Page 1

Arts + Leisure

Raising hope

Stick stars An OV senior again leads the Addison Independent Field Hockey All-Star Team. See Page 1B.

An a cappella singing group with classical roots will bring closeharmony jazz to town.

Area clergy have organized a gathering in response to two recent acts of hate. See Page 10A.

ADDISON COUNTY

Vol. 70 No. 48

Thanksgiving blaze offers more reasons to be grateful By GAEN MURPHREE STARKSBORO — Starksboro resident Lausanne Allen had a little something else to be thankful for this Thanksgiving: Her home didn’t burn down. As they exited the house on Frank Orvis Road to join friends down the street for their Thanksgiving feast, she and husband Brian Anderson noticed smoke pouring out of their adjacent workshop building. “I’ve got my fiddle in one hand and the pie in the other, and we’re thinking do we take the car?,” said Allen. “If we had taken the car, we would have probably not seen the fire ... But we decided to walk. And as we got close to the shop, we could see the smoke rolling out over the door and knew something was (See Fire, Page 14A)

INDEPENDENT Middlebury, Vermont

Thursday, December 1, 2016  46 Pages

$1.00

Rifle hunters bag a record number of bucks

2016 season easily best since ban on spikehorns

FRANK RAYMOND POSES with the 205-pound, 9-point buck that he shot in Addison on Nov. 14 as his grandson Jeb celebrates in the background. Raymond took the trophy animal to Vermont Field Sports in Middlebury to be weighed. Word is that Raymond’s deer gave him bragging rights over hunting buddy Kevin Kayhart, who the same day shot a 198-pound, 7-pointer in Waltham that he had weighed at Rack ’N Reel in New Haven.

HOPE Holiday Shop offers free toys for kids By JOHN FLOWERS ing through the bounty of gift seMIDDLEBURY — Area residents lections on Monday at the Holiday with a steady income can look for- Shop, located in the Community ward each year to “Black Friday” Services Center on Boardman Street and “Cyber Monday” to get great in Middlebury. Monday was opening deals on holiday gifts. day for the shop, which But there are some in will serve an estimated Addison County who “I’m glad that 400 and 600 Addison can’t afford to make pur- people do County children, ages chases even when they this for us, birth through 18, by the are marked down 60 per- and I’m glad time it closes for the seacent. son on Dec. 23. it gives our Fortunately for those “It’s very hard for famkids a chance ilies folks, there’s a local gift like us to be able to that keeps on giving — to experience afford Christmas for our the Helping Overcome what it’s like kids, especially with the Poverty’s Effect (HOPE) to have these way the economy is goHoliday Shop, which an- kinds of gifts.” ing right now,” said Alinually offers free cloth— Alicia, mother cia, who is on disability ing, toys and books to of a 7-year-old and asked that her full Addison County families name not be revealed. who would otherwise not “And it’s really expenbe able to give their kids much of sive, food-wise and gift-wise.” anything for Christmas. She discovered the HOPE Holiday Alicia, a divorced mom from Shop around six years ago, when her Starksboro who is on disability daughter was 1. She has used the and has a 7-year-old daughter, was service annually to supplement what among the qualifying parents brows(See HOPE, Page 16A)

Photo courtesy of Jessie Raymond

By ANDY KIRKALDY ADDISON COUNTY — Freezers throughout Addison County are packed with venison, and in many local homes that dish probably served as the main course on Thanksgiving. That’s because the 2016 rifle season in Addison County was easily the most successful since 2005, when “The quality the Vermont Department of of the deer is Fish & Wildlife banned shootgood, too. They ing two-point “spikehorn” were definitely bucks during Vermont’s 16-day healthy, happy November rifle season. In all, hunters brought 573 deer.” — Erica Bedell, bucks to be weighed at the Green Mountain county’s nine official wildlife Trails End weigh stations between Nov. 12 and 27. That total that was 29 percent higher than 2015’s rifle season’s number, which until this fall was the highest since 2005. In 2015, the county’s weigh stations handled a post law-change local record of 444 deer, and area hunters shattered that mark by 129 bucks this November. The county’s seven-year rifle season average coming into this season was 385, meaning this season was a full 50 percent better than average. (See Rifle season, Page 7A)

Heirlooms create flavors at Windfall 30 varieties blended into craft cider This is the fourth in a series pro- ing the local foods movement and filing the effect of the hard cider trying to connect chefs with farmboom on Addison County apple ers. “We both felt that it was impororchards. tant if we were going to be active By GAEN MURPHREE CORNWALL — Award-winning participants in this discussion and hard cider maker Brad Koehler in this movement that we had to be active participants calls himself an “acboth as chefs and cidental orchardist.” as food producers,” Koehler and his said Koehler. “You wife (noted chef, gotta get your hands food writer and dirty.” UVM professor The couple’s Amy Trubek) were search for a home looking for a place landed them in Cornnear Middlebury, wall — on land that after Koehler landed just happened to ina job some 14 years ago managing resi- WINDFALL GOLDEN clude an abandoned dential dining services at Middle- three-acre orchard. “It was completely overgrown,” bury College. The couple had been teaching at the New England Culi- said Koehler. But Koehler’s windfall wasn’t nary Institute in Montpelier and in that role had been actively promot(See Apples, Page 16A)

ORCHARDIST AND CIDER maker Brad Koehler of Windfall Orchard in Cornwall checks on a graft on one of his trees. Koehler blends 30 varieties of heirloom apples to get the flavor profile for his awardwinning ciders.

Independent photo/Gaen Murphree

Sheriff’s campaign contribution By the way scrutinized Used department fund to cover high bailiff ad

‘Nutcracker’s Adventure’

CATHERINE CARPENTER REHEARSES a scene from the Middlebury Community Players’ production of “The Nutcracker’s Adventure” Tuesday night. The show opens Friday and runs through Sunday in the Middlebury Union High School auditorium. For more photos see Page 11A.

Independent photo/Trent Campbell

By JOHN FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY — Addison County Sheriff Don Keeler is drawing criticism from some state officials for using some of his department’s funds during the Nov. 8 election to back his preferred candidate for high bailiff, an official who has the power to arrest the sheriff and potentially replace that person if he or she is unable to perform the duties of that office. It was on Nov. 10 that Keeler paid $154 for advertising that had run in the Addison Independent in support of Charles Clark, who was the Republican candidate in a four-way race for Addison County high bailiff. Clark finished second in the race (with 6,487 votes) to the winner, Democrat Ron Holmes, who received 8,309 votes. Keeler paid for the ad with a check from the account of the Addison (See Payment, Page 15A)

Jack Mayer, a local doctor turned author, will discuss his latest book in a talk at Bristol’s Lawrence Memorial Library next Thursday, Dec. 8, at 7 p.m. Mayer’s non-fiction book “Before the Court of Heaven” recounts origins of the Third Reich through the story of Ernst Werner Techow. Defeated, humiliated, and in chaos, post-World War I Germany was imperiled by leftist revolution and right-wing violence. Techow, a German right-wing na(See By the way, Page 15A)

Index Obituaries................................. 6A Classifieds.......................... 5B-8B Service Directory............... 6B-7B Entertainment.........Arts + Leisure Community Calendar......... 8A-9A Arts Calendar.........Arts + Leisure Sports................................. 1B-3B


PAGE 2A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

County gets new state police head Danoski is the third barracks chief this year

was promoted to captain. Manley now oversees the VSP’s New Haven, Rutland, Shaftsbury, Royalton and Westminster barracks. Manley had By JOHN FLOWERS led the VSP’s Addison County force MIDDLEBURY — Vermont since October of 2013. State Police on Monday officially In a sense, Cacciatore and Danoski confirmed Lt. Jeff Danoski as the are replacing each other: Cacciatore new leader of the agency’s New Ha- is taking Danoski’s former job as diven barracks, which serves Addison rector of the VSP’s Office of ProfesCounty. Danoski, 47, becomes the sional Development & Training in third commander of the New Haven Waterbury. That office is responsible barracks in just four for both the recruitmonths. ment and initial train“This is where I “I’m obviously want to be and ing of new troopers, honored and excited as well as in-service about the opportunity what I want to training for all memto command the New do.” bers. — Lt. Jeff Danoski Haven barracks and Danoski joined work with the citizens the VSP in March of and other agencies in the county,” 1991, soon after completing his studDanoski said during a phone inter- ies in criminal justice and sociology view on Wednesday. “I hold myself at the State University of New York and the members assigned here to at Buffalo. He was first assigned to high standards.” the VSP’s Rutland barracks, where Danoski, a Pittsford resident, re- he worked for 13 years before transplaces Lt. Chuck Cacciatore, who ferring to Waterbury. During his time took the New Haven barracks’ reins with the Office of Professional Dein late August when the previous velopment & Training in Waterbury commander, Lt. Michael Manley, he earned promotions to sergeant

LT. JEFF DANOSKI

and then lieutenant. For the past 18 months, Danoski was assigned to the VSP headquarters as an assistant staff operations commander. He officially began his new job in New Haven on Sunday, Nov. 27. Danoski leads a New Haven barracks that, when fully staffed, includes 15 uniformed personnel: 10 troopers, four sergeants and himself. “I had an interest in assuming command of a barracks,” Danoski said of his new assignment. He anticipates providing continuity to a VSP post that has seen a lot of turnover in Addison County. “This is where I want to be and what I want to do,” Danoski said. With only a few days under his belt as New Haven barracks commander, Danoski has understandably not yet established his longterm vision for law enforcement priorities in Addison County. “I really haven’t had an opportunity yet to sit down with the troopers and the sergeants here,” Danoski said, “but I will meet with them and get our strategic plan together.” He promised the barracks would deliver high quality services on his watch. “I expect (the uniformed personnel) to fulfill the ideals and mission of the VSP as they serve the county and the state,” Danoski said. Major Rick Hopkins, who recently assumed command of the VSP Field Force Division, said the leadership transition in Addison County is in line with a current trend of turnover within the state police ranks. That turnover has largely being driven by recent and impending retirements, most of them senior supervisors. Hopkins said the VSP has seen around 15 retirements this far in 2016, with a similar number forecast for both 2017 and 2018. Most of those retirees are sergeants, lieutenants and captains, and Hopkins said there is often a domino effect in terms filling positions because of promotions when a supervisor leaves. State police uniformed personnel must be age 50 and have contributed 20 years into the system to collect full retirement benefits. Retirement for all members is mandatory at age 55. State police are actively recruiting new troopers, and Hopkins encouraged prospective applicants to check out the agency’s website at vermont.gov/employment. “It’s really challenging to try to manage that and keep up this ambitious agenda that we have,” Hopkins said of the turnover and recruitment process. State police, he said, go through a laborious vetting process for new candidates due to the public safety nature of the positions. “You need to have great people,” he said. The VSP makes around 30 new hires each year, according to Hopkins. Having Cacciatore and Danoski swap assignments was an opportunity for the VSP to “get the right people in the right jobs.” Hopkins pointed to Cacciatore’s past experience with personnel management and Danoski’s desire for — and proven track record with — leadership positions. He believes that the New Haven barracks will now enjoy a more stable run of leadership. “We see (Danoski’s appointment) as a long-term solution for Addison County,” Hopkins said. Reporter John Flowers is at johnf@addisonindependent.com.

Gatekeeper

PIERRE VACHON REHEARSES a scene from the Middlebury Community Players’ production of “The Nutcracker’s Adventure” Tuesday night in the Middlebury Union High School auditorium. Vachon plays Uncle Drosselmeyer and Bittersweet the gatekeeper in the show. Independent photo/Trent Campbell

Addison plan hearing set for Dec. 6 By ANDY KIRKALDY on which planners have been working ADDISON — What could be the for almost four years. final public hearing on a proposed The plan is intended to replace a new Addison Town Plan will be held 2014 interim plan to which planners by the Addison selectboard on Tues- and selectboard members agreed after day at 7 p.m. at the town clerk’s of- a debate on whether to allow smaller fice. lots in the Low Density ResidenThe plan could lay tial and Agricultural the groundwork for District (LDRA), the new zoning laws that Despite some town’s largest zone. would allow for small- pushback on Selectboard memer lots in the town’s bers wanted smaller the renewable biggest zoning district, lots, setbacks and road and create permanent energy provisions frontages to create regulations at the town in the plan at its more affordable houslevel on solar arrays September public ing, while planners and wind turbines. The hearing, the said many in town fatown now has interim Addison Planning vored open farmland regulations on the sitand vistas. ing of solar arrays that Commission sent With help from the the selectboard adopt- an unchanged Addison County Redraft to the ed in July. gional Planning ComDespite some push- selectboard. mission, the new plan back on the renewable proposes as a solution energy provisions in to the discussion creatthe plan at its September public hear- ing “a density based zoning code” for ing, the Addison Planning Commis- the LDRA district. sion sent an unchanged draft to the Density bonuses will allow landselectboard. owners or developers to create one or Likewise, in an email to the Inde- more smaller lots if they agree to prependent, selectboard Chairman Jeff serve open land on the larger parcel Kauffman said that board also opted that is being subdivided. The tactic to make “no changes” to a document thus allows affordable lots and pre-

serves farmland and scenery. Other plan provisions, to be enforced only when zoning is adopted, would call for the lots created to be surveyed, and wherever possible to be served by a single curb cut. If the selectboard does make any major changes to the planners’ proposed plan after the upcoming hearing, it must return it to the planning commission for further review — and more hearings. Planners this summer also added a number of provisions in an “Energy” section after the Legislature passed a bill giving towns the right to go before the Public Service Board on proposals for solar arrays and wind turbines — but only if towns had standards in their plans to regulate renewable energy projects. The Addison draft plan’s provisions on “Energy” include: • A ban on commercial solar projects generating more than 15 kilowatts (15kw) a year in the Village Center (Addison Four Corners), Shoreland Recreational and Shoreland Residential (along and near Lake Champlain) districts. • A limit of 500kw for projects in the LDRA zone and a complete ban in (See Addison, Page 3A)


PAGE 2A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

County gets new state police head Danoski is the third barracks chief this year

was promoted to captain. Manley now oversees the VSP’s New Haven, Rutland, Shaftsbury, Royalton and Westminster barracks. Manley had By JOHN FLOWERS led the VSP’s Addison County force MIDDLEBURY — Vermont since October of 2013. State Police on Monday officially In a sense, Cacciatore and Danoski confirmed Lt. Jeff Danoski as the are replacing each other: Cacciatore new leader of the agency’s New Ha- is taking Danoski’s former job as diven barracks, which serves Addison rector of the VSP’s Office of ProfesCounty. Danoski, 47, becomes the sional Development & Training in third commander of the New Haven Waterbury. That office is responsible barracks in just four for both the recruitmonths. ment and initial train“This is where I “I’m obviously want to be and ing of new troopers, honored and excited as well as in-service about the opportunity what I want to training for all memto command the New do.” bers. — Lt. Jeff Danoski Haven barracks and Danoski joined work with the citizens the VSP in March of and other agencies in the county,” 1991, soon after completing his studDanoski said during a phone inter- ies in criminal justice and sociology view on Wednesday. “I hold myself at the State University of New York and the members assigned here to at Buffalo. He was first assigned to high standards.” the VSP’s Rutland barracks, where Danoski, a Pittsford resident, re- he worked for 13 years before transplaces Lt. Chuck Cacciatore, who ferring to Waterbury. During his time took the New Haven barracks’ reins with the Office of Professional Dein late August when the previous velopment & Training in Waterbury commander, Lt. Michael Manley, he earned promotions to sergeant

LT. JEFF DANOSKI

and then lieutenant. For the past 18 months, Danoski was assigned to the VSP headquarters as an assistant staff operations commander. He officially began his new job in New Haven on Sunday, Nov. 27. Danoski leads a New Haven barracks that, when fully staffed, includes 15 uniformed personnel: 10 troopers, four sergeants and himself. “I had an interest in assuming command of a barracks,” Danoski said of his new assignment. He anticipates providing continuity to a VSP post that has seen a lot of turnover in Addison County. “This is where I want to be and what I want to do,” Danoski said. With only a few days under his belt as New Haven barracks commander, Danoski has understandably not yet established his longterm vision for law enforcement priorities in Addison County. “I really haven’t had an opportunity yet to sit down with the troopers and the sergeants here,” Danoski said, “but I will meet with them and get our strategic plan together.” He promised the barracks would deliver high quality services on his watch. “I expect (the uniformed personnel) to fulfill the ideals and mission of the VSP as they serve the county and the state,” Danoski said. Major Rick Hopkins, who recently assumed command of the VSP Field Force Division, said the leadership transition in Addison County is in line with a current trend of turnover within the state police ranks. That turnover has largely being driven by recent and impending retirements, most of them senior supervisors. Hopkins said the VSP has seen around 15 retirements this far in 2016, with a similar number forecast for both 2017 and 2018. Most of those retirees are sergeants, lieutenants and captains, and Hopkins said there is often a domino effect in terms filling positions because of promotions when a supervisor leaves. State police uniformed personnel must be age 50 and have contributed 20 years into the system to collect full retirement benefits. Retirement for all members is mandatory at age 55. State police are actively recruiting new troopers, and Hopkins encouraged prospective applicants to check out the agency’s website at vermont.gov/employment. “It’s really challenging to try to manage that and keep up this ambitious agenda that we have,” Hopkins said of the turnover and recruitment process. State police, he said, go through a laborious vetting process for new candidates due to the public safety nature of the positions. “You need to have great people,” he said. The VSP makes around 30 new hires each year, according to Hopkins. Having Cacciatore and Danoski swap assignments was an opportunity for the VSP to “get the right people in the right jobs.” Hopkins pointed to Cacciatore’s past experience with personnel management and Danoski’s desire for — and proven track record with — leadership positions. He believes that the New Haven barracks will now enjoy a more stable run of leadership. “We see (Danoski’s appointment) as a long-term solution for Addison County,” Hopkins said. Reporter John Flowers is at johnf@addisonindependent.com.

Gatekeeper

PIERRE VACHON REHEARSES a scene from the Middlebury Community Players’ production of “The Nutcracker’s Adventure” Tuesday night in the Middlebury Union High School auditorium. Vachon plays Uncle Drosselmeyer and Bittersweet the gatekeeper in the show. Independent photo/Trent Campbell

Addison plan hearing set for Dec. 6 By ANDY KIRKALDY on which planners have been working ADDISON — What could be the for almost four years. final public hearing on a proposed The plan is intended to replace a new Addison Town Plan will be held 2014 interim plan to which planners by the Addison selectboard on Tues- and selectboard members agreed after day at 7 p.m. at the town clerk’s of- a debate on whether to allow smaller fice. lots in the Low Density ResidenThe plan could lay tial and Agricultural the groundwork for District (LDRA), the new zoning laws that Despite some town’s largest zone. would allow for small- pushback on Selectboard memer lots in the town’s bers wanted smaller the renewable biggest zoning district, lots, setbacks and road and create permanent energy provisions frontages to create regulations at the town in the plan at its more affordable houslevel on solar arrays September public ing, while planners and wind turbines. The hearing, the said many in town fatown now has interim Addison Planning vored open farmland regulations on the sitand vistas. ing of solar arrays that Commission sent With help from the the selectboard adopt- an unchanged Addison County Redraft to the ed in July. gional Planning ComDespite some push- selectboard. mission, the new plan back on the renewable proposes as a solution energy provisions in to the discussion creatthe plan at its September public hear- ing “a density based zoning code” for ing, the Addison Planning Commis- the LDRA district. sion sent an unchanged draft to the Density bonuses will allow landselectboard. owners or developers to create one or Likewise, in an email to the Inde- more smaller lots if they agree to prependent, selectboard Chairman Jeff serve open land on the larger parcel Kauffman said that board also opted that is being subdivided. The tactic to make “no changes” to a document thus allows affordable lots and pre-

serves farmland and scenery. Other plan provisions, to be enforced only when zoning is adopted, would call for the lots created to be surveyed, and wherever possible to be served by a single curb cut. If the selectboard does make any major changes to the planners’ proposed plan after the upcoming hearing, it must return it to the planning commission for further review — and more hearings. Planners this summer also added a number of provisions in an “Energy” section after the Legislature passed a bill giving towns the right to go before the Public Service Board on proposals for solar arrays and wind turbines — but only if towns had standards in their plans to regulate renewable energy projects. The Addison draft plan’s provisions on “Energy” include: • A ban on commercial solar projects generating more than 15 kilowatts (15kw) a year in the Village Center (Addison Four Corners), Shoreland Recreational and Shoreland Residential (along and near Lake Champlain) districts. • A limit of 500kw for projects in the LDRA zone and a complete ban in (See Addson, Page 3A)


Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 3A

Forest Service offering $5 permits to cut Xmas trees VERMONT — U.S. Forest Service officials in Vermont are encouraging the public to purchase Christmas tree removal permits should they be interested in a five-dollar tree for the holidays. This year, all fourth graders can take advantage of the Every Kid in a Park Initiative and get a free Christmas tree voucher found here: www. everykidinapark.gov. Fourth graders who present a printed copy of the voucher may redeem it for an EKIP Pass and a Christmas tree removal permit at one of the U.S. Forest offices listed below. This is a one-time opportunity to cut down a Christmas tree on national forest land during the 2016 holiday season. Christmas trees for personal use may be cut on the Green Mountain National Forest, subject to the following conditions: • A “Christmas Tree Removal” permit must be purchased ($5) at one of the Forest Service offices located in Rutland, Middlebury, Manchester Center or Rochester • Permit must be attached to the tree before transporting it from the site where it was cut. • Permit holder is responsible for knowing that the tree comes from Forest Service land. Maps are available when you purchase your permit. • Trees over 20 feet tall are not designated for cutting by the Christmas tree permit. • The height of the tree stump left after a tree has been cut should be six inches or less above the soil. • Christmas trees shall not be cut in active timber sales, wilderness areas, campgrounds, picnic areas, or within 25 feet of any Forest Service, town or state maintained road. • Only one Christmas tree permit will be issued per household per year. • Permits are not refundable. • Trees obtained under the Christ-

mas tree permit may not be resold. U.S. Forest Service offices in Vermont: Rutland: Forest Supervisor’s Office, 231 North Main Street, Rutland, 802-747-6700. Manchester Ranger Station: 2538 Depot Street, Manchester Center, 802-362-2307. Middlebury Ranger Station: 1007 Route 7 South, Middlebury, 802-3884362. Rochester Ranger Station: 99 Ranger Road, Rochester, 802-7674261. The U.S. Forest Service is an agency of the U.S. Department of Agriculture, with a mission of sustaining the health, diversity and productivity of the nation’s forests and grasslands to meet the needs of present and future generations. The Forest Service’s Eastern Region includes 20 states in the Midwest and East, stretching from Maine, to Maryland, to Missouri, to Minnesota. There are 17 national forests and one national tallgrass prairie in the Eastern Region. For more information, visit www.fs.usda.gov/R9. The U.S. Forest Service manages 193 million acres of public land, provides assistance to state and private landowners, and maintains the largest forestry research organization in the world. Public lands the Forest Service manages contribute more than $13 billion to the economy each year through visitor spending alone. Those same lands provide 20 percent of the nation’s clean water supply, a value estimated at $7.2 billion per year. The agency has either a direct or indirect role in stewardship of about 80 percent of the 850 million forested acres within the U.S., of which 100 million acres are urban forests where most Americans live. For more information, visit www.fs.usda.gov/.

Bristol seeking volunteers to serve on ANESD board

BRISTOL — With the passage on Nov. 8 of the Addison Northeast Supervisory Union plan to consolidate governance and budgeting as described in Act 46, a new Supervisory District board is forming. Bristol is allotted five seats to this new board; currently only two are filled. The Bristol School Board is seeking volunteers who are committed to and passionate about the direction of the five-town schools to step forward and apply to fill those last three spots for Bristol residents on the new ANESD board. The new ANESD board will have an organizational meeting some time in early 2017 and begin its work in preparation of taking over all ANESU operations by

July 2018. The current governance structure including the Bristol Elementary School board will remain in operation until that time, and is responsible for appointing the remaining three members to the new board. Any Bristol resident who would like to be considered for this opportunity is asked to submit a letter of interest to the Bristol School Board, Attn: Karen Wheeler at the ANESU Office on Munsill Avenue in Bristol. Applicants will be invited to attend the December meeting of the Bristol board at which time representatives will be appointed. This meeting is scheduled for Dec. 12 at 6:30 p.m. in the Bristol Elementary library.

Addison (Continued from Page 2A) the Conservation district. • A ban of commercial wind projects on Snake Mountain. • A case-by-case review of smaller-scale (50-meter) wind turbines in some areas considered suitable. • Support for home roof-mounted solar arrays, but a limit of how high they can reach over roof peaks (10 feet). • Requirements for the use of landscape screening and natural topography to limit projects’ visual impact, which will be assessed using standard state methods to evaluate neighborhood impact. Residents Jeff Nelson and Alden Harwood in September said the town lacked the authority to establish those provisions and in some cases they were discriminatory because the same standards were not

applied to other commercial development. Planners defended the section, noting that much of the language has been approved by regional planners, and is thus likely to be legal, and that the chapter meets the goal of getting the town a say when proposed solar or wind projects go before the Public Service Board seeking Certificates of Public Good. Among other provisions, the draft town plan calls for establishing the town’s first conservation commission; adds pages of maps devoted to facilities, resources, soil septic suitability, population density and more; details survey results in a number of topics; creates a new “Flood Overlay District” within the Conservation District; and makes specific recommendations for how to obtain the goals included in each chapter.

THE MIDDLEBURY AREA Land Trust is planning upgrades to this railroad crossing on the Trail Around Middlebury near the suspension footbridge over Otter Creek. Independent photo/Trent Campbell

MALT to upgrade path at railroad crossing $37K fix to include gate, pad over tracks

tary path — made of hard-packed gravel and some wood shavings — at that rail crossing. It’s about six feet wide. Work vehicles can cross it. The By JOHN FLOWERS college has a pump station near the MIDDLEBURY — The Middle- crossing, and the school runs some bury Area Land Trust (MALT) is classes, at the adjacent ball fields, planning state-mandated improve- noted MALT Executive Director ments to a prominent Carl Robinson. rail crossing along “This is a very He said the crossthe Trail Around important connector ing has come under Middlebury, upincreased scrutiny grades intended to for the TAM, and of late, with recent make the increasing- also as a path for improvements to the ly popular path safer everybody. Kids use rail line and in light for walkers, runners it to get to school, of wider use of the and cyclists. TAM. The TAM has and it is used for The estimated commuting and as a become a very popu$37,000 project will lar running path. involve installation recreation path.” “It came to light — MALT Executive that this needed to of metal gates and Director Carl Robinson be worked on,” Robasphalt surface at the crossing, which inson said. is located just west of the swing“It’s a safety requirement,” he ing footbridge, known as Boathouse added of the VTrans request. “We’re Bridge, that spans the Otter Creek. It going to be required to install some is on the trail between Fucile Field, safety gates with a pad over the which hosts Middlebury Union High railroad tracks, so it will be easier School soccer, baseball and softball to cross. Right now, there’s quite a games, to the east and the Middle- big lip for people to walk across, run bury College ball fields to the west. over, or bike over.” Currently, there’s just a rudimenMALT, Vermont Railway, VTrans

New Haven town budget draft includes pay raises

By GAEN MURPHREE NEW HAVEN — The current preliminary draft of the 2017 New Haven town budget includes a wage increase of at least 3 percent for all town employees. At its Nov. 15 meeting, the selectboard discussed and voted on additional wage changes for town employees: • Town clerk, town treasurer, 5 percent increase. • Zoning administrator, 6 percent increase. • Zoning administrator’s assistant, 5 percent increase. • Full-time road crew workers, 5 percent increase. • Selectboard clerk, 5 percent increase. • Development Review Board minute taker, 3 percent increase. Additionally, the selectboard voted to pay all three town auditors $17 per hour and to pay all three listers $15 per hour. Different selectboard members

spoke out to recommend wage increases for different types of employees. Selectboard Chair Kathy Barrett made the motion to increase wages for the town clerk, treasurer, zoning administrator’s assistant, selectboard clerk and DRB minute taker. Selectman Doug Tolles moved to increase wages for the auditors and listers. And Selectman John Roleau moved to increase the zoning adminstrator’s wages and raised the discussion of wage increases for the fulltime road crew. The selectboard will review its proposed wage changes and finalize them at its Dec. 6 meeting. The selectboard will continue to work on the draft 2017 budget to get it ready by late January, in time to be warned for Town Meeting Day. New Haven residents will have their opportunity to vote that budget up or down on March 7. Reporter Gaen Murphree is reached at gaenm@addisonindependent.com.

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and Middlebury College are working collaboratively to plan the project to make sure it is well designed and adequately financed. The college owns the fields on both sides of the track. Vermont Railway owns the track right of way. “We are working on this together to get these gates and crossing pad installed. Since it is on the Vermont Railway right of way, work has to be done closely with them,” Robinson said. “There are some specifications we will have to work with.” MALT received an estimate of $37,000 from ECI Engineers Construction Inc. to do the job. Middlebury Town Manager Kathleen Ramsay said an initial draft of the fiscal year 2018 budget includes a sum of $7,500 for the

MALT rail crossing. Robinson said he has yet to approach the town with a specific financial request. He will eventually make a pitch to both the town and Middlebury College. The organization will search for grants and solicit donations in an effort to come up with the entire $37,000 budget. “If it could all be funded through grants, I think that would be great,” Robinson said. “This is a very important connector for the TAM, and also as a path for everybody. Kids use it to get to school, and it is used for commuting and as a recreation path. I think it’s an important resource that we have.” If all goes well, the rail crossing should be completed by next spring, according to Robinson.


PAGE 4A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

A DDIS ON INDE P E NDEN T

Letters

Editorials

to the Editor

Sheriff’s action was legal, but not good public policy Ever so often, all of us will make a judgment call that is off base, and we sometimes struggle to find the footing to set it right. That’s particularly so when no rules or laws are broken; or when no outright violation of norms were broken, yet still the call falls short of expectations. Such is the case with Addison County Sheriff Don Keeler’s decision to use the general fund account from the sheriff’s office to pay for a political ad supporting his favored candidate for high bailiff. That candidate was one of four in the running. (See story on Page 1A.) The amount we’re talking about is inconsequential — $154. The election also was won by a candidate Keeler did not support, so Keeler’s action did not affect the election. Nor, and this is the most important thing to remember, was Keeler’s action illegal. On the contrary, it was perfectly legal. So what’s the story? It’s the principle of using funds from a publicly entrusted office for partisan politics. As State Auditor Doug Hoffer, who audits the state’s sheriff’s offices, said in a story in today’s Addison Independent, “Generally, public funds should never be used for partisan political matters.” And as Secretary of State James Condos stated in the same story, “I think it’s certainly going down a dangerous and slippery slope to allow state funds or government funds to advocate for specific candidates. It surprises me that (Keeler) would do that. Maybe he has a different take on it.” Keeler does, of course, have a different take. He maintains the money is his to spend as he pleases. “That money in that general fund is my money under my direction,” he told The Independent. “…It’s not county funds, it’s not federal funds, it’s Don Keeler’s funds. It’s for the work that I do with contracts.” He’s right about that. The money Keeler is referring to is raised by the fees he charges for services and the contracts he fulfills for the 14 towns he serves. And it is separate from the relatively small amount of money he receives from the county’s budget. Indirectly, however, the town contracts are paid by local taxpayers and how that money is spent does make a difference to voters. Inappropriate use of those funds may not rise to the level of being illegal, but voters might certainly think it is wrong. Sheriff Keeler could have said, “Hey, while it’s legal and it is my right to spend the money the way I see it, I understand while you’re questioning this expense and concede it would be better if I reimbursed the department and opted not to use sheriff department funds in that manner in the future.” End of story. But Keeler is struggling to find his footing, and at the moment he’s fallen back on the legal aspects of his rights, rather than on what’s right. We want to emphasize this is not a huge deal. The amount of money is small; the action was legal. This is not a scandal. But it’s also not good policy and we would hope Keeler will publicly acknowledge that in the near future and, in so doing, set a better precedent — and perhaps someone in the Legislature might want to tweak the state’s campaign finance laws to simply state that public funds should not be used in partisan political matters. Seems simple enough.

Havurah grateful to its neighbors The members of Havurah are deeply grateful to our Middlebury and Addison County neighbors and to friends from farther away for their expressions of solidarity — in word, deed and supportive attendance of our recent Saturday morning service, Nov. 19 — following the discovery of hostile graffiti on our door. Though we like to think of Vermont as a refuge from baseless hatred and intolerance, we must acknowledge that it sometimes lies just below the surface even here and needs little encouragement to emerge. Communication, education and the determination of a united community are our best hope for creating a culture of mutual understanding and preventing future manifestations of bigotry. We are proud to work with our neighbors and friends in this all-important effort. With appreciation and hope. Michael and Judy Olinick on behalf of the Addison County Jewish Congregation

Electoral college should say ‘no’

Through the snow

A CRUSHED STONE trail remains snow-free through a forest of snow-covered trees in Middlebury last week.

Independent photo/Trent Campbell

Angelo S. Lynn

Trump and the climate change narrative

From hate springs love In the wake of Republican Donald Trump election as president, more than 700 incidents of “hateful harassment” were documented in the first week after the Nov. 8 election. It was, without doubt, a reaction to the hate-filled rhetoric used by Mr. Trump to pit one America against the other. Trump tapped into America’s ugly underbelly, stirred up resentments, and brought that anger out into the open. Two previously reported incidents occurred here in Middlebury — the scrawling of swastikas on the door of Havurah House in Middlebury and the words F*** MUSLIMS/#TRUMP2016 written on a whiteboard outside a Middlebury College dorm room occupied by two Muslim students. Yet, from such ugliness springs hope. This Saturday, Dec. 3, the multi-faith Middlebury Area Clergy Association has organized “A Community Gathering of Love and Hope.” According to the group, that’s when “area citizens—of any faith or no faith—will be invited to assemble at meeting places around greater Middlebury between noon and 12:30. Shortly before 1 p.m. they’ll begin to make their way toward the Green, carrying donations of cash, winter clothing and food for H.O.P.E. (Helping Overcome Poverty’s Effects). On the Green, a parked truck will receive the donations. Participants will be invited to leave messages of solidarity and hope.” That event will allow the community to gather and unite, but many in the county have already responded, according to the clergy group. “After the swastika incident, we received hundreds of e-mails and countless letters of support,” said Sarit Katzew, the director of education for Havurah House. “Our sidewalks and walkway were covered with uplifting messages of hope and love. Kids from area schools and churches made us cards, and people I’d never met would stop me to say how upset they were by what happened and that they stand with Havurah.” And there is this statement of common hope from the Rev. Tim Franklin, pastor of the Bridport Congregational Church: “My faith teaches me that the best and most powerful response in any situation is love, and my faith connects me to a supply of inexhaustible love. On Dec. 3 we’re inviting all people, no matter what they’re experiencing or feeling, be it fear or anger or intimidation or anxiety, to choose to respond with a tangible act of love. Bringing our donations of food and money to H.O.P.E. helps move us toward what we all want Addison County to be — a community of love and justice and peace. “My prayer is that the love and goodwill that already exist in our community will deepen and grow in the face of the acrimonious times we find ourselves in, and that this gathering will be just one in a continuing series of everyday expressions of love that make Addison County a beautiful and ennobling place to live.” That, at least, would be a silver lining to these post-election events.

Angelo S. Lynn

ADDISON COUNTY

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Liberals everywhere are gnashing their teeth over shortages and the flooding of land where hundreds of what will happen under President Donald Trump and millions of people live — Ebell says that global warming has actually been good for humanity. the GOP Congress. How did we get here? Will Trump abolish Obamacare and deprive 22 milThe quick answer is that most voters don’t really lion Americans of the healthcare coverage they just worry about climate change — and that got? Will he cancel the Iran deal and move Donald Trump won a large majority of the world closer to nuclear war? Will he electoral votes, despite the fact that Hillreally try to deport 11 million immigrants, ary Clinton won the popular election by 2.5 slash the Medicaid safety net, and penalize million votes. women who get an abortion? And how did Trump do that? Whatever the outcome of those worries, One key is that he controlled the narrait’s clear that Trump plans to reverse the tive — creating a convincing enough story Obama Administration’s efforts to confront about why he was the better candidate. the dangers of climate change. After all, what does “Stronger Together” This is, after all, a president-elect who really mean, in the face of the much more has said that climate change is a hoax perpowerful “Make America Great Again.” petrated by the Chinese to steal American While liberal intellectuals were snarkily jobs. asking when Trump thought America had Trump did recently tell The New York previously been “great,” enough voters got Times he thinks there might be “some” conhis real message: “Make America White nection between human activity and climate Again.” change. As I was reminded last week while standThat’s like saying he thinks there might be some connection between the Colorado by Gregory Dennis ing in the TSA line at the San Francisco airport, the electorate in states like California River and formation of the Grand Canyon. is now less than 50 percent white. DemogWould Trump consider doing something raphy is eventually on side of the Democrats. But in the to combat climate change? It “depends on how much it’s going to cost our com- meantime we are stuck with Trump. That’s got me thinking about how to change the narpanies,” he told the Times. Myron Ebell, who is heading up the Environmental rative about climate change. How might we change what we say about climate Protection Agency element of the Trump transition, is a well-known climate denier. In the face of scientific cer- change so it becomes a more pressure issue for voters tainty that burning fossil fuels causes climate change, — and they support candidates such as Hillary Clindestabilizes weather patterns, and will cause food (See Dennis, Page 5A)

Between The Lines

Trump has range of Supreme Court options Soon after his inauguration on Jan. 20, President-elect Trump will send to the Senate the name of his nominee to replace the late Justice Antonin Scalia on the Supreme Court. The nominee will come from a list of 21 names that Trump announced during the campaign. With one exception (Sen. Mike Lee of Utah), all 21 are currently either federal judges or state supreme court judges in Midwestern, southern or Rocky Mountain states. All the names on Trump’s list have been vetted by the Heritage Foundation, the Federalist Society and other conservative advocacy groups. Four of the current eight Supreme Court justices were nominated by Democratic presidents, and four were nominated by Republicans. However, the dynamics of the court are more complex than just a four-to-four partisan split. Justices Clarence Thomas and By Eric L. Davis Samuel Alito are the most conservative members. They are most inclined to adopt the “originalist” interpretation of the constitution emphasized by Scalia — interpreting the document in the light of the framers’ intent rather than in the light of historical development and contemporary understandings. Chief Justice John Roberts and Justice Anthony Kennedy, while often voting the same as Thomas and Alito, are not rigid conservatives, and are much less likely to adopt an originalist interpretation. Sometimes these justices will vote with the court’s moderates and liberals, as did Roberts in his decisions upholding the Affordable Care Act, or Kennedy in his decisions on the constitu-

Politically Thinking

tional right of same-sex couples to marry. The strongest voices on the court for an expansive approach to constitutional interpretation are those of Justices Ruth Bader Ginsburg and Sonia Sotomayor. These justices are most likely to take issue with an originalist interpretation, and are most likely to argue that the Constitution should be read broadly to protect the rights of women, minorities and other historically disadvantaged groups. The remaining two Democratic appointees, Justices Stephen Breyer and Elena Kagan, often agree on the results with Ginsburg and Sotomayor, but they are less likely to write sweeping opinions based on grand theory. By writing more modest, narrowly focused opinions, Breyer and Kagan are sometimes able to pick up the support of Roberts and/or Kennedy, leaving Alito and Thomas isolated in dissent. Experts who have studied the records of Trump’s 21 possible justices note that, while all of them could be considered conservative, some are more likely to fall into the Roberts-Kennedy camp, while others are more similar to Thomas, Alito, and Scalia. An example of a moderate conservative on Trump’s list is Judge Diane Sykes, who sits on the federal appeals court in Chicago. She is not known as an ideologue, and she has sometimes voted with moderate and liberal colleagues on her court, for example in a decision striking down Wisconsin’s voter ID law. Sykes is the sort of nominee who would likely be confirmed rather easily, (See Davis, Page 5A)

According to a Nov. 21 article in The Atlantic, the Electoral College was created so that “the office of President will never fall to the lot of any man who is not … endowed with the requisite qualifications.” The author writes: “The electors, Hamilton believed, would prevent someone with ‘talents for low intrigue, and the little arts of popularity’ from becoming president. And they would combat ‘the desire in foreign powers to gain an improper ascendant in our councils.’ They would prevent America’s adversaries from meddling in its elections.” In other words, the founders created the Electoral College to prevent the election of someone like Donald Trump. Go online to http://tinyurl.com/ jramxaf for a clear and informed discussion of the issue. I urge the Electoral College to reject Donald Trump as president because his opponent won the popular vote by over 2 million votes; and because Russia, false news stories, district gerrymandering, and the FBI interfered with the election. I urge the Electoral College to reject Donald Trump because he has made it clear that he holds women, Muslims, Mexicans, the environment, a balanced Supreme Court, science, and anyone who disagrees with him in low regard. Although I understand the appeal of someone who promises to return us to a time that, in retrospect, may seem idyllic, but he simply does not have the requisite qualifications to be President. His record of fraud alone is enough to disqualify him. The Founders had the wisdom to build a safety value into our election system. The Presidential Election of 2016 is what it was designed to address. Go here to sign a petition to this end: http://tinyurl. com/jgsd6re. Harry Chaucer New Haven

Letter, headline were imprecise

Thanks for sharing various persons’ reflections on the recent election, including a letter with the newspaper’s title “Nation’s founding documents show us way forward” (Addison Independent, Nov. 21). Both the letter cited and its Addy-Indy-supplied title could use an improvement, i.e., that the Declaration of Independence was a very important document, drawn up and signed by some very brave, self-appointed men in Philadelphia who pledged their lives, their fortunes, and their sacred honor — but it was not a founding document per se. Those brave men in Philadelphia did NOT claim to pledge the support of the citizenry, who had not chosen or authorized these men to speak in their behalf. Indeed, many citizens were violently opposed to what these brave men were claiming as the best way to proceed. It was victory in the Revolutionary War that set the challenging path toward an independent nation, and not merely a (See Letter, Page 5A)


Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 5A

Spinoza’s Religion Editor’s note: This is the 15th in ics is not about such things. The a series of essays about the Dutch practice of looking for favors from philosopher Benedict Spinoza a presumed supreme supernatural (1632-1677) and his thoughts con- power was repugnant to him, as it was, by the way, to Lucretius, who cerning nature, God and politics. In the first essay of this series, Spinoza had read and approved. But there are other sorts of reI wrote that Spinoza practiced no religion, professed no faith and ligion, which prescribe meditadid not affiliate with any religious tion and seek no reward other community. He was neither a Jew than enlightenment, a clarity of nor a Christian, which were the mind with regard to truth and realonly real options in 17th century ity. This kind of religion seems a Holland. He lived by choice a sec- better fit for Spinoza. To discover ular life, publicly and privately. In whether it really fits, we must repour time, there are many who live licate his metaphysical thinking, like Spinoza, and yet who admit to see whether thinking after him to a lingering sense of religion or about the nature of things satisfies and brings clarity and spirituality, one that resolution to a secular is often vague and religious longing. ill defined, perhaps a Now to find an anmere longing. Could swer to our question it be that Spinoza had concerning Spinoza’s the same feeling? It religious sensibility, is a question worth we must begin to read exploring. For we the most difficult and can be sure that a rofor many off-putting bust thinker like Spipart of his literary noza, this athlete of body: his great work, the mind, would have which he titled “Ethbrought it to clarity ics.” I beg the readand definition. er’s patience; it is a Consider the eviSpinoza on very great work. As dence. Spinoza called the object of his su- Nature, God and a literary work, it belongs in a class with preme idea “God.” Politics: Joyce’s “Ulysses, or And he promised that “Finnegan’s Wake.” the knowledge of An essay by It begins with a set God, as he represents Victor Nuovo of definitions, words it, “feeds the mind Middlebury College that are supposed to with a joy entirely fashion in the mind exempt from sadprofessor emeritus that thinks them a ness.” He described of philosophy grasp of reality: ulthis knowledge as timate reality, being love, albeit an intellectual love, and he imagined it to itself, eternal, complete, selfbe a saving passion that frees the sufficient, encompassing vast and mind from anxiety and from every changing landscapes. By cause of itself I understand other disturbing passion, replacing them with gentle ones that provide something whose essence [what it quiet joy and infinite calm. It is is] involves existence [that it exlike redemption. This knowledge ists], or whose essence cannot be of God or Nature was for him not conceived except as existing. That thing is said to be finite in an occasional idea; rather it was an enduring state of a mind engaged its own kind which can be limited with the whole of reality. It was by another of the same nature. [For metaphysical. So, was Spinoza’s example: a body of a certain kind metaphysics his religion, and if so, — a mere human body, or a galaxy, what sort of religious sensibility or a universe is limited by and limits other bodies etc.; bodies cannot did it produce? We can be sure that Spinoza’s be in the same place at the same religion would have nothing to do time; and while universes have with traditional theistic religion, their own space-time, they do not which is a practical affair involv- and perhaps cannot infringe upon ing transactions or contractual each other.] By substance I understand agreements between a personal divinity and his chosen clients. “I something that exists in itself shall be your God and you shall and is conceived through itself; a be my people”; “Believe in the thing whose concept does not reLord Jesus Christ and you shall quires the idea of another thing to be saved.” Spinoza’s metaphys- be thought [a thing that is not like

anything else, that is unique, selfdependent, and self-sufficient]. By attribute, I understand what the intellect perceives of a substance as constituting its essence [attributes are the qualities that define a thing]. By mode I understand the affections of a substance, or that which is another through which it is conceived. By God [or Nature] I understand a being absolutely infinite, that is a substance consisting of an infinity of attributes, of which each one expresses an eternal or infinite essence. That thing is called free which exists from the necessity of its nature alone, and is determined to act by itself alone. By eternity I understand existence itself. Here it is, the whole of reality in eight definitions. What are we to make of it? To comprehend it requires that one enter an infinite intelligence, which encompasses reality’s every detail: what was, what is, and whatever will be, a mind reflecting the whole of reality and its never ceasing generative power, God or Nature, the cause of itself, free, eternal, a being that cannot be thought not to exist. Now consider yourself, a finite being, neither self-conceived nor self-sufficient, one of many things that come and go, a creature of nature; not a lasting thing, hence neither a substance, nor an attribute; merely a mode, a modification, a bundle affections or affectations, a passing fancy, soon to be gone without a trace. Yet with the aid of your intelligence, you are able to let yourself go, to abandon your attachment to a vanishing unsubstantial self and enter the infinite expanse of Being, never ending, eternal, all encompassing. Universes and worlds pass in review. Nations and empires rise and fall. Creatures are conceived, born, and die; here is a vast display of reality, tragic, comic, pathetic, or sublime, passing in review. If you ask, “What does it all mean?” you will receive no answer. But it is awesome, wonderful, the ultimate mystery, yet curiously welcoming. Postscript: An English translation of Spinoza’s “Ethics” by Edwin Curley is published by Penguin Books. It is affordable and fits easily in your hand, and, although not so easy to read, if you read it persistently, it will become a welcome companion. Ask at your local bookseller.

Letter (Continued from Page 4A) statement to that effect, a path that initially the Republic of Vermont did not join. The claim was “that these united Colonies are, and of Right, ought to be Free and Independent States….” (Capitalization as per the document.) Contrary to the above-cited letter and to the implications of your newspaper’s supplied title, the Declaration of Independence was only that; it did not claim nor plan how to join those “free and independent states” in to a new nation. Our country has had two “found-

Davis (Continued from Page 4A) obtaining the votes of all Republican senators and some Democrats as well. An example of a more ideological conservative on Trump’s list is Judge William Pryor, of the federal appeals court in Atlanta. Pryor is a former attorney general of Alabama and a protégé of U.S. attorney generaldesignate Sen. Jeff Sessions. Pryor is a strong originalist, and a vocal critic of the Supreme Court’s current direction on topics such as abortion and constitutional rights for LGBT people. If Trump were to nominate Pryor, or someone like him, nearly all Senate Democrats would vigorously oppose him. Could they pick up the votes of three Republicans and defeat the nomination? If not, would they filibuster the nomination? If so, would Majority Leader Mitch McConnell invoke the “nuclear option” and try to eliminate the filibuster on Supreme Court nominations, as it has been eliminated for nominations to the executive branch and the lower federal courts? Eric L. Davis is professor emeritus of political science at Middlebury College.

ing documents,” the Articles of Confederation (12 July 1776) and the Constitution (4 March 1789). We now exist and govern under this second founding document. Opinions and principles espoused by the Declaration and the Articles do not bear legal force on our government, though the thought in those documents can be very useful stimuli toward our on-going consideration of government in the United States. Why do we continue to hoodwink each other into thinking that the Declaration of Independence was a “founding document” that

establishes much of anything beyond an opinion? Admittedly, persons, especially those with theocratic hopes, tend to cite convenient lines from the Declaration as “proof” that our country should be a “Christian nation.” A careful reading of the Constitution, of course, debunks that false claim. Your letters-to-the-editor authors should write with the same care with which Dr. Nuovo writes. He sets a high standard for the present writer as well and for which this writer is thankful. Dr. Karl E, Moyer Lancaster, Pa.

Dennis (Continued from Page 4A) ton who promised to do something about it? I asked several of my thoughtful friends about that. “I’ve always wondered why (climate change) didn’t get more traction,” Middlebury College sociology professor Jamie McCallum told me. “It seems that all those red staters appreciate national parks and monuments carved into stone. Why can’t ‘climate change’ be like ‘protecting the natural beauty of America’ or ‘safeguarding our habitat’ in a way that appeals to sport hunters, for example? “I think the main sticking point is that the logic of climate change sort of ends up telling people we have to do with less. Or at least that’s what they hear. Less plastic cups, less gasoline, less consumption of everything. “Plenty of people are already doing with less,” McCallum continued, “and they’d like to do with a lot more. So they resent the accusation that it is their turn to sacrifice when they have already been asked to cut back in terms of wages and benefits… “Alternately, I suppose you could think of climate change like my grandma used to say about God: ‘It is real whether you believe in it or not, so you had better act accordingly.’” There’s something to what McCallum’s grandmother said when it’s applied to climate change. We can argue all we want about how serious a problem it is — but the physics are not favorable. The planet is getting hotter, and it’s starting to have a real effect. Kathy Blume, who heads the 350Vermont.org board, has this perspective of how to change the narrative: “It’s about using the arts as an integral part of putting your vision/ communications forward, because they’re already designed to engage the head and the heart simultaneously, and because they understand the power of quality storytelling. “It’s also about the coalition-

building that was, for example, the reason the People’s Climate March in NYC was so successful. We’re learning about embedded racism, embedded sexism, embedded patriarchy, embedded class/economic inequities. The list goes on… “I don’t think it’s ultimately about better slogans,” she added. “It’s about more equitable, more heterogeneous, more resilient communities and deeper relationships with everyone in those communities.” Jon Isham, a Middlebury College economist who focuses much of his work in environmental issues, noted one recent small victory in Florida. There, a grassroots campaign “that included solar manufacturers, environmental organizations and Tea Party groups stood up for low-cost, decentralized solar power. Monopolists and their backers lost; consumers and small businesses won.” I’m with Isham on this. I think the most persuasive argument we have is economic. Pointing to Elon Musk, who is developing solar batteries, cars and other technologies that promote clean energy, Isham said, “Musk is the new Thomas Edison. Whose side are you on? Musk, or those who are profiting from the old ways? What Vermonters would not prefer a house with solar roof shingles, a battery pack in the garage, an electric heat pump, and an electric car or two — which would all be less expensive than their current fossil-fuel powered household? “Green Mountain Power is in the forefront of this clean energy revolution,” Isham noted. “Are Vermonters with these Rutland-based innovators or with D.C.-based monopolists who don’t want to ‘drain the swamp’?” We’re facing at least four years of policy out of Washington that will reward the fossil fuel industry and push us closer to climate chaos. So it’s time those of us in the environmental movement started talking more about the economy and the effects of climate change. Especially if the main worry is “how

much it’s going to cost our companies.” We need to better connect the dots between climate change and weather catastrophes like Katrina and Irene. We need to be talking to people whose jobs are tied up with the military industrial complex. To point out, for example, that America’s largest naval base in Norfolk, Va., will one day be underwater unless we stop melting the ice caps. We need to be talking to insurance companies about the huge losses they will bear from increasingly out-of-control weather events. Real estate people understand money. Let’s start talking more about how flooding along our coasts is going to wipe out billions of dollars in value — to the point that this factor alone could destabilize the economy. “A warming planet has already forced a number of industries — coal, oil, agriculture and utilities among them — to account for potential future costs of a changed climate,” The New York Times reports. Now its real estate’s turn. The chief economist for mortgage giant Freddie Mac recently said it’s only a matter of time before the rise in sea level is catastrophic. We’re approaching a point, he said, when many residents will simply abandon the coastlines — leaving their mortgages unpaid and prompting another meltdown in the housing market. And this time around, he said, those housing prices might never recover. The environmental movement will find little solace in Washington for the next four years. But we can find receptive ears among those who care about the economy. So here’s my suggestion for the new narrative: “Climate Change: We Can’t Afford It.” Gregory Dennis’s column appears here every other Thursday and is archived on his blog at www.GregDennis.WordPress.com. Email: GregDennisVt@yahoo.com. Twitter: #greengregdennis.

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LEICESTER — The Leicester Historical Society is sponsoring their annual Memory Tree(s) at the Four Corners. You may remember a departed loved one by purchasing a bulb for $1, or six names for $5. Names clearly written, with your payment made to the Leicester Historical Society, can be sent to Diane Benware at 1594 Old Jerusalem Road, Salisbury, VT 05769. The deadline for submitting names is Monday, Dec. 12. The trees will be lit at 4 p.m. on Saturday, Dec. 17. The list of names will be posted at the Town Office. The Leicester Historical Society is sponsoring Prize Bingo on Saturday, Dec. 10, at 1 p.m. at the Senior Center. Refreshments will be served and all are welcome. Funds raised help with the maintenance of the historical buildings at the Four Corners.

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“I really enjoy teaching people in my own age group!” Professor John Berninghausen, with student Jo Birnbaum


PAGE 6A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Obituaries

ADDISON COUNTY

Virginia McClain, 96, Missouri INDEPENDENCE, Mo. — Virginia McClain passed away peacefully on Nov. 28, 2016 after a period of declining health. Virginia was born in Green Forest, Ark. on Dec. 9, 1919 to Tom Anderson and Ethel Callen. She lived most of her life in Independence, Mo., as well as wintering in the Rio Grande Valley. She and her husband Jay traveled throughout the world and had many adventures. She was predeceased by her husband of 70 years, JR McClain; son, Paul; and daughter-in-law Cindy Mills. She is survived by daughter Chris McClain of Ferrisburgh, Vt.; daughter-in-law Heidi McClain; grandsons Ned and wife Sarah; Brad and wife Krista; and greatgrandchildren Claire, Ajax and Emma, all of Colorado. She was an accomplished artist, a voracious reader and a world traveler. She will be missed by her family including dozens of nieces, nephews and their children and her many, many friends.

VIRGINIA MCCLAIN Visitation hours will be on Friday, Dec. 2, from 6 to 8 p.m., at Speaks Chapel on 39th Street in Independence, Mo. Burial will be at the Mound Grove Cemetery, No. River Road, Independence, Mo. Please consider donating to the ALS Association, 1275 K Street NW, Suite 250, Washington DC 20005 in memory of Paul, or the charity of your choice. ◊

Roger Joseph Gevry, 76, Addison ADDISON, Vt. — Roger Joseph Gevry passed away unexpectedly at home on Nov. 24, 2016. Roger was born in Addison to Cecile LaFramboise Gevry and Lawrence Gevry on Feb. 5, 1940. He was predeceased by both of his parents. Roger was a 1958 graduate of Vergennes High School and was the Vermont State Champion in Cross Country in 1957 under Coach Merle Crown. He enlisted in the Vermont Army National Guard in 1957 at age 17. He was a dairy farmer, carpenter and custodian, retiring after 10 years from Porter Hospital in 2005. He is survived by his devoted wife of 58 years, Joanne Thompson Gevry; his children, Melissa and Roger Bienvenue; Melinda and Dean Gilmore; Michlynn Barrows; and Matthew and Pamela (Clark) Gevry. Also mourning his loss are his beloved grandchildren and great-grandchildren, Jamie and Eli Smith; Ethan and Kayla Gevry; and Adeline and Steele Smith. Roger was a stand-in father for 37 years to Denis Barrows’ children Stephen, Pixie and Kelley Barrows, and Bambi Lombard. Roger is also survived by twin brother Rheal (Gail); brothers Bernard (Jenny); Leo and David; and

ROGER GEVRY sister Joyce (Joe) Tarte; and many nieces, nephews, grand-nieces, grand-nephews and cousins. To honor Roger’s wishes there will be no visiting hours and no funeral. For those who wish to honor Roger’s memory, donations may be made to the Addison Volunteer Fire Department, 44 VT Route 17 West, Addison, VT 05491. Godspeed Roger. In peace, go home. ◊

In Loving Memory of

Marc Lawrence LaPete Dec. 3, 1969 – Jan. 5. 2007

Marc, you are in our thoughts and prayers as we remember you on your birthday. Forever in our hearts! Dad, Mom and Chris

Obituary Guidelines The Addison Independent does not charge to print a 100-word Notice of Passing. Families may opt for unedited Paid Obituaries, which are designated with “◊” at the end. Guidelines are published on our web site: www.addisonindependent.com/obits.

Thomas Howard Geno, 85, Proctor WILLISTON, Vt. — Thomas Howard Geno of Proctor, Vt., passed away peacefully in his home in Williston early Sunday morning after a valiant fight against advancing vascular dementia. He was surrounded by his wife, Marie; son Marc; and beloved caregiver Josephine. He is also survived by his loving step-daughter Caroline Juneau and her three remarkable children, Alex, Matt and Leena Unger of Burlington. Tom was born in Proctor in 1931, the only son of Dolores Pauline Geno and Howard Vincent Geno. Propelled by his love of reading, music and Hollywood, then later his Latin and French mentor Lyrace Fontaine at Proctor High School, he went on to teach at both the high school and college levels. He earned several advanced degrees in the study and teaching of French, culminating in a Ph.D. while at U.V.M. He met Marie in the early 1960s while teaching at Middlebury College. They married and eventually moved to Burlington where Marc was born in 1967. Tom and Marie taught together at U.V.M. for over 25 years. While there, he co-founded the V.O.S.P. foreign exchange and specialized in theater, French-African literature and pedagogy. He was an avid member and sometimes top leader within every active foreign language association, received many awards of recognition for his involvement and teaching, and was highly esteemed by his colleagues, many of whom became his closest friends. Tom’s boundless energy also led him around the world to study, teach and lecture, first in Indochina and later Africa. Not only did he inspire countless college and high school students with his love of music and theater, but he also acted in and then directed many memorable productions in Burlington, at U.V.M. and especially with Lyric Theater. Even teaching full time, he jumped at the occasion to portray a notorious or difficult role on stage, as this may have been his first and most lasting vocation.

LIGHTHOUSE POINT, Fla. — Stephen Gregory Senesac was born in Burlington, Vt., on Nov. 21, 1957 and raised in Vergennes. He passed away Oct. 31, 2016. Stevie was a 30-year resident of Lighthouse Point, Fla. He was predeceased by his mother, Andrea; sister Frances; and brother Lee. He is survived by his father Levi; sister Deborah;

THOMAS GENO Upon retiring, Tom worked many years diligently in the archives of the Society of Saint Edmund to produce an insightful history of the Edmundites’ challenging years moving to Vermont. Tom was delighted to give back to the religious community who had helped guide him as a young man while attending Saint Michael’s College. He was also a devoted and engaged parishioner at Immaculate Heart of Mary in Williston. Thanks to the meticulous care of our family doctor, the expert specialists of the U.V.M. Medical Center, the love and patience of Tom’s many care-takers and the Visiting Nurses Association’s superb organization, Dad was able to spend his last and possibly most remarkable years at home in Williston. He will be long remembered as a charismatic and involved community member, as well as an expert teacher and actor. He was a dear friend to many, and the kindest, most loving husband and father. A funeral service will be held on Saturday, Dec. 3, 2016, at 11 a.m. in Immaculate Heart of Mary Church. Interment will be in the spring in East Cemetery, Williston. Arrangements are in the care of the Ready Funeral & Cremation Service. To send online condolences to the family please visit www.readyfuneral.com. ◊

where Mrs. Blair became well known for her antique collections, exquisite taste in art and décor, gourmet cooking and beautiful gardens. She volunteered on many local committees, including the Auxiliary Board of Porter Hospital, and gave generously to local charities and theaters. The Blairs enjoyed their travels to Florida, London and Spain. Following Mr. Blair’s death in 2009, Mrs. Blair moved to the Residence at Otter Creek, where she lived with her beloved dog Bentley. She is survived by her daughters Annie Blair, Susan Johnson and Kate Blair; sonsin-law Michael Johnson and David Bearg; four grandchildren and two great-grandchildren. Donations in her name may be made to Addison County Home Health & Hospice, 254 Ethan Allen Hwy, New Haven, VT 05472.◊

388-3171

acpcc@sover.net • addisoncountypcc.org

• Community Playgroups • Parent Education Classes • Home Visits • Pregnancy Prevention Programs • Parent Training & Child Center

Helping Young Families Get The Right Start

Memory Tree

The The Middlebury Lions ClubClub informs those who Middlebury Lions informs those wish to memorialize the names of deceased who wish to memorialize the names of the relatives friends on year’son “Christmas deceasedorrelatives andthis friends this year’s Memory Tree” that they may do so by the “Christmas Memory Tree” that they maydonado tion of a dollar for each name & forwarding so by the donation of a dollar for each name namesthe tonames the: to the: and forwarding Middlebury Lions Club Middlebury P.O.Lions Box 5 Club P.O. Box 5 Middlebury, Vermont 05753

Middlebury, VT 05753

The Lions suggest each name be

The Lions be typed or suggest printedeach so asname to beto legible. typed or printed so as to be legible. Please use coupon below or attach Please use below or attach separate separatelist listfor formore more names. names. Final

date for acceptance of donations is THIS Tree AD SPONSORED BY Dec. 19th. lighting ceremony rd is Monday,Desabrais Dec. 3 at Glass 6:00p.m.

Deadline for acceptance is December 19th 17

DEADLINE FOR ACCEPTANCE IS DECEMBER 17.

NaMe:

NAME

NaMe:

NAME

brother Robert; nieces Serena, Rene and Hailey; and a large extended family. Donations can be made in Stevie’s name to Trust Bridge Health and Hospice, 5300 East Ave., West Palm Beach, Fla., 33407. Dearly missed by his beloved family, Stevie will be remembered as charming, witty and an avid motorcycle rider.

Judith Eve Brown, 70, Brandon

Reba B. Blair, 94, Middlebury MIDDLEBURY — Reba B. Blair, 94, passed away peacefully at home on Nov. 23, 2016, attended by her three daughters, two dear friends, and her devoted dog, of complications of a broken hip. Born Sept. 12, 1922 in Harrisburg, Pa., she was the daughter of the late Earl and Harriet Blizzard. Before marrying Robert Dike Blair in 1941, she had worked as an operator for AT&T. The Blairs lived on many different U.S. Army bases before settling in Detroit, where Mrs. Blair put her secretarial school background to use as an administrative assistant. In 1950, the Blairs and their two young children relocated to New England, where Mr. Blair created the Vermont Book Shop on Main Street in Middlebury. After the birth of a third daughter, the family moved to a new home on South Street Extension,

Stephen Gregory Senesac, 58, formerly of Vergennes

BRANDON — Judith Eve Brown, 70, passed away Sunday, Nov. 27, 2016, surrounded by her loving family at her home in Brandon. She lived the last five-and-a-half years in a continual dance of spirit contending with ovarian cancer and scleroderma. She pursued treatment across the spectrum of traditional and non-traditional medicine. Her hard-earned learning taught her to listen to her own body, and it was her wish for this obituary to encourage women everywhere: “listen to, and trust, your body.” In her words, “The more you accept where you are, your mind then isn’t in a constant struggle...and then your life doesn’t revolve around it… you know me, I never liked guns, I’m not a fighter, but I’m aggressive about knowledge. The more you can learn…to make your inner terrain healthier, the more empowered you are.” She understood a basic principle that you can’t fight and heal at the same time. Judy Eve’s symbol was the heart, hearts abound in her home and her husband Tom was at the center of hers. She loved her family madly, “to the moon and back.” She relished gardening, long days at the oceanside in Cape Cod, skiing in the mountains and watching her kids’ ski races. Every December, she transformed the Brown household into a Christmas wonderland with world crafts she had gathered across the years of working beside her husband, at the cozy gift shop they created together, Browns of Brandon. Together, with their shop, they brought their own magic to their town and celebrated their 40th year by closing the doors as a gift to themselves. Born July 19, 1946 in Manhattan, N.Y., she grew up in Munich, Germany and Westport, Conn. She

Lincoln

JUDITH BROWN graduated from Staples High School and Greenwich Nursing School and enjoyed a short yet fulfilling time as an operating room nurse at Rutland Hospital. Judy Eve was the mother of love and hugs. Her spirit lives on through her beloved husband, Tom Brown; daughter Kristi Brown Lovell and Evan Lovell and their three daughters, Lucia, Isobel and Evelyn of Stowe; son Todd Thomas Brown of the San Francisco Bay Area; daughter Megan Brent and Rick Brent and their two children, Madison and Harper of Park City, Utah; faithful four-legged love HildeBear; brothers James Gregory and Mickey Gregory of Plattsburgh, N.Y; and sister Betty Carrol of New York. A Celebration of Life will be held at The Brandon Inn on Sunday, Dec. 4, from 1-3 p.m. In lieu of flowers, Mom wishes to support Dartmouth Hitchcock Norris Cotton Cancer Center, Friends of the Earth and the Brandon Rescue Squad. Arrangements are by Miller & Ketcham of Brandon. ◊

Have a news tip? Call Kathy Mikkelsen at 453-4014 NEWS

LINCOLN — Hello again! Hope your Thanksgivings were joyful, peaceful, filled with friends and family and lots of yummy food! This Friday, Dec. 2, is one of my favorite happenings! The Midd Winds will be performing their Winter Concert at Middlebury College’s Mahady Center for the Arts concert hall at 7 p.m. Free to one and all. If you cannot attend on Friday night, there will be a repeat concert on Saturday, Dec. 3, at 2 p.m. in the Mount Abraham Union High School auditorium. These are very talented

people who love to play so much that they practice very hard and then “play their hearts out” for our enjoyment! Come show them how much they are appreciated. The Lincoln United Church has begun Christmas celebrations. The sanctuary is all decorated beautifully, the outside tree is decorated and will be lit each night for all to enjoy, and the wooden manger is out on the lawn. You will also notice that the wooden crèche figures have begun appearing at different places along West River Road.

TRADITION

Where our Roots Are Planted. From humble beginnings based on affordable, trustworthy services, we have grown into a reliable resource your family can depend on. Rooted in our traditions, we stay firmly connected to the families we serve and the care we provide. We continue serving all faiths and all families in the only way we know how – by staying true to our heritage.

Sanderson-Ducharme Funeral Home 117 South Main St. Middlebury, VT • 388-2311 sandersonfuneralservice.com


Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 7A

Ferrisburgh

Rifle season (Continued from Page 1A) “It was a really fun year,” said Lincoln General Store owner Vaneasa Stearns. “The guys were happy with their harvest.” Weigh station operators all reported evidence of a healthy herd. “The quality of the deer is good, too,” said Erica Bedell of Bristol weigh station Green Mountain Trails End. “They were definitely healthy, happy deer.” The single biggest factor in the higher kill total was probably a bigger herd after a gentle winter. According wildlife officials’ estimates, the state’s deer population stood at 145,000 heading into the fall, larger than in recent years. The department estimate a year ago after harsh winters in 2013 and 2014 stood at 120,000, but this past winter allowed a higher survival rate and better food sources, according to a Fish & Wildlife press release and local experts. “That just shows you what weather does,” said Dick Phillips, owner of Vermont Field Sports in Middlebury. The herd size increase alone was about 18 percent, however, and would not account for all of the better results. Good weather encouraged many hunters, according to weigh station operators, and Phillips and others noted bucks were in rut (showing interest in breeding) throughout the rifle season. “They’re still in rut,” Phillips said on Monday. BIG PICTURE With weigh stations also reporting a strong bow season, the odds appear good that the final number for Addison County for all fall deer hunting seasons will also break the post-2005 mark of 1,021 that was set in 2010. Other annual totals for all seasons (archer, rifle, muzzleloader and Youth Hunting Weekend) in recent years have ranged from 671 in 2011 to 875 in 2013. The 2015 all-season total came in at 772 despite the solid rifle number; that final count would have been higher, but wildlife officials imposed a doe-shooting ban in most of Addison County during muzzleloader season. After the December archery/muzzleloader season concludes, the Independent will look at final bow and muzzleloader season numbers and the annual local total of all seasons. Weigh station operators and hunters also mostly said that deer appeared bigger on the average this year. According to Independent calculations, they are correct, but the increase is not dramatic: The average weight of a buck killed in this past rifle season came in at just under 146 pounds, about two pounds heavier than the 2015 average. That weight is at the high end compared to averages in recent years and is matched only by 2012, when the average also stood at 146 pounds. In other years: • The 2014 average was 145. • The 2013 average was 141.

• The 2011 average was 144. A dozen bucks that tipped the scales at 200 pounds or more helped up this rifle season’s average. Three were taken opening weekend and reported in the Nov. 17 issue of the Independent. Five of the nine shot in the final 14 days of rifle season were weighed at Buxton’s Store in Orwell, including the biggest buck brought down locally, a 235-pound, eight-pointer killed by Paul Gaboriault in Bridport. Also having 200-pounders weighed at Buxton’s were Andre Fletcher, a 210-pound, 4-pointer he shot in Orwell; William Bishop, a 200-pound, 8-pointer killed in Benson; Duane Kehoe, a 205-pound, 8-pointer taken in Shoreham; and Jeremy Quenneville, a 200-pound, 7-pointer bagged in Orwell. Vermont Field Sports weighed a 205-pound, 9-pointer that Frank Raymond shot in Addison, and that store also handled a smaller deer of note: a 162-pound, 10-point buck that Danny Dragon shot in Ripton. That deer was one of only two bucks taken in rifle season with a rack of more than nine points. Also, Rack ’N Reel in New Haven Junction handled a 212-pound, 8-pointer that Ryan Mobbs took in Hinesburg; Jerusalem Corners Country Store in Starksboro weighed a 210-pound, 7-pointer that Jason Barnard shot in Starksboro; and Mark Atkins brought a 201-pound, 8-point buck to Lincoln General Store. Hunters who were successful during the final 14 days of the rifle deer season, listed with town of kill, pounds and points, were: VERMONT FIELD SPORTS Frank Raymond, Addison, 205-9; James Fitzgerald, Addison, 195-8; James Gorton, Middlebury, 192-8; Richard Roorda, Shoreham, 189-8; David Many, Middlebury, 185-8; David Werner, New Haven, 1838; Jamie Butterfield, New Haven, 180-6; Russell Bishop, Shoreham, 173-8; Shawn Gero, Cornwall, 1707; Christopher Hahn, Ripton, 168-6; Mort Pierpont, Salisbury, 165-8; and Eric Foster, Middlebury, 165-8. Also, Ernest Malzac, New Haven, 162-6; Danny Dragon, Ripton, 16210; Marshall Currier, Middlebury, 161-8; Samuel Berthiaume, Middlebury, 160-7; Daniel Fifield, Cornwall, 158-6; Benjamin Cram, Ripton, 158-7; Ronald Felion, Leicester, 158-8; Timothy Devino, Brandon, 158-8; Patrick Deering, Cornwall, 155-4; Norman Michaud, Middlebury, 155-7; Rodney Bordeau, Salisbury, 155-8; and Thatcher Trudeau, Salisbury, 154-8. Also, Scott Quenneville, Brandon, 151-5; Jay Malinowski, Leicester, 150-7; Ronald Devoid, Middlebury, 147-8; Casey Butler, Middlebury, 147-4; Christopher Stearns, Shoreham, 147-6; Brian Webb, Ripton, 147-4; Daniel Gaotti, Salisbury, 147-6; Douglas Coburn, Ripton, 146-7; Eric Kaufmann, Ripton, 1468; Chris Ringey, Cornwall, 143-4;

Shop Locally DON’T GET CAUGHT WITH YOUR WINDOWS UNDRESSED

Andrew Recupero, Hancock, 143-3; and Gary Perkins, Ripton, 143-4. Also, Scott Whitman, Ripton, 1976; Wyatt Cameron, Goshen, 190-9; Robert Leggett, Middlebury, 188-4; Jeffrey Smith, Weybridge, 169-2; Karl Kaufmann, Bridport, 162-7; Keith Tremblay, Goshen, 161-6; Rhonda Roberts, Middlebury, 1608; Kirk Ringey, Cornwall, 154-6; Joshua Lawrence, Shoreham, 148-4; Sandra Brown, Bristol, 140-5; Michael Desjadon, Salisbury, 140-8; and Michael Palmer, Ripon, 140-1. Also, Wilfred Lafountain, Middlebury, 140-4; Michael Clark, Salisbury, 140-8; Danny Raymond, Salisbury, 138-5; Jonathan Pratt, Cornwall, 138-4; Devin Dwire, Salisbury, 138-4; Todd Seguin, Weybridge, 137-6; Gregory Gearwar, Brandon, 137-8; Asa Sargent, Ripton, 137-6; Caleb Rockwood, Middlebury, 136-6; John Fitzpatrick, Cornwall, 136-6; Brian Raymond, Ripton, 136-4; and Calihan Butler, Bristol, 135-3. Also, Michael Barrett, Bridport, 135-3; Matthew Lawton, Bridport, 135-3; Michael Ash, Cornwall, 1353; Barry Whitney, Salisbury, 135-3; Shawn Kilburn, Hancock, 133-5; Noah Fleury, Ripton, 132-9; Gary Gorton, Salisbury, 132-7; Timothy Comes, Middlebury, 131-3; Edgar Butterfield, New Haven, 131-3; Michael Collitt, Ripton, 130-4; William Burton, Springfield, 130-6; and Sawyer Pierpont, Leicester, 129-3. Also, Ronald Berthiaume, Salisbury, 128-3; Robert Dayton, Ripton, 127-6; Michael Whitney, Middlebury, 125-5; Michael Lefebvre, Ripton, 125-4; Adam Piper, Leicester, 125-4; Andrew Piper, Leicester, 125-8; Robert Benoure, Grand Isle, 124-4; Stephen Pratt, Cornwall, 1238; Justin Rubright, Shoreham, 1225; Blake Emilo-Webb, Middlebury, 120-6; Eric Hathaway, Middlebury, 119-3; and Geoffrey Dutton, Middlebury, 119-3. Also, Todd Kennedy, Goshen, 1185; Darcy Trudeau, Salisbury, 118-4; Abigail Copeland, Weybridge, 1154; Justin Malzac, Middlebury, 115-5; Judson Larocque, Bridport, 113-4; Joseph Dragon, Cornwall, 113-3; John Bergevin, Brandon, 111-8; Stanley Hartman, Monkton, 105-3; Ryan Emilo, Ripton, 105-3; Owen

Comes, Middlebury, 103-4; and Charles Mraz, Ripton, 96-3. NEW HAVEN VILLAGE GREEN MARKET Linda Cousino, New Haven, 1536; Michael Lucier, Ferrisburgh, 1746; William Thorpe, New Haven, 140-3; Andre Rheaume, New Haven, 127-3; Denis Smith, Monkton, 155-7; Ryan Cornellier, Ferrisburgh, 140-6; Matthew Hunter, Hinesburg, 182-8; Maxwell Flynn, Waltham, 152-7; Robert Therrien, Charlotte, 130-6; David Hurlburt, Monkton, 145-8; and Michael Hurlburt, Monkton, 150-4. Also, Jody Conant, Huntington, 124-6; Rusty Conant, Hinesburg, 130-6; Andre Palmer, New Haven, 144-4; Justin Huizenga, Monkton, 115-5; Stephen Aruzza, Huntington, 128-7; Langdon Smith, New Haven, 138-6; Daniel Heath, New Haven, 141-4; Matthew Huizenga, Monkton, 135-6; Rich Munsell, Monkton, 124-5; and Kenneth Curler, Ferrisburgh, 141-6. RACK ’N REEL Ryan Mobbs, Hinesburg, 2128; Kevin Kayhart, Waltham, 1987; Wayne Stearns Jr., Ferrisburgh, 190-7; Colin Jennings, Starksboro, 189-8; Robert James, Weybridge, 183-7; John Cole, Ferrisburgh, 1808; Andy Gendreau, Monkton, 1808; Stephen Winn, Charlotte, 174-8; Bruce Meader, Ripton, 171-8; Henry Bissonette, Panton, 168-6; Andrew Raymond, Ferrisburgh, 167-7; and Christopher Fortin, Charlotte, 167-5. Also, John Sheldon, Ferrisburgh, 167-7; Steven Fifield, Ripton, 165-7; Rowan Nelson, Ripton, 164-8; Bruce Smith, Monkton, 163-4; Christopher Bessette, New Haven, 159-4; Lee Lapell, Fayston, 156-4; Matt Leonard, Ferrisburgh, 154-6; Adam Lafountain, Starksboro, 153-8; Tyrell Montani, Ferrisburgh, 153-8; Bailey Smith, Ferrisburgh, 152-8; Nathan Kerr, Shoreham, 152-4; and Joseph Martin, Charlotte, 151-5. Also, Scott Stearns, Ferrisburgh, 150-4; Brian Hill, New Haven, 1508; Kristian Ashley, Ferrisburgh, 1498; Timothy Yandow, Bristol, 149-5; Amber Whittemore, New Haven, 148-6; Randall Stearns, Ferrisburgh, 147-3; Evan Fleming, Ferrisburgh, 147-4; Raymond Stearns, Ferris(See Deer, Page 12A)

Have a news tip? Call Sally Kerschner at 877-2625 or email her at smwkersch@comcast.net NEWS

FERRISBURGH — Consider supporting local Ferrisburgh businesses when buying gifts and services this holiday season by visiting the website for “The Ferrisburgh List.” This compilation of local businesses has been growing over the past few years and now contains over 180 businesses that are either located in Ferrisburgh or do their work principally in Ferrisburgh. Listed are such businesses as artists, child care, woodworking, auto repair and handy man services. What a wealth of talent and commerce located right in our community. Please support these businesses for the holiday season and also year round! For more information contact Mickey Davis at mzdavis@gmavt.net or visit www.TheFerrisburghList.com. The Bixby’s Friday Night monthly movie showing is “American Hustle.” Produced in 2013, this dark comedydrama stars Amy Adams, Jennifer Lawrence, Bradley Cooper and Christian Bale and tells the story of the dangerous world of New Jersey powerbrokers and the mafia. The showing is Friday, Dec. 2 at 6:30 p.m. at the Bixby. For more information, contact

Salisbury

Adult Services Librarian Muir Haman at muir.haman@bixbylibrary.org. The Commodore Friends of Music invites the community to their famous Breakfast with Santa on Saturday, Dec. 3, from 8-10:30 a.m. at the Vergennes Union High School cafeteria. This fun event includes a scrumptious pancake breakfast, a highly talented elf band and chorus, holiday craft making, and, of course, a visit with Santa! Admission is $5 for children and $7 for adults. All proceeds benefit the VUMS/VUHS music program. The Ferrisburgh Central School PTO is sponsoring the annual Holiday Make and Take, which is an opportunity for students and families to come together and make a wide variety of holiday crafts. This is a great way for children to share the season’s joy of giving by creating personal and meaningful gifts. The Make and Take will be held on Sunday, Dec. 4 from 1-3 p.m. (note that children must be accompanied by an adult, no “dropoffs”.) The PTO welcomes volunteers if you are able to assist, please email FCSPTO@gmail.com.

NEWS

SALISBURY — The annual tree lighting will be held on Saturday, Dec. 10, at 5 p.m. at the Veteran’s Park across from Maple Meadow Farm. There will be a bonfire, hot cocoa, Santa’s arrival and of course the tree lighting. Following the lighting there will be wagon rides down to the Town Hall where the library will host a soup supper, visits with Santa and a reading and dedication of the book chosen for all babies born in 2016. The wagon will return folks to the park. Please note the change in the date for the event. The Salisbury Community School will host a bingo night on Friday, Dec. 9, beginning at 6 p.m. in the school gym. This is a fundraiser for the fifthand sixth-graders Spring trip. Everyone is welcome. The Friends of the School are collecting items for the Dollar Sale that will be held Wednesday, Dec. 21. Items should be clean and in good condition; items may be brought to the

Have a news tip? Call Mary Burchard at 352-4541

school during school hours. Students will be able to purchase gifts for family members for one dollar. The Salisbury fire department is making and selling wreaths again this year. Wreaths are 24-inches round with a red or burgundy bow. To order call Justin at 989-9479 or Mark at 9897796.

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UPCOMING EVENTS Friday, December 2 12:00pm lunch time public skate 7:45pm adult intro & intermediate hockey clinics Sunday, December 4 2:45pm public skate Tuesday, December 6 9:00am public skate 10:45am figure skate only 12:00pm adult stick & puck Wednesday, December 7 2:15pm public skate Hockey Skate Rental: Youth size 8J to Adult 13

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PAGE 8A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

community

calendar

Letters to Santa

Singer songwriter

Kids! Send us your letter to Santa and we’ll print it in our paper so Santa himself can see and send you a personal reply!

AWA R D - W I N N I N G SINGER songwriter Jory Nash, who blends elements of folk, jazz, blues, pop and soul into sound, performs Saturday, Dec. 3, at the Ripton Community Coffee House. Doors open at 7 p.m. Info: rcch.org.

Be sure to include a return address, and send your letter to:

Santa, c/o Addison Independent 58 Maple St., Middlebury, VT 05753 or deliver your letter to our office in the Marble Works, Middlebury

Letters received by Monday, December 19th may be published with names in our December 22nd edition.

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT Serving Addison County, Vt., Since 1946

Middlebury Farmers’ Market Annual Holiday Market

Saturday, Dec 3rd – 50 vendors!

Great home-made baked goods & holiday gift items Produce • Meat • Bread • Maple Syrup • Crafts & More!

Saturday 9:30am – 2pm • Mary Hogan www.middleburyfarmersmarket.org

Dec

1

I Spy Contest in Middlebury. Dec 1-31, downtown Middlebury. Try to find the hidden ornaments designed by artist Ashley Wolff in ten store windows in downtown Middlebury and be entered to win $100 in Middlebury Money. Rules and contest details will be displayed in the window of the Vermont Bookshop starting Dec. 1. Free. Be Your Favorite Christmas Character in Middlebury. Dec. 1-31, downtown Middlebury. Ever wonder what you’d look like as a snowman? Or a gingerbread girl? Your family can pose for pictures with an assortment of adorable character cutouts around town, including Santa, a nutcracker, gingerbread siblings and snowmen. Free. Senior meal in Bristol. Thursday, Dec. 1, noon, First Baptist Church of Bristol. The menu is spaghetti with meat sauce, salad bar, cottage cheese, garlic bread and chocolate bread pudding. Suggested donation $4. Call Nancy at 453-5276 to get on the list. Come early and talk with friends and meet new ones. Radical new developments in HIV/AIDS prevention talk in Middlebury. Thursday, Dec. 1, 4:30 p.m., Robert A. Jones ’59 House, Middlebury College. In recognition of World AIDS Day, Assistant Professor of Psychology Robert W. Moeller discusses his research on HIV/AIDS among racial and sexual minorities in the U.S. Free. Info: www.middlebury. edu/arts or 802-443-3168. Twist O’ Wool Spinning Guild meeting in Middlebury. Thursday, Dec. 1, 7 p.m., 49 Wilson Road. There will be a general meeting and show and tell, followed by a Holiday Gift Swap. Info: 453-5960. Talk and slideshow in Lincoln. Thursday, Dec. 1, 7 p.m., Lincoln Library. In March of 2016, Alan Kamman of Lincoln started out on one of the most life-changing journeys of his life — walking the entire length of the Appalachian Trail. Join him as he looks back on his trek and how it influenced his life.

Dec

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Closing

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THURSDAY

FRIDAY

Holiday bazaar in Lincoln. Friday, Dec. 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Lincoln Library. The Lincoln Library will have a small select group of items that are “new with tags” or “new without tags.” Items were donated to the Library for resale. Come and shop for the holidays and save a bundle. Lots of earrings, purses, pins and more. Great for kids to shop for their moms or grandmas. There will also be a table of “like new” items for sale. “Candy cane Christmas” marketplace in Bristol. Friday, Dec. 2, 1-5 p.m., St. Ambrose Church. The “Candy Cane Christmas” Marketplace will feature crafts, baked goods, doll and linen shop, wonder jars, silent auction, attic treasures and fabulous raffles. Prizes include hand quilted heirloom quilt, theme baskets and a Fuji 24-speed bicycle. Gingerbread house reception in Middlebury. Friday, Dec. 2, 4-6 p.m., Vermont Folklife Center. Opening reception for the 18th annual gingerbread house exhibit and competition. The exhibit will be open Monday through Saturday until Dec. 23. Registration forms available online at www. vermontfolklifecenter.org or in person and are due Nov. 23. “Middlebury Money” prizes will be awarded in each category. This year’s theme is “A Christmas Carol: Revisiting the English Tradition of Ghost Stories During the Holidays.” Chocolate walk in Bristol. Friday, Dec. 2, 4-10 p.m., downtown Bristol. Come to Bristol’s Chocolate Walk and experience a complimentary treat in downtown businesses. Grab a Chocolate Walk map and travel from store to store, sampling the decadent chocolate offerings, while browsing for gifts. Look for the “Chocolate Stop” signs at participating businesses. Memory tree lighting in Bristol. Friday, Dec. 2, 6 p.m., On the Green in Bristol. Come to the Memory Tree Lighting in Bristol, where the names of the honorees will be read. There will be music and refreshments. Purchase a bulb for $5. Deadline is Nov. 28. Info: 453-5885. Candy cane hunt in Bristol. Friday, Dec. 2, 6:30 p.m., On the Green in Bristol. Santa has hidden candy canes all around the park. Bring your flashlight and help us find them. You may even find a special candy cane with a prize winning ribbon. Movie night in Vergennes. Friday, Dec. 2, 6:30 p.m., Bixby Memorial Library. Bixby’s Friday night monthly movie showing is “American Hustle.” For more information contact Muir Haman at muir. haman@bixbylibrary.org. “The Nutcracker’s Adventure” in Middlebury. Friday, Dec. 2, 7 p.m., Middlebury Union High School Auditorium. “The Nutcracker’s Adventure,” featuring Tchaikovsky’s famous music, will be presented by Middlebury Community Players. Tickets $6.

Christmas music night in New Haven. Friday, Dec. 2, 7 p.m., New Haven United Reformed Church, Route 7. Come and enjoy Christmas songs, readings and refreshments to celebrate the holiday season. All are welcome. For more information contact Liesbeth at 877-2486. Panther hockey in Middlebury. Friday, Dec. 2, 7-9 p.m., Kenyon Arena, Middlebury College. The Middlebury College men’s hockey team opener game will take place against Connecticut College. United Way of Addison County is asking for a donation in lieu of admission at the doors and will be holding a 50/50 raffle with half of the raffle going to the United Way.

Dec

3

SATURDAY

Breakfast with Santa in Vergennes. Saturday, Dec. 3, 8-10:30 a.m., Vergennes Union High School cafeteria. The Commodore Friends of Music invite you to breakfast with Santa, and includes an elf band and chorus, crafts for the kids, and a visit with Santa! $5 kids; $7 adults. All proceeds benefit the VUHS music program. Annual holiday open house and bazaar in East Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-noon, Sarah Partridge Library, 431 East Main St. Free refreshments, book and plant sale, free crafts for kids, and gifts to buy. Christmas bazaar in Hancock and Granville. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Community Church of Hancock and Granville. The Community Church of Hancock and Granville will hold its Christmas bazaar. Holiday at the Bixby in Vergennes. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Bixby Memorial Library. Gift basket auction from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Santa reads at 10:30 a.m., Jon Gailmor performs at 11 a.m., refreshments served from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., and Commodore singers perform at 1 p.m. Christmas bazaar in Bristol. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., First Baptist Church. Christmas bazaar will feature silent auction items, homemade baked goods, pickles, fleece mittens, homemade chocolates, bibs, Girl Scout candy, attic treasures, Rada cutlery and many other items. Choose from delicious corn chowder or one of the other soups for lunch along with a sandwich. Christmas bazaar in Orwell. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Orwell Town Hall. St. Paul’s annual Christmas bazaar will feature handmade gifts and crafts, Christmas decorations, raffle, silent auction, flea market, bake sale, lunch and refreshments. Benefits St. Paul’s Church. For information call Kathy Buxton at 948-2049.

Craft fair in Leicester. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Leicester Central School. Craft fair to benefit the sixth grade end of year class trip. Spaces are available for $15. Contact Heather LaPorte at 377-2363 for information. Holiday craft fair in Vergennes. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Vergennes Union Elementary School. 16th annual winter holiday fair to benefit the after school fusion program takes place with over 60 vendors. Entry fee: bring a non-perishable donation of goods for the area food shelf or animal shelter. Gingerbread house judging in Vergennes. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., downtown Vergennes. Third annual gingerbread house judging. Enter your own gingerbread house by Nov. 28 or choose your favorites. Green Mountain Club hike in Ripton. Saturday, Dec. 3, Ripton. A moderate 5.2 mile hike or snowshoe that will take about 4 1/2 to 5 hours. Hike up the ridge on switchbacks for a gradual descent to Skylight Pond and Skyline Lodge. Dog-friendly event. For information contact Mike Greenwood at 349-5653 or mike802vt@comcast.net. Info: www.gmcbreadloaf.org. Youth adventurers club in Ripton. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m., Ripton. Outdoor art and inspiration at Robert Frost Interpretive Trail. While the pace is geared toward younger adventurers (ages 4-8), everyone is welcome. For information contact Lauren Bierman at 349-7498 or laurenbiermanrn@gmail.com. Info: www.gmcbreadloaf. org. “Candy cane Christmas” marketplace in Bristol. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., St. Ambrose Church. The “Candy Cane Christmas” Marketplace will feature crafts, baked goods, doll and linen shop, wonder jars, silent auction, attic treasures and fabulous raffles. Prizes include hand quilted heirloom quilt, theme baskets and a Fuji 24-speed bicycle. Santa will visit also. Holiday market in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Mary Hogan Elementary School. Middlebury Farmers’ Market Holiday Market featuring baked goods, organic products, cheese and dairy products, crafts, fresh fruit and vegetables, honey, jam, jellies, preserves, maple syrup, meat and poultry products, wine, bread, plants, pickles, prepared foods, soap and body care products, eggs, yarn and cider. Hot cocoa hut in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Cannon Park. Take a break from shopping to make a cup of hot cocoa from the Hot Cocoa Hut. Just 25 cents for a cup with all the fixings! Santa’s arrival in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9:45 a.m., downtown Middlebury. Kick the holiday season off with a fun-filled morning in Middlebury. Welcome Santa as he arrives via fire truck, over the Cross Street Bridge and up Main Street, going around twice to give everyone time to see him. Then, enjoy a visit with the right jolly old elf himself at the Middlebury Community House from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Families can take an old-fashioned horse drawn wagon ride through Middlebury from 10 a.m.-noon. Free.

Sophie Shao and friends

CELLIST SOPHIE SHAO returns for her ninth consecutive season with violinist Jennifer Frautschi, violist Dimitri Murrath, and pianist Gloria Chien for an afternoon of chamber music on Sunday, Dec. 4, at 3 p.m. at Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. Info: www. middlebury.edu/arts. Photo credit Neda Navaee


community

calendar

Holiday bazaar in Lincoln. Saturday, Dec. 3, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Lincoln Library. The Lincoln Library will have a small select group of items that are “new with tags” or “new without tags.” These items were donated to the Library for resale. Come and shop for the holidays and save a bundle. Lots of earrings, purses, pins and more. Great for kids to shop for their moms or grandmas. There will also be a table of “like new” items for sale. Holiday open house in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sheldon Museum. Come to the Sheldon Museum’s annual holiday open house and enjoy the electric train layout, carols played on the Sheldon’s 1831 piano and a miniature Christmas tree raffle. Info: www.henrysheldonmuseum.org. Holiday cardmaking in Bristol. Saturday, Dec. 3, 11 a.m.-3 p.m., ARTSight Studios and Gallery, 6 South St. Come and make your own holiday greeting cards. All materials will be provided. Free or donations accepted. Children ages 16 and under must be accompanied by an adult. Charles Dickens “A Christmas Carol” in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., Town Hall Theater. Town Hall Theater’s Education Program presents the Charles Dickens classic, “A Christmas Carol.” Donations accepted. Santa’s Village in Vergennes. Saturday, Dec. 3, noon-3 p.m., Vergennes Opera House. Come visit Santa’s Village at the Vergennes Opera House. Sit with Santa and get your picture taken. Decorate gingerbread men and do crafts with Northland Job Corps students. Listen to Mrs. Claus read stories and write your letter to Santa with the help of a Vergennes Police Officer who will safely deliver your letter to the Post Office. Gift wrapping station in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, noon-4 p.m., 51 Main. Anything purchased in Middlebury can be wrapped for free at 51 Main, just bring your receipt.

Dec

4

SUNDAY

Holiday open house in Middlebury. Sunday, Dec. 4, noon-4 p.m., Sheldon Museum. Come to the Sheldon Museum’s annual holiday open house and enjoy the electric train layout, carols played on the Sheldon’s 1831 piano and a miniature Christmas tree raffle. Info: www.henrysheldonmuseum.org. FCS take and make holiday crafts in Ferrisburgh. Sunday, Dec. 4, 1-3 p.m., Ferrisburgh Central School. The Ferrisburgh Central School PTO is sponsoring the annual Holiday Make and Take, which is an opportunity for students and families to come together and make a wide variety of holiday crafts. Children must be accompanied by an adult. “The Nutcracker’s Adventure” in Middlebury. Sunday, Dec. 4, 2 p.m., Middlebury Union High School Auditorium. “The Nutcracker’s Adventure,” featuring Tchaikovsky’s famous music, will be presented by Middlebury Community Players. Tickets $6. Annual holiday auction in Brandon. Sunday, Dec. 4, 2:30-5:30 p.m., Brandon Free Public Library. Over 50 local patrons, artists and Brandon businesses have donated wreaths and other seasonal decorations, dinners for two, birdhouses, gift certificates and more. There will be music, refreshments and door prizes. Requested donation $1. Info: 247-8230. Holiday auction in Brandon. Sunday, Dec. 4, 2:305:30 p.m., Brandon Library. Join the Friends of the Brandon Free Public Library for their annual holiday auction. Over 50 local patrons and artists donate holiday wreaths, décor, original artwork and treasures for the event. Refreshments and door prizes. Preview at 2:30 p.m., auction at 3 p.m.

Moonlight madness at the library in Brandon. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 4-8 p.m., Brandon Free Public Library. The Friends of the Brandon Free Public Library will be holding a holiday used book sale featuring an assortment of fiction and non-fiction for adults, teens, tweens and children as well as CDs for sale. There will be holiday books also. Stop by, browse and shop and enjoy refreshments. Moonlight madness in Brandon. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 4-9 p.m., downtown Brandon. Moonlight Madness in Brandon is a time for sales, discounts, specials, exceptional deals, warm drinks and sweet treats. Many shops offering 20 percent off storewide. Shop local. “The Spirit of Christmas Past: Four Centuries of Christmas in New England” talk in Middlebury. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 7 p.m., Henry Sheldon Museum. Kenneth Turino of Historic New England will present a talk titled “The Spirit of Christmas Past: Four Centuries of Christmas in New England” that traces the development of Christmas celebrations from 17th century New England through today. $10 non-members. Info: 388-2117. First Wednesdays lecture series in Middlebury. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 7 p.m., Ilsley Public Library. Yale Professor of English and Dean of Humanities Amy Hungerford will examine poet Wallace Stevens’s work at the cusp of the modern age in a talk titled, “Wallace Stevens and the Art of the Empty Mind.” Free and open to the public.

THURSDAY

Dec

8

Christmas decorating contest in Brandon. Thursday, Dec. 8, 5 p.m., Brandon. Sponsored by the Brandon

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John LaRouche Trio

THE JOHN LAROUCHE Trio, featuring John LaRouche on the chromatic harp, Levent Unal on guitar, and Ellen Powell on bass, performs at Brandon Music on Saturday, Dec. 3, at 7:30 p.m. Info: www.brandon-music.net.

Gathering of love and hope in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 1 p.m., Middlebury town green. Multi-faith gathering of hope and love organized by the Middlebury Area Clergy Association to counter recent acts of hate. Area citizens are invited to bring donations of cash, winter clothing and food for H.O.P.E. Tea with Mrs. Claus in Bristol. Saturday, Dec. 3, 1-2 p.m., Holley Hall. Join Mrs. Claus for tea and cookies, a story read by Mrs. Claus and crafts with the elves. $15 per child and $10 per accompanying adult (required). Reserve your seat by calling 453-5885. “The Nutcracker’s Adventure” in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 2 p.m., Middlebury Union High School Auditorium. “The Nutcracker’s Adventure,” featuring Tchaikovsky’s famous music, will be presented by Middlebury Community Players. Tickets $6. Panther hockey in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 3 p.m., Kenyon Arena, Middlebury College. The Middlebury College men’s hockey team opener game will take place against Tufts University. United Way of Addison County is asking for a donation in lieu of admission at the doors and will be holding a 50/50 raffle with half of the raffle going to the United Way. Celebrate in the park in Vergennes. Saturday, Dec. 3, 3-5:30 p.m., downtown Vergennes. Live music and caroling in the bandstand. Stay warm and make s’mores around the campfires. Pet the baby animals. Take a picture with Santa and Mr. Candy Cane. SD Ireland’s famous lighted cement truck arrives at 4:45 p.m. displaying an amazing lighting show. Snacks and drinks available for purchase. Tree lighting in Vergennes. Saturday, Dec. 3, 5:30 p.m., downtown Vergennes. Annual tree lighting with Mayor Benton of Vergennes.

LIVEMUSIC Michelle Fay Band in Middlebury. Friday, Dec. 2, 8-10 p.m., 51 Main. Jory Nash in Ripton. Saturday, Dec. 3, 7 p.m., Ripton Community Coffee House. John LaRouche in Brandon. Saturday, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. The Doughboys in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 3, 8-11 p.m., 51 Main. Mimi Bain and Friends in Middlebury. Thursday, Dec. 8, 7-9 p.m., 51 Main. St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble in Brandon. Thursday, Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. Conquer Root in Middlebury. Friday, Dec. 9, 8-10 p.m., 51 Main. PossumHaw in Lincoln. Saturday, Dec. 10, 7:30 p.m., Burnham Hall, 52 River Road. Sarah Blacker with Aaron Katz in Brandon. Saturday, Dec. 10, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. Aaron Audet Band in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 10, 8-10 p.m., 51 Main. The Good Medicine Band in Middlebury. Saturday, Dec. 14, 7-9 p.m., 51 Main. Swing Noire in Middlebury. Thursday, Dec. 15, 8-10 p.m., 51 Main.

Memory tree lighting in East Middlebury. Sunday, Dec. 4, 4 p.m., East Middlebury. Come for a short memorial service, caroling, refreshments and fellowship. Submit $1 per name to: E.M.F.D.A. Sandy Hayes, PO Box 225, East Middlebury, VT 05740.

Dec

5

MONDAY

Mr. Christmas Tree Pageant in Bristol. Monday, Dec. 5, 6 p.m., Mount Abraham Union High School auditorium. Addison County Young Life will host the fourth annual Mr. Christmas Tree Pageant featuring Mount Abe seniors Finn Clements, Keion Correll, Chris Wood, Andrew Raymond, Sam Kuhns, Wyatt Gendreu and Coleman Russell. Over 300 people attended last year, so doors will open at 5:30. Free. Refreshments will be served. Info: 349-0498. Addison County Democratic Committee meeting in Middlebury. Monday, Dec. 5, 7 p.m., Ilsley Library. Local Democratic House and Senate representatives will take questions about issues likely to be taken up in the next legislative session. All Democrats are encouraged to attend.

Dec

7

WEDNESDAY

Victorian Christmas program in Lincoln. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 1 p.m., Lincoln Library. Lucinda Cockrell will talk about the traditions kept by people in Victorian times. Make a “Christmas Cracker.” Revisit the season as it was celebrated in days gone by. Refreshments will be served. Special door prizes.

Area Chamber of Commerce, judges will be on the streets starting at 5 p.m. so be sure to have your lights on! There will be four categories judged: residential traditional; residential whimsical (to include blow-ups); civic; commercial. Info: 247-6401 or info@brandon.org. Midd night stroll in Middlebury. Thursday, Dec. 8, 5-8 p.m., downtown Middlebury. Come enjoy evening shopping and so much more in Middlebury! Hot chocolate hut in Middlebury. Thursday, Dec. 8, 5-8 p.m., Cannon Park, downtown Middlebury. Enjoy a cup of hot cocoa with all the fixings. 25 cents a cup. Free gift wrap service in Middlebury. Thursday, Dec. 8, 5-8 p.m., 51 Main. Free wrapping for any gift purchased in Middlebury, just show your receipt! SD Ireland lighted cement mixer in Middlebury. Thursday, Dec. 8, 6-8 p.m., downtown Middlebury. The SD Ireland lighted cement mixer will arrive in Middlebury. Author reading in Bristol. Thursday, Dec. 8, 7 p.m., Lawrence Memorial Library. John Mayer, author of “Before the Court of Heaven” will speak on his book that recounts the origins of the Third Reich through the story of Ernst Werner Techow. Co-sponsored by the Vermont Humanities Council. Info: 453-2366.

FULL LISTINGS

ONLINE WWW.ADDISONINDEPENDENT.COM

ONGOINGEVENTS GOVERNMENT & POLITICS Addison Peace Coalition. Saturday, 10:30-11 a.m. Triangle Park in Middlebury. Citizens for Constitutional Government in Bridport. Thursday, 7-9 p.m. Bridport Community School. Learn about the U.S. and Vermont constitutions and how to defend our rights. Five-Town Area Vigil for Peace. Friday, 5-5:30 p.m. Bristol green. All welcome to speak out for world peace. Vermont Department of Motor Vehicles Mobile Service Van. Second and fourth Wednesdays, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m.; Every Thursday, 8:30 a.m.-3:15 p.m. Addison County Courthouse, in Middlebury. The van offers written exams, customer service and road tests. 828-2000. BINGO American Legion Hall, Middlebury. Wednesday. Doors open 5:30 p.m. with early birds. Jackpot $3,000. Food available. Benefits veterans, scholarships and community programs. 388-9311. Brandon Senior Center, Brandon. First and third Mondays. 6 p.m. Refreshments sold. 247-3121. Brandon American Legion. Tuesday, warm-ups

6:15 p.m., regular games 7 p.m. Food available, complimentary hot tea and coffee. Info: 247-5709. VFW Post 7823, Middlebury. Monday. Doors open 5 p.m., quickies 6:15 p.m., regular bingo 7 p.m. 388-9468. FUNDRAISING SALES Bixby Memorial Library Book Sale, Otter Creek Room, 258 Main St., Vergennes. Monday-Friday, 2-4:30 p.m. (Thursday, 2-6:45 p.m.); and Saturday, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. Proceeds support library programs and materials. Brandon Free Public Library Used Book Sale. Wednesdays, 4-7 p.m.; Fridays and Saturdays, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The 2016 season runs May 4 through mid-October. Ilsley Public Library Book Sale. First Saturday, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Vermont Room. Ongoing sale in The Last Word during library hours. Info: 388-4095. St. Peter’s Closet in Vergennes. Behind St. Peter’s. Open on Thursdays and Fridays from 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Two Brothers Tavern’s Charitable Mondays. First Monday. 10 percent of entire day’s proceeds go to designated charity.

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PAGE 10A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Clergy plan event to boost hope Gathering to counter recent acts of hate

THE LADIES OF the First Baptist Church of Bristol, pictured from left to right (back row): Flora Norris, Lois Burbank, Sandra Comly, Nancy Skidmore and a worker at MBMM; front row from left, Bonnie Crowe and Linda Osborne.

Bristol church gives to refugees

BRISTOL — “Weaving God’s Love Across Cultures” is the slogan of the Massachusetts Baptist Multicultural Ministries in Lexington, Mass. Each year the ladies of the First Baptist Church of Bristol collect items for the American Baptist Association of N.H. and Vt. for the White Cross projects to share in spreading God’s love.

These often go to help those overseas. This year because the items were going to the MBMM in Massachusetts, the ladies decided to deliver them in person to hear about the work. The MBMMs’ goal is that refugees seamlessly achieve a path to self-sufficiency, inclusion and become active citizens in their new

communities. The MBMM is active in Somalian, Congolese, Burmese, Bhutanese and Iraqi refugee communities in Lynn, Dorchester, Lowell, Worcester, and Springfield, Mass. The ladies found it inspirational to hear how the MBMMinistries is reaching out in love to those from different faiths and cultures.

Speak love to power The Quakers have a venerable saying, “Speak Truth to Power.” I deeply appreciate the sentiment behind it, which is that we need to step forward and say something to those in power when we recognize that things are wrong: slavery, wars, discrimination, disrespect. Over the years this principle has helped people come together to demand changes, such as abolition or giving equal rights to women, and I am grateful to be one small player in that tradition. But it has always made me uncomfortable since I’m seldom sure what absolute truth is and certainly my take is only one understanding among many. In these troubling times, so reminiscent of the period of the Vietnam War and the early Civil Rights movement, it is hard to know how to respond; hard to know what truth is (do we really live in a bubble here in Vermont?); and hard not to be dispirited. I read the 2016 report on Hate Groups, published by the Southern Poverty Law Center and wonder if we are living in parallel universes. Can people really be this frightened, this angry, this unfeeling that they strike out with such hate and encourage others to do the same? The answer clearly is yes. So beyond saying that what they are doing is wrong, which I find so easy to do, how can I be engaged in changing

the environment and circumstances cafes of Naples where someone who that have led them to that point? had experienced good luck would I suppose the answers are simple: order a sospeso (suspended coffee), join or support groups that work for paying the price of two coffees but racial, social and economic justice; receiving and consuming only one. learn about the underA person enquiring pinnings of injustice later whether there and the evolution of was a sospeso availhate and violence; able would then band together with be served a coffee others to try, in the for free. This has words of William captured my imagiPenn to “See What nation ever since Love Can Do.” learning of it in a But when it comes wonderful, free, ondown to making the line course from the changes I need to Open University. in my own life, it is Could there be a more difficult. Am I similar, consistent, still harboring grudgact of love paid fores and resentments ward in our culture within my own family that might help to and circle of friends change this growing and colleagues? Am climate of incivilI benefitting inequiity? I haven’t figured By Cheryl Mitchell tably from the labor it out yet, but I trust of others? Do I fail to that together we will understand the privilege of being a indeed learn to speak love to power middle class, white woman, in a rel- and to change the conditions that atively safe and loving community? are creating these current, troubling Are there more ways I could use that times. position of privilege to protect and Cheryl Mitchell is president of promote the rights of others? Treleven, a retreat and learning proItalian café culture has an inter- gram located on her family’s sheep esting feature: A caffé sospeso is a farm in Addison County. She does cup of coffee paid for in advance as freelance consulting on issues relatan anonymous act of kindness. The ed to children, families, social policy tradition began in the working-class and farm to community work.

Ways of Seeing

Thank you all! As I celebrate my 90th year, I wish to thank all of those, past and present, who have made my life full and enjoyable. I have been blessed by wonderful family, friends and neighbors, many of whom were kind enough to help me celebrate my birthday with a lovely party on Sunday November 13th, 2016. Thanks for all the great wishes, cards and gifts.

-Victor Quesnel

MIDDLEBURY — The Southern Poverty Law Center, a Montgomery, Ala.-based organization that tracks hate crimes nationally, documented more than 700 instances of “hateful harassment” during the week after the Nov. 8 presidential election. At least two of those were in Middlebury: the scrawling of swastikas on the door of Havurah House, Addison County’s Jewish congregation; and F*** MUSLIMS/#TRUMP2016 on a whiteboard outside a Middlebury College dorm room occupied by two Muslim students. In response, the multi-faith Middlebury Area Clergy Association has organized “A Community Gathering of Love and Hope” for midday this Saturday, Dec. 3. That’s when area citizens — of any faith or no faith — are invited PARTICIPANTS IN THIS Saturday’s Gathering of Hope on the Middleto assemble at meeting places bury town green will recreate this sticky note mural of hopeful mesaround greater Middlebury between sages that was made by Havurah Hebrew School students and others noon and 12:30 p.m. Shortly before in response to an incident of hateful harassment at the Jewish com1 p.m. they’ll begin to make their munity house. way toward the town green, carrying ing messages of hope and love. Kids ers will encourage participants in the donations of cash, winter clothing from area schools and churches made Dec. 3 event to create a similar coland food for the organization HOPE us cards, and people I’d never met lage, which will be displayed around (Helping Overcome Poverty’s would stop me to say how upset they the county afterward. were by what happened and that they “My faith teaches me that the Effects). best and most powerful response On the green, a parked truck will stand with Havurah. “So many people wanted to do in any situation is love, and my receive the donations. Participants something but weren’t faith connects me to a supply of will be invited to leave sure what that could be. inexhaustible love,” said the Rev. messages of solidarity “My faith I’m thrilled to help or- Tim Franklin, pastor of the Bridport and hope, and an ensemble will provide teaches me that ganize this event that Congregational Church. “On Dec. 3 the best and gives people of all faiths we’re inviting all people, no matter music for dancing. and backgrounds a way what they’re experiencing or feeling, The starting points most powerful to come together and be it fear or anger or intimidation or for the processions response in do something positive anxiety, to choose to respond with a will include Havurah any situation to stand together as tangible act of love. House on North Pleasant is love, and my — a community and show “Bringing our donations of food Street; Middlebury Unitthat these acts of anti- and money to HOPE helps move us ed Methodist Church faith connects Semitism and Islamo- toward what we all want Addison (North Pleasant); the me to a supply Champlain Valley Uni- of inexhaustible phobia we’ve seen in County to be — a community of Middlebury over the love and justice and peace. My tarian Universalist So- love.” ciety (Charles Avenue); — the Rev. past few weeks are outli- prayer is that the love and goodwill and Mead Chapel on Tim Franklin ers and do not represent that already exist in our community how this community as a will deepen and grow in the face the Middlebury College of the acrimonious times we find whole feels.” campus. But anyone One element of the event, Katzew ourselves in, and that this gathering similarly moved may organize a procession to the green from anywhere pointed out, originated at Manhat- will be just one in a continuing series else in the community, or simply tan’s Union Square subway station of everyday expressions of love that show up in support without process- and was replicated by children at make Addison County a beautiful Havurah House’s Hebrew School. and ennobling place to live.” ing from a house of worship. For more information about “After the swastika incident, we re- Using Post-It notes, Havurah stuceived hundreds of e-mails and count- dents addressed messages of support the event, contact the Rev. Mary less letters of support,” said Sarit to anyone who felt disheartened or Kay Schueneman, pastor of the Katzew, the director of education for threatened by recent acts of hostility Cornwall Congregational Church, Havurah House. “Our sidewalks and and then arranged the Post-Its on a at 802-989-3015 or mschueneman@ walkway were covered with uplift- wall in the shape of a heart. Organiz- middlebury.edu.

milestones BIRTHS • • • • • • •

Jessica Sarah Racusin & Donald Edward Mason Jr., Middlebury, Nov. 15, a daughter, Lily Tzipporah Mason. Kristen & Alexander Wimett, Pittsford, Nov. 16, a daughter, Olivia Grace Wimett. Ashley (Hertford) & Jake Steven Rick, Poultney, Nov. 17, a daughter, Sloane Marie Rick. Miranda (Cary) & Clinton Snyder, Orwell, Nov. 19, a son, Clinton Jasper Scott Snyder. Elise (Mellor) & Jeffrey Bunn, North Ferrisburgh, Nov. 23, a son, Elijah Aaron Bunn. Margot Smithson & Larry Tucker, Whiting, Nov. 25, a daughter, Hazel Lou Tucker. Sarah (Parker) & Stephen Binshadler, Orwell, Nov. 26, a son, Hawthorne Emmet Binshadler.

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Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 11A

Holiday on stage THE MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY Players’ annual production of “The Nutcracker’s Adventure” comes to the Middlebury Union High School stage starting Friday, Dec. 2, at 7 p.m. The show will also be performed on Saturday and Sunday at 2 p.m. Seen here from a rehearsal of the family show are, clockwise from top left, Erin Mulcahy, Hannah Cormier, Catherine Carpenter and Ainsleigh Johnson; Cormier, Luke Bleich and Pierre Vachon; Tristan Woods; Laura Holmes, Tomas McElhaney and Ian Ross, Tim Dyer; Ellie Kiel; Kiel; and Sarah Pschernig.

Independent photos/Trent Campbell


PAGE 12A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

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Chamberlain, Lincoln, 137-4; Raymond Bushey, Middlebury, 131-6; Michael Betourney, Salisbury, 1353; Frank Cousino, Bristol, 112-3; Jessica Thompson, Bristol, 156-4; George Coro, Middlebury, 122-4; Charles Commiskey, Middlebury, 143-4; Geoff Booth, Lincoln, 157-7; Ronald Gorton, New Haven, 165-8; and Kirk Jennings, Bristol, 148-4. Also, Ryan Fraser, Shoreham, 164-6; Anthony Bedell, Starksboro, 117-4; Corey Jennings, Hinesburg, 180-6; Raymond Germain, Bristol, 163-5; McGregory Butler, Middlebury, 195-9; Jerry Butler, Bristol, 145-9; Ashley Lowell, Bristol, 1366; Thomas Bishop, Bristol, 116-6; Philip Bedell, Starksboro, 161-8; and David Yandow, Bristol, 131-6. Also, Jillmarie Shortsleeve, Starksboro, 130-4; Jackie Gorton, Bristol, 128-7; Brian Ledeau, Bristol, 167-7; George Carty, Starksboro, 147-8; Brian McCormick, Goshen, 100-7; Michael Bromley, Starksboro, 131-6; Chad Longley, New Haven, 117-3; and Dillon Hunt, Starksboro, 119-3. WEST ADDISON GENERAL STORE Chris Bingham, Bridport, 163-6; Mitchell Gallison, Addison, 122-2; Roger Bienvenue, Addison, 133-7; Gary Grant, Bridport, 125-3; Christopher Goodrich, Leicester, 178-8; Russell Bishop, Shoreham, 151-7; Dawn St. George, Charlotte, 124-4; Christopher Reed, Addison, 110-4; Ryan Emmons, Addison, 123-4; and Richard Shimel, Bridport, 156-4. Also, Tupper Hinsdale, Ferrisburgh, 103-5; Benjamin Newkirk, Ripton, 94-4; Robert Jennings, Bridport, 127-7; Brendin Roberts, Shoreham, 137-4; Jamison Bannister, Addison, 135-4; Brent Perkins, Addison, 155-7; Bryan Nolan, Panton, 130-6; Michael Safford, Monkton, 123-6; and Peter Viau, Addison, 149-6. JERUSALEM CORNERS STORE Justin Raymond, Huntington, 1388; Trevor Conant, Starksboro, 131-5; Robert Labossiere, Starksboro, 1576; Roland Haskins, Starksboro, 135-

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MONKTON — On Friday, Dec. 9, the Russell Memorial Library story hour program will feature a preview reading of “Sleep Tight Farm.” All are welcome to attend the reading from 10 to 11 a.m. You can call the library at 453-4471 or check the library website at russelllibraryvt.wordpress.com for information on their programs.

4; Eric Larose, Ripton, 145-7; John Bounincontro, Huntington, 125-6; Bruce Moody, Huntington, 1899; Joe Gallese, Starksboro, 141-8; Jack Grace, Lincoln, 144-6; Jeremy Fitzgerald, Huntington, 140-8; Patrick Fitzgerald, Huntington, 110-3; and Corey Shepard, Huntington, 130-5. Also, Peter Pizzagalli, Huntington, 143-7; Jason Barnard, Starksboro, 210-7; Chad Murray, Charlotte, 170-7; Danny Grace, Bristol, 119-5; Bruce Taft, Huntington, 197-5; Michele Sullivan, Starksboro, 133-4; Ronald Raymond, Huntington, 1907; Chris Haskins, Huntington, 145-4; and Kyle Bezanson, Lincoln, 146-6. LINCOLN GENERAL STORE Sarah Lathrop, Lincoln, 123-3; Kasey Cavoretto, Lincoln, 153-8; Jeremiah Gracie, Lincoln, 145-4; Mark Atkins, Lincoln, 201-8; Bradley Palmer, Lincoln, 162-6; Jody Brown, Lincoln, 127-5; Richard Antone Jr., Williston, 128-5; Hunter O’Connor, Lincoln, 138-6; Robert Kuck, Lincoln, 175-8; Richard Antone, Williston, 110-4; Dana Paige, Lincoln, 170-8; and Lucius Cousino, Bristol, 113-4. Also, Shonda Cavoretto, Lincoln, 134-4; Robert Cavoretto, Lincoln, 133-5; Scott Manning, Ripton, 122-7; Tara Mason, Lincoln, 1345; Jacob Thomas, Lincoln, 173-7, Christopher Jerome, Lincoln, 102-4; Shaun O’Connor, Lincoln, 157-8; Nathan Nimblett, Lincoln, 136-7; Todd Beauvais, Lincoln, 104-4; and Robert Jimmo, Lincoln, 119-5. BUXTON’S STORE IN ORWELL Will Madison, Shoreham, 135-3; Don Tupper, Orwell, 110-4; Garrett Givens, Orwell, 165-6; Paul Gaboriault, Bridport, 235-8; Keith Betourney, Bridport, 187-6; Dan Gosselin, Orwell, 127-6; David Quenneville, Whiting, 156-6; John Boyer, Hubbardton, 130-6; Tim Williams, Sudbury, 138-8; Thomas Williams, Whiting, 123-4; and Dennis Parsons, Shoreham, 123-6. Also, John Gosselin, Shoreham, 128-6; Marc Brisson, Shoreham, 128-6; Dwyer Coltey, Orwell, 147-

4; Keenan Pratt, Orwell, 176-7; Joey LaRock, Sudbury, 136-6; Russell Nickerson, Orwell, 140-3; Francis Oldenburg, Shrewsbury, 105-4; Paul Gosselin, Orwell, 140-4; Carter Audet, Orwell, 130-5; Andre Fletcher, Orwell, 210-4; and Allen Plouffe, Bridport, 162-8. Also, Bret Williams, Whiting, 161-8; Del Frazier Jr., Salisbury, 140-5; Kerrigan Disorda, Benson, 175-8; Anthony Warren, Shoreham, 186-8; Desmond Russell, Bridport, 120-4; Thomas Disorda, Whiting, 128-3; Brian Kemp, Whiting, 133-4; Alan Christian, Orwell, 189-6; Peter Root, Orwell, 170-6; Liam Quinn, Shoreham, 176-6; and Bradley Disorda, Whiting, 136-3. Also, Cole Warren, Shoreham, 140-4; Gabe Laberge, Shoreham, 140-4; Scott Stanley, Shoreham, 152-6; William Bishop, Benson, 200-8; Lauren Dame, Shoreham, 152-7; Chip Maynard, Orwell, 1716; Joe Warren, Whiting, 170-7; Jeremy Quenneville, Orwell, 200-7; Britney Hedvab, Fair Haven, 113-4; Nick Neff, Orwell, 113-4; and Richard Ladd, Orwell, 165-7. Also, Gene Goodspeed, Orwell, 133-5; Austin Morin, Shoreham, 123-8; Steve Brileya, Shoreham, 143-4; David Charron, West Haven, 124-4; Gus Hill, Benson, 150-8; Gary Hill, Benson, 143-6; Jacob Kemp, Sudbury, 115-6; Darryl Davis, Shoreham, 185-4; Jamie Northrup, Cornwall, 111-3; Edson Lanpher, Shoreham, 158-3; and Walter Brown, West Rutland, 1566. Also, James Giard, Shoreham, 123-3; Adrian Brower, Fair Haven, 102-3; Jonathon Lanpher, Leicester, 160-5; Chris Brown, Orwell, 126-5; Taylor Patterson, Shoreham, 1485; Russell Davis, Bridport, 129-4; Duane Kehoe, Shoreham, 205-8; Tristan Stearns, Cornwall, 154-8; Tim Bertrand, Orwell, 167-8; John Hutchins, Brandon, 148-3; Mark Reginbald, Shoreham, 131-4; Jim Gill, Cornwall, 119-6; and Pamela Bedard, Cornwall, 157-8. Andy Kirkaldy may be reached at andyk@addisonindependent.com.

Have a news tip? Call Liz Pecor at 453-2180 NEWS

Author! Author! On Saturday, Dec. 10, the author of the book, “Sleep Tight Farm,” Monkton’s own Eugenie Doyle of the Last Resort Farm, will be visiting the library to talk with readers and to sign a copy of this new picture book for children. She will be available from 10 to 11 a.m. at the Russell Memorial Library. You can pick up a

copy of this wonderful book at local bookstores in Middlebury, Shelburne and Burlington. Bring your own copy with you for Doyle to autograph. All are welcome. Hey! Hey! The big guy is on his way to Monkton; but not with his reindeer and sleigh. He’s giving the reindeer a rest until the big day. Santa will arrive

at the fire department at 1 p.m. sharp on Saturday, Dec. 17. Come early to see him arrive by fire truck and bring your camera for a picture with the jolly old elf! He’ll make you laugh in spite of yourself! There will be cookies, juice and candy canes to enjoy while you wait for your visit with Santa. P.S.don’t forget your wish list!

wellness directory

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(Continued from Page 7A) burgh, 147-4; Dylan Raymond, Ferrisburgh, 146-4; Bradley Hill, New Haven, 146-3; Benjamin Greenstein, Charlotte, 146-6; and Kyle Kayhart, New Haven, 145-7. Also, Mark Livingston, New Haven, 144-6; Jordan Rule, Ferrisburgh, 144-6; Nick Jennings, Bristol, 1448; Eric Raymond, Monkton, 143-6; Raymond Therrien, Charlotte, 1433; Edward Kwiatkowski, New Haven, 140-6; Rodney Stearns, Ferrisburgh, 138-8; Wyatt Traverse, New Haven, 138-6; Brady West, Bristol, 136-6; Jesse Lalumiere, Ferrisburgh, 136-4; Michelle Kilbreth, Cornwall, 135-8; and Stephen Davis, New Haven, 135-5. Also, Todd Roscoe, Lincoln, 1348; Timothy Farr, Monkton, 134-6; Alan Whitney, New Haven, 131-4; Michael Poirier, New Haven, 1315; Dustin Brace, Ferrisburgh, 1294; Jeremy Lattrell, Lincoln, 128-3; Matthew Norton, Bristol, 127-6; Daniel Bushey, Starksboro, 127-4; Cody Greene, Ferrisburgh, 127-6; Sally Torrey, Ferrisburgh, 126-3; Alan Bessette, Ferrisburgh, 126-4; and Lance Perlee, Bristol, 126-4. Also, Chase Atkins, Bristol, 1253; Randy Butler, New Haven, 1255; William Smits, Bridport, 125-4; Lance Fleming, Ferrisburgh, 124-7; Daniel Sweet, Ferrisburgh, 124-4; Timothy Paquette, Shoreham, 1236; Paul Wildasin, New Haven, 1233; Jennifer Bora, Charlotte, 121-6; Patrick Murphy, Waltham, 120-4; Josh Roscoe, Starksboro, 119-3; and Richard Brunet, Waltham, 116-2. Also, Patrick Blaise, Ferrisburgh, 114-3; Abigail Stearns, Ferrisburgh, 113-6; Shawn Roscoe, Bristol, 1124; Nathan Couture, Ferrisburgh, 112-5; Philip Livingston, New Haven, 108-4; Brendon Huestis, New Haven, 106-5; Joanne Newell, New Haven, 105-3; Charles Desjadon, Ripton, 103-4; and Sterling Pelsue, Chester, 102-4. C&S HUNTING SUPPLIES Hunter Warner, Ripton, 138-4, and Donald Brown, Bristol, 146-8. GREEN MT. TRAILS END Gary Briggs, Lincoln, 160-4; John

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Charlotte McGray, PSYD 388-0929 Doctor McGray also takes referrals for psychotherapy.

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Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 13A

Vergennes Holiday Stroll Little City’s Holiday Stroll kicks off the season VERGENNES — Citizens and visitors to Vergennes can eat breakfast with Santa Claus, take part in the Bixby Library silent auction, shop at city merchants and at an annual holiday craft fair and generally get in the holiday spirit this coming Saturday, Dec. 3, when the Little City hosts its annual Holiday Stroll. The full day of activities will kick off when Santa pops up at the Vergennes Union High School cafeteria at a pancake breakfast from 8 to 10 a.m. in an event sponsored by VUHS students and Friends of Music. After breakfast, see what’s on offer at the 16th annual Winter Holiday Craft Fair at Vergennes Union Elementary School, which runs from 9 a.m. to 3:30 p.m. The price of admission is canned goods or other non-perishable foodstuff for the local food shelf. Bixby Memorial Library will host a holiday open house from 9 a.m. to 2 p.m., which will include a silent auction of holiday baskets donated by local businesses and library patrons. Bidding on the goody-filled baskets closes at 1:45, with winners announced at 2 p.m. At the library, Santa will read Clement Moore’s classic poem, “’Twas the Night Before Christmas” at around 10:45 a.m. Then Vermont singer/songwriter Jon Gailmor will entertain the jolly makers at the library around 11 a.m. Due to limited space and high demand, free tickets are required for the Gailmor performance; those interested may call 877-2211 for tickets. Sometime during the day, you’ll want to stop in to see the entrants in the Gingerbread House Contest, which will be on display between 9 a.m. and 4 p.m. Individual/Family entries will be on display in the storefront at Luigi’s, and business entries will be displayed in the window of Vergennes Wine. The Basin Harbor Club is sponsoring the contest. Kids who want to share their wish lists with Santa will have a chance during the afternoon. Santa’s Village will be open noon- 3 p.m. at the Vergennes Opera House. This is a chance to take some pictures with Santa (including a free 5x7 print), enjoy story time with Mrs. Claus, take part in gingerbread man decorating, write your letter to Santa and more. Many Vergennes merchants will be offering promotions that day. Night falls early in December and people in Vergennes will gather to mark the coming of the darkness with celebrations in City Park from 3-5:30 p.m. There will be toasty campfires, s’more making, Santa visits, musical performances — the Vergennes Partnership even advertised a petting zoo from 3:30-4:30 p.m. A high spot for many is the group caroling. The evening ends with an appearance by the dazzling SD Ireland Holiday cement truck, which will be bedecked with hundreds and hundreds of Christmas lights — it is breathtak-

Holiday giving

THE ROTARY OF Greater Vergennes combined forces with the Vergennes Lions Club to collect Thanksgiving dinners to be donated to the Vergennes Food Shelf. The meals consisted of all the trimmings for a complete Thanksgiving dinner including a turkey. On Saturday, Nov. 19, volunteers from both of those groups loaded enough food to fill five SUVs and transported that food from City Hall Park in Vergennes to the Vergennes Food Shelf. Pictured are Vergennes Rotary President Susan Burdick and Rotarian Scott Gaines loading turkeys into the back of an SUV.

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Gift certificates galore, a plethora of handmade and hand-painted items including pillows, potholders, frames and mirrors, baskets full of surprises and goodies and a nice selection of toys for kids make up the available items this year. They’re all on display with bid sheets at the library now through Saturday, December 3 when bids will close at 2:00 p.m. All proceeds benefit the Friends of Bixby Library! Next time you are at one of the local businesses listed here, take time to say “Thank You” for their support of Bixby Memorial Library.

3 Squares 802 Performance Antidote Aubuchon Hardware, Vergennes Big Barn Home Center Bixby Memorial Library BJ’s Farm Supply Black Sheep Bistro Bridge Restaurant Classic Stitching Comfort Hill Kennel Daily Chocolate Dakin Farm DR Power Equipment Eating Well Everywear for Everyone Full Circle Veterinary Green Mountain Pet & Tack Hayden Designs Hollyhocks Flowers & Designs Joan Burt Beading & Design Judy Coulman Rice Designs KB Café Kinneys, Vergennes Lake Champlain Maritime Museum Lake Champlain Chocolates Linda’s Apparel & Gifts Malabar Marbleworks Pharmacy, Vergennes Men’s Corner

Pam Farnsworth Bags Park Squeeze People’s United Bank Periodic Tables by Alan Simon PT 360 Raintree Shaw Supermarket, Vergennes Shuen Lee Chinese Takeout Silver Forest Strong House Inn Subway, Vergennes The Stove Depot Vergennes Animal Hospital Vermont Livestock Slaughter & Processing VT Teddy Bear WOW Toyz Carol Kress Daniel Doyle Janet Seaburg Jeff Tweedy Jim McClay Karlene DeVine Linda Braginton Lisa Patton Marsha Hoffman Paulette & Joe Bogan Shannon Atkins Sue Berkenbush

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PAGE 14A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

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Fire (Continued from Page 1A) really wrong.” Anderson crawled in under the flames far enough to investigate and when he returned Allen ran into the house to call 911 and to grab two “mosquito size” kitchen fire extinguishers. Soon firefighters from Starksboro, Lincoln and Bristol were on the scene, unrolling hoses and battling the blaze. Ironically, one of the first firefighters on the scene, Jake Orvis from the Lincoln Fire Department, had a family member for whom Allen had organized a benefit following a devastating fire some years ago. Orvis donned his protective gear and was ready to enter the fire before the hose on the Starksboro tanker could even be unfurled, Allen said. A tanker truck and crew from New Haven responded as well and parked nearby in case it was needed. Allen said that the outpouring of caring from friends and neighbors and the speed with which local firefighters left their family celebrations to attend to duty has left she and Anderson feeling deeply grateful. It reminds you, said Allen, “that you live in a community and that when you need someone at your back they’re there for you.” Nonetheless, Allen explained that it’s important to she and her husband to take care of the fire’s aftermath themselves. “We try to take care of ourselves, and it’s gratifying that we have so many friends who’ve offered to give us help, but we’re just taking care of it,” she said. The workshop that caught fire is central to the couple’s work. Anderson, a well-known blacksmith, has his forge in the downstairs part of the

FIREFIGHTERS ENTER a Starksboro workshop owned by weaver Lausanne Allen and blacksmith Brian Anderson on Thanksgiving Day. The shop sustained considerable damage.

Courtesy photo

building. Allen’s weaving and spinning studio is upstairs. The insurance adjuster offered them a professional service to clean out the burned area. But it’s important to Allen and Anderson to sift through every single thing by hand, Allen said. The couple have begun going through the two floors of the workshop, seeing what is salvageable and what must be thrown away. Allen says that they hope to have gone through things enough that by the spring they can consider beginning repairs on the building itself. The couple believes the fire began from a spark off a grinder. “My husband for every day of the last 50 Thanksgivings has always worked in his shop on Thanksgiving morning and this was no differ-

Shoreham SHOREHAM — The town of Shoreham was awarded a grant through the Better Roads Program to replace a culvert and stone line a 500-foot section of ditch on Harrington Hill Road this past summer of 2016.

ent. He was over in his shop working with a grinder grinding on some metal and one of the sparks must have flown into something that smoldered,” said Allen. The heaviest damage is on the ground floor of the workshop, where Anderson has his tools and other objects associated with his long career as an artisan. Despite these losses, Allen’s response remains focused on gratitude. Just two hours after they had first set off for their Thanksgiving celebration, the couple made their way down the road to their friend’s house. “It was one of the most moving Thanksgiving Day speeches I’ve ever given at the dinner table, I’ll tell you that,” said Allen. “You don’t feel gratitude like that so deeply as when

you know that you could have gone by that smoldering fire and come home to a hole in the ground with nothing in it but coals … We would have probably lost the total building, everything in it.” Allen also noted that however much she and Anderson might have lost in the fire, it made them deeply aware of others around the world who have lost even more — with no safety net in place. “Our shop is a wonderful part of what we’ve had here. And it certainly is sad to have it suffering the way it looks right now. But it’s a luxury, in the scope of things. If we lived in Syria and our next door building were bombed out, we’d be running for our lives, and we wouldn’t be calling 911.”

Have a news tip?

Call the Addison Independent at 388-4944 NEWS

The awarded amount of $9,892.36 helped greatly to fix the erosion problem that was present at this site. With equipment and manpower provided by the Shoreham Highway Department this project was successfully completed in September and will

prove to mitigate phosphorus running into Lake Champlain for years to come and keeping Shoreham on its plan for correcting these problems. Prepare for your holiday activities by coming to a pancake breakfast on Saturday, Dec. 10, from 8 to 10 a.m.

at the Shoreham Congregational Church at 28 School Road. Feast on plain and blueberry pancakes with real maple syrup, scrambled eggs, sausage, home fries, and beverages for only $7 adults, $3 children, and $20 families.


Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 15A

Payment (Continued from Page 1A) County Sheriff’s Department General Fund, as opposed to a personal check. Keeler explained that the department’s general fund does not include any county or federal funds, but rather the proceeds from service contracts that his force maintains with towns for security, traffic details and other law enforcement activities. The sheriff’s department, at last count, had contracts with 17 Addison County towns, which pay for the sheriff’s services primarily with their property tax revenues. State officials said that while Vermont campaign finance laws don’t regulate the sources from which contributors tap funds to support their preferred candidates in an election, they questioned the advisability of an elected official using his or her department funds to influence a partisan election. “From a policy standpoint, it doesn’t appear to be a good policy decision to have done that,” Vermont Secretary of State Condos said. “It would certainly raise questions. “I would never in my wildest dreams think about using secretary of state’s operating money to move a political agenda,” Condos added. “You just don’t do that.” Keeler, contacted on Tuesday, maintained his purchase of an ad for Clark using department funds was a legitimate expense. “That is my money,” he said. “That money in that general fund is my money under my direction.” Keeler, during that initial interview, said he planned on reimbursing the department for the $154 if “somebody wants to make an issue out of it.” But the sheriff called back a short time later saying he had changed his mind. “I just had a conversation with my bookkeeper, and I have decided that I’m not going to reimburse to the department for $154 … and you can make whatever issue you want to make out of that,” Keeler said. “It’s not county funds, it’s not federal funds, it’s Don Keeler’s funds. It’s for the work that I do with contracts.” Keeler said the media inquiry would, however, prompt him to reassess his planned contribution of $420 from his department’s general fund to Camp Ta-Kum-Ta, a South Hero camp serving children with cancer

and their families. The sheriff’s department is participating in a countywide law enforcement fund drive called, “deer camp beards for kids with cancer.” As reported in the Nov. 10 issue of the Independent, the fund drive invites officers to refrain from shaving during the month of November as long as they each donate $30 to the camp. “I guess if the other thing is an issue, I guess Camp Ta-Kum-Ta is a loser in this one,” Keeler said. “I’m disappointed.” When asked if there was a difference between using department funds to make a contribution to Camp TaKum-Ta and using such funds to help a favorite candidate in an election, Keeler replied, “There is no difference. It’s not public funds. They are under my direct control and are not public funds.” CAMPAIGN FINANCE LAW Vermont’s campaign finance laws are addressed in Chapter 61, Title 17 of state statutes. The law addresses such issues as contribution limitations and prohibiting the transfer of donations, but nothing about where a contributor can or can’t source his or her donations, noted Will Senning, director of elections for the state of Vermont. “Interestingly, the election law doesn’t have any of that kind of prohibition on the source of funding for a contribution,” Senning said of Keeler’s ad purchase in support of Clark. “I get this or similar questions a lot, but the election law doesn’t speak to that. It doesn’t say a contribution cannot be made, for instance, using taxpayers funds or government money,” Senning said. “At least from the perspective of the campaign finance law, there’s really no prohibition on what money you’re spending toward a contribution.” When Senning fields such questions from elected officials, he said he advises them “to look at the institu-

tion’s policy or county government policy to see if there was anything that would prohibit the use of those funds for anything personal — including campaign contributions.” The Independent’s repeated efforts to reach John Campbell, executive director of the Vermont Department of State’s Attorneys and Sheriffs, were unsuccessful on Tuesday and Wednesday, as the paper went to press. Since the state’s campaign finance law doesn’t speak to where contributions are sourced, Condos said such a remedy would have to come through a governmental code of ethics or personnel policy. “I think it is certainly going down a dangerous and slippery slope to allow state funds or government funds to advocate for specific candidates,” Condos said. “It surprises me that (Keeler) would do that. Maybe he has a different take on it.” The sheriff’s department derives the vast majority of its revenue from the services it provides to clients throughout the county. Those services include law enforcement, security, speed limit enforcement, serving writs and warrants, and transporting prisoners. The department also receives reimbursement from the county budget for such expenses as building maintenance, training and administrative support. The county and state of Vermont are also required to cover additional ACSD expenses, including the sheriff’s salary and benefits, office space and some automotive expenses, according to the most recent (2014) independent audit of the department’s revenues and expenditures. The most current Addison County budget, for fiscal year 2017, shows $126,529 in funding for the sheriff’s budget, including $79,000 for salaries, $20,026 for benefits, and $500 for training — a sum that Keeler said was far less than requested by other sheriff’s departments.

The most recent independently audited sheriff’s department budget showed total operating expenses of $778,542 for 2014. ‘PARTISAN POLITICAL PURPOSES’ State Auditor Doug Hoffer said this was the first such case he had heard of an elected official using his or her department funds to back a candidate of his or her choice for a related office. Hoffer became auditor in 2012. “In my view, in such cases, elected officials should always exercise caution and avoid such entanglements,” Hoffer said. “Generally, public funds should never be used for partisan political matters. I am not aware of any explicit prohibition in statute in that

regard, but all those who directly or indirectly pay for the services of the sheriff or any other public figure, I think it’s fair to say, did not expect that their funds would be used for partisan political purposes.” Hoffer stressed his office has no authority over sheriff department’s expenditures. But the auditor’s office pays one third of the costs of the biennial audits of the state’s 14 county sheriff’s department budgets. An independent firm performs those audits — eight in one year, six the next. “It seems to me that as a public official, not only should this situation be avoided, but public funds should never be used for partisan political purposes,” Hoffer said.

It was Gov. Peter Shumlin who appointed Keeler — a former Addison County high bailiff — to serve as Addison County sheriff after longtime incumbent James Coons died in office during the spring of 2012. Keeler won election to the job in his own right in 2014, besting Holmes, who ran as a write-in candidate. Keeler began as a part-time deputy with the county sheriff’s department back in 1972. When Keeler and his family sold their filling station on Court Street in 1988, Keeler joined the department full-time. Holmes worked as a deputy with the sheriff’s department for 25 years until being let go by Keeler around three years ago.

By the way (Continued from Page 1A) tionalist, was recruited to participate in the 1922 murder of Foreign Minister Walther Rathenau, the highest-ranking Jew in the Weimar Republic. This situation opened the door to Hitler’s rise to power. Sounds like a good read and a fascinating talk. Musicians of all ages and all instruments — including singers! the Middlebury Community Music Center will host its third annual MCMC Christmas Caroling Party this Saturday from 4-5:30 p.m. The fabulous Susanne Peck will conduct the ensemble when it meets at the Middlebury Community House — 6 Main St. Bring a stand and a libation or snack to share if you feel like it. Please email Emily Sunderman if you plan to attend so she can make sure there are enough parts and seats available. Or RSVP by going to this website: https://goo.gl/forms/ ZJef4AG92a9mEqth2. Lincoln artist Kathleen Kolb’s wonderful show of paintings called “Shedding Light on the Working Forest” continues its tour and is currently on view in Montpelier through Dec. 30 at the Vermont Supreme Court Gallery. Kolb and collaborator Verandah Porche will be at the exhibit this Friday from 4-7 p.m. in conjunction with the Montpelier Art Walk. Mary Hogan Elementary School in Middlebury recently was recognized by the organizers of the Way to Go! Challenge — a contest for Vermont businesses, organizations and school to lower their carbon footprints during a two-seek period earlier this fall. More than 11,000 people from 333 groups participated in this year’s Way to Go! Challenge. In total, participants saved an estimated 741,266 pounds of carbon pollution in just two weeks. Way to Go! is designed to encourage a culture of shared mobility, and it seeks to get people moving, support cleaner air and reduce fossil fuel consumption. While Mary Hogan School did not win the top prize — a solar array — organizers recognized four groups as “Carbon Cutting Leaders” because they “went above and beyond in their efforts to drive big participation and save a lot of carbon pollution.

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PAGE 16A — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Apples (Continued from Page 1A) just any three acres. Windfall Orchard (as it’s still called) had once been the passion and pride of local physician Ted Collier. Collier’s longtime orchard manager Art Blaise (both are now deceased), helped Koehler understand the hidden gems in his tangle of trees. “Becoming as good of an apple grower as I was a chef, that’s something that I’d like to do. But Art Blaise probably forgot more than I’ll ever learn,” said Koehler. One of the most important skills Blaise taught Koehler was how to graft. And grafting has become central to Koehler’s business as an orchardist and cider maker. Most of the three acres Koehler purchased along with his home were Macintosh trees. But at a mere three acres, Koehler knew he couldn’t even begin to produce enough Macs to make a profit. He also knew he was interested in a far different flavor profile and wanted to raise heirloom varieties of apples. So he decided to get the most value out of his mature trees by grafting new varieties onto them. Now these former Macintosh trees are producing a range of European cider varieties, heirloom eating apples and an exciting range of wild apples found in Addison County as part of Shacksbury Cider’s Lost Apple Project. “These are the apples that our

ancestors would have eaten,” said Koehler. Flavor is everything to Koehler, whose success in creating one of the country’s top-rated ice ciders and top-rated farmhouse-style cider is based on his hand-crafted, smallproduction approach to cider. For the cider bottled under the Windfall Orchard name, Koehler blends around 30 varieties of apples to create the signature flavor profile. He then ferments the mixture using only the wild yeasts that are naturally occurring in the wood of the press or on the skins of the fruits themselves. Unlike large-batch ciders, such as those produced at Citizen or Woodchuck, Koehler doesn’t manipulate the flavor post-fermentation but rather creates his flavor profile through the apples he selects and blends beforehand. Four classes of apples are traditionally used to make hard cider, Koehler explains: sharp, bittersharp, bittersweet and sweet. Each class has a different range of acidity and tannin levels. For hard ciders, tannins are especially important. “Tannin is what makes you want to spit the apple out,” Koehler said. “Tannin is bitter. Tannin is what makes you feel like you’ve eaten a cotton ball, like your mouth just totally dries out.” But beyond these foundational components, Koehler is interested in an even more elusive range of fla-

vors found in heirloom eating varieties such as Winter Banana, Arkansas Black, Esopus Spitzenburg, Westfield Seek No Further, Blue Pearmain, and others. “The range of flavors are like what grapes can exhibit in wine. Some are very aromatic. Some are spicy. Some are herbal,” Koehler said. “I have one particular apple called a White Winter Pearmain that is perfumey; it has almost a jasmine-like flavor to it. I have the Windfall Golden, which is a wild chance that we named here; it tastes more like a pear than it tastes like an apple. The Winter Banana starts tasting like a banana after it sits in storage. These are flavor profiles that you can’t find in supermarket apples.” How much Windfall’s mix relies on traditional European cider varieties, how much on heirloom eating apples and how much on wild apples found in Addison County is proprietary. But Koehler says that as an orchardist and as a cider maker, he believes the most promising are those apples gleaned from Addison County hedgerows as part of Shacksbury Cider’s ongoing Lost Apple Project. “These are wild trees that have survived here. And these are varieties that were produced here,” he said. “That cross pollination that created that seed that created that tree that created that fruit, which is all chance, all happened here.” With the exception of Dabinet, a

ily of four, according to Montross. HOPE officials will also consider hardship cases involving parents who might have some savings, but who have recently fallen on hard times — such as a job loss or house fire, for example. “It’s for low-income people who otherwise wouldn’t be able to have gifts for their children, unless they were using the rent money or the fuel money,” Montross explained. Holiday Shop customers are assigned gift limits based on family size. In general, qualifying families, according to Montross, can make the following selections per child: one toy, something warm to wear or an outfit that “makes them feel good,” a game or craft, and up to four books. “We want to promote reading, literacy and empowerment,” Montross said. There are additional stacks of surplus material from which parents can choose a family gift, or smaller toys, Montross noted. “Lillian” was another parent carefully combing through the Holiday

Shop’s gift selections on Monday. She lingered a little longer than Alicia, and with good reason; Lillian has six children at home and has limited work hours. Lillian (not her real name) diligently shops at clearance sales most of the year in order to get presents at the lowest possible cost, but she can only stretch a dollar so far. This is the fourth year she’s availed herself of Holiday Shop merchandise, and she’s grateful for the help. “I think this is a Godsend; it’s so helpful and I appreciate it more than words can express,” Lillian said of the free gifts for her children. Montross knows there are many more Addison County parents like Alicia and Lillian who depend on the Holiday Shop to allow their children — for at least one day — to share in the excitement that other kids feel in receiving something nice and new on Christmas morning. “What we’re trying to do is level the playing field a little bit,” Montross said of the shop.

BRAD KOEHLER, OWNER of Windfall Orchard in Cornwall, poses with some of the hard ciders he produces from his apples. Independent photo/Trent Campbell

French variety, many of the European traditional hard cider varieties don’t seem to grow vigorously enough in Vermont’s harsh climate. Windfall cider is in an upper-niche market, sold and enjoyed more like wine than beer. A bottle of the farmhouse cider retails locally for $11.99; a large bottle of the ice cider retails for $26.99.

While Koehler is proud of his product and proud of the ways his hand-crafted, small-production approach focuses on achieving flavor pre-fermentation and uses only wild yeasts, he also emphasized that the fact there are a range of ciders made in Vermont benefits all cider makers. “It’s all great,” he said. “We all

have this focus of making cider a viable industry and (also) getting Vermont — and the Champlain Valley most specifically — to be recognized as the Napa Valley of cider or to be recognized as a specific geographic location where the best ciders in the country are produced. “And it takes all of us to make that happen, to put us on the map.”

HOPE (Continued from Page 1A) she is able to buy her daughter with her limited funds. “It’s a good opportunity for kids to have a little extra for Christmas,” she said of the shop. “If it wasn’t for this, us low-income adults would not be able to afford Christmas presents for our kids.” The HOPE shop, Alicia said, has also allowed her to maintain her daughter’s belief in Santa Claus. The shop hours allow her to discreetly pick out gifts while her daughter is at school. “I’m happy to see my daughter’s face on Christmas morning,” Alicia said. “I’m glad that people do this for us, and I’m glad it gives our kids a chance to experience what it’s like to have these kinds of gifts.” The gifts are diverse, colorful, utilitarian and selected with the goal of exercising the children’s imaginations, according to HOPE Executive Director Jeanne Montross. The puzzles, mittens, coats, toy trucks, board games, rocket ships, books, miniature cars and many other items have all been provided by area residents or purchased by HOPE with donated funds. A nice chunk of the inventory comes from gift idea tags that contributors pluck from Christmas trees set up at area businesses, churches and institutions, including Middlebury College, UTC Aerospace Systems, the National Bank of Middlebury, Agri-Mark/Cabot, St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church and the Weybridge Congregational Church. The St. Ambrose, St. Mary’s and St. Peter’s Catholic Churches have already sent in gifts from their respective donations efforts. Porter Hospital and Middlebury’s Mary Hogan Elementary School are also conducting holiday toy drives this year, according to Montross. Helen Haerle is among a handful of local volunteers who help stock and operate the Holiday Shop each year. Her specialty is supervising the shop displays and keeping account of the inventory of gifts. Haerle is perfect for the job for two major reasons: She coordinated the former St. Mary’s Christmas Shop for 15 years before merging that operation with HOPE’s annual effort; and she gained a wealth of retail experience as owner of the former Lazarus Department Store in Middlebury. “People are so generous; they give really nice things,” Haerle said. “It always feels good to do something for somebody else. THOSE IN NEED In order to qualify for a shopping trip at the HOPE Holiday Store, parents cannot earn a household income of more than 185 percent of the federal poverty guideline. That’s around $44,000 (pre-tax) annually for a fam-

A VISITOR AT the Helping Overcome Poverty’s Effects Holiday Shop picks out some gifts for her daughter. The Holiday Shop, which opened on Monday, offers free children’s gifts, clothing and books to parents who would otherwise not be able to buy their kids Christmas presents. Independent photo/Trent Campbell

She recalled a particularly emotional case on a Christmas Eve a few years ago involving a mom who

was crying in a vehicle parked in the HOPE parking lot. The woman explained she had no food and no

Christmas gifts to offer her son. Montross said HOPE officials were able to bring her into the building to make some gift and food selections. Her little boy’s eyes lit up when he saw a can of baked beans in the food shelf. “We’re going to be able to eat beans for dinner!” the boy exclaimed to his mom, according to Montross. Donors can drop their gifts off at HOPE’s Boardman Street headquarters during business hours, Monday through Friday. The gifts should be unwrapped. Folks looking for ideas of specific gifts to buy can get a list of suggestions by emailing receptionist@hope-vt.org. The HOPE Holiday Gift Shop is now open to qualifying parents Monday through Friday, from 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., until Dec. 23. The shop will also be open from 10 a.m. to noon on Saturday, Dec. 17, for folks unable to visit during the workweek. Montross stressed that parents must first call ahead (388-3608) to make an appointment to pick out gifts from the shop.


ADDISON COUNTY INDEPENDENT

B Section

THURSDAY, DECEMBER 1, 2016

MATT DICKERSON

Following a beeline through snowy woods Just 40 yards from my stand, the tracks cut across the lumber trail I was walking along. They were too big to miss even in the dim light of dawn. Bee thief. Honey stealer. Black bear. The tracks, left in three inches of heavy wet snow, were still distinct and fresh. Probably less than an hour old, I thought. Five subsequent thoughts then crossed my mind, in the following order, I think. Thought No. 1: This is really cool. It would be even cooler to actually see a bear. I hadn’t seen a bear in Vermont in two years. Thought No. 2: I’m probably not going to see a deer this morning. I really didn’t imagine a deer wandering past my stand when there was fresh bear scent in the area. Thought No. 3: I should skip deer hunting and follow the tracks! Thought No. 4: He (or she) — which is to say, the bruin — had probably been in my bee hives, which were less than 200 yards away through the woods from where I stood, looking at the tracks. This was an even more discouraging thought than Thought No. 2. Thought No. 5. Really more of an impulse of my imagination than a rational thought. Something that flashed across my mind. I’m really glad that, for the first time this hunting season, I hadn’t set my alarm. I had slept in an hour later than usual and was walking to my stand in the first light of dawn and not in the pitch dark an hour before dawn. Despite the Thought No. 2 — and maybe with the Thought No. 5 breathing down the back of my neck — I quickly climbed up into my tree stand and sat waiting for a deer to pass by. A deer I was fairly sure was not actually going to pass by. I focused my deer-watching (See Dickerson, Page 9B)

ScoreBOARD COLLEGE SPORTS Women’s Hockey Panther/Cardinal Classic at Midd. 11/26 Midd. vs. Utica................................5-1 11/27 Plattsburgh vs. Midd.......................2-1 Men’s Hockey Northern Shootout at Plattsburgh 11/25 Norwich vs. Midd............................3-2 11/27 Plattsburgh vs. Midd.......................5-2 Men’s Basketball 11/27 Endicott vs. Midd........................93-89 11/29 Midd. vs. RPI..............................79-72 11/30 Johnson at Midd...........................Late

Schedule

COLLEGE SPORTS Women’s Hockey 12/2 Midd. at Conn..............................7 p.m. 12/3 Midd. at Conn..............................3 p.m. 12/10 Midd. at Castleton......................3 p.m. Men’s Hockey 12/2 Conn. at Midd..............................7 p.m. 12/3 Tufts at Midd................................3 p.m. 12/9 Hamilton at Midd..........................7 p.m. 12/10 Amherst at Midd.........................3 p.m. Women’s Basketball

SPORTS

ALSO IN THIS SECTION:

• School News • Legal Notices

OV senior leads field hockey squad

Lowell again tops Independent team

By ANDY KIRKALDY ADDISON COUNTY — Unlike 2015, when Otter Valley and Mount Abraham union high school field hockey teams met in the Division II final and Middlebury won a first-round D-I game, the 2016 field hockey postseason in these parts was relatively brief: Only the defending D-II champion Otters won a playoff contest this time around. But each team still enjoyed good moments, especially Coach Stacey Edmunds-Brickell’s 8-6 Otters and their high-scoring senior Allison Lowell, who repeats as the Addison Independent Field Hockey Player of the Year. Lowell leads the 2015 Addison Independent Field Hockey All-Star Team, and two of her teammates join her on the squad. Meanwhile, five of Coach Mary Stetson’s Mount Abe team earned spots on the Independent team. The Eagles just might have had the best local LOWELL squad, finishing 6-8-1 after playing 13 of 14 games against D-I competition before losing on the road in the D-II playoffs to the eventual champion, 1-0. Hurt by major losses from their 2015 lineup, Coach Megan Sears’ Tigers dipped to 3-12, although they were competitive in many games thanks to a strong attack, and they knocked off No. 2 Essex late in the season. Three Tigers are honored here. Selections were made based on observation, statistics and consultation with the coaches. Congratulations to the following: ALLISON LOWELL, OV SENIOR, PLAYER OF THE YEAR. Notes: Tremendous scorer and all(See Field hockey, Page 2B)

HIGH-SCORING OTTER VALLEY senior Allison Lowell is the Addison Independent High School Field Hockey Player of the Year. She led all local athletes with 19 goals this season, and also added three assists.

• Classifieds • Police Logs

Middlebury men’s hoop splits a pair of contests MIDDLEBURY — The Middlebury College men’s basketball team split two recent home games, sufferings its first loss on Sunday before bouncing back to win on Tuesday. The 4-1 Panthers were set to host Johnson State on Wednesday after the deadline for this issue of the Independent. The Panthers will next host Colby-Sawyer and Clarkson on Tuesday and Wednesday, respectively. On Sunday, visiting Endicott edged the Panthers, 93-89, using a 25-3 run in the second half to rally past the Panthers, who found themselves in foul trouble: point guard Jake Brown ultimately fouled out, and guards Matt St. Amour and Jack Daly finished with four apiece. Endicott, ranked No. 26 in the preseason poll to the Panthers’ No. 24, outrebounded Middlebury, 40-31; earned an 11-0 edge in second-chance points; and shot 52.3 percent to the Panthers’ 46.4 percent. Middlebury won the turnover battle, committing just eight to 15 for the Gulls, and outscored Endicott on points off turnovers, 19-13, and in transition, 12-8. But the Panthers could not hold the 55-38 lead they took with 18:22 to go on a St. Amour layup that capped a 9-0 run. The Gulls answered with their 25-3 run, capped off on a three-point field goal from Vinny Clifford, for a 63-58 lead with 12:38 left. Kamahl Walker had 10 points for the Gulls during the run, while Daquan Sampson chipped in with five points. (See Hoops, Page 3B)

Brandon Reporter file photo/Lee J. Kahrs

Women’s hockey edged by Cardinals Panthers look strong in tournament By ANDY KIRKALDY MIDDLEBURY — The Middlebury College women’s hockey team played well at home this past weekend in the annual Panther/ Cardinal Classic, but came up just short in the final to top-ranked Plattsburgh, 2-1, in a rematch of an NCAA Division III semifinal from last March. On Saturday, the 3-1 Panthers, who entered the weekend ranked No. 5, dismissed Utica, 5-1, in a Panther/Cardinal Classic semifinal before outshooting — and for long stretches outplaying — the 9-1 Cardinals in Sunday’s setback. Middlebury’s official 25-15 edge in shots on goal vs. Plattsburgh does not include a Maddie Winslow tally that the officials waved off, ruling that she had tipped in

Carly Watson’s power-play drive from the blue line with a high stick. Replays on a press box computer showed the goal clearly should have counted. Regardless, Coach Bill Mandigo was pleased with the Panthers’ effort over the weekend, which followed two overtime road wins the weekend before vs. NESCAC rival Trinity. “They battled, stuck their nose in. I’m happy with the effort. I told them that,” Mandigo said after Sunday’s loss. “I feel bad for them with the outcome.” Mandigo would like to see the effort — which vs. the Cardinals included good stick-to-stick passing in all zones and disruptive forechecking and center-ice checking (See Hockey, Page 3B)

UTICA GOALIE AMANDA Lupo stops Panther forward Katarina Shuchuk from stuffing the puck in the goal during Middlebury’s 5-1 victory in the semifinal of the Panther/Cardinal Classic tournament in Middlebury this past Saturday. The next day, the Middlebury College women’s hockey team lost in the final to Plattsburgh, 2-1. Independent photo/Trent Campbell

(See Schedule, Page 9B)

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PAGE 2B — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Field hockey (Continued from Page 1B) around player who once again led all local athletes with 19 goals, adding three assists … Finished her four-year varsity career with 58 goals and eight assists … Set the OV single-game record this fall with six goals vs. Fair Haven … Has excellent skills and a quick first step to go with poise, a powerful shot and a knack for hitting the corners … Tireless player who hustles and works hard to win the ball. Edmunds-Brickell’s Quotes: “She had a great season … She just lives the sport, and that shows. It just shows on and off the field. She’s a great leader … She pushes herself. She expects a lot of herself and works hard to get there … Her stick skills, of course, are fantastic … She’s eager to support others … Often she’d be back helping on defense because she can cover so much ground …

She’s just a well-rounded hockey player.” LILY SMITH, MUHS SENIOR. Notes: Dangerous, fast and talented left wing who led the Tigers with 11 goals and tacked on three assists … Had the speed and stick skills to blow past defenders and finish plays, and the vision to set up teammates … Versatile athlete who also saw time at midfield when needed … Determined deSMITH fender and team leader who never stopped trying to win the ball back and also went deep into the Tiger end to help out. Sears’ Quotes: “She is a tenacious, aggressive ath-

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lete who always knows what to do … She can hustle back and play solid aggressive defense … She has that hunger for the goal … The way she was able to support her teammates defensively was really helpful … The way she was able to transition from a forward to a midfield position was valuable to us … She had that great ability of being humorous and being focused and leading all at the same time.” ASHLEY TURNER, MOUNT ABE SENIOR. Notes: Tireless two-way center mid and team leader who contributed to the Eagle attack with three goals and five assists … Harassed opposing midfielders and defended well in the Eagle third and circle … Skilled player who could take on opponents one-on-one and make the right passes to set up teammates. Stetson’s Quotes: “She’s a real strong presence. As she went, we went … Her ability to make people around her better was one TURNER of her better qualities … She has a bottomless source of energy … She stepped in and scored some critical goals for us as well as gave some beautiful assists. She sees the field really well … She could maneuver in tight situations … She had strong leadership skills.” ROBYN ARENA, MOUNT ABE JUNIOR. Notes: Excellent, quick defender with the stick skills and field vision to also step up and play well at midfield at times this season … Primarily a left back who shut down most opposing right wings … Credited with five defensive saves, mostly on penalty corners. Stetson’s Quotes: “She’s fearless, determined, and just a strong, solid defender … She marks and tackles well … She’s versatile … She can make that transition (to ARENA midfield) well … She was a real pivotal person on our penalty corner unit … There were times that teams were already celebrating, and she was celebrating the fact that she took away the goal.” COURTNEY BUSHEY, OV SENIOR. Notes: Solid all-around player who thrived at center mid after moving from the front line to fill a void for OV … Scored four goals and assisted three more … Set up many more chances and helped key the Otters’ transition from defense to offense … Communicated and defended well. Edmunds-Brickell’s Quotes: “She scored for us. She assisted for us. She played good defense for us. She moved around the field well … She was smart in how she BUSHEY played the ball … She was able to get the ball up to the front line, and bust back to support the defense when needed … She knew where to position herself … She worked hard to fill that spot, and I think she did a nice job for us.” LAURA WHITLEY, MUHS JUNIOR. Notes: Tireless, quick center mid who defended relentlessly and moved the ball quickly and well … Broke up many plays as a member of the Tiger defense against opponents’ penalty corners and was a constant defensive presence … Junior tri-captain whose passing sent the Tiger forwards into the attack. Sears’ Quotes: “She really helped with transition from the defense through the midfield to the forward WHITLEY line … She has speed and composure … She had a lot of on-field leadership. She was a great leader in the heat of the moment in a game … She was a defensive force … She’s a very nice player, and I’m psyched for next year for her.” JACKIE REISS, MOUNT ABE SENIOR. Notes: Led Mount Abe with six goals and added an assist … Came on strong as the season progressed … Hard to contain with the ball on her stick … Could shoot hard and low and also had a good lift shot … Tough defensive

forward and good passer. Stetson’s Quotes: “She sees the field well … Her ability to pass and move off the ball made her a scoring threat … She has great stick work in tight spaces … She became more aggressive as the season went on … Her ability to pressure the ball made her a stronger offensive player … Once she got ahold of the ball she held onto it.” EMILY ALDRICH, MOUNT REISS ABE JUNIOR. Notes: Poised sweeper whose work in the defensive circle helped hold the state’s toughest teams to 1.53 goals per game against the Eagles … Made three defensive saves … Smart positional player with the quickness to mark top attackers … Made good decisions and has the skill to carry the ball out of trouble or make crisp passes. Stetson’s Quotes: “She has strong tackling skills … She knows when to tackle as it comes toward her … She stopped the opposition before they could sustain or generate any shot at goal … She was asked to ALDRICH take the most dangerous player repeatedly and hold the fort, and she did a great job at that. There was not a team we played that didn’t have big-time scorers.” LEXI BARTLETT, MUHS FRESHMAN. Notes: Made an immediate impact as a freshman in the state’s toughest league, racking up six goals and seven assists … Fast, tireless forward who played aggressively in the circle and saw passing lanes to set up her teammates … Used her stamina to come back and help out defensively and trigger the attack. Sears’ Quotes: “She was right in front of the goalie ready to score goals, and her stick was always on the ground … She had that want to score a goal … She knew where to BARTLETT dish the ball … Her athleticism definitely was a part of the equation … She also played great man-to-man defense when necessary and wasn’t afraid to get in the defensive circle to help.” COURTNEY RANDALL, OV SENIOR. Notes: Hard-working defender who enjoyed a strong year at left back frustrating opponents’ dangerous right wings, and also filled in at sweeper … Improved her skills and confidence … Made several key defensive saves … Made good decisions under pressure and had the ability to carry the ball out of danger. Edmunds-Brickell’s Quotes: “I always had confidence in her when she had the ball … She really knew how to play back there and was very RANDALL consistent this year … She was just really solid and she believed in herself so much more this year … She pushed herself as hard as anyone on the team … She was so smart in front of the goal … I believed in her ability in front of the cage.” CHESSLEY JACKMAN, MOUNT ABE SOPHOMORE. Notes: Stopped 121 shots and surrendered 23 goals in 15 games for an .840 save percentage against Vermont’s top offenses … Rangy goalie with quick feet and excellent mobility … Stepped off her line well to clear the ball out of harm’s way … Recorded three shutouts and allowed just one goal six times. Stetson’s Quotes: “She really blossomed as the year went on … She could initiate play, send us strong clears … She could keep us alive in JACKMAN games, and we had some really tight games … She covers ground, and she’s tall. You’ve got to like that … And she anticipates well. She’s thinking ahead. She’s not just reacting … She was fearless.”

Keep up to date with all the action, read

Arts + Leisure every Thursday in the Addy Indy!


Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 3B

Hockey

Hoops

(Continued from Page 1B) as well as solid defensive zone coverage — translate to more offensive production. Only in Saturday’s win have the Panthers scored more than one goal in regulation. “Working hard is great, but at the end of the day you still have to have more than them at the end, and we didn’t,” Mandigo said. “And we had all kinds of chances. We’ve just got to figure it out. At least we know we can play with them, which is a real good thing.” PLATTSBURGH GAME Both Plattsburgh goals on Sunday came after rare Panther breakdowns, one 56 seconds after the puck dropped. Tournament MVP Melissa Sheeran picked off a careless clearing pass, skated to the bottom of the left circle and fed Kayla Meneghin at the far post. Meneghin moved across the crease to her backhand and tucked the puck home. The Cardinals nearly took a 2-0 PANTHER JUNIOR Jessica Young tries to tip a shot past Utica goalie Amanda Lupo during Saturday afterlead at 4:50, but Ashley Songin’s noon’s game at The Chip. Middlebury won the game, 5-1. Independent photo/Trent Campbell shot on a two-on-one break hit the crossbar. The Panthers then easily At 4:43 of the third, Rachael St. Panthers have scored — at times killed two penalties, and the ice be- Middlebury’s edge in shots was 19Clair converted a Sherman feed on last winter they relied heavily on gan to tilt the other way — Middle- 14 after two periods. After a sloppy early power play a two-on-one break. Jane Pagano Winslow and Young. bury launched the final six shots of in the third, Middlebury made it 2-1 scored for the 3-4 Pioneers with He expects the young Panthers to the period. At 9:53 Winslow’s goal was in- 5:51 into the period on a five-on- 1:43 remaining. Middlebury goalie improve, especially as he learns the correctly waved off, but the Pan- three power play. Watson moved the Julia Neuberger made 28 saves, best combinations on the ice. “I’m not sure I have the right thers kept coming and Cardinal puck from the center point to Win- while two Utica goalies combined people in the right spots,” Mandigo goalie Camille Leonard held the slow at the bottom of the left circle, for 22 stops. Overall, Mandigo listed as plus- said. “You just hope by the end of short side on Winslow soon after- and Winslow snapped a shot into the top right corner. Jen- es the return of Watson, an all-star January you have it figured out who ward. Late in the na Marotta picked defender and offensive contributor should be where and who should be period, Leonard also up the second assist. who missed almost all of last season doing what.” denied Winslow’s se- “They battled, Han then came with an injury, the early promise of Andy Kirkaldy may be reached at nior linemate Jessica stuck their nose Young from the slot, in. I’m happy with up big again, flash- the freshmen, and the fact that eight andyk@addisonindependent.com. ing her left pad to and did the same earthe effort. I told stop Meneghin on a ly in the second. breakaway straight Middlebury also them that. I feel squandered a power bad for them with out of the penalty box. play early in the sec- the outcome.” The Panther ond period — Man— Coach Mandigo pressed. Leonard dedigo noted that as nied senior Victoria an area needing imLaven’s screened bid from the right provement. The Cardinals had their best sus- point, a shot that Katarina Shuchuk tained stretch in the game in the might also have tipped, at 10:45, middle of the second period, in part and also stopped Kelly Sherman on because some of the Panther young- three-on-two with seven minutes to sters — there are only four seniors go. Middlebury pulled Han after a on the roster, and several freshmen skated regular shifts — briefly lost timeout with 1:57 remaining, but Leonard (24 stops) made a terrific composure. “If there were a drug that could do Panther freshman goalie Lin Han glove save on a wide-open Young for human health everything that cutting into the slot after she took a (13 saves) made a strong stop on Sheeran at 13:09, but had no chance feed from Winslow, and Plattsburgh excersize can, it would likely be the at 10:02. Meneghin, behind the net, held on. most valuable pharmaceutical ever.” made a nifty pass between her legs UTICA GAME – Dr Mark Tarnopolsky In Saturday’s 5-1 win, the Panto Ashley Songin in the corner, and she found Sheeran at the far post for thers scored twice in the first period. Freshman Sidney Portner set the easy tap-in. ADULT Han then robbed Karen Hudson up Shanna Hickman in the slot 1:30 MEMBERSHIP FEE into the contest, and at 10:16 Hlinka with a sliding pad save and denied until Christmas Eve Songin on a two-on-one shorthand- tipped a Marotta pass from the right point inside the far post. ed bid. In the second period, Elizabeth The Panthers fought back late STUDENT in the period, but Leonard made a Wulf, who joined Young on the MEMBERSHIP FEE All year long pad save on a Young breakaway, all-tournament team, scored two gloved a short Winslow forehand power-play goals to make it 4-0. set up by Young, and held the post She redirected a Watson shot from VERGENNES MIDDLEBURY when Janka Hlinka — who played a the point and later lifted a Watson vermontsun.com strong game — cut in from the side. rebound home from the right circle. 877.2030 388.6888

(Continued from Page 1B) Endicott took its largest lead 8072 via a three-point play by Max Motroni with 5:02 to go. Middlebury cut the lead to two twice at 89-87 and 91-89 on layups from Daly, but Sampson converted four straight free throws to ice the victory. St. Amour tied his career high with 33 points to go along with four rebounds and three assists. Daly posted a career-best 22 points and tied a careerhigh total with five steals, adding six rebounds and six assists. Adisa Majors chipped in 16 points, while Zach Baines added 12 points and a team-best seven rebounds. Brown handed out a gamebest eight assists, moving him into fifth place in the Middlebury record books with 399 career assists. Walker led four Gulls in double figures with 28 points, while Sampson tallied 19 points and a game-best 14 rebounds. Motroni added 18 points and dished out six assists, while Chris Lipscomb tallied 14 points. On Tuesday, Middlebury held off a late charge by Rensselaer (3-2) to win, 79-72. The Panthers led at the break, 41-32, and by as many as 17, 58-41, with 13:53 left

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in the game. The Engineers made their move with an 11-2 run that began at the 11:17 mark, when they trailed by 62-48. Tom Horvat sparked the surge with five points and Jonathan Luster capped it with a jumper to make it 64-59 with 7:31 left to play. The Panthers answered with a 6-0 spurt. Brown hit a hoop, Baines made a steal and converted a layup, and St. Amour stole the ball and fed Daly. But RPI scored the game’s next eight points to close the gap to 7572 with 2:05 left to play. The Engineers had the ball trailing by three with 1:08 remaining, but a missed shot and a big bucket in the paint from Majors gave the Panthers a safe 77-72 lead with 33 seconds to go. St. Amour led all scorers with 22 points (17 in the second half) to go along with six rebounds. Baines recorded 16 points and 11 rebounds, while Brown and Daly each scored 10 points and earned four assists. Majors finished with eight points and six boards, while Daly also added three steals. Andreas Kontopidis led RPI with 21 points and five rebounds, and Luster added 17 points.

panther BASKETBALL


PAGE 4B — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Police seize pot growing material Vergennes Police Log

BRISTOL — Bristol police, assisted The officer helped get the keys to the by a Vermont State Police K-9, ex- vehicle and took care of the problems. ecuted a search warrant at a Mountain • Ticketed and had towed two veStreet home on Nov. 18, following an hicles parked in violation of the winter investigation and information regard- parking ban on Nov. 20. ing the cultivation and possession of • On Nov. 21 received a report from marijuana by a teenage male. Mountain Street of the theft Police seized evidence, of a “VT Strong” plate from including what they called a the front of a vehicle parked small growing operation. in the driveway overnight. Police Log Court action is pending. • On Nov. 21 an ofAlthough the residents ficer observed a vehicle were not home at the time of the traveling on Route 7 that was reported search, police said they found several to have caused an accident near the teens there. intersection of Route 17 in New HaBetween Nov. 14 and 27, Bristol ven. The Bristol officer stopped the police provided town-contracted traf- vehicle for Vermont State Police, who fic patrol on seven dates on Lincoln, responded to interview the driver. Burpee, Hardscrabble, Monkton and • On Nov. 22 referred to state poHewitt roads, Route 116 and at Dan- lice a report of a domestic cat shot near iel’s Four Corners. Officers issued one a home outside the police district. ticket for a stop sign violation, two • On Nov. 22 assisted in the execuspeeding tickets, citations for expired tion of a search warrant upon cellular registration and seatbelt violations phones in connection with an active and eight warnings. Officers of the investigation. Bristol Police Department (BPD) also • On Nov. 22 assisted the Bristol conducted foot patrol and checks of Rescue Squad on North Street. downtown businesses on Nov. 14, 17, • On Nov. 23 at 8:22 a.m. respond19, 23, 25 and 27. ed to a two-vehicle crash at Kountry Two officers attended annual man- Trailer Park. A park resident, leaving datory CPR Training at the Bristol the park, was backed into by another Rescue Squad to maintain certification resident backing her car from her as emergency medical technicians on driveway. The struck vehicle was inNov. 16. And on Nov. 18, an officer at- operable due to the crash. No one was tended seven hours of training in Bur- hurt, and no court action was taken. lington. • On Nov. 23 received a driver’s liIn other recent actions, Bristol po- cense found at MAUHS; police left a lice: message at the home of the owner to • Assisted the Vermont Teen pick the license up from the PD. Leadership Safety Program at Mount • On Nov. 23 responded to a oneAbraham Union High School with its car crash on Mountain Street at the Sticker Shock event on Nov. 14. Stu- intersection of Mountain View Street. dents went to five area stores where Police said the driver drove passed a stickers warning of the consequences “Road Closed” sign and the car drove of furnishing alcohol to minors were into a trench cut across the street causplaced on cases of beer in the stores. ing heavy damage to the vehicle. Seven VTLSP students took part. • Worked out of the BPD space at Bristol Elementary School on Nov. 14, 15, 17 and 21, interacting with students and staff, including discussion with Principal Kevin Robinson about truancy. • Helped a resident retrieve her car keys on Nov. 14. • Assisted with an investigation as part of the Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force on Nov. 15. • Responded to a Drake Smith Road residence where Cindy Fuller-Winters, 58, was found dead by her boyfriend. Police initiated an investigation, together with the Medical Examiner’s Office. Foul play is not suspected. An autopsy was ordered to determine the cause of death. • Assisted Vergennes police with the search of a car stopped on Green Street in Vergennes on Nov. 15. • Issued a juvenile citation for possession of marijuana to a student at MAUHS on Nov. 15 and released the student to their parent. • Took a report on Nov. 16 of a driver who had passed a stopped school bus on Oct. 25 at 8:03 a.m. Police warned the vehicle owner. • Received a request on Nov. 16 from MAUHS for assistance with a student who has been repeatedly truant, despite meetings with the student and family. Action is pending. • Responded to a Mountain Street home for a 911 hang-up on Nov. 17. Police spoke to the homeowner’s daughter and determined the family was teaching the elderly woman how to use the emergency button on her new cell phone. • Attended a Nov. 18 meeting with MAUHS staff, social service providers and the family of a middle school student with truancy issues. • Assisted the Bristol town administrator on Nov. 17 with notifying residence on Maple and Pine streets and Taylor Avenue of a 36-hour water boil notice following a water line repair on Pine Street. • Investigated a report of juveniles hanging around the Bristol town garage on Nov. 17. • Investigated a report of a man in a black hat and black coat acting weird, standing in front a silver SUV on Pine Street on Nov. 18. Police found and questioned a man answering that description. Because the man seemed nervous when asked about illegal contraband in the vehicle (and other observations), police asked for consent to search the vehicle and were denied. • Responded on Nov. 18 to a Pine Street business where a man was reportedly making a scene and trying to enter a locked door by pulling on the handle and yelling obscenities at the receptionist. Police informed the man that if he acted like that again there could be charges, and he apologized to the employees. • On Nov. 18 at 11:30 p.m. arrested Michael Paul Laflam, 38, of Hinesburg for an outstanding warrant after a traffic stop for driving with a suspended license. Laflam was lodged at the Chittenden Regional Correctional Facility. • Noticed a vehicle in the parking lot of a closed service station with the dome light on and rear window down on Nov. 20. It appeared the vehicle had been towed and dropped off. The officer contacted the owner to inform them of the dome light and window.

Bristol

• On Nov. 23 assisted a Kountry Trailer Park resident concerned about cameras on a neighboring property. Follow-up is planned. • On Nov. 23 a driver who had locked their keys in their vehicle, which was still running and partially in the traveled portion of the roadway. The officer was able to unlock the car without incident. • On Nov. 23 at 10:12 p.m. took a male chocolate Lab into custody after he showed up at a Ledge Lane residence. The dog had no tags so the dog was taken to the pound. It was later recovered by its owner. • On Nov. 24 at 12:18 a.m. responded with state police to a Rockydale resident who was reporting someone trying to break into his home. The caller was known to police and has dementia and has made similar complaints recently. Officers checked his welfare and found him to be OK. • On Nov. 24 at 8:54 a.m. assisted a Fish and Wildlife game warden in Lincoln on Gap Road for a man who was seen shooting from the roadway. The officer located and identified the man. The Bristol officer turned over all information to the game warden when he arrived, and the warden issued a ticket to the man for shooting from the roadway. • On Nov. 26 accepted found property from a citizen and returned it to its owner. • On Nov. 26 were told that a dog had bitten a jogger on North Street; investigation continues. • On Nov. 26 checked the welfare of a Garfield Street resident, who said she was fine. • On Nov. 26 at 9 p.m. went to a reported family fight on Mountain Street. The officer learned a man and woman

VERGENNES — Vergennes police are reminding residents and visitors that the city’s wintertime ban on parking on city streets takes effect Thursday, Dec. 1, and runs through March 31. Cars may not be left on city streets between the hours of 2 and 6:30 a.m. In recent years the city council increased fines for offenses, and cars are subject to being towed. Vergennes police officers on Thursday last week went around in the evening and placed notices on cars parked downtown reminding vehicle owners of the city ordinance. In other action between Nov. 21 and 27, Vergennes police: • On Nov. 21 warned a motorist on Route 7 to drive more carefully, action taken after receiving a tip from another driver. • On Nov. 21 stood by a disabled vehicle on Route 22A in Panton until a wrecker arrived; police were alerted the vehicle had lost a tire by another driver. • On Nov. 21 helped Vermont State Police at a domestic dispute on

Route 22A in Panton. • On Nov. 21 helped a man retrieve his birth certificate from an uncooperative ex-girlfriend. • On Nov. 21 cited Grace P. Deming, 22, of Addison for driving under the influence of alcohol after she allegedly failed a sobriety test on Main Street; police said due to a malfunction they had to test her blood-alcohol content at VSP barracks at New Haven, where the test read at 0.51, lower that the legal limit of 0.08. However, with the time expired before the test police alleged she was under the influence when driving. • On Nov. 22 checked the welfare of a city resident who was possibly threatening to harm herself and determined she was OK; police acted on behalf of the Howard Center in Burlington. • On Nov. 22 helped round up sheep that had escaped from the Ferrisburgh Solar Farm on Monkton Road. • On Nov. 22 on behalf of VSP told a New Haven man not to burn papers on his driveway.

• On Nov. 22 helped a driver whose car ran out of gas at the intersection of School and Green streets. • On Nov. 23 met with a man and woman who said her ex was harassing her and sending her lewd messages via phone; VSP helped city police by warning a Bridport man to stop. • On Nov. 23 helped the Vergennes Area Rescue Squad at Clark’s Nursing Home on North Street. • On Nov. 23 dealt with an unlocked Main Street door found while on after-hours foot patrol. • On Nov. 25 cited Jennifer Lowell, 35, of Hinesburg for DUI after a tip from a motorist that she was allegedly driving erratically on Main Street. Police allege her blood alcohol content tested at 0.171. • On Nov. 26 calmed a man and woman arguing on Main Street. • On Nov. 26 were told a man was missing from a Walker Avenue residence; he was found playing poker in an acquaintance’s garage. • On Nov. 27 cited Kathleen Ayers, 48, of Middlebury for DUI-drugs and violation of conditions of release.

had been arguing and both parties wished to remain on-scene. Approximately 10 minutes later officers were re-dispatched to the residence after the parties had another disagreement. The woman was provided courtesy transportation from the residence. • On Nov. 27 at approximately 11:49 a.m. stopped a car driven on Liberty Street by Timothy Lee Taylor, 50, of Bristol. Police said Taylor has two pending cases for driving with a criminally suspended license before the Addison Superior Court,

criminal division, from arrests earlier this year. In each of the two pending cases the judge ordered Taylor cannot drive any motor vehicle, including a car, truck or motorcycle. Bristol Police Chief Kevin Gibbs reported that Taylor’s driver’s license has been suspended since 2000 for driving under the influence. On Sunday, police cited Taylor again for driving with a suspended license. • On Nov. 27 cited Kathleen Ayers, 48, of Vergennes for violating conditions of release. Police report that at

just before noon an officer was conducting a traffic stop and arrest on Stoney Hill Road when Ayers arrived and parked her vehicle next to the officer’s vehicle to speak with the subject of that investigation. The investigating officer later learned that Ayers did not have a valid driver’s license and had active court conditions that she not operate a motor vehicle without a valid driver’s license. The officer issued Ayers a ticket for driving with a suspended license and a citation for violating her conditions of release.


Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 5B

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Cards of Thanks Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Services

Services

THANK YOU HOLY SPIRIT and St. Jude for prayers answered. V.B.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYM O U S M I D D L E B U RY MEETINGS THURSDAY: Big Book Meeting Noon1:00 PM at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury. Speaker Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM at St. Stephen’s Church, Main St. (On the Green).

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS VERGENNES MEETINGS: Sunday, 12 Step Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM. Friday, Discussion Meeting 8:00-9:00 PM. Both held at St. Paul’s Church, Park St. Tuesday, Discussion Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM, at the Congregational Church, Water St.

NA MEETINGS MIDDLEBURY: Sundays, 3:00 pm, held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd.

OPIATE OVERDOSE RESCUE KITS are distributed on Wednesdays from 9 am until 12 pm at the Turning Point Center of Addison County, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury, VT. A short training is required. For info call 802388-4249 or 802-683-5569 or visit www.turningpointaddisonvt.org.

C&I DRYWALL. Hanging, taping, skim coat plastering. Also tile. Call Joe 802-2345545 or Justin 802-2342190.

PARTY RENTALS; CHINA, flatware, glassware, linens. Delivery available. 802-3884831.

CONSTRUCTION: ADDITIONS, RENOVATIONS, new construction, drywall, carpentry, painting, flooring, roofing, pressure washing, driveway sealing. All aspects of construction, also property maintenance. Steven Fifield 802-989-0009.

PROFESSIONAL PAINTING; interior/exterior, residential/commercial, pressure washing. 20 years’ experience. Best prices. References. 802-989-5803.

Public Meetings ADULT ALL- RECOVERY Group Meeting for anyone over 18 who is struggling with addiction disorders. Fridays, 3-4 p.m. at the Turning Point Center (54 Creek Rd). A great place to meet with your peers who are in recovery. Bring a friend in recovery. For info call 802388-4249 or 802-683-5569 or visit www.turningpointaddisonvt.org. AL-ANON FAMILY GROUP - For families and friends of problem drinkers. Anonymous, confidential and free. At the Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury. 7:30-8:30 PM Friday evenings. AL-ANON: FOR FAMILIES and friends affected by someone’s drinking. Members share experience, strength and hope to solve common problems. Newcomers welcome. Confidential. St. Stephen’s Church (use front side door and go to basement) in Middlebury, Sunday nights 7:15-8:15 pm. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS BRANDON MEETINGS: Monday, Discussion Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM. Wednesday, 12 Step Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM. Friday, Big Book Step Meeting 7:008:00 PM. All held at the St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Rte 7 South.

Services

ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS BRISTOL MEETINGS: Sunday, Discussion Meeting 4:00-5:00 PM. Wednesday, 12 Step Meeting 7:00-8:00 PM. Friday, Big Book Meeting, 6:00-7:00 PM. All held at the Howden Hall, 19 West Street. ALCOHOLICS ANONYM O U S M I D D L E B U RY MEETINGS FRIDAY: Discussion Meeting Noon-1:00 PM at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury. ALCOHOLICS ANONYM O U S M I D D L E B U RY MEETINGS MONDAY: As Bill Sees It Meeting Noon1:00 PM. Big Book Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM. Both held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury. ALCOHOLICS ANONYM O U S M I D D L E B U RY MEETINGS SATURDAY: Discussion Meeting 9:0010:00 AM at the Middlebury United Methodist Church. Discussion Meeting 10:0011:00 AM. Beginners’ Meeting 6:30-7:30 PM. These two meetings are held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury. ALCOHOLICS ANONYM O U S M I D D L E B U RY MEETINGS SUNDAY: 12 Step Meeting 9:00-10:00 AM held at the Middlebury United Methodist Church on N. Pleasant Street. Came to Believe Meeting 1:002:00 PM held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS ANONYM O U S M I D D L E B U RY MEETINGS TUESDAYS: 12 Step Meetings; Noon1:00 PM. AND 7:30-8:30 PM. Both held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury. ALCOHOLICS ANONYM O U S M I D D L E B U RY MEETINGS WEDNESDAY: Big Book Meeting 7:15-8:15 AM is held at the Middlebury United Methodist Church on N. Pleasant Street. Discussion Meeting Noon-1:00 PM at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS NEW HAVEN MEETINGS: Monday, Big Book Meeting 7:30-8:30 PM at the Congregational Church, New Haven Village Green. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS NORTH FERRISBURGH MEETINGS: Sunday, Daily Reflections Meeting 6:00-7:00 PM, at the United Methodist Church, Old Hollow Rd. ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS RIPTON MEETINGS: Monday, As Bill Sees It Meeting 7:15-8:15 AM. Thursday, 12 Steps and 12 Traditions Meeting 7:15-8:15 AM. Both held at Ripton Firehouse, Dugway Rd.

Services

ARE YOU BOTHERED BY SOMEONE’S DRINKING? Opening Our Hearts Al-Anon Group meets each Wednesday at 1:30 pm at Middlebury’s St. Stephen’s Church on Main St. (enter side door and follow signs). Anonymous and confidential, we share our experience, strength and hope to solve our common problems. Babysitting available. M A K I N G R E C O V E RY EASIER (MRE). Wednesdays, 5:30-7:00 p.m. at the Turning Point Center (54 Creek Rd). This will be a facilitated group meeting for those struggling with the decision to attend 12-Step Programs. It will be limited to explaining and discussing our feelings about the 12-Step Programs to create a better understanding of how they can help a person in recovery on his/her life’s journey. A certificate will be issued at the end of all the sessions. Please bring a friend in recovery who is also contemplating 12-Step Programs. NA MEETINGS MIDDLEBURY: Fridays, 7:30 pm, held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd. NA MEETINGS MIDDLEBURY: Mondays, 6 pm, held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd.

Community Impact Funding Volunteers

The Volunteer Center, a collaboration of RSVP and the United Way of United Way of Addison County is seeking volunteers that will Addison County, be part of a committee in charge of reviewing education posts dozens of Tasks include, reviewing grants, vol,grant 3 x applications. 3 volunteer opportunities site visits, determining fund decisions. Experience and on the Web.Go to www.unitedwayaddison county.org/ VolunteerDonate and click on VOLUNTEER NOW!

background in education and community is a plus but not required. The ideal candidates will possess a willingness to inquire and ask questions, get to know agencies, interest in child development, school age children, and after school programs. If interested please call 802-388-7189.

L o c a l age n c ie s c a n p o s t t h e i r v o l u n te e r ne e d s w i t h Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r by c a l l i ng RSV P at 388-7044.

The Volunteer Front Desk Volunteers Needed Center, a collaboration of We need compassionate, reliable people to staff our front RSVP and the desk and greet visitors when they come to the Turning Point United Way of Center. Volunteers have two main responsibilities: First, they Addison County, make the center a welcoming, safe space where people who posts dozens of volunteer opportunities are struggling with addiction can come for confidential support. They also collect data on how many people use on the Web.Go to www.unitedwayaddison county.org/ VolunteerDonate and click on VOLUNTEER NOW!

NEW SUPPORT GROUP Grief Anonymous Meeting every Thursday @ 6:30 pm at Grace Baptist Church 52 Merchants Row, Middelbury, Vt. First Meeting Thursday, December 1st, 2016 OA (OVEREATERS ANONYMOUS) MEETS on Thursdays at 6 PM. Located at the Turning Point Center of Addison County, 54 Creek Road, Middlebury, VT.

Help Wanted

PARKINSONS SUPPORT GROUP meets on the last Thursday of every month from 10 am to 11:30 am. We meet at the Mountain Health Center in Bristol. For info call APDA at 888-763-3366 or parkinsoninfo@uvmhealth. org.

Counseling Service of Addison County

ATTENTION PCA’S: PART TIME and full time, day and night shifts available. On the job training, competitive wages and flexible scheduling. Call Angie at 802-8771363 or e-mail ringerhomecare@gmail.com if interested. BANKRUPTCY: CALL to find out if bankruptcy can help you. Kathleen Walls, Esq. 802-388-1156.

WE BUY OLD STUFF Estates, collections, antiques etc. Also hunting and fishing items. Call Erik 802-3450653.

ELECTRICAL ENGINEER WILL not be disappointed by the unusual challenge of these gizmos. Hundreds of dollars available for one afternoon,no more than two afternoons of perusing relays and timers. 802-4536975

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Emergency Team Clinician! Seeking an experienced mental health clinician for interesting work on our Emergency Team. Crisis mental health is a clinical specialty that is challenging, collaborative, varied, and worthwhile. Provide phone and face-to-face assessment, crisis intervention and stabilization counseling. Primarily office-based with some evening and weekend on call required. Master’s Degree is preferred, excellent engagement and assessment skills are required, pluscSAC the ability to think on your feet, and a strong team orientation. 3 x Must 5 have reliable transportation and the ability to be in Middlebury within about 30 minutes during on call shifts. Full benefits package, excellent clinical supervision, and supportive team-based work environment. Submit resume and cover letter to apply@csac-vt.org. For more opportunities please visit www.csac-vt.org

college st. childrens

COLLEGE STREET CHILDREN’S CENTER 2 EARLY x 4 CHILDHOOD EDUCATOR College Street Children’s Center is looking for a nurturing, creative, enthusiastic center teacher to join our team of childcare professionals. The position is guaranteed 20 hours a week, with more hours available, and begins as soon as possible. Person must have flexibility to work varied hours. We are also looking for substitute teachers. Experience with children birth to three and a degree in Early Childhood Education or related field is preferred. Send resume and 3 letters of reference by December 16th to: Jenne Morton College Street Children’s Center 228 College Street | Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-2401 | E-mail: cscc1@sover.net

Part-Time Front Office Staff We are seeking a front desk staff to monitor use of the tennis facility, answer phones, take court reservations, and other duties as assigned. Applicants should have a professional and warm demeanor coupled with strong communication skills. Weekend availability a must. Tennis experience a plus. Please send cover letter and resume by December 31 to: humanresource@vermontcf.org

the center, and how they use it. Volunteer duties include greeting visitors, filling out basic paperwork, restocking the coffee area and bathrooms, light cleaning duties, answering phones, and working with staff to refer visitors to local meetings and resources. If interested please call 802-388-7189

Or mail to: The Vermont Community Foundation, 3 Court Street, Middlebury, VT 05753. The Vermont Community Foundation is an equal employment opportunity employer.

L o c a l age n c ie s c a n p o s t t h e i r v o l u n te e r ne e d s w i t h Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r by c a l l i ng RSV P at 388-7044.

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

Cash in on our 4-for-3 rates! Pay for 3 issues, get 4th issue free!

ADDISON INDEPENDENT 58 Maple Street, Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944 www.addisonindependent.com • email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD...

An ad placed for consecutive issues (Mondays & Thursdays) is run 4th time free! • Special 4 for 3 rates not valid for the following categories: Services, Opportunities, Real Estate, Wood heat, Attn. Farmers, For Rent & Help Wanted

Name: Address: Phone: Email:

RATES

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

DEADLINES: Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

• 25¢ per word • minimum $2.50 per ad • $2 internet listing for up to 4 issues • minimum 2 insertions

Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost ’N Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities Adoption ** no charge for these ads

Work Wanted Help Wanted For Sale Public Meetings** For Rent Want to Rent Wood Heat Real Estate Animals Spotlight with large

3$2

Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals

The Independent assumes no financial responsibility for errors in ads, but will rerun classified ad in which the error occurred. No refunds will be possible. Advertiser will please notify us of any errors which may occur after first publication.

Number of words: Cost: # of runs: Spotlight Charge: Internet Listing: TOTAL:

$2.00


Business&Service

PAGE 6B — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

DIRECTORY

Rene Many - CTPA, Inc.

MARK TRUDEAU

Corporate Partnerships, Small Businesses & Personal Returns

GENERAL CARPENTRY HOME IMPROVEMENTS LOCAL CONTRACTOR

Tax Preparation & Accounting

Call 758-2000 Today!

Remodeling • Additions Painting • Roofing

Cell: 802-989-5231 Office: 802-453-2007

Dryers Ranges Microwaves Air Conditioners

Andre’s Floor Refinishing - An Established Vermont Business with Over 30 Years of Experience -

WINDOW & SIDING CO., INC Windows • Vinyl siding • Garages Roofs • Additions • Decks

Waste Management – Roll-off container service

982 Briggs Hill Road • Bristol

Fast, friendly, reliable service & competitive rates.

802-877-2102 Toll Free: 888-433-0962 mlbrunet@gmavt.net

Specializing in Hardwood & Softwood Floors Commercial Oil and Waterborne Finishes Quality Workmanship - Competitive Pricing 54 Daigneault Hill Road Orwell,Vermont 05760

www.cloverstate.com Desabrais Means Glass & Affordable Service

References

462-3737 or 989-9107

Fully Insured

Kim or Jonathan Hescock hescock@shoreham.net

Professional Installation • Heating Systems • Plumbing Supplies • Bathroom Design • Water Treatment Great Advice

NDO N DUPlumbing & 'S Heating

Rt. 22A, Orwell 948-2082 388-2705

Plumbing • Heating 125 Monkton Road Bristol, VT 05443 802-453-2325 cvplumbingheating.com

Fuel Delivery 185 Exchange Street Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4975 champlainvalleyfuels.com

Residential & Commercial

Middlebury, VT 05753 • 388-9049

GREAT RATES • FULLY INSURED

Reliable & Thorough

Automotive

Dense Pack Cellulose • Blown In Insulation Complete Air Sealing

802 345-6257

802-545-2251 • Maurice Plouffe 1736 Quaker Village Road, Weybridge, VT 05753

Over 30 yrs. experience

Field Automotive Inc.

Complete Auto Service • Domestic & Foreign Repairs

Invitations

The PC MediC of VerMonT

Preventive Maintenance Brakes • Tune-ups • Exhausts Towing • Alignments Air Conditioning • State Inspections

GET YOUR COMPUTER RUNNING LIKE NEW AGAIN ! • Fast, Reliable Repairs • Hardware & Software Installations & Upgrades • Spyware Removal & Virus Protection • Secure Wireless Network Setup • Computer Purchasing Assistance • Affordable Rates at Your Convenience

62 Meigs Rd., Vergennes

877-9222

Stop in to the Addison Independent office in the Marble Works to order your custom

Invitations

for any occasion!

Paul Claudon • 802-734-6815 pcmedic@gmavt.net

Business Cards

For more information call 388-4944

Engineering

Labels & Letterhead too!

Lumber  Rough Lumber Native Vermonter

 Pine Siding

Order your Custom Business Cards here at the

A friendly, professional, and affordable family business.

Free Estimates

Insulation

Melissa’s Quality Cleaning Services

Insurance Approved discounts

HESCOCK PAINTING

802-948-2004

Cleaning Services

• Windshield Repair • Insulated Glass • Plate Glass • Window Glass • Plexiglass • Safety Glass • Mirrors • Auto Glass • Storm Windows • Screen Repairs • Custom Shower Door Enclosures Vinyl Replacement windows and Complete Installation

ards Business C der r Made to O

cell phone

email: cmulliss@gmavt.net 1900 Jersey St., S. Addison, VT 05491

MIDDLEBURY, VERMONT

Jack Alexander

OR

phone or fax

CLOVER STATE

t!

us

v

Washers Refridgerators Dishwashers Disposals

Se r

yo ice

GAS OR ELECTRIC

Painting

802-759-2706 802-349-6050

802.388.0860

Alexander Appliance Repair Inc.

• masonry • medical supplies • woodworking

Carpet Cleaning & Water Removal Stripping - Waxing - Buffing

WINNER of “Best Local Contractor” THREE CONSECUTIVE YEARS by READERS CHOICE AWARDS!

tr

• computers • engineering • equipment rentals • floor care • insulation • invitations • lumber

Floor Care

Accounting

n u ca

• accounting • appliance repair • auto glass • automotive • business cards • carpentry/contractors • cleaning services

Addison Independent.

 Open most nights & weekends mikeysmill.com

Long Beams

Serving all your plumbing and heating needs. Owned and operated by: Bill Heffernan, Jim & David Whitcomb

802-388-7828  End of S. Munger St.  Middlebury

Call Vicki at 388-4944 or stop by our office in the Marble Works between 8am & 5pm Monday- Friday.

Masonry Bruce A. Maheu’s

1438 S. Brownell Rd. • PO Box 159 • Williston, VT 05495 802-862-5590 • www.gmeinc.biz

MASONRY

NEW & REPAIR Residential • Lake Camps (Dunmore) Brick – Block – Stone

Chimneys, Fireplaces, Outside Barbecues, Steps, Patios, Stone Walls 27 Years Experience Honest & Fair Pricing Free Estimates Fully Insured

Alan Huizenga, P.E., President Kevin Camara, P.E. Jamie Simpson, P. E. • Middlebury Brad Washburn, P. E. • Montpelier “INNOVATIVE ENGINEERING SOLUTIONS WITH A COMMON SENSE APPROACH DELIVERED TO OUR CLIENTS IN A PROFESSIONAL, COST EFFECTIVE AND PERSONAL MANNER”

Quaker Village Carpentry

802-545-2251

• material forklifts • excavators • bulldozers • mini-excavators • skidsteers

Certified by the Dry Stone Wallers Association of Great Britain

1736 Quaker Village Road Weybridge, VT 05753

275 South 116 Bristol, VT116 05443 275 South 116 275 South Bristol, VT 05443 Bristol, VT 05443

• Man lifts up to 80’ • man basket w/crane up to 188

• concrete compactors • backhoes

We’ve been here for you for 43 years – Let us help you with your solar projects today.

802-233-4670 jmasefield@gmavt.net

Medical Supplies

Go Green with us –

Call for a FREE on-site evaluation

Septic & Water FOR SEPTIC TANK PUMPING & DRAIN CLEANING SERVICE,

NDON'S DU

Rely on the professionals.

Plumbing & Heating

PORTABLE RESTROOMS Rt. 22A, Orwell • 948-2082 Rt. 7 So., Middlebury •388-2705

The Medical Equipment and Oxygen

www.brownswelding.com

oVer 40 LiFTS 275 South 116, Bristol, Vermont 05443 oVer 40 LiFTS LiFTS oVer 40

1-800-880-6030 SALES & Fax:1-800-880-6030 (802) 453-2730 1-800-880-6030 Knowledgable Staff Fax:(802) (802)453-2730 453-2730 Fax:

(802) 453-3351• Cell (802) Please give us363-5619 a call. Please give us a call. We have the lift for you! We haveScissor theLifts liftupfor you! 40’ to 80’ manlifts to 32’ mini excavator

40’ to 80’ manlifts

Don’t spend your hard-earned money making the hot water or electricity that you use today– SOLAR IS MORE AFFORDABLE THAN EVER!

802-352-6050

Jamie Masefield

40 TYPES OF RENTAL EQUIPMENT TO CHOOSE FROM

Soak Up The Sun!

Call Bruce

Fine Dry Stone Masonry

Equipment Rentals

Siding, Windows, Garages, Decks & Porches New Construction, Renovations and Repairs

Maurice plouffe

Salisbury, VT

Renewable Energy

Scissor Lifts up to 32’

mini excavator

RENTAL Personalized Service

Fax: 388-4146 Marble Works, Middlebury, VT

388-9801

Addison Independent More than just a newspaper!


&

Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 7B

DIRECTORY

Business Service Septic & Water

STORAGE 4 Sizes ~ Self-locking units Hardscrabble Rd., Bristol

Monthly prices

Celebrating 31 Years

6’x12’ $30 • 8’x12’ $45 10’x12’ $55 • 12’x21’ $75

Environmental Consultants – Licensed Designers Steve Revell CPG, LD#178 BW Jeremy Revell LD#611 BW • Tyler Maynard LD#597 B • Water Supply - Location, Development and Permitting • On-Site Wastewater Design • Single & Multiple Lot Subdivision • Property Development & Permitting • State and Local Permitting • Underground Storage Tank Removal & Assessment Toll-Free: 800-477-4384

802-453-4384

• siding • stamps • storage • surveying • towing

Wedding

TREADWAY & RINGEY

Stop in to the Addison Independent office in the Marble Works to view a wonderful selection of

24 hr Heavy Towing & Recovery Heavy Truck Repair & Diagnosis Heavy Haul, Oversize, Local & Long distance

Wedding Invitations

Call Jeff 802-948-2950

for Your Special Day!

CREDIT CARDS ACCEPTED

www.livingstonfarmlandscape.com

For more info call

Tree Service

Fax 802-453-5399 • Email: jrevell@lagvt.com 163 Revell Drive • Lincoln, VT 05443

www.lagvt.com

• tree services • veterinary services • wedding • woodworking

Towing

Shoreham, Vermont

VISIT US ON FACEBOOK

• painting • plumbing & heating • renewable energ • sawmill • septic & water

388-4944

Window Treatments

25 Yrs Experience 60’ bucket truck wood chipper available Fully Insured Free Estimates

Premium window treatments, retractable screens and awnings.

Brett Sargent

owner/operator

LAROSE SURVEYS, P.C. Ronald L. LaRose, L.S. • Kevin R. LaRose, L.S.

Land Surveying/Septic Design “We will take you through the permitting process!”

Stamps

25 West St. • PO Box 388 Bristol, VT 05443 Telephone: 802-453-3818 Fax: 802- 329-2138

larosesurveys@gmail.com

MADE TO ORDER Self Inking & Hand Stamps

Short Surveying, inc. Serving Addison County Since 1991

Timothy L. Short, L.S. Property Line Surveys • Topographical Surveys FEMA Elevation Certificates

388-4944

AIRPORT AUTO Self Storage • Low Rates

Barnard & Gervais, LLC Land Surveying - Water & Septic Designs State & Local Permitting Environmental Consulting

Jason Barnard

Michael Gervais

Licensed Designer

Licensed Surveyor

Also a good selection of used vehicles

Serving Vermont from offices in Enosburgh and Starksboro

44 School House Hill Road, E. Middlebury

802-349-8433 802-453-2597 www.barnardandgervais.com

388-0432 • 388-8090

BROWN’S TREE & CRANE SERVICE

FREE ESTIMATES FOR TREE SERVICES

WE HAVE THE RIGHT EQUIPMENT FOR THE RIGHT JOB – TO GIVE YOU REASONABLE RATES Dangerous Trees Cut & Removed Stumps Removed Trusses Set Trees Trimmed Land Clearing Reasonable Rates • Year-round Service • Fully Insured

(802) 453-3351 • Cell (802) 363-5619 24 Hour Emergency Service 453-7014

Brownswelding.com

135 S. Pleasant St., Middlebury, VT 388-3511 ssi@sover.net

Available at the Addison Independent in the Marble Works, Middlebury

298 Maple Street Middlebury, VT 802.247.3883 vtshadeandblind@gmail.com VermontShadeandBlind.com

Serving Vermont for over 42 years!

Dave’s Tree Removal Stump Grinding, Trimming, Tree Evaluation, Storm Damage, Firewood & Lot Clearing Serving Addison County & Area Lakes Dangerous trees our specialty!!

made you look. imagine what white space can do for you.

802-282-9110 Free Estimates • Fully Insured!!!

The season is changing ...

are you ready for Winter? Yard Cleanup

Chimney Sweeping

Furnace Service

Firewood

Fuel Oil Delivery

Snow Plowing

Whatever your service – it is TIME to get your listing in our Business & Service section.

Call Anna TODAY 388-4944


PAGE 8B — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

EXPERIENCED,RELIABLE AND DEDICATED caregiver with many specialized skills seeks position assisting the elderly,disabled and chronically ill individuals. Record of long-term loyal commitment to patients. References readily available. Please call 802-234-9725 or e-mail HomeCareVT@gmail.com

MENTAL HEALTH PEER SUPPORT position. Hiring for full time and part time positions. Alyssum, located in Rochester VT, is an integrated, peer run mental health hospital diversion service. Individuals interested please go to our job opportunities page at: www.alyssum.org for more information.

NOW HIRING VERGENNES Advance Auto Parts Salespersons and Drivers. Visit AdvanceAutoParts.jobsor talk to a Team Member to learn more. How To Apply: 1. Visit www.AdvanceAutoParts. job, 2. Click on Apply Now Advance Auto Parts is an Equal Opportunity Employer.

For Sale

For Rent

For Rent

For Rent

SUBSTITUTE TEACHERS- EARLY CHILDHOOD substitute teaching positions open at Middlebury, East Middlebury and Orwell locations. Work with a team on overall classroom management,indoor and outdoor play and activities. Experience/training in early childhood education required. Send resume and three references to: Mary Johnson Children’s Center, 81 Water Street Middlebury,VT 05753,office@mjccvt.org.

ANTIQUE DOUBLE BARREL ACME Arms Co. 12 gauge. Beautiful vintage firearm. $185. 802-9895803.

BRANDON: PARK VILLAGE is now accepting applications for 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apartments. Rents starting at $700 includes heat and trash. No pets. Laundry onsite. Income restrictions apply. Call Summit Property Management Group at 802-247-0165 or visit our website www.summitpmg.com.

DRY, WINTER/SUMMER STORAGE SPACE in Addison. Available storage space in my barn for summer/winter storage. The barn is structurally sound and weathertight with electricity. No heat or running water. The barn is also available for lease. The entrance door measurements are 8’ wide by 7’ high. For more info: 802-363-3403 or rochon_m@yahoo.com.

BRIDPORT ONE BEDROOM apartment. No smoking, no pets please. Above two car garage, great views of Adirondacks, 8 miles to Middlebury. Great small storage area. $700/month-snow removal, water, lawn care and Direct TV included. Call 802-989-8556.

FERRISBURGH, UPSTAIRS 2 BEDROOM apartment. $1,000 month plus security deposit. References. Includes heat, electricity, water and snow removal. Call 802-989-8031 or 802343-6112.

PANTON: SHARE A HOME with a woman in her 80s who is active in the community. Offering reduced rent for female housemate, in exchange for snow shoveling, gardening, occasional errands, nighttime presence. Furnished bedroom. Shared bath/kitchen. No pets/smoking. 802-863-5625 or HomeShareVermont.org for application. Interview, references, background checks required. EHO.

For Sale 55 GALLON SAND AND SALT barrels, plastic, with pressure treated legs. $75. each. Also 55 gallon pickle barrels with spin-off covers. Make great sand and salt barrels, $25. each. Delivery available. 802-453-4235. TWO STUDDED WINTER TIRES P235/75R15. $30 each. Call 802-388-9175.

COMMERCIAL DIVISION

INSTALL TECHNICIAN KE Durasol Awnings, Inc. in Middlebury is seeking flexible, motivated individuals to become part of our manufacturing team as installation technicians. Qualified candidates must have a valid driver’s license, be familiar with power hand tools, able to travel out of state overnight, willing to work overtime, comfortable at heights and on ladders and have an aptitude for layout work. Ability to lift 100lbs on a routine basis is required. Experience in building construction is a plus. KE Durasol offers wages commensurate with experience and generous benefits.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

CHAMPLAIN BEEF, CO. CDL - CLASS A DRIVER NEEDED PLEASE CALL 518-499-1895 OR APPLY IN PERSON AT: CHAMPLAIN BEEF CO 9679 STATE ROUTE 4 WHITEHALL, NY

Please apply in person or send your resume to:

KE Durasol Awnings 38 Pond Lane, Suite B Middlebury, VT 05753

EXERCISE BIKES FOR SALE Lifecycle 9500HR Recumbent bike $325 OBO. Stairmaster 3400CE Upright bike $275 OBO. Call Middlebury Fitness at 802388-3744.

For Rent 1,800 SQ. FT. WAREHOUSE as is or renovate to suit. Creek Road, Middlebury. 802-558-6092. 2 BEDROOM APARTMENT, Cornwall, 8 miles from the college. $925/month. Heat, snow removal and lawn care included. Garden space available. First, last, security and references required. Call 802-462-3624. 2 BR, 2BA CONDO, Middlebury. Newly renovated. Oversized with lots of storage. Private second floor, end unit. Nice deck, sunny location, view of the woods (Twin Circles), walking distance to everything. $1,375/ mo. heat, snow and trash removal, lawn care included. Credit check, security, references required. Available December 1. 802-352-4266. 281 MAIN STREET, VERGENNES Available now, medium size 2 bedroom apartment. $900 per month. Laundry hookups, large enclosed porch & full bath. Heat and hot water included. Call 802-862-7467.

B R I S T O L R E N TA L S , W O O D L A N D A PA R TMENTS. Included: heat, water, trash pickup, parking, snow removal, mowing, range, refrigerator, dishwasher. We fix things. Efficiency $560. 1 Bedroom $755. Located on Woodland Drive. Coin washer & dryer in each building. Pets negotiable. No smoking. susan_bowen@comcast.net, 802-662-3136.

BRISTOL; 3 BEDROOM APARTMENT Heat, hot water, stove and refrigerator, snowplowing, lawn care, included. Basement. Garage. No pets. $1,175/mo. 802-453-2566.

Help Wanted

An equal opportunity employer.

FULL-TIME TELLER POSITIONS

Join Our Team! Paris Farmers Union on Route 7 South in Middlebury is looking to fill a warehouse/ delivery driver position. The successful candidate will be an honest, motivated, hard working team player with a clean driving record. You must enjoy working in a fast paced retail environment and possess a farmers genuine, paris strong desire to provide outstanding service 2 to xour customers. Knowledge 6 and/or experience with animals, farming, gardening, yard care, landscaping, plumbing, electrical, hardware, etc. or any combination thereof would be a plus. We are a solid, stable organization that’s been around for 97 years. We offer an excellent benefits package and a competitive wage structure. Applications available at the store or send or drop off your resume with references to: Alan Bean, Store Mgr. Paris Farmers Union 1438 Route7 South Middlebury, VT 05753 Please, no phone calls. EOE

DRIVER POSITION Casella Waste Systems, Inc. We are currently seeking qualified applicants to fill a Driver position in Middlebury, VT

National Bank of Middlebury has fulltime teller positions available. Ideal candidates must be committed to providing quality customer service and superior teamwork. A positive attitude is essential, flexibility a plus. Cash handling experience desirable. Approximately 37 hours per week Monday - Friday Saturdays on rotating basis Competitive benefit package Salary ranges from $15.09 - $16.17 NBM per hour If you are interested, please apply in person2at:x 6.5

5 Carver St., Brandon 240 Court St., Middlebury 30 Main St., Middlebury 29 Green St., Vergennes 28 Main St., Bristol 140 Commerce St., Hinesburg

LEICESTER - COZY 3 BEDROOM, 2 bath house on Route 7. No pets. No utilities. 1st, last and security. 1 year lease. $1250 per month. Includes 2 car garage. 802247-3708, leave message. MASSAGE SPACE AVAILABLE for rent: Downtown Middlebury. Table provided. Call for info. 802-349-4443. MONKTON: SHARE A HOME with an artist in her 70s interested in VPR, exercise, and reading. $300/ month plus small share of utilities, some assistance in the garden and yard. Furnished bedroom, shared bath. Must be dog-friendly. 802 863-5625 or HomeShareVermont.org for application. Interview, references, background checks required. EHO.

TWO BEDROOM APARTMENTS available for occupancy. Modern apartments, carpet/tile, w/d hookups plus onsite laundry. Ample parking and storage. Includes trash,snow removal,professional management and 24 hour maintenance. Efficient gas heat/ hot water. In quiet Middlebury neighborhood. Rents are $546-$778 per month plus utilities. Income limits apply. References required. Please call us at 802-4725016 for more information. Equal housing opportunity.

Account: Addison Independent 1 Cols Wide #55243 Equal Housing

Wood Heat

OFFICE SPACE IN MIDDLEBURY. Court Street/ Creek Road, 2nd floor. Utilities included. 280 square feet. Contact Eric at 802388-6054.

CLICK, CALL & SAVE www.1-844-KILNDRIED. com - Ready-2-burn kiln dried split 16” firewood. Free delivery.

MOUNTAIN ROAD FIREWOOD. Wood for sale-cut, split and delivered. Green, ash, beech, hickory, maple. Also available: partially dry wood, cut and split 5 months. Call 802-759-2095.

Help Wanted

Reliable transportation to and from work

Particularly on sites like Craigslist.

Physically able to lift 100 pounds

Clean driving record

And it’s easier to break the law than you might think. You can’t say “no children” or “adults only.” There is lots you can’t say. The federal government is watching for such discrimination.

To fill out an application please stop by our office 533 Exchange Street, Middlebury, VT Also apply on-line at Casella.com/careers If you have submitted an application in the past, please feel free to submit again for consideration.

533 Exchange Street, Middlebury, VT Casella.com/careers • An equal opportunity employer

TRUSTED 3RD GEN. VT Antique dealer specializing in jewelry, watches, silver, art, military, antique collectibles, etc. Visit www. bittnerantiques.com or call Brian at 802-272-7527. Consulting/appraisal services available. House calls made free of charge.

VT COLLECTOR WILL PAY cash for old wood bird carvings, goose, duck and shorebird decoys. 802-238-1465.

Classified

Stock Purchase Plan, 401k, Blue Cross/Blue Shield Benefits, Uniforms, Boot Allowance and Safety Bonus and Growth Opportunities.

SNOW TIRES, PREFERABLY with studs and 15” Camry wheels. Size 225-65R15. In good shape. Have cash. 802-453-4235.

EOE

Work well with customers and employees

Casella offers…

LARGE ROUND, FIRST CUT, net wrapped bales, $50 each. Trucking available. 518-569-0957.

Deadline for applications: December 9th, 2016

3x7

Att. Farmers

For a copy of the job description or questions, please contact Sandra Trombley (802) 388-4982 or email strombley@nbmvt.com.

Positive attitude and behavior

casella Minimum of Class B CDL

BUILDING LOT, DAISY LANE, East Middlebury. Town water, underground telephone, cable and electric service. Good perking soil. Regular septic. Site approved for 4 bedroom home. Jack Brown, 802-388-2502 or 802-388-7350. Email: brownnov@together.net.

Wanted

FIREWOOD, MIXED HARDWOOD. Green and seasoned. Cut, split, delivered. Call 802-282-9110.

Real Estate

2014 SUBARU IMPREZA (2L,H4)- white exterior, black interior, four door, hatchback, automatic transmission. 17,225 miles. In very good condition. Minor scratches on front fender. One owner. No accidents. Regularly serviced. Asking 13,750 which is Kelley Blue Book value. Please call Natasha at 802-461-3611.

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Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 9B

Dickerson (Continued from Page 1B) attention on the woods on the opposite side of the stand from the tracks, furthest from the scent of the bear. But my bear-watching attention kept drifting back the other way. I saw no deer or bear. Nothing but squirrels, chickadees, and nuthatches. I heard nothing but sudden thumps when large heavy clumps of melting snow slid off branches, crashed through other branches, and slammed into the ground. Three hours after climbing up, I climbed back down from my stand and decided to go with Thought No. 3. I should have gone with Thought No. 3 from the very start. The tracks were now three hours older. I followed them. Twenty-five yards into the woods, the tracks

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grew even more distinct. And bigger, I thought, though it wasn’t really possible that the bear had grown. I could see not only individual pads and toes in the prints, but distinct claw marks. They went straight up the north side hill. I followed. The tracks did not veer for obstacles or to follow the hill’s contours. They plowed straight up the steepest part of the slope, over fallen trees, and through bushes. They followed a beeline. Or, rather, a beethief-line. I occasionally detoured around the obstacles but kept on the tracks. The tracks continued over the hilltop and down the other side. On the south-facing ledge the snow had melted off in patches. The tracks disappeared. I began to look around

me. There were large cracks in the ledges on both sides where a bear could hide. I slowed my pace and went more cautiously, but I walked on. On the far side of the bare patch, where the snow picked up again, the bear tracks continued on still following that beeline. Another 50 yards ahead they disappeared in another patch of bare ground. I circled around all sides looking carefully at the snow. All sides except for one, which dropped down a very steep slope. The tracks did not emerge on any other side. The bear, I assume, had dropped over the edge and was someplace down below me, probably apartment hunting for a little studio or one-bedroom where she (or he) could cozy up for the winter. Disappointed, and a little re-

Schedule (Continued from Page 1B)

12/1 Midd. at RPI.................................6 p.m. 12/6 Colby-Sawyer at Midd.................7 p.m. 12/7 Clarkson at Midd..........................6 p.m. 12/10 Skidmore at Midd.......................2 p.m. Men’s Basketball 12/7 Midd. at S. Vermont.....................7 p.m. 12/10 Skidmore at Midd.......................4 p.m. HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Boys’ Hockey 12/10 Hartford at MUHS......................7 p.m.

Girls’ Hockey 12/13 St. Albans at MUHS...................7 p.m. Boys’ Basketball 12/10 Burr & Burton at MUHS......12:30 p.m. 12/10 Mt. Abe at Randolph.............2:30 p.m. 12/13 Harwood at VUHS.....................7 p.m. 12/15 OV vs. MSJ at Proctor..........5:30 p.m. Girls’ Basketball 12/10 Mt. Abe at Mt. Mansfield.....12:30 p.m. 12/10 VUHS at Harwood.....................1 p.m. 12/10 MUHS at Mill River...............2:30 p.m.

12/20 OV at Mt. Abe............................7 p.m. 12/13 St. Albans at MUHS...................7 p.m. Wrestling 12/10 ... VUHS at Conval, N.H., Tournament 12/10 ... OV/Mt. Abe at St. Johnsbury Tourn. 12/14 MUHS Hosts..............................6 p.m. Gymnastics 12/14 Randolph at MUHS....................6 p.m. Late games were played after deadline. Spectators are advised to consult school websites for the latest schedule updates.

lieved, I turned and headed back down the hill following my own tracks. I checked on my bees, half expecting to find bear tracks leading up to my electric fence, backing up suddenly, and then loping off in another direction. Or to find that my fence was not working and my hives had been torn to pieces. Both guesses were wrong. The bee thief had kept clear of the bees. Thought No. 6. I love living where there are wild bears. Especially when they stay away from my honeybees. They are the best possible excuse for not harvesting any venison on a snowy vacation day.

TOWN OF WALTHAM DEVELOPMENT REVIEW BOARD NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The Waltham Development Review Board will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, December 20, 2016 at 6:30PM in the Town Clerks office to hear an application by David & Kevin Kayhart, dba as Kayhart Farms, lnc. for a final plat plan approval for a four (4) lot subdivision. This property is located on the mountain side of Maple Street in Waltham. All interested persons may appear and be heard. Application #16-015 is available for viewing in the Town Clerks office during the business hours of 9AM to 3PM on Tuesdays and Fridays. Participation in this public hearing is a prerequisite to the right to take any subsequent appeal. Terrance Evarts, DRB Chairperson 12/01

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MARKET REPORT ADDISON COUNTY COMMISSION SALES

RT. 125 • EAST MIDDLEBURY, VT Sales for Nov. 23 & Nov. 28 BEEF Visser Bros. Orr Family Farm H. Sunderland D. Pouliot Gosliga Lucas Dairy Deer Valley

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CALVES Mitch Kelley Laduc Acres Elysian Fields R. Crown

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Dollars 688.50 1105.50 940.80 918.40 979.65 841.05 768.60

Total # Beef: 229 • Total # Calves: 352 We value our faithful customers. Sales at 3pm - Mon. & Thurs. For pickup and trucking, call 1-802-388-2661

Public Notices Index

Public Notices for the following can be found in this ADDISON INDEPENDENT on Pages 9B.

Addison County Court House (2) Vergennes Panton Water District (1) Vermont Secretary of State (1) Waltham (1) PROPOSED STATE RULES By law, public notice of proposed rules must be given by publication in newspapers of record. The purpose of these notices is to give the public a chance to respond to the proposals. The public notices for administrative rules are now also available online at https://secure.vermont. gov/SOS/rules/ . The law requires an agency to hold a public hearing on a proposed rule, if requested to do so in writing by 25 persons or an association having at least 25 members. To make special arrangements for individuals with disabilities or special needs please call or write the contact person listed below as soon as possible. To obtain further information concerning any scheduled hearing(s), obtain copies of proposed rule(s) or submit comments regarding proposed rule(s), please call or write the contact person listed below. You may also submit comments in writing to the Legislative Committee on Administrative Rules, State House, Montpelier, Vermont 05602 (802-828-2231).

THE COUNTY OF ADDISON – WARNING – PRELIMINARY BUDGET MEETING The Assistant Judges of Addison County invite the public to a meeting to discuss the preliminary proposed county budget for 2017-2018 (July 1, 2017 – June 30, 2018). This meeting will not take the place of the Annual Meeting, which will be held in January 2017, but will allow for public participation in the preliminary budget process. The meeting will be held on Wednesday, December 7, 2016 at 9am at the Judge Frank Mahady Court House in Middlebury, VT. Irene Poole, Assistant Judge Alice M. George, Assistant Judge 11/10, 17, 24, 12/1

CONTACT GOV. SHUMLIN Governor Peter Shumlin 1-800-649-6825 (Vt. only) • 802-828-3333 109 State Street, Pavillion Montpelier, Vermont 05609-0101 www.vermont.gov/governor

PUBLIC NOTICE Full Passport Service Addison County Courthouse The Addison County Clerk is available to accept passport applications and provide passport photos. REGULAR HOURS Monday – Friday 9am to 1pm Appointments appreciated, but not necessary.

802-388-1966

WARNING ANNUAL MEETING OF THE VERGENNES-PANTON WATER DISTRICT, INC. DECEMBER 13, 2016

The legal voters of VERGENNES-PANTON WATER DISTRICT, INC. are hereby notified and warned to meet at the V.P.W.D. office building on Canal Street in the City of Vergennes in said District, on the 13th day of December, 2016 at 7:00 P.M. to transact the following business to wit: ARTICLE I: To elect by ballot the following officers: a.) a moderator b.) a clerk c.) a treasurer ARTICLE II: To hear and act upon the reports from the officers of the VERGENNES-PANTON WATER DISTRICT, INC. ARTICLE III: To have presented by the Board of Commissioners of the VERGENNES- PANTON WATER DISTRICT, INC. their estimate of expenses for the ensuring year and to appropriate such sum as it, the VERGENNES-PANTON WATER DISTRICT, INC. deems necessary for said expenses together with the amount required to pay the balance, if any, left unpaid expressing said sum in dollars in its vote. ARTICLE IV: To establish salaries for the Commissioners and other elected officers of the Water District. ARTICLE V: To see whether the voters of said Water District will authorize its Board to borrow money pending receipt of water rents, by issuance of its notes or orders payable not later than one(1) year to date. ARTICLE VI: To transact any other business proper to come before said meeting. Dated at Vergennes, Vermont, this 28TH day of November, 2016 Maria L. Brown, Clerk VERGENNES-PANTON WATER DISTRICT 11/28

General Rule for Executive Branch Administrative Hearing Officers Vermont Proposed Rule: 16P075 AGENCY: Agency of Administration CONCISE SUMMARY: This rule for administrative hearing officers in the Executive Branch ensures ethical standards for hearing officers, establishes a complaint procedure for the conduct of hearing officers, and ensures that all parties in a proceeding presided over by hearing officers are provided with a copy of the rules of procedure, including the rules for filing an appeal. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT: Alison Powers, Staff Attorney, Vermont Department of Human Resources 120 State Street, 5th Floor, Montpelier VT 05620 Tel: 802-522-6635 Email: alison.powers@vermont.gov URL: http://aoa.vermont.gov. FOR COPIES: Michelle Anderson, General Counsel, Vermont Department of Human Resources 120 State Street, 5th Floor, Montpelier VT 05620 Tel: 802-522-6233 Email: michelle.anderson@ vermont.gov. Reach Up / Postsecondary Education / Reach Ahead Rules. Vermont Proposed Rule: 16P076 AGENCY: Dept. for Children and Families (DCF) CONCISE SUMMARY: This rule implements two changes to the Reach Up program required by Act 172 (2016): (1) 33 V.S.A. § 1103(c) was amended to require DCF to count $115.00 of a parent’s Supplemental Security Income (SSI) payment when determining the amount of the family’s Reach Up financial assistance; and (2) 33 V.S.A. § 1108(d) was amended to expand the types of work activities a participant who has reached the 60-month time limit may engage in order to continue receiving assistance. Additionally, this rule clarifies and modifies provisions in the Reach Up and Reach Ahead program rules related to work requirements and activities, self-employment verification, temporary absences, time limits, formation of the assistance group, housing allowances, and medical deferments and modifications. Finally, this rule proposes changes to the Postsecondary Education program to enhance participation in the program. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT: Heidi Moreau, Agency of Human Services, Department for Children and Families, Economic Services Division, 280 State Drive, HC 1 South, H12502, Waterbury VT 05671-1201, Tel: 802-595-9639, Fax: 802-241-0460, Email: heidi. moreau@vermont.gov URL: http://dcf.vermont.gov/esd/rules. FOR COPIES: Afsar Sultana, Agency of Human Services, Department for Children and Families, Economic Services Division, 280 State Drive, HC 1 South, H12502, Waterbury VT 05671-1201, Tel: 802-241-0641, Fax: 802-241-0460, Email: afsar.sultana@vermont.gov. 12/1


PAGE 10B — Addison Independent, Thursday, December 1, 2016

Brandon man cited for driving drunk MIDDLEBURY — Middlebury police cited Harold Brown, 66, of Brandon for driving under the influence, following a report that he had allegedly driven on the sidewalk off South Street with a flat tire on Nov. 25. Police said they measured Brown’s blood-alcohol content at 0.138 percent; the legal limit for driving is 0.08. In other action last week, Middlebury police: • Investigated an accident involving a vehicle running into a pedestrian on Washington Street, near Shaw’s Supermarket, on Nov. 21. Police said the pedestrian sustained minor injuries. • Received, from a South Village Green resident, some pieces of a water bong (drug paraphernalia) to be destroyed on Nov. 21. • Responded to a car-versus-deer crash on Munger Street in New Haven on Nov. 22. • Served a restraining order on a local woman on Nov. 22. • Were informed that Helen Porter nursing home had been receiving some harassing phone calls on Nov. 22. • Were informed on Nov. 23 of the theft of some signs from outside of

Middlebury Police Log

Middlebury College’s Chellis House off Hillcrest Road on Nov. 23. • Received a report about the theft of an unspecified sum of cash from Middlebury College’s Hadley Hall, as well as its Field House on Nov. 23. • Were informed on Nov. 23 of the theft of a laptop from Middlebury College’s Ross Dining Hall on College Street on Nov. 23. • Responded to a domestic dispute at the Briarwood Apartments on Nov. 23. Police said a couple had been arguing. • Assisted Vermont State Police in investigating a car crash on River Road in New Haven on Nov. 23. • Responded to a report of a woman allegedly threatening to harm herself with a knife at a Valley View residence on Nov. 24. Police said the woman denied the report. The woman left the home to be with family members, according to police. • Served a restraining order on a local man on behalf of the Berlin Po-

lice Department on Nov. 24. • Responded to a reported dispute between two Birchard Park neighbors on Nov. 26. • Investigated a report of a “very intoxicated” man yelling at the roundabout intersection on Main Street in downtown Middlebury on Nov. 26. Police said the man was taken to Porter Hospital due to his high blood-alcohol level. • Investigated a report of credit card fraud at a Parkline Place residence on Nov. 26. • Responded to a report of a suspected drunken driver on Court Street Extension on Nov. 26. Police said the driver was simply tired. • Assisted a county game warden with a deer that had been struck by a vehicle on Lower Plains Road on Nov. 27. • Attempted to find a woman who left Porter Hospital with an IV still in her arm on Nov. 27. • Helped resolve a domestic dispute at a Valley View home on Nov. 27. Police said one person was trying to prevent another person from removing things from their apartment. • Assisted Vergennes police at Porter Hospital with an unresponsive patient who had been taken in for treatment on Nov. 28.

Steer missing from New Haven farm

vehicle driven by Justin Bassett, 40, of Vergennes for an expired vehicle registration. Police cited Bassett for driving with criminally suspended license, seized the vehicle’s registration plates, and had the vehicle towed.

Monument Farms honored for support of military WEYBRIDGE, Vt. — Dan James of Weybridge, director of Sales and Distribution at Monument Farms Dairy, was recently presented with the U.S. Department of Defense Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR) Patriot Award. David Wheel, representing Vermont Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve, presented the award

for the unconditional support that James has given to his employee and citizen-service member, Tony Harvey, from Monkton, Vt., who serves as a Sergeant First Class in the Operations section of Headquarters and Headquarters Company of the 572d Engineer Battalion of the Vermont Army National Guard in Rutland, and works as a route driver/salesman

for Monument Farms Dairy. Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve is a U.S. Department of Defense organization that promotes, recognizes and enhances civilian employer support of citizen service members. ESGR also facilitates meaningful employment opportunities for citizen warriors, all veterans and military spouses.

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ADDISON COUNTY — Vermont State Police are investigating the theft of a steer from a cattle farm on River Road in New Haven. The farmer on Nov. 28 reported that he is unsure who would have stolen the male bovine, which is black with a white face and of a breed known as “Black Baldy.” He told the trooper that it was a very tame animal, and anyone with a handful of feed could have lured it way from its enclosure. Anyone with information regarding this steer is asked to Police Log contact state police at 802-388-4919. Information can also be submitted anonymously online at www.vtips.info or by texting “CRIMES” (274637) to Keyword: VTIPS. In other recent activity, troopers: • On Nov. 21 at approximately 7:32 p.m. responded, with members of the Lincoln Fire Department and Bristol Rescue Squad, to a motor vehicle crash on Forge Hill Road in Lincoln. Police report that the 17-year-old driver lost control of his vehicle on a downhill curve while driving west on the snow and ice covered roadway. The Lincoln resident’s Grand Cherokee left the roadway and collided with a tree, damaging the passenger-side door, roof and hood. The vehicle was removed from the scene by Dupont’s Towing and is likely totaled. This crash remains under investigation. • On Nov. 23 at approximately 3:46 a.m. received a report of a onecar crash into a utility pole on River Road in New Haven. By the time state police arrived, the driver, identified as 28-year-old Christopher Gearwar of Hinesburg, had been transported to Porter Hospital for non-life threatening injuries — specifically sore extremities and neck. When a trooper later interviewed Gearwar, Gearwar said he was driving a 1997 Toyota Camry southbound on River Road at approximately 40 mph when he looked down briefly at his phone and when he looked backed up he saw the utility pole. The Camry struck the pole and overturned. Gearwar’s vehicle was totaled. Police said that neither alcohol nor drugs played a factor in the crash. • On Nov. 23 at just before 8 p.m. stopped a motor vehicle at the intersection of Silver Street and States Prison Hollow Road in Monkton. police cited the driver, 18-year-old Harley Allen of Bristol, for driving with a criminally suspended driver’s license. • On Nov. 25 stopped a motor vehicle after observing a traffic violation on Route 73 West, at the intersection of Brown Lane. The trooper cited the driver, Nicholas Parent, 36, of Orwell, for driving with a criminally suspended license. • On Nov. 26 at around 7 p.m. responded to a family disturbance at a Ferrisburgh home. A neighbor told troopers that he saw a woman who lived there with red marks on her face and chest. Police investigated and determined that 27-year-old Brandon Bothwell of Ferrisburgh and the woman had an argument that turned physical and the woman sustained minor injuries. The woman told troopers that Bothwell slapped her face and punched her in the chest, knocking her over onto the porch of the house and pulling her by her feet back into the house as she tried to escape. Bothwell fled the scene and turned himself into Shelburne police the following day, Nov. 27. Police cited Bothwell for domestic assault

DAVID WHEEL, VERMONT Employer Support of the Guard and Reserve (ESGR), presented Dan James with the ESGR Patriot Award, and Sergeant First Class Tony Harvey nominated James for the award.

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ARTS+LEISURE

The Addison Independent

December 1, 2016

Members of Maple Jam Alexandra Tursi, Jeff Prescott, Jose Schmidt, Andy Warner, Clara Cavitt, Vikki Day, Karen Chickering and Maarten van Ryckevorsel get tangled up with the holiday spirit. Catch their a cappella act at Brandon Music on Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. PHOTO / KRISTI TURSI

Maple Jam: Vermont’s own jazz a cappella

D

uring her 40-minute commute from Vergennes to Shelburne, Karen Chickering sings. A soprano for Vermont’s one and only jazz a cappella group, called Maple Jam, the drive offers her an ideal window of time to perfect her part before weekly rehearsal.

But Maple Jam’s style differs vastly from these groups, which focus mostly on pop and show tunes. With seven out of eight of its members hailing from the Vermont Symphony Orchestra Chorus, Maple Jam is firmly grounded in classical knowledge and has been bringing close-harmony and jazz to venues around Vermont since 2004.

Chickering said she doesn’t care who’s watching.

BY EMMA COTTON

“I don’t notice,” she said, smiling. “Both hands are on the wheel.”

The popularity of a cappella has budded in recent years, with shows like “The Sing-Off,” an American Idol-esque reality show, and films like “Pitch Perfect” having captured the attention of millions. Pentatonix, an a cappella group that got its start from “The Sing-Off,” is among the top 20 most heavily followed channels on YouTube.

“It’s very different than what most people do,” Chickering said. “What we do is very uncommon. So people are taken by surprise and frequently blown away, which makes us feel happy.” Maple Jam has pulled inspiration from groups like The Swingle Singers, a renowned group based in classical music that was founded in Paris in the ’60s, and is now based out of London. The Vermont group had the chance to sing with the Swingle Singers at a music festival in Toronto. SEE MAPLE ON PAGE 7


PAGE 2 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

Vcevy Strekalovsky ON EXHIBIT AT EDGEWATER GALLERY ON THE GREEN, MIDDLEBURY

A

ccording to his Instagram profile, artist and architect Vcevy Strekalovsky is a “Rockin’ Renaissance Man.” That somewhat over-the-top description — crafted by a fellow artist friend — might not be that far from the truth.

Strekalovsky, a fit and youthful 78, is energized by a diverse but complimentary set of interests and experiences. His life is an intense, disciplined and rewarding integration of practical and creative, cerebral and physical, work and play. A healthy sense of humor keeps it all in check. As a longtime supporter of community arts organizations, he has enjoyed putting his design expertise to work for their benefit. In 1970, when their children were young, he and his wife Jane joined other families to help found a music conservatory. For 45 years, he has participated as board member, architect, parent and student. His architectural portfolio includes similar subsequent projects, including the Ellison Center for the Arts in Duxbury, Mass., and the Copley Society of Art in Boston. Though he maintains his architectural practice in Hingham, Mass., the part-time Weybridge resident is finding more time to paint. He enjoys working in both watercolors and oils, and the spontaneity of painting en plein air — in Vermont (where he exhibits at Edgewater Gallery), in Hingham, and around the country, particularly out West and in Maine. Regardless of subject — the landscape, a creature, or a structure — he is a passionate, appreciative, and observant painter,

using words like “lush” and “juicy” as they refer to brushstrokes and paint medium. Strekalovsky received a B.A. in Fine Art from Middlebury College and a Masters in Architecture from the University of Pennsylvania, and studied Urban Design at the University of Edinburgh in Scotland. During a recent conversation, he reflected on his early influences, the excitement of plein-air painting, arts integration in education, and what’s exciting him these days.

WHEN WERE YOU FIRST EXPOSED TO PAINTING? My Russian grandfather, and his three sons were all watercolorists (I assumed all Russians were). I grew up painting watercolors en plein air with my dad, opening my eyes to shapes, values and colors, and enjoying the spontaneous brushwork and luminosity that is the nature of the medium. I have tried to carry this freshness into my oil painting as well. In high school, I worked with oil and came to love its texture, and then at Middlebury College with noted watercolorist Arthur K. D. Healy and painter Robert Reiff, developed a sense for abstraction and pre-architectural basic design. Architecture at the University of Pennsylvania was part of the School of Fine Arts in those days, and in my architectural career I’ve felt that painting and architecture interact in design intent, problem solving, and the relationship between shapes and spaces.

Otter Creek II – 12" x 16" – $800.

WHAT INSPIRED YOU TO REVISIT OIL PAINTING? On my first trip to Russia in the early ‘90s, I discovered the Russian Impressionists. I loved the way they saw nature and applied paint, and I began to paint with oil. Nicolai Fechin had come to this country in the 1920s and Sergei Bongart it the 1940s, and they each greatly influenced plein air painting, particularly in the west and the southwest. At the Fechin Institute in Taos, N.M., Scottsdale Artists School in Arizona, Art Center in Jackson Hole, Wy., as well as other locations, I began to take workshops with painters such as Carolyn Anderson, Michael Lynch, Ned Jacob, and Skip Whitcomb, and develop my ability to see and paint figures, landscapes and livestock.

WHAT IS IMPORTANT TO YOU ABOUT PAINTING EN PLEIN AIR? Plein air painting excites me because I never know where I will end up; starting with a sketch of the basic idea and trying to maintain that idea as the painting develops is the challenge. Painting from life can have immediacy if the spirit of the subject is retained, its abstract qualities developed, and detail minimized to what the eye (not the camera) sees. I like brushstrokes CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 3

ART CONTINUED FROM PAGE 2

to show, so that the process and the character of paint are visible. The relationship between lines and shapes in a painting is not unlike that of forms and spaces in a building — the goal should be an interesting visual journey.

WHAT ROLE DO ARTS PLAY IN EDUCATION AND IN LIFE? Our culture values the practical over the artistic. Arts education is often considered a luxury, outside the base curriculum, yet Harvard’s Howard Gardner shows in his “Multiple Intelligences” theory that visual and performing arts awaken and engage students, leading to self-esteem and followthrough — transferrable effects. I believe that education should involve the development of both sides of the brain. The arts need to be in the core curriculum to ensure this… it is understood in most other parts of the world. I find it energizing to maintain various disciplines… each gives perspective and meaning to the other. I think architecture satisfies me in that it is art

H

College on the Hill – 12" x 16" – $800.

Smiling in the Chapel – 18" x 24" – $1,800.

and science, and involves problem solving and interaction with people.

whom I make regular plein air outings here in Hingham, or to California, Texas, Montana, Maine, Vermont, Wyoming or Arizona. There are several opportunities for figure painting evenings during the week. We share the passion and have a lot of fun! I am a member of the Providence Art Club, Salmagundi Club in New York City, and the Copley Society of Art in Boston, and currently exhibit my work in Massachusetts, Vermont, and Montana. Through my Instagram account, @ vcevystrekalovsky, I enjoy communicating with artists all over the world.

Music is probably the most abstract and universally felt of the arts. The interval relationships within a modal scale and the color wheel are similar… Kandinsky and others explored these connections. To me, the ultimate artistic interaction is between two musicians, such as Dave Brubeck and Paul Desmond… each feeds the other and develops the other’s idea. I try to get to my guitar once a day and work on theory through jazz classics.

WHAT EXCITES YOU MOST ABOUT PAINTING RIGHT NOW? The painting community is a congenial one… I’m fortunate to have four painting buddies with

OLIDAY SPECIAL

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I suggest that painting is a “contact sport,” in that sustained concentration at an easel requires energy, and adding a little pilates, skiing and tennis to the mix helps.

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PAGE 4 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

SPIN UNITED You SPIN, We All Win. Join us for this FUNdraising event to raise money to assist our friends, families, and neighbors with shelter, food, access to health care, educational opportunities, and financial services.

Jan. 22, 2017 CREATE A TEAM!

FREE Massage Therapist on site!

SPIN AS AN INDIVIDUAL!

Create a team of 6 and compete to raise the most money. The top 3 winning teams will get to choose which of our funded partners they will donate to! $300 Registration Fee

Compete to raise the most money. The top 3 winning teams will get to choose which of our funded partners they will donate to! $50 Registration Fee

REGISTRATION IS EASY.

GREAT THINGS HAPPEN WHEN WE LIVE UNITED!

You can register and create a team by TEXT or ONLINE TEXT: spinunited to 71777 Or online; http://app.mobilecause. com/vf/spinunited

Event Goal $10,000 WE CAN DO IT WITH YOUR HELP!

Hosted and sponsored by Middlebury Fitness 175 Wilson Rd., Middlebury 48 Court Street, PO Box 555 Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-7189 OF Contact: info@unitedwayaddisoncounty.org

ADDISON COUNTY

OUT OF TOWN Film contest opens third season

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Calling all filmmakers ages 10-30 who live or go to school in Vermont. Win cash prizes and share your work on Vermont PBS and at film festivals statewide in the 2017 Freedom & Unity TV Vermont Youth Film Contest. The deadline for the third annual competition, which accepts short films with a Vermont focus, is March 26, 2017. To get rules, enter and watch films from last year’s contest, visit freedomandunitytv.org. This yearʼs competition will step things up in a big way. Weʼre expanding to include middle school students and weʼre holding a two-day Youth Film Festival and Media Maker conference on May 6-7, 2017 at the Briggs Opera House in White River Junction, Vermont! Audiences will be able to view the

winning films, participate in workshops taught by professional filmmakers, and more. The film contest is an outgrowth of Freedom & Unity: The Vermont Movie, a six-part film on Vermont history and culture created by 30-plus Vermont filmmakers and shown statewide in 2014. Jacobson served as executive producer. “ New this year is the $3,500 Work-InProgress Filmmaking Award for Vermont filmmakers. Vermont filmmakers working on a film (in any genre or length) that was shot in Vermont, and/or includes a Vermont theme, who are not currently enrolled in an educational institution, are eligible to apply. The application deadline is Feb. 15, 2017. To learn more, visit: thevermontmovie.com.

ELLIS PAUL PERFORMS AT HIGHER GROUND Some artists document their lives through their music. Others chronicle their times. It’s a rare artist who can do both, telling their own story through songs that also encapsulate the essence of people and places who have helped define their era overall. Ellis Paul is one of those gifted singer/songwriters, and he’s

coming to play at Higher Ground in South Burlington on Saturday, Dec. 10. Though some may refer to Paul as a folksinger, he is more, for lack of a better word, a singular storyteller. He’s a musician whose words reach out from inside, expressing feelings, thoughts and sensibilities

that most people can relate to in one way or another. The exhilaration of the open road. A ​celebration of heroes. The hope for redemption. Come here Paul play next weekend. Doors open at 7 p.m., show starts at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $17 in advance and $20 day of.

JOE & JUDI PERFORM BENEFIT CONCERT AT CVU Joe Lovano, Grammy award-winning saxophonist, Blue Note recording artist, composer, arranger, and educator and Judi Silvano, vocalist, composer and lyricist, will be performing Sunday, Dec. 4, at Champlain Valley Union (CVU) High School at 3 p.m. as a benefit for Responsible Growth Hinesburg. Jazz mandolin performer Jamie Masefield, opens the concert. Lovano and Silvano will play with an all-star rhythm section of Tom Cleary, piano, Clyde Stats, bass, and Gabe Jarrett, drums. Tickets are $30, $20 for students 18 and under. Tickets at Flynntix or at the door.


Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 5

IN TOWN Broadway Direct to the Vergennes Opera House

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his is the eleventh year that Broadway veteran and Vergennes resident Bill Carmichael brings his Broadway friends to the Vergennes Opera House stage for an evening of exceptional music and songs.

This year’s production will focus on the music and lyrics of perhaps the most well-known Broadway music duo, Rodgers and Hammerstein. Their beautifully composed songs have become familiar “showstoppers” in such musicals as The Sound of Music, South Pacific, the King and I and more. “Songs from Broadway musicals offer the audience moments of escape directly to the familiar scene in the production the music is

from,” said Gerianne Smart, President of the Friends of the Vergennes Opera House. “Bill pulls this show together every year, and for one evening, we are all transported to the theaters of Broadway where the songs are big, the music is somehow familiar, and the characters all come to life.” The professionals joining Carmichael on stage this year are Kathryn Markey, David Rossetti and Lucy Sorensen. Once again, they will be accompanied on the Vergennes Opera House grand piano by Scott Nicholas. A few years ago, Carmmichael decided to add another element of talent to this popular show by inviting high school students to join the cast. This year the student performers are Caitlin

Walsh (Vergennes), Stella Pappas (Charlotte) and Jonny Barden (Colchester). St. Michael’s Playhouse collaboration: As in years past, this entire show, students and all, will also be performing a matinee and an evening performance the very next day on Saturday, Dec. 10 in St. Michael’s Playhouse. This gives the students an incredible opportunity to perform with professional singers/actors on an equity stage. The Vergennes Opera House doors open at 6:45 p.m. for a 7:30 p.m. show next Friday. Tickets are $18 for adults, $15 for seniors (62+), and $5 for students 18 and younger; they are available online at www.vergennesoperahouse.org or call 802-877-6737.

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE COMES TO THE STAGE AS A LIVE RADIO PLAY It’s on everyone’s list of favorite holiday films, but Middlebury Actors Workshop is presenting It’s a Wonderful Life with a delicious twist: it’s Christmas Eve in 1946 at WBFR studios, and It’s a Wonderful Life is about to be performed as a live radio play, in front of a live studio audience.

Director Haley Rice is charmed by the script, and is thrilled with her acting company. “I’ve got some of the most talented people in Vermont working on this show,” said Rice, who is also the operations manager and festival producer for Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater. “I couldn’t be happier.”

Macbeth for Middlebury Actors Workshop shifts gears to play Clarence the Angel among other characters. MacArthur Stine, Second City alum and stand-up comic also plays many diverse characters, including host Freddie Filmore and the play’s villain, Henry Potter.

Five stellar professional actors perform the entire show, playing over 40 characters from Potter to Zuzu. Central to the fun is Sam Hurlburt, who creates all of the show’s sound effects in full view of the audience, exactly as it was done in the Golden Age of Radio. Randall Pierce adds Christmas tunes and original music from the piano, providing a live soundtrack for the production.

George Bailey is played by Robert Harte, screenwriter, actor and former cast member of “One Life to Live.” Prolific Vermont actress Karen Lefkoe, who will star in Vermont Stage’s upcoming play Blackberry Winter plays Mary. Shakespeare and Co. actor and THT’s esteemed education director Lindsay Pontius plays siren Violet Bick and many others. Paul Schnabel, a seasoned actor who played Richard III in Richard III and Duncan in

It’s a Wonderful Life will play at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater Friday, Dec. 9 at 7:30 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 10 at 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, Dec. 11 at 2 p.m. Tickets are $22, $10 students and may be purchased at www.townhalltheater.org, 802-3829222, at the THT box office, or at the door. Rated G. Run time is approximately 1 hour, 45 minutes with a 15 min intermission.

one two three THREE THINGS YOU NEED TO KNOW THIS WEEK ‘I SPY’ MIDDLEBURY

“THE SPIRIT OF CHRISTMAS PAST”

Very Merry Middlebury is kicking off its annual “I Spy” contest. Illustrator Ashley Wolff once again hand painted 10 tiny ornaments for the contest. Look for 10 ornaments of painted bears around town, snap a pick and share it on Instagram( #VeryMerryMiddlebury). The winner will receive $100 of Middlebury Money and an ornament. The remaining ornaments will go to nine runners up.

Every wonder how the Christmas tree became popular? Why halls were decked? Or why Santa Claus came to town? Find out at the Sheldon Museum’s talk about the four centuries of Christmas in New England on Wednesday, Dec. 7 at 7 p.m. Kenneth Turino, Manager of Community Engagement and Exhibitions at Historic New England will explain Christmas celebrations from 17th century New England through today. Call to reserve your space 802-388-2117.

WEDNESDAY 7 DEC.

MUSIC, DOUBLE-TIME DaddyLongLegs will host a CD release party on Saturday, Dec. 3, at 7:30 p.m., Sally Burrell’s, 36 Pine Street, Brisol. There will be food, but BYOB. $10 admission. Call 453-4613 to reserve your spot. Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble presents their winter concert on Friday, Dec. 2, at 7 p.m., Robison Concert Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury. Then again on Saturday, Dec. 3, at 2 p.m., Mount Abe Auditorium, Bristol. Both concerts are free.


PAGE 6 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

T HEATER

OWN HALL

Merchants Row, Middlebury, VT Tickets: 802-382-9222 • www.townhalltheater.org

EXHIBITS ADDISON COUNTY IN PROFILE: SILHOUETTES FROM THE HENRY SHELDON MUSEUM ARCHIVES. On exhibit through December at the Henry Sheldon Museum of Vermont History, 1 Park St., Middlebury. 3882117 or www.henrysheldonmuseum.org.

GREAT ART WEDNESDAYS

ANCIENT MEDITERRANEAN AND EARLY EUROPEAN ART. Ongoing exhibit, highlighting an Egyptian Old Kingdom relief and an early fifteenth-century Italian panel painting. Lower Gallery at the Middlebury College Museum of Art, 72 Porter Field Road, Middlebury. (802) 443-5007.

A fresh new biography of this artistic giant.

BLOOM AND DOOM: VISUAL EXPRESSIONS AND REFORM IN VIENNA 1900. On exhibit through Dec. 11 at the Middlebury College Museum of Art, Overbrook Gallery. 72 Porter Field Road, Middlebury. (802) 443-5007.

Wed 12/7 11am $10/$5 Students

RENOIR: REVERED AND REVILED

Fri–Sun 12/9 7:30pm, 12/10 2pm & 7:30pm, 12/11 2pm $22/$10Students

IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE A LIVE RADIO PLAY

This beloved American holiday classic comes to life as a ‘40’s radio broadcast. Directed by Haley Rice.

Sun 12/11 7pm $24/$10 Students METROPOLITAN OPERA IN HD

L’AMOUR DE LOIN

Described by the New York Times as “transfixing… a lushly beautiful score” L’Amour de Loin’s Metropolitan Opera premiere is a dazzling new production by Robert Lepage.

Fri & Sat 12/16 7pm & 12/17 2pm $15 Advance/$20 at Door

MIDDLEBURY DOES CHRISTMAS

Jazzy takes on your favorite Christmas songs performed by Middlebury’s most talented musicians.

Sun 12/18 2pm $17/$10 Students NATIONAL THEATRE LIVE

NO MAN’S LAND

Following their hit Broadway run, Ian McKellen & Patrick Stewart return to the West End stage in Harold Pinter’s classic. Exclusive Q&A with the cast and director Sean Mathias follows the broadcast.

Sat 12/31 Doors 8pm; Show 9pm $15*

NEW YEAR’S EVE WITH THE GRIFT

Bid farewell to 2016 and welcome 2017 with Middlebury’s favorites – The Grift! *Cash Bar and snacks for purchase

Sun 1/8 2pm $20/$10 ages18 & under

JOHNNY PEERS AND THE MUTTVILLE COMIX

Six personality-plus canines will tickle your funny bone! These mutts have even played the White House. A show for the whole family and for the dog lover in each of us, bringing 1,000 laughs to Town Hall Theater.

EUROPEAN AND AMERICAN ART. Ongoing exhibit, featuring landscapes by American painters Jasper Cropsey and John Frederick Kensett alongside sixteenth- and seventeenth-century European religious and devotional images and American and European sculpture. Cerf Gallery at the Middlebury College Museum of Art, 72 Porter Field Road, Middlebury. (802) 443-5007. MORE LIGHT. On exhibit Dec. 1 through Jan. 15 featuring a group show of small works by Bonnie Baird, Anne Cady, Sobelman CortaPega, Rebecca Kinkead, Katie Loesel, Cameron Schmitz and Pamela Smith. Northern Daughters Gallery, 221 Main Street, Vergennes. Thursday-Sunday 11 a.m.-7 p.m. 877-2173. ‘PEACE ON EARTH.’ On exhibit Nov. 4-Jan. 7 featuring the good in people, the beauty of this world, and that as human beings, we are all in this together. The exhibit was an open call to artists for that which celebrates and strengthens the ideals of ‘Peace on Earth’. The resulting compilation of work presents an eclectic view of the theme. Compass Center, 333 Jones Drive, Brandon. (802) 247-4295. POST POP: PRINTS OF KEITH HARING. On exhibit through Dec. 11. Following the illustrious career of Keith Haring from 1982, when he made his first silkscreen prints, to his death from AIDS related complications in 1990. Middlebury College Museum of Art, 72 Porter Field Road, Middlebury. (802) 443-5007. QUAKER MADE: VERMONT FURNITURE, 1820-1835. On exhibit starting Sunday, July 10 at the Rokeby Museum. Route 7, Ferrisburgh. 877-3406. 7 ARTISTS FOR OUR 7TH BIRTHDAY: A SMALL WORKS SHOW. On exhibit Nov. 1-Dec. 31 featuring the works of Sara Katz, Patty Sgrecci, Irma Cerese, Hannah Sessions, Amy Brnger, Michael Egan and CJ Hockett. Edgewater Gallery at the Falls, 1 Mill Street, Middlebury. 802-458-0098. SILKSCREEN PRINTS. On exhibit Nov. 29-Dec. 6, featuring work by Middlebury College students. Students addressed various technical and conceptual challenges, resulting in a wide array of imagery, both observed from life and from their own imagination. The silkscreen process is refined through composition, drawing and computer manipulation. Johnson Memorial Building, Middlebury College. Free. (802) 443-3168. THE SPIRIT OF THE SEASON: MY FAVORITE THINGS. On exhibit Nov. 4-Jan. 31 featuring a holiday themed show by the ensemble company of the Brandon Artists Guild. An opening reception will be held 5-7 p.m. on Nov. 4. All are welcome. Brandon Artists Guild, 7 Center Street, Brandon. (802) 247-4956. HAVE AN EXHIBIT YOU WANT PUBLISHED?

let us know

NEWS@ADDISONINDEPENDENT.COM


Addison Independent

MAPLE CONTINUED FROM PAGE 1

“When we grow up, we want to be just like them,” Chickering said.

Maple Jam’s a cappella focuses on incorporating the sounds of jazz — instruments included — into multi-part songs. The group includes a vocal percussionist, a vocal trombone imitator, and Chickering “plays” the trumpet.

upcoming show Maple Jam performs live at Brandon Music on Dec. 17 at 7:30 p.m. Concert tickets are $20. More info at www.brandon-music.net

piano and played violin. “I was in the conservatory in Argentina,” he said. “The choir was where all the cute girls went.” Schmidt had a role in the effort to found Maple Jam. Though someone else officially started the group, Schmidt urged him to follow through.

Sitting at a booth in a Shelburne pizzeria, she demonstrated. Lips pursed to the right, she puffed high-pitched sounds out of her mouth in bursts, sounding — uncannily — like a trumpet. The melodies and instrument interpretations are accompanied by choreography: a move to the front of the stage during a solo or a playful interaction between two members. In this way, Chickering said, the group has evolved since their inception. “Our first concert was 13 of us, all lined up with our music stands, standing in front of the church and not moving,” she said. “We had a ways to go. And we have come a long way, baby.” Chickering has been singing, her mom tells her, since she was in a play pen, and Maple Jam’s low bass, Jose Schmidt, has been singing since he was a child growing up in Argentina, where he also studied

After a few bumps in leadership and a slight drop in membership, Maple Jam became a “democratic” group. “We don’t have a leader,” Chickering said. “We all have input, we all decide. Someone usually takes ownership of a song, and they usually direct it, but we try very hard to have it be a very easy process.” Chickering and Schmidt agreed, the easy-going process promotes a friendly atmosphere within the group. “We all still talk to each other,” Chickering said. “We genuinely love being together.” “Basically, this is something that we do for fun,” Schmidt added. “We love the music, and we want to share it with our audience.”

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 7 Maple Jam’s next scheduled show will take place at Brandon Music on Dec. 17. The group performs about 12 times per year, breaking performances into chunks to give them time to learn and integrate new material. Their shows pop up around the state in the fall, around the winter holidays, and in the spring and summer. Audiences range from an intimate group of 40 to a packed church on New Year’s Eve and include a diverse range of listeners. “When we have youngsters, they really dig it, because they have never heard it before,” Schmidt said. “A lot of the older people come because they’re hearing what they grew up with. They like the novelty of listening to familiar melodies in a new setting. You see them smiling and singing along, and you see them remembering.” With residences in Argentina, Canada and the U.S., Schmidt feels Vermont is the perfect location for the group. “What you notice about Vermont when you come here from other places is that people choose to live (here),” he said. “They come here because they like the lifestyle. They’re not trying to make the big bucks — they can do fun things, get involved in community, sing, hike.” Chickering likes to bike. She once biked all the way from Burlington to Middlebury to get to a rehearsal. “All the way practicing the trumpet,” Schmidt said. More info at Maplejam.com.

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PAGE 8 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

CALENDAR “CANDY CANE CHRISTMAS” MARKETPLACE IN BRISTOL. Friday, Dec. 2, 1-5 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-5 p.m., St. Ambrose Church. CHOCOLATE WALK IN BRISTOL. Friday, Dec. 2, 4-10 p.m., downtown Bristol. Look for the “Chocolate Stop” signs at participating businesses. MEMORY TREE LIGHTING IN BRISTOL. Friday, Dec. 2, 6 p.m., On the Green in Bristol. There will be music and refreshments. Purchase a bulb for $5. Deadline is Nov. 28. Info: 453-5885. CANDY CANE HUNT IN BRISTOL. Friday, Dec. 2, 6:30 p.m., On the Green in Bristol. Santa has hidden candy canes all around the park. Bring your flashlight and help us find them. You may even find a special candy cane with a prize winning ribbon. CHRISTMAS BAZAAR IN BRISTOL. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., First Baptist Church. Lunch served. TEA WITH MRS. Claus in Bristol. Saturday, Dec. 3, 1-2 p.m., Holley Hall. Join Mrs. Claus for tea and cookies, a story read by Mrs. Claus and crafts with the elves. $15 per child and $10 per accompanying adult (required). Reserve your seat by calling 453-5885. BREAKFAST WITH SANTA IN BRISTOL. Sunday, Dec. 10, seatings at 8:30 a.m., 9:30 a.m. and 10:30 a.m., Holley Hall. Carriage rides from 8:30-10:30 a.m. Tickets and info: 453-5885.

BRANDON HOLIDAY AUCTION IN BRANDON. Sunday, Dec. 4, 3 p.m., Brandon Library. Join the Friends of the Brandon Free Public Library for their annual holiday auction. Refreshments and door prizes. Preview at 2:30 p.m., auction at 3 p.m.

WHAT YOU WANT TO DO DECEMBER 1-10, 2016

ARTS

Holiday Happenings BRISTOL

WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW ABOUT

CHRISTMAS DECORATING CONTEST IN BRANDON. Thursday, Dec. 8, 5 p.m., Brandon. Judges will be on the streets starting at 5 p.m. so be sure to have your lights on! There will be four categories judged: residential traditional; residential whimsical (to include blow-ups); civic; commercial. Info: 247-6401 or info@ brandon.org. FARMERS MARKET ANNUAL HOLIDAY FAIR IN BRANDON. Sunday, Dec. 10, 9 a.m.-3 p.m., Neshobe School. Contact Wendy Cijka at 273-2655 or cijka4@gmail. com.

CREATIVE BLOC PAINT AND SIP IN MIDDLEBURY. Thursday, Dec. 1, 5-7 p.m., 51 Main. Join Creative Bloc for a fun-filled paint and sip. We will be painting a Christmas scene and all bottles of wine will be 51 percent off. Space is limited. $40. Call Rebecca Manley with questions: 802-758-2444 or 518-572-2666. OPENING RECEPTION IN BRANDON. Friday, Dec. 9, 3-7 p.m., Compass Music and Arts Center. An opening reception for the “Peace on Earth” exhibit, which arose from an open call to artists to express their ideas and ideals of “Peace on Earth.”

CRAFTS MAKERCLUB IN SHOREHAM. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 2:45 p.m., Platt Memorial Library. Is building with your hands one of your favorite things? At this special MakerClub you can create a holiday gift. Work with a friend or by yourself.

EAST MIDDLEBURY ANNUAL HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AND BAZAAR IN EAST MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-noon, Sarah Partridge Library, 431 East Main St. Free refreshments. MEMORY TREE LIGHTING IN EAST MIDDLEBURY. Sunday, Dec. 4, 4 p.m., East Middlebury. Come for a short memorial service, caroling, refreshments and fellowship. Submit $1 per name to: E.M.F.D.A. Sandy Hayes, PO Box 225, East Middlebury, VT 05740.

HANCOCK CHRISTMAS BAZAAR IN HANCOCK AND GRANVILLE. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Community Church of Hancock and Granville.

LEICESTER CRAFT FAIR IN LEICESTER. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Leicester Central School. Craft fair to benefit the sixth grade end of year class trip. Spaces are available for $15. Contact Heather LaPorte at 377-2363 for information.

LINCOLN HOLIDAY BAZAAR IN LINCOLN. Friday, Dec. 2, 10 a.m.-4 p.m. and Saturday, Dec. 3, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Lincoln Library. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

DANCE FALL DANCE CONCERT IN MIDDLEBURY. Friday, Dec. 2 and Saturday, Dec. 3, 8 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. Night of new dance works by student


Addison Independent

dance artists. Tickets $12 public; $10 college ID holders; $10 students. Info: www.middlebury. edu/arts or 802-443-3168. WORKS IN PROGRESS SHOWING IN MIDDLEBURY. Thursday, Dec. 8, 5 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. Dance Company of Middlebury presents: Works in Progress Showing. See excerpts from Border|Zones, a new work under development for performance in January. Free. Info: www.middlebury.edu/ arts or 802-443-3168.

FILM WARREN MILLER’S “HERE, THERE AND EVERYWHERE” IN MIDDLEBURY. Thursday, Dec. 1, 7:30 p.m. Town Hall Theater. The 67th annual Warren Miller ski film, “Here, There and Everywhere” celebrates everything related to snow sports. $18. Doors open at 6:30 p.m. “CHEVALIER” IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 3 p.m. and 8 p.m., Dana Auditorium. Six men on a fishing trip aboard a yacht in the Aegean Sea decide to play a game they call the Best at Everything. When the game is over, only one man receives the victory ring: the Chevalier. In Greek with English subtitles. Free. Info: www. middlebury.edu/arts or 802-443-3168. “SCREENAGERS” IN MIDDLEBURY. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 7:30 p.m., Dana Auditorium, Middlebury College. Middlebury College will be hosting the film, “Screenagers.” There will be several leaders from our health and wellness community attending the screening and a post-screening Q&A.

MUSIC NOONDAY CONCERT IN MIDDLEBURY. Thursday, Dec. 1, 12:15-12:45 p.m., St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 3 Main St. Organ recital by Adam Schneider, organist of First Baptist Church in Burlington. Event is free. Bring a lunch and enjoy as you listen to the music. COMMUNITY WIND ENSEMBLE CONCERT IN MIDDLEBURY. Friday, Dec. 2, 7 p.m., Robison Concert Hall, Middlebury College. The Middlebury College wind ensemble winter concert featuring the music of Gabrieli, Verdi, a tuba concerto with Dana Howe and the premier of two original arrangements by members Ken Weston and Jerry Shedd. Free. CD RELEASE PARTY IN BRISTOL. Saturday, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., Sally Burrell’s, 36 Pine St. DaddyLongLegs will have a CD release party. Refreshments provided BYOB. $10 admission. Limited seating. Call 453-4613 for reservations.

THE SOUND INVESTMENT JAZZ ENSEMBLE IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 8 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. Sound Investment Jazz Ensemble celebrates the wisdom that “it don’t mean a thing if it ain’t got that swing” with a program of the best of classic big band repertoire and contemporary jazz compositions. Free. Info: www.middlebury.edu/arts or 802-443-3168. SOPHIE SHAO AND FRIENDS IN MIDDLEBURY. Sunday, Dec. 4, 3 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts, Robison Hall. Cellist Sophie Shao returns for her ninth consecutive season with violinist Jennifer Frautschi, violist Dimitri Murrath and pianist Gloria Chien for an afternoon of chamber music. $25 public; $20 college ID holders; $6 students. Info: www. middlebury.edu/arts or 802-443-3168. SONGS ALIVE! in Middlebury. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 8 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. Students from Su Lian Tan’s first-year seminar, “Pavilions, Serpents, and High Cs” will perform newly composed original songs and arias from operas. Free. Info: www.middlebury.edu/arts or 802-443-3168. NOONDAY CONCERT IN MIDDLEBURY. Thursday, Dec. 8, 12:15-12:45 p.m., St. Stephen’s Episcopal Church, 3 Main St. The St. Stephen’s String Quartet, directed by Emily Sunderman, featuring Corelli’s Christmas Concerto and a Handel organ/strings concerto. Free. Bring a lunch and enjoy as you listen to the music. MUSIC IN MIDDLEBURY. Friday, Dec. 9, 8 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. Original compositions from Su Lian Tan’s Music I course are performed by the students in a semester-end celebration of their work. Free. Info: www.middlebury.edu/arts or 802-443-3168. O GREAT MYSTERY! A Concert of Christmas Motets and Carols with Amaryllis: Vermont’s Early Voice in Middlebury. Monday, Dec. 5, 7:30 p.m., Stephen’s Episcopal Church. The 15-member, a capella ensemble will perform the four-part Mass by William Byrd, motets in Latin and French, and a bevy of old English carols. Directed by Susanne Peck. Suggested donation $15. Info: lunalove@gmavt.net or 4533513. www.amaryllisvt.org. VOCAL RECITAL IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 10, 8 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury College. Students of affiliate artists Carol Christensen, Susanne Peck and Beth Thompson cap off a semester of vocal study with an evening of songs and arias. Accompanied by affiliate artist Cynthia Huard, piano. Sponsored by the Department of Music. Free. Info: www.middlebury.edu/arts or 802443-3168. SEE CALENDAR ON PAGE 17

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 9

Holiday Happenings

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 8

HOLIDAY BAZAAR IN LINCOLN. Saturday, Dec. 3, 10 a.m.-1 p.m., Lincoln Library. VICTORIAN CHRISTMAS PROGRAM IN LINCOLN. Wednesday, Dec. 7, 1 p.m., Lincoln Library. Lucinda Cockrell will talk about the traditions kept by people in Victorian times. Refreshments and door prizes.

MIDDLEBURY BE YOUR FAVORITE CHRISTMAS CHARACTER IN MIDDLEBURY. Dec. 1-31, downtown Middlebury. Free. GINGERBREAD HOUSE RECEPTION IN MIDDLEBURY. Friday, Dec. 2, 4-6 p.m., Vermont Folklife Center. Opening reception for the 18th annual gingerbread house exhibit and competition. The exhibit will be open Monday through Saturday until Dec. 23. Registration forms and info online at www.vermontfolklifecenter.org. HOLIDAY MARKET IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Mary Hogan Elementary School. Middlebury Farmers’ Market Holiday Market. HOT COCOA HUT IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9:30 a.m.-2 p.m., Thursday, Dec. 8, 5-8 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Cannon Park. 25 cents for a cup. SANTA’S ARRIVAL IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9:45 a.m., Middlebury. Welcome Santa as he arrives via fire truck, over the Cross Street Bridge and up Main Stree. Then, enjoy a visit with an elf at the Middlebury Community House from 10 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Horse drawn wagon rides from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. Free. HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Sheldon Museum. Enjoy the electric train layout, carols played on the Sheldon’s 1831 piano and a miniature Christmas tree raffle. Info: www. henrysheldonmuseum.org. ANNUAL HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE AND BAZAAR IN EAST MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-noon, Sarah Partridge Library, 431 East Main St. Refreshments, book and plant sale, free crafts for kids, and gifts to buy. HOLIDAY PANCAKE CHARACTER BREAKFAST IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 10, 8:30 and 10 a.m., Middlebury Inn. Info on Eventbrite. VISIT WITH SANTA IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 10, 10 a.m.-noon, Maple Landmark Woodcraft. Free.

NEW HAVEN CHRISTMAS MUSIC NIGHT IN NEW HAVEN. Friday, Dec. 2, 7 p.m., New Haven United Reformed Church, Route 7. 877-2486.

ORWELL CHRISTMAS BAZAAR IN ORWELL. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Orwell Town Hall. St. Paul’s annual Christmas bazaar will feature handmade gifts and crafts, Christmas SEE HOLIDAY HAPPENINGS ON PAGE 17


PAGE 10 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

Meet the chef

Tim Snyder from Middlebury Inn

T

im Snyder is a southern boy, and he’s got the hospitality to match. He grew up in Myrtle Beach where “everything’s about hospitality” he said in an interview last week.

BY ELSIE  LYNN PARINI

So he did what any 15-year-old boy looking for some summer cash would do — he got a job in a restaurant washing dishes.

Snyder’s name came up. “We’d been struggling to find a chef here,” said Jeff Conrad, the Middlebury Inn’s trusted General Manager of five years. Snyder got the call while cooking in Tampa, Fla. He said, yes and he and his girlfriend made the move to Vergennes. This December marks one full year that Snyder has been at the helm of the Inn’s kitchen.

“This was definitely not in the plans,” said Snyder, never guessing he would uproot himself and his “Then one day, someone in the girlfriend to move kitchen didn’t show someplace that up,” Snyder said. has snow! “The “And that’s how I summers are good, learned to cook.” but the winters....” yeah, well, let’s just Since then Snyder “THIS WAS say Snyder could hasn’t stopped live without them. cooking. He’s DEFINITELY NOT worked in kitchens IN THE PLANS...” It’s more than the all over the south cold weather that’s and has a solid — Tim Snyder different for Snyder. repertoire of “It’s rural here,” he southern staples said. “I come from including all kinds of the city where seafood, shrimp and you always have grits, pulled pork, 24-7 access to collard greens, dirty everything. It’s the rice... you get the little things that I take for granted... picture. He did go to a technical like when I wanted to buy grits, school to earn his culinary degree, apparently I need to plan ahead for but that’s almost incidental. those.” “Now I don’t know how to do For the record, polenta and grits anything else,” he said. “Cooking’s are not the same thing. become my career.” Prior to moving north, Snyder cooked at The Westin Poinsett in Greenville, S.C., which is owned by the same group that bought the Middlebury Inn back in November of 2006. The Dopp brothers (Mike and Steve — owners of the hotel group) knew Snyder from his prior work at The Westin Poinsett, so when they heard the Middlebury Inn needed a head chef,

But then, there are some nice things about living in Vermont too. “Like the first fall, wow,” said Snyder. “I never knew what all the fuss was about leaves changing color, but it was beautiful, I mean it was really nice.” “Up here we also get to use a lot more local ingredients,” Snyder CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE Tim Snyder is celebrating his first year as head chef at the Middlebury Inn.

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Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 11

CHEF

CHOCOLATE AVOCADO PUDDING

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 10

Recipe from Tim Snyder, head chef at Middlebury Inn

INGREDIENTS: 2 large avocados, peeled, pitted and cubed ½ cup unsweetened cocoa powder ½ cup brown sugar 1/3 cup coconut milk 2 tsp vanilla extract 1 pinch cinnamon

added. Like lamb and pork from Duclos & Thompson Farm in Weybridge or beef from Boyden Farm in Cambridge, or even the modest garden they had out back at the Inn with herbs, tomatoes and a few other basics. Next time your enjoying your meal at the Middlebury Inn, take a minute to pass your thanks back to Snyder in the kitchen. Here’s to many more years of Snyder’s cooking, and maybe a southern-comfort menu to warm us up this winter.

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PAGE 12 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

WINTERBERRIES

New England's very own holly

T

In mid-winter, the red fruit of winterberries stand out against the snow.

he holly of my childhood was the ‘Christmas card holly’, with fat red berries and shiny spiny leaves that stayed green all winter long. I can still recall a row of enormous holly bushes along the back fence of my parent’s garden. Each year we cut branches for Christmas decorations, carefully placing a holly sprig above every picture in the house.

BY JUDITH IRVEN

Presumably these huge bushes were the English Holly, Ilex aquifolium. To me they exuded a dark and gloomy look, and I really disliked the prickly dead leaves that collected beneath them. In the 1950s New York plant hybridist, Kathleen Meserve worked on crossing holly types from around the world. Her breeding program resulted in a magnificent line of smaller evergreen hollies, called Ilex x meserveae in her honor, among them the popular Blue Holly and China Girl Holly. Unfortunately these evergreen hollies are not good candidates for our Vermont gardens.

PHOTOS / DICK CONRAD

Unless if you live in the warmest part of the state (with a Hardiness Zone 5 rating) they are unlikely to survive our cold winters And even then you must be sure to plant them in a sheltered spot to avoid the leaves being damaged by “winter burn.”

WILD WINTERBERRIES

However, the holly family (all the plants starting with the Latin name Ilex) is huge — with over 400 species of trees and shrubs that inhabit woodlands all over the world. Just one of these, the Winterberry Holly (Ilex verticillata), is native to New England and, needless to say, it comes though our winters beautifully.

Winterberries — also known as Black Alder — grow wild in damp spots throughout New England. Most of the year they are nothing more than a tangled jumble of nondescript bushes. But come November and December their myriad red berries positively shine in the low sun.

New England’s Winterberry Holly is different.

There is a huge winterberry colony in the Cornwall Swamp, a boggy area near Route 30 along the town border with Whiting. When driving along Route 30 at this time of year I always slow down to admire their beautiful fruit.

Winterberries, as their name suggests, have bright red berries that grace the plants in wintertime. But, unlike the familiar “Christmas card holly,” winterberries are deciduous. This means, as a defense against our normally colder winters, they lose their leaves in winter, all the better to show off their abundant berries against the snow.

These berries are a rich source of food for the birds in the coldest part of the year when they need it most, and for us humans they create a wonderful symbol of the season.

TAMING THE JUMBLE Winterberries also make great garden plants. In early September, while the leaves are still on the bushes, their fruit starts to fatten up and turn red― — a pretty backdrop for late flowering CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE


Addison Independent

GARDEN CONTINUED FROM PAGE 12

perennials such as Black-eyed Susans.

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 13

bushes, spaced eight feet apart. Each has grown into an elegant vase-shaped shrub, about eight feet across and eight feet high.

Soon the leaves drop to the ground, leaving rows of fat red berries affixed to the leafless branches. It is always fun to cut a few stems and make a table centerpiece for the holidays. And, when set off against a fresh fall of snow, winterberries look absolutely stunning in the winter garden.

Then, in the angle between the two sides, I added one compatible male plant, “Southern Gentleman” which, like “Winter Red,” flowers in June.

We probably would not want to grow the messylooking wild version of winterberries around our homes. But plant breeders have also worked to develop a wide range of elegant winterberry varieties for the garden.

THE CONTROLLING GARDENER

I like the way these shrubs look when they are planted in groups of three or even five, as it seems to make their fruit look more dramatic. And while winterberries are slow growing, most cultivars eventually grow quite large. So check the information supplied by the nursery and space your plants accordingly. It is also very important to remember that (as with almost all species of Ilex) winterberries are dioecious, meaning that the male and female flowers are borne on different plants, with the wind carrying the pollen from the male to the female plants. So, for your female bushes to set fruit, you must plant a compatible male variety, one that flowers at the same time, in a nearby spot.

A WINTERBERRY HEDGE I wanted to create an informal hedge around the corner of our driveway where we park our cars. So about 15 years ago I planted three Ilex verticillata “Winter Red” plants along both sides of the L-shaped bed. This gave me a total of six female

For a small garden the cultivar “Red Sprite” — growing just three feet high and wide — is an excellent choice. A group of five shrubs would look nice, with the compatible male “Jim Dandy” in the center.

Nothing beats the picture the winterberries, with their bare branches covered with brilliant red fruit, set off against a fresh January snow. So I really want to be sure my bushes still have their berries by that time. I think of myself as a “wildlife friendly” gardener. But I also resent wild creatures helping themselves to all the fruits of my labors, most especially to the berries on my carefully tended bushes closest to the house. Unfortunately each November large flocks of robins gather around, eager to fill their bellies in preparation for their coming migration, and they especially seem to enjoy the winterberry fruit. The robins are more than welcome to partake of winterberries growing near our pond, but I draw the line at those around the house. However, scaring off a crowd of determined thieving robins can be a quite challenge, and over the years I tried many approaches, with little success. I started out by tying paper plates, with round “eyes” painted in the middle, to the bushes. Then I floated four “Evil Eye” balloons above the bushes.

Winterberries and Black Eyed Susans make a nice duo in September.

Winterberry fruit starts to ripen in September before the leaves drop.

After “the eyes” failed, I set a fake owl on a post in the middle of the bushes — still to no avail. After that, I turned to making big noises. Certainly banging a yogurt container against a garbage can lid sent the robins flying, but I still had to run outside every time they returned. Finally my husband, Dick, purchased a pair of children’s air horns. Now all I have to do is to crack open the front door (or the back door) and TOOT MY HORN! The robins go flying and I get to feel like the ultimate control freak!

Judith Irven and Dick Conrad live in Goshen where together they nurture a large garden. Judith is a Vermont Certified Horticulturist and teaches Sustainable Home Landscaping for the Vermont Master Gardener program. You can subscribe to her blog about her Vermont gardening life at www. northcountryreflections.com. Dick is a landscape and garden photographer; you can see more of his photographs at www.northcountryimpressions.


PAGE 14 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

FIRE & ICE R E S T A U R A N T

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Shao and friends play

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ellist Sophie Shao will return for her ninth consecutive Middlebury College Performing Arts Series appearance on Sunday, Dec. 4 at the Mahaney Center for the Arts. Shao is always an audience favorite, performing chamber music alongside a group of virtuosic friends each year. Although Shao has been the constant, the rest of the ensemble has changed every year, reflecting Shao’s seemingly inexhaustible supply of supremely talented colleagues. This year’s performance will include violinist Jennifer Frautschi, violist DEC. Dimitri Murrath and pianist Gloria Chien.

Mahaney Center for the Arts, Middlebury

The concert program will include Beethoven’s C Minor string trio, Schumann’s Piano Trio no. 2, and Dvořák’s second piano quartet. The performance begins at 3 p.m. Tickets are $25 for the public; $20 for Middlebury College ID holders and $6 for Middlebury College students. For more information, or to purchase tickets, call (802) 443-MIDD (6433) or visit www.middlebury.edu/arts.

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JENNIFER FRAUTSCHI Jennifer performs on a 1722 Antonio Stradivarius violin known as the “ex-Cadiz.”

DIMITRI MURRATH Dimitri was named laureate of the Juventus Festival in 2012 — it’s an award recognizing young European soloists.


Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 15

Jory Nash plays Ripton Coffee House

T

he Ripton Community Coffee House, a nonprofit community concert series, welcomes award-winning singer-songwriter and storyteller Jory Nash on Saturday, Dec. 3, at 7:30 p.m.

Toronto-based Nash blends elements of folk, jazz, blues, pop and soul into an original mix of sound. He has recorded eight critically acclaimed albums, the most recent being his 2015 release of “The Many Hats of Jory Nash.” In 2013 his album “Little Pilgrim” was nominated for a Canadian SATURDAY DEC. Folk Music Award (CFMA) for Best Producer. His 2009 album “New Blue Day” was named Ripton Community Coffee House Penguin Eggs Magazine Critic’s Choice Album of the Year. Nash also received a CFMA nomination for “New Blue Day.”

3

A multi-instrumentalist, Nash plays acoustic guitar, piano and banjo and his warm, unique voice urges you to listen to his thoughtful lyrics and intricate melodies. Flip on the radio and you might very well be listening to Nash, he’s a regular on numerous CBC radio programs, SiriusXM, BBC, Galaxie, and college/NPR stations. Nash’s songs have been used in the feature length movie Moon Point

and the upcoming documentary 30 Ghosts. Multiple Nash songs have been covered by Juno-nominated jazz singer Lori Cullen. As always, the Ripton concert begins at 7:30 p.m. with an open mic set, followed by the featured performers. Open mic performers are encouraged to call in advance and reserve one of the four open-mike slots. Admission to the coffeehouse is $3 kids (12 and under), $10 general admission, and $15 generous admission. The economically challenged may pay what they can afford. Refreshments will benefit the coffeehouse. The coffeehouse is held on the first Saturday of each month, except August. For more information, contact Richard Ruane or Andrea Chesman at 388-9782.

BRANDON JAZZED-UP WITH JOHN LAROUCHE TRIO Inspired by traditional jazz, the John LaRouche Trio has added their own unique voice to familiar tunes and their own compositions. Drawing from a wide range of jazz styles, they play jazz tinged with Latin, swing and tango beats. The trio’s large repertoire includes jazz tunes from the ‘40s through the ‘60s written by Duke Ellington, Miles Davis, Charlie Parker, Johnny Mercer and others. Special guest Cooie DeFrancesco will lend vocals to the concert at Brandon Music on Saturday, Dec. 3.

The trio features John LaRouche on the chromatic harp, Levent Unal on guitar and Ellen Powell on bass. LaRouche has been playing harmonica for over 40 years. He studied jazz at Pasadena City College with noted cornet player Bobby Bradford. LaRouche also studied with the late Cham-Ber Huang, who was a world renowned classical harmonica virtuoso. His influences include Toots Thielemans, Larry Adler and Stevie

Wonder. LaRouche has taught music at college level and continues to give private lessons. His performances of note are with the famous pianist John Coates Jr. and cornetist Bobby Bradford. The concert begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets are $20. A pre-concert dinner is available for an extra $25. Reservations are recommended for the show and required for dinner. BYOB. Contact (802) 247-4295, info@brandon-music.net or visit www.brandonmusic.net for more info.

live music Michelle Fay Band. Friday, Dec. 2, 8-10 p.m., 51 Main, Middlebury. Jory Nash. Saturday, Dec. 3, 7 p.m., Ripton Community Coffee House. John LaRouche. Saturday, Dec. 3, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. The Doughboys. Saturday, Dec. 3, 8-11 p.m., 51 Main, Middlebury. Mimi Bain and Friends. Thursday, Dec. 8, 7-9 p.m., 51 Main, Middlebury. St. Petersburg Men’s Ensemble. Thursday, Dec. 8, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. Conquer Root. Friday, Dec. 9, 8-10 p.m., 51 Main, Middlebury. PossumHaw. Saturday, Dec. 10, 7:30 p.m., Burnham Hall, 52 River Road, Lincoln.

jingle jokes WHAT DO YOU CALL AN ELF WHO SINGS?

Sarah Blacker with Aaron Katz. Saturday, Dec. 10, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. Aaron Audet Band. Saturday, Dec. 10, 8-10 p.m., 51 Main, Middlebury. ANSWER: A WRAPPER!


PAGE 16 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

the movie MOONLIGHT — RUNNING TIME: 1:51 — RATING: R Barry Jenkins made an unusual decision when he decided to write and direct a movie about three stages of one man’s life. Instead of a chronology, he has shown us how and why a young boy became who he is. The beauty of his film lies in the fact that every one of the actors understood the director’s unusual way of showing us what influenced his character. Though it is never explained explicitly, by the end, we understand. During the first third of the film we follow 10-year-old Chiron (Alex Hibbert) as he moves silently through school where he is bullied and nicknamed “Little.” At home his single mother pushes him out of the house while she entertains men as the boy sneaks off to various empty rundown places where he hides from trouble. Ashton Sanders in Moonlight (2016).

He meets Juan (Mahershala Ali), a drug dealer with a heart, who takes the boy into his car and introduces him to his girlfriend Teresa (a very fine Janelle Monae). Throughout this first phase, Juan and Teresa are the only human beings who extend a hand to the boy who has nowhere to go or to live, has little to eat, eat and says almost nothing. For him, the mechanics of connecting have been crushed. Credit young Alex Hibbert whose deep, searching eyes create so much emotion for the audience. There are times during that first phase when we wonder about the long silences followed by little action. Where is this going? That’s when we begin to realize a tone is developing that gives us a deep look at the emptiness of the life of this silent young boy. Will he ever be able to transcend that void to discover who he is? All of this unfolds to a deeply affecting and original score.

As he moves to section three, Chiron (Trevante Rhodes) is still dealing with both his sexual identity and innocence as he looks up Kevin (Jharrel Jerome) the only boy who had befriended him in school long ago. At 26, Chiron still says no more than a few words at a time. So little dialogue, so much feeling delivered on long walks, long rides, and much of it comes through a few nods or a glance. We remember what Juan told Chiron when he protected him at 10: “At some point you gotta decide who you gonna be.” From that age to 26, this young boy moves through life with little human connection and no support. There is no way to remain unaffected by the film Barry Jenkins has made. With a superb grasp of the director’s intentions, the actors and the composer of the score have created raw aloneness. Their gift to the audience is a beautiful tone poem.

In the second section, 16-year-old Chiron (Ashton Sanders) is beaten and taunted by classmates and worries about his sexuality. He is living the life of a mere survivor but summons the will to even some scores.

—― Reviewed by Joan Ellis

the book THANK YOU FOR BEING LATE — BY THOMAS L. FRIEDMAN (Farrar, Straus and Giroux)

Thomas Friedman enjoys, at his own admission, taking a complex subject and trying to break it down so that he can understand it and then help readers better understand it. In this book he argues “that we are living through one of the greatest inflection points in history... The three largest forces on the planet — technology, globalization and climate change — are all accelerating at once.” And, he goes on to explain, it’s no surprise that humans are having a hard time keeping up with the pace of these changes. He goes on to suggest that if we look for the gains to be made by these accelerations, rather than focusing on the losses incurred, we will be much more equipped to adapt. In Friedman’s view, there is a positive message and a path forward, and he lays it out for you. A three-time recipient of the Pulitzer Prize for his work with The New York Times, Friedman is the author of six bestselling books, including The World is Flat. — Reviewed by Jenny Lyons of the Vermont Book Shop in Middlebury.

UNDER-APPRECIATED HOLIDAY BOOKS The Fir Tree, by Sanna Annukka The Latke Who Couldn’t Stop Screaming, by Lemony Snicket Hogfather, by Terry Pratchett The Jolly Christmas Postman, by Janet & Allan Ahlberg The Box of Delights, by John Masefield Twelve Kinds of Ice, by Ellen Bryan Obed Christmas at Eagle Pond, by Donald Hall Hershel and the Hanukkah Goblins, by Eric Kimmel


Addison Independent

Holiday Happenings

CALENDAR CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

decorations, raffle, silent auction, flea market, bake sale, lunch and refreshments. Benefits St. Paul’s Church. 9482049.

SALISBURY HOLIDAY TREE LIGHTING IN SALISBURY. Saturday, Dec. 10, 5 p.m., Salisbury Veterans Memorial Park. Annual holiday tree lighting and celebration with a bonfire, hay rides, a visit from Santa, sing-a-long, hot cocoa and more!

SHOREHAM HOLIDAY STORY TIME WITH BOB CLAUS IN SHOREHAM. Sunday, Dec. 10, 3 p.m., Platt Memorial Library. Story time with Bob Claus, crafts, cookies and cocoa. A HOLIDAY READER’S THEATER EVENT IN SHOREHAM. Sunday, Dec. 10, 4 p.m., Platt Memorial Library.

STARKSBORO ARTISAN FAIR IN STARKSBORO. Saturday, Dec. 10, 10 a.m.2 p.m., Starksboro Public Library.

VERGENNES HOLIDAY AT THE BIXBY IN VERGENNES. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Bixby Memorial Library. Gift basket auction from 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Santa reads at 10:30 a.m., Jon Gailmor performs at 11 a.m., refreshments served from 11:30 a.m.-1 p.m., and Commodore singers perform at 1 p.m. HOLIDAY CRAFT FAIR IN VERGENNES. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Vergennes Union Elementary School. 16th annual winter holiday fair to benefit the after school fusion program. Bring a non-perishable donation. GINGERBREAD HOUSE JUDGING IN VERGENNES. Saturday, Dec. 3, 9 a.m.-4 p.m., downtown Vergennes. Third annual gingerbread house judging. Enter your own gingerbread house by Nov. 28. SANTA’S VILLAGE IN VERGENNES. Saturday, Dec. 3, noon3 p.m., Vergennes Opera House. Take your pic with Santa. Decorate gingerbread and do crafts. Listen to Mrs. Claus read stories and write your letter to Santa with the help of a Vergennes Police Officer. CELEBRATE IN THE PARK IN VERGENNES. Saturday, Dec. 3, 3-5:30 p.m., Vergennes. Live music and caroling. S’mores, campfires, baby animals, pictures with Santa and Mr. Candy Cane. SD Ireland’s lighted cement truck arrives at 4:45 p.m. TREE LIGHTING IN VERGENNES. Saturday, Dec. 3, 5:30 p.m., downtown Vergennes. Annual tree lighting with Mayor Benton of Vergennes. BREAKFAST WITH SANTA IN VERGENNES. Saturday, Dec. 3, 8-10:30 a.m., Vergennes Union High School cafeteria. $5 kids; $7 adults. All proceeds benefit VUHS music. CHRISTMAS COOKIE AND CRAFT SALE IN VERGENNES. Saturday, Dec. 10, 10 a.m.-2 p.m., Champlain Valley Christian Reformed Church. 877-9986.

CONTINUED FROM PAGE 9

SHOP I SPY CONTEST IN MIDDLEBURY. Dec 1-31, downtown Middlebury. Try to find the hidden ornaments designed by artist Ashley Wolff in ten store windows in downtown Middlebury and be entered to win $100 in Middlebury Money. Rules and contest details will be displayed in the window of the Vermont Bookshop starting Dec. 1. Free. POTTERY SALE IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., 2377 Route 7 South. Middlebury Studio School will hold a pottery sale with pottery by Kathy Clarke, Ken Martin, Stacey Stanhope, Su Shannon, local potters, studio assistants and students. This a fundraiser to benefit the school. FRIENDS OF THE LIBRARY SALE IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 11 a.m.-2:30 p.m., Ilsley Public Library. Friends of the library offer holiday shopping bargains. Be sure to visit the specially priced books room and the children’s book room. All profits will be used to support library programming.

THEATER “THE NUTCRACKER’S ADVENTURE” IN MIDDLEBURY. Friday, Dec. 2, 7 p.m., Saturday, Dec. 3, 2 p.m., and Sunday, Dec. 4, 2 p.m., Town Hall Theater. “The Nutcracker’s Adventure,” featuring Tchaikovsky’s music, will be presented by Middlebury Community Players. Tickets $6. Info: www. townhalltheater.org. CHARLES DICKENS “A CHRISTMAS CAROL” IN

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 17

MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 11 a.m. and 4 p.m., Town Hall Theater. Town Hall Theater’s Education Program presents the Charles Dickens classic, “A Christmas Carol.” Donations accepted. BORDERLESS: A NIGHT OF INTERNATIONAL CULTURES IN MIDDLEBURY. Saturday, Dec. 3, 5:30 p.m. and 8 p.m., Middlebury College. With more than 100 students from Middlebury College, ISO (International Student Organization) presents a night of international cultures on stage. Tickets $6 Info: go.middlebury.edu/boxoffice or call 443-6433. ADDISON REPERTORY THEATER PERFORMANCE IN MIDDLEBURY. Thursday, Dec. 8, Friday, Dec. 9 and Saturday, Dec. 10, 7 p.m., Black Box Theater, Hannaford Career Center, Charles Avenue.

Addison Repertory Theater presents “Never Before Seen Ten Minute One Acts.” Tickets $7 students; $10 adults. Info: 382-1036. “IT’S A WONDERFUL LIFE:” A LIVE RADIO PLAY IN MIDDLEBURY. Friday, Dec. 9, 7:30-9:30 p.m., and Saturday, Dec. 10, 2 p.m. and 7:30 p.m., Town Hall Theater. The beloved American holiday classic, “It’s a Wonderful Life,” comes to life as a 1940s radio broadcast. $22/$10 students. BROADWAY DIRECT IN VERGENNES. Friday, Dec. 9, 7:30 p.m., Vergennes Opera House. Local talent and Broadway veteran Bill Carmichael is joined on stage by his Broadway professional friends and some local youth as they present an evening of familiar show and holiday tunes. www. vergennesoperahouse.org.


PAGE 18 — Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016

realestate

did you know ? CALL 802-388-4944

ADVERTISE ON THIS PAGE.

BATHROOM LIGHTS AREN'T ALWAYS YOUR FRIENDS. AVOID PLACING A CEILING FIXTURE OR RECESSED LIGHT DIRECTLY ABOVE YOUR BATHROOM MIRROR — IT’LL MAKE YOU LOOK LIKE AN EXTRA IN A ZOMBIE FLICK. SCONCES FLANKING THE MIRROR WILL BATHE YOUR FACE IN LIGHT EVENLY. CENTER THE SCONCES AT EYE LEVEL ROUGHLY 60 INCHES ABOVE THE FLOOR, AND SPREAD THEM 36 TO 40 INCHES APART.

70 Court Street, Middlebury, VT

802-989-7522

champlainvalleyproperty.com

MIDDLEBURY

$195,000

This lovely condo is in a very nice Middlebury Location. There is hardwood flooring, stainless steel appliances, spacious light filled spaces, and a full basement for storage. One car garage and a very nice deck complete the space.

For more information visit www.houselogic.com

FERRISBURGH

$399,000

A classic 1832 stone home on a beautiful 10-acre lot. Beautiful Adirondack views from the back of the house, and Green Mtn. views from the front. Large barn and lots of storage. A fabulous historic home in a great location.

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

Bonnie Gridley 802-349-8646 • bgridleyvt@gmail.com Kristine Kimball 802-349-7505 • kkimballvt@gmail.com

ORWELL LAND

$45,000

Beautiful 16 acre sloping lot has views to the west with road frontage and easy access to Route 22A. Initial soils evaluations have found sites suitable for on-site septic. A great opportunity to own land near the historic village of Orwell.

NEW LISTING!

28 VINCENT DRIVE, BRISTOL

Contemporary 4BR cape with open floor plan. Country neighborhood convenient to downtown!

www.midvthomes.com

$219,500

101 Court St., Middlebury, VT

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 as amended which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or persons receiving public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-424-8590. For the Washington, DC area please call HUD at 426-3500.


Addison Independent

| ARTS+LEISURE | Thursday, December 1, 2016 — PAGE 19


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