praised   Dailyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   many   contributions. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   simply   express,   on   behalf   of   the   board   of   directors,   our   tre-­ mendous   appreciation   to   Jim   for   his   loyal   and   committed   service   to   Por-­ ter   Medical   Center   and   the   Addison   County   community   over   the   last   30   years,â&#x20AC;?   Townsend   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jim   has   dedicated  one  half  of  his  life  to  build-­ ing  and  leading  a  robust  and  sustain-­ able  health  care  system  that  delivers   compassionate,   high-­quality   care   to   our  community;Íž  and  as  a  result  of  his   leadership   Porter   is   well   positioned   and   ready   to   meet   the   ensuing   chal-­ lenges  in  the  ever  changing  world  of   health  care.â&#x20AC;?

Local  man  sentenced  to  20  years  to  life  for  sexual  assault  of  a  minor MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   A   former   Vergennes  man  will  serve  a  prison   term  of  20  years  to  life  in  connec-­ tion   with   the   sexual   assault   of   a   12-­year-­old   Addison   County   girl   back  in  November  of  2012. Addison   County   Superior   Court   Judge  Robert  Mello  passed  the  sen-­ tence   on   Leo   Pratt,   46,   following  

an  extensive   hearing   at   the   Addi-­ son   County   Courthouse   on   Thurs-­ day,  March  27.  Pratt  was  convicted   of  the  charge  of  aggravated  sexual   assault,   at   a   trial   that   Judge   Mello   presided   over   in   Addison   County   Superior   Court,   criminal   division,   last  October. Addison  County  Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Attorney  

David  Fenster   and   Deputy   Stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Attorney   Dennis   Wygmans   pros-­ ecuted   the   case   against   Pratt,   who   was   alleged   to   have   assaulted   the   girl  at  his  Vergennes  home,  accord-­ ing  to  court  records. Pratt   has   a   lengthy   criminal   re-­ cord  that  includes  multiple  convic-­ tions   for   assaultive   behavior   and  

various  property  crimes,  according   to  court  records.  His  record  also  in-­ cludes  a  conviction  for  â&#x20AC;&#x153;prohibited   acts,â&#x20AC;?   relating   to   a   text   messaging   incident  involving  a  girl,  Wygmans   noted.  Pratt  has  spent  the  majority   of   the   past   30   years   behind   bars,   according  to  Wygmans. Prosecutors  had  recommended  a  

40-­year  sentence  for  Pratt,  but  said   WKH\ ZHUH VDWLV¿HG ZLWK  \HDUV to   life   handed   down   by   Mello.   It   means   that   Pratt   will   be   incarcer-­ ated   until   at   least   2032,   according   to   Wygmans.   Pratt   will   also   have   to   undergo   counseling   while   in   prison. Wygmans   said   the   victim   is  

working  to  move  beyond  the  abuse   that  she  suffered. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dealing  with  the  emotion-­ al   trauma,â&#x20AC;?   Wygmans   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a  very  strong,  smart  child.  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  hop-­ LQJ VKH ZLOO EH DEOH WR ÂżQG SHDFH with  the  verdict  and  sentence.â&#x20AC;?

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pkg.

One  More  Reason  to  Shop  at   Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  during  April  â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Spend $25 or more for a chance to win a 42â&#x20AC;? LG Flat Screen TV!

  Ă&#x160; , -/-

lb.

149

$

lb.

iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;9iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2C6;Ă&#x2030;Ă&#x17D;äĂ&#x160;VĂ&#x152;°

Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;i`Ă&#x160;-Â&#x2026;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x201C;ÂŤ .......... $9.99 ÂŤÂ&#x17D;}° >Ă&#x17E;iÂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;}Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;>Â?

Ă&#x20AC;>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152; .................... $3.99 ÂŤÂ&#x17D;}°

>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2021;-Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x201C;LÂ&#x153;

i>Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;Â&#x17D;Ă&#x192; ..........................5ÂŤÂ&#x17D;}Ă&#x192;°Ă&#x2030; 5 $

Professional  Meat  Cutter  on  Duty  Mon  -­  Sat,  9-­5

Produce $

,Â&#x153;>Ă&#x192;Ă&#x152;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;}Ă&#x160; Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;VÂ&#x17D;iÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x192; ................ 1.29 lb. $

Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x20AC;i Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;-ÂŤÂ?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;

Newly  Expanded   Produce  Department  with  more  organic  selections

Seniors* Day at Gregâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s

6am-â&#x20AC;?noon save 10% on all purchases and get a free muffin and coffee while youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re here.

,i`Ă&#x160;-ii`Â?iĂ&#x192;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;>ÂŤiĂ&#x192; ............ $2.49 lb.

ViLiĂ&#x20AC;}Ă&#x160;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x2022;Vi................. $1.29 Â&#x2026;`°

Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x17E;`iĂ&#x153; iÂ?Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x192; ............. $2.99 i>°

>Ă&#x2022;Â?Â&#x2C6;yÂ&#x153;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x20AC;............................Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;$5 xÂ?L°Ă&#x160; >}Ă&#x160;`>Â&#x2026;Â&#x153;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;iĂ&#x192; .............Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;$5 6Â&#x2C6;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x160;,Â&#x2C6;ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;i`Ă&#x160;/Â&#x153;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x152;Â&#x153;iĂ&#x192; ....... $1.29 lb. Ă&#x201C;Â?L°Ă&#x160;L>}Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x192; ......................$1.29 Ă&#x20AC;iĂ&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; >Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x152;>Â?Â&#x153;Ă&#x2022;ÂŤiĂ&#x192; ..................Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;$4

Red Ă&#x20AC;>ÂŤivĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152; ........................Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;$1 8Ă&#x160; >Â?Â&#x2C6;vÂ&#x153;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2DC;Â&#x2C6;>Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;}iĂ&#x192; ............ 69¢ i>° Â&#x2DC;}Â?Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x2022;VĂ&#x2022;Â&#x201C;LiĂ&#x20AC;Ă&#x192; ..................Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;$3

Dairy  &  Frozen xÂ&#x2122;Â&#x153;â°Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;ÂŤÂ&#x2C6;V>Â&#x2DC;>Ă&#x160;"Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;}iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Vi..........Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;$5

5 $ Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;iÂ&#x2DC;`Ă&#x192;Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤĂ&#x160; Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x152;>}iĂ&#x160; Â&#x2026;iiĂ&#x192;i...........Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030; 5 Â&#x153;Ă&#x152;Ă&#x160;EĂ&#x160;i>Â&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;*Â&#x153;VÂ&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;Ă&#x192; ...................... $1.99 ÂŁĂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x153;â°Ă&#x160; Â&#x153;Â&#x153;Â?Ă&#x160;7Â&#x2026;Â&#x2C6;ÂŤ........................ $1.69 *iÂŤÂŤiĂ&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`}iĂ&#x160;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160; Ă&#x20AC;i>`Ă&#x192; ..................Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;$4 xÂ&#x2122;Â&#x153;â°Ă&#x160;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x153;iĂ&#x20AC;½Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;*Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x2C6;`iĂ&#x160;"Ă&#x20AC;>Â&#x2DC;}iĂ&#x160;Ă&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Vi....Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x2030;

$

Deli 4.49 lb. Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;iĂ&#x17E;Ă&#x160;>Â&#x201C;................$5.99 lb. *Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x153;Ă&#x203A;Â&#x153;Â?Â&#x153;Â&#x2DC;i...................$4.69 lb. iĂ&#x192;ÂľĂ&#x2022;Â&#x2C6;Ă&#x152;iĂ&#x160;-Â&#x201C;Â&#x153;Â&#x17D;i`Ă&#x160;/Ă&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x17E;.. $5.99 lb. >Ă&#x20AC;`Ă&#x160;->Â?>Â&#x201C;Â&#x2C6; ..................

$

Ă&#x17D;Ă&#x160; Â?Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;-Ă&#x152;°]Ă&#x160;Â&#x2C6;``Â?iLĂ&#x2022;Ă&#x20AC;Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;näĂ&#x201C;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x17D;nnÂ&#x2021;Ă&#x201C;ÂŁĂ&#x2C6;Ă&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;"ÂŤiÂ&#x2DC;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2021;Ă&#x160; >Ă&#x17E;Ă&#x192;Ă&#x160;Ă&#x2C6;>Â&#x201C;Ă&#x160;Â&#x2021;Ă&#x160;nĂ&#x160;ÂŤÂ&#x201C;Ă&#x160;UĂ&#x160;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;Ă&#x153;°}Ă&#x20AC;i}Ă&#x192;Â&#x201C;>Ă&#x20AC;Â&#x17D;iĂ&#x152;°VÂ&#x153;Â&#x201C;

Thursday is

Over 60

*

e  Quality  &  Service  Come  Firs W he r t

GREGâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S Local Market

April 4 2014 a section  
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