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MONDAY   EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 25 No. 6

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Middlebury, Vermont

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Monday, April 1, 2013

Timetable  set  for  new   Middlebury  bridges By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY  —  Engineers  are   plowing   head-­on   into   planning   for   the   replacement   of   the   Merchants   Row  and  Main  Street  railroad  over-­ passes,  a  project  they  said  would  be   accomplished   with   unprecedented   rapidity   and   with   what   they   hope   will   be   minimal   disruption   to   local  

businesses. That  was   the   basic   message   de-­ livered   on   March   28   by   Vanasse   Hangen   Brustlin   Inc.   (VHB)   rep-­ resentatives   to   around   80   citizens,   PHUFKDQWV DQG PXQLFLSDO RIÂżFLDOV who   assembled   at   the   Town   Hall   Theater  for  a  “local  concernsâ€?  meet-­ (See  Middlebury,  Page  21)

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Welch  looks  for  stability  in   student  loan  interest  rates By  LEE  J.  KAHRS Brandon  Reporter RUTLAND   —   Just   listening   to   these  working  parents  pursuing  col-­ lege  degrees  is  exhausting.   Ava   Pehm,   42,   of   Pittsford   is   a   single  mother  to  two  kids,  ages  10   and  13.  She  is  pursuing  a  degree  in   administrative   management   from  

the  Community  College  of  Vermont   in  Rutland  and  works  part-­time.   Greg  Lambert,  36,  of  Rutland  is   a   single   father   to   a   seven-­year-­old   boy  and  is  a  recent  cancer  survivor   pursuing  a  degree  in  environmental   science  at  CCV.   Niki   Twohig   of   Rutland   has   (See  Welch,  Page  7)

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Getting  a  head  start BETH  WIMETT  WORKS  in  the  Woods  Market  Garden  greenhouse  in  Brandon  recently.  Frigid  air  swirled  outside  the  greenhouse,  but  inside   it  was  hot  and  humid. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

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Mt. Abe celebrates French culture, cuisine

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By  XIAN  CHIANG-­WAREN BRISTOL   —   The   location   may   have   been   rural   Vermont,   but   the   ambiance  was  entirely  French  at  the   Mount  Abraham  Union  High  School   cafeteria  last  Thursday.  French  music   piped  in  through  the  speakers,  crisp,   white  tablecloths  dressed  up  the  caf-­ eteria,  and  students  gathered  to  con-­ verse  in  French  over  a  gourmet  meal  

prepared  by   chef   Bill   Snell   of   New   Haven’s  Tourterelle  restaurant. “It’s   what   we   want   meals   to   be   like  —  this  idea  of  community,�  said   Kathy  Alexander,  director  of  the  Ad-­ dison   Northeast   Supervisory   Union   Food  Service  Cooperative,  surveying   the  scene  with  a  smile. The   high   school’s   second   annual   French  Day  was  a  collaborative  effort  

between  Mount  Abe  French  students,   Tourterelle  owners  Bill  and  Christine   Snell,   and   the   staff   of   the   ANeSU   food  co-­operative.   In   recent   years,   the   ANeSU   co-­ op   has   made   great   strides   in   using   school   kitchens   —   not   to   mention   the  county’s  agricultural  heritage  —   to   enhance   the   learning   experiences   of   students   in   the   Five   Town   Area.  

Along  with  in-­school  community  ser-­ vice  programs,  the  co-­op  has  planned   themed  lunch  days  as  special  events   that   also   integrate   classroom   learn-­ ing.   They   recently   hosted   a   Turkish   Lunch,  and  the  high  school  has  Greek   Day  and  Latin  American  Day  coming   up.   Most   theme   days   highlight   food   from   cultures   around   the   world,   but   (See  Mt.  Abe,  Page  2)


PAGE  2  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Mt.  Abe (Continued  from  Page  1) students  prepared  themselves  earlier   they  aren’t  limited    to  geography  —   in  the  week.  “(Students)  came  in  as   last  year  on  March  14  (which  can  be   we   were   cooking   in   the   morning,   abbreviated   “3.14â€?),   the   co-­op   also   and  they  were  excited  to  eat  lunch.â€? sponsored  a  Pi  Day  (think  of  the  nu-­ “To   see   (students)   trying   differ-­ merical  concept  of  “piâ€?),  where  every   ent   food   is   also   nice   to   see,â€?   Snell   item  on  the  menu  came  in  pie  form.   laughed.  “I  don’t  think  I  would  have   Dishes  included  pizza  and  quiche  as   eaten  celery  puree  at  that  age.â€? well  as  dessert  pies. Tourterelle  pastry  chef  Adam  Fe-­ “We   are   really   committed   to   be-­ derman   was   also   on   hand,   busily   ing  part  of  students’  education,â€?  said   serving  up  trays  of  apple  clafouti,  a   Alexander.  “We  tell  all  our  teachers,   traditional   French   dessert   of   apples   especially  here  at  the  high  school,  if   over  vanilla  custard. you   want   to   inject   food   and   culture   “I   wanted   to   do   something   the   into  your  studies  to  make  it  more  in-­ students   could   learn   how   to   make   teresting   or   fun,   we’re   themselves,â€?   Federman   here  for  you.â€? explained.   “It   is   one   “To see Mount   Abe   French   of   the   simplest   French   teacher   Jori   Jacobeit   (students) desserts   out   there.   Ju-­ took   them   up   on   it.   trying different lia  Child  describes  it  as   This  year’s  French  Day   food is also pancake   batter   poured   marked   a   special   occa-­ nice. I don’t over   fruit.   Traditional,   VLRQ²IRUWKHÂżUVWWLPH think I would simple,  and  it’s  good.â€? a   collaboration   was   The   meal   was   pre-­ have eaten made   with   community   pared  with  the  best  avail-­ members   outside   of   the   celery puree at able  ingredients  that  the   that age.â€? school  system.   ANeSU   cooperative   — Chef Bill Snell had,  with  input  from  the   “I  just  thought,  this  is   such   a   wonderful   op-­ students   and   the   Tourt-­ portunity   to   partner   with   our   col-­ erelle  staff.  Planning  a  school  lunch   leagues   in   the   community,â€?   said   menu  can  be  an  educational  experi-­ Alexander,  who  added  that  in  plan-­ ence   in   itself,  Alexander   explained,   ning   French   Day,   she   immediately   since  she  and  her  staff  have  to  meet   thought  of  Bill  and  Christine  Snell,   USDA  nutritional  standards  for  each   whose  restaurant  is  among  the  most   meal  served  in  the  cafeteria.   popular   and   well-­reviewed   destina-­ The   French   Day   menu   was   de-­ tions  for  French  cuisine  in  the  state   VLJQHG WR UHĂ€HFW WUDGLWLRQDO )UHQFK and   whose   two   youngest   children   cuisine  while  using  fresh,  local  Ver-­ currently   attend   Beeman   Elemen-­ mont   ingredients,   a   principle   that   tary  School. Tourterelle   uses   to   an   even   higher   “Everyone’s   excited,â€?   said   Bill   degree   when   preparing   dishes   for   Sn“Everyone’s   excited,â€?   said   Bill   its   customers.   Tourterelle’s   menu   Snell   on   Thursday,   taking   a   break   changes   seasonally,   and   the   Snells   from   preparing   the   meal   of   pork   rely   on   local   meats,   vegetables   and   with   cider   and   prunes   (“sautĂŠ   de   cheese  in  the  restaurant. porc  au  cidre  et  aux  prunesâ€?);Íž  pureed   Students  also  helped  in  food  prepa-­ parsnips   with   celery   (“purĂŠe  de   pa-­ ration  itself.  On  Monday,  French  stu-­ nais  et  de  celeryâ€?);Íž  rice  pilaf  (“riz  pi-­ dents   went   to   the   cafeteria   and   pre-­ lafâ€?);Íž  and  sautĂŠed  green  beans  with   pared  ratatouille,  a  traditional  French   almonds  (“haricots  verts  aux  aman-­ vegetable  dish.  They  chopped  toma-­ desâ€?).  Snell  also  assisted  with  the  ra-­ toes   and   eggplant   with   chef   knives,   tatouille  dish  that  Mount  Abe  French   sautĂŠed   the   vegetables,   layered   the  

MOUNT  ABRAHAM  UNION  High  School  student  Vanessa  Malloy  sits  at  the  “table  francophone�  with  fellow   students  and  French  teacher  Jori  Jacobeit  during  a  French-­themed  lunch  in  the  school  cafeteria  last  Thurs-­ day.  Only  French  was  spoken  at  the  table.

YHJHWDEOHV WR HQKDQFH WKH Ă€DYRU DW %LOO 6QHOOÂśV GLUHFWLRQ DQG OHW LW ³ÀD-­ vor  upâ€?  for  a  few  days  before  serving   on  Thursday. Tenth-­graders   Katie   Meyer   and   Susannah  Frey  staffed  the  lunch  line   along   with   Christine   Snell,   herself   a   native  of  France. “We  did  a  lot  of  stuff  in  class  over   the  last  couple  of  weeks,â€?  Meyer  said.   She  and  Frey  had  helped  make  a  bul-­ letin  board  for  the  hallway,  decorated   the  cafeteria,  and  found  French  music   to  play  during  the  event.   “I  think  it’s  good  to  get  people  in-­ terested   in   French,   too,â€?   Meyer   said   of  the  event.  “It’s  not  like  you’re  just   sitting  in  a  classroom  reading  a  text-­ book,  you’re  really  involved  in  learn-­ ing  the  language  and  the  culture.â€? ANeSU   co-­op   educator   Kristen   Andrews  emphasized  that  the  cafete-­ ria   can   really   be   an   ideal   classroom  

for  students.   “It’s   an   amazing   resource   that’s   usually   untapped   in   high   schools,   a   place  for  them  to  do  hands-­on  work   and  to  apply  what  it  is  they’re  learn-­ ing.  It’s  here,  so  why  not  use  it?�  An-­ drews  said. “It  helps  them  to  be  more  intimate   with   the   operation   of   food,   it   helps   them   think   about   planning   healthy   meals,  it’s  really  linked  to  health  and   well-­being.   The   more   that   students  

are  involved  in  preparing  their  foods,   seeing  where  their  food  comes  from,   seeing  that  we  have  local  farms  that   are  dropping  off  their  food  here,  that   their   beef   is   from   a   local   farm   —   it   can  have  lifelong  consequences.� In  the  short  term  though,  the  Mount   Abraham   community   seemed   to   be   thoroughly   enjoying   French   Day’s   success. “Can   I   have   thirds?�   one   student   asked.

TOURTERELLE  CHEF  AND  co-­owner  Bill  Snell  works  on  a  green  bean   MOUNT  ABRAHAM  UNION  Middle  School  eighth-­grader  Peter  Gebo,  who  would  like  to  own  a  restaurant   dish   for   service   during   Mount   Abraham   Union   High   School’s   French   some  day,  talks  with  Food  Service  Cooperative  Director  Kathy  Alexander  and  Tourterelle  pastry  chef  Adam   Day  celebration  last  Thursday. Federman  in  the  Mount  Abraham  Union  High  School  kitchen  last  Thursday.   Independent  photos/Trent  Campbell


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  —  PAGE  3

Council  to  add  member  on  April  9;͞  candidates  emerge By  ANDY  KIRKALDY VERGENNES   —   Vergennes   city   council  members  at  their  meeting  last   week   said   they   will   almost   certainly   ¿OOWKHYDFDQF\RQWKHFRXQFLODWWKHLU April   9   meeting,   and   two   candidates   have  emerged  for  the  vacancy  created   when   Alderman   Bill   Benton   won   a   race  for  mayor  on  March  5.   Former   alderman   Peter   Garon   had   already   expressed   an   interest   before   Tuesday’s   meeting.   On   Wednesday,   Vergennes   real   estate   broker   Lynn   -DFNVRQ'RQQHOO\FRQ¿UPHGWKDWVKH too,   would   like   to   be   appointed   to   VHUYHWKH¿QDO\HDURI%HQWRQœVWHUP which   will   expire   in   March   2014.   Both  attended  last  week’s  meeting.   %HQWRQ UXQQLQJ KLV ¿UVW PHHWLQJ since  his  election,  asked  all  other  in-­ terested   candidates   to   submit   a   letter   to  City  Clerk  Joan  Devine  with  their   background   and   reasons   for   wanting   to  serve.   City   Manager   Mel   Hawley   said   those   letters   should   be   received   by   this  Thursday  to  allow  him  to  include   the   letters   in   the   packet   he   will   send   to  aldermen  in  advance  of  their  April   9  meeting. Garon  served  a  two-­year  term  that   expired  in  March,  but  lost  a  four-­way   race  for  three  seats  on  March  5.  He  is   a  10-­year  city  resident  who  has  retired   from   a   long   career   working   for   the   state   as   a   human   resources   adminis-­ trator;͞  he  now  works  for  the  Vermont   State   Employees   Union   as   a   labor  

educator.  He  has  served  on  boards  and   rescue  squads  in  other  towns  and  as  a   Vergennes  Area  Rescue  Squad  presi-­ dent.     Jackson  Donnelly  is  a  lifelong  resi-­ dent  of  the  Vergennes  area  who  is  the   principal   broker   of   Century   21   Jack   Associates.   She   recently   returned   to   Vergennes   after   living   in   Panton,   where  she  served  on  the  town  select-­ board,   including   as   its   chairwoman.   She  also  has  an  extensive  community   service  rĂŠsumĂŠ.   The   exact   process   for   the   council   to   choose   their   new   colleague   from   among  those  two  and  any  other  candi-­ dates  remains  up  in  the  air.   Hawley  said  the  Vergennes  charter   calls   for   a   vacancy   to   be   “forthwith   ÂżOOHG E\ WKH DSSRLQWLQJ DXWKRULW\´ D statement  that  he  said  means  aldermen   must  act  promptly.   Alderman   Renny   Perry   said   that   also   elsewhere   councils   cast   ballots   in  secret  before  announcing  the  win-­ ner.   Hawley   said   he   would   research   whether   Vergennes   aldermen   would   have  to  go  on  public  record  with  their   votes.     Regardless  of  how  the  vote  is  han-­ dled,   Garon   suggested   a   “public   in-­ terview   processâ€?   to   allow   for   “more   transparency,â€?  a  suggestion  aldermen   viewed  favorably. But  they  did  not  agree  last  week  on   whether   the   candidates   should   all   be   asked  the  same  set  of  questions  —  as   suggested   at   the   meeting   by   former  

mayor  Mike   Daniels   —   or   whether   the   interview   should   be   more   free-­ Ă€RZLQJ Alderwoman  Ziggy  Comeau  made   a   recommendation   that   was   well   re-­ ceived   —   simply   giving   each   candi-­ date  a  few  minutes  to  make  his  or  her   case.   “You  can  let  each  of  them  speak,â€?   Comeau  said.   Alderman   Joe   Klopfenstein   said   after   those   presentations   the   council   could  then  ask  “clarifying  questionsâ€?   of  the  candidates.   Benton  said  he  and  Hawley  would   work  out  a  process  and  discuss  it  with   the  council  before  April  9. “We’ll   try   to   come   up   with   some-­ thing   that   is   fair   and   not   take   two   hours,â€?  Benton  said.   TEAMWORK  ISSUE? Aldermen   also   last   week   voted   to   ask  a  warning  to  be  prepared  for  their   April  9  meeting  that  would  call  for  a   $1.45  million  bond  vote  to  support  a   $1.55   million   police   station   project   on  North  Main  Street;Íž  that  issue  was   covered  in  the  March  28  Independent.     On  conclusion  of  discussion  of  the   police  station,  Alderman  Klopfenstein   made   a   statement   that   it   was   crucial   for   citizens   to   trust   the   council,   and   for  aldermen  to  trust  and  support  each   other,   act   as   a   team   and   back   group   decisions.   “It’s  very  important  we  uphold  that   decision,  especially  if  it  is  unanimous,   publicly  and  privately,â€?  he  said.  

Afterward,  Klopfenstein   said   he   was   not   pleased   that   Comeau,   also   a   member  of  the  council’s  police  station   committee,  had  allegedly  campaigned   against   aldermen’s   $1.85   million   Town  Meeting  Day  police  station  pro-­ posal  after  voting  for  it  as  a  member   of  council. Reached  later  in  the  week,  Comeau   said   she   had   not   actively   lobbied   against  the  proposal. “I  didn’t  say  one  way  or  another  on   it.  I  didn’t  campaign  against  it,  knock   on  doors  or  anything,â€?  she  said.   Comeau   did   acknowledge   that   if   people   “approached   me   concerned   with   their   taxes,â€?   she   told   them   they   had  the  right  to  vote  against  the  plan. “Of  course,  I  have  a  lot  of  seniors   who  talk  to  me,  and  that’s  what  I  tell   them,â€?  she  said. If   people   asked   her   about   the   size   and   scope   of   the   project   before   the   vote,  Comeau  said  her  response  was,   “I  said  they’re  planning  ahead  for  the   future,â€?   adding,   “I   was   trying   to   be   careful  about  how  I  said  it.â€? Comeau  said  she  encouraged  all  she   spoke  to  to  vote.   “I   did   say   we   have   to   know   how   you  feel  ‌  because  that’s  a  big  proj-­ ect,â€?  she  said.   Aldermen  last  week  also:   ‡ 7DEOHG D YRWH IRU VHQLRU DOGHU-­ PDQXQWLOWKHFRXQFLOYDFDQF\LVÂżOOHG Randy  Ouellette  has  served  as  senior   alderman   in   recent   years.  The   senior   alderman  serves  the  remainder  of  the  

mayor’s  term  if  the  mayor  steps  down.   ‡ 9RWHGWRVHHNÂłLQWHUYHQHU´VWDWXV before   Public   Service   Board   delib-­ erations  on  the  Vermont  Gas  Systems’   DSSOLFDWLRQIRUD&HUWLÂżFDWHRI3XEOLF Good   for   its   Addison   County   natu-­ ral   gas   pipeline   project.   Hawley   said   that  status  would  allow  Vergennes  to   negotiate  with  Vermont  Gas  how  the   pipeline   runs   in   Vergennes   and   how   city  residents  are  served.   ‡ $GRSWHG5REHUWÂśV5XOHVRI2UGHU for   boards   and   committees,   a   move   that  will  mean  a  slight  departure  from   past   council   procedure.   In   the   past,   mayors   have   generally   not   fully   par-­ ticipated  in  discussions  and  only  cast   tie-­breaking  votes.  The  Robert’s  Rules   VSHFLÂżF WR ERDUGV DOORZ ERDUG FKDLU-­ persons   to   participate   in   discussions   and  vote. ‡ +HDUGIURP+DZOH\WKDW(QFRUH Redevelopment  Inc.  “is  in  the  design   phaseâ€?  for  a  solar  array  project  to  be   built  near  the  city’s  wastewater  treat-­ ment  plant. ‡ 5HDSSRLQWHG &KHU\O %ULQNPDQ as  the  city’s  representative  to  the  Ad-­ dison   County   Solid   Waste   Manage-­ ment   District,   Christine   Bradford   as   the   council’s   representative   on   the   Bixby   Memorial   Library   board,   the   entire   city   recreation   committee,   and   Mike  Daniels  and  Craig  Miner  as  the   co-­chairmen  of  the  town’s  Green  Up   Day  effort. Andy   Kirkaldy   may   be   reached   at   andyk@addisonindependent.com.

Brandon  DRB  decision  on  marijuana  dispensary  appealed By  LEE  J.  KAHRS landowner   has   appealed   a   recent   cal  marijuana  dispensary  on  Lovers   On   March   7,   the   Brandon   DRB   Brandon  Reporter Brandon   Development   Review   Lane. issued   a   decision   unanimously   ap-­ BRANDON   —   A   neighboring   Board   decision   to   permit   a   medi-­ -RDQQH1LFKROVÂżOHGDQDSSHDOWR proving  a  change  of  use  application   the   Vermont   Environmental   Court   for   Alexandra   Ford   and   Rutland   on  March  21,  citing  numerous  con-­ County  Organics  for  a  building  at  84   cerns   with   the   proposed   facility,   Lovers   Lane.   The   property,   owned   including   issues   of   safety,   privacy,   by   Chuck   Mitchell,   is   in   the   Rural   odor   and   air   quality,   pesticides   and   Development  zone  and  was  permit-­ Welcome   fertilizers,   and   the   potential   risk   of   ted   for   light   wood   manufacturing.   living  next  to  a  “high-­crime  target.â€? The  DRB  approved  a  change  of  use   1HZ$IÂżOLDWHV

ACBOR  would  like  to  welcome  all  of  the  new  businesses   DQGSURIHVVLRQDOVDVDI¿OLDWHPHPEHUV¹ We’re  glad  to  have  you  with  us! Appraisal  Professionals -­                    Justus  Devries,  Jr.,  Inc. -­                    Stavenow  Appraisal  Services,  Inc. -­                    W.D.  Benton  Inc.  Appraisers   Building  Professionals -­                    A.Ginsburg  Architects -­                    Cramer  Inspection  Group,  Inc -­                    Jim  Murphy  Property  &  Home  Inspection -­                    Woodland  Woodworks,  LLC   Environmental  Professionals -­                    LaRose  Surveys,  PC -­                    LTM  Environment   Insurance  Professionals -­                    Gaines  Insurance  Agency,  Inc. -­                    Liberty  Mutual  Insurance   Legal  Professionals -­                    American  Land  Title,  Inc /DZ2I¿FHVRI)UHG93HHW3& Marketing  Professionals -­                    Addison  Independent  /  Addison  Press Mortgage  Professionals -­                    Kittredge  Mortgage  Corporation -­                    National  Bank  of  Middlebury -­                    People’s  United  Bank -­                    Real  Estate  Mortgage  Network 9HUPRQW6WDWH(PSOR\HHV&UHGLW8QLRQ Other  Professionals -­        6FHQWVDWLRQV)ORZHUV *LIWV Repair  Professionals -­                    Third  Generation  Appliance  Repair

to  a  licensed  medical  marijuana  dis-­ pensary  and  manufacturing  facility. All   appeals   of   local   permitting   decisions  go  before  the  Vermont  En-­ vironmental   Court.   To   overturn   the   DRB’s   decision   to   issue   a   permit,   the   appellants   must   prove   that   the   project   would   have   adverse   effects   on  the  building,  the  character  of  the   (See  Marijuana,  Page  7)


PAGE  4  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

A DDIS ON   INDE P E NDEN T

Editorial

&RORUDGR¿UVWRIDWUHQG" In  a  sign  of  what  the  nation  might  hope  is  the  start  of  a  continuing  trend,   &RORUDGREHFDPHWKH¿UVW:HVWHUQVWDWHWRDGRSWWRXJKHUJXQFRQWUROODZV with  the  recent  signing  of  legislation. The  measure,  which  is  similar  to  what  Vermont  legislators  were  asked  to   consider  but  decided  not  to  tackle  this  year,  bans  magazines  for  automatic   assault-­style   weapons   that   hold   more   than   15   rounds   and   requires   back-­ ground  checks  made  online  or  through  private  parties  (like  gun  shows).   &RORUDGRLVWKH¿UVWVWDWHEH\RQGWKH(DVW&RDVWWRVWUHQJWKHQLWVJXQODZV since  last  year’s  shootings  in  Aurora  in  a  movie  theater  killed  12  people  and   left  60  wounded,  and  the  more  recent  shootings  in  Newtown,  Conn.  In  ad-­ dition  to  the  ban  on  magazines  holding  more  than  15  rounds,  the  law  bans   magazines  with  a  smaller  capacity  but  which  can  be  easily  converted  to  hold   more  than  15  rounds. In   their   tired   response,   Republican   opponents   criticized   the   legislation   VD\LQJ VRPH FULPLQDOV ZLOO ¿QG ZD\V WR VNLUW WKH ODZV DQG WKDW WKH PHD-­ sure   will   hurt   the   state’s   economy   by   eliminating   jobs.   Seriously.   In   their   response,  Republican  opponents  offered  no  recognition  that  this  style  of  as-­ sault  weapon  has  been  used  by  mentally  ill  people  to  walk  into  public  spaces   and  wreak  senseless  havoc,  and  yet  could  buy  the  assault  weapons  with  no   questioning  about  their  background  —  including  criminal  records  or  mental   stability.   The  modest  proposals  being  made  to  bring  a  little  sanity  to  state  and  na-­ tional  gun  control  laws  is  yet  another  argument  (same  sex  marriage  and  the   notion  that  we  can’t  keep  cutting  taxes  to  the  wealthiest  few  are  two  others)   in  which  Republicans  need  to  take  an  accurate  measure  of  the  public’s  pulse   (roughly  80  percent  of  Americans  support  increased  background  checks  and   stricter  control  of  assault-­style  weapons)  before  they  discover,  once  again,   they  are  on  the  wrong  side  of  history. The  issue  here  is  not  about  preventing  Americans  from  owning  guns,  in   JHQHUDO EXW UDWKHU OLPLWLQJ DFFHVV WR KLJKO\ VSHFL¿F ZHDSRQV ZKRVH SUL-­ PDU\LQWHQWLVWRNLOOSHRSOHZLWKUDSLG¿UHSUHFLVLRQ6XUHO\ZHFDQJHWPRVW Americans,  and  even  the  gun  lobby,  to  support  a  commonsense  approach.   .XGRVWR&RORUDGRIRUOHDGLQJWKH:HVW+RSHIXOO\LQ9HUPRQWZHZLOOWDNH much  needed  action  next  year.

$QRWKHUSOXJIRUDFDUERQWD[ Here’s  another  reason  a  tax  on  carbon  dioxide  emissions  (a  carbon  tax)   makes  good  economic  sense:  According  to  a  study  done  for  the  International   Monetary  Fund,  governments  throughout  the  world  are  subsizing  cheap  en-­ ergy  to  the  detriment  of  the  world  economy  (not  just  the  environment)  to  the   tune  of  $2  trillion  in  2011. The  enormous  negative  impact  —  that  $2  trillion  annually  —  is  not  just   cash  subsidies  used  minimize  fuel  costs,  but  also,  as  a  Washington  Post  edi-­ torial  said  on  Sunday,  “what  policymakers  are  refusing  to  do.  Burning  fossil   fuels  produces  a  range  of  negative  side  effects,  such  as  pollution.  The  only   economically  rational  response  is  to  build  those  costs  into  the  price  of  energy   WKURXJKDQHIÂżFLHQWWD[ÂŤ*RYHUQPHQWSROLFLHVWKDWPDNHSULFHVDUWLÂżFLDOO\ low   encourage   people   to   use   too   much   energy,   resulting   in   pollution   that   A  CLASSIC  KID’S  bike  with  a  banana  seat  and  monkey  bar  handlebars  sits  outside  Little  City  Cycles   dirties   local   environments,   congested   streets   and   global   warming.   At   the   in  Vergennes  last  Monday  morning. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell VDPHWLPHVXEVLGLHVGLVWRUWLQYHVWPHQWLQVWHDGRIDOORZLQJFDSLWDOWRĂ€RZ to  where  it  would  do  the  most  good,  they  push  it  toward  fossil-­fuel  produc-­ tion  —  and  away  from  enterprises  that  would  more  usefully  employ  some   of  the  money,  such  as  clean  energy.  Supports  also  hurt  government  budgets   E\GLYHUWLQJUHVRXUFHVDZD\IURPZRUWKLHUVWDWHVSHQGLQJÂŤ(YHU\FRXQWU\ LQWKHZRUOGZRXOGEHQHÂżWIURPWKHKRQHVWSULFLQJRIHQHUJ\7KH*URXSRI (LJKWUHFRJQL]HGWKLVLQLWVVXPPLWDW&DPS'DYLGODVW\HDUZKHQLWVPHP-­ ber  countries  recommitted  eliminating  fossil-­fuel  supports.â€? :KDWÂśVGLIÂżFXOWWRQHJRWLDWHLVJHWWLQJEX\LQIURPWKHJOREDOFRPPXQLW\ so  one  country  isn’t  punished  economically  by  implementing  the  tax  while   Many  lake  property  owners  are   preciation  for  lake  conservation   relocation  or  enlargement  of  any   RWKHUVEHQHÂżWE\QRWLPSOHPHQWLQJVRPHWKLQJVLPLODU7KDWÂśVDWRXJKQXWWR not  aware  of  the  Vermont  House   and  allowing  future  generations  the   VWUXFWXUHDVZHOODVVSHFLÂżFDWLRQRQ crack,  but  it  needs  to  be  a  top  concern  of  the  Obama  administration  if  it  is   opportunity  to  enjoy  more  pristine   vegetative  cover,  including  dead,   to  help  lead  the  world  in  solving  the  problems  caused  by  a  warming  planet. Bill  H.526  (Shoreland  Protection   for  Lakes)  that  will  allow  the  state   lakes.  However,  I  am  deeply  con-­ diseased  or  fallen  tree  removal,   Angelo  S.  Lynn to  have  jurisdiction  to  control  not   cerned  that  the  H.526  bill  as  written   would  require  a  permit.  The  permit   only  construction  as  they  have  at   ZLOOUHVXOWLQÂżQDQFLDOEXUHDXFUDWLF would  be  issued  after  meeting  the   ADDISON COUNTY this  point,  but  also  maintenance  of   and  unrealistic  implications  (end-­ requirements  of  rules  and  payment   vegetation  within  100  feet  of  the   less  and  frivolous  lawsuits)  that   RIIHHVQRW\HWVSHFLÂżHGLQWKHELOO mean  water  level. portions  of  this  legislation  will  have   The  impact  of  a  100-­foot  buffer  on   Periodicals  Postage  Paid  at  Middlebury,  Vt.  05753 The  bill  proposes  to  authorize   on  many  lake  property  owners  by   a  1-­acre  lot  with  200  feet  of  front-­ Postmaster,  send  address  change  to  Addison  Independent, the  ANR  (Agency  of  Natural   implementing  controls  that  are  in   age  would  impact  50  percent  of  the   32%R[0DSOH6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQW‡‡)D[ Resources)  to  adopt  by  rule,  the  re-­ excess  of  the  environmental  conser-­ resident’s  lot. (0DLOQHZV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP‡:HE6LWHZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP quirements  for  ground  disturbances   vation  process. I  also  noted  in  the  bill  there  are   3XEOLVKHGHYHU\0RQGD\7KXUVGD\E\WKH$GGLVRQ3UHVV,QF0HPEHU9HUPRQW3UHVV$VVRFLDWLRQ1HZ(QJODQG3UHVV$V and  development  within  shoreland   This  bill  proposes  establishment   variances  only,  no  waivers.  This   VRFLDWLRQ1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ 68%6&5,37,215$7(69HUPRQWÂą0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV2XWRI6WDWHÂą zones  adjacent  to  lakes  in  the  state   of  “lakeside  zonesâ€?  which  include   would  make  it  almost  impossible  to   0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV'LVFRXQWHGUDWHIRU6HQLRU&LWL]HQVFDOOIRUGHWDLOV  of  Vermont. “allâ€?  the  land  within  100  feet  of  the   request  changes,  especially  if  you   7KH,QGHSHQGHQWDVVXPHVQRÂżQDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURUVLQDGYHUWLVHPHQWVEXWZLOOUHSULQWWKDWSDUWRIDQ I  have  lived  on  Lake  Champlain   lake’s  mean  water  level.  Activities   have  unfriendly  neighbors  as  abut-­ DGYHUWLVHPHQWLQZKLFKWKHW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURURFFXUUHG$GYHUWLVHUZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\WKHPDQDJHPHQWLPPHGLDWHO\RIDQ\ HUURUVZKLFKPD\RFFXU for  30  years  and  have  much  ap-­ such  as  construction,  conversion,   (See  Letter,  Page  5) 7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636

Classic

Letters to the Editor

House  bill  would  affect  shoreline  property  owners

INDEPENDENT


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  —  PAGE  5

Letters to the Editor

Letter

Solar  energy,  not  large-­scale  wind,  is  the  way  to  go In  reference  to  letters  printed  in   the  Addison  Independent  on  Feb.   11  and  March  11  concerning  wind   energy  in  Vermont,  I  have  the  fol-­ lowing  comments: I  have  learned  much  from  liv-­ ing  off-­grid  for  the  past  eight   years,  and  I  do  own  a  small  wind   turbine.  It  helps  the  process,   but  the  solar  energy  is  truly  the   workhorse.  I’m  not  sure  that  there   is  anywhere  in  Vermont  where   enough  wind  can  be  produced   constantly  to  make  it  worth   scourging  our  ridgelines? It  is  worth  noting,  that  wind   developers  are  as  intertwined   with  political  parties  as  any  other   interest.  When  I  worked  in  opposi-­ tion  to  the  larger  VELCO  power   lines  coming  through  our  county,   the  large  wind  interests  were  one   of  the  major  obstacles.  Even  then   (about  10  years  ago),  certain  wind   projects  in  the  state  seemed  a  trade   for  the  VELCO  project  approval.   Perhaps  the  largest  letdown  of   all  was  approaching  Bill  McKib-­

ben  for  assistance  (at  the  time  he   was  writing  articles  concerning   local  this,  local  that),  only  to  have   follow-­up  e-­mails  avoided  and  re-­ ceive  no  assistance  at  all.  I  wonder   where  he  is  now  when  natural-­ gas  lines  equated  with  fracking,   contaminating  water  supplies  and   explosion,  are  looming  over  Addi-­ son  County  to  service  International   Paper?  But,  he  too  is  sold-­out  and   beholden  to  certain  interests  as   much  as  any  politician:  He  knows   when  it’s  safe  to  get  involved  and   only  then  does  he  make  a  move. ,¿QGLWKDUGWREHOLHYHWKDW percent  of  all  Vermonters  favor   wind  on  our  ridgelines.  This  state-­ ment  made  me  wonder  about  the   Castleton  State  College  poll,  who   was  surveyed,  and  how  many?  I   went  online  to  study  the  results   and  noticed  it  was  a  very  small   sample  of  people.  Also,  it  did   not  identify  if  subjects  had  any   existing  knowledge  about  large   wind  installations.  I  am  an  ardent   backer  of  renewable  energy;͞  I  live  

it  —  but  renewable  energy  done   wisely.  I  do  not  believe  huge  wind   on  our  ridgelines  is  wise  for  nu-­ merous  reasons,  some  explained   in  your  previous  letters,  and  I  be-­ lieve  we  will  regret  those  projects   in  the  future. Distributed  solar  energy  is  the   way  to  go.  I  picture  a  world  where   everyone  has  solar  panels  to  pow-­ er  their  home/business,  maybe  a   small  wind  turbine  as  well,  energy   HI¿FLHQF\LVSUDFWLFHGDQGZHDUH all  driving  better-­mileage  cars  or   hybrids.  Sure,  in  the  winter  you   may  need  some  backup  propane  or   oil,  but  it  won’t  be  anywhere  near   what  you  are  using  now!  How   about  all  new  construction  being   required  to  be  energy  producers?   The  above  would  be  enough  to  be-­ gin  solving  our  climate  troubles,   all  without  ugly,  earth-­harming,   controversial  projects.  The  tech-­ nology  is  there  for  us  to  take  care   of  ourselves:  Make  it  real,  folks! Judy  Kowalczyk Ripton

Bristol  Fire  Department  project  should  have  been  OK’d Let  me  begin  by  telling  you  what   an  educated,  dependable  and  well-­ WUDLQHG¿UHGHSDUWPHQWWKHWRZQRI Bristol  is  lucky  to  have.  I  have  to   give  them  so  much  credit  for  spend-­ ing  years  of  their  free  time  trying   to  come  up  with  a  reasonable  plan   in  order  to  keep  our  historic  N.H.   Munsill  Hose,  Hook  and  Ladder   ¿UHKRXVHFXUUHQWWRWKHFRPPX-­ nity,  but  at  the  same  time  restore  a   badly  needed  worn-­out  building.   Free  time.  Time  away  from  his  or   her  families,  in  order  to  help  the   community  and  hold  onto  the  pride   that  anyone  can  see  when  you  hear   D¿UH¿JKWHUWDONDERXWKLVGHSDUW-­ ment  and  about  bettering  the  town   of  Bristol. 7KLVLVDYROXQWHHU¿UHGHSDUW-­ ment.  I’m  sure  I  don’t  even  know   all  the  time  they  put  into  this  organi-­ zation  so  freely.  For  us,  the  citizens   of  Bristol.  So  it  saddened  me  to   hear  and  see  the  way  some  of  our   community  members  treated  the   PHPEHUVRIRXU¿UHGHSDUWPHQWDW several  meetings  that  were  held  in   order  to  talk  about  a  proposal  that   FRXOGZRUNIRURXU¿UHGHSDUWPHQW Maybe  some  community  mem-­ bers  were  just  upset  because  they   were  not  asked  to  be  on  the  com-­ mittee  as  to  what  was  needed.  But   everyone  can’t  be  on  the  committee.   No  one  asked  me  to  be  on  the  com-­ mittee  to  restore  Holley  Hall  either.   But  it  was  refurbished.  Everyone   can’t  be  on  every  committee  or   nothing  would  be  done. How  many  people  did  you  ask   when  it  was  time  to  build  your  busi-­ ness?  Did  you  give  anyone  notice   that  it  might  block  someone’s  view   or  be  too  close  to  someone’s  side-­ walk?  Besides,  who  better  knows   ZKDWD¿UHGHSDUWPHQWQHHGVWKDQ WKH¿UH¿JKWHUV":KRNQRZVEHVW how  much  money  they  might  need?  

7KH¿UH¿JKWHUV+RZZRXOG\RX feel  if  someone  without  the  knowl-­ edge  of  your  business  were  to  come   in  and  tell  you  not  only  how  to  set  it   up  but  also  what  it  was  that  would   work  best  for  you? The  selectboard  meetings  are   open  to  the  public,  and  anyone   could  have  gone  to  any  meeting   pertaining  to  the  proposed  build-­ ing  site  or  watched  in  on  TV.  There   was  no  secret  agenda.  Where  have   you  people  been  for  the  last  six   years  while  these  discussions  were   taking  place  at  the  selectboard   meetings?  As  far  as  the  residential   LVVXHJRHVWKH¿UHKRXVHLVDOUHDG\ in  our  neighborhood,  as  well  as   many  other  businesses  around  the   corner,  across  the  street  and  on  the   street.  The  parking  issue  would   be  greatly  improved,  as  it  would   get  the  cars  of  North  and  Church   streets.  The  trucks  already  come   out  on  North  Street,  it  would  be    no   different. Yes,  I  grew  up  in  Bristol,  right   on  Church  Street,  and  kept  time   by  the  noon  whistle,  and  listened  

to  the  different  codes  that  blew  to   DOHUWXVWRD¿UH(YHU\RQHLVVR concerned  about  the  old  Duclos   home,  and  not  moving  it  or  tearing   it  down,  but  few  seem  to  care  about   WKHUHDOO\KLVWRULF¿UHKRXVHZKLFK LVIDOOLQJGRZQDURXQGWKH¿UH¿JKW-­ ers  and  could  be  gone  tomorrow  if   something  is  not  done  soon.  That   is  a  landmark  that  would  be  truly   missed. I  want  to,  at  the  very  least,  thank   the  property  owners  for  the  oppor-­ tunity  that  they  gave  to  the  Bristol   Fire  Department  and  the  town  of   Bristol.  It  is  now  your  choice  to  do   whatever  you  feel  best,  however  a   loss  for  the  town  of  Bristol. 5HPHPEHUWKLVLVDYROXQWHHU¿UH GHSDUWPHQW:KDWLIRXU¿UH¿JKWHUV get  tired  of  spending  all  this  free   time,  getting  nowhere  and  being   treated  like  they  don’t  know  what   they  are  doing,  and  decide  to  close   the  building  and  tell  us,  the  citizens   of  Bristol,  to  hire  someone  else  to   SXWRXWRXU¿UHV":KDWWKHQ" Mary  J.  Orvis-­Baker Bristol

REMINDER TOWN OF BRISTOL PROPERTY TAXES DUE FRIDAY, APRIL 5th, 2013 Office hours are Monday – Friday 8:00 AM to 4:30 PM

(Continued  from  Page  4) ters  who  can  contest  your  variance   forever  or  use  it  as  a  blackmail  or   extortion  tool. This  legislation  also  has  the   potential  to  increase  the  cost  of   maintenance  without  reducing  the   prime  tax  rate  charged  for  lakefront   property.  In  addition,  the  legislation   puts  landowner  property  rights  at   risk  —  would  “shoreline  zonesâ€?  be   seen  as  public  access  points  to  the   water?  Could  an  uninvited  person   ÂżVKRUVZLPIURPSULYDWHO\RZQHG state-­controlled  “shoreland  zonesâ€??   Who  covers  insurance  if  they  are  in-­ jured,  etc.,  while  we  pay  the  taxes?   This  bill  throws  many  yet-­unknown   burdens  on  the  lake  property  owners   without  having  evaluated  the  many   XQNQRZQÂżQDQFLDOLPSDFWVDQGIRU sure  lowered  property  values. Other  unknowns  arise  where  this   is  quite  a  bit  of  vegetation  on  a  lot   consisting  of  small  and  large  trees,   saplings  and  shrubs  within  the  100-­ foot  buffer  zone.  Some  of  the  veg-­ etation  requires  annual  trimming  or   removal.  Under  this  bill,  lakefront   owners  would  be  required  to  obtain   a  permit  to  remove  a  dead  tree,  one   presenting  a  danger  to  the  dwelling,   or  blown  over  in  our  more  frequent   windstorms.  Conditions  for  removal   are  unknown  and  there  is  no  clue   as  to  how  the  permit  process  would   work.

Many  lake  residents  have  docks   to  access  the  water.  If  a  dock  is   taken  out  in  the  fall,  would  we  be   required  to  obtain  a  state  permit  to   replace  it?  Again,  at  what  cost  and   what  fees? This  is  important:  Could  the  state   disallow  replacement  of  structure   (including  camps  within  the  100   feet)  in  this  buffer  zone,  even   though  they  are  pre-­existing?  Again,   neighbors  can  make  hay  out  of  this   by  appealing  any  decision  and  drag-­ ging  it  on  for  years  or  by  extorting   the  party  requesting  the  permit. I  love  the  lake  and  want  to  see  it   improved  but  not  with  such  draco-­ QLDQOHJLVODWLRQVRXQGH¿QHGWKDW even  I  (a  non-­lawyer)  could  tie  up   any  owner  requesting  changes  for   years.  Also,  the  enforcement  of  this   legislation  would  be  very  costly  to   the  state,  towns  and  residents.  Pro-­ tecting  the  environment  is  a  com-­ monsense  and  noble  cause  we  all   support,  but  this  piece  of  legislation   seems  to  be  lacking  common  sense   and  will  only  open  a  Pandora’s  box   RILQ¿QLWHOLWLJDWLRQ I  urge  lake  property  owners  to   read  Bill  H.526  at  www.leg.state. vt.us  and  contact  your  representa-­ tives  and  Gov.  Shumlin  with  your   opinion  on  this  proposal.   John  Carrigan South  Burlington Addison  property  owner

Letters to  the  editor

The  Addison  Independent  encourages  readers  to  write  letters  to  the  editor.  We   believe  a  newspaper  should  be  a  community  forum  for  people  to  debate  issues  of   the  day.  Because  we  believe  that  accountability  makes  for  responsible  debate,  we   will  print  signed  letters  only.  Be  sure  to  include  an  address  and  telephone  number,   too,  so  we  can  call  to  clear  up  any  questions. If  you  have  something  to  say,  send  it  to:  Letters  to  the  Editor, Addison  Independent,  P.O.  Box  31,  Middlebury,  VT  05753. Or  email  to  news@addisonindependent.com

Home  Builders  &  Remodelers  Association  of  Southern  Vermont

16th Annual Home & Recreation Show

6DW$SULO‡DPSP‡6SDUWDQ$UHQD Admission is FREE

(behind Diamond Run Mall) Rt 7 South, Rutland, VT

Â&#x2021;)UHH.LG¡V$FWLYLWLHVSURYLGHGE\ 7KH0HQWRU&RQQHFWRUDP  Â&#x2021;([KLELWRUV%RRWKV SPNLGVFDQOHDUQKRZWR Â&#x2021;'RRU3UL]H'UDZLQJVWKURXJKRXWWKH'D\  SODQWVHHGVLQĂ RZHUSRWVDQGWDNH Â&#x2021;6SHFLDO3UL]HVIRU.LGV VWJHWDELUGKRXVHNLW KRPHFRPSOLPHQWVRI+RPH'HSRW FREE 30 Minute Workshops  DP Â&#x2021;+HDW3XPSVDQHZWHFKQRORJ\WRKHDW\RXUKRPHPRUHHIĂ&#x20AC;FLHQWO\   3UHVHQWHU1HLJKERU:RUNVRI:HVWHUQ9HUPRQW  DP Â&#x2021;+RPH/RDQVIURPSUHDSSURYDOWRFORVLQJ3UHVHQWHUV+HULWDJH)DPLO\&UHGLW   8QLRQDQGDSURIHVVLRQDODSSUDLVHU  1RRQ Â&#x2021;:LUHOHVV6ROXWLRQVIRU<RXU+RPHDQG2QWKH*R3UHVHQWHU9HUL]RQ:LUHOHVV  SP Â&#x2021;/HDUQ$ERXW5HSODFHPHQW:LQGRZV3UHVHQWHUV+XUG:LQGRZVDQG&ROODERUDWLRQV  SP Â&#x2021;2UJDQLF/DZQ&DUHDQG3HVW&RQWURO3UHVHQWHU7KH*URXQGV*X\V In-­kind  sponsors:  LaValley  Building  Supply,  Gilmore  Home  Center

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re building, remodeling, or just want to browse, this is an event you wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t want to miss.

FOR MORE INFORMATION, CALL (802) 773-0672


PAGE  6  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

ADDISON COUNTY

Obituaries

Richard Jerome, 77, Monkton 021.721 ² 5LFKDUG Âł'LFN´ -HURPH  RI 0RQNWRQ SDVVHG DZD\SHDFHIXOO\RQ0DUFK surrounded  by  his  family.   Dick   was   born   in   Burlington   on   Jan.   14,   1936,   the   son   of   the   late   David  and  Beulah  (Mitchell)  Jerome.   On   Jan   31,   1953,   he   married   the   love   of   his   life,   Veronica   LaBelle,   and  they  began  their  life  together  in   3DQWRQ ZKHUH KH ZDV HPSOR\HG E\ Simmonds  Precision  and  retired  after   38  years  of  service.     8SRQPRYLQJWR0RQNWRQLQ 'LFN DQG 9RQ IXOÂżOOHG D OLIHORQJ dream  of  owning  their  own  farm.  His   WUXHSDVVLRQVLQOLIHZHUHKXQWLQJDQG ÂżVKLQJERWKWUDLWVKHSDVVHGRQWRKLV children  and  grandchildren.  Later  in   OLIH'LFNHQMR\HGDQGUDUHO\PLVVHG KLVDIWHUQRRQYLVLWVZLWK1LOHV0RH and   Tiger.  All   who   knew   Dick   will   UHPHPEHU KLV VSDUNOLQJ EOXH H\HV great   sense   of   humor   and   friendly   smile.   Dick  is  survived  by  his  wife  of  60   years,  Von,   and   their   children,   Judy   DONNA  PALMER (Pete)   Bissonette,   David   (Jackie)   -HURPH  -DQH 'DYLG  &RIÂżQ DQG Paul   (Alicia)   Jerome;Íž   son-­in-­law   Memorial   gifts   may   be   made   to   5DOSK /DQJ JUDQGFKLOGUHQ $QJLH the   Brandon   Area   Rescue   Squad,   Jeremy,  Shawn,  Heidi,  Andy,  Ashley,   32%R[%UDQGRQ97 Chris,  Jesse,  Katie,  Michael  and  Jake;Íž   and   nine   great-­grandchildren.   He   is   also  survived  by  brothers  James  and   Sharon   Jerome   of   Chandler,   Ariz.,   and   Donald   and   Mary   Jerome   of   Seymour,  Tenn.,   and   several  nieces,   QHSKHZVDQGFRXVLQV +H ZDV SUHGHFHDVHG E\ KLV Paul   Piche   of   Burlington;Íž   as   well   DV QLHFHV QHSKHZV DQG D ODUJH H[WHQGHGIDPLO\ +HU EURWKHU 3HWHU 3LFKH SUHGH-­ ADDISON COUNTY ceased  her. A   Mass   of   Christian   Burial   will   be   concelebrated   from   St.   Andrew   Catholic   Church   in   Waterbury   on   Sierra   Dessureault,   the   daughter   $SULODWDP$UHFHSWLRQ RI 5LFK DQG 'HE 'HVVXUHDXOW RI 1HZ ZLOOIROORZLQWKHFKXUFKSDULVKKDOO Haven,  has  been  named  to  the  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list   Inurnment   will   be   in   Holy   Cross   for  the  fall  2012  semester  in  the  College   &HPHWHU\LQ'X[EXU\ of  Agriculture  and  Life  Sciences  at  the   To   send   online   condolences   visit   8QLYHUVLW\ RI 9HUPRQW 6KH KDV DOVR XV DW ZZZSHUNLQVSDUNHUFRP EHHQLQGXFWHGLQWRWKH1DWLRQDO6RFLHW\ Memorial   gifts   may   be   made   to   of  Collegiate  Scholars. Addison   County   Home   Health   and   Dessureault,   a   freshman,   is   on   a   +RVSLFH32%R[0LGGOHEXU\ SUHPHG WUDFN PDMRULQJ LQ ELRORJLFDO 97 science.  

Donna Palmer, 69, Leicester LEICESTER  â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Donna   Marie   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Duckyâ&#x20AC;?  Palmer,  69,  died  Monday,   March  25,  2013,  at  Rutland  Regional   Medical  Center. She   was   born   in   Brandon   on   July   20,   1943.   She   was   the   daugh-­ ter   of   Homer   and   Freda   (Devino)   Mitchell.   She   received   her   early   education  in  local  Brandon  schools   and   graduated   from   Brandon   High   School,  class  of  1961. In   her   earlier   years   she   worked   DW WKH $\UVKLUH %UHHGHUV 2IÂżFH LQ Brandon.   She   later   worked   in   the   RIÂżFH RI WKH VXSHULQWHQGHQW RI WKH Brandon  School  District.  She  after-­ ZDUGZDVHPSOR\HGDW1H[XV&RUS LQTXDOLW\FRQWURODQGVKLSSLQJDQG afterwards   at   the   Forest   Dale   Post   2IÂżFH+HUIDPLO\VD\VVKHHQMR\HG traveling,   was   an   avid   reader   and   adored  her  grandchildren. Surviving   are   her   husband,   Lemuel  Palmer  of  Leicester,  whom   she   married   in   Forest   Dale   on   Oct.   15,   1983;Íž   her   mother,   Freda   Mitchell   of   Brandon;Íž   her   daugh-­ ter   Tammy   Ricard   and   husband   *OHQQRI:LQGVRUKHUVWHSGDXJKWHU

Vicki  Genier   and   husband   Shawn   of   Leicester;Íž   her   sisters,   Charlene   Grimes   and   husband   Roddy   of   Forest   Dale,   Linda   Russell   and   husband   Harold   of   Forest   Dale,   Lorraine   Williams   and   husband   John   of   Sudbury,   and   Jane   Aines   and  husband  David  of  Forest  Dale;Íž   ÂżYHJUDQGFKLOGUHQDQGWKUHHJUHDW JUDQGFKLOGUHQ 0DQ\ QLHFHV QHSK-­ ews  and  cousins  also  survive  her. 6KHZDVSUHGHFHDVHGE\KHUIDWKHU Homer  Mitchell,  in  December  1980. The   funeral   service   will   be   held   RQ )ULGD\ $SULO   DW  DP DW *UDFH (SLVFRSDO &KXUFK in   Forest   Dale.   The   Rev.   Margaret   )OHWFKHU UHFWRU ZLOO RIÂżFLDWH $ SULYDWHJUDYHVLGHFRPPLWWDOVHUYLFH and  burial  will  follow  in  the  family   lot,  at  Forest  Dale  Cemetery. Following   the   ceremony   the   family   will   receive   friends   in   the   church   â&#x20AC;&#x153;undercroftâ&#x20AC;?   for   a   time   of   IHOORZVKLSDQGUHPHPEUDQFH Friends   may   call   at   the   Miller   &   Ketcham  Funeral  Home  in  Brandon   RQ 7KXUVGD\ $SULO   IURP SP

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Mary Grace, 69, Vergennes 9(5*(11(6:$7(5%85< ² Mary  P.   Grace,   69,   of   Vergennes   and   formerly   of   Waterbury,   died   at   home   on   Sunday   evening,   March   24,   2013.   Born   in   Colchester   on   1RY   VKH ZDV WKH GDXJK-­ WHU RI WKH ODWH *LOEHUW DQG 8UVXOD (Thomas)  Piche. On   Oct.   3,   1964,   she   married   John  Grace  in  Johnson.  They  made   their  home  in  Waterbury  where  she   was   a   homemaker   raising   her   two   FKLOGUHQ /DWHU GHFLGLQJ WR SXUVXH a   career   in   education,   she   gradu-­ ated  from  Johnson  State  College  in   1985  and  became  an  educator  at  the   Moretown  Elementary  School,  from   which  she  retired.

+HU IDPLO\ VD\V VKH HQMR\HG UXQQLQJ SOD\LQJ SLDQR YHJHWDEOH gardening  and  sewing  in  her  leisure   time.   Since   living   in   Vergennes,   she   became   very   involved   with   St.   Peter   Catholic   Church,   serving   as   a   catechism   teacher   and   Eucharist   minister. She  is  survived  by  her  husband  of   48  years,  John  Grace  of  Vergennes;͞   their  children,  Katy  Grace  of  South   Burlington   and   Tim   Grace   and   his   ZLIH %DUEDUD RI +RZHOO 1- three   sisters,   Martha   Head   and   her   husband,  Larry,  of  Shelburne,  Diane   9LHQV RI /DJR 9LVWD 7H[DV DQG Denise   Kennedy   and   her   husband,   Jeff,   of   Vergennes;͞   her   brother,  

Funeral, Cremation & Memorial Services, Pre-Planning Services

BROWN-McCLAY

To Celebrate and Remember the Life of your loved one.

FUNERAL HOMES

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  7

Marijuana

U.S.  REP.  PETER  Welch  hears  from  working  parents  about  their  strug-­ gles  to  get  a  college  degree  in  a  visit  to  the  Community  College  of  Ver-­ mont  last  Thursday.  

Independent  photo/Lee  Kahrs

Welch (Continued  from  Page  1) two-­year-­old   twin   boys,   and   splits   her  time  between  school  and  work.   U.S.   Rep.   Peter   Welch,   D-­Vt.,   visited  CCV  Thursday  as  part  of  an   effort  to  thwart  a  proposed  doubling   of   interest   rates   on   new,   subsidized   Stafford   student   loans,   from   3.4   to   6.8  percent.  The  event  was  a  round-­ table   discussion   with   10   CCV   stu-­ dents   who   count   on   Stafford   loans   DQG RWKHU ÂżQDQFLDO DLG VRXUFHV WR pursue  their  academic  goals.   Welch   intends   to   take   some   of   WKHLU VWRULHV WR WKH +RXVH Ă&#x20AC;RRU WKLV month   when   he   argues   against   the   interest  rate  hike.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  worked  before   and   the   Congressman   hopes   it   will   work   again.   Welch   used   the   same   strategy  in  March  of  2012  to  win  a   one-­year  reprieve  on  the  interest  rate   hike.   That   reprieve   is   set   to   expire   July  1.  If  the  interest  rate  hike  goes   through,   it   will   add   roughly   $1,000   to  the  Stafford  loan  tab  per  students. But  it  would  also  raise  an  estimat-­ ed   $6   billion   toward   lowering   the   IHGHUDOGHÂżFLWDWDWLPHZKHQIHGHUDO budget  negotiations  have  Democrats   and   Republicans   at   a   standoff.   At   this   point,   neither   party   has   money   set   aside   in   their   respective   budget   proposals  to  keep  student  loan  inter-­ est  rates  at  current  levels. But   Welch   said   Thursday   that   he   believes   just   cutting   costs   is   not   the  way  to  solve  the  debt  crisis  and   shared   a   recent   argument   he   had   with   Wisconsin   Republican   Paul   Ryan,  who  chairs  the  House  Budget   Committee  and  was  the  Republican   vice  presidential  nominee  last  year. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  argument  is,  yes,  we  have  to   deal   with   debt   in   this   country,   but   we   also   have   wage   stagnation   and   income  inequality,â&#x20AC;?  Welch  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   to   invest   in   our   future   and   in   our   infrastructure,   and   if   the   only   thing   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   doing   is   cutting,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going  to  make  (the  economy)  worse,   not  better.â&#x20AC;?

Welch  was  clearly  impressed  with   the  workload  the  students  have  taken   on,  with  six  out  of  10  of  them  work-­ ing  while  going  to  school  and  raising   families. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  if  I  can  get  through   the  rest  of  you,â&#x20AC;?  Welch  said  jokingly   after   hearing   from   half   of   the   stu-­ dents.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Do  you  know  how  easy  my   life  is  compared  to  yours?â&#x20AC;? Welch   added   that   supporting   stu-­ dents  is  the  best  way  to  invest  in  the   countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  future. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   to   get   incomes   up   and   get   people   to   work,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;And   here  you  are,  working  hard  to  create   a  future,  and  your  governmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pol-­ icies  should  take  advantage  of  that.â&#x20AC;? Ava  Pehm  concurred. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Yes,   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   we   the   future?â&#x20AC;?   she   asked.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  we  the  ones  who  will   be  paying  our  taxes  and  contributing   to  the  economy?â&#x20AC;? The   congressman   seemed   heart-­ ened  by  the  exchange. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  are  the  future,  and  you  know   ZKDW",IHHOFRQÂżGHQWLQRXUIXWXUH´ he   told   the   students.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   going   to   take   care   of   me   in   my   old   age.   As   citizens,   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   entitled   to   have   Congress  watching  your  back,  more   than  we  are  now.â&#x20AC;? Afterwards,  Welch  said  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hop-­ ing   for   a   longer-­term   solution   than   another   one-­year   reprieve,   but   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   take  it. Âł,ÂśOO GHÂżQLWHO\ EH WDONLQJ DERXW these   students,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   are   so  inspiring.  All  they  want  is  a  shot.   I  would  like  a  longer-­term  solution,   but  letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  do  what  we  can.â&#x20AC;? Welch   said   he   believes   there   are   ways   to   raise   revenue   other   than   a   hike   in   student   loan   interest   rates,   which  he  considers  taking  advantage   of  students. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   unconscionable   to   dou-­ ble   the   cost   to   these   students,â&#x20AC;?   he   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  like  a  punitive  tax.  If  we   could  get  some  stability  for  families   instead,  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  be  much  better  off.â&#x20AC;?

nents  also  cite  the  fact  that  children   (Continued  from  Page  3) DUHD WUDIÂżF ORFDO E\ODZV DQG RUGL-­ live  in  the  area  around  the  proposed   nances,   and   impacts   under   the   Act   dispensary   site.   At   the   very   least,   opponents   say,   the   selectboard   250  land  use  law. The   Vermont   Medical   Marijuana   should  have  held  a  public  informa-­ law  of  2004  allows  for  up  to  four  dis-­ tion  meeting  about  the  issue  before   pensaries   statewide   to   serve   almost   it  went  to  the  DRB.  The  selectboard   500   patients   on   the   state   registry.   did  not  act  on  the  proposal,  remand-­ There  are  currently  two  dispensaries   ing  it  to  Town  Zoning  Administra-­ permitted,  one  in  Burlington  and  one   tor   Tina   Wiles   and   the   DRB   since   in  Waterbury.  There  are  almost  200   there   was   no   town   ordinance   ban-­ patients  on  the  state  registry  living  in   ning  such  a  facility. In   her   appeal,   Nichols   four  southern  counties  of   also  noted  that  there  is  no   Vermont   who   are   unable   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I have a to  access  the  more  north-­ responsibility letter  of  support  from  Po-­ lice  Chief  Chris  Brickell   ern  dispensaries. regarding  the  dispensary.   By  law,  a  patient  must   as the police In  fact,  Brickell  stated  at   suffer   from   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;debilitat-­ chief to look a   March   11   selectboard   ing   medical   conditionâ&#x20AC;?   at how this meeting   that   Ford   mis-­ in   order   to   qualify   for   affects my characterized  his  support   the   medical   marijuana   community.â&#x20AC;? of   the   project.   While   he   registry.   Patients   must   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Police Chief said   a   February   meet-­ have   the   approval   of   a   Chris Brickell ing  with  Ford  went  well,   physician  they  have  been   he   did   take   issue   with   a   seeing   for   at   least   six   months,   who   authorizes   the   use   of   line   in   the   minutes   from   the   Feb.   medical   marijuana   for   the   patient   19  DRB  hearing,  which  he  did  not   once  all  other  avenues  have  been  ex-­ attend.   In   the   minutes,   Ford   said,   hausted.  Patients  must  be  screened   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   chief   told   her   he   is   comfort-­ by  the  Department  of  Public  Safety,   able   with   everything   they   are   pro-­ submit   to   a   background   check   and   posing.â&#x20AC;?   Brickell   said   that   is   inac-­ agree  to  no-­knock  searches  by  law   curate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   talked   about   security   and   enforcement  before  being  accepted   surveillance  and  I  would  say  it  went   onto  the  state  registry. The   dispensaries   operate   under   well,â&#x20AC;?   Brickell   said   in   a   March   11   the   authority   of   the   state   Depart-­ interview   with   the   Brandon   Re-­ ment   of   Public   Safety.   They   must   porter.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  to  say  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  comfortable   operate   by   appointment   only,   and   with   everything   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   proposing   only   one   patient   at   a   time   is   al-­ is  inaccurate.â&#x20AC;? Brickell   said   he,   too,   has   been   lowed  to  be  seen.  The  facility  must   be   equipped   with   surveillance   and   concerned   that   no   public   informa-­ tion  meeting  was  held  on  the  issue. alarm  equipment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   have   a   responsibility   as   the   Some  Brandon  residents  have  re-­ cently   expressed   their   disapproval   police  chief  to  look  at  how  this  af-­ with  the  plan  to  establish  a  medical   fects  my  community,â&#x20AC;?  he  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  do   marijuana  facility  in  Brandon,  say-­ have  a  problem  with  this  (dispensa-­ ing  it  will  increase  drug  use  and  the   ry)   becoming   a   potential   target   for   crime  rate  in  Brandon.  There  is  no   criminals.  Certainly  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  legitimate   proof  that  a  medical  marijuana  dis-­ business,   but   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   much   broader   pensary   has   that   effect,   but   oppo-­ social  issue  about  what  we  want  to  

bring  into  our  community.â&#x20AC;? Brickell  did  say  that  he  and  Ford   came   to   an   understanding   of   the   police  departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  role  should  the   dispensary   be   approved,   and   there   is  the  possibility  of  a  memorandum   of  understanding  with  the  Brandon   police.  That  would  give  Brickell  the   same   authority   as   the   Department   of   Public   Safety,   the   overseeing   body  of  medical  marijuana  dispen-­ saries   in   the   state,   to   perform   sur-­ prise   or   â&#x20AC;&#x153;no-­knockâ&#x20AC;?   searches   and   spot  checks. According   to   Nicholsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   appeal,   she   was   also   unclear   about   her   rights   as   an   abutting   landowner   when  she  attended  the  Feb.  19  pub-­ lic  hearing  held  by  the  DRB  on  the   dispensary   application.   While   she   acknowledged  receipt  of  a  letter  ap-­ prising   her   of   the   hearing,   Nichols   said   she   was   not   told   of   her   rights   as  an  abutter. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   letter   did   not   say   I   had   to   attend   or   be   sworn   in   to   testify   to   appeal   any   decision   made   by   the   DRB,â&#x20AC;?   Nichols   wrote,   adding   that   the  condition  of  being  sworn  in  was   not  made  clear  at  the  hearing  either. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   assumed   I   would   be   able   to   ask  questions  at  that  meeting,â&#x20AC;?  she   wrote.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   did   not   realize   it   was   a   judiciary   hearing.â&#x20AC;?   Nichols   added   that  she  did  not  have  ample  time  to   prepare  for  the  hearing. A   number   of   people   attending   that   hearing   had   the   same   com-­ plaint.   According   to   Wiles,   Town   Attorney   Jim   Carroll   has   told   her   that  everyone  who  signed  in  at  the   public   hearing   should   be   included   on   a   list   of   interested   parties.  That   will   give   them   the   right   to   appeal,   but   the   Environmental   Court   will   ultimately  determine  party  status. That   said,   there   is   still   time   for   other   appeals   in   this   case.  The   30-­ GD\ SHULRG LQ ZKLFK WR ÂżOH DQ DS-­ peal  is  up  April  6.


PAGE  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

communitycalendar

Apr

2

TUESDAY

Tai  Chi  for  Arthritis  graduate  class   in  Vergennes.  Tuesday,  April  2,  12:15-­1   SP1RUWKODQG-RE&RUSV7KHÂżUVWLQDVHULHV of   graduate   tai   chi   classes   meeting   Tuesdays   and  Thursdays   through   May   23.   Sponsored   by   CVAA,  these  free  classes  for  people  age  50  or   ROGHU FDQ KHOS LPSURYH EDODQFH Ă&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\ DQG PXVFOHVWUHQJWK5HJLVWHUDWH[W 1028.  

Apr

3

WEDNESDAY

GED  testing   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,  April  3,  8:45  a.m.-­1  p.m.,   Vermont  Adult  Learning,  282  Boardman   St.   Pre-­registration   required.   Call   388-­4392   for   info  and  to  register.   Tai   Chi   for   Arthritis   class   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   April   3,   10-­10:45   a.m.,   Eastview.   7KH ÂżUVW LQ D VHULHV RI EHJLQQHU WDL FKL FODVVHV meeting  Wednesdays  and  Fridays  through  May   24.   Sponsored   by   CVAA,   these   free   classes   for   people   age   50   or   older   can   help   improve   EDODQFHĂ&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\DQGPXVFOHVWUHQJWK5HJLVWHU DWH[W Gallery   talk   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   April   3,   noon-­1   p.m.,   Henry   Sheldon   Museum.   Bill   %URRNV H[HFXWLYH GLUHFWRU RI WKH 6KHOGRQ ZLOO lead  a  talk  on  items  from  the  museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  current   H[KLELW Âł7UHDVXUHV IURP WKH 6KHOGRQ´ ,QIR 388-­2117  or  www.henrysheldonmuseum.org.   Tai   Chi   for   Arthritis   class   in   Middlebury.   :HGQHVGD\$SULOSP,OVOH\/LEUDU\7KH ÂżUVW LQ D VHULHV RI LQWHUPHGLDWH WDL FKL FODVVHV meeting  Wednesdays  through  May  8.  Sponsored   by  CVAA,  these  free  classes  for  people  age  50   RUROGHUFDQKHOSLPSURYHEDODQFHĂ&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\DQG muscle   strength.   Register   at   (802)   865-­0360,   H[W â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bullyâ&#x20AC;?   screening   at   Middlebury   College.   Wednesday,  April  3,  7-­9  p.m.,  Dana  Auditorium.   $QXQĂ&#x20AC;LQFKLQJORRNDWKRZEXOO\LQJKDVWRXFKHG WKHOLYHVRIÂżYHNLGVDQGWKHLUIDPLOLHV6HHPRUH DWKWWSWKHEXOO\SURMHFWFRP,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;Knight  to  Queen:  Chess,  Courtly  Life,  and  the   Game   of   Love   in   the   Middle   Agesâ&#x20AC;?   presen-­ tation   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,  April   3,   7-­9   SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ 'DUWPRXWK SURIHVVRU -DQH &DUUROOH[DPLQHVWKHPHGLHYDODUWRIĂ&#x20AC;LUWLQJWKH power   plays   of   love,   and   the   skill   of   negotia-­ WLRQDVH[SUHVVHGWKURXJKWKHJDPHRINLQJV$ Vermont   Humanities   Council   First   Wednesday   HYHQW,QIR Public   meeting   on   methane   digester   in   Salisbury.   Wednesday,   April   3,   7-­9   p.m.,   6DOLVEXU\&RPPXQLW\6FKRRO,QWHJUDWHG(QHUJ\ Solutions  will  discuss  the  methane  digester  being   installed   by   Ernie   Goodrich,   and   the   pipeline   going   from   the   digester   to   Middlebury   College.   Residents  encouraged  to  attend  and  learn  more.   Mount  Abe  Family  Swim  in  Bristol.  Wednesday,   April  3,  7:30-­9  p.m.,  MAUHS  pool.  Cost:  $5  per   IDPLO\SHULQGLYLGXDO,QIR

Apr

4

THURSDAY

Stone  Soup   Summit   in   Bristol.   Thursday,  April  4,  3:15-­7  p.m.,  Mount   Abraham   Union   High   School.   Addison   County  Relocalization  Network  hosts  this  annual   Farm   to   School   gathering,   to   discuss   and   increase   local   success   in   the   movement   to   get   local  food  and  agriculture  into  our  schools.  Free,   with  a  suggested  $5-­10  donation  for  local-­foods   GLQQHU,QIRLQIR#DFRUQYWRUJ Art   history   lecture   at   Middlebury   College.   Thursday,  April  4,  4:30-­6  p.m.,  Mahaney  Center   for   the   Arts,   Room   125.   Jessica   Boehman   of   NYU,  a  specialist  in  Roman  baroque  sculpture,   SUHVHQWVÂł(UFROH)HUUDWDDQGWKH$UWRI/HDUQLQJ WR &DUYH LQ %HUQLQLÂśV 5RPH´ )UHH ,QIR ZZZ middlebury.edu/arts  or  443-­3168.   Twist   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Wool   Spinning   Guild   meeting   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   April   4,   7-­9   p.m.,   American  Legion.  Guest  speaker  Judy  Comfort   will  give  a  presentation  on  the  website  Ravelry.   Participants   should   bring   or   borrow   a   laptop,   WDEOHW RU VPDUWSKRQH 7KH /HJLRQ KDV ZLÂż$OO

Strings  attached ELECTRIC  VIOLIN  VIRTUOSO  Tracy  Silverman  joins  the  Champlain  Symphony  Or-­ chestra  at  the  Town  Hall  Theater  in  Middlebury  on  Sunday,  April  7,  at  4  p.m. DUHZHOFRPH,QIR Exhibit   opening   reception   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,  April  4,  8-­9  p.m.,  51  Main.  Celebrating   WKHRSHQLQJRI³3URJUHVV:LOO.LOO8V´DQH[KLELW of   charcoals,   soft   pastels   and   ink   portraits   by   Levi   Westerveld   depicting   the   faces   of   French   farmers  from  the  Dordogne  region.  Portraits  are   accompanied   by   short   biographies   of   the   farm-­ ers.  The  artist  will  be  on  hand  to  discuss  his  proj-­ ect.  Refreshments  served.  

Apr

5

FRIDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Middlebury.   Friday,  April   5,   11:30   a.m.-­1:30   p.m.,   Middlebury   VFW.   CVAAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   monthly   First   Friday   luncheon,   with   glazed   ham,   mashed   potatoes  with  cheddar  and  chives,  baby  carrots,   green  salad,  dinner  roll  and  apple  pie  with  cream.   Suggested   donation   $4.   Reservations   required   by  April   3:   1-­800-­642-­5119.   Free   transportation   by  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Prom   dress   sale   in   Bristol.   Friday,   April   5,   3-­7   p.m.,  Mount  Abraham  Union  High  School  cafete-­ ria.  The  Mount  Abe  PTO  is  selling  prom  dresses   for   $25   each.   Many   styles,   sizes   and   colors   to   choose  from.  Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  formal  wear  also  available.   Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Warehouse   will   donate   $5   back   to   the   372IRUHYHU\WX[UHQWDO$OOWX[UHQWDOVRII $OOSURFHHGVEHQHÂżWWKH372 Community  health  center  open  house  in  Bristol.   Friday,  April  5,  5-­7  p.m.,  Mountain  Health  Center,   Bristol   Works,   74   Munsill  Ave.   Come   celebrate   the  opening  of  the  Mountain  Health  Center,  the   ÂżYHWRZQ DUHDÂśV QHZ FRPPXQLW\ KHDOWK FHQWHU Refreshments   provided   by   the   centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   neigh-­ ERUV $TXD 9LWHD .RPEXFKD DQG WKH %ULVWRO Bakery  and  CafĂŠ.   Âł6SULQJ ,QWR 6XPPHU´ EHQHÂżW DXFWLRQ LQ Middlebury.  Friday,  April  5,  6-­8  p.m.,  Middlebury   ,QQ +HOS UDLVH PRQH\ IRU WKH %R\V DQG *LUOV Club  of  Greater  Vergennes.  Tickets,  $25,  include   a   Caribbean   buffet   dinner   and   admission.   Tickets   available   at   877-­6344   or   at   Everywear   for  Everybody  in  Vergennes.   %HQHÂżW DXFWLRQ LQ 0LGGOHEXU\   Friday,   April   5,    SP 0LGGOHEXU\ ,QQ 7KH %R\V DQG *LUOV &OXE RI *UHDWHU 9HUJHQQHV ZLOO KROG D Âł6SULQJ ,QWR 6XPPHU $XFWLRQ´ WR VXSSRUW WKH FOXEÂśV

after-­school  programming.  More  than  75  items,   many  with  a  summer  theme,  have  been  donated.   Event   includes   a   silent   auction,   live   auction   with   Charlie   Barsalow,   a   Caribbean-­themed   EXIIHW DQG D QRKRVW EDU ,QIR EJFYHUJHQQHV# comcast.net  or  on  Facebook.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fractured  Fairy  Talesâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.   Friday,  April  5,  7:30-­9:30  p.m.,  Vergennes  Opera   House.  Little  City  Players  present  this  collection   of  classic  stories,  with  a  twist.  Tickets  $12  adults,   $10  seniors  and  students,  available  at  the  VOH,   Classic   Stitching   in   Vergennes   or   www.vergen-­ nesoperahouse.org.  Also  on  April  6  and  7.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great  Expectationsâ&#x20AC;?  broadcast  in  Middlebury.   Friday,   April   5,   7:30-­9:45   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.  The  critically  acclaimed  London  produc-­ tion  of  Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  classic  will  be  broadcast  on  the   big  screen  at  the  THT.  Tickets  $17/$10  students,   DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  RU www.townhalltheater.org,  or  at  the  door.   Violinist  Mary  Rowell  in  concert  at  Middlebury   College.   Friday,   April   5,   8-­10   p.m.,   Mahaney   Center   for   the   Arts.   Rowell,   with   special   guest   (YH%HJODULDQSUHVHQWVÂł/HW0H7HOO<RX:KHUH ,ÂśYH%HHQ´DFRQFHUWRIPXVLFIRUYLROLQYLRODDQG HOHFWURQLFV)UHH,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXDUWV or  443-­3168.  

Apr

6

SATURDAY

Green  Mountain   Club   hike   in   Bridport/Addison.  Saturday,  April  6,   time   and   meeting   place   TBA.   Hike   up   6QDNH 0RXQWDLQ (DV\ (PDLO SDXOHWWHERJDQ# yahoo.com   or   call   475-­2848   for   meeting   time   and  place.   Trinkets   and   Treasures   Rummage   Sale   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,   April   6,   8   a.m.-­2   p.m.,   VUHS   middle-­school   gym.   Annual   fundraiser   hosted   by   the   Commodore   Parents   Teacher   Group.   Household   goods,   furniture,   books,   FROOHFWLEOHVÂżVKLQJDQGVSRUWLQJJHDUDGXOWDQG childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clothing,   toys,   games,   jewelry   and   PRUH3URFHHGVEHQHÂżW98+6VWXGHQWVWKURXJK enrichment  programs  and  opportunities.   GMC   Young   Adventurersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Club   labyrinths   and   mazes   in   Ripton.   Saturday,   April   6,   9-­11   DP6SLULWLQ1DWXUHWUDLOV$QGUHD.DQHOHDGV WKLV *UHHQ 0RXQWDLQ &OXE HYHQW IRU NLGV ,QIR

RUGUHDNDQH#FRPFDVWQHW Spring  Fling   Flea   Market   in   Bristol.   Saturday,   April  6,  9  a.m.-­3  p.m.,  Bristol  American  Legion.   Food  and  beverages,  bake  sale  items,  and  lots   RIWUHDVXUHV7REHQHÂżWWKH$X[LOLDU\6FKRODUVKLS Fund.   Spring  rummage  sale  in  Bristol.  Saturday,  April   6,  9  a.m.-­1  p.m.,  First  Baptist  Church  of  Bristol.   Shop  for  spring  clothing  and  linens.  Cost  $5  per   bag.  Bags  supplied.   Basketball   tournament   in   Shoreham.   Saturday,   April  6,  9:30  a.m.-­1  p.m.,  Shoreham  Elementary   School.   The   Platt   Memorial   Library   presents   a   co-­ed,   inter-­generational,   3-­on-­3,   lightning   round   tournament,   played   on   the   schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   new   J\P Ă&#x20AC;RRU 5HJLVWUDWLRQ WHDP DVVLJQPHQWV DQG warm-­up  9:30;  tournament  starts  at  10  a.m.  Ages   10  and  up,  $5  per  player,  free  to  watch.  Coffee,   fresh  donuts,  fruit  and  water.   Large-­print   book   sale   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   $SULO   DP SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ $V SDUW of   the   libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   regular   book   sale,   there   will   be   a   special   table   featuring   over   200   large-­print   ERRNV 3URFHHGV IXQG OLEUDU\ SURJUDPV ,QIR 388-­4095.   Solar  open  house  in  Ferrisburgh.  Saturday,  April   6,   1-­3   p.m.,   1096   Route   7.   Come   see   how   the   Co-­op   Solar   hot-­water   heating   program   works,   get   the   details   and   learn   about   incentives.   Program  ends  April  30.  Sign  up  online  at  www. co-­opsolar.net.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fractured  Fairy  Talesâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.   Saturday,   April   6,   2-­4   p.m.,   Vergennes   Opera   House.  Little  City  Players  present  this  collection   of  classic  stories,  with  a  twist.  Tickets  $12  adults,   $10  seniors  and  students,  available  at  the  VOH,   Classic   Stitching   in   Vergennes   or   www.vergen-­ nesoperahouse.org.  Also  on  April  7.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  Darknessâ&#x20AC;?  screening  at  Middlebury  College.   6DWXUGD\$SULOSP'DQD$XGLWRULXP,Q German-­occupied  Ukraine,  a  blunt,  opportunistic   sewer   worker   takes   bribes   to   help   Jews   evade   capture  through  underground  tunnels,  but  even-­ tually   grows   committed   to   saving   their   lives.   )UHH,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXDUWV Jon  Gailmor  in  concert  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,   April   6,   3-­5   p.m.,   Middlebury   Municipal   Gym.   Gailmor,   a   beloved   Vermont   singer,   songwriter,   educator   and   performer,   will   give   a   concert   to   EHQHÂżWWKH0DU\-RKQVRQ&KLOGUHQÂśV&HQWHUDQG College   Street   Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Center.   Homemade   Âł7DNH +RPH 0HDOV´ ZLOO DOVR EH DYDLODEOH IRU sale.   Meal   to   serve   four   people:   $12,   including   side   salad.  Admission   $8   adults,   $5   children   8   and  older,  $2  for  children  under  8.  Tickets  avail-­ able  at  the  door  or  at  Mary  Johnson  or  College   Street  childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  centers.   Pajama  story  time  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  April     SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ .LGV DUH LQYLWHG WR drop   in   and   enjoy   a   special   evening   story   time   complete  with  games  and  crafts.  Hosted  by  the   Middlebury  College  Page  One  Literacy  program.   3DMDPDVHQFRXUDJHG,QIR Spring   Fling   Pasta   Dinner   &   Dance   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   April   6,   6-­11   p.m.,   American   Legion   Post   27.   Eighth   annual   fund-­ raiser   to   support   the   Vermont   National   Guard   Charitable  Foundation  and  other  causes.  Social   hour  6  p.m.,  spaghetti  and  meatball  dinner  at  7   SPPXVLFDQGGDQFLQJSP0XVLFE\,YRU\  UDIĂ&#x20AC;H VLOHQW DXFWLRQ 7LFNHWV  GLQQHU and   dance,   $8   dance   only   (after   8   p.m.),   avail-­ DEOHDWWKH/HJLRQLQDGYDQFHRUDWWKHGRRU,QIR 388-­9931  or  352-­1027.   Chris   Dorman   and   His   PBRs   in   concert   in   Ripton.  Saturday,  April  6,  7:30-­9:30  p.m.,  Ripton   Community   House.   The   Ripton   Community   Coffee  House  welcomes  singer-­songwriter  Chris   Dorman   and   his   PBRs:   Philip   Halteman,   Brett   Hughes  and  Ryan  Hayes.  One-­hour  open  mike   at  7:30  p.m.  followed  by  the  featured  performers.   5HIUHVKPHQWVEHQHÂżWWKH)ULHQGVRIWKH5LSWRQ Church.   Adults   $9,   seniors   and   teens   $6,   chil-­ GUHQ,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;In  Darknessâ&#x20AC;?  screening  at  Middlebury  College.   Saturday,   April   6,   8-­10   p.m.,   Dana   Auditorium.   ,Q *HUPDQRFFXSLHG 8NUDLQH D EOXQW RSSRUWX-­ nistic   sewer   worker   takes   bribes   to   help   Jews   evade  capture  through  underground  tunnels,  but   eventually  grows  committed  to  saving  their  lives.   )UHH,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGXDUWV Contradance   in   Bristol.   Saturday,   April   6,   8-­11   p.m.,   Holley   Hall.   Alison   James   calling,   with   music   by  Toss   the   Feathers.  All   dances   will   be  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  9

communitycalendar taught;  no   experience   necessary.   Beginners   workshop   at   7:30   p.m.   Admission   $5-­$10;   SURFHHGV WR EHQHÂżW DFRXVWLF LPSURYHPHQWV WR the  hall.  Info:  453-­4613.   Sophie   Shao   and   Friends   in   concert   at   Middlebury   College.   Saturday,   April   6,   8-­10   p.m.,   Mahaney   Center   for   the   Arts.   Cellist   Shao  and  friends  return  as  a  quartet  to  perform   Brahmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Piano   Quartet   in   A   Major   and   a   %HHWKRYHQSLDQRWULR5HVHUYHGVHDWLQJ7LFNHWV $25/20/6.   Info:   443-­3168   or   www.middlebury. edu/arts.  

Apr

7

Apr

11

SUNDAY

Pancake  breakfast  in  Starksboro.   Sunday,   April   7,   7-­10:30   a.m.,   5RELQVRQ (OHPHQWDU\ 6FKRRO 7KLUWHHQWK DQQXDO DOO\RXFDQHDW EUHDNIDVW homemade   buttermilk   pancakes,   scrambled   eggs,   McKenzie   of   Vermont   bacon   and   sausage,   local   cider,   home   fries,   toast,   juice,   coffee,  tea  and  Starksboro  maple  syrup.  Adults   $8,  seniors  and  kids  $5.  Mini  silent  auction  and   D 5HG 6R[ UDIĂ&#x20AC;H IRU WZR WLFNHWV WR D JDPH DW )HQZD\WKLVVXPPHU7REHQHÂżWWKH6WDUNVERUR sports  program.  Info,  or  to  help  out:  453-­4074.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fractured  Fairy  Talesâ&#x20AC;?  on  stage  in  Vergennes.   Sunday,   April   7,   2-­4   p.m.,   Vergennes   Opera   House.   Little   City   Players   present   this   collec-­ WLRQRIFODVVLFVWRULHVZLWKDWZLVW7LFNHWV DGXOWV  VHQLRUV DQG VWXGHQWV DYDLODEOH at   the   VOH,   Classic   Stitching   in   Vergennes   or   ZZZYHUJHQQHVRSHUDKRXVHRUJ Tracy   Silverman   in   concert   with   the   CPO   in   Middlebury.6XQGD\$SULOSP7RZQ+DOO 7KHDWHU(OHFWULFYLROLQYLUWXRVR7UDF\6LOYHUPDQ joins  the  Champlain  Philharmonic  Orchestra  for   DXQLTXHFRQFHUWDQGWKHSUHPLHURIÂł(PEUDFH´ DSLHFHIRUHOHFWULFYLROLQDQGRUFKHVWUDE\.HQML %XQFKÂł(PEUDFH´WDNHVWKHIRUPRIDĂ&#x20AC;DVKPRE and  includes  elements  of  Afrobeat,  Indian  music   DQGJRVSHO7LFNHWVDGXOWVVHQLRUV VWXGHQWVIHHIRUNLGV\RXQJHUWKDQ7LFNHWV DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  RU www.townhalltheater.org,  or  at  the  door.  

Apr

8

MONDAY

Legislative  breakfast   in   Shoreham.   Monday,   April   8,   7-­8:45   a.m.,   Shoreham   Congregational   Church.  Breakfast  at  7  a.m.,  program  7:30-­8:45.   Kindergarten   registration   and   orientation   in   Salisbury. 0RQGD\ $SULO   DP SP Salisbury   Community   School.   Choose   one   of   WKUHH VHVVLRQV  DP  DP RU  p.m.  Kindergartners  can  explore  the  classroom   and  meet  the  teachers  and  staff.  Children  who   are  5  by  Sept.  1  are  eligible  to  attend  kindergar-­ WHQ3OHDVHEULQJWKHFKLOGœVELUWKFHUWL¿FDWHDQG LPPXQL]DWLRQUHFRUG&DOO'RQQDDWWR let  her  know  which  session  you  will  attend.  

Apr

9

TUESDAY

Behind-­the-­Scenes  Lunch   and   Discussion  at  Middlebury  College.   7XHVGD\ $SULO   SP :ULJKW 0HPRULDO 7KHDWHU +HDU D GLVFXVVLRQ with   cast,   crew   members   and   the   audience   about  the  upcoming  production  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undressing   &LQGHUHOOD$ )HVWLYDO RI 1HZ 3OD\V´ /XQFK LV free  to  college  ID  holders;  community  donations   are  accepted.  Info:  www.middlebury.edu/arts  or   443-­3168.   Culinary   herbs   presentation   in   Middlebury.   7XHVGD\ $SULO   SP ,OVOH\ /LEUDU\ 7KH Middlebury  Garden  Club  welcomes  past  presi-­ dent   Shari   Johnson,   who   will   discuss   culinary   KHUEV )UHH 5HIUHVKPHQWV VHUYHG ,QIR  3UHVHQWDWLRQ RQ RFHDQ DFLGLÂżFDWLRQ DW Middlebury   College. 7XHVGD\$SULO   SP )UDQNOLQ (QYLURQPHQWDO &HQWHU 2UFKDUG  /LEE\ -HZHWW GLUHFWRU RI 12$$ÂśV 2FHDQ $FLGLÂżFDWLRQ 3URJUDP SUHVHQWV Âł2FHDQ $FLGLÂżFDWLRQ:KDWÂśV,W*RWWR'R:LWK2\VWHUV"´ 7KH WDON GLVFXVVHV KRZ WKH ULVH LQ DWPR-­ spheric  CO2  is  already  causing  harm  to  marine   ecosystems.  

Music  on  the  mountain SINGER-­SONGWRITER  CHRIS  DORMAN  performs  with  his  â&#x20AC;&#x153;PBRsâ&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Philip  Halte-­ man  on  upright  and  electric  bass,  Brett  Hughes  on  harmonies  and  electric  guitar  and   mandolin,  and  Ryan  Hayes  on  drums  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  at  the  Ripton  Community  Coffee  House  on   Saturday,  April  6,  at  7:30  p.m. The   Harlem   Superstars   comedy   basketball   team  in  Bristol.7XHVGD\$SULOSP Mount   Abraham   Union   High   School   gymna-­ VLXP 7KH +DUOHP 6XSHUVWDUV SOD\ DJDLQVW WKH %ULVWRO'UHDP7HDPPDGHXSRIWKH0RXQW$EH FRDFKLQJ VWDII DQG ÂżYH JLUOV IURP WKH YDUVLW\ basketball  team.  Family  fun,  trick  shots,  dunks,   PXVLF GDQFLQJ DQG DQ LQWHUDFWLYH KDOIWLPH VKRZ$GYDQFHWLFNHWVDYDLODEOHDW0DUWLQÂśV +DUGZDUH DQG WKH VFKRRO RIÂżFH7LFNHWV DW WKH door  $10.  Buy  tickets  early;  this  will  be  a  sellout.  

Apr

10

WEDNESDAY

Rural  Vermont  annual  celebration   in  Vergennes.  Wednesday,  April  10,    SP 9HUJHQQHV 2SHUD +RXVH 5XUDO9HUPRQWVXSSRUWHUVIURPDURXQGWKHVWDWH JDWKHU IRU D VSHFLDO HYHQLQJ IHDWXULQJ NH\QRWH speaker   Philip   Ackerman-­Leist   of   Green   Mountain  College.  Finger  food  potluck,  wine  and   EHHU FDVK EDU XQLTXH UDIĂ&#x20AC;H SUL]HV 'RQDWLRQV EHQHÂżW 5XUDO 9HUPRQW ,QIR DQG 5693   RUVKHOE\#UXUDOYHUPRQWRUJ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wyethâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Spaceâ&#x20AC;?  poetry  reading  and  presenta-­ tion   in   Middlebury. :HGQHVGD\$SULO   p.m.,  Ilsley  Library.  Cornwall  poet  Gary  Margolis  

will  read  poems  from  his  latest  collection,  a  book   that  responds  to  paintings  by  Andrew  Wyeth  in   0DLQHDQG3HQQV\OYDQLD6OLGHVRIWKHSDLQWLQJV ZLOOEHVKRZQ,QIR Historical  society  presentation  in  Ferrisburgh.   Wednesday,  April   10,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Ferrisburgh   +LVWRULFDO 6RFLHW\ 5RXWH  6LODV 7RZOHU ZLOO UHYLHZ WKH GLVFRYHULHV EXULHG ZLWKLQ DQ 1842-­1843  credit  account  book  for  the  general   store   that   once   stood   on   the   Ferrisburgh   town   green.  Free.  All  are  welcome.   Mount  Abe  Family  Swim  in  Bristol.  Wednesday,   $SULOSP0$8+6SRRO&RVWSHU IDPLO\SHULQGLYLGXDO,QIR â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undressing   Cinderella:   A   Festival   of   New   Playsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   at   Middlebury   College.   Wednesday,   April   10,   8-­10   p.m.,   Wright   0HPRULDO 7KHDWHU .LFNLQJ RII 0LGGOHEXU\ÂśV LQDXJXUDO 1HZ 3OD\ )HVWLYDO SOD\ZULJKWV IURP DURXQG WKH QDWLRQ KDYH WXUQHG WKH &LQGHUHOOD tale  upside  down,  writing  short  plays  using  any   character   other   than   Cinderella   as   the   main   IRFXV7ZRGLIIHUHQWSOD\VHOHFWLRQV3URJUDP$ to  be  presented  April  10  and  12;  program  B  to   EHSUHVHQWHG$SULODQG7LFNHWV Info:  www.middlebury.edu/arts  or  443-­3168.  

THURSDAY

Monthly  wildlife   walk   in   Middlebury. 7KXUVGD\ $SULO  8-­10   a.m.,   Otter   View   Park   and   Hurd   *UDVVODQG$PRQWKO\2&$60$/7HYHQWLQYLW-­ LQJ FRPPXQLW\ PHPEHUV WR KHOS VXUYH\ ELUGV and  other  wildlife.  Meet  at  Otter  View  Park  park-­ ing   area,   corner   of   Weybridge   Street   and   Pulp   0LOO %ULGJH 5RDG 6KRUWHU DQG ORQJHU URXWHV SRVVLEOH /HDGHU 5RQ 3D\QH &RPH IRU DOO RU part   of   the   walk.   Beginning   birders   welcome.   ,QIRRU Senior   luncheon   in   Bristol. 7KXUVGD\ $SULO  11:30  a.m.-­1:30  p.m.,  Bristol  Masonic  Hall.  CVAA   VSRQVRUV WKLV IDYRULWH PHDO 0HQX VKHSKHUGÂśV pie,   soup   and   salad,   and   dessert.   Suggested   GRQDWLRQ  5HVHUYDWLRQV UHTXLUHG  7UDQVSRUWDWLRQYLD$&75 Lecture   on   BPA/plastics   and   research   at   Middlebury  College.7KXUVGD\$SULO SP%LFHQWHQQLDO+DOO5RRP7KH%LRORJ\ Department   welcomes   guest   speaker   Patricia   +XQWRI:DVKLQJWRQ6WDWH8QLYHUVLW\ZLWKDWDON WLWOHGÂł3ODVWLFV%LVSKHQRO$ %3$ DQG5HVHDUFK Credibility:   When   a   Scientist   Collides   With   ,QGXVWU\DQGWKH0HGLD´,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\ edu/academics/bio/news.  Free.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Armchair   Visit   to   Chinaâ&#x20AC;?   presentation   in   Middlebury. 7KXUVGD\ $SULO   SP Ilsley   Library.   Addison   County   resident   Mike   1RUULV ZLOO VKDUH VWRULHV DQG SKRWRV RI KLV recent  trip  to  China,  including  Beijing,  Shanghai,   6X]KRXDQG+DQJ]KRX,QIR Visiting  architect  lecture  at  Middlebury  College.   7KXUVGD\$SULOSP-RKQVRQ0HPRULDO %XLOGLQJ 5RRP  &DUO )UHGULN 6YHQVWHGW D Swedish-­born,  Yale-­trained  architect  now  based   LQ 3DULV SUHVHQWV Âł%XLOW8QEXLOW´ )UHH ,QIR www.middlebury.edu/arts  or  443-­3168.   Northeast   Tenor   Sax   Summit   in   concert   in   Brandon. 7KXUVGD\ $SULO   SP Brandon   Music.   A   unique   band   comprised   of   VHYHUDO RI 1HZ (QJODQGÂśV SURIHVVLRQDO WHQRU saxophonists   backed   by   a   premium   rhythm   section.   Part   of   Brandon   Musicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   monthly   jazz   VHULHV *HQHUDO DGPLVVLRQ  UHVHUYDWLRQV HQFRXUDJHG,QIR   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Undressing   Cinderella:   A   Festival   of   New   Playsâ&#x20AC;?   on   stage   at   Middlebury   College.   7KXUVGD\$SULO   SP :ULJKW 0HPRULDO 7KHDWHU.LFNLQJRII0LGGOHEXU\ÂśVLQDXJXUDO1HZ 3OD\)HVWLYDOSOD\ZULJKWVIURPDURXQGWKHQDWLRQ KDYH WXUQHG WKH &LQGHUHOOD WDOH XSVLGH GRZQ writing   short   plays   using   any   character   other   WKDQ&LQGHUHOODDVWKHPDLQIRFXV7ZRGLIIHUHQW play  selections:  Program  A  to  be  presented  April   10  and  12;  program  B  to  be  presented  April  11   DQG7LFNHWV,QIRZZZPLGGOHEXU\ edu/arts  or  443-­3168.  

LIVEMUSIC Sound  Investment   Jazz   Ensemble   in   Middlebury.  Friday,  April  5,  8-­10  p.m.,  51  Main.   3  Sheets  2  the  Wind  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  April   SPPLGQLJKW7ZR%URWKHUV7DYHUQ Soule   Monde   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   April   6,   8-­11  p.m.,  51  Main.   The   Wheelers   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,  April   6,   SPPLGQLJKW7ZR%URWKHUV7DYHUQ Dayve  Huckett  in  Middlebury.7KXUVGD\$SULO 5-­7  p.m.,  51  Main.   Snake   Mountain   Bluegrass   and   the   Connor   Sisters  in  Middlebury.7KXUVGD\$SULO p.m.,  51  Main.   Zack  duPont  Trio  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  April  12,   SP7ZR%URWKHUV7DYHUQ The  Engines  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  April  12,  8-­11   p.m.,  51  Main.   Casio  Bastard  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  April  12,  10   SPPLGQLJKW7ZR%URWKHUV7DYHUQ

See  an  extended  calendar  and     a  full  listing  of  

O N G O I N G E V E NT S

on  the  Web  at

www.addisonindependent.com


PAGE  10  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Pros to perform Mahler and Brahms Award-­winning  cellist  Sophie  Shao   Tchaikovsky   competitions.   Just   this   will   return   at   8   p.m.   on   Saturday   to   season,   she   performed   the   premiere   perform   a   program   of   Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   RI ÂżOP FRPSRVHU +RZDUG 6KRUHÂśV String   Trio   in   D   Major,   concerto   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mythic   Gar-­ Mahlerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Piano   Quartet   densâ&#x20AC;?  with  the  American   in  A   Minor,   and   Brahmsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Symphony  Orchestra,  she   epic   Piano   Quartet   in   A   played  the  complete  Bach   Major   in   the   concert   hall   Suites  (in  one  evening)  at   at   Middlebury   Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Union   College,   and   led   Mahaney   Center   for   the   her  annual  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sophie  Shao   Arts.   Shao   will   be   joined   and   Friendsâ&#x20AC;?   tour   from   BY GREG PAHL Middlebury   to   Sedona,   by  violinist  Frank  Huang;Íž   violist  Roger  Tapping;Íž  and   Ariz.   frequent   Series   guest   pianist   Pei-­Yao   Violinist   Frank   Huang   was   ap-­ Wang. pointed  concertmaster  of  the  Houston   Shao  is  a  highly  accomplished  cel-­ 6\PSKRQ\LQ+HZDVÂżUVWSUL]H-­ list   with   a   string   of   accolades   and   winner   of   both   the   2003   Naumburg   honors  to  her  credit.  She  received  an   Competition   and   the   2000   Hannover   Avery   Fisher   Career   Grant,   and   won   International  Violin  Competitions. top   prizes   at   the  Rostropovich   and   Roger  Tapping  played  in  a  number   of  Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  leading  chamber  ensem-­ bles   before   joining   Britainâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   longest   established   quartet,   the  Allegri   Quar-­ tet.   In   1995,   he   joined   the   esteemed   TakĂĄcs  Quartet  in  the  U.S. Pianist   Pei-­Yao   Wang   made   her   orchestral  debut  with  the  Taipei  Sym-­ phony   Orchestra   at   the   age   of   eight,   and   has   since   performed   throughout   the  United  States,  Canada,  Europe  and   Asia.   Tickets   are   $25   for   the   general   public.   For   more   i n f o r m a t i o n ,   call   443-­6433   or   go   to   http:// go.middlebury. edu/arts.   Free   parking  is  available. RIPTON  COFFEE   HOUSE The   Ripton   Com-­ munity  Coffee  House,   D QRQSURÂżW FRPPX-­ nity  concert  series,  wel-­ comes   Chris   Dorman   and   His  PBRs  on  Saturday,  at  the  Rip-­ ton  Community  House. Singer-­songwriter  Dorman  is  a   IDPLO\PDQDQGKLVVRQJVUHĂ&#x20AC;HFW FRANK  HUANG

arts beat

email us: You can reach us at

news@addisonindependent.com

that.  In  Dormanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   music   you   can   KHDU WKH LQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFH of   folk   musicians   from   the   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;60s   and   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;70s  like  James  Tay-­ lor,  Joni  Mitchell,  and   story  tellers  like  Greg   Brown.   The   timbre   of   his   voice   has   been   compared   to   James   Taylor,   and   he   accom-­ panies   himself   on   acoustic  guitar. Dorman   has   two   albums,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;To   Be   Born   Againâ&#x20AC;?   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sita.â&#x20AC;?   Reviewing   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sitaâ&#x20AC;?   in  Seven  Days,  Dan  Bolles  wrote  that   Dorman  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  profoundly  talented  and   ambitious   songwriter   who   is   some-­ thing  of  a  sonic  chameleon.  And  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Sitaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   is  as  unpredictable  as  it  is  fascinating   and  rewarding,  regardless  of  how  you   categorize  it.â&#x20AC;?   The  PBRs  include  legendary  musi-­ cian   Brett   Hughes   on   harmonies   and   electric   guitar   and   mandolin,   Philip   Halteman  on  upright  and  electric  bass,   and  Ryan  Hayes  on  drums.   As   always,   the   concert   begins   at   7:30  p.m.  with  a  one-­hour  open  mike   set,  followed  by  the  featured  perform-­ ers.  Open-­mike  performers  are  encour-­ aged  to  call  in  advance  and  reserve  one   RIWKHÂżYHRSHQPLNHVORWV

SOPHIE  SHAO Admission  to  the  coffeehouse  is  $9   for   adults,   $6   for   seniors   and   teens,   and  $3  for  children.  The  coffeehouse   LV KHOG RQ WKH ÂżUVW 6DWXUGD\ RI HDFK month,   except   August.   For   more   in-­ formation,   contact   Richard   Ruane   or   Andrea  Chesman  at  388-­9782. CPO  AT  THT The   violin   is   over   400   years   old,   but  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  still  evolving  as  a  musical  in-­ VWUXPHQW (OHFWULÂżHG LW KDV D UDQJH of   colors   and   timbres   that   Mozart   could   only   dream   about.   Tracy   Sil-­ verman  has  been  called  the  greatest   living  exponent  of  the  electric  violin,   and   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   join   the   Champlain   Phil-­ harmonic  Orchestra  for  a  concert  at   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Town  Hall  Theater  on   Sunday  at  4  p.m. Conductor   Paul   Gambill   has   cre-­ ated   a   program   that   includes  Tchai-­ kovskyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Symphony   No.   5,   Marin   Van  Burenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life,â&#x20AC;?  and  the  premiere   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Embrace,â&#x20AC;?   a   piece   for   electric   violin  and  orchestra  by  Kenji  Bunch. The   new   composition   has   an   un-­ XVXDO LQVSLUDWLRQ ² WKH Ă&#x20AC;DVK PRE Bunch   begins   the   work   with   a   solo   violin   on   stage.   Music   gradually   emerges   from   offstage,   from   the   back   of   the   hall,   and   from   the   au-­ dience   itself,   surrounding   and   em-­ bracing  the  audience.  Bunch  usually   works   within   the   tradition   of   West-­ ern  form  and  harmony,  but  this  piece   is  built  on  hypnotic  rhythmic  drives   and   improvisation,   and   includes   el-­ ements   of   Afrobeat,   Indian   music,   and  gospel. Tickets   are   $15   adults,   $12   se-­ niors,  $10  students,  and  free  for  chil-­ dren  under  12  and  may  be  purchased   at   townhalltheater.org,   at   382-­9222,   DW WKH 7+7 %R[ 2IÂżFH 0RQGD\ Saturday,   noon   to   5   p.m.)   or   at   the   door. â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;GREAT  EXPECTATIONSâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; This  season  the  talk  of  London  is   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great   Expectations,â&#x20AC;?   a   spectacular   staging   of   Dickensâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   classic,   which   will   be   broadcast   at   7:30   p.m.   on   (See  Arts  Beat,  Page  11)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of April 1 THE Â WHEELERS

Arts  Beat (Continued  from  Page  10) Friday   at   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Town   Hall   Theater. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Great   Expectationsâ&#x20AC;?   has   never   been  produced  for  The  West  End  or   Broadway,  widely  believed  to  be  too   GLIÂżFXOW WR WUDQVODWH WR VWDJH +RZ-­ ever,  this  Jo  Clifford  adaptation  has   been  universally  acclaimed  as  a  tri-­ umph   on   its   sellout   tour   of   the   UK   ahead  of  its  West  End  debut.  This  is   a  Tim  Burton-­esque  take  on  the  sto-­ U\HHULHDQGDOZD\VVXUSULVLQJZLWK D VWXQQLQJ VHW DQG HYHQ DQ RQVWDJH ÂżUH7KHSURGXFWLRQSXOOVRXWDOORI WKH VWRSV LQ FUHDWLQJ 3LSÂśV MRXUQH\ WKURXJKOLIH The  London  press  have  hailed  the   SURGXFWLRQ DV D ÂżYHVWDU KLW 7KH Times   calls   it   â&#x20AC;&#x153;pure   theater,   inven-­ WLYH SK\VLFDO DQG WKULOOLQJ´ 7KH Telegraph   raves   about   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;dream-­ like   qualityâ&#x20AC;?   of   the   production,   and   FDOOVLWDÂłVWULNLQJSLHFHRIWKHDWUH´ Tickets   are   $17   and   may   be   pur-­ FKDVHG DW WRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJ DW  DW WKH 7+7 %R[ 2IÂżFH (Monday-­Saturday,   noon   to   5   p.m.)   or  at  the  door. VIOLINIST  MARY  ROWELL   New   music   proponent,   violinist,   DQG 0LGGOHEXU\ &ROOHJH $IÂżOLDWH $UWLVW0DU\5RZHOOZLOOSHUIRUPPX-­ sic  for  violin,  viola  and  electronics  in   a  free  concert  at  8  p.m.  on  Friday,  at   WKH0DKDQH\&HQWHUIRUWKH$UWV Her  concert,  entitled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Let  Me  Tell   You   Where   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   Been,â&#x20AC;?   will   follow   5RZHOOÂśV XQLTXH PXVLFDO MRXUQH\ DV a   professional   violinist   in   the   20th   DQGVWFHQWXULHV7KHSURJUDPZLOO feature   contemporary   works   written   IRU5RZHOO&RPSRVHU%HJODULDQZLOO MRLQ5RZHOODVDVSHFLDOJXHVWZRUN-­ LQJWKHHOHFWURQLFVRQWKHSURJUDP 5RZHOO KDV DSSHDUHG DV VRORLVW with   some   of   the   worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   most   rec-­ RJQL]HG PXVLFDO RUJDQL]DWLRQV DQG

has  also   toured,   performed,   and   re-­ corded   with   some   of   the   worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   PRVW QRWDEOH PXVLFLDQV LQFOXGLQJ 7RGG 5XQGJUHQ 0DGRQQD 3DXOD Cole,   Billy   Joel,   John   Lurie,   Steve   Coleman  and  Scott  Johnson. $GPLVVLRQ LV IUHH QR WLFNHWV are   required.   For   more   informa-­ WLRQ FDOO  RU JR WR KWWS JRPLGGOHEXU\HGXDUWV â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;FRACTURED  FAIRY  TALESâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; /LWWOH &LW\ 3OD\HUV FRQWLQXHV LWV tales   with   a   twist   this   Friday   at   the   9HUJHQQHV2SHUD+RXVHZLWKLWVSUR-­ duction  of  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fractured  Fairy  Talesâ&#x20AC;?  at   SP5HSHDWSHUIRUPDQFHVZLOO be  on  Saturday  and  Sunday  at  2  p.m. The  show  is  a  collection  of  some   of  the  classic  stories  we  know  from   our   childhood   tweaked,   turned   DURXQGDQGPDVKHGWRJHWKHULQZD\V both  witty  and  whimsical.  The  show   LVDSSURSULDWHIRUDOODJHV Co-­directed   by   Eileen   Corco-­ ran,   Brian   Torstenson   and   Melinda   8PH]DNL WKLV ZLWW\ FROOHFWLRQ RI stories  features  a  cast  of  18  local  ac-­ WRUV WKDW UDQJH LQ DJH IURP  \HDUV old  to  over  70.   Tickets  for  the  production  are  $12   IRU DGXOWV DQG  IRU VHQLRUVVWX-­ dents  and  are  available  at  the  VOH,   &ODVVLF 6WLWFKLQJ LQ 9HUJHQQHV RU RQOLQH DW YHUJHQQHVRSHUDKRXVHRUJ For  more  information  call  877-­6737. JON  GAILMOR  BENEFIT On  Saturday,  the  Mary  Johnson  and   &ROOHJH6WUHHWFKLOGUHQÂśVFHQWHUVZLOO KRVWD-RQ*DLOPRUEHQHÂżWFRQFHUWDW the  Middlebury  Municipal  Gym  from   3  to  5  p.m.  There  will  be  two  hours  of   PXVLFDQGGDQFLQJ²JUHDWIRUPX-­ VLFORYHUVRIDOODJHV7KLVFRQFHUWLV open  to  the  public  and  is  a  fundraiser   for  MJCC  and  CSCC. Gailmor   is   a   beloved   Vermont   VLQJHU VRQJZULWHU HGXFDWRU DQG (See  Beat,  Page  13)

$5,(6 0$5&+ $35,/  6RPH FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFW-­ than  later   and   make   the   most   of   your   emotions   LQJVLJQDOVIURPDIULHQGWKLVZHHNPLJKWVHHPOLNH ZKLOHWKH\ÂśUHVWURQJ trouble  is  ahead.  But  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  more  likely  that  your  per-­ 6$*,77$5,86129(0%(5'(&(0%(5 ception  of  the  situation  is   21   Learn   from   the   past   a  little  off. but  do  not  allow  letdowns   7$8586 $35,/  from   the   past   to   dictate   0$<  <RXU LPDJLQD-­ your   future.   There   is   no   tion  has  a  life  of  its  own   JXDUDQWHHWKDWWKLQJVZLOO this   week.   You   may   be   be  repeated.   WKLQNLQJ RI OLYLQJ RQ WKH &$35,&251 '(-­ HGJH D OLWWOH ELW LQ WKH &(0%(5-$18$5< next   few   days   but   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t    :ULWH WKLQJV GRZQ overdo  it. this  week  before  you  say   *(0,1, 0$<  them  to  be  sure  you  have   -81(  $YRLG D GHHS HYHU\WKLQJ FRUUHFW 7KLV 383  Exchange  Street discussion   about   your   will   help   you   when   you   Â&#x2026;ÂĄÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;¤Â?Â&#x161;­ª¹Ă&#x2C6;388-­2221 IHHOLQJVZLWKVRPHRQHDW need   to   make   an   impor-­ work   this   week.   Now   is   tant  announcement. not  the  time  or  the  place   www.cacklinhens.com $48$5,86 -$18-­ WR VKDUH DQ\WKLQJ SHU-­ $5<)(%58$5< sonal,   so   keep   it   profes-­ You  may  feel  like  escap-­ sional. LQJ WR D IDQWDV\ ZRUOG &$1&(5 -81( but   that   does   not   mean   -8/<  'RQÂśW JHW WKH SUHVVLQJ PDWWHUV ZLOO sidetracked   this   week   VLPSO\GLVDSSHDU$YDFD-­ A Gallon of because   coworkers   are   WLRQ PD\ UHFKDUJH \RXU Regal Select Interior H[SHFWLQJ \RXU IXOO DW-­ batteries. tention   and   effort   at   the   3,6&(6 )(%58$5< RIÂżFH <RX PD\ QHHG WR 0$5&+  <RX DUH MXJJOHDIHZUHVSRQVLELOL-­ in   much   better   shape   WLHVIRUWKHWLPHEHLQJ than   you   think   you   are.   /(2 -8/< $8-­ So   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   too   hard   on   GUST  23  Make  sure  you   yourself   this   week.   It   is   Offer good through Limit 4 comments   are   not   mis-­ DOO ULJKW WR SXW \RXU IHHW Saturday 4/13/13. per household. interpreted   this   week.   up. &UHHN5G0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021;0)Â&#x2021;6DW 6RPHRQH PLJKW WDNH Â&#x2021;www.countrysidecarpetandpaint.com VRPHWKLQJ WKH ZURQJ FAMOUS way,   so   choose   your   BIRTHDAYS words  carefully. 0$5&+ 9,5*2 $8*867 (ZDQ0F*UHJRU$FWRU 6(37(0%(5  (42) <RXPD\EHIHHOLQJJUHDW $35,/ physically,   but   there   is   a   5DFKHO 0DGGRZ 79 QDJJLQJSUREOHPWKDW\RX Host  (40) simply   cannot   identify.   $35,/ Give   it   time   and   it   will   $GDP 5RGULJXH] $F-­ come  to  the  surface. tor  (38) /,%5$6(37(0%(5 $35,/ 2&72%(5  <RX $OHF %DOGZLQ $FWRU 388-2800 know  what  you  want  and   (55) do  not  need  anyoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ap-­ $35,/ Your Bridal Specialist! proval,  but  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  help   &KULVWLQH /DKWL $F-­ Mon.  -­  Fri.  9  -­  5:30,  Sat.  9-­2 FKHFNLQJLQZLWKDIDPLO\ tress  (63) ZZZPLGGOHEXU\Ă&#x20AC;RUDODQGJLIWVFRP PHPEHUWKLVZHHNWRJHW $35,/ 5W6RXWK0LGGOHEXU\ a  second  opinion. Mike   McCready,   Gui-­ 6&253,2 2&72-­ tarist  (47) %(5 129(0%(5  &KDQQHO \RXU URPDQWLF $35,/ IHHOLQJV LQWR DFWLRQ WKLV ZHHN $FW VRRQHU UDWKHU &DQGDFH&DPHURQ$FWUHVV 

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PAGE  12  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Addison Independent Puzzles This  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  puzzle  is  rated

The  Real  Thing By  Myles  Mellor  and  Sally  York

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Down

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1.  Witty  ones

32.  Broadway  opening?

5. Â About

2.  Genesis  brother

33.  Shows  approval

10. Â Jackknife

34.  Diacritical  mark

14. Â Touch

3.  Nickname  for   football  coach  Bill   Parcells

15.  Relating  to  a  district

4. Â Dwarf

16. Â Computerphile

38.  Inspiration  for  poets   and  musicians

5.  Jail,  slangily

17.  Real  things

41.  Jersey  call

6.  E.U.  member

20.  Loose  talk?

42. Â Sanction

7. Â Behind

21.  Trial  run,  of  a  type

43.  Most  fairylike

8.  Chocolate  substitute

22.  Nip  partner

48.  Like  some  decrees

9.  Language  group

36

25.  The  facts  of  life?

49.  Italian,  e.g.

10.  Way  in  or  out

26.  Island  chain

53.  Musical  notation

40

11.  Archipelago  part

29. Â Nonpareil

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55.  Coffee  cup  holders,  in   the  Middle  East

44

31.  Womanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hat

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56.  Impress  clearly

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19.  Baal,  e.g.

58.  Fast  pace

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69

70

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71

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3

4

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6

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11

12

13

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34

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28

23

24

29

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31

32

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54.  Court  attention-­getter 56.  Turns  into  money 61.  Lively  dance 65.  Witness  stand   requirement 68.  Cheat

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5

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This  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  puzzle  solutions can  be  found  on  Page  31.

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Sudoku Each  Sudoku  puzzle  consists  of  a  9x9  grid  that  has  been   subdivided  into  nine  smaller  grids  of  3x3  squares.  To  solve  the   puzzle  each  row,  column  and  box  must  contain  each  of  the   numbers  1  to  9.  Puzzles  come  in  three  grades:  easy,  medium   DQGGLI¿FXOW Level:  Medium.    

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  13

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(Continued  from  Page  11) performer.   His   funny   and   witty   tunes   are   ideal   for   kids,   grown-­ups   and   grown-­up   kids.  A   consummate   performer,  his  love  of  music  comes   across  and  infects  the  audience,  giv-­ ing  a  charge  of  happiness  to  every-­ one  around  him.   Admission   is   $8   for   adults,   $5   for   children   8   and   over   and   $2   for   children   under   8.   Tickets   will   be   available  at  the  door,  or  may  be  pur-­ chased  in  advance  at  Mary  Johnson   or  College  Street  childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  centers. TWO  BROTHERS  TAVERN There   will   be   two   live   musi-­ cal   performances   this   week   at   Two   Brothers   Tavern   in   Middlebury.   On   Friday,   the   tavern   will   feature   3   Sheets   2  The  Wind,   beginning   at   10   p.m.   This   is   a   cover   band   with   a   large   musical   vocabulary   and   ad-­ venturous   spirit.   Tight   rhythms,   three-­part   harmonies   and   non-­stop   fun.  There  is  a  $3  cover. Then,   on   Saturday,   the   tavern   presents   The   Wheelers   at   10   p.m.   The   Wheelers   are   a   dance-­centric   cover   band   that   will   hit   you   with   your   favorite   tunes   of   the   last   30   years   with   an   authentic   Wheeler   sound.   Expect   genres   from   pop   to   reggae   to   rock,   and   everything   in   between.  There  is  a  $3  cover  charge.   For   more   information,   call   Two   Brothers  at  388-­0002. LIVE  MUSIC  AT  51  MAIN There  will  be  two  musical  events  

this  week  at  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  51  Main.   At  8  p.m.  on  Friday,  The  Sound  In-­ vestment  Jazz  Ensemble  takes  to  the   stage.  The  Ensemble  is  Middlebury   Collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   swinginâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   17-­piece   big   band. Then,  at  8  p.m.  on  Saturday,  Soule   Monde   will   perform.   Soule   Monde   is  a  funk  duo  with  Ray  Paczkowski   on  Hammond  organ  and  Russ  Law-­ ton  on  drums.  Groove  is  the  bottom   line  in  this  band. All  ages,  no  cover.  For  additional   information   visit   www.go51main. com  or  phone  388-­8209. INTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;L  FILM  SERIES 7KH +LUVFKÂżHOG ,QWHUQDWLRQDO Film   Series   continues   its   exciting   2012-­2013   series   on   Saturday   at   Middlebury   College   with   the   2011   3RODQG*HUPDQ\&DQDGD ÂżOP Âł,Q Darkness,â&#x20AC;?   directed   by   Agnieszka   Holland. In   German-­occupied   Ukraine,   a   blunt,   opportunistic   sewer   worker   takes  bribes  to  help  Jews  evade  cap-­ ture   in   a   network   of   subterranean   tunnels,  but  eventually  grows  com-­ mitted  to  saving  their  lives. Âł,Q'DUNQHVV´ZLOOEHVKRZQDW and  again  at  8  p.m.  in  Dana  Audito-­ rium.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free. CONTRA  DANCE  IN  BRISTOL There   will   be   a   contra   dance   on   Saturday,  at  8  p.m.  in  Holley  Hall  in   Bristol.  Lively  music  will  be  provid-­ ed  by  Toss  the  Feathers  (Rick  Cebal-­ los,  Bill  Drislane,  Matt  Witten)  with  

caller  Alison  James.  All  dances  will   be  taught.  No  experience  necessary.   There  will  be  a  beginnersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  workshop   DW  SP 3URFHHGV ZLOO EHQHÂżW acoustic   improvements   to   the   hall.   Admission   is     on   a   sliding   scale   of   $5-­$10.   Sponsored   by   Bristol   Rec-­ reation  Department.  For  more  infor-­ mation  call  453-­4613.

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PAGE  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Forest  workshop  to  be  held in  Bristol  on  Sat.,  April  13 BRISTOL   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Vermont   Fam-­ ily   Forests   and   Lewis   Creek   Association   will   co-­sponsor   a   free   workshop,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Forwarding   Path  and  Skid  Trail  Closureâ&#x20AC;?  on   Saturday,  April   13,   from   9   a.m.   to   noon   at   New   Leaf   Organics   Farm,   4818   Bristol-­Monkton   Road,  in  Bristol Participants  will  learn  how  to   properly   stabilize   and   close   out  

forest  skid  trails  and  forwarding   paths,  how  to  install  appropriate   trail  drainage,  and  how  to  assess   DQG ¿[ SUREOHP DUHDV RQ IRUHVW access  trails.  The  workshop  will   be  held  rain  or  shine. Pre-­registration   is   not   re-­ quired.   No   pets,   please.   For   more  information  call  453-­7728   or  visit  www.familyforests.org.

Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s centers to host Jon Gailmor MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Jon  Gailmor,   a   beloved   Vermont   singer,   song-­ writer,   educator   and   musician   will   perform  a  fun,  family-­friendly  con-­ cert  this  Saturday,  April  6,  as  a  fun-­ draiser  for  the  Mary  Johnson  Chil-­ drenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Center  and  the  College  Street   Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Center. 7KH EHQHÂżW FRQFHUW ZKLFK LV open   to   all,   will   take   place   at   the   Middlebury   municipal   gym   from   3-­5  p.m.  There  will  be  two  hours  of   music  and  dancing;Íž  organizers  said   it   will   be   great   for   music-­lovers   of   all  ages.  

Gailmorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  funny  and  wit-­ auction  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  proceeds  of   ty   tunes   are   ideal   for   kids,   In addition which  will  also  go  to  ben-­ grown-­ups   and   grown-­up   to great live HÂżWWKHWZRFHQWHUV kids.   A   consummate   per-­ entertainOrganizers  offered  their   former,   his   love   of   music   ment, there thanks   to   the   sponsors   infects  the  audience,  giving   will also whose   generous   support   a  charge  of  happiness  to  ev-­ make   this   concert   be a â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take helped   eryone  around  him. possible. In   addition   to   great   live   Home Admission   is   $8   for   entertainment,   there   will   Mealâ&#x20AC;? sale. adults,   $5   for   children   8   also   be   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Take   Home   and   over   and   $2   for   chil-­ Mealâ&#x20AC;?  sale.  There  will  be  delicious,   dren  under  8.  Tickets  will  be  avail-­ home-­made   packaged   meals   (com-­ able   at   the   door,   or   may   be   pur-­ plete   with   a   side   salad)   available   chased  in  advance  at  Mary  Johnson   for   purchase.   These   meals   are   a   or  College  Street  childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  centers.   perfect   solution   for   a   no-­fuss   din-­ There   will   also   be   a   ticket   given   ner  that  evening  after  the  show  (or,   away  on  Minibury.com. save   your   meal   for   another   night).   For   more   information   on   Mary   Take-­home   meals   suitable   for   four   Johnson   Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Center,   and   its   will  be  sold  for  $12.  There  will  also   DIÂżOLDWHGHDUO\FKLOGKRRGSURJUDPV be  a  healthy  snack  sale  and  a  silent   visit  www.mjccvt.org.

ADDISON COUNTY

School News Briefs

Ana  Fleming   of   Middlebury,   a   senior,   and   Lillian   Rosenberg   of   Cornwall,   a   junior,   earned   high   honors   on   the   winter   honor   roll   at   the   Loomis   Chaffee   School   in   Windsor,  Conn.

Kasee  Ingram   of   Vergennes   graduated  from  Charleston  Southern   University   in   December   2012   with   bachelor  of  arts  degrees  in  commu-­ nication  and  religion. Ingram   was   named   to   the   deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   list  for  the  fall  2012  semester.  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  15

CELEBRATE SPRING

Coloring & Decorating Contest 1- Color and decorate

this Springtime picture anyway you choose (you can use this one or photocopy it or draw/trace the outline the same size).

2- Have fun!

Get Creative!

3- Send your entry to: Addison Independent P.O. Box 31 Middlebury, VT 05753 or drop them off at 58 Maple Street (Marble Works) in Middlebury.

4- Entries must be in by: Wednesday, April 10 At 5pm

Name:

Two winners from each age group will win gift certificates from local businesses. All contestants will receive a prize which will be given when and if entries are picked up. Winners will be announced in the April 18 edition of the Addison Independent. All entries and prizes must be claimed by April 30th, 2013 at 5 p.m.

Age:

Parent/Guardianâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name: Address: City:

State:

Zip:

Phone: Age Group:

ADDISON COUNTY

under 5

5-6

7-8

9-11

12-15

16-Adult

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP


PAGE  16  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Menâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s lax unbeaten before weekend play

SPORTS MONDAY

MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  Middlebury  College   men  last  Wednesday  hung  on  to  top  visiting  NE-­ SCAC  foe  Hamilton,  6-­5. The  Panthers,  ranked  No.  11  in  NCAA  Divi-­ sion  III,  improved  to  6-­0  overall  and  4-­0  in  the   conference  heading  into  a  Saturday  home  game   vs.  Bowdoin  (4-­2,  2-­2  NESCAC).   On   Wednesday,   Hamil-­ ton  took  a  1-­0  lead  when   Pax   Anthos   scored   at   LQWKHÂżUVWTXDUWHU Middlebury   responded   LACROSSE with   three   goals   in   the   VHFRQGTXDUWHUIURP4XLQQ&URQLQDW$Q-­ GUHZ0HWURVDWDQG0LNH*LRUGDQRDW Hamilton  took  advantage  of  a  Panther  offensive   turnover  with  a  Paul  Armideo  goal  in  transition   ZLWKIRXUVHFRQGVOHIWLQWKHKDOIWRPDNHLW Hamiltonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ball-­control   and   deliberate   offen-­ sive  game  plan  kept  the  pace  slow,  but  Middle-­ bury   got   goals   from   Scott   Redmond   and   top   scorer  Jon  Broome  to  outscore  the  Continentals   E\LQWKHWKLUGDQGWDNHDOHDG 7KH3DQWKHUVPDGHLWLQWKHIRXUWKRQD Joel  Blockowitz  goal  off  a  nice  dodge  at  10:44.   +DPLOWRQ VFRUHG WZR JRDOV LQ WKH ÂżQDO PLQ-­ utes,  including  a  man-­up  tally  by  Luke  Walsh   with   0:52   to   play.   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Brian   Foster   then  won  the  decisive  faceoff  and  the  ground   ball.  Giordano  maintained  possession  for  most   RIWKHÂżQDOVHFRQGVWRVHFXUHWKHZLQ Billy  Chapman  got  the  lone  assist  for  Mid-­ dlebury.   Goalie   Nate   Gaudio   made   10   saves,   ZKLOH )RVWHU ZRQ  RI  IDFHRIIV DQG WLHG *LRUGDQRZLWKDJDPHKLJKÂżYHJURXQGEDOOV $UPLGHR SDFHG +DPLOWRQ  RYHUDOO  NESCAC)   with   two   goals,   and   goalie   Will   'ULVFROOPDGHVDYHV

panther

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lax  moves  to 6-­0  with  midweek  win HOBOKEN,  N.J.  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  Middlebury  College   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  lacrosse  team  defeated  host  Stevens  In-­ VWLWXWHODVW:HGQHVGD\DVVHQLRUPLGÂżHOGHU Margaret  Souther  recorded  a  hat  trick  that  includ-­ ed  the  100th  goal  of  her  career.   The   Panthers,   ranked   No.   4   in   NCAA   Divi-­ sion  III,  improved  to  6-­0  heading  into  a  Saturday   game  at  Bowdoin.   Middlebury  allowed  just  11  shots  in  the  game   MOUNT  ABRAHAM  UNION  High  School  junior  Ashlie  Fay  is  the  Addison  Independent  high  school  girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  basketball  player  of  the   and  scored  eight  straight  goals  through  the  mid-­ dle   of   the   contest.   Emma   Kramer   scored   two   year. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell JRDOVHDUO\WRSXWKHUWHDPXSDWRI WKHÂżUVWKDOI6WHYHQVVFRUHGWZRRIWKHQH[WIRXU before  Liza  Herzog  tallied  two  straight  to  put  the   3DQWKHUVXS&KULVV\5LWWHUQHWWHGWKHÂżQDO WDOO\RIWKHKDOIWRJLYH0LGGOHEXU\DOHDG Middlebury  then  opened  the  second  half  with   By  ANDY  KIRKALDY also  helped  that  the  Eagles  had  enough  depth   lead   her   old   Middlebury   team,   which   started   ÂżYHVWUDLJKWJRDOVWRPDNHLWZLWKUH-­ ADDISON   COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   It   was   a   dream   WR KDYH ÂżYH WHDP PHPEHUV LQ DOO UHFRJQL]HG out  0-­10  this  winter  and  then  went  5-­5  in  the   maining.   Five   Panthers   scored   during   the   deci-­ season   for   longtime   Coach   Connie   LaRoseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   RQWKHAddison  Independent  Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Bas-­ second   half   of   the   regular   season.   A   senior   sive  run. Mount   Abraham   Union   High   School   girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   ketball  All-­Star  Team   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   including   two   non-­ FDSWDLQDQGVSDUNSOXJHDUQHGDÂżUVWWHDPIn-­ +HU]RJ HTXDOHG 6RXWKHUÂśV HIIRUW ZLWK WKUHH basketball   team,   which   won   the   Division   II   starters.   dependent  berth.   goals,  and  Kramer  and  Ritter  scored  two  apiece.   WLWOHZLWKDUHFRUGWKDQNVWRVNLOOWHDP-­ First-­year  coach  Steve  Keithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Otter  Valley   Coach   Billy   Wallerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   four-­win   Vergennes   Herzog   controlled   four   draws,   and   Catherine   work,  chemistry,  hard  work  and  relentless  de-­ VTXDGFRPSLOHGWKHVHFRQGEHVWORFDOPDUNDW team  also  played  better  in  the  second  half  of   Fowler  controlled  three,  while  Michaela  Colbert   fense. 10-­11,  and  the  Otters  gave  the  Eagles  one  of   the   season   after   an   0-­8   start.  A   strong   senior   picked  up  four  ground  balls.  Lily  Nguyen  earned   And   it   didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   hurt   that   the   Eagles   had   the   their  best  battles  of  the  winter  in  an  eight-­point   UHERXQGHUDOVRPHULWHGDÂżUVWWHDPQRGKHUH ÂżYHVDYHVZLWKRQHJRDODOORZHGLQZKLOH  Addison   Independent   Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Basketball   December   setback.  Three   Otters   are   honored   Selections   are   based   on   observation,   con-­ Katie   Mandigo   made   one   save   and   allowed   a   Player  of  the  Year  in  the  lineup,  either,  multi-­ KHUHRQHRQWKHÂżUVWWHDPDQGQRQHRIZKRP sultation  with  the  coaches,  and  statistics.  Con-­ goal  in  10:10  of  play  during  her  collegiate  debut.   talented  junior  Ashlie  Fay,  who  earns  that  dis-­ will  graduate  this  spring. gratulations  to  the  following:   Stevens  goalie  Meg  Collins  made  eight  saves. tinction  for  the  second  straight  season.  And  it   First-­year   coach   Mary   Nienow   returned   to   (See  Hoop  stars,  Page  17)

Eagle junior tops Independent girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; team


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  17

Hoop  stars (Continued  from  Page  16) FIRST  TEAM ASHLIE  FAY,  MOUNT  ABE  JUNIOR,   PLAYER   OF   THE  YEAR.   Notes:   Poised,   skilled,  fast  and  versatile  player  who  might   have   been   the   best   around  at  every  po-­ VLWLRQ RQ WKH Ă&#x20AC;RRU from   point   guard   to   power   forward   â&#x20AC;Ś   Averaged   lo-­ cal   bests   of   14.1   points,   4.1   assists   and   3.5   steals,   and   chipped   in   4.5   re-­ bounds   per   game   â&#x20AC;Ś   Can   handle   the   ball   and   throw   passes  on  the  break   at   full   speed   with   FAY either   hand,   and   KLWIURPEHKLQGWKHDUFRUÂżQLVKLQWKHODQH â&#x20AC;Ś  Savvy  defender  who  reads  passing  lanes   well  and  covers  tons  of  territory  in  the  Ea-­ glesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  press,  or  inside  or  outside  in  the  Eagle   zones.   LaRoseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   has   the   ability   to   make  everyone  elseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  job  easier  â&#x20AC;Ś  She  had   games   with   20   points,   and   she   had   games   with   20   rebounds,   depending   on   what   you   asked  her  to  do  â&#x20AC;Ś    Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  great  defensively   because   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   great   athlete   â&#x20AC;Ś   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   got   OLJKWQLQJTXLFNKDQGVÂŤ6KHÂśVÂżYHVHYHQRU VRDQGKDVJRWWKHYHUVDWLOLW\WREHDÂżYH kid,  with  those  long  arms  and  great  leaping   ability  â&#x20AC;Ś  The  head   is  up.  She  sees  the   court.   She   knows   what   the   best   op-­ tion  is.â&#x20AC;? JESSICA   FRA-­ ZIER,   OV   JU-­ NIOR.   Notes:   Speedy,   athletic   player   who   scored   in   double   digits   in   15   of   21   games   and   averaged   13.6   points   to   lead   the   Otters   â&#x20AC;Ś   Explo-­ FRAZIER sive   scorer   with   ÂżQH VKRRWLQJ UDQJH DQG D JUHDW ÂżUVW VWHS who  is  particularly  effective  slashing  to  the   basket  â&#x20AC;Ś  Good  defender  who  was  effective   in   OVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   pressure   defense   and   averaged   2.0   steals  per  contest.   Keithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jessica   was   always   on   the  attack  â&#x20AC;Ś  Jessica  used  her  speed  to  con-­ sistently  attack  the  lane  â&#x20AC;Ś  Jessica  was  able   to   defend   with  a  high   intensity  on  the   ball,   while   still   being   able   to   react   quickly   and   read   the   passing   lanes   â&#x20AC;Ś   Jessica   is   a   gym   rat.   Jessica   wants   to   be   in   the   gym   all   the   time   and   consistently   improve   â&#x20AC;Ś   Jessica   has  a  huge  passion  for  the  game  of  basket-­ ball.â&#x20AC;? TIFFANY   DANYOW,   MUHS   SENIOR.   Notes 7RXJK GHIHQGHU DQG Ă&#x20AC;RRU OHDGHU ZKR led   the   Tigers   with   9.7   points   per   game   â&#x20AC;Ś   Chipped   in   1.84   steals   and   3.74   rebounds   a  

game  â&#x20AC;Ś   Good   defending   on-­ball,   reading   passing  lanes,  or  helping  teammates  â&#x20AC;Ś  Four-­ year   varsity   player   who   always   played   hard   â&#x20AC;Ś   Shrugged   off   a   late-­game   injury   to   score   six   points   in   overtime  in  a  win  at   VUHS.   Nienowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   very   hard-­ working,   tough   physically,   fearless,   always   driving   to   the   rim   ...   She   re-­ ally  understands  the   game   of   basketball   â&#x20AC;Ś  Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  great  de-­ fender  â&#x20AC;Ś  She  wants   DANYOW all  of  her  teammates   to   get   better,   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   giving   her   team-­ mates   feedback   in   practice   â&#x20AC;Ś   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   true   leader,  kept  the  girls  positive,  always  willing   to  help  out  the  team  on  and  off  the  court.â&#x20AC;?   MEGHAN   LIVINGSTON,   MOUNT   ABE   JUNIOR.   Notes:   Quick   and   consistent   guard  who  scored  at  key  times  for  the  Eagles   this  winter  â&#x20AC;Ś  Averaged  9.6  points,  2.0  assists,   2.0   rebounds   and   2.5   steals   â&#x20AC;Ś   Ef-­ ÂżFLHQW VFRUHU ZKR hit   about   two-­thirds   of   her   shots   from   WKH Ă&#x20AC;RRU DQG DERXW 80   percent   of   her   free   throws   â&#x20AC;Ś   Had   three-­point   range   and   the   ability   to   get   to   the   basket   â&#x20AC;Ś   Smart   defender   who  helped  key  the   Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   zones   and   press.   LIVINGSTON LaRoseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Her   consistency   is   her   strength   â&#x20AC;Ś   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   money  from  the  free  throw  line  â&#x20AC;Ś  She  moves   her   feet   (defensively).   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   shutting   down   passing   lanes   â&#x20AC;Ś   Her   scoring   seems   to   come   when  she  sees  the  need.  When  you  need  a  bas-­ ket,  she  seems  to  be  the  one  to  step  up  â&#x20AC;Ś  Her   best  seems  to  come  out  in  our  toughest,  big-­ gest  games.â&#x20AC;? CAITLIN   CHAPUT,   VUHS   SENIOR.   Notes:   Gave   the   Commodores   a   tough   inside   pres-­ ence   and   led   all   local   players   with   an   average   of   7.75   rebounds   per   game   â&#x20AC;Ś   Averaged   6.25   points   per   game,   and   her   roughly   .400   shooting   per-­ centage   was   the   teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best   â&#x20AC;Ś   Turned   the   ball   over   only   a   team-­ CHAPUT best  once  a  game  â&#x20AC;Ś   Hit   more   than   lay-­ups,   showing   a   nice   jump   shot  when  given  the  opportunity  â&#x20AC;Ś  Solid  po-­

sitional  defender.   Wallerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  QuotesÂł6KHKDGÂżYHRUVL[JDPHV in  a  row  where  she  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  any  (turnovers)   â&#x20AC;Ś   She   had   a   real   nice   15-­footer   â&#x20AC;Ś   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   pretty  strong  and  she  learned  her  senior  year   to  carve  out  some  space  â&#x20AC;Ś  She  boxed  out  all   night  â&#x20AC;Ś  Those  (soccer)  goalie  instincts  came   in  when  the  ball  was  near  her  â&#x20AC;Ś  She  wasnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  a   captain,  but  she  gave  us  leadership  â&#x20AC;Ś  She  was   MXVWDFDOPLQJLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFH´ SECOND  TEAM OLIVIA   BLOOMER,   OV   JUNIOR.   Notes:  Smart  player  who  developed  this  win-­ ter   into   a   much-­needed   inside   presence   for   OV   and   averaged   a   team-­high   6.0   re-­ bounds   per   game   despite  giving  away   size   most   of   the   time   â&#x20AC;Ś   Also   de-­ fended   well   inside   with  smart  position-­ ing   and   boxing   out   on   the   boards   â&#x20AC;Ś   Team   leader   who   chipped  in  with  6.7   points   per   contest,   second   for   the   Ot-­ BLOOOMER ters.   Keithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Olivia   always   makes   the   right   play   on   the   Ă&#x20AC;RRUÂŤ2OLYLDSOD\HGDERYHKHUVL]HFRQVLV-­ tently  out-­rebounding  opponents  â&#x20AC;Ś  Olivia  de-­ fended  well  in  the  post  and  was  always  in  the   right   help   spot.   Olivia   understands   the   game   of  basketball  and  how  it  should  be  played  â&#x20AC;Ś   2OLYLDLVDSRVLWLYHWHDPLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHDQGZRUNV to  keep  her  teammates  focused.â&#x20AC;? SAM   DRISCOLL,   MOUNT   ABE   JU-­ NIOR.  Notes:  Consistently  gave  the  Eagles  a   lift  off  the  bench  this  season,  and  played  and   produced  in  Barre  when  it  mattered  â&#x20AC;Ś  Aver-­ aged   8.0   points,   1.8   assists   and   1.5   steals   â&#x20AC;Ś   Good   three-­point   shooter   ZKR FRXOG DOVR ÂżQ-­ ish   or   set   up   team-­ mates   on   the   break   â&#x20AC;Ś   Became   a   hard-­ working,   disruptive   defender.   LaRoseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   just   felt   her   growth   as   a   player   was   huge   this   year   DRISCOLL â&#x20AC;Ś  When   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   hot,   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   really   hot   â&#x20AC;Ś   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  very  quick  and  athletic,  no  doubt  about   it   â&#x20AC;Ś   Sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   got   great   basketball   savvy   â&#x20AC;Ś   In   those  games  (in  Barre)  she  really  stepped  up   to  the  plate  â&#x20AC;Ś  She  showed  us  what  she  could   do  defensively.â&#x20AC;?   TAYLOR   AINES,   OV   JUNIOR.   Notes:   6DYY\WHQDFLRXVĂ&#x20AC;RRUOHDGHUDQGSRLQWJXDUG who  averaged  an  area  second-­best  3.0  assists   per   game   â&#x20AC;Ś   Could   hit   from   long   range   and   averaged   6.5   points   per   game,   often   scoring   key  hoops  in  close  games  â&#x20AC;Ś  Determined  de-­ fender  who  made  it  tough  for  opposing  guards  

to  bring   the   ball   up   and  get  shots  off.     Keithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Taylor   is   one   of   the   hardest-­working   players  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  coached   â&#x20AC;Ś  Taylor   is   a   com-­ petitor   and   will   not   back   down   â&#x20AC;Ś   Tay-­ lor   handled   the   ball   all  year  and  request-­ ed   the   ball   during   crunch  time  â&#x20AC;Ś  Tay-­ lor   defended   well   AINES and   hit   several   key   shots  throughout  the   season  â&#x20AC;Ś  Taylor  is  a  ferocious  competitor  at   ERWKHQGVRIWKHĂ&#x20AC;RRU´ LIZZIE  HUIZENGA,  MOUNT  ABE  SE-­ NIOR.  Notes:  Quick  and  tireless  defender  who   typically   keyed   the   Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   trademark   1-­2-­2   SUHVV DV WKH SRLQW SHUVRQ ÂŤ 7HUULÂżF GHIHQG-­ ing  one-­on-­one,  or  in  the  Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  press  or  zone   looks  â&#x20AC;Ś  Could  stick   jumpers,   and   con-­ tributed   offensively   with   5.0   points   and   2.0  assists  per  game   â&#x20AC;Ś   Also   averaged   2.5  steals  and  2.0  re-­ bounds. LaRoseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lizzie   is   just   the   Energizer   Bunny   out   there   â&#x20AC;Ś   I   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   think   of   any   other   kid   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   had   who   HUIZENGA had   such   relentless   energy   out   there   â&#x20AC;Ś   And   sheâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   not   a   bad   perimeter   shooter   â&#x20AC;Ś   I   looked   at   her   as   our   best   defender   â&#x20AC;Ś   Lizzie   had  a  huge  year  of  growth  in  terms  of  compo-­ sure  on  the  court.â&#x20AC;? ISABEL   BRENNAN,   MOUNT   ABE   SOPHOMORE.   Notes:   Six-­footer   who   earned   more   time   as   the   season   progressed   and   averaged   5.0   points   and   a   team-­high   6.5   rebounds   â&#x20AC;Ś   Has   good   hands   and   showed   a   nice  touch  posting  up  and  in  transition  â&#x20AC;Ś  Im-­ proved   offensively   and   defensively,   and   made   an   im-­ pact   in   the   middle   of   the   Eagle   zone   â&#x20AC;Ś   Shone   in   Barre,   with   nine   points   and  seven  boards  in   the   semi   and   game-­ highs   of   16   points   and   nine   rebounds   LQWKHÂżQDO LaRoseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Quotes:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;She   picked   a   real   good   time,   I   think,   BRENNAN those  last  two  games   in  Barre,  to  show  us  what  she  could  do  â&#x20AC;Ś  She   showed  such  a  great  attitude  and  such  a  great   willingness  to  learn  â&#x20AC;Ś  There  was  that  consis-­ tent  improvement  â&#x20AC;Ś  I  thought  she  made  some   solid  improvement  on  defense.â&#x20AC;?

Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  soccer  squad  to  hold  April  21  youth  clinic   MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Mid-­ dlebury   College   womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   soccer   team   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which   has   participated   in  the  NCAA  Division  III  tourna-­ ment   six   times   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   will   present   a   three-­hour   clinic   for   youth   play-­ ers   on   Sunday,   April   21,   from  

noon  until  3  p.m.  The  program  is   open   to   boys   and   girls   between   the  ages  of  6  and  13  and  will  in-­ clude   instruction,   fun   games   and   match  play.   According   to   the   coaches   and   Panther   players,   participants   will  

have  the  opportunity  to  work  with   the   Middlebury   soccer   athletes   while  learning  fundamental  skills,   clever  tricks  and  key  elements  of   the   game   in   a   fun,   challenging,   supportive  soccer  environment.   In  addition  to  instructional  ses-­

VLRQVVPDOODQGIXOO¿HOGJDPHV are  planned.  There  will  be  a  break   midway   through   the   clinic,   and   participants   are   encouraged   to   bring  a  snack.   The   $30   cost   will   include   a   T-­ shirt.   Those   interested   may   reg-­

ister  at   www.middlebury.edu/ athletics/sports/womenssoccer/ wscampsclinics.   More   informa-­ tion   is   available   from   Coach   Pe-­ ter   Kim   at   443-­5410   or   ptkim@ middlebury.edu.


PAGE  18  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

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Bristol Internal Medicine

Welcomes Dr. Lynn Wilkinson to the Practice.

Gretchen  Gaida  Michaels,  MD

Lynn  Wilkinson,  MD

Emily  Glick,  MD Patricia  Lewis,  APRN

The providers at Bristol Internal Medicine look forward to accepting new patients and serving more people in the Bristol area. &Ć&#x152;Žž>Ä&#x17E;Ĺ&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝ZĹ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;Ä?ĹŹZĹ˝Ç Í&#x2014; >Ä&#x201A;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;'Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ?Ć?Í&#x2022;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;DÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2013; :Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć?Ĺ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;,Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÍ&#x2022;ZEÍ&#x2013;WÄ&#x201A;ĆŠÇ&#x2021;KÍ&#x203A;DÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Í&#x2022; &Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2013;'Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹŻŽƾĆ?Ĺ?ŜŽÍ&#x2022;>WEÍ&#x2013; ŽŜŜÄ&#x201A;^Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2039;ĆľĹ?ĹśÍ&#x2022;&Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; &Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;ZĹ˝Ç Í&#x2014;ĹśÇ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹľĆ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŜĹ?Í&#x2022;ZEÍ&#x2013; >Ä&#x201A;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;DĹ?ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2022;&Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2013;ŽŜŜÄ&#x201A; ĆľĆ?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022;&Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC;

Now located in the Bristol Works! Complex &Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;žŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?ŜĨŽĆ&#x152;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜor  to  schedule  an  appointment,

please  call  453-­â&#x20AC;?7422  

Â Ç Ç Ç Í&#x2DC;Ä?Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć?Ć&#x161;ŽůĹ?ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĹśÄ&#x201A;ĹŻĹľÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ?ĹśÄ&#x17E;Í&#x2DC;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ĺ? CONTACT GOV. PETER SHUMLIN

Governor Peter Shumlin  WROOIUHHLQ9WRQO\ Â&#x2021; 109  State  Street,  Pavillion Montpelier,  Vermont  05609-­0101 www.vermont.gov/governor

4-­Hers  compete  in  Quiz  Bowl RANDOLPH  CENTER  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  For  the   54  Vermont  4-­H  club  members  who   participated   in   the   state   4-­H   Dairy   Quiz  Bowl  on  March  16  in  Randolph   Center,  the  annual  event  provided  an   opportunity  to  match  wits  with  other   4-­Hâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ers   on   everything   dairy-­related,   from   what   cows   eat   to   herd   health,   cattle  breeds  and  genetics. University  of  Vermont  (UVM)  Ex-­ tension   hosted   the   event   at  Vermont   Technical   College.   The   competition   consisted   of   a   written   test   and   sev-­ eral   rounds   of   oral   questions   with   the  combined  scores  from  each  used   to  determine  the  winners  in  each  age   group. In   an   unusual   turn   of   events,   the   winner  of  the  senior  division  (ages  14   and  up),  Maggie  Kirby  of  East  Mont-­ pelier,  is  ineligible  for  the  2013  Ver-­

mont  Dairy  Quiz  Bowl  Team  because   her  birthday  falls  after  the  cutoff  date   for  eligibility,  making  her  too  young   to  compete  nationally. Instead,  the  team  will  be  made  up   RI WKH VHFRQG WKURXJK ¿IWKKLJKHVW scorers   in   the   senior   division:   Jake   Senecal,   Bradford;͞   Shelby   Biasini,   Morrisville;͞   Levi   Vaughan,   East   Thetford;͞  and  Tim  Carson,  Newbury.   7KH ¿UVW DOWHUQDWH LV .HOOL -HURPH of   Leicester.   The   second   alternate   is   Devin   Mitchell   of   Richford.   The   team   will   represent   the   state   in   quiz   bowl   competition   at   Eastern   States   ([SRVLWLRQ LQ :HVW 6SULQJ¿HOG Mass.,   in   September,   and   the   North   American   Invitational   4-­H   Dairy   Quiz   Bowl   Contest   in   Louisville,   Ky.,  in  November. Junior   division   winners,   by   age  

group,  and   in   order   of   placement   were: Eight   to   9   years   old   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Caroline   Kirby,  East  Montpelier;Íž  Peter  Thorn-­ ton,   South   Royalton;Íž   Sadie   Ellner,   Morrisville;Íž   and   Michael   Plouffe,   Bridport. Ten  to  11  years  old  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Isabel  Hall,   East   Montpelier;Íž   Chandra   Stanley,   Enosburg  Falls;Íž  Lucy  Kelley,  Morris-­ ville;Íž  and  Adele  Biasini,  Morrisville. Twelve   to   13   years   old   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Lilli   Seward,   East   Wallingford;Íž   Maddie   Nadeau,   Derby;Íž   Andrew   Seward,   East   Wallingford;Íž   and   Will   Ringey,   Brandon. For   more   information   about   the   Vermont  4-­H  dairy  program,  contact   Wendy  Sorrell,  UVM  Extension  4-­H   livestock  educator,  at  (802)  656-­5418   or  wendy.sorrell@uvm.edu.

Remove  bird  feeders  to  help  keep  bears  out  of  your  yard VERMONT  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  Vermont  Fish   &   Wildlife   Department   is   urging   people  to  take  down  their  bird  feed-­ ers  to  avoid  attracting  bears  that  are   emerging  from  their  winter  dens  and   looking  for  food. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  is  best  to  remove  food  sources   before   hungry   bears   locate   them,â&#x20AC;?   said   Fish   &   Wildlifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Col.   David   LeCours.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   highly   recommend   taking   down   bird   feeders   and   not   feeding  birds  until  Dec.  1. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Also,   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   leave   pet   food   out-­ side,   wash   down   your   barbecues  

after  using   them,   and   secure   your   garbage  containers,â&#x20AC;?  he  added.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And   above   all,   never   purposely   leave   food   out   for   bears.   Feeding   bears   may   seem   kind,   but   it   is   almost   a   sure  death  sentence  for  them.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Help   keep   bears   wild,â&#x20AC;?   said   LeCours.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   care   about   these   bears  as  much  as  anyone.  Having  to   destroy  one  that  has  become  a  threat   to   human   safety   is   not   a   pleasant   experience,  and  we  know  that  mov-­ ing  them  to  another  location  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   change  their  behavior.  They  contin-­

ue  to  seek  food  near  people  because   they  have  learned  that  it  works.â&#x20AC;? Vermont   law   prohibits   a   person   from  killing  a  bear  that  has  been  at-­ WUDFWHGWRDQ\DUWLÂżFLDOEDLWRUIRRG VXFKDVELUGVHHG7KHÂżQHIRUGRLQJ so  can  be  as  high  as  $1,000.   Bears  often  eat  seeds  in  the  wild,   so   a   birdfeeder   chock   full   of   high-­ energy  seed  is  a  concentrated  source   of   what   a   bear   considers   natural   food.  And  they  are  smart.  Once  bears   learn  to  obtain  food  around  peopleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   homes,  they  will  be  back  for  more.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  19

Best of Luck in the future to all Addison County Students! ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

Students of the Week from area High Schools Middlebury Union High School

Middlebury  Union   High   School   is   pleased   to   recognize   Sydney   Reigle   as   its   Student   of   the   Week.   Sydney   is   the   daughter   of   Natalie   and   Steve   Reigle   of   Weybridge.   Her   older  sister,  Danielle,  will  be  graduating  from  the  University  of   Pittsburgh  this  spring. Sydney   has   achieved   High   Honors   and   Honors   all   four   years  at  MUHS  and  is  a  member  of  the  local  chapter  of  the   1DWLRQDO +RQRU 6RFLHW\ 6KH ZDV WKH UHFLSLHQW RI WKH VW Century   Book   Award   for   English   in   grade   9.   Sydney   has   enrolled   in   challenging   coursework   including   AP   Calculus   I   and  II,  AP  Statistics,  AP  Environmental  Science  and  Advanced   Physics  with  Calculus.   Sydney   is   a   Peer   Leader   for   grade   9   students.   She   was   selected  to  attend  the  Vermont  Athletic  Leadership  Conference   LQJUDGH6\GQH\ZDVYRWHG³0RVW6FKRRO6SLULWHG´E\WKH FODVV RI  IUHTXHQWO\ DWWHQGLQJ 7LJHUV¶ VSRUWLQJ HYHQWV 6\GQH\UHFHQWO\DSSHDUHGDVDSDUHQWLQWKHVHQLRUSOD\³%\H %\H%LUGLH´6KHSOD\HGÃ&#x20AC;XWHLQWKH&RQFHUW%DQGLQJUDGHV DQG Sydney  Reigle Sydney   has   competed   on   the   varsity   soccer   team   for   the   M.U.H.S. 7LJHUVDOOIRXU\HDUVVHUYLQJDVDFDSWDLQWKLV\HDU6KHZDV QDPHGD%XUOLQJWRQ)UHH3UHVV$OO6WDULQJUDGH6\GQH\ZDVDOVRWKH/DNH'LYLVLRQVW7HDPUHFLSLHQWLQ JUDGHVDQG In  addition  to  the  National  Honor  Society  community  service  initiatives,  the  blood  drive  and  food  drive,  Sydney   volunteers  for  Success  Saturdays  in  the  Learning  Lab.  She  tutors  math  and  other  subjects  to  students  needing   help  with  understanding  the  subjects  or  to  catch  up  on  schoolwork.  She  has  also  volunteered  for  the  past  two   \HDUVDVDQDVVLVWDQW3DQWKHUV¶6RFFHU&OXEFRDFKIRUWKH0LGGOHEXU\5HFUHDWLRQ'HSDUWPHQW Outside  of  school,  Sydney  enjoys  playing  soccer  and  other  sports  and  socializes  with  friends  in  her  spare  time.   In  the  winter,  she  works  at  the  Snow  Bowl  and  in  the  summer  at  Middlebury  College  Dining  Services.  She  has   played  Panther  Soccer  since  the  age  of  seven  and  enjoys  going  to  a  variety  of  sporting  events. 6\GQH\ZLOODWWHQGDIRXU\HDUFROOHJHLQWKHIDOOZKHUHVKHZLOOPDMRULQNLQHVLRORJ\H[HUFLVHVFLHQFH4XDOLWLHV VXFKDVSHUVHYHUDQFHDSRVLWLYHRXWORRNDQGD³FDQGR´DWWLWXGHZLOOVHUYH6\GQH\ZHOOLQDOOKHUIXWXUHHQGHDYRUV Congratulations,  Sydney,  from  everyone  at  MUHS!

Middlebury  Students  of  the  Week  receive  a  free  pizza  from  Green  Peppers.

Vergennes Union High School

Vergennes  Union   High   School   is   proud   to   name   Kaitlin   /H5RX[(DVWPDQDVLWV6WXGHQWRIWKH:HHN.DLWOLQOLYHVLQ Vergennes  with  her  mother,  BonnieRita  Hearthstone,  and  her   WZRVLVWHUV(PPD/HD+HDUWKVWRQH JUDGH DQG5RVD/HD +HDUWKVWRQH JUDGH   +HU IDWKHU :LOVRQ <HWWHU OLYHV LQ Whiting. Kaitlin   has   been   on   the   honor   or   high   honor   roll   since   freshman   year.   She   has   challenged   herself   with   a   total   of   four  Advanced  Placement  classes  and  French  classes  at  the   University  of  Vermont.  She  was  selected  as  the  Boys  &  Girls   &OXE<RXWKRIWKH<HDUIRUWKHVWDWHRI9HUPRQWLQ As   a   member   of   the   VUHS   Community,   Kaitlin   has   been   D PHPEHU RI WKH &RPPRGRUH 6LQJHUV DQG WKH $OO6WDWH Music   Choir,   and   has   logged   hundreds   of   hours   helping   at   the   local   Boys   &   Girls   Club.   In   addition   to   her   involvement   with   the   Commodore   Music   Program   and   her   community   VHUYLFH.DLWOLQZRUNVRYHUKRXUVDZHHNDWDORFDOHOGHUO\ care  home.  During  her  free  time,  Kaitlin  can  be  found  singing,   playing   piano,   working   on   a   service   project   and   helping   her   Kaitlin  M.  LeRoux-­Eastman sisters  and  other  young  children  grow. V.U.H.S When  asked  about  her  philosophy  on  life,  Kaitlin  remarked,   ³0\OLIHSKLORVRSK\LVWRDOZD\VSHUVHYHUHHYHQWKURXJKWKHWRXJKHVWRIWLPHV,I\RXFDQ¶WSXVKSDVWWKHGLI¿FXOW WKLQJVLQOLIHWKHQ\RX¶UHQRWJUDWHIXOIRUWKHHDV\SDVVHV(YHU\WKLQJLQOLIHFRPHVZLWKDSULFHDQG\RXQHHG to  be  willing  to  pay  it  in  order  to  achieve  your  dreams. ³,GRQ¶WWKLQN,FRXOGDVNIRUDEHWWHUKLJKVFKRROH[SHULHQFH,KDYHWKHPRVWDPD]LQJWHDFKHUVIULHQGVDQG FRPPXQLW\9HUJHQQHVLVYHU\VSHFLDOSODFH´ $ERXW.DLWOLQ98+6FKRUDOWHDFKHU.DUHQ-RUGDQVDLG³.DLWOLQLVRQHRIWKHPRVWGLOLJHQWVWXGHQWV,NQRZ 6KHZRUNVKDUGDWKHUVLQJLQJZKLFKKDVUHVXOWHGLQKHUEHLQJDFFHSWHGWRWKH9HUPRQW$OO6WDWH&KRUXVWKLV spring.  She  also  manages  to  volunteer  for  both  the  Boys  and  Girls  Club  as  well  as  her  church  in  addition  to   KROGLQJVHYHUDOSDUWWLPHMREV.DLWOLQDOZD\VKDVDSRVLWLYHDWWLWXGHDQGDUHDG\VPLOH´ )ROORZLQJJUDGXDWLRQ.DLWOLQSODQVRQDWWHQGLQJDXQLYHUVLW\ LQ)ORULGDDQGPDMRULQJ LQFULPLQRORJ\7KH faculty,  staff  and  VUHS  community  wish  Kaitlin  the  very  best  in  her  future  endeavors.

Vergennes  Students  of  the  Week  receive  a  free  sandwich  and  drink  from  3  SQUARES.

Students of the week from all area high schools will receive a gift certificate from Vermont Book Shop. Students of the Week are chosen by school teachers and administration.

We proudly acknowledge all our students & say

Congratulations Congratulations Taylor & & Kaitlin Casey Sydney

Congrats to the Students of the Week!

68 West Street Bristol 802-453-3617

5W6RXWKÂ&#x2021;0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021;

Barash  Mediation  Services 3KRHEH%DUDVK )DPLO\'LYRUFH0HGLDWLRQÂ&#x2021;)DFLOLWDWLRQ &RQÃ&#x20AC;LFW0DQDJHPHQW7UDLQLQJV

Celebrating 10 Years

Warmest Congratulations,

Sydney & Kaitlin

Plumbing  &  Heating  

125 Monkton Rd. Bristol, VT 453-2325

Fuel  /Oil  Delivery

185 Exchange St., Middlebury, VT 388-4975

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www.vermontbookshop.com 38 MAIN ST Middlebury

802-388-2061

Two locations to help serve you better...

859 Route 7 South Middlebury 802-388-9500

The Vermont Book Shop awards a gift to a Student of the Week- EVERY WEEK!

tions

la Congratu Name  & SYDNEY & Name KAITLIN

32%R[%0DLQ6WÂ&#x2021;%ULVWRO97 Â&#x2021;SKRHEH#EDUDVKPHGLDWLRQFRP www.barashmediation.com

FOOTEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S INSURANCE AGENCY 6 Green St., Vergennes Â&#x2021; www.footesinsurance.com

FERRISBURGH

BAKE SHOP & DELI

Great Job Students! 5 6 R287( OUTE  7  S287+ OUTHÂ&#x2021; 5RXWH6RXWKÂ&#x2021; 0)Â&#x2021;6 $7 AT  0)Â&#x2021;66

Keep your Eye on your future goals! 877-2422 5VFT'SJs

27 Main Street, Vergennes

Congratulations, Name & Sydney & Name! Kaitlin 877-3118 Main St., Vergennes, VT


PAGE 20  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

ADDISON COUNTY

School Briefs

WWW.

addisonindependent.com

Benjamin J.   Brisson   of   Shore-­ ham  has  been  selected  for  inclusion   MIDDLEBURY   —   When   four   on  the  dean’s  list  for  the  fall  2012  se-­ students   from  New  Haven’s  Beeman   Spring  Fair mester  at  St.  Lawrence  University  in   By  Phoebe  Morse  of  Middlebury   Canton,  N.Y.  He  is  a  member  of  the   Elementary   School   grade   3-­6   team   Little  lambs  racing came   to   visit   Project   Independence   class  of  2016. And  thrushes  sing— in  Middlebury  recently,  they  shared   It  is  spring  fair Plymouth   State   University   stu-­ a  few  of  their  own  poems,  and  then   And  an  elderly  lady  is  racing  by!!! dents   Tegan   Donnelly   of   Brandon,   led   Project   Independence   partici-­ Sean  Noonan  of  Brandon  and  Todd   pants   in   a   poetry   writing   exercise   Savage   of   Shoreham   have   been   that  resulted  in  the  following  poems. Blue  Blooms named  to  the  “Who’s  Who  of  Ameri-­ By  Elaine  McLaren  of  Salisbury,   can  Colleges  and  Universities.”   Friendly  Love Art  Sherman  of  New  Haven,  and   Eli  Cohen  and  Sonia  Hare,  both   By  George  Farwell  of  Benson  and   Brian  Larsen,  grade  5   Blue  blooms  shoot  in  lovely  rich-­ members  of  the  class  of  2013,  earned   Jackson  Gepfert,  grade  5 Red  gives  apple. ness term  honors  for  the  fall  2012  semes-­ The   cow   wanders   with   blown   Beautiful  blue  eggs ter  at  Skidmore  College. All  the  lightning  rush  through  the   Cohen  is  the  son  of  Robert  Cohen   winds. The  pleasant  showers  pass. heavens and  Claudia  Cooper  of  Middlebury.   She  walks  with  me  all  day Descending  to  the  timber Hare   is   the   daughter   of   Steve   and   %\WKHZKLWHÀRZHUV The  thrush  echoing  in  the  trees. Shelly  Hare  of  Middlebury. In  the  open  meadow  grass Kay   Keren   of   Middlebury   was   She  eats  the  tart  cream. named   to   the   dean’s   list   for   the   fall   Friendly  love. She  showers 2012   semester   at   Parsons   The   New   ZLWKÀRZHUV School  For  Design  in  New  York,  N.Y.   By  Sally  Bruch Spring  is  Lovely and  Barbara  Gillies By  Louise  Elwood  of  Salisbury,   Sierra   Dessureault,   daughter   of   6KHVKRZHUVZLWKÀRZHUVWKHUH Rich   and   Deb   Dessureault   of   New   Liz  Hunt  of  Middlebury, She  walks  by  the  friendly  cow,  all Haven,  was  named  to  the  dean’s  list   and  Jessica  Frey,  grade  5 Red  and  white  and  wet. Spring  is  lovely  and   for  the  fall  2012  semester  in  the  Col-­ She  eats  cream  and  apple  with  the   The  beautiful  tree  blooms. lege  of  Agricultural  and  Life  Sciences   open All  the  leaves  echo  and  descend at  the  University  of  Vermont Grass  blown  winds. Their  richness. A   freshman   on   a   pre-­med   track   She  wanders  with  the  cow,  among The  heavens  sing.  Does  it  hear majoring   in   biological   science,   Des-­ The  meadow  and  gives  all  the  love   The  racing  little  lambs sureault  is  also  a  member  of  the  Na-­ in  her  heart. As  they  brush  the  glassy  weeds? tional  Society  of  Collegiate  Scholars.  

MCTV SCHEDULE  Channels  15  &  16 MCTV  Channel  15 Tuesday, April 2   4:30  a.m.   Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Meeting   6:30  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   8  a.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard  11:30  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   1  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  1)   3  p.m.   Public  Affairs  from  the  Vermont  Media   Exchange  (VMX)   4  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   4:30  p.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  Service   6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   7  p.m.   Selectboard   8:25  p.m.   Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Meeting   11  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  1) Wednesday, April 3   5  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   6:30  a.m.   Mid  East  Digest   7:30  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   9  a.m.   Vermont  Workers’  Center   10  a.m.   Selectboard  11:30  a.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  1)   1:30  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   2:45  p.m.   Governor’s  Proposed  Budget/     From  the  VMX   4  p.m.   Salaam  Shalom   5  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   6  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   6:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   7  p.m.   Public  Affairs  from  the  VMX   8  p.m.   Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Meeting   10  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast    11:30  p.m.   Vermont  Workers’  Center Thursday, April 4   4:30  a.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  1)   6:30  a.m.   Salaam  Shalom   7:30  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   10  a.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  11:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   Noon   Selectboard   1:25  p.m.   Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Meeting   4  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  1)

Beeman students share poems with the elderly

8:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   9:30  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  1) Friday, April 5   4:30  a.m.   Public  Affairs  from  the  VMX   6  a.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  1)   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   10  a.m.   Selectboard   Noon   Legislative  Breakfast   1:15  p.m.   Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Meeting   3:30  p.m.   Lifelines   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board/Public  Affairs   7:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   8  p.m.   Public  Affairs   10  p.m.   Mid  East  Digest   11  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  5) Saturday, April 6   5  a.m.   For  the  Animals   5:30  a.m.   Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Meeting   7:30  a.m.   Public  Affairs  from  the  VMX   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard   Noon   Legislative  Breakfast   1:30  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  5)   3:30  p.m.   For  the  Animals   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  5)   8  p.m.   Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Meeting  10:30  p.m.   Salaam  Shalom   11  p.m.   Public  Affairs  from  the  VMX Sunday, April 7   5:30  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   7  a.m.   Words  of  Peace   7:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   8  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   8:30  a.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   9  a.m.   Catholic  Mass   9:30  a.m.   Public  Affairs  from  the  VMX   11  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   1  p.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  Service   2:30  p.m.   For  the  Animals   3  p.m.   Green  Mountain  Veterans  for  Peace

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please see  the  MCTV  website,  www.middleburycommunitytv.org,  for  changes  in  the  schedule;  MCTV  events,   classes  and  news;  and  to  view  many  programs  online.  Submit  listings  to  the  above  address,  or  call  388-­3062.

4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Vermont  Workers’  Center   6:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   Catholic  Mass   7:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   8  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  5)   10  p.m.   Words  of  Peace  10:30  p.m.   Green  Mountain  Veterans  for  Peace  11:30  p.m.   Community  BulletinBoard/Public  Affairs Monday, April 8   5  a.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting/Public  Affairs     8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Lifelines   10  a.m.   Selectboard  11:30  a.m.   Railroad  Overpass  Bridge  Meeting   2:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   3  p.m.   Mid  East  Digest   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board/Public  Affairs   7:30  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast   9  p.m.   Vermont  Gas  Meeting  (Held  April  5)   11  p.m.   Development  Review  Board  (DRB) METV Channel 16 Tuesday, April 2   5  a.m.   Sister  Helen  Prejean:  Dead  Man  Walking,     the  Journey  Continues   6:30  a.m.   First  Wednesday   7:30  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education  12:30  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   3  p.m.   Hannaford  Career  Center  (HCC)   6  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   9  p.m.   First  Wednesday   10  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0  10:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education   Wednesday, April 3   5  a.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society   6  a.m.   New  England  Review  Reading  Series   7  a.m.   HCC  Board   11  a.m.   UD-­3  Board     4  p.m.   Middlebury  College  Environmental       Colloquium  (MCEC)   5  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6:30  p.m.   ACSU  Board   9  p.m.   UD-­3  Board

11:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Thursday, April 4   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education  12:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   1  p.m.   ACSU  Board   4  p.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   5  p.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society/Local     Performance   8  p.m.   New  England  Review  Reading  Series   9:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   10  p.m.   First  Wednesday  11:30  p.m.   From  the  College Friday/Saturday, April 5/6   5:30  a.m.   Awareness  Theater   6  a.m.   King  Lear     7  a.m.   Hannaford  Career  Center  (HCC)  Board   9:15  a.m.   UD-­3/ACSU/ID-­4  Boards   3:15  p.m.   Vermont  Youth  Orchestra  (VYO)     Winter  Concert   5:02  p.m.   Awareness  Theater   5:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6  p.m.   La  Bohème   7:01  p.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society   8  p.m.   VINS:  Bats  in  Motion   10  p.m.   First  Wednesday   11  p.m.   VYO  Winter  Concert Sunday, April 7   6:10  a.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society:  Owls   7  a.m.   VYO  Winter  Concert   9  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   9:30  a.m.   A  Week  at  Whiting  Elementary  School   10  a.m.   New  England  Review  Reading  Series   11  a.m.   First  Wednesday/Local  Performance   4  p.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   5  p.m.   Awareness  Theater   5:30  p.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society:  Owls   6:20  p.m.   A  Week  at  Whiting  Elementary  School   6:30  p.m.   King  Lear   7:30  p.m.   VYO  Winter  Concert  11:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0  Monday, April 8   5:30  a.m.   HCC  Board   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education  11:30  a.m.   ACSU/UD-­3  Boards   4  p.m.   First  Wednesday   7  p.m.   ID-­4  Board  11:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  21

Gas  pipeline  meeting   in  Middlebury  Monday

Middlebury (Continued  from  Page  1) ing.  It  was  a  gathering  at  which  VHB   engineer   Mark   Colgan   described   a   state-­   and   federal-­mandated   process   thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  expected  to  lead  to  replacement   of  the  two  deteriorating  spans,  hope-­ fully  within  two  years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   schedule   is   accelerated   and   very   aggressive,â&#x20AC;?   said   Colgan,   who   also   worked   on   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Cross   Street  Bridge  project. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  are  going  to  be  moving  very   quickly.â&#x20AC;? The   rapidity   of   the   project   is   be-­ ing  driven  by  the  sorry  condition  of   the  bridges,  as  well  as  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   VHOHFWLRQ DV WKH ÂżUVW 9HUPRQW FRP-­ munity  to  take  part  in  a  new  federal   program   that   expedites   capital   proj-­ ects  in  towns  with  a  proven  track  re-­ cord   in   such   endeavors.   Middlebury   developed   that   track   record   through   construction   of   the   Cross   Street   Bridge,   completed   in   less   than   two   \HDUVXVLQJFUHDWLYHÂżQDQFLQJ Colgan   said   Middlebury   will   be   able  to  use  a  â&#x20AC;&#x153;construction  manager-­ general   contractor   modelâ&#x20AC;?   that   will   allow  for  a  contractor  to  be  brought   onto   the   scene   before   the   construc-­ tion  phase  of  the  project.  This  allows   the   contractor   to   be   involved   all   the   way   through   design   and   building.   This   differs   from   the   conventional   system   that   requires   projects   receiv-­ ing   state   and   federal   funds   to   use   a   design-­bid-­build   process.   That   sys-­ tem  brings  the  contractor  in  at  a  later   stage   of   the   project   and   can   lead   to   changes   in   design   and   construction   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   which   can   in   turn   lead   to   delays   and  additional  costs,  Colgan  said. Âł7KLVLVDUHDOO\JRRGÂżW´&ROJDQ said   of   the   new   streamlined   process   that  the  Middlebury  rail  bridge  proj-­ ects   will   follow.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   about   getting   WKHSURMHFW ULJKWWKHÂżUVWWLPH´ Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  an  aspiration  shared  by  the   many  businesses  and  commuters  who   DUHFRQFHUQHGDERXWSRWHQWLDOWUDIÂżF snarls   and   lost   parking   spots   during   construction.   Colgan   acknowledged   those  impacts,  though  he  said  work-­ ers  will  look  to  keep  inconveniences   to   a   minimum   and   the   new   Cross   Street  Bridge  will  provide  an  impor-­

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tant  outlet  while  the  railroad  bridges   tion  for  an  extended  period,â&#x20AC;?  Colgan   are  out  of  commission. said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   we   shut   down   Middlebury,   In   addition,   he   noted   the   project   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  quite  a  bit  of  effort  to  re-­route   will  require  some  drainage  improve-­ down  toward  Bellows  Falls  and  then   ments   and   the   relocation   of   some   up  to  White  River  Junction  and  to  St.   utilities,   work   that   will   occasionally   Albans   and   further   north.   There   is   inconvenience   property   owners,   ac-­ quite  a  runaround  for  the  railroad  in   cording  to  Colgan. VKXWWLQJGRZQWUDIÂżF´ â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   want   to   minimize   impacts,â&#x20AC;?   The   coming   months   will   see   he  said. VHB   and   the   town   of   Middlebury   While  the  two  railroad  bridges  will   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  which  will  manage  the  project  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   be   the   primary   focus   of   work,   the   work   to   meet   a   timeline   that   would   project   area   will   include   a   lengthy   call  for  construction  to  begin  during   swath  of  rail  line  extending  from  the   the   spring   of   2014.   Colgan   said   the   Otter   Creek   truss   bridge   timeline   includes   three   (to   the   south),   all   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The schedule phases: way   to   Elm   Street   to   the   is accelerated Â&#x2021; 3URMHFW GHÂżQLWLRQ north.   Before   construc-­ and very and   alternatives   evalu-­ tion   wraps,   workers   will   ation.   This   will   entail   aggressive. have   excavated   the   rail   ruling  out  the  options  of   bed   in   a   gradual   fashion   We are going leaving  the  bridges  alone,   along  the  entire  stretch,  in   to be moving or  renovating  them.  It  is   a  manner  that  will  provide   very quickly.â&#x20AC;? expected  to  culminate  in   for  an  additional  three-­  to   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; engineer the   selection   of   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;pre-­ four  feet  of  clearance  un-­ Mark Colgan ferred   alternativeâ&#x20AC;?   that   der  the  two  bridges.  This,   will   be   mapped   out   in   Colgan  explained,  will  allow  Amtrak   concept,   along   with   potential   envi-­ to   run   double-­stack   cars   under   the   ronmental  impacts. bridges  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  something  that  cannot  be   Â&#x2021; 3URMHFW GHVLJQ 'XULQJ WKLV done  with  the  current  spans. phase,   plans   will   be   completed   on   Contractors  will  also  need  to  wid-­ the  preferred  design,  with  public  in-­ en  the  horizontal  clearance  for  trains   volvement.   This   will   include   meet-­ under   the   bridges,   which   will   mean   ings   with   nearby   property   owners   renovating  or  replacing  the  old  stone   for   the   negotiation   of   right-­of-­way   walls   that   buttress   the   rail   corridor   easements  and  any  potential  property   downtown.  This  will  be  a  tricky  en-­ acquisition. gineering  task,  as  well  as  pose  some   Â&#x2021; &RQVWUXFWLRQ &ROJDQ VDLG WKLV delicate   historic   preservation   ques-­ will   occur   with   a   lot   of   public   out-­ tions. reach  through  e-­mails,  a  communica-­ FREIGHT  TRAFFIC WLRQV RIÂżFHU DQG LQIRUPDWLRQ SRVWHG And  as  if  the  project  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  present   on  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  website.  There  will  be   enough  challenges,  it  will  have  to  be   an   emphasis,   he   said,   on   stressing   GRQH LQ GHIHUHQFH WR IUHLJKW WUDIÂżF that  downtown  Middlebury  is  â&#x20AC;&#x153;open   That  will  mean  staggering  tasks  and/ for  business.â&#x20AC;? RUZRUNLQJZLWKUDLORIÂżFLDOVWRVXV-­ Not   encountering   any   substantial   SHQGWUDIÂżFLQRUGHUWRJHWFRQVWUXF-­ environmental   issues   will   be   key   tion  done.  Middlebury  is  a  prominent   to   getting   the   project   moving   on   point   on   the   Burlington-­to-­Benning-­ the   speediest   possible   path,   Colgan   ton  line.  Another  point  on  the  line  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   stressed.   The   necessity   of   having   to   Rutland  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  is  second  only  to  Burling-­ prepare   an   Environmental   Impact   ton   as   the   largest   freight   hub   in   the   Statement   for   the   project   could   add   state,  Colgan  said. one  to  three  years  to  the  project,  Col-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  are  daily  trains  and  limited   gan  said.  Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  why  he  is  hoping  the   freight   storage   capacity   in   Burling-­ undertaking   will   be   granted   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;cat-­ ton,  so  there  are  some  challenges  with   egorical   exclusion,â&#x20AC;?   which   he   said   the  idea  of  closing  off  a  bridge  loca-­ could   limit   the   environmental   study  

to  two  to  three  months. Audience  members  inside  the  the-­ ater  listened  intently  to  Colganâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  pre-­ sentation  and  asked  several  thought-­ ful   questions,   including   whether   the   two  spans  would  be  replaced  simulta-­ neously  and  if  a  concrete  tunnel  link-­ ing  the  bridges  was  shaping  up  as  the   leading  replacement  option. Colgan   said   planners   have   not   ruled   out   replacing   both   bridges   at   WKH VDPH WLPH DQG FRQÂżUPHG WKDW a   tunnel   is   shaping   up   as   an   option   warranting  more  study.  One  audience   member   noted   a   tunnel   would   have   WKHVLGHEHQHÂżWRIFORVLQJDJDSLQWKH town   park   that   could   be   seeded   and   enjoyed  as  more  open  space. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  a  tunnel  is  appealing  to  a   lot   of   people,â&#x20AC;?   Colgan   said,   calling   such   a   scenario   a   50-­50   proposition   at  this  point. He  added  thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  the  potential  that   some   work   could   be   done   at   night,   thereby  reducing  impacts  on  rail  traf-­ ÂżFDQGSDUNLQJ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  all  on  the  table  right  now,â&#x20AC;?  he   said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Not   everyone   will   get   what   they   want,â&#x20AC;?  he  added.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  will  do  the  best   we  can.â&#x20AC;? 9+% RIÂżFLDOV KDQGHG RXW VRPH electronic  clickers  to  audience  mem-­ bers   that   allowed   them   to   express   their   feelings   about   elements   of   the   project.  A   clear   majority   of   respon-­ dents   expressed   interest   in   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;tun-­ nelâ&#x20AC;?  option  and  cited  parking  as  their   number  one  concern. 0LGGOHEXU\ 7RZQ 3ODQQHU )UHG 'XQQLQJWRQ SUHVHQWHG &ROJDQ ZLWK sections   of   the   town   plan   that   relate   to   railroad   bridges.   The   plan   asks   that  the  bridges  be  replaced  in  a  man-­ ner   that   keeps   streets   and   sidewalks   pedestrian   and   bicycle   friendly,   that   it   be   done   with   sensitivity   to   down-­ town  parking,  that  the  new  bridges  be   â&#x20AC;&#x153;passenger   rail   ready,â&#x20AC;?   and   that   the   project   afford   the   possibility   of   cre-­ ating  a  safer  and  better  access  to  the   Marble  Works  shopping  complex. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  town  plan  has  anticipated  this   IRUPDQ\\HDUV´'XQQLQJWRQQRWHG Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

0,''/(%85< ² 9HUPRQW *DV Systems  will   hold   an   informational   meeting  on  Monday,  April  1,  in  the   Middlebury   Municipal   Gym,   from   7-­9  p.m.  to  discuss  potential  pipeline   routes   for   its   proposed   natural   gas   pipeline.   3KDVH ,, RI WKH 9*6 SODQ ZRXOG extend  a  natural  gas  pipeline  through   Middlebury,   Cornwall   and   Shore-­ KDPDQGRQWRWKH,QWHUQDWLRQDO3D-­ SHU&RPLOOLQ7LFRQGHURJD1<2Q Monday,  VGS  will  present  a  prelimi-­ QDU\ URXWH IRU WKH 3KDVH ,, SLSHOLQH through  Middlebury,  and  they  are  in-­ terested  in  hearing  public  feedback.   For   those   who   may   not   be   able   to  make  this  meeting,  a  second  and   similar   meeting   is   scheduled   for   April   15,   again   at   the   municipal   gym,  from  7-­9  p.m.

Basketball  tourney  to be  held  in  Shoreham SHOREHAM   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   A   co-­ed,   inter-­ generational,   3-­on-­3   lightning   round   basketball   tournament   will   be   held   at   the   Shoreham   Elementary   School   gym  on  Saturday,  April  6.  The  event   LV D IXQGUDLVHU IRU WKH 3ODWW 0HPR-­ rial   Library   and   will   feature   single-­ elimination   brackets.   This   is   an   op-­ portunity  for  the  public  of  all  ages  (10   DQGXS WRWU\RXWWKHQHZJ\PĂ&#x20AC;RRU 7KH Ă&#x20AC;RRU ZDV LQVWDOOHG WKLV ZLQWHU thanks   to   the   fundraising   efforts   of   WKH 6KRUHKDP 3DUHQWV7HDFKHUV DQG Friends  group. 3DVWSOD\HUVIURPWKHROG6KRUHKDP High   School   and   Middlebury   High   School,   casual   dooryard   players   and   out-­of-­  towners  are  all  encouraged  to   come  and  shoot  some  hoops  to  ben-­ HÂżW WKH 3ODWW 0HPRULDO /LEUDU\ 7KH tournament  will  run  from  10  a.m.  to  1   p.m.  Registration,  warm-­up  and  team   assignments  will  take  place  from  9:30   to  10  a.m.  The  cost  per  player  is  $5;Íž   spectators   are   free   of   charge.   Grand   prizes   will   be   presented   to   the   win-­ ning  teams.  Coffee,  fresh  donuts,  and   fruit  will  be  sold. For  more  information  contact  Bob   Rathbun   at   897-­7969   or   stop   by   the   library  for  a  registration  form.


PAGE  22  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Monkton NEWS

021.721 ² 7KH 0RQNWRQ Volunteer  Fire  Department  will  hold  its   DQQXDO EUHDNIDVW RQ 6XQGD\$SULO  IURPWRDP7KLV\HDUœVGHOLJKW IXO DOO\RXFDQHDW PHDO FRQVLVWV RI VFUDPEOHGHJJVHJJFDVVHUROHVDXVDJH EDFRQSDQFDNHV)UHQFKWRDVW(QJOLVK PXI¿QVGHVVHUWVPLONFRIIHHDQGMXLFH ,WœVDJUHDWZD\WRVHH\RXUIULHQGVDQG QHLJKERUVFDWFKXSRQWKHORFDOQHZV DQGHQMR\DWHUUL¿FPHDOZKLOHVXSSRUW LQJ \RXU ORFDO ¿UH GHSDUWPHQW 3ULFHV

Have a news tip? Call Liz Pecor at 453-2180

ZLOOEHIRUDGXOWVIRUVHQLRUVDQG FKLOGUHQXQGHU&RPHRQHFRPHDOO and  bring  your  appetite. 3OHDVH QRWH QHZ LQFUHDVHG KRXUV IRU WKH 5XVVHOO 0HPRULDO /LEUDU\ %HJLQQLQJ0RQGD\$SULOWKHOLEUDU\ ZLOO EH RSHQ 7XHVGD\ DQG 7KXUVGD\ HYHQLQJV IURP  WR  SP 2Q )ULGD\ and   Saturday   the   library   will   be   open   IURP  DP WR  SP 7KH OLEUDULDQV ZHOFRPH\RXWRVWRSLQDQGWDNHDGYDQ WDJHRIWKHH[WUDKRXUV

e h W t e f e o k t Pe

Hi, my name is Mauja. I am a male mixed breed . . .

If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to include your pet as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pet of the Weekâ&#x20AC;? simply include your petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, gender, approximate age (if you know it), along with comments about the petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s favorite activities, your favorite activity with the pet, what

the pet enjoys eating, and any particular stories or incidents you might like to share concerning your pet. Send the photo and story to the Addison Independent, Pet Page, P.O. Box 31, Middlebury, Vt., 05753.

 (mostly  Great  Pyrenees),  between  6  and  7  years   old,  and  weighing  in  at  a  mere  96  pounds.  My  name   PHDQVÂłGHHSĂ&#x20AC;XII\VQRZ´DQGWKDWLVZKHUH,DP KDSSLHVW,UROOLQLWWRVVLWLQWKHDLUZLWKP\QRVH HDWLWIRUDUHIUHVKLQJVQDFNDQGXVHLWIRUEXU\LQJ WUHDWV LQFDVH,QHHGRQHODWHU 0\KXPDQVIRXQGPH \HDUVDJRDWDQDQLPDOVKHOWHULQ1HZ<RUN1RZ, DPVRKDSS\DQGDV\RXFDQVHH,ORYHWKHWKUHHFDWV ZKRVKDUHP\KRPHHVSHFLDOO\P\EHVWIULHQG%HOOD IRUPHUO\+HOHQ ZKROLYHGDWWKH+RPHZDUG%RXQG

$QLPDO6KHOWHUIRURYHU\HDUV,DPVRJODGWKDW WKH+%$6KDVDQRNLOOSROLF\EHFDXVH%HOODLVP\ sweetheart. ,I\RXZDQWDVSHFLDOIULHQGZKRZLOOORYH\RX XQFRQGLWLRQDOO\FRQVLGHUDGRSWLQJDFDWRUGRJ7KH\ ZLOOÂżOO\RXUKRPHZLWKORYHDQGMR\-XVWDVNP\ humans. Carole, Mike and Peter Cummings Ripton

PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUND ANIMAL WELFARE CENTER What a pretty gal, right??? Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m Lily, one of the beautiful, sweet, and lovely kitties here at the shelter. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m an active girl and enjoy being around the action. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m fun, affectionate and quite the snuggler. I love to be patted and talked to. I enjoy the company of people and I have peacefully coexisted with other cats and dogs in my previous home. I am great with people of all ages. Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m just simply a sweet and loving gal who is anxiously awaiting a loving, forever home. I will make someone a loving and loyal companion. Take me home and see for yourself!

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  23

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PAGE  24  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Willowell brings NYC artists to share ideas with local students MONKTON  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Two  emerging  art-­ ists  based  in  New  York  City  will  hold   brief  residencies  with  Addison  County   schools  in  early  April.  Anna  K.  Miller   and   Nobutaka   Aozaki   will   present   their   artistic   practices   to   high   school   students  in  the  Walden  Project  outdoor   high  school  program  at  the  Willowell   Foundation,  and  to  elementary  school   classes   at   Monkton   Central   School   and  Vergennes   Union   Elementary,   as   part  of  Willowellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  ongoing  efforts  to   bring  visual  artists  into  Vermont  class-­ rooms.   On  Wednesday,  April  3,  Anna  Mill-­

er  will  lead  Walden  Project  students  in   a   performative   work   called   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Hand,â&#x20AC;?   which  Miller  says  â&#x20AC;&#x153;is  meant  to  explore   the   space   between   language   and   the   physical  world.â&#x20AC;?  A  number  of  Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   sculptural   and   performance   pieces   have   included   honey.   She   intends   to   create  a  performative  honey  sculpture   with  the  Walden  students.   On  April   4,   with   the   younger   stu-­ GHQWV ² 0RQNWRQ ÂżUVWJUDGHUV DQG Vergennes   fourth-­graders   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Miller   will   share   a   piece   called   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Honey   Library,â&#x20AC;?  paired  with  a  honey  tasting.   Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   practice   includes   both  

sculpture  and   per-­ QLÂżFDQW GDLO\ PDWWHUV formance   involving   On April 4, with could   become   a   door   â&#x20AC;&#x153;a   limited   palette   of   the â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Monkton for   new   perspectives   common   materials,   Ă&#x20AC;UVWJUDGHUVDQG on   art   making,   com-­ plywood,   beeswax,   9HUJHQQHVIRXUWK munication,   and   our   honey,   canvas,   and   JUDGHUVÂł0LOOHU way   of   living.â&#x20AC;?   In   his   cheesecloth,â&#x20AC;?   accord-­ Aozaki   says   he   ZLOOVKDUHDSLHFH art,   ing   to   SIGNAL,   the   often   â&#x20AC;&#x153;plays   with   ev-­ Brooklyn   gallery   that   FDOOHGWKH´+RQH\ eryday   interactions   in   hosted  her  recent  solo   /LEUDU\ÂľSDLUHG order   to   explore   the   exhibition.  That   exhi-­ ZLWKDKRQH\ relationship   between   bition,   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Folds,â&#x20AC;?   WDVWLQJ artistic  labor  and  non-­ involved   700   yards   artistic   labor,   an   artist   of   cheesecloth   spanning   the   gallery   and  audiences,  art  and  commodity.â&#x20AC;? IURP Ă&#x20AC;RRU WR FHLOLQJ 6,*1$/ VD\V His  recent  projects  include  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Value_ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Millerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  practice  has  long  focused  on   Added   #240950,â&#x20AC;?   which   consists   of   repetitive   processes,   the   gradual   ac-­ a  can  of  corn  with  a  pile  of  receipts.   cumulation   of   effects   in   a   given   ma-­ According   to   his   website:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   art-­ terial,â&#x20AC;?  amounting  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  conversation   ist  takes  one  canned  good  to  multiple   with  material.â&#x20AC;?  She  has  also  exhibited   supermarkets   and   re-­buys   it.   This   her   work   at   the   Liloveve   Gallery   in   single  can  of  corn  has  been  re-­bought   Brooklyn   and   the   Lucas   Gallery   in   from   100   supermarkets   for   a   total   of   Princeton,  N.J. $107.42.â&#x20AC;?   Another   recent   piece   is   Nobutaka   Aozaki   will   visit   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Names   on   Starbucks   Cups,â&#x20AC;?   which   Walden   Project   on   Monday,  April   8.   involves   a   collection   of   Starbucks   Aozaki  says  he  will  be  talking  about   plastic   cups   with   Aozakiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   name   his   work,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;focusing   on   how   insig-­ spelled,  often  incorrectly,  on  the  cups.  

Aozaki  goes  by  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nobuâ&#x20AC;?;Íž  some  of  the   misspellings  include  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Norbert,â&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x153;No-­ bel,â&#x20AC;?  and  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mobu.â&#x20AC;?  By  using  the  cups   in  an  installation,  Aozaki  says  he  turns   his   â&#x20AC;&#x153;position   as   a   passive   consumer   into  active  producer  of  artwork.â&#x20AC;?   Aozaki   has   exhibited   his   work   in   New   York   and   Los   Angeles,   among   other  cities,  and  in  2012  received  the   C12  Emerging  Artist  Award. Both   Miller   and   Aozaki   recently   completed  the  MFA  program  at  Hunt-­ er   College   in   Manhattan,   and   con-­ nected  with  Willowell  through  fellow   MFA  Marela  ZacarĂ­as.  ZacarĂ­as  spent   a   month   this   past   fall   at   Willowell,   working   with   over   130   students   and   community   members   to   build   a   per-­ manent   sculptural   mural   installation   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Azimuth.â&#x20AC;?   Willowell   founder   and   director   Matt   Schlein   says   he   hopes   that   these   residencies   promote   enthusiasm   for   the   arts   among  Addi-­ son  County  students  and  teachers.   For   more   information,   visit   www. willowell.org,  www.annakmiller.com,   and  www.nobutakaaozaki.com.  

Pre-­kindergarten  screening  to  be   held  in  Leicester The Board of Directors of the Mountain Health Center invites you to celebrate the five-town areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s new Community Health Center

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Opinions:

Write  a  Letter  to  the  Editor. Send  it  to  news@addisonindependent.com

LEICESTER  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Registration   for   Leicester   pre-­kindergarten   and   new   kindergarten   students   will   be   held   at   Leicester  Central  School  on  Tuesday,   April  9,  beginning  at  6  p.m.  Children   who  will  be  four  years  old  before  Sept.   1  will  be  able  to  register  for  the  half-­ day   pre-­kindergarten   program.   Chil-­ GUHQZKRZLOOEHÂżYH\HDUVROGEHIRUH Sept.  1  and  are  not  already  attending   Leicester   School   should   register   for   the  full-­day  kindergarten  program. Parents   are   asked   to   bring   copies   of   their   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   immunization   and   health   records   when   they   register.   Those   attending   on   the   evening   of   April  9  will  meet  with  school  staff  at   DQGWKHQÂżOORXWUHJLVWUDWLRQIRUPV This  evening  is  meant  for  adults;Íž  how-­ ever,  childcare  will  be  available  if  re-­ quested   in   advance.   Anyone   having   questions  or  needing  childcare  should   call  the  school  at  247-­8825  and  speak   to  Diane  Randall.

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  25

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Notice

Public  Meetings

DOG  TEAM   CATERING.   Seating  250,  plus  bar  avail-­ able.   Full   menus   available.   802-­388-­4831,   dogteamca-­ tering.net.

ALATEEN:  FOR   YOUNG   PEOPLE   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   af-­ fected  by  someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drink-­ ing.  Members  share  experi-­ ence,  strength,  hope  to  solve   PARTY   RENTALS;   China,   common   problems.   Meets   flatware,   glassware,   lin-­ Wednesdays   7:15-­8:15pm   ens.   Delivery   available.   downstairs  in  Turning  Point   Center   of   Addison   County   802-­388-­4831. in  Middlebury  Marbleworks.   (Al-­Anon   meets   at   same   time  nearby  at  St.  Stephens   Public  Meetings Church. AL-­ANON:  FOR  FAMILIES   and   friends   affected   by   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drinking.   Mem-­ bers   share   experience,   strength   and   hope   to   solve   common  problems.  Newcom-­ ers   welcome.   Confidential.   St.   Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church   (use   front   side   door   and   go   to   second  floor)  in  Middlebury,   Sunday  nights  7:15-­8:15pm.

A L C O H O L I C S  A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   M E E T I N G S   S A T U R -­ DAY:   Discussion   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   at   the   Mid-­ dlebury   United   Methodist   Church.  Discussion  Meeting   10:00-­11:00   AM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Be-­ ginners   Meeting   6:30-­7:30   PM.   These   three   meetings   are  held  at  the  Turning  Point   Center  in  the  Marbleworks,   Middlebury. A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS   FRIDAY:   Dis-­ cussion  Meeting  Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   Turning   Point   in   the  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

Services The Volunteer Center, a collaboration of RSVP and the United Way of Addison County, posts dozens of volunteer

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A L C O H O L I C S  A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS  THURSDAY:  Big   Book  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM   at  the  Turning  Point  Center  in   the  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.   Speaker  Meeting  7:30-­8:30   PM  at  St.  Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,   Main  St.(On  the  Green).

A L C O H O L I C S  A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS  MONDAY:  As  Bill   Sees   It   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   P M .   B i g   B o o k   M e e t i n g   7:30-­8:30  PM.  Both  held  at   the  Turning  Point  Center  in   the  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

A L C O H O L I C S  A N O N Y-­ MOUS   BRANDON   MEET-­ INGS:   Monday,   Discussion   M e e t i n g   7 :3 0 -­ 8 :3 0   PM .   Wednesday,  12  Step  Meet-­ ing  7:00-­8:00  PM.  Friday,  12   Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.   All   held   at   the   St.   Thomas   Episcopal   Church,   RT   7   South.

A L C O H O L I C S  A N O N Y-­ MOUS   NORTH   FERRIS-­ BURGH   MEETINGS:   Sun-­ day,  Daily  Reflections  Meet-­ ing   6:00-­7:00   PM,   at   the   United   Methodist   Church,   Old  Hollow  Rd.

BRAIN  INJURY  SUPPORT   GROUP:   Survivors,   family   members   and   care   givers   are   invited   to   share   their   experience   in   a   safe,   se-­ cure   and   confidential   envi-­ ronment.  Meets  monthly  on   the   second   Tuesday   from   6:00pm   to   8:00pm   at   the   Hannaford   Career   Center,   Room   A214   (second   floor,   an   elevator   is   available)   in   Middlebury.  For  more  infor-­ mation,   contact   Beth   Dia-­ mond  802-­388-­9505.

A L C O H O L I C S  A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS   WEDNESDAY:   Big  Book  Meeting  7:15-­8:15   AM  is  held  at  the  Middlebury   United  Methodist  Church  on   N.  Pleasant  Street.  Discus-­ sion  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Meeting  5:30-­6:30   PM.  Both  held  at  The  Turning   Point  Center  in  the  Marble-­ A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ works,  Middlebury. MOUS  NEW  HAVEN  MEET-­ A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ INGS:   Monday,   Big   Book   M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the   MEETINGS  TUESDAY:  11th   Congregational  Church,  New   Step   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   Haven  Village  Green. PM.   ALTEEN   Group.   Both   held   at   Turning   Point,   228   A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ Maple  Street.  12  Step  Meet-­ MOUS  RIPTON  MEETINGS:   ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  12  Step   Monday,  As  Bill  Sees  It  Meet-­ Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.  Both   ing  7:15-­8:15  AM.  Thursday,   held   at   the   Turning   Point   Grapevine  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   Center  in  the  Marbleworks,   PM.  Both  held  at  Ripton  Fire-­ house,  Dugway  Rd. Middlebury.

Services

Services

Web. Go to www. unitedwayaddisoncounty .org/VolunteerDonate

We are seeking volunteers to sew hot packs for Addison County Home Health and Hospice clients. They are a very simple rectangular shape Yf\Ă&#x161;dd]\oal`_jYaf&

Alsoâ&#x20AC;Ś Might You Have Any Fabric To Spare?

And Finallyâ&#x20AC;Ś Do You Have Any Bulk Grain Youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d Like to Donate?! A^qgm`Yn]kge]]pljY$^j]k`$[d]Yf$\jq$Zmdc *-dZk&![go[gjf$Ă&#x203A;Yp seed or rice, give us a call at 388-7044. Thank you!

and click on VOLUNTEER NOW!

A L C O H O L I C S  A N O N Y-­ MOUS   BRISTOL   MEET-­ INGS:   Sunday,   Discussion   M e e t i n g   4 :0 0 -­ 5 :0 0   PM .   Wednesday,  12  Step  Meet-­ ing   7:00-­8:00   PM.   Friday,   Big  Book  Meeting,  6:00-­7:00   PM.  All  held  at  the  Federated   Church,  Church  St. A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   V E R G E N N E S   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   12   Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.   Friday,   Discussion   Meeting   8:00-­9:00  PM.  Both  held  at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church,   Park   St.   Tuesday,  Discussion  Meeting   7:00-­8:00  PM,  at  the  Congre-­ gational  Church,  Water  St.

Services

Services

L o c a l age n c ie s c a n p o s t t h e i r v o l u n te e r ne e d s w i t h Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r by c a l l i ng RSV P at 388-7044.

NA  MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Mondays,  6pm,  held   at  the  Turning  Point  Center   located  in  the  Marbleworks.

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Name: Address: Phone:

NA  MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Fridays,  7:30pm,  held   at  the  Turning  Point  Center   located  in  the  Marble  Works.

Peg  Allen,   of   Whiting,   is   the   Pro-­ gram   Chair   of   the   Milk   &   Honey   Quilt   Guild   which   meets   monthly   and   makes   lovely  quilts.    Often,  the  group  uses  their   meeting   time   to   support   a   local   charity,   and   this   month   they   took   on   the   task   of   sewing   â&#x20AC;&#x153;chemo   capsâ&#x20AC;?   for   the   American   Cancer  Society.    Peg  spent  time  decipher-­ ing  the  directions  and  creating  a  proto-­type   for  the  members  of  the  Guild  to  duplicate.     Another   sewing   project   that   Peg   has   en-­ joyed  was  making  pet  beds  for  Homeward   Bound   (previously   the   Humane   Society)   and  she  also  volunteers  at  Addison  County   Fair   and   Field   Days,   for   SOUL   and   as   a   Master  Gardener.    Peg  explained  that  she   enjoys   â&#x20AC;&#x153;working   on   a   common   project   with   other   members   of   the   guildâ&#x20AC;?   who   praise  her  as  â&#x20AC;&#x153;a  quiet  leader,  who  leads  by   exampleâ&#x20AC;?.    Thank  you,  Peg!  

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

RATES

ARE  YOU   BOTHERED   by   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drinking?  What-­ ever   your   problems,   there   are   those   of   us   who   have   had  them  too.  We  invite  you   to   our   Opening   Our   Hearts   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Al-­Anon   group,   meeting   every   Wednes-­ day   at   7:15   pm   upstairs   at   IS  LIFE  FEELING  like  a  con-­ St.Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   on   the   Green   stant  struggle?  In  addition  to   in  Middlebury. taking  over  your  life  and  who   you  are  as  a  person?  Do  you   B I B L I C A L   R E C O V E RY   remember   when   the   sim-­ GROUP  Meeting,  Mondays   plest  things  could  make  you   6:30-­7:30pm  at  Grace  Bap-­ happy?  If  you  said  yes,  come   tist  Church,  Merchants  Row,   to   the   Turningpoint   Center   Middlebury.   psalm62minis-­ of  Addison   County   for   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life   tries.org  . in  Transitionâ&#x20AC;?.  These  recov-­ ery  meetings  are  for  young   adults,  ages  16-­25,  with  any   kind   of   addiction.   Meetings   on   Mondays   and   Fridays,   4-­5  pm,  at  the  center  in  the   Marble  Works  in  Middlebury.   Our  support  system  will  help   you  make  a  difference  in  your   life.  Stop  in,  even  if  it  is  just   to  talk.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  your  life,  choose   how  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  live  it. Services

Do You Enjoy Sewing?

These hot packs are made with 100% cotton, using rectangles of 12â&#x20AC;?x6â&#x20AC;?. Pretty colors would be wonderful!

opportunities on the

A L C O H O L I C S  A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS   SUNDAY:   12   Step   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   held   at   the   Middlebury   United  Methodist  Church  on   N.  Pleasant  Street.  Discus-­ sion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00  PM   held   at   the   Turning   Point   Center  in  the  Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

D E A D L I N E S Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

CATEGORIES Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost & Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities

Spotlight with large

Work Wanted Public Meetings** For Sale Help Wanted For Rent Want to Rent Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals



$2

Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted

** No charge for these ads

OVEREATERS  ANONY-­ MOUS:   SATURDAYS   at   L a w r e n c e   M e m o r i a l   L i-­ brary,   1:00pm.   40   North   Street,   Bristol.   For   info   c a l l :   8 0 2 -­ 4 5 3 -­ 2 3 6 8   o r   802-­388-­7081. OVEREATERS   ANONY-­ MOUS:  TUESDAYS  at  Turn-­ ing   Point   Center,   5:15pm.   Marble   Works,   Middlebury.   For  info  call:  802-­352-­4525   or  802-­388-­7081.

ADDISON INDEPENDENT P.O. Box 31, Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

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PAGE  26  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Addison Independent

Help  Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS Services

Help  Wanted

C&I  DRYWALL.   Hanging,   taping   and   skim   coat   plas-­ tering.   Also   tile.   Call   Joe   802-­234-­5545.

FULL  TIME  NURSE  position   available  in  May-­June:  Seek-­ ing  full-­time  experienced  and   dynamic  LPN  or  Medical  As-­ sistant  to  join  our  fast  paced   team.  Work  one-­on-­one  with   a  doctor.  Job  includes  room-­ ing   patients,   giving   injec-­ tions,   EKGs,   venipuncture   and   triaging   phone   calls.   Electronic   Medical   Record   experience   a   plus   but   will   train  the  right  person.  Com-­ petitive  Salary  and  benefits   included.  Position  is  3.5  days   per  week.  Send  resume  and   references   to:   Middlebury   Family   Health,   Attn:   Stacy   Ladd,  Practice  Administrator,   44   Collins   Drive   Suite   201   Middlebury,  VT  05753,  Fax:   802-­388-­0441.

CONSTRUCTION:  ADDI-­ TIONS,   RENOVATIONS,   new   construction,   drywall,   carpentry,   painting,   floor-­ ing,   roofing.   All   aspects   of   construction,   also   property   maintenance.  Steven  Fifield   802-­989-­0009.



DEVELOPMENTAL  HOME   PROVIDER  for  live-­in  client   or  respite  care.  36  years  ex-­ perience.  State  background   check   completed.   State   Agency  and  past  client  fam-­ ily  references  provided.  Call   INN  ON  THE  GREEN  in  Mid-­ Doreen  at  802-­247-­4409. dlebury  now  hiring  additional   breakfast   /   housekeeping   staff   for   Thursday,   Friday,   FREELANCE  GRAPHIC  DE-­ Saturday   from   early   morn-­ SIGNER   offering   reason-­ ing  (7:00  am)  through  early   able  rates  for  work  in  Adobe   afternoon.   Housekeeping   Photoshop   and   InDesign,   experience   preferred,   but   Custom  Clip  Art,  Logos  and   will   train.   Contact   Bruce   or   Artwork.  Basic  tutorial  in  pho-­ Brenda   at   802-­388-­7512   to   toshop  and  indesign.  Great   apply.



references.  $15  /  hour   or   by   contract.   No   job   too   small.   Email:  freelance.mdesign@ gmail.com  or  call  483-­6428.

GREENHOUSE  WORKERS   WANTED.  Part  time  season-­ al.  First  Season  Greenhous-­ es.  Call  5pm-­6pm,  475-­2588.

MOBILE  FIREWOOD  PRO-­ CESSING.   Equipment   and   crew  for  hire  to  cut,  split  and   stack.   Reasonable   rates.   802-­238-­7748.

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

HIRING  CARE  GIVERS  part   time  and  per  diem,  all  shifts.   Email  your  resume  and  refer-­ ences   to   info@livingwellvt. org  .

Help  Wanted

SALISBURY SCHOOL BOARD School Board Meeting Recorder The Salisbury School Board is seeking someone to take meeting minutes at their board meetings which are scheduled for the second Thursday of the month beginning at 6:30pm. All meeting materials are available through electronic submission. Apply by sending a letter of interest, resumĂŠ and three current reference letters to: Dr. Gail B. Conley, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 Deadline: April 15, 2013

E.O.E.

MIDDLEBURY UNION HIGH SCHOOL

Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  largest  sitework  and  concrete  contractor,  S.D.  Ireland  is   looking  for  experienced  and  enthusiastic  people  to  join  our  team.  We   have  immediate  openings  for  the  following  positions: Â&#x2021;&RQFUHWH)LQLVKHUV

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Please  apply  in  person  at  ,QGXVWULDO$YHQXHLQ:LOOLVWRQ97   WR¿OORXWHPSOR\PHQWDSSOLFDWLRQRUPDLO\RXUUHVXPHWR 32%R[6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ97

 No  emails  or  phone  calls  please.   S.D.  Ireland  is  an  Equal  Opportunity  Employer

FULL  TIME  CUSTODIAN Middlebury Union High School is looking for an energetic, motivated individual to work as a custodian from 3:00 to 11:30 PM, Monday through Friday. Experience is a plus, but not required. This is a salaried position with LIEPXLFIRI½XW4PIEWIGEPP&VYGI1EG-RXMVIEX 802-382-1198 for more information. Apply by sending letter of interest, resume and references to: Dr. Gail Conley, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 Position Open Until Filled.

E.O.E.

PORTABLE  SAW   MILL.   Sawing   of   your   logs   and   timbers.  802-­989-­9170.

Free F R E E  R A B B I T   M A -­ NURE!   Please   call   Mo   at   802-­349-­8040.

Help  Wanted BANKRUPTCY:  Call  to  find   out   if   bankruptcy   can   help   you.   Kathleen   Walls,   Esq.   388-­1156. BARNES   DAIRY,   SHORE-­ HAM   seeking   feeder.   Per-­ son  needed  for  mixing  feed   and   delivering   to   animals.   Need   valid   drivers   license,   experience  preferred.  Some   light  maintenance  or  feeding   equipment.  6  days  per  week.   40-­50   hours.   For   interview   call  802-­989-­8853. CREW   CHIEF   AND   IN-­ STALLER   for   Middlebury   Fence.  Ideal  candidate  must   have  fence  installation  and  /   or   contruction   experience;   supervisory  experience;  at-­ tention   to   detail   and   qual-­ ity.   Must   be   self-­motivated.   Send   email   with   resume   or   inquiries  to  EBiello@middle-­ buryfence.com  .

SUBSCRIBE! Call 388.4944, today!

GET ALL THE ADDISON COUNTY NEWS THATâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S FIT TO PRINT WHEN YOU

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Addison Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  —  PAGE  27

Addison Independent

Help Wanted

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

DRIVERS: CDL-­B:  Great   Pay,  Hometime!  No-­Forced   Dispatch!   New   singles   Plattsburgh,   NT.   Pass-­ port  /  Enhanced   License   required.   TruckMovers. com  or  1-­888-­567-­4861.

FULL AND   PART   TIME   deli   positions   available.   Prior  work  experience  with   food  preparation  required.   Applicants  should  apply  in   person  at  Small  City  Market   in  Vergennes  or  call  Cory   at  802-­349-­7101.

TOWN OF  SHOREHAM HIGHWAY  DEPARTMENT

KITCHEN HELP  NEEDED:   Local   Food   Service   com-­ pany   seeks   kitchen   help.   Looking   for   motivated,   hard-­working   individuals   to   help   prep   and   pack   Help  Wanted food   Thursday   through   Saturday.   Please   email   PART-­TIME,   RELIABLE,   resume  and  references  to   flexible,  personable  person   info@grazedelivered.com   for  a  customer  service  posi-­ -­scheduling  interviews  im-­ tion  at  a  busy  flower  shop.   mediately. Must  have  a  clean  driver’s   license.   Send   resume   to   colesflowers@myfairpoint. net  or  stop  in  to  see  Paula.

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Resumes should  be  mailed  to: Town  of  Shoreham 297  Main  Street Shoreham,  VT  05770

ƉƉůLJŽŶůŝŶĞĂƚwww.schoolspring.com WŽƐŝƟŽŶƐǁŝůůƌĞŵĂŝŶŽƉĞŶƵŶƟůĮůůĞĚ͘K͘

by March  30,  2013

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NOW HIRING

Architect/Designer     Vermont   Integrated   Architecture,   P.C.   of   Middlebury   seeks   architect   with   5-­‐10   years   of   experience   with   ĚĞƐŝŐŶ͕ĐŽŶƐƚƌƵĐƟŽŶĚŽĐƵŵĞŶƚĂƟŽŶ͕ĂŶĚƐƉĞĐŝĮĐĂƟŽŶ ǁƌŝƟŶŐ ĨŽƌ ĐŽŵŵĞƌĐŝĂů ĂŶĚ ŝŶƐƟƚƵƟŽŶĂů ƉƌŽũĞĐƚƐ͘ WŽƐŝƟŽŶ ƌĞƋƵŝƌĞƐ ĞdžĐĞůůĞŶƚ ĐŽŵŵƵŶŝĐĂƟŽŶ ƐŬŝůůƐ ĨŽƌ ĞdžƚĞŶƐŝǀĞ ĐůŝĞŶƚ ŝŶƚĞƌĂĐƟŽŶ͕ ĐŽŶƐƵůƚĂŶƚ ĐŽŽƌĚŝŶĂƟŽŶ͕ and   team   management.     Candidate   must   be   a   resourceful   and   independent   worker   while   also   being   a   team   player.     Commitment   to   and   experience   ǁŝƚŚ ĞŶĞƌŐLJ ĞĸĐŝĞŶĐLJ ĂŶĚ ƐƵƐƚĂŝŶĂďŝůŝƚLJ ƐƚƌĂƚĞŐŝĞƐ in   buildings   paramount.     Extensive   experience   with   ƵƚŽĂŵƵƐƚ͘<ŶŽǁůĞĚŐĞŽĨĚŽďĞƌĞĂƟǀĞ^ƵŝƚĞ ĂŶĚ^ŬĞƚĐŚͲƵƉƉƌŽŐƌĂŵƐƉƌĞĨĞƌƌĞĚ͘ ^ĞŶĚůĞƩĞƌŽĨŝŶƚĞƌĞƐƚĂŶĚƌĞƐƵŵĞƚŽ ĂŶĚƌĞĂΛǀĞƌŵŽŶƟŶƚĞŐƌĂƚĞĚĂƌĐŚŝƚĞĐƚƵƌĞ͘ĐŽŵ

Applications can  be  printed  from  our   website  &  emailed  to  info@jpcarrara.com, faxed  to  802-­388-­9010  or  returned  in   person  at  2464 Case St., Middlebury, VT No  phone  calls,  please.

MIDDLEBURY UNION HIGH SCHOOL SUMMER SCHOOL DRIVER EDUCATION TEACHER Middlebury Union High School is seeking a Summer School Driver Education teacher who has subject appropriate Vermont 'IVXM½GEXMSRERHLEWHIQSRWXVEXIHWYFNIGX area expertise with a background in Driver Education. Successful candidate must have demonstrated effectiveness regarding rapport with students and communication with parents and students, demonstrated knowledge of current technology, be willing to work summers (stipend) and after school and have exemplary oral and written communication skills.

Munson Earth Moving is seeking experienced construction workers for upcoming projects throughout Vermont.

We are currently taking applications for: Laborer/Pipe Layer ★ Mechanics ★ Operators ★ Flaggers ★ Lowbed Operators ★ Sitework Layout/Survey ★

Apply by sending a letter of interest, resume, three current reference letters, complete transcripts and evidence of licensure to:

Please send applications to:

Munson Earth Moving 85 Shunpike Rd Williston, VT 05495

JP Carrara  &  Sons  is  looking  for: CONCRETE LABORERS Individuals  applying  for  these  positions   must  be  able  to  work  well  in  a  fast-­paced,   challenging  enviroment.

EOE

Dr. Gail Conley, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury,VT 05753 E.O.E.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

For Sale

MIDDLEBURY FARMERS   MARKET  MANAGER:  The   MFM  is  seeking  an  orga-­ nized,  personable  and  hard   working  individual  to  work   with  our  board  of  directors   to   facilitate   the   smooth   operation   and   promotion   of   our   summer   market.   Markets   are   held   Satur-­ day  mornings  May  through   October   and   Wednesday   mornings  mid  June  through   mid  October.  The  position   offers  excellent  opportunity   for   connecting   with   the   Middlebury  community  and   earning  a  significant  sup-­ plemental  income.  Contact   for   more   information   or   resumes   can   be   sent   to   Spencer   Blackwell   at   el-­ mer.farm@yahoo.com   or   855  Case  St.  Middlebury,   VT  05753.

PER DIEM   POSITION   available   immediately:   Seeking   per   diem   LPN   or   Medical   Assistant   to   join   our   fast   paced   team.   Job  includes  rooming  pa-­ tients,   taking   vitals   and   more  based  on  your  skills.   PreMed  students  welcome   to   apply.   Join   our   team   and   get   a   head   start   on   your  career  with  hands  on   training.   Electronic   Medi-­ cal   Record   experience   a   plus  but  will  train  the  right   person.  Send  Resume  and   references   to   Middlebury   Family  Health,  Attn:  Stacy   Ladd,   Practice   Adminis-­ trator,   44   Collins   Drive   Suite  201,  Middlebury,  VT   05753,  Fax:  802-­388-­0441.

TREADWAY DAIRY   LLC   is  looking  to  fill  the  position   of  feeder.  Candidate  must   have  a  valid  driver’s  license,   prior   experience   preferred   but   not   necessary.   Please   call  Brian  at  802-­349-­6199   to  schedule  an  interview.

T O W N O F   L I N C O L N   seeks  Assistant  to  the  Se-­ lectboard  10  hrs  /  wk  to  work   with  the  board  doing  min-­ utes   and   other   assigned   tasks.  Computer  skills  re-­ quired.  Must  be  available   evenings.  Apply  at  Lincoln   Town   Office,   62   Quaker   St.,  Lincoln,  VT  05443  or   call  802-­453-­2980.  Appl

T O W N O F   L I N C O L N   seeks   Asst.   Town   Clerk   10  hrs  /  wk  assistant  to  the   Town   Clerk   to   aid   with   multiple   tasks.   Excellent   people  and  computer  skills   required.   Flexible   hours.   Apply   at   Lincoln   Town   Office,   62   Quaker   St.,   Lincoln,  VT  05443  or  call   POTENTIAL   DEVELOP-­ 802-­453-­2980.  Application   MENTAL  HOME  Provider   sought   for   21   year   old   deadline:  April  10. woman  with  a  mild  devel-­ opmental   disability   and   anxiety.   She   is   graduat-­ ing   from   high   school   this   summer,  and  wants  to  try   getting  to  know  a  person  /   family  through  respite  now   to  find  the  right  match  for   later   this   summer.   She   loves  music,  movies,  going   for  walks,  making  teas  and   crafts.  Experience  is  desir-­ able,  especially  supporting   others   through   anxious   times.  Looking  for  support   in  learning  life  and  social   Check the skills   during   this   time   of   transition   into   adult   life.   Classifieds twice a Call   Paula   Dougherty   at   week in the Addison Community   Associates   8 0 2 -­ 3 8 8 -­ 4 0 2 1 . i c a t i o n   Independent. deadline:  April  10.

Our ClassLÀHGV Work!

For Rent

For Rent

For Sale LUNCHEON   PATTERN   CHINA,   includes   several   chaffing  dishes,  same  pat-­ tern.  4  place  setting.  Make   offer.  802-­453-­4597.



MO’S COUNTRY   RAB-­ BITS:   Fresh   Rabbit   Meat   for   sale.   Average   weight:   4-­5   lbs.   Charging   $14.00   per  rabbit.  Also  selling  live   adult   rabbits,   as   well   as   baby   rabbits   for   negotia-­ ble   price.   Many   different   breeds   including   “Giants”.   May   be   seen   by   appoint-­ ment.   Call   Mo   O’Keefe   at   802-­349-­8040.  Great  Meat.   Great  Pets.  Great  Prices. SAP  TOTES:  275  Gallons,   clean,   food   grade,   heavy   duty.   $125   each.   Delivery   available.  802-­453-­4235. VA C U U M  —  C A N N I S -­ TER   Dirt   Devil   Vision,   model   082660.   Almost   new.   Was   $129.99,   $60.   802-­388-­1835. WINTER   SPECIAL  —  THE   BARREL   MAN:   55   gallon   Plastic   and   Metal   barrels.   Several   types:   55   gallon   rain   barrels   with   faucets,   Food   grade   with   remov-­ able  locking  covers,  plastic   food  grade  with  spin-­on  cov-­ ers   (pickle   barrels).   Many   types   of   barrels.   55   gal-­ lon  salt  /  sand  barrels  with   PT   legs.  Also,   275   gallon   food  grade  totes,  great  for   Maple   sap.   Special   price,   $125.   Delivery   available.   802-­453-­4235.

For Rent

It’s against  the  law   to  discriminate  when   advertising  housing   related  activities. Particularly  on  sites  like  Craigslist. And  it’s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you  might   think.  You  can’t  say  “no  children”  or  “adults  only.”   There  is  lots  you  can’t  say.  The  federal  government   is  watching  for  such  discrimination. Let  us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities  of  the  Fair   Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the  right  side  of  the   nation’s  Fair  Housing  Law.   Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

Ad Classified

s (Publish

ed: 5/5/11

)

llege. For Rent Close to co TMENT furbished. OM APAR 1 BEDRO Middlebury, newly re 00. , 00 Main Street , includes heat. 000-­ th $750/mon of Middleb T, mile north posit. 00 TMEN rubbish, 1 OM APAR 1 BEDRO udes heat, electric, $595/month plus de cl ly, upstairs, in Available immediate on Route 7. and ref e m s. Deposit LE ho plus utilitie OM MOBI 2 BEDRO Private lot. $650/mo. . in Salisbury 0-­0000. required. 00 t. Refe ONDO HOUSE/C arage and basemen 00. G OM TOWN 2 BEDRO mons, Vergennes. heat. No pets. 000-­00 d om Country C excluding utilities an tellite pletely $1,000/mo. ERN, com Hi-­speed internet, sa ry e OM, MOD 2 BEDRO ke Dunmore house. 85’ lake frontage. Ve ro th La ell, furnished h, drilled w ting August 29, 2009 us ened porc ar dryer, scre 10 month rental; st tiable. $1,000/mo. pl r go efficient. Fo -­smoking. Pets ne Non 26, 2010.


PAGE  28  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS For  Rent

For  Rent

For  Rent

1  LARGE,  1  BEDROOM  apart-­ ment   in   Salisbury   near   Lake   Dunmore.   Super   energy   ef-­ ficient.  Bedroom  and  full  bath   on  second  floor.  Eat-­in  kitchen   with   stove   and   refrigerator;   and  living  room  on  first  floor.   Private  basement  with  washer   and  dryer  included.  Available   May   1.   $800  /  mo.   plus   utili-­ ties.   Yard   maintenance   and   snow   plowing   included.   Se-­ curity  and  references  required.   Non-­smoking   property.   No   pets.  802-­352-­6678.

BRISTOL  2   BEDROOM   HOUSE:   2   Bath,   2   Living   rooms,  2  fire  places,  2  porches,   undercover  parking  for  2  cars.   2250  sq.  ft.  Private  with  views.   First  floor  living.  New  stainless   steel  flat  top  stove.  Washer?  /   dryer.  Free  Wifi.  Extra  storage.   Garden   space.   Plowing   and   lawn  maint,  for  small  fee.  No   pets  /  smoking.  Security,  refer-­ ences,   lease.  Avail.   June   1.   $1325  /  month.   802-­453-­4838   Leave  message.

SPRING  ON   LAKE   DUN-­ MORE:  Expecting  company?   Comfortably   furnished   2-­BR   winterized   lakefront   cottages   available   by   night   (2-­night   minimum),  weekend,  week  or   month  u  ntil  mid-­June.  Smaller   heated  cottages  open  in  May.   10   minutes   to   Middlebury   or   Brandon.   Some   vacancies   left   for   commencement.   No   smoking.  802-­352-­4236;  info@ northcovecottages.com  .

TWO-­  BAY   GARAGE,   de-­ BRISTOL  2  BEDROOM  Mo-­ posit,  references.  Middlebury.   2   BEDROOM   UPSTAIRS   bile   home   in   small   park.  All   802-­558-­6092. apartment.  $1145  /  mo.  Includes   appliances.  Call  802-­453-­4207. UP   TO   7500   SQ.FT.   avail-­ electricity,  hot  water,  heat,  rub-­ EAST   MIDDLEBURY;   1   able   for   food   processing   or   bish  removal.  No  pets.  Security   bedroom   apartment.   Small   light   manufacturing.   Includes   deposit.  802-­453-­4037. kitchen  /  dining  room.  $650  /  mo.   freezer   and   cooler.   Ex-­ 25,000  SQ.FT.  INDUSTRIAL   References.  Available  May  1.   change   Street,   Middlebury.   802-­388-­4831. space  available  in  Middlebury   802-­352-­4124. industrial  park.  Call  for  details.   EAST  MIDDLEBURY;  3  bed-­ VERGENNES   3BR:   washer   802-­349-­8544. room   house   with   backyard.   /  dryer   hookup.   $900  /  month.   2500  SQ.FT.  LIGHT  industrial   $995  /  m onth   plus   utilities.   Pets  negotiable.  On  Monkton   space   on   Exchange   Street,   Available  April  1.  References   Rd.   across   from   Vergennes   Variety.  240-­281-­1508  or  email   Middlebury.  For  more  informa-­ required.  802-­352-­4124. ocopom.ninja.turtle@gmail. tion  call  388-­4831. MIDDLEBURY  1  BEDROOM   com  Available  April   1.   Must   4000  SQUARE  FEET  or  less.   apartment   near   downtown.   pass  background  check. Professional   Office   space   in   Appliances,  lease,  security  de-­ Middlebury,  multi-­  room,  recep-­ posit.  No  pets.  Real-­Net  Man-­ VERGENNES,  277  MAIN  ST.   tionist  desk.  Ground  level,  park-­ agement,  Inc.  802-­388-­4994. available  3/1/13.  Large  reno-­ vated   7-­room   apartment,   full   ing,  handicapped-­accessible.   MIDDLEBURY  1BR  APART-­ bath,   laundry   hookups,   large   Available  now.  802-­558-­6092. MENT   near   Marble   Works.   porch,  includes  heat  and  hot   ADDISON  HOUSE  TO  share.   Rent  includes  heat,  off-­street   water.   $1100.   Call   between   Private   suite   consisting   of   1   parking,  large  lawn  and  garden   8am  and  8pm.  802-­349-­4125. bedroom,   small   living   room,   space,   storage,   plowing   and   private   bath,   skylights,   laun-­ lawn   maintenance.   No   pets   WEYBRIDGE;  1  BEDROOM   dry   room   with   washer  /  dryer,   or  smoking.  Lease,  references   furnished   cottage   2   miles   includes   internet,   satellite   tv   and  security  deposit  required.   from  Middlebury.  Great  view,   and   all   utilities.   $550  /  month.   Available   immediately.   $675   screened  porch,  washer,  dryer,   References   and   deposit.   /  mo.   Call   802-­355-­4164   for   dishwasher.   Pets   ok.   $850  /   more  information. mo.  plus  utilities.  References,   802-­759-­2133. deposit.  ihwashington@gmavt. ADDISON   NEWER   3BR   MIDDLEBURY  PRIVATE  SET-­ net  . HOME  with  2  full  baths,  fire-­ TING:  3  Room  apartment  with   place,   deck   and   large   yard.   own   entrance   and   parking.   $1195  /  m onth   plus   utilities.   Appliances,   heat,   hot   water,   No   pets.   Call   Karen   at   Lang   rubbish   and   snow   removal.   McLaughry   Real   Estate,   Available  May  1.  $900  /  month.   802-­388-­6131. 802-­388-­1977. ADDISON:   1   BEDROOM   1   Bath.   $1250  /  month   utilities   included.  First  months  rent  plus   security  deposit.  1  year  lease.   Available  April  1.  Contact  Karla   at  802-­377-­7445.

MIDDLEBURY  UPSTAIRS   STUDIO   apartment.   Heat,   electric,  rubbish  removal  inc.   $600  /  month.   First,   last   and   security.  802-­453-­4823.

M I D D L E B U RY,  L A R G E   BRANDON   2   BR   $650   +   2   bedroom,   upstairs   apart-­ utilities.   802-­773-­9107   www. ment.   Close   to   downtown.   Security   deposit,   references   thefuccicompany.com  . required.  $1000  /  mo.  plus  heat;   BRANDON:  1  BEDROOM  Up-­ other   utilities   included.   Call   stairs  apartment.  $575  /  month   802-­759-­2169. plus  utilities.  Security  deposit   and  first  months  rent.  Available   NEW   HAVEN   1   Bedroom   apartment.   $830  /  month   ev-­ April  1.  802-­247-­3393. erything  included.  Please  call   BRISTOL  1  BEDROOM  apart-­ 802-­453-­3870. ment.  Small,  $650  /  month,  in-­ cludes  heat.  No  pets,  no  smok-­ ONE   BEDROOM   APART-­ ing.  Available   May   3.   Lease   MENT,  Country  setting.  12  min-­ and  Deposit  required.  Available   utes  to  college.  $750  includes   all.  802-­989-­8124. now.  802-­453-­7037. BRISTOL  LARGE  ONE  bed-­ room   apartment.   Walking   distance   to   town.   No   pets.   No   smoking.   $700  /  m onth   and  utilities  and  deposit.  Call   802-­388-­0730.

RV,  BOAT   AND   HEATED   MOTORCYCLE   STORAGE   Available.  Call  802-­453-­5563. SELF-­STORAGE,  8X10  units.   Your  lock  and  key,  $50  /  month.   Middlebury.  802-­558-­6092.

Wood  Heat

Cars

CORNWALL,  VT:  WELL  Sea-­ soned  3â&#x20AC;?x5â&#x20AC;?  diameter,  16  inch   length   firewood.   Mostly   hard-­ hack.  $300.  per  cord.  You  pick   up   $245   cash.   Get   it   while   it   lasts.  802-­462-­3313.

FREE  JUNK  CAR  REMOVAL.   Cash   paid   for   some   com-­ plete  cars.   Call   388-­0432   or   388-­2209.

FIREWOOD;  CUT,   SPLIT   and   delivered.   Green   or   sea-­ soned.   Call   Tom   Shepard,   802-­453-­4285. MOBILE   FIREWOOD   PRO-­ CESSING.   Equipment   and   crew   for   hire   to   cut,   split   and   stack.  Reasonable  rates.  802-­   238-­7748. MOUNTAIN   ROAD   FIRE-­ WOOD:   50   cords   dry   hard-­ wood   for   sale.   Call   for   price.   802-­759-­2095.

Cars

Cars

MIDDLEBURY;  INDUSTRIAL   PARK.  Available  2  acres,  lease   or  build  to  suit.  802-­558-­6092.

Att.  Farmers 145   ACRES   AVAILABLE   for   five   year   lease.   Organic   pre-­ ferred.  $5500  per  year.  First  and   last  year  rent  paid  at  signing  of   contract.  619-­208-­2939.  www. landwoodwater.com  . HAY  FOR  SALE:  Small  square   bales.   First   cut,   second   cut,   and  mulch.  Delivery  available.   Call  for  pricing.  802-­453-­4481,   802-­349-­9281,  or  802-­989-­1004. HAY  FOR  SALE;  first  and  sec-­ ond  cut.  Call  352-­4686. HAY:   FIRST   AND   SECOND   Cut.   Small   squares.   First   cut-­   big  squares.  4  x  5  round  bales.   802-­759-­2015. JOHN   DEERE   TRACTOR.   Model  #4230.  Good  condition.   $14,000  OBO.  802-­758-­2417. LOCAL  PIGLETS  FOR  SALE   wormed   and   vaccinated.   To   reserve,  call  349-­4566. SAWDUST;  STORED  AND  un-­ dercover.  Large  tandem  silage   truck   $600,   delivered.   Large   single   axle   dump   $250,   deliv-­ ered.   Single   axle   dump   $185,   delivered.   Pick   up   also   avail-­ able.   Phone   order   and   credit   cards  accepted.  802-­453-­2226.   Bagged  shavings  in  stock.  $5.50   per  bag. STANLEY   LIVESTOCK.   WE   pick   up   all   sizes   and   ages   of   cattle.   For   information   call   518-­321-­4946,  518-­692-­2760. WANTED:   TO   PURCHASE   from   owner,   open   land,   20+   acres.  802-­558-­6092.

WHITNEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  CUSTOM  FARM   WORK   Pond   agitating,   liquid   manure   hauling,   mouldboard   Want  to  Rent plowing.   462-­2755,   John   SEEKING  2  BEDROOM,  1-­1/2   Whitney. bath   house  /  apt.   (first   floor)   in   Middlebury   for   mid   May   for   2   professional   females.   773-­420-­6658.

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Advertising

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WANTED:  OLDER   TOYO-­ TA   Camry.   Automatic,   low   miles,   in   good   to   excellent   2003  JEEP  LIBERTY:  Green,   shape   (Grammaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   car).   105,508   miles.   Recently   802-­453-­4235. refurbished.   $3500   OBO.   802-­349-­6874.

Cars

â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;07 CHEVROLET COBALT LT FOR SALE BY OWNER White with tan interior in good condition with no accidents and clean driving history. 94K miles. Price includes set of 4 winter tires (mounted) and 4 all season tires.

NEXT  SEASONS  FIREWOOD.   All   hardwood.   $250  /  cord;   cut,   split,  delivered.  802-­352-­1034,   802-­349-­5457.

Real  Estate

SUVs

$

Wanted WANTED  TO   BUY   1   item   or   houseful.  Also   old   books.   Call   Blue   Willow   Antiques.   802-­247-­5333. WANTED:   TWO   THREE   drawer   single   file   cabinets.   Good,   clean   condition.   Call   Pam  at  802-­388-­4944.

Buy it! Sell it! Find it!

6,000

Check the Classifieds twice a week in the Addison Independent.

Call 802-343-7484

Public Notices Index Public  notices  for  the  following  can  be  found  in  this     ADDISON  INDEPENDENT  on  Pages  28,  29,  30  &  31.

Addison  (1) Addison  Central  School  (1) Addison  County  Superior  Court  (3) Addison  Northeast  Supervisory  Union  -­   M.A.U.H.S.  (1) Bristol  (1) Ferrisburgh  (2) Middlebury  (2) 0LGGOHEXU\8QL¿HG'LVWULFW 

North  Ferrisburgh  Cemetery  Assoc.  (1) Orwell  (1) SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 188-­6-­10 Ancv

GMAC  Mortgage,  LLC,  Plaintiff   v. Thomas  A.  Lebiecki  &  Occupants  residing  at  1243  Forrest  Rd,  Bridport,  VT,  Defendants       NOTICE OF SALE By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Thomas  A.  Lebiecki  to  Mortgage  Electronic  Registration  Systems,  Inc.,  as  nominee  for   GMAC  Mortgage  Corporation  dated  October  8,  2003  and  recorded  in  Volume  59,  Page   359,  which  mortgage  was  assigned  from  Mortgage  Electronic  Registration  Systems,  Inc.,   as  nominee  for  GMAC  Mortgage  Corporation  to  GMAC  Mortgage,  LLC  by  an  instrument   dated  June  11,  2010  and  recorded  on  June  23,  2010  in  Volume  76,  Page  492  of  the  Land   Records  of  the  Town  of  Bridport,  of  which  mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder,   for   breach   of   the   conditions   of   said   mortgage   and   for   the   purposes   of   foreclosing   the   same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at  9:00  A.M.  on  April  24,  2013,  at  1243  Forrest  Road,   Bridport,  Vermont  all  and  singular  the  premises  described  in  said  mortgage:        To  Wit: Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Thomas  A.  Lebiecki  by   virtue  of  a  Warranty  Deed  from  Stephen  A.  Longshore  and  Stephanie  A.  Longshore   dated  August  30,  1996  and  recorded  August  31,  1996  in  Volume  43,  Page  207  of  the   Bridport  Land  Records.        Terms  of  Sale:    $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the   time  of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.  The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing   to  the  Town  of  Bridport.        The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.        Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe  &  Fortin,  30  Kimball   Avenue,  Ste.  306,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.        DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  28th  day  of  March,  2013. *0$&0RUWJDJH//&Â&#x2021;&RUH\-)RUWLQ(VT/REH )RUWLQ3/& .LPEDOO$YH6WHÂ&#x2021;6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ97 4/1,  8,  15


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  29

Public Notices can  be  found  on  Pages    28,  29,  30  &  31.

++++++++++++++ UD#3 SCHOOL BOARD MEETING MUHS LEARNING CENTER 78(6'$<$335,/Â&#x2021;30 AGENDA   Call  to  Order     Comments  &  Questions  from  Visitors                    and  Members  of  the  Community     Approved  minutes  of  March  19,  2013   Act  on  Bills   Reports:                  A:  Students                  B:  SCOHR  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Honduras  Trip                  C:  Principals                  D:  Superintendent                  E.  Board Legislative  Committee  to  Prepare                Resolutions  about  Existing  Legislation Discuss  Declining  School  Enrollment Executive  Session:    Contract                  Negotiations   Items  for  Future  Meetings     Adjournment                                4/1

TOWN OF FERRISBURGH REQUEST FOR BIDS LAWN MOWING SPECIFICATIONS

The  Town  of  Ferrisburgh  is  seeking  bids   from   contractors   to   cut   the   grass   and   perform  spring  clean-­up  work  at  the  Town   2I¿FH&RPPXQLW\&HQWHUDW5RXWHWKH 7RZQ 6KHG RQ /LWWOH &KLFDJR 5RDG WKH 8QLRQ0HHWLQJ+DOODQGVKHGWKH&HQWHU 6FKRROWKH7RZQ%HDFK7KH)LUH6WDWLRQ VLWHDW5RXWHDQGFHPHWHULHV  LQ :HVW)HUULVEXUJKLQ1RUWK)HUULVEXUJK DQGLQ)HUULVEXUJK&HQWHU 2SHUDWRUV PXVWEHDWOHDVW\HDUVRIDJHDQGKDYH DOOQHFHVVDU\VDIHW\HTXLSPHQW 7KHELGVVKRXOGEHVXEPLWWHGLQZULWLQJ DFFRPSDQLHGZLWKFXUUHQWSURRIRIOLDELOLW\ LQVXUDQFHWRWKH7RZQ&OHUNE\SP$SULO WK  7KH 6HOHFWERDUG ZLOO UHYLHZ WKH sealed   bids   at   their   regular   Selectboard   PHHWLQJ$SULOWKDQGUHVHUYHVWKHULJKW WRUHMHFWDQ\DQGDOOELGVRUWRDFFHSWWKH bid   deemed   to   be   in   the   best   interest   of   the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh &RQWUDFWRU ELGV VKRXOG LQFOXGH performing  the  following:  ,QLWLDO FOHDQXS LQ WKH VSULQJ DW DOO VLWHVZKLFKZRXOGLQFOXGHUHPRYLQJDQG GLVSRVLQJRIIDOOHQEUDQFKHVGHEULVHWF DVQHFHVVDU\ *UDVVDWDOOVLWHVZLOOEHNHSWDW´WR í´ RU EHORZ DQG ZLOO QRW EH FXW ORZHU WKDQí³$OOFHPHWHULHVZLOOEHWULPPHG WRWKHIHQFH  :HHG ZKDFNLQJ DQGRU WULPPLQJ ZLOO EHGRQHDWWKHWLPHRIHDFKPRZLQJ 0RZLQJZLOOFRPPHQFHRQRUDURXQG 0D\stDQGFRQWLQXHWKURXJK2FWREHUst  $OO FHPHWHULHV ZLOO EH PRZHG DQG WULPPHGIRU0HPRULDO'D\ 3D\PHQWVWREHLQHTXDOLQVWDOOPHQWV IROORZLQJ WKH QG UHJXODU 6HOHFWERDUG PHHWLQJ RI WKH PRQWKV RI 0D\ -XO\ 6HSWHPEHUDQG2FWREHU  7KHFHPHWHULHVDUH ,Q :HVW )HUULVEXUJK )UHG $OOHQ %DVLQ +DUERU 1HZWRQ :DUQHU :HEVWHU DQG Fletcher ,Q 1RUWK )HUULVEXUJK 2OG 4XDNHU DQG &KDPSOLQ+LOO ,Q )HUULVEXUJK &HQWHU 5RELQVRQ &ROOLQVDQG3RUWHU 127($OOVLWHVPXVWEHYLVLWHGEHIRUH ELGGLQJ 

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 68-­3-­07 Ancv

Deutsche  Bank  National  Trust  Company,  as  Trustee  for  HSI  Asset  Securitization &RUSRUDWLRQ2370RUWJDJH3DVV7KURXJK&HUWLÂżFDWHV6HULHV237   Plaintiff   v. Thomas  Kerr,  Donna  Kerr,  Ford  Motor  Credit  Co.  and  Occupants  residing  at  2029   Goshen  Ripton  Road,  Goshen,  Vermont,   Defendants       NOTICE OF SALE By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Thomas  Kerr  and  Donna  Kerr  to  H&R  Block  Mortgage  Corporation  dated  October  26,   2005  and  recorded  in  Volume  24,  Page  131,  which  mortgage  was  assigned  from  H&R   Block  Mortgage  Corporation  to  Option  One  Mortgage  Corporation  by  an  instrument  dated   February  13,  2007  and  recorded  on  March  10,  2007  in  Volume  25,  Page  22  of  the  Land   Records  of  the  Town  of  Goshen,  which  mortgage  was  further  assigned  from  Option  One   Mortgage   Corporation   to   Deutsche   Bank   National   Trust   Company,   as   Trustee   for   HSI   $VVHW6HFXULWL]DWLRQ&RUSRUDWLRQ2370RUWJDJH3DVV7KURXJK&HUWLÂżFDWHV6HULHV 2006-­OPT3  by  an  instrument  dated  October  5,  2006  and  recorded  on  March  10,  2007  in   Volume  25,  Page  21  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Goshen,  a  corrective  assignment   of  mortgage  from  ADA  Services  Corp.  f/k/a  H&R  Block  Mortgage  Corporation  to  Option   One  Mortgage  Corporation  dated  December  10,  2010  was  recorded  December  21,  2010   in  Volume  27,  Page  71  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Goshen,  of  which  mortgage  the   undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of  said  mortgage  and  for   the  purposes  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at  10:15  A.M.  on  April   24,  2013,  at  2029  Goshen  Ripton  Road,  Goshen,  Vermont  all  and  singular  the  premises   described  in  said  mortgage:        To  Wit: Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Thomas  and  Donna  Kerr   by  virtue  of  an  Administrators  Deed  from  Joan  Fox,  Administrator  of  the  Estate  of   Elizabeth  George  dated  June  30,  1992  and  recorded  September  15,  1992  in  Volume   19,  Page  108  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Goshen.        Terms  of  Sale:  $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the   time  of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing   to  the  Town  of  Goshen.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.    Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe  &  Fortin,  30  Kimball  Avenue,   Ste.  306,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.    DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  28th  day  of  March,  2013. Deutsche  Bank  National  Trust  Company,  as  Trustee  for  HSI  Asset  Securitization   &RUSRUDWLRQ2370RUWJDJH3DVV7KURXJK&HUWLÂżFDWHV6HULHV237 Corey  J.  Fortin,  Esq.,  Lobe  &  Fortin,  PLC .LPEDOO$YH6WHÂ&#x2021;6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ97 4/1,  8,  15

INVITATION TO BID LAWN MOWING ADDISON CENTRAL SCHOOL

  The  Addison  Board  of  School  Directors  is  seeking  bids  for  mowing,  trimming  and  general   lawn  care  at  the  Addison  Central  School. GENERAL SPECIFICATIONS: 1.  Bidder  will  submit  bids  for  the  job  of  mowing  the  lawns,  trimming  and  general  lawn  care   at  the  Addison  Central  School  for  the  ensuing  year,  commencing  upon  award  and  ending   May  31,  2014.  Please  submit  your  bid  BY THE SEASON. 2.  The  schedule  of  mowing  will  be  determined  by  the  administration  with  the  cooperation   and  in  collaboration  with  the  successful  bidder.    Scheduling  limitations  include,  but  may  not   be  limited  to,  times  when  school  is  in  session  and  during  after-­school  and  summer  athletic   activities. 6HUYLFHVWREHSURYLGHGLQFOXGHFRPSOHWHPRZLQJRIWKHODZQDUHDVDQGWKHDWKOHWLFÂżHOG areas   around   the   school;Íž   clipping   around   building,   shrubbery,   fences,   etc.;Íž   general   lawn   care,  which  includes  picking  up  paper  and  other  small  debris  on  the  lawn  prior  to  mowing;Íž   DQGPRZLQJRIVSHFLDODUHDV LHOHDFKÂżHOG DVQHHGHG 4.   Payment   will   be   made   in   four   equal   installments   during   the   months   of   July,   August,   September  and  October.    %LGV PXVW VKRZ WKH DPRXQW RI :RUNHUVÂś &RPSHQVDWLRQ LI DSSOLFDEOH  DQG /LDELOLW\ ,QVXUDQFH ZKLFK WKH SRWHQWLDO FRQWUDFWRU FDUULHV  $ Âł&HUWLÂżFDWH RI ,QVXUDQFH´ PXVW EH submitted  by  the  successful  bidder  before  any  contractual  obligation  will  occur. 6.  The  successful  bidder  may  be  required  to  submit  personal  and  business  references  prior   WRWKHÂżQDODZDUGRIWKHELG      Interested  bidders  should  contact  Jeff  Kauffman,  Head  Custodian,  Addison  Central   6FKRROWRYLHZWKHSURSHUW\DQGFRQÂżUPWKHVFRSHRIWKHVHUYLFHVUHTXLUHG prior  to  submitting  a  bid.    The  Board  of  School  Directors  reserves  the  right  to  waive  any  irregularities  to  accept  or   reject  any  or  all  bids  as  it  may  deem  to  be  in  the  best  interest  of  the  school  district.    Bids will be accepted until 4:00 PM Friday, April 12, 2013.        Please  submit  to  Kathleen  Cannon,  Business  Manager,  Addison  Northwest  Supervisory   Union,   48   Green   Street,   Suite   1,   Vergennes,   VT     05491   in   a   sealed   envelope   marked   â&#x20AC;&#x153;ACS Lawn Mowing Bid.â&#x20AC;?  Bids  will  be  presented  at  the  regularly  scheduled  school  board   meeting  in  April. 3/28,  4/1,  4,  8

Lincoln  school  announces   kindergarten  registration LINCOLN   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Lincoln   Community   School   will   hold   its   2013-­2014  kindergarten  registration   on   Friday,  April   12,   from   8   a.m.   to   3   p.m.   in   the   Lincoln   Community   School  kindergarten.  Children  regis-­ tering  need  to  be  5  years  old  by  Sept.   1. Parents  should  call  Deirdre  Zele  at  

SUPERIOR COURT ADDISON UNIT

453-­2119  or  email  dzele@anesu.org   WR VHW XS D VSHFL¿F WLPH WR UHJLVWHU their  child.  Children  may  play  in  the   kindergarten  to  become  familiar  with   their   new   classroom.   Kindergarten   teacher   Deb   Eddington   and   assis-­ tant   Beth   Trombly   will   be   there   to   welcome   families   and   answer   any   questions  parents  may  have.  

STATE OF VERMONT CIVIL DIVISION DOCKET NO: 236-­9-­10 Ancv

HSBC  BANK  USA,  N.A.,  AS  TRUSTEE  ON  BEHALF    OF  ACE  SECURITIES  CORP.  HOME   EQUITY  LOAN    TRUST  AND  FOR  THE  REGISTERED  HOLDERS  OF    ACE  SECURITIES   CORP.   HOME   EQUITY   LOAN   TRUST,    SERIES   2007-­WM2   ASSET   BACKED   PASS-­ THROUGH    CERTIFICATES Plaintiff  v. GARY  F.  WEATHERWAX;    CAROLYN  A.  WEATHERWAX;    VERMONT  FEDERAL   CREDIT  UNION; Defendants NOTICE  OF  SALE By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given   by  Gary  F.  Weatherwax  and  Carolyn  A.  Weatherwax  to  Mortgage  Electronic  Registration   Systems,  Inc.,  as  nominee  for  WMC  Mortgage  Corp.  dated  November  3,  2006  and  recorded   in  Book  90  at  Page  251  of    the  City/Town  of  Addison  Land  Records,  of  which  mortgage  the   undersigned  is  the  present  holder  by  Assignment  of  Mortgage  recorded  on  February  12,   2008  in  Book  92  at  Page  324,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of  said  mortgage  and  for  the   purpose  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at  10:00  a.m.  on  April  16,   2013  at  218  Algonquin  Drive,  Addison,  VT  05491  all  and  singular  the  premises  described   in  said  mortgage, To  Wit: The  following  described  real  property  situated  in  Addison  County,  Vermont,  to  wit:  Parcel   1:    Commencing  at  a  point  marked  by  an  existing  iron  pipe  located  S  24  degrees  43â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W   and  approximately  60  feet  form  a  set  iron  pipe  located  on  the  southerly  side  of  Hospital   Creek,  so-­called:    Thence  S  76  degrees  31â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  145.36  feet  to  an  existing  iron  pipe;    Thence   S  86  degrees  39â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  125  feet  to  a  set  iron  pipe;    Thence  S  86  degrees  39â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  400  feet  to  an   existing  iron  pipe  at  or  near  P.  P.  #5;  Thence  N  03  degrees  21â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  133.45  feet  to  an  existing   iron  pipe;    Thence  N  03  degrees  21â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  91.55  feet  to  a  point  marking  the  approximate  low   water  mark  located  on  the  southeasterly  shore  of  Lake  Champlain;    Thence  proceeding  in   a  general  Northeasterly  direction  along  the  approximate  low  water  mark  of  Lake  Champlain   to  a  point  located  on  the  said  low  water  mark  of  Lake  Champlain;  Thence  S  50  degrees  09â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   E  75  feet,  more  or  less,  to  an  existing  iron  pipe;  Thence  S  60  degrees  09â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  361.54  feet  to   the  existing  iron  pipe  marking  the  point  or  place  of  beginning.  Included  in  this  conveyance   is  dwelling  and  other  outbuildings  thereon.  Said  Parcel  contains  3.44  acres,  more  or  less.   Reference   is   made   to   a   survey   map   entitled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Property   of   George   M.   Marrow   (Chimney   Point)   Addison   County,   Addison,   Vermontâ&#x20AC;?   surveyed   by   Lee   H.   Lowell,   Land   Surveyor   2FWREHURQÂżOHLQWKH$GGLVRQ7RZQ&OHUNÂśV2IÂżFHUHIHUHQFHLVDOVRPDGHWRD survey  map  entitled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Certain  Lands  of  Warren  and  Jean  Fauser  Addison  County,  Addison,   VT,  being  portions  of  BK.  35,  PG.  483  and  BK.  32,  PG.  163â&#x20AC;?  surveyed  by  Rodney  R.  Orvis   'HFHPEHURQÂżOHLQWKH$GGLVRQ7RZQ&OHUNÂśV2IÂżFH5HIHUHQFHLVIXUWKHUPDGH to  a  Homestead  Exemptions  dated  September  3,  1991  as  recorded  in  Book  51,  Page  471   of  the  Addison  Land  Records.  Parcel  2:  Commencing  at  a  point  marked  by  a  set  iron  pipe   located  on  the  Easterly  side  of  Lake  Port  Road,  so-­called,  and  further  described  as  being   the  Northwest  corner  of  the  property  herein  conveyed;  Thence  N  86  degrees  39â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  167   feet  to  a  set  iron  pipe  marking  the  Northeast  corner  of  the  parcel  being  conveyed  and  the   Northwest  corner  of  Lot  24,  so-­called;  Thence  S  08  degrees  58â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  30â&#x20AC;?  W  100  feet  to  a  set  iron   pipe  marking  the  Northeast  corner  of  the  parcel  being  conveyed  and  the  Southwest  corner   of  Lot  24,  so  called;  Thence  S  86  degrees  39â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  155.08  feet  to  a  set  iron  pipe  marking   the  Southwest  corner  of  the  parcel  being  conveyed  and  the  Northwest  corner  of  Lot  18,   so-­called;  Thence  N  19  degrees  08â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  E  24.62  feet  to  a  set  iron  pipe;  Thence  N  03  degrees   21â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  W  75  feet  to  the  set  iron  pipe  marking  the  point  or  place  of  beginning.  Included  in  this   conveyance  is  a  swimming  pool  located  on  the  said  premises.  Reference  is  made  to  â&#x20AC;&#x153;A   Survey  Map  of  the  premises  to  be  conveyed,  carrying  the  legend  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Property  of  George  M.   Marrow,  (Chimney  Point),  Addison  County,  Addison,  Vermont,  survey  Lee  W.  Lowell,  Land   Surveyor,   October   13,   1961,   revised   by   Lee   H.   Lowell,   Land   Surveyor,   1/7/63,   1/20/64,    3URSHUW\ NQRZQ DV$UERXUVLGH´ 0DS 1R Âś LV RQ ÂżOH LQ VDLG$GGLVRQ /DQG Records.  Excepting  and  Reserving  herefrom  that  portion  of  the  above-­described  premises   conveyed  by  Gary  Weatherwax  to  Champlain  Bridge  Marina,  Inc.,  by  Warranty  Deed  dated   April  11,  2003  and  Recorded  April  15th,  2003  in  Book  80,  Page  332  of  the  Land  Records   of  the  Town  of  Addison,  Vermont.  BEING  THE  SAME  PROPERTY  CONVEYED  TO  GARY   F.  WEATHERWAX  AND  CAROLYN  A.  WEATHERWAX,  HUSBAND  AND  WIFE  BY  DEED   FROM  GARY  F.  WEATHERWAX  A/K/A  GARY  WEATHERWAX  RECORDED  01/03/2006   IN   DEED   BOOK   88   PAGE   242,   IN   THE   TOWN   CLERKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   OFFICE   OF   ADDISON,   VERMONT    Parcel  No.  AL0218 Plaintiff  may  adjourn  this  Public  Auction  one  or  more  times  for  a  total  time  not  exceeding   30  days,  without  further  court  order,  and  without  publication  or  service  of  a  new  notice  of   sale,  by  announcement  of  the  new  sale  date  to  those  present  at  each  adjournment.  Terms   RI6DOHWREHSDLGLQFDVKRUE\FHUWLÂżHGFKHFNE\WKHSXUFKDVHUDWWKHWLPH RIVDOHZLWKWKHEDODQFHGXHDWFORVLQJ3URRIRIÂżQDQFLQJIRUWKHEDODQFHRIWKHSXUFKDVH to  be  provided  at  the  time  of  sale.  The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the  Town   of  Addison. The  Mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale. Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale. HSBC   Bank   USA,   N.A.,   as   Trustee   on   Behalf   of  ACE   Securities   Corp.   Home   Equity   Loan   Trust   and   for   the   Registered   Holders   of  ACE   Securities   Corp.   Home   Equity   Loan   7UXVW6HULHV:0$VVHW%DFNHG3DVV7KURXJK&HUWLÂżFDWHV.DWKU\Q'RQRYDQ(VT Shechtman,   Halperin,   Savage,   LLP,   1080   Main   Street,   Pawtucket,   RI     02860,   877-­575-­ 1400,  Attorney  for  Plaintiff 3-­25,  4-­1,  4-­8  


PAGE  30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Public Notices can  be  found  on Pages  28,  29,  30  &  31.

NORTH FERRISBURGH CEMETERY ASSOCIATION REQUEST FOR BIDS

  Request  for  mowing  and  trimming  bids  for   the  2013  season.  For  information  call  877-­ 6903.  Bids  are  due  by  April  15,  2013.          4/1,  4

TOWN OF BRISTOL â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOTICE TO PUBLIC OF INTENT TO REQUEST RELEASE OF FUNDS

To ALL INTERESTED AGENCIES, GROUPS AND PERSONS: The  purpose  of  this  notice  is  to  identify  actions  to  be  taken  by  the  Town  of  Bristol,  VT.     On  or  about  April  9,  2013  the  above  named  municipality  will  request  that  the  Vermont   Agency  of  Commerce  &  Community  Development  (hereinafter  Agency)  to  release  funds   under  the  Vermont  Community  Development  Act  to  be  used  for  the  following  project.     Project Title: Addison  County  Dental  Center Purpose/Nature of Project: The  Town  of  Bristol  will  subgrant  $297,500  to  Addison   County  Dental  Center  to  establish  an  affordable  dental  center  at  BristolWorks!,  Bristol,   VT.    The  dental  center  will  be  part  of  the  Mountain  Health  Center,  5  Town  Health  Alliance   VHUYLQJ%ULVWRO0RQNWRQ/LQFROQ1HZ+DYHQ 6WDUNVERUR7KHSURMHFWZLOOEHQHÂżW low-­moderate  income  households.     Location of Project: BristolWorks!,  Bristol,  VT Estimated Cost of Project: $458,615 Project Summary:  Addison  County  Dental  Center  will  use  the  funds  for  purchase,   VKLSSLQJDQGLQVWDOODWLRQRIGHQWDOHTXLSPHQWIRUDFKDLUGHQWDORIÂżFH7KHHTXLSPHQW will  be  installed  in  leased  premises  at  BristolWorks!,  an  adaptive  use  project  in  Bristol.     )ROORZLQJLQWHULRUÂżWXSWRWKHLQWHULRURIDQH[LVWLQJEXLOGLQJLQVWDOODWLRQRIWKHHTXLSPHQW and  furnishings  will  not  change  the  size,  capacity  or  character  of  BristolWorks!.     Finding of Categorical Exclusion: An  environmental  review  for  the  project  has  been   PDGHE\WKH7RZQRI%ULVWRODQGLVDYDLODEOHIRUWKHSXEOLFH[DPLQDWLRQDQGFRS\LQJDW WKHPXQLFLSDORIÂżFHVGXULQJQRUPDOEXVLQHVVKRXUV%DVHGRQWKLVUHYLHZWKH7RZQRI %ULVWROKDVGHWHUPLQHGVDLGSURMHFWWREH&DWHJRULFDOO\([FOXGHGXQGHUWKHSURYLVLRQV of  the  National  Environmental  Policy  Act  of  1969  (PS  91-­910). Public Comments on Finding: All   interested   agencies,   groups   and   persons   disagreeing   with   this   decision   are   invited   to   submit   written   comments   for   the   consideration  by  the  Town  of  Bristol  no  later  than  April  9,  2013.    All  comments  must   FOHDUO\VSHFLI\ZKLFKGHFLVLRQWKH\REMHFWWRÂąWKH)LQGLQJRI&DWHJRULFDO([FOXVLRQRU the  Request  for  Release  of  Funds.    All  comments  so  received  will  be  considered  by  the   Town  of  Bristol  prior  to  its  taking  any  administrative  action  or  requesting  release  of  funds   on  the  date  listed  immediately  above. Request for Release of Funds: The   Town   of   Bristol   will   undertake   the   project   described   above   with   Vermont   Community   Development   Program   funds   from   the   Agency.    The  Town  of  Bristol  is  certifying  to  the  Agency  that  the  Town  of  Bristol,  and   :LOOLDP %U\DQW LQ KLV RIÂżFLDO FDSDFLW\ DV 7RZQ$GPLQLVWUDWRU FRQVHQW WR DFFHSW WKH jurisdiction   of   the   Federal   Courts   if   an   action   is   brought   to   enforce   responsibilities   in   relation   to   environmental   reviews,   decision-­making,   and   action;   and   that   these   UHVSRQVLELOLWLHVKDYHEHHQVDWLVÂżHG7KHOHJDOHIIHFWRIWKHFHUWLÂżFDWLRQLVWKDWXSRQLWV approval,  the  Town  of  Bristol  may  use  the  Vermont  Community  Program  funds,  and  the   $JHQF\ZLOOKDYHVDWLVÂżHGLWVUHVSRQVLELOLWLHVXQGHUWKH1DWLRQDO(QYLURQPHQWDO3ROLF\ Act  of  1969  and  other  environmental  responsibilities  listed  in  24  CFR  Part  58.       Objection to Release of Funds: the  agency  will  accept  an  objection  to  its  approval   RIWKHUHOHDVHRIIXQGVDQGDFFHSWDQFHRIWKHFHUWLÂżFDWLRQRQO\LILWLVRQRQHRIWKH following  bases: D 7KDWWKHFHUWLÂżFDWLRQZDVQRWLQIDFWH[HFXWHGE\WKH&HUWLI\LQJ2IÂżFHUDSSURYHG by  the  Agency; (b)  That  the  Town  of  Bristolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  environmental  review  record  for  the  project  indicated   RPLVVLRQ RI D UHTXLUHG GHFLVLRQ ÂżQGLQJ RU VWHS DSSOLFDEOH WR WKH SURMHFW LQ WKH environmental  review  process; (c)   The   grant   recipient   or   other   participants   in   the   development   process   have   committed  funds,  incurred  costs  or  undertaken  activities  not  authorized  by  24  CFR  Part   58  before  approval  of  a  release  of  funds  by  HUD/State;  or (d)    Any  other  reason  allowed  under  24  CFR  Part  58  Section  58.75 Objections   may   be   addressed   to   the   Agency   of   Commerce   and   Community   Development,  Department  of  Housing  &  Community  Affairs,  National  Life  Building,  6th   Floor,  One  National  Life  Drive  Montpelier,  Vermont  05620.    No  objection  received  after   15  days  from  the  date  of  request  for  funds  listed  above  will  be  considered  by  the  Agency. 4/1

TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY BOARD AND COMMISSION VACANCIES

Each  year   at   this   time   the   Town   of   Middlebury   Select   Board   makes   its   annual   appointments   to   volunteer   positions   required   by   State   Statute,   and   local   and   regional   boards  and  commissions.    If  you  are  interested  in  any  of  the  following  positions,  please   VXEPLWDOHWWHURILQWHUHVWWRWKH7RZQ0DQDJHUœV2I¿FH0DLQ6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\QR ODWHUWKDQ)ULGD\$SULO,I\RXZRXOGOLNHWR¿QGRXWPRUHDERXWDQ\RIWKHVH positions,  please  contact  us  at  388-­8100,  Ext  202. (  )  indicates  number  of  positions  open Three  Year  Terms Auditor  (1) Auditor  (1) Development  Review  Board  (1) Planning  Commission  (2) Fence  Viewer  (3) Design  Advisory  Committee  (2) First  Constable  (1)   Development  Review  Board  (1)   /LVWHU  WR¿OOXQH[SLUHGWHUPXQWLOQH[W Downtown  Improvement  District      March  Town  Meeting    Committee  (2) Middlebury  Community  Television  Board  (1) Two  Year  Term Sports  Commission  (3) Auditor  (1) Town  Agent  (1) One  Year  Term Town  Grand  Juror  (1) Addison  County  Regional   7RZQ6HUYLFH2I¿FHU 

  Planning  Commission  (3) Tree  Warden  (1) Addison  County  Solid  Waste   Tree  Warden  Deputy  (1)    Management  District  (1) The  Select  Board  is  also  taking  names  of  citizens  interested  in  serving  on  the  Middlebury   Area  Land  Trust  and  Town  of  Middlebury  Power  House  Committee.

 

NOTICE OF TAX SALE TOWN OF ADDISON

  The  resident  and  non-­resident  owners,  lien  holders  and  mortgagees  of  lands  in  the  Town   RI$GGLVRQLQWKH&RXQW\RI$GGLVRQDUHKHUHE\QRWLÂżHGWKDWWKHWD[HVDVVHVVHGE\VXFK 7RZQ UHPDLQ HLWKHU LQ ZKROH RU LQ SDUW XQSDLG RQ WKH IROORZLQJ GHVFULEHG ODQGV LQ VXFK Town,  to  wit: Property Owners: Michael and Donna Sumner Property Address: 5627 Lake Street, Addison, VT 05491 Parcel ID # LS5627 /DQG DQGSUHPLVHV GHVFULEHG LQ D4XLWFODLP 'HHGIURP0DUWKD %%ODFNORFN DQG'RQQD 6XPQHU WR 0LFKDHO 6XPQHU DQG 'RQQD 6XPQHU GDWHG 0DUFK   DQG UHFRUGHG LQ 9ROXPHDW3DJH Tax Year: 2011, 2012 Amount of tax, interest, cost and penalties: $4,870.83 5HIHUHQFHPD\EHKDGWRVDLGLQVWUXPHQWVIRUDPRUHSDUWLFXODUGHVFULSWLRQRIVDLGODQGV DQGSUHPLVHVDVWKHVDPHDSSHDULQWKH7RZQ&OHUNÂśV2IÂżFHRIWKH7RZQRI$GGLVRQ 6RPXFKRIVXFKODQGVZLOOEHVROGDWSXEOLFDXFWLRQDW$GGLVRQ7RZQ&OHUNÂśV2IÂżFH97 5RXWH:HVW$GGLVRQ97RQWKHrdGD\RI0D\DWRÂśFORFNLQWKHIRUHQRRQ DV VKDOO EH UHTXLVLWH WR GLVFKDUJH VXFK WD[HV ZLWK LQWHUHVW FRVWV DQG SHQDOWLHV XQOHVV SUHYLRXVO\SDLG3URSHUW\RZQHUVRUPRUWJDJHHVPD\SD\VXFKWD[HVLQWHUHVWFRVWVDQG SHQDOWLHVLQIXOOE\FDVKRUFHUWLÂżHGFKHFNPDGHSD\DEOHWRWKH7RZQRI$GGLVRQ$WWD[VDOH VXFFHVVIXOELGGHUVPXVWSD\LQIXOOE\FDVKRUFHUWLÂżHGFKHFN1RRWKHUSD\PHQWVDFFHSWHG $Q\TXHVWLRQVRULQTXLULHVUHJDUGLQJWKHDERYHUHIHUHQFHGVDOHVKRXOGEHGLUHFWHGWRWKH following  address: %ULDQ30RQDJKDQ(VT0RQDJKDQ6DIDU'ZLJKW3//& %DWWHU\6WUHHW%XUOLQJWRQ97 EPRQDJKDQ#PVGYWFRP 0RQDJKDQ6DIDU'ZLJKW3//&DQGWKH7RZQRI$GGLVRQJLYHQRRSLQLRQRUFHUWLÂżFDWLRQDVWR WKHPDUNHWDELOLW\RIWLWOHWRWKHDERYHUHIHUHQFHGSURSHUWLHVDVKHOGE\WKHFXUUHQWRZQHUWD[SD\HU 'DWHGDW$GGLVRQ9HUPRQWWKLVthGD\RI0DUFK &DHWOLQ+DUZRRG&ROOHFWRURI'HOLQTXHQW7D[HVâ&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Town  of  Addison 

ORWELL PLANNING COMMISSION ORWELL TOWN PLAN â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The  Orwell  Planning  Commission  will  hold  a  public  hearing  on  Wednesday,  May  15,   DW30DWWKH7RZQ&OHUNÂśV2IÂżFHLQ2UZHOO9HUPRQWRQWKHSURSRVHG2UZHOO 7RZQ3ODQ7KLVKHDULQJLVKHOGSXUVXDQWWR96$7KLVQRWLFHLVLVVXHGSXUVX-­ DQWWR96$ E  STATEMENT  OF  PURPOSE  AND  AREAS  OF  TOWN  AFFECTED 7KH2UZHOO7RZQ3ODQFUHDWHVDQGGHÂżQHVDORQJWHUPYLVLRQIRUWKH7RZQRI2UZHOO The  Plan  provides  historical  data  and  statistics  to  provide  context  for  those  making  com-­ munity  decisions.  It  describes  Orwellâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  current  conditions,  character  and  challenges.      It   also  establishes  goals  and  action  items  intended  to  implement  the  vision  of  the  Plan.  The   Plan  should  serve  as  a  primary  reference  for  all  individuals  and  entities  making  commu-­ QLW\GHFLVLRQVDQGVKRXOGJXLGHORFDORIÂżFLDOVVHWWLQJSXEOLFSROLF\$OODUHDVZLWKLQWKH Town  of  Orwell  are  affected.    Topic  areas  of  the  Plan  include:   TABLE OF CONTENTS 1.  Introduction                              1.1.  General  Description  ................................................................................8                      1.2.  Authority  and  Purpose  ............................................................................9                      1.3.  Town  History  ...........................................................................................11 2.  The  People 'HPRJUDSKLF3URÂżOH  ...............................................................................21 +RXVLQJ3URÂżOH  .......................................................................................22 (FRQRPLF3URÂżOH  .....................................................................................26   3.  The  Community 3.1.  Historic  &  Archaeological  Resources  ......................................................29 3.2.  Town  Facilities  and  Lands  ......................................................................31 3.3.  Economy  .................................................................................................32 3.4.  Education  and  Childcare  ........................................................................34 3.5.  Recreation  ..............................................................................................34 3.6.  Transportation.........................................................................................36 3.7.  Utilities  and  Energy  .................................................................................39 3.8.  Public  Health  and  Safety  ........................................................................41 3.9.  Fiscal  Condition  ......................................................................................43 4.  The  Environment 4.1.  Air  ...........................................................................................................44 4.2.  Land........................................................................................................46 4.3.  Water  ......................................................................................................48 4.4.  Special  Features  .....................................................................................54 5.  The  Future 5.1.  Natural  and  Historic  Features  .................................................................55 5.2.  Agriculture  and  Forestry  .........................................................................57 5.3.  Extraction  of  Earth  Resources  ................................................................58 5.4.  Recreation  ..............................................................................................58 5.5.  Transportation.........................................................................................59 5.6.  Public  Facilities  and  Services  .................................................................61 5.7.  Energy  ....................................................................................................62 5.8.  Economic  Development  ..........................................................................62 5.9.  Education................................................................................................63 5.10.  Childcare  ..............................................................................................63 5.11.  Housing  .................................................................................................64 5.12.  Land  Use  Plan  ......................................................................................65 5.13  Implementation  ......................................................................................72 5.14.Compatibility  ..........................................................................................73 &RSLHVRIWKHSURSRVHG2UZHOO7RZQ3ODQFDQEHYLHZHGDWWKH7RZQ&OHUNÂśV2IÂżFH 2UZHOO9HUPRQW For  further  information  please  call  Andrea  Ochs,  Chair  of  the  Planning  Commission  at    RUHPDLO$QR[#6KRUHKDPQHWRUFDOOWKH7RZQ&OHUNDW   Orwell  Planning  Commission BY:  Andrea  Ochs,  Chair 4/1

MIDDLEBURY SELECTBOARD SPECIAL WORKING SESSION

Recreation  Building 77  Mary  Hogan  Drive Monday,  April  1,  2013 4:30  p.m. The   purpose   of   the   working   session   is   to  discuss  Board  process  and  procedures   &  objectives  for  and  potential  challenges  in   the  coming  year. 4/1

MIDDLEBURY UD#3 CONTROLS PROJECT REQUEST FOR BIDS

Project  scope   of   work   includes   a   com-­ plete   modernization   of   HVAC   controls   at   the  Middlebury  Union  High  School  and  at   the   Middlebury   Union   Middle   School.  All   legacy  HVAC  controllers  shall  be  removed   and  replaced  with  modern  HVAC  control-­ lers.   A   new   web   based   HVAC   manage-­ ment  head  end  shall  be  provided  for  cen-­ tralized  management  of  both  schools.  For   more  information  please  contact  Facilities   Manager   Bruce   MacIntire   802-­382-­1500   or  bmacintire@addisoncentralsu.org.  All bids  will  be  due  no  later  than  April  8,  2013   at  1:00  PM. 3/28

TOWN OF FERRISBURGH NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING PLANNING COMMISSION

A  public   hearing   before   the   Planning   Commission   of   the   Town   of   Ferrisburgh   ZLOOEHKHOGDWWKH7RZQ&OHUNœV2I¿FHRQ April   17,   2013   to   consider   the   following   applications: 7:35  PM.     An   application,   #13-­028,   submitted   by   Debbie   and   Terry   Allen   for   a  two-­lot  minor    subdivision,  Property  ID#   05.02.75.21.   Property   located   at   5467   Route  7.  Zoning  District  RA-­5. 7:45  PM     An   application,   #13-­029,   submitted   by  Alyth   and   Melody   Hescock   for   a   two-­lot   subdivision.   Property   ID#11.01.09,   165   Fuller   Mountain   Road.   Zoning  Dist.  RA-­5. The   above   applications   are   available   IRULQVSHFWLRQDWWKH7RZQ&OHUNœV2I¿FH Persons  wishing  to  appear  and  be  heard   may  do  so  in  person  or  be  represented  by   an  agent  or  an  attorney PLEASE  NOTE:  Participation  in  the  local   proceeding  is  a  prerequisite  to  the  right  to   take  any  subsequent  appeal.   Communications   about   the   above   DSSOLFDWLRQV PD\ EH ¿OHG LQ ZULWLQJ ZLWK the  Board  or  at  such  hearing. 4/1

ADDISON NORTHEAST SUPERVISORY UNION DISTRICT â&#x20AC;&#x201C; NOTICE OF RECORDS DESTRUCTION

(Bristol, Lincoln, Monkton, New Haven, Starksboro, Mt. Abraham UMHS) ATTN: Parents & eligible students who received Special Education services up to June 2007. The  Vermont   Agency   of   Educationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   State   Board   of   Ed.   Manual   of   Rights   and   Practices,   Section   2365,   2.13(a)   Destruction   of   Information,   states:     â&#x20AC;&#x153;For   purposes  of  an  audit,  when  a  participating   agency   has   counted   a   child   to   justify   receipt   of   IDEIA   funds,   the   district   shall   retain   copies   of   the   childâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   IEP   and   special   education   eligibility   evaluations,   IRUDPLQLPXPRIÂżYH\HDUVIURPWKHHQG of  the  school  year  in  which  the  document   was   in   effect.â&#x20AC;?     If   you   received   Special   Education   services   and   graduated   between  2005-­  2007  you  are  entitled  to  a   copy  of  your  records.    The  ANESU  District   will   destroy   these   Special   Education   records  on  Monday,  4/8/13.      If  you  want   a   copy   of   your   record,   contact   ANESU   6XSHULQWHQGHQWÂśV 2IÂżFH DW  Your   request   must   be   received   prior   to   Friday,  4/5/13. 3/18,  3/25,  4/1


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  31

Vermont  wildlife  responding  to  milder  winter  weather Following   a   spell   of   warm,   spring-­ like  weather,  biologists  at  the  Vermont   Fish   &  Wildlife   Department   observed   black   bears   out   of   their   dens   early   in   March.   In   recent   years,   mild   weather   has   frequently   driven   bears   to   enter   their  dens  later  and  to  emerge  earlier.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Bears   are   triggered   to   enter   their   den   when   food   begins   to   become   scarce   in   fall   or   early   winter,   which   usually  follows  a  heavy  snowfall,â&#x20AC;?  said   Forrest  Hammond,  bear  project  leader   for  Vermont   Fish   &  Wildlife.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Spring   rains   and   warm   temperatures   cause   bears   to   leave   their   dens   in   search   of   uncovered   nuts   and   green   shoots   that   start   to   emerge   from   the   melting   snowpack.  Bears  will  be  active  as  long   DV WKH\ FDQ HDVLO\ ÂżQG IRRG EXW WKH\ will  return  to  their  dens  if  another  deep   snowfall  covers  their  food  supply.â&#x20AC;? Shorter  denning  seasons  in  Vermont   are   consistent   with   reports   from   the   American   West,   Scandinavia   and   Spain,  where  many  brown  bears  have   forgone   hibernation   altogether.   Bears   vary   the   duration   of   winter   dormancy   based   on   their   latitude   and   altitude;Íž   bears   that   live   further   north   or   high   in   the   mountains   typically   den   for   a   longer  period  of  time. Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   black   bears   are   not   the  

only  species   changing   their   behavior   due  to  recent  winter  weather  patterns.   Many   bird   species   have   started   to   migrate,   breed,   and   nest   earlier   in   the   spring  in  recent  years. John   Buck,   migratory   bird   project   leader   for   Vermont   Fish   &   Wildlife,   says  that  the  department  has  observed   state  endangered  spruce  grouse  display-­ ing   courtship   and   breeding   activity   three  weeks  early  as  a  response  to  low   spring  snowpack  levels  in  recent  years.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  concerned  that  the  females  may   nest  early  and  then  see  their  nests  buried   under  a  heavy,  late-­season  snowstorm,   which  would  likely  result  in  a  high  rate   of  nest  failures,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. The   department   has   also   observed   that   waterfowl   are   delaying   their   departure  from  Vermont  for  the  winter   because   they   continue   to   have   access   to   open   water,   sometimes   late   into   December  or  January. Fish   &   Wildlifeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Steve   Parren   has   been   studying   a   population   of   wood   turtles  for  the  past  25  years.  According   to   Parren,   the   turtles   have   historically   emerged   from   hibernation   in   mid-­ April.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;During  the  extreme  warm  spell   that  we  had  last  winter,  we  saw  wood   turtles  basking  on  March  17,  nearly  a   month   earlier   than   they   are   typically  

BEARS  THAT   EMERGED   during   the   warm   weather   in   early   March   were   likely   driven   back   into   their   dens   by   the   heavy   snows   that   hit   Vermont  near  the  end  of  the  month. Photo  by  Tom  Rogers,  Vermont  Fish  &   Wildlife  Department

spotted,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. Other  amphibian  and  reptile  species   responded  to  a  warm  early-­March  rain   this   year   by   emerging   from   winter   dormancy  Herpetologist  Jim  Andrews,   of  the  Vermont  Reptile  and  Amphibian   Atlas,   tracks   the   spring   emergence   of   reptiles   and   amphibians   in   Vermont.   Andrews,  a  Salisbury  resident,  reported   seeing   spring   peeper   frogs,   spotted  

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salamanders  and   even   some   Eastern   newts   on   March   12   this   winter   in   the   Champlain  Valley. Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   insects   also   vary   their   emergence   dates   based   on   the   spring   temperatures.  During  warmer  and  drier   springs,  many  will  emerge  early. Âł)ORZHULQJ SODQWV EHHV EXWWHUĂ&#x20AC;LHV â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  these  species  have  evolved  together   EDVHG RQ D VSHFLÂżF WLPLQJ RI HYHQWV in   the   spring,â&#x20AC;?   said   Fish   &   Wildlife   biologist   Mark   Ferguson.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Many   of   the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  crops,  including  apple  trees,   require   insects   for   pollination.â&#x20AC;?   Last   spring,   many   Vermont   apple   growers   saw  high  levels  of  frost  damage  when   unusually   high   temperatures   pushed   Ă&#x20AC;RZHUEXGVRXWEHIRUHWKHODVWIURVWVRI the  season  were  over. Milder   winter   temperatures   can   make   controlling   many   forest   pest   VSHFLHV GLIÂżFXOW 9HUPRQWÂśV KHPORFNV are  currently  threatened  by  a  non-­native   insect   known   as   the   hemlock   woolly   adelgid,   which   feeds   on   hemlock   sap   and  may  inject  toxic  saliva  while  feed-­ ing.  The  adelgidâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  northward  spread  is   limited  by  its  inability  to  tolerate  long   stretches  of  temperatures  below  minus   20   degrees   Fahrenheit,   which   have   become  less  frequent  in  Vermont  in  the   last  decade.  

April 1 Puzzle Solutions

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EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 as amended which makes it illegal to advertise â&#x20AC;&#x153;any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or persons receiv-­ ing public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.â&#x20AC;? This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimina-­ tion, call HUD Toll-­free at 1-­800-­424-­8590. For the Washington, DC area please call HUD at 426-­3500.

For  Lease:  1,100  SF  former  Mainstream  Salon  space.  Ideally  suited  for   DVSDRUVDORQFRQFHSWEXWFDQEHFRQYHUWHGWRRWKHUUHWDLORURI¿FHXVHV ADA  compliant  bathroom.  Fully  air  conditioned.  Incredible  visibility  and   H[SRVXUHLQ0LGGOHEXU\¶VPRVWIRRWWUDI¿FNHGDUHD   $PSOHRQVWUHHWSDUNLQJ For  Lease  or  Sale:6)RI¿FHRUUHWDLOVSDFH)RUPHUO\/ROO\JDJJHU¶V this  space  can  be  leased  or  purchased.  Wonderful  stone  walls  adorn  two   VLGHVRIWKHVSDFH9LHZVRIWKHIDOOVHQKDQFHWKHLQVLGHIHHO$JUHDW opportunity  for  a  small  business  owner. For  Sale:6XLWH&XUUHQWO\XVHGDVDPDVVDJH WKHUDS\RI¿FH7KLV6)XQLWZDVUHFHQWO\UHQRYDWHG and  includes  a  new  furnace.  Beautiful  detail  adds  to  the   KLJKHQGFKDUDFWHURIWKHVSDFH7KUHHURRPVSOXVD SULYDWHEDWKURRP7KLVLVDZRQGHUIXORSSRUWXQLW\IRUD small  business  owner  to  invest  in  their  own  space.  

Redstone       802-­658-­7400  ext  16      redstonevt.com Duncan  Harris      802-­343-­4661      dharris@redstonevt.com

As  this   pest   spreads,   it   can   cause   devastating   declines   in   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   hemlock   forests.   Hemlock   forests   are   a   critical   habitat   for   many   Vermont   species;Íž   bears,   bobcats   and   ruffed   grouse   all   use   hemlock   for   protective   cover,   and   these   forests   are   crucial   as   wintering   habitat   for   white-­tailed   deer.   Following   the   mild   winter   of   2011,   hemlock   woolly   adelgid   spread   to  seven  additional  towns  in  Vermont,   more   than   doubling   the   number   of   towns  in  which  the  pest  was  previously   detected. :KLOH PLOG ZLQWHUV PD\ EHQHÂżW some  species  in  Vermont,  the  weatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   XQSUHGLFWDELOLW\FDQSURYHGLIÂżFXOWIRU wildlife.  Mid-­winter  rains  followed  by   deep   freezes   or   March   temperatures   above  50  degrees  F  followed  by  heavy,   late-­season   snowfalls   can   cause   oner-­ ous  conditions  for  many  species. â&#x20AC;&#x153;During  a  normal  winter,  bud  break,   insect   hatching   and   birds   returning   to   Vermont  or  establishing  nests  all  occur   at  the  same  time,â&#x20AC;?  added  Buck.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mild   and   unpredictable   winters   cause   these   events   to   get   out   of   sync.   Birds   that   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   keep   up   with   changing   weather   patterns  return  to  Vermont  to  nest  and   ÂżQG WKDW WKH LQVHFWV WKDW WKH\ IHHG RQ have  already  hatched.â&#x20AC;?

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PAGE 32  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  April  1,  2013

Monday, April 1, 2013  

Addison Independent Newspaper