Page 1

MONDAY EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 29 No. 51

Middlebury, Vermont

Monday, April 16, 2018

32 Pages

$1.00

Americana music galore • The Michele Fay Band will lay down some tunes at Brandon Music on April 21. See Arts Beat on Pages 10-13.

Solar farm eyed for expansion • Middlebury to review a proposal for the South Ridge project. See Page 3.

MUHS, VUHS teams square off • Commodore baseball and softball hosted the Tigers on Friday with a wary eye on the weather. See the results on Page 17.

Panton building ready for repairs • Work on town hall will include new cupola, access upgrades. See Page 2.

Pledge allegiance

MADELINA NDAYIRAGIJE, SECOND from left, and her family join with the Hon. John Conroy, U.S. magistrate judge, to celebrate Ndayiragije’s swearing in as a U.S. citizen in the New Haven town gym this past Thursday. Ndayiragije, originally from Burundi, was among 26 people from 18 countries who gained U.S. citizenship in a naturalization ceremony that afternoon. See more photos on Page 21.

Independent photo/John S. McCright

New Haven vendor pans gun laws Ineffective gun rules won’t prevent shootings, he says

Pretty pooch is at your service

• A Great Dane who lives with her “mom” in Vergennes is full of personality. See Pet of the Week on Page 22.

By CHRISTOPHER ROSS NEW HAVEN — Licensed firearms dealer David Pidgeon is happy to keep guns out of the hands of people who shouldn’t have them. “No dealer wants to sell a firearm to someone who shouldn’t have it,” he said. But the owner of Pidgeon’s Gun Shop in New Haven doesn’t think the gun-control bills Gov. Scott signed into law last Wednesday are going to make anyone safer. The new laws ban accessories that turn guns into military-style weapons; allow police to take guns from citizens in a few specific cases; and limit, for a period of time, who (See Gun rights, Page 23)

Hemp firm plants roots in Middlebury

Will make products in old Full Sun spot

SOME SELLERS OF rifles, such as these at a New Haven gun shop, are not happy with the new gun regulations signed into law last week.

Independent photo/John S. McCright

By JOHN FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY — Netaka White was understandably crestfallen when financial reasons forced him to shutter Full Sun Company’s Exchange Street plant after less than three years of producing sunflower and canola oils. But things are looking up. Full Sun’s presses will spring back into motion in a few months. Only they’ll be pressing hemp seeds, not (See Hemp, Page 15)


PAGE 2 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

City council balks at issuing permits to bar City Limits owner invited to meeting

By ANDY KIRKALDY VERGENNES — With a memo in hand from Vergennes Police Chief George Merkel detailing three $500 fines assessed to the City Limits Nightclub for allegedly over-serving alcohol to patrons, on Tuesday the city council for a second time decided not to act on the Green Street bar owner’s application for its annual liquor and live entertainment license. Instead the council chose to invite City Limits owner Brett Ward, who was unavailable to attend this past Tuesday, to its April 24 meeting to discuss the issues Merkel raised. In his April 6 memo Merkel said he met with Department of Liquor Control (DLC) Inspector Jay Clark the week before. According to Merkel, Clark told him that while Clark was at City Limits giving Ward two notices of violations carrying $500 fines and “attempting to acquire video recordings” related to those incidents, Clark “witnessed a violation in the immediate presence

of Ward, subsequently resulting in issuance of another notice of violation ($500 penalty).” According to Merkel, one of the earlier incidents came on March 11, when city police cited a driver for driving under the influence of alcohol, a driver police alleged had been drinking at City Limits. Police alleged the suspect’s blood-alcohol content tested at 0.289 percent, almost four times the legal limit for driving of 0.08. The other incident came on March 15, when on patrol early in the morning police helped a man having “difficulty walking” home after allegedly drinking at City Limits. Police said his BAC tested at 0.256. At the meeting City Clerk Joan Devine said the DLC has in the past suspended Ward’s license for seven days, and that the DLC could be considering a suspension this time as well even though it had to this point just issued tickets. “It just doesn’t happen overnight,” Devine said. City Manager Mel Hawley advised the council not to deny or suspend City Limits’ license, or even to set any conditions on it,

By ANDY KIRKALDY PANTON — Although some questions remain about the feasibility of a kitchen on the upper level of Panton Town Hall, work that voters approved on Town Meeting Day to improve the 19th-century structure will soon begin. Overall plans call for making town hall’s two bathrooms handicap-accessible, replacing the handicap ramp, adding the kitchen, and installing a newly built, lowmaintenance cupola to replace the deteriorated cupola that was removed in 2011. Voters in March approved using $100,000 from a general fund surplus to pay for the work, and also authorized the selectboard to borrow

up to $100,000 for the cupola project. Residents also agreed to Town Hall Committee Chairman David Raphael’s motion to add $23,775 to the selectboard’s recommendation of $15,000 to be placed into the Town Hall Restoration Fund. Those funds, plus $18,000 remaining in a grant for the cupola and ongoing extra tax revenue from new Green Mountain Powers 5-megawatt solar array — revenue voters have agreed to put towards town hall — will pay for the project, per estimates from contractor McKernon Group of Brandon. The Panton selectboard last week authorized McKernon to begin renovating the two bathrooms, one that serves the basement town office

at the Tuesday meeting because you’ve got to ask yourselves what there would be no “due process,” you would do with it,” he said. particularly in Ward’s absence. In other business, the council: “I would guard against doing • Agreed to spend $350 to buy an that,” Hawley said. “Brett should ad in a brochure that will promote have an opportunity to address Vergennes that is being prepared by the city council and talk about the Middlebury artist Doug Lazarus. content of that memo.” Lazarus said local Hawley said, “Brett should businesses and tourist however, that the council have an attractions have also does serve as the city’s bought ads for the opportunity to liquor commission and brochure, which might want to consider address the council members its options at a meeting city council and agreed would have a to which Clark will be talk about the distinctive look that invited. should make it stand content of that “The city council memo.” out on racks. Lazarus is who makes the said he plans to print — City Manager 3,000 in the first year expectations clear,” Mel Hawley and distribute them Hawley said. “Based on the memo, the within a half-hour expectations need to be made clear.” drive of the city. The city funding Deputy Mayor Jeff Fritz, filling will come from donations left in a in for absent Mayor Renny Perry, collection box near city docks. asked if the hearing was put off • Discussed options for new doors until April 24 if there would be to the rear of the city hall lobby that time to act for Ward to renew City city offices share with the Vergennes Limits’ license before its expiration Opera House. Council members deadline. said they prefer glass doors, which Hawley suggested the time frame Hawley said would cost $5,300 and was not the major issue. could be locked, unlike the current “If you got this memo in October, doors, and offer visitors a look at

the conference room now being renovated. But Hawley and Fritz said theater backers like the current doors, which need renovation. Council members agreed to give the theater group two more weeks to propose a viable alternative, at which time they said a decision needs to be made to allow the conference room project to be completed. • Heard from Fritz that the search to replace Hawley as city manager had already drawn eight applicants, with two from as far away as California. The search committee, of which Fritz is chairman, will meet on Tuesday to develop an interview process. “All in all, I’m really pleased,” he said. • Heard from Hawley that the October increase in sewer rates has stabilized the city’s sewer budget, but that police spending is running a little high due to overtime. One officer has been out due to illness, leading to overtime for other officers, he said. “I’m not predicting we’ll be under budget,” Hawley said, adding that the department is adding a second part-time officer to help bring overtime spending in line.

Panton Town Hall renovations to begin soon and one that serves the upper-level meeting room. Another key handicap-accessibility project will begin soon, according to Selectboard Chairman Howard Hall, the replacement of the building’s unusable access ramp. “After we’re done with the bathrooms, then we’re going to focus on the ramp,” Hall said. The downstairs bathroom is out of service, but Hall said it is due to a failed pump, not a larger septic system problem. Officials decided as long as one facility was available and two were on the way it didn’t make sense to fix the short-term problem. Hall said workers will focus on the town office rest room first. “We’ll get that downstairs

bathroom up and running as soon as possible,” he said. Meanwhile the board is looking into the feasibility of the kitchen, which was supported in a town survey as well as at Town Meeting Day. Two issues must be dealt with. Officials say the building’s septic system is adequate for the two rest rooms, but could not handle extra gray water from a kitchen sink and dishwasher. “We have an older system that’s good for two bathrooms, period,” Hall said. Panton Town Hall Committee member and former selectman John Viskup at town meeting said he had learned that public buildings like

Panton Town Hall could be permitted for a holding tank. According Raphael, Viskup has agreed to work with the selectboard on that solution. Hall said the board will wait on the tank until it knows the state will permit it, with one issue being what the building would be used for if the kitchen is installed; that is, would more intensive uses raise questions about the septic system. “We have to make sure the state of Vermont … would approve such activities that we could do that,” Hall said. Raphael said he believes adding the kitchen would just enhance the building’s existing uses, and that adding the kitchen should be OK (See Panton, Page 3)

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Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 3

Middlebury South Ridge solar farm eyed for expansion

By JOHN FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY — The Middlebury selectboard last week gave a tentative nod to a proposed 500-kilowatt solar project that would be nestled between two existing solar farms of identical size within the South Ridge planned unit development off Meadow Glen Road. The selectboard won’t make its endorsement official, however, until the planning commission and the public weigh in on the plan that is being pitched by Middle Road Ventures LLC. Officials have set a Tuesday, May 8, public hearing on the proposal. It should also be noted that Charlie Kireker, managing partner at Middle Road Ventures, is not merely seeking the town’s blessing on “Phase III” of the South Ridge solar project. He’s also asking the board to support the facility as a “Category III Preferred Site Designation,” per the Vermont Public Utility Commission’s (PUC) Rule 5.100. Rule 5.100, which took effect on

July 1, 2017, offers favorable terms to net-metering projects that meet specific “preferred site” criteria. Those who apply for such a designation must include, in their materials, “a joint letter of support from the municipal legislative body and municipal and regional planning commissions in the community where the net-metering system will be located.” The new solar arrays would be installed between two pre-existing, 500-kW solar farms located on land adjacent to the Residence at Otter Creek retirement community. The topography of the land is such that solar panels are largely hidden from public view. Kireker, a Weybridge resident and long-time Middlebury businessman, said Dr. Mike Kiernan of the Middlebury-area company “Bee The Change” would plant flowers and shrubs throughout the solar site that would attract pollinators. “Instead of just farming the sun for energy, we’re also creating the conditions that nurture bees,” Kireker said at the April 10 Middlebury

selectboard meeting. Kireker wants to build Phase III of the South Ridge solar project before the end of this year, though he concedes it could be 2019 before he receives the required permission. He’s hoping that permission will include the ability to access “Phase III” through one of the two existing roads that serve Phases I and II. Current state rules require solar farms to have their own, independent infrastructure. “We don’t have an option to build a third (access) road, and what’s the point?” Kireker said. “We will make a case to the PUC to allow more than one 500kW project to be served by the same road.” State officials are banking that Rule 5.100 will encourage communities to identify sites deemed suitable for future renewable energy projects. Ross Conrad, chairman of the Middlebury Energy Committee, said the town could include such a preferred-sites list in its updated energy plan. This would free the selectboard from having to weigh in

on solar projects individually. In other action this past Tuesday, the Middlebury selectboard: • Accepted a slate of candidates for an array of appointed commissions, boards and other civic offices. Board members said they were thrilled to see a lot of people volunteer this year for vacancies. In most cases, a candidate has stepped forward for each vacancy on such panels as the Design Advisory Committee, the Development Review Board and the Downtown Improvement District Board. In a couple of cases, there are more candidates than positions available, which will force the selectboard to make some tough choices. For example, Ted Davis, Karl Neuse, Ross Conrad, Larry Bailey and Ashley Laux have stepped forward for three available one-year spots representing Middlebury on the Addison County Regional Planning Commission. The selectboard is scheduled to vote on the slate of candidates at its next meeting, April 24.

• Approved the proposed transfer of a 25-acre parcel off Dragon Brook Road from the Arlington, Va.-based Conservation Fund to the Green Mountain National Forest (GMNF). Chris Mattrick, United States Forest Service ranger for the Rochester/ Middlebury district of the GMNF, also updated the selectboard on its now-vacant administrative offices at 1007 Route 7 south. He said the USFS is seeking funding to proceed with an auction, or outright sale, of the Middlebury property, which includes seven buildings of varying sizes on roughly 3.9-acres. Mattrick hopes that sale can occur this summer. Plans call for the USFS to eventually maintain a part-time presence at the Addison County Chamber of Commerce headquarters on Court Street. That worker would continue to process firewood permits, Christmas tree permits and provide visitor information. In the meantime, the USFS is scheduling service at the Chamber offices by appointment, according to Mattrick.

although he said Hall is “right to have those concerns.” Raphael noted a visit from a state fire marshal a year ago — he granted the inspection did not include a kitchen — in which it was determined existing measures were adequate for the building’s legal occupancy numbers. “It has always been a meeting house that has a certain capacity, which of course we would need to respect and observe,” Raphael said. Hall is also cautious on the cupola funding, which was not in the original selectboard budget. “We did not budget money to make payments on a $100,000 loan,” Hall

said. “We have to make sure we have sufficient funds.” Raphael, again, was more optimistic. “I think it was pretty clear that the town expected that if needs be we would bond for it,” he said. “I think we understand we might have to get a loan to do it, and that loan would be paid back by the revenues, as the wording indicated, from new sources of revenue such as the solar field.” Hall said the work would get done “at the best of our ability as a board,” but board members want to proceed carefully. “We’re making sure all the i’s are

dotted and all the t’s are crossed and everything is done, we have a permit and we have an understanding what our responsibilities are, either with the septic field or with the cupola,” Hall said. “It takes some time and I have to make sure I have the finances to do all that.” Raphael said he understands the need for care, although he called the $100,000 budget “more than adequate” for the cupola. “I think the selectboard understands it’s now their role to follow the wishes and directions of the voters. But it is in their purview to make the decisions on how best to fund this

and where the money is coming from and the timing,” he said. Raphael is also looking forward to seeing all the work done, including the cupola back on town hall. “This is very important to the town both symbolically and physically,” he said. “I just think that restoring this town hall as the singular icon of our community, and really aside from the town garage our only building, it’s absolutely important to our sense of place and our sense of community.”

Panton (Continued from Page 2) with the state on those grounds. “I think we’ll use it occasionally, but what this does is give us the opportunity to have events and community gatherings, and have a meal or a dinner,” Raphael said. “No one is about to go out and put an ad in the paper and say, ‘Come rent Panton Town Hall.’” Hall said the second kitchen question is whether a state fire marshal might insist on fire suppression measures, such as sprinklers, that would be too much for Panton to afford. Again, Raphael is optimistic,

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PAGE 4 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

A D DIS ON INDE P E NDEN T

Editorial

Addressing our cultural failure The rule of law doesn’t always follow what appears to be common sense. In the Jack Sawyer case, for example, the Vermont Supreme Court ruled that just because the 18-year-old wrote in his journal that he was planning to carry out a mass shooting at his former high school in Fair Haven, Vt., that was not enough evidence to hold him without bail on attempted murder charges. That decision comes in spite of the fact that he had purchased weapons allegedly to carry out such a mass shooting and had confessed his thinking to a female friend, who in turn had tipped off authorities — a move that may have prevented a tragedy. So here’s the question: Does an alleged assailant have to pull the gun’s trigger (or detonate a bomb) before it’s considered an attempt? Or is there some threshold of intent to do harm that can be considered legally viable short of that point? As per case law in Vermont that threshold is currently fairly high, and, according to news reports, one recourse would be for the Legislature to try to enshrine a definition of “attempted” murder in legislation, rather than to have case law define that scope (the last case tried in Vermont was 100 years ago under very different circumstances.) It’s fortunate that among the three gun control measures signed last week by Gov. Scott, one of them allows law enforcement officers to seize weapons if officers and a court determine that an extreme risk protection order is warranted. Such an order was granted last week in the Sawyer case and a hearing was set for April 25 to extend that order for six months. Certainly for Fair Haven Union High students in particular, it’s a relief to know that Sawyer won’t be released from jail with those same guns readily available to him. On the flip side of this case, it’s not difficult to understand the defense’s argument. Of the four charges levied against Sawyer, two included attempted aggravated murder and attempted first-degree murder, even though (as far as we know or has been reported) he never set foot on the school grounds with weapons in his possession. So, is it an attempt if you’re just thinking about it and writing about it in a journal? That aspect of the charge was always questionable. As the Supreme Court noted, the allegations against him did not meet the standard for the crimes he had been charged with. The defense has suggested it will seek dismissal of all charges at the next hearing on April 27, or sooner. But how does that ruling meet the standard of common sense? If law enforcement officials tell students and parents and the community at large that keeping our eyes and ears open and reporting suspicious behavior is our best defense, then how does that advice square with this Supreme Court decision? Surely society has to have some way to stop such attacks before they happen. Might we consider some stricter definition of “plotting” the crime in more exact terms to be that tipping point? But then how would you distinguish between “just thinking about it,” and actually “plotting” in any criminal sense? Slippery slope, indeed. But if not that, then what? ********* Perhaps denying Sawyer the right to have lethal weapons is the best the system can provide today. It certainly helps resolve the initial threat. Perhaps, too, mental health counseling will be a condition of his sentence or release pending the outcome of court proceedings still to come. Still, these are different times in a gun culture that has seemingly strayed too far over the line. Vermont has taken initial steps to expand background checks and deny gun access in extreme risk cases, but gun rights advocates are right in thinking that those measures alone won’t stop the violence in a culture that has for too long glorified guns as a weapon to kill others. How we address that cultural failure – remember, other western countries don’t have the same problem to any similar degree — will define how long our children, and all the rest of us, live in fear and dread of the next mass shooting. Angelo Lynn

ADDISON COUNTY

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Newbies

STEFANIA NARDI, LEFT, and Luca Mannolini, both natives of Italy, share a word during the naturalization ceremony in the New Haven Town Hall on Thursday, when they both became U.S. citizens.

Independent photo/John S. McCright

Letters to the Editor The ‘gun grab’ in Vermont has begun with bill S.55 This is written in response to Angelo Lynn’s March 19 editorial, “Gun Control: Facts vs. Fiction,” plus his subsequent response to a reader’s inquiry on March 26 as to the source of the “2015 Study.” Much time has passed since then and awaiting Gov. Scott’s signature on S.55 was perhaps unnecessary after all; fait accompli. Having read his dissent, it was rather telling that Sen. Dick Sears Jr., the original sponsor of the bill, ended up voting Nay just prior to it landing on the governor’s desk. Time will tell if S.55 is in direct violation of Article 16 of the Vermont Constitution. Studies which demonstrate a

direct correlation between strict gun control laws and a reduction in gun deaths are ubiquitous; they are a dime a dozen. That is, these studies conflate suicides with homicides. Nationwide, suicides comprise upwards of 60 percent of the gun deaths reported (New York Times). Hence, someone who wishes to commit suicide, will take the path of least resistance and kill themselves with an overdose rather than unnecessarily getting embroiled in a newly imposed legal fight to obtain a handgun. In the end, the individual successfully kills him or herself but it is no longer listed as a gun death. Let’s talk vehicular suicide rather

than gun suicide. If an individual speeds head long into a large tree, that is a suicide. If an individual drives his truck into eight people on a bike path in lower Manhattan, that is homicide. The students from Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School get the difference. They were not marching to protest suicides. The JAMA Internal Medicine, Elinore J. Kaufman et al., 2015 study’s Abstract/Objective was “to determine whether counties located closer to states with lenient firearm policies have higher firearm death rates.” This is not an objective statement, but rather predetermines (See Letter, Page 5)


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 5

Bipartisan Support for Clean Water from an Unlikely Place – Washington, D.C. For anyone paying attention to programs. The Land and Water Congress, it would be a significant Conservation Fund, which is used understatement to say it has not to acquire conservation properties exactly been a pillar of bipartisan from willing landowners, cooperation and common-sense saw its first increase in years. deal making the last few years. Importantly, thanks in large part That is especially the case on to Senator Leahy’s efforts, this environmental issues, where must-pass bill avoided having the Trump administration and a any policy “riders” attached to majority in Congress have fought it that would have negatively tooth and nail to impacted air and undermine bedrock water and had been environmental attached by the protections for clean anti-environment air, water, land and Republicans to many wildlife. previous spending This week’s Yet, an bills. Community appropriations bill Directly relevant Forum is by passed last week with to Vermont, Senator Zach Cockrum, bipartisan majorities Leahy managed to Northeast Director boost funding for in both chambers of Conservation of Congress stands federal programs Partnerships out as a clear lesson that will help with for the National that the ability for required cleanup of Wildlife our elected officials the Lake Champlain Federation and to sit down and watershed. Funding Brian Shupe, craft common sense for the Lake Executive Director Champlain program policy that benefits of the Vermont the environment still within the EPA Natural Resources nearly exists, and we think doubled Council. Vermont’s elected to $8.3 million, officials — most $5 million was importantly Governor Scott — dedicated to funding fisheries can learn from this example. improvements in the lake, Despite all of the rhetoric and a research program at the and political blustering, when University of Vermont funded congressional leaders including by the National Oceanic and Vermont’s Senator Leahy, the Vice Atmospheric Administration will Chair of the Senate Appropriations be getting an increase. Committee, sat down behind Senator Leahy’s leadership closed doors to negotiate funding was also critical to preventing the government, environmental cuts to farm bill conservation protection and restoration fared programs for the first time in a quite well. Despite President decade, increasing funding for Trump’s call for slashing the landowner technical assistance, budget of the Environmental and reducing barriers for farmers Protection Agency (EPA) by up to utilize conservation assistance to a third, Senator Leahy stood by eliminating unnecessary grant up for Vermont values and made compliance requirements. sure that funding for this critical All of these funding increases agency remained level. will be helpful in cleaning up The bill also fixed a Lake Champlain, although it is longstanding problem where not a substitute for the important increasingly severe forest fires role that the state must play were devastating the Forest in this effort. And while we Service’s budget, creating massive commend Senator Leahy for shortfalls that were cannibalizing advocating for Vermont and the much-needed conservation (See Community forum, Page 7)

Community

Forum

Letters to the Editor Proposed boost in logging won’t help Camel’s Hump Camel’s Hump is an absolute gem. However, the DRAFT Forest Resource Management Plan suggests significantly increased logging. Why? It is time to take a different approach that puts more emphasis on forest ecosystem conservation and less emphasis on timber harvest, over-developed recreation, and human control. Vermont will benefit

Vermont’s forestry beyond Gifford Pinchot’s wise use approach. Aldo Leopold’s more holistic relationship with forests is what is needed now. In a rapidly changing climate, culture, and economy, putting forest health first would be the ‘right’ thing to do. And Camel’s Hump gives us the opportunity to at least begin that conversation. David Brynn Bristol

Evidence of Trump’s incompetence continues to build Those who identify with a Trumpian world should possess sufficient awareness to recognize a problem. How much more evidence will it take? An imbecilein-chief could be survived were he elected Scout Master of the local troop. Scout Masters, of course, generally possess a moral compass and do not have access to nuclear codes. Referring to missiles, which are

not to be confused with foreign aid, the President said in less than 140 characters, “Get ready Russia, because they will be coming, nice and new and smart.” Who in their “right mind” talks like that, even on the playground? As my five-year-old neighbor observed, “What’s wrong with the President?” Perhaps, in our partisanship we refuse to acknowledge the

undoing of a country and planet. Congress takes no responsibility for any of this. The citizens remain disbelieving and disengaged, if not powerless. Nero, detached from right and wrong, dependent on flattery, behaved in a similar fashion. It didn’t work out well for him, or the Empire. And all he had was a violin and a match. Alexander Lyall Middlebury

darkness for one-third of the entire year could explain this depression. There was no mention of either Chicago nor Vermont in the aforementioned editorial. Today, Chicago has the most Draconian Gun Laws of any city in the United States, next to Washington, D.C., and yet in Chicago in 2016 alone, 762 murders occurred, with 4,331 shooting victims (CNN News, not a conservative news network). Compare that to 47 homicides in all of Vermont over a six-year period from 2011–2016 (NPR, once again not a conservative news outlet). This suggests that the chances are nil that someone is going to pull a gun on you when you just might be carrying a concealed weapon yourself. Vermont was rated the safest state in the U.S. for 2013–2015 and the second-safest state for 2016. But

you can be sure that next year gungrabbers will declare that thanks to S.55 being passed in 2018, Vermont is now the second-safest state in the union. If we just took more gun rights away from gun owners, we could be number one. Let us be clear. The gun-grab in Vermont has begun. Today, retired Associate Justice of the US Supreme Court John Paul Stevens, a Republican In Name Only, wants to see the U.S. Second Amendment repealed. And those on the left say that gun-rights supporters are overreacting regarding the slippery-slope argument. Are we really? Daniel J. Monger New Haven

Letter (Continued from Page 4) the outcome. And this study made it very clear up front, that firearm deaths considered were from both suicide and homicide data. It is easy to see today why many people, not just students, see such studies as opinions rather that facts. Data sets should not be co-mingled and should be treated as sacrosanct. If not, Garbage In, Garbage Out. Also, this study was conducted with data from the 48 contiguous states, yet the aforementioned editorial reports that it is the state of Alaska which had the highest number of gun deaths, at 19.8 per 100,000 people. Alaska is the state with the second highest suicide rate in the US. There were 27.1 suicides per 100,000 people (Juneau Empire News) in 2015 which accounts for all 19.8 gun deaths above. Living in

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Obituaries

ADDISON COUNTY

Daniel Bill, 67, Monkton MONKTON — Daniel Arthur Bill, 67, died Tuesday morning, April 10, 2018, at his residence after a long illness. He was born April 23, 1950, in New Hampshire, the son of Arthur and Delores (Scudder) Bill. He is survived by his daughter, Autumn Bill of Monkton. A celebration of his life will be held on Friday, April 20, at noon at Sanderson Ducharme Funeral Home. Visiting hours will be from 11 a.m. until the time of the service. Online condolences at sandersonfuneralservice.com.◊

DANIEL ARTHUR BILL

Joseph A. Bradley Jr., 35, Salisbury SALISBURY — Joseph A. Bradley Jr., 35, died Wednesday evening April 11, 2018 at his residence in Salisbury surrounded by his loving family after a courageous battle with cancer. He was born August 21, 1982 in Middlebury, the son of Joseph A. Bradley Sr. and Betsy (Trudeau) Bradley. Joe was a graduate of Middlebury Union High School class of 2001. He enjoyed golfing with his uncle Herman and fishing with his friends. Joe enjoyed watching W.W.E. Wrestling, NASCAR and spending time with his family and many friends, he was also an avid Yankees and New York Giants Fan. Joe was the most giving person, always helping

his friends and family. Joe is survived by his mother Betsy Bradley, of Salisbury, by his brothers, Jason Kenneth Bradley and Bijah “Bear” James Bradley, both of Salisbury, by numerous aunts, uncles, cousins and many friends. He was predeceased by his father Joseph A. Bradley Sr. who died in 2013. A memorial service will be held on Thursday April 19, at 11 a.m. at the Sanderson-Ducharme Funeral Home, 117 South Main Street, Middlebury. The Rev. Gary Lewis will officiate. Memorial Contributions will be set up at gofundme.com Online condolences at sandersonfuneralservice. com.◊

Obituary Guidelines The Independent will publish paid obituaries and free notices of passing. Paid obituaries cost 25 cents per word and will be published, as submitted, on the date of the family’s choosing. Paid obituaries are marked with a “◊” symbol at the end. The Independent offers a free notice of passing up to 100 words, subject to editing by our news department. Photos with either paid obituaries or free notices cost $10 per photo. Obituaries may be emailed to obits@ addisonindependent.com, or call 802‑388‑4944 for more information.

In Loving Memory

Oakley Palmer 11/24/26 - 4/17/16

Your presence we miss, Your memory we treasure, Loving you always, Forgetting you never. Maggie & Your Family

Barbara Brooker, 99, Middlebury

MIDDLBEURY — Barbara Ann Brooker (Bobbie), 99, of Middlebury, Vt., died on Wednesday, April 11, 2018 at The Residence at Otter Creek. Bobbie was born in Everett, Wash., to Julie and Krickel Carrick. Her early childhood years were spent in Newton, Mass. She graduated from Newton High School and entered Middlebury College, where she met and later married Walter Brooker in 1938. After moving to Wellesley, Mass., twin sons were born. After Walter’s return from the Pacific with the U.S. Navy, they remained in Wellesley until 1956. The family then moved to Middlebury, where Walter accepted a position with Middlebury College as the Director of Development. From 1956 through 1981, Bobbie actively supported her husband in his official capacities. After Walter’s retirement as Vice President of Development, the trustees established a Walter E. and Barbara Ann Brooker scholarship. The both received honorary degrees

from the college, with Bobbie’s citing her 25 dedicated years of service to the college as an unofficial ambassador to countless graduates, parents and friends of the college. Bobbie is survived by her sons Eric and his wife Pat of Strafford, N.H, and David and his wife Barbara of Lebanon, N.H.; and three granddaughters, one grandson and six great grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, the family is requesting that donations be directed to the Brooker scholarship at Middlebury College or the Ilsley Public Library on Main St. A farewell for Bobbie will be held later at the convenience of the family. Bobbie left this message: “To all I am leaving behind — I thank you for making my life the happy one that it has been, I was fortunate to have a loving family with three sisters and parents that helped guide me through the early years. Then Middlebury came into my life. It was a perfect place to raise children, and the community bent over

BARBARA ANN BROOKER backward to welcome us as a family. We were blessed to have made such special friends. Thank you for everything. Take care of yourselves, the town and the college. I don’t want to come back disappointed!” ◊

Kelly J. Sumner, 43, Cornwall CORNWALL — Kelly J. Sumner, 43, passed away Tuesday, April 10, 2018, at University of Vermont Medical Center in Burlington. She was born June 8, 1974 in Burlington, the daughter of Ellie LaRose and Paul Parent She went to Vergennes Union High School and graduated in 1995. Her hobbies were raising her children and caring about other people, for which she had a big heart. She had a love for animals, especially her dog Roxie. She loved going camping in the summer time. Kelly is survived by her husband Jason Sumner; her children Mallissa and Eric Sumner; her parents, Ellie

LaRose and Paul Parent Sr. and their spouses Joe LaRose and April Parent; her brother and sister, Paul Parent Jr. and Tonya Larrow; and many aunts, uncles, nieces and nephews. Visiting hours were held on Saturday, April 14, at BrownMcClay Funeral Home in Vergennes from 1 to 2 p.m. with a funeral following at 2 p.m. at the funeral home. Interment will be at a later date. In lieu of flowers contributions may be made to the family, Attn. Tonya Larrow, 21 First Street, Vergennes, VT 05491. To send online condolences to her family visit www. brownmcclayfuneralhomes.com.◊

KELLY J. SUMNER

Legion sets city’s Memorial Parade theme VERGENNES — American Legion Post No. 14 has announced that the 2018 theme of Vermont’s largest Memorial Day Parade is “Honor & Commemorate: Freedom Isn’t Free.” The purpose of the Memorial Day Parade is to honor those who have paid the ultimate sacrifice for their country. Veterans Capt. Brian Gebo and Ron Nimblett will serving as the keynote speaker and parade marshal, respectively. The parade is hosted by American Legion Post No. 14 and will be held on Monday, May 28, beginning at

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Vergennes Union High School and winding its way through the Little City. Each entrant — whether in the antique tractors, classic cars, motorized units, float category, walking/ marching, fire departments, rescue squads, or military classes — must complete an entry form. The parade will begin at 11 a.m. and will conclude with a formal Memorial Day remembrance in the city park in Vergennes beginning at approximately 12:30 p.m. Following the parade, American Legion Post No. 14 will hold a chicken barbeque at the post. Copies of the parade entry form, and of the rules and regulations can be found on the Vergennes Partnership website, vergennesdowntown.org, or by stopping by Post No. 14. Again this year there will be a number system and each participant will be assigned a number when the parade lineup is created. Float representatives will receive their number when they check in with the Legion volunteer when arriving at VUHS on the morning of the parade. The number will indicate the position

in the lineup. Parade entrants (not including bands) should not perform movements or drills that impede the movement of the parade for longer than three minutes. No candy, water or gifts can be thrown from moving vehicles or floats. Units with horses, dogs and other animals are asked to provide their own sanitation helpers to follow the unit and clean up along the route as well as in the lineup area. Cash prizes are given to floats that meet the following criteria: Parade theme, workmanship, originality and general effect. Prizes are awarded for 1st, 2nd and 3rd place in both junior and adult divisions. Winners will be announced on the City Green following the ceremony. Prize checks will be mailed the following day to the address on the registration form. For more info reach out to Martha Sullivan DeGraaf or Commander Ralph Wenzel at American Legion Post No. 14 Parade Committee, 100 Armory Lane, Vergennes, Vermont 05491 or email vergennespost14@ gmail.com or call (802) 877-3216.


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 7

Jewish community seeks repairs for Havurah House Group schedules April 28 benefit

By JOHN FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY — Havurah, the Addison County Jewish congregation, is in the midst of a $30,000 fund drive to make some key repairs to its meeting house at 56 North Pleasant St. in Middlebury. The group has been soliciting donations among its members as part of a “Raise the Roof” campaign that will include a “Taste the Tradition” fundraiser on Saturday, April 28, to generate more financial backing and interest in the project. It’s no coincidence the campaign has been dubbed “Raise the Roof,” That’s because the Havurah House roof is the most pressing improvement on the repair list. That list includes: • Replacing the deteriorating shingles over the social hall with a long-lasting standing seam roof, along with repairing the porch roof. • Replacing worn-out carpeting and tile floors.

• Acquiring a new refrigerator. “We also reached out to the general “A lot of this (deterioration) has community as a voice for Jewish happened over time,” explained values and social action.” Sarit Katzew, Havurah’s director Donation of the North Pleasant of education and coordinator of Street home gave Havurah some firm outreach and programming. roots and a permanent place in which “We want to to hold its religious repair the roof now programming and before it becomes an It’s no coincidence events. It has also emergency situation.” the campaign provided a venue for It was in 1999 has been dubbed the organization’s that the Jewish Hebrew School, community of “Raise the Roof,” which has been Addison County That’s because growing and evolving moved into its 56 the Havurah as more young, North Pleasant St. House roof is the Jewish families move location, donated most pressing into Addison County. to the group by the School enrollment improvement on Lazarus family. Prior increased from to that — during the repair list. 11 to 18 this past its first 20 years summer, and plans — Havurah members gathered call for creating separate classes to informally in church basements, specifically cater to young, middle Middlebury College facilities and and pre-Bar/Bat Mitzvah students, members’ homes. according to Katzew. Modest “Even without a physical center, numbers have historically driven Havurah became the spiritual classes of multiple student age center of Jewish life in Addison groups with different proficiencies County,” reads a brief history of the in Hebrew. organization provided by Katzew. While a $30,000 campaign might

Talk to focus on impact of climate change on wildlife MIDDLEBURY — Vermonters of all ages are invited to attend a presentation about Vermont’s wildlife in a changing climate on Tuesday, May 15, at 7 p.m. The presentation, organized by Vermont Coverts: Woodlands for Wildlife, will be given at the Ilsley Public Library at 75 Main St. in Middlebury. Tom Rogers will be presenting

at the event. Rogers is a biologist who has worked on a variety of conservation projects, researching zebras in Kenya, golden-winged warblers in New York, sage grouse and bald eagles in Wyoming, and grizzly bears in Montana. Rogers currently works in outreach for the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department, connecting the public with fish and wildlife through

writing, speaking and photography. Through colorful photos and captivating stories, the audience will come away with a new understanding of how climate change is affecting wildlife. Rogers will talk about what people can do to help conserve biodiversity in Vermont in the face of these new threats. The talk is free and open to the public.

Community forum (Continued from Page 5) lake, final passage of this funding required bipartisan co-operation the likes of which we have not seen in Washington in years. Unfortunately, that stands in stark contrast to recent developments for the state of Vermont to contribute its fair share of the funding to clean up the lake and its watershed. Competing bills in the Vermont General Assembly were debated this week, including the Senate unanimously passing S. 260 which would simply require (another) study to identify potential funding sources for clean water improvements. Yet, Governor Scott remains opposed to even this simple study requirement, let alone raising the funds needed to actually accomplish our goals. With the good news about federal funding, federal players like the Environmental Protection Agency and Natural Resources Conservation Service remain ready to help restore our waters, work with landowners and farmers, and do necessary water quality research. Local watershed groups and conservation organizations are already doing their part to help plant trees on stream banks and improve local rivers and streams. In order to keep building

on this work, though, the State of Vermont absolutely must do its part, and that requires finding a permanent funding solution. Vermont is well known for its ability to work across the aisle to achieve common-sense goals that reflect community values. And we’re undoubtedly infamous for our environmental quality, which is why

so many tourists visit our incredible state. It is not often that we would point to the notoriously dysfunctional and staunchly anti-environment U.S. Congress and ask our state to learn lessons, but today that is exactly what we are calling for. Our leaders, including Governor Scott, must take a cue from Washington and find ways to fund the Lake Champlain cleanup.

seem small when compared to recent school renovation projects around the county, it represents a sizeable layout for a small congregation, Katzew noted. There are currently 65 families and individuals who are members of Havurah. It would cost around $800 per member-family for the project to be financed within the congregation, according to Katzew. “The money will need to come from beyond our membership,” she said, adding internal solicitations have thus far raised around $6,000 toward the goal. So Havurah is reaching out to the broader community, and the “Taste the Tradition” celebration is looking like a real winner. Scheduled for 6 to 9 p.m. at Havurah House, it will be an interesting twist on a potluck dinner. Attendees are being asked to bring a favorite family dish, the recipe, and tell its story with a note and/or photo to display. Havurah will use that information to create a community cookbook for sale after the event. Participants will learn about each

other’s family histories and vote for different categories — such as “most reminds me of home.” Admission to the event is $25 per person. The meal will also feature a raffle of some very nice donated prizes, such as a gift basket from Vermont Soap Co., two Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival Passes, and “Taste of Middlebury” — dinner for 2 at Two Brothers Tavern, Rough Cuts, The Lobby and Fire & Ice. Raffle tickets are $5 each. Those who bring a dish and recipe to potluck will get a free raffle ticket. You don’t need to be a Havurah member to attend. Child-friendly food and entertainment will be provided for an additional $10 donation. Folks wanting to attend Taste the Tradition should RSVP by April 20 to hheddirector@gmail.com. More information on Havurah and “Raise the Roof” can be found at havurahaddisoncounty.org. Reporter John Flowers is at johnf@addisonindependent.com.


PAGE 8 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

communitycalendar

Apr

16

MONDAY

Age Well Senior Luncheon in Bristol. Monday, April 16, 10:45 a.m., Cubbers, Main St. Chef’s choice — always delicious — includes beverage and dessert. $5 suggested donation does not include gratuity. Advanced reservations required. Call Michelle to reserve 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. “Objectivity in the Fake News Era” lecture in Middlebury. Monday, April 16, 4:30-6 p.m., Dana Auditorium, Sunderland Language Center 356 College St. Jane Lindholm of Vermont Public Radio will deliver the 2018 Robert van de Velde Jr. Memorial Lecture on the challenges facing the public, the news media, and others in the current climate of fabricated news. Brain injury support meeting in Middlebury. Monday, April 16, 5:30-7p.m., Library, Middlebury Union Middle School, 43 Deerfield Ln. The meeting topic will be “Awareness and Empathy and They Go Together!” More info contact Lisa at 802-388-2720.

Apr

17

TUESDAY

ANWSD fine arts festival in Vergennes. Tuesday, April 18, 8:30 a.m.-3:30 p.m., Gymnasium, Vergennes Union High School, Monkton Rd. This K-12 exhibit is open to visitors, classes and the community. Age Well Senior Luncheon in Vergennes. Tuesday, April 17, 10 a.m., Vergennes Area Seniors Armory Lane Senior Housing, 50 Armory Lane. Bingo, tai chi and coffee hour followed by a SASH Health Awareness Program at 11:15 a.m. and a noon meal. Bring your own place setting. Free transportation may be provided. Call ACTR at 802-388-1946. $5 suggested donation. Advanced reservations required. Call Michelle to reserve 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. CCV info session in Middlebury. Tuesday, April 17, 12:15-1:15 p.m., CCV Middlebury, 10 Merchants Row. At “Getting Started at Community College of Vermont (CCV)” learn about translating years of experience into college credit, admissions pathways to UVM, VTC, Castleton, and other Vermont colleges, Tuition-free opportunities for high school students and more. More info at 802-388-3032. Lecture with Ashley Wolff in Middlebury. Tuesday, April 17, 3 p.m. The Residence at Otter Creek, 350 Lodge Rd. An informative talk with local author and illustrator Ashley Wolff, who is eager to share what she has discovered from 30 years of playing with color and light. Free, open to the public and fully accessible. RSVP to Pat Ryan at 802-388-1220 or pryan@residenceottercreek. com. Writing Practice in Middlebury. Begins Tuesday, April 17, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Art Room, EastView at Middlebury, EastView Terrace. Johanna Nichols, blogger and former contributor to the “Ways of Seeing” column in the Addison Independent offers Natalie Goldberg’s model: given a prompt, first write and then read. Free and open to the public. Space is limited. Phone or e-mail to register or for more information. Tuesdays through May 8. Tobacco cessation workshop in Vergennes. Begins Tuesday, April 17, 5 p.m., Armory Ln. Senior Housing. A free workshop to help create a plan to succeed. Free nicotine replacement therapy available. Registration required at 802-3888860 or mbutler@portermedicalcenter.org. Addison Central Teens community conversation in Middlebury. Tuesday, April 17, 5:30-6:30 p.m., Teen Center, 77 Mary Hogan Dr. Parents are invited to share their ideas for making the teen center accessible and exciting for all teens in Middlebury. This will be the first in a series of Community Conversations. Childcare and snacks provided. “Coming Soon: The Cougar Returns to the East” presentation in Bristol. Tuesday, April 17, 6:30-7:30 p.m., Holley Hall, Main St. Come hear natural history and tracking expert Susan Morse as she talks about cougar biology and ecology in the broad diversity of habitats where Sue has studied them. She will also talk about the latest confirmations of cougars in the east. Free and open to the public. Author Jack Mayer on writing in Middlebury.

is open to visitors, classes and the community. Tuesday, April 17, 7-8:30 p.m., Age Well Senior Luncheon in Vergennes. Community Meeting Room. Ilsley Thursday, April 19, Vergennes Area Seniors Public Library. 75 Main St. Join Armory Lane Senior Housing, 50 Armory Mayer as he discusses his writLane. Bingo, tai chi and coffee hour ing process and inspiration for his BEGINNING WALTZ — Anyone can learn this followed by a noon meal of beef & mushtwo books, “Life in a Jar: The Irena room stroganoff over seasoned cavataSendler Project” (creative nonficclassic ballroom dance. Wow your friends with ppi pasta, carrot raisin salad, blueberry tion about the Warsaw ghetto) just a few easy to learn moves! Classes held at the muffin and cantaloupe. Bring your own and “Before the Court of Heaven” Vergennes Opera House for 3 weeks on Thursdays, place setting. Free transportation may be (historical fiction inspired by the April 19 – May 3, 6:30-7:30 PM. Partners not provided. Call ACTR at 802-388-1946. $5 history of how Germany’s Weimar suggested donation. Advanced reservademocracy became the Third necessary. $10 per class. Open dance for 1 hour tions required. Call Michelle to reserve Reich). after all classes. Open to the public! Call Jim 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 “‘Where Do We Go From Here?:’ Condon for more information at 802-475-2349 and up and their spouse of any age. Martin Luther King Jr.’s or email jscondon@mac.com, also on Facebook A Walk in their Shoes: Dementia Unanswered Question” in Simulation in Middlebury. Thursday, Middlebury. Tuesday, April 17, under James Condon. April 19, 4-5 p.m., The Residence at 7:30-9 p.m., Dana Auditorium, Otter Creek, 350 Lodge Rd. This simu356 College St. Clayborne Carson American Flatbread, Marble Works. Help raise lation helps participants understand how it feels of Stanford University and director of the King funds for GFI’s Betasab Project in Addis Ababa, to manage the many challenges dementia presPapers Project will reflect on Dr. King’s legacy and Ethiopia, aimed at improving the social and ents. Certified Dementia Practitioners guide you the current challenges facing civil rights propoeconomic conditions of vulnerable children and through the challenges of compromised vision, nents today. A book signing will follow the lecture. women through self-reliance and sustainability. hearing and dexterity which all affect cognition. Middlebury College Orchestra performs in Proceeds from pizzas, raffle tickets, and direct Free, open to the public and fully accessible. Middlebury. Tuesday, April 17, 8 p.m., Robison donations will support the children and women RSVP to Pat Ryan at 802-388-1220 or pryan@ Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts. 72 Porter Field who gain a family, a safe home, an education, residenceottercreek.com. Rd. Evan Bennett, Director, will lead the orchesand freedom from abuse in the programs. Music U.S. Middle East policy lecture in Middlebury. tra as they play Aaron Copeland “An Outdoor provided by local band the Avant-Garde Dogs. Thursday, April 19, 4:30-6 p.m., RAJ Conference Overture” and “Symphony No. 8, Op. 88, B. 163,” Anne Wallace and Howard Russell in Middlebury. Room, Rohatyn Center for Global Affairs, by Antonin Dvorak. Free and open to the public. Wednesday, April 18, 6:30 p.m., The Vermont Middlebury College. Journalist and author Ahmed Book Shop, 38 Main St. Wallace and Russell Rashid will deliver a talk titled “From Afghanistan will read from, discuss and sign “I’m Home!!: A to Iraq and Syria: The Failures of U.S. Middle Manual for Providing Therapeutic Childcare.” East Policy.” Rashid has been a prominent voice Donna Bailey, co-director of the Addison County ANWSD fine arts festival in of criticism of the U.S. involvement in the Middle Parent/Child Center will facilitate discussion. Vergennes. Wednesday, April 18, 8:30 East, especially Afghanistan in the aftermath of a.m.-3:30 p.m., Gymnasium, Vergennes Mystery Readers book discussion in Middlebury. the September 11 attacks. Wednesday, April 18, 6:30 p.m.-7:30 p.m., Capoeira performance in Ripton. Thursday, April Union High School, Monkton Rd. This K-12 exhibit Shafer’s Market & Deli, 54 College St. Meet and is open to visitors, classes and the community. 19, 6 p.m., Ripton Elementary School. Come see discuss “Cuckoo’s Calling” by Robert Galbraith. Instrumental and vocal concert by students in the culmination of what students learned during Open to everyone, the Mystery Readers Book grades 5-8 at 6:30 p.m. a weeklong residency of Capoeira performer and Group meets on Wednesdays every month. Age Well Senior Luncheon in Middlebury. teacher Fabio Nascimento. Capoeira is a blend Wednesday, April 18, 11 a.m., Middlebury Rec Spring birding presentation in Orwell. of dance and martial arts originating from Brazil Wednesday, April 18, 7 p.m., Orwell Free Library, Center, Creek Rd. Socializing and entertainment and continuing today as an important practice and Main St. Spring migration is prime time for bird followed by a noon meal of pan-seared chicken way of life in Brazilian culture. watchers as birds return to their local nesting “Learning about Starksboro through Maps” Marsala with portobello mushroom sauce, oven areas or pass through to places further north. roasted potatoes, winter mixed vegetables, in Starksboro. Thursday, April 19, 7 p.m., Join Ron Payne, bird watcher and president of dinner roll and birthday cake. Bring your own Starksboro Village Meeting House, 2875 Route the Otter Creek Audubon Society, as he speaks place setting. $5 suggested donation. Advanced 116. Enjoy an illustrated presentation showing about which birds are coming and where to go to reservations required. Call Michelle to reserve images of maps over time and what they can find them. 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 and up reveal about Starksboro and its history. All are MUHS student showcase in Middlebury. and their spouse of any age. welcome. Light refreshments. Donations to the Wednesday, April 18, 7 p.m., Auditorium, James Blair on photography in Middlebury. Starksboro Historical Society for map conservaMiddlebury Union High School. Come support Wednesday, April 18, noon, Henry Sheldon tion work and to the Meeting House for the restolocal student bands, solos, dances, skits, and Museum, 1 Park St. Join James P. Blair, retired ration project appreciated. stand-up. Tickets $2 or $1 plus a non-perishable “The Jungle Book Kids” on stage in Vergennes. “National Geographic” photographer, as he food item. discusses some of the 36 photographs from the Thursday, April 19, 7 p.m., Auditorium, Vergennes Sheldon Museum’s collection now on view in Union High School, Monkton Rd. A high-energy the exhibit Our Town: Love, Joy, Sadness, and 30-minute musical designed for elementary Baseball — 100 Years of Photography from the school-aged performers, full of jazzy dancing and ANWSD fine arts festival in Sheldon Museum. More info at 802-388-2117 or singing. Tickets $5 adults/$20 families at the door. Vergennes. Thursday, April 19, 8:30 henrysheldonmuseum.org. Parker Merrill Speech Competition a.m.-3 p.m., Gymnasium, Vergennes Global Family Initiative benefit bake in Championship in Middlebury. Thursday, April Union High School, Monkton Rd. This K-12 exhibit Middlebury. Wednesday, April 18, 6:30-9 p.m., 19, 7:30 p.m., Robison Hall, Mahaney Center for the Arts, 72 Porter Field Rd. In a tradition dating back to 1825, six student speakers will compete for the title of Middlebury Speaker of the Year and a top prize of $500. Free. More info at middlebury. edu/arts or 802-443-3168. Faculty dance concert in Middlebury. Thursday, April 19, 8 p.m., Dance Theater, Mahaney Center for the arts, 72 Porter Field Rd. Come see samples of faculty choreography, featuring works by Julian Barnett, Christal Brown, Scotty Hardwig, and Laurel Jenkins. Tickets $15 General public/$12 Midd ID holders/$6 Midd students available at middlebury.edu/arts or 802-443-3168. “4.48 Psychosis” on stage in Middlebury. Thursday, April 19, 8 p.m., Hepburn Zoo, Middlebury College. A suicidal woman fights for sanity as the lines between reality and her mind disappear. Senior work of Roxy Adviento in directing/choreography and of Stephen Chen in lighting design. Tickets $6, available at middlebury.edu/ arts or 802-443-3168.

Apr

18

WEDNESDAY

Apr

19

THURSDAY

Apr

First step

THIS CONTINGENT FROM Middlebury is shown at their graduation from Community College of Vermont a few years back. CCV will host an info session at its Battell Block offices in Middlebury on Tuesday, April 17, 12:15-1:15 p.m.

20

FRIDAY

Age Well Senior Luncheon in Middlebury. Friday, April 20, 11:15 a.m., The Glass Onion, Hannaford Career Center, 51 Charles Ave. Meal is chef’s choice prepared by Chef Woody and his Culinary Arts students. $5 donation does not include gratuity.


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 9

communitycalendar Space is limited. Advanced reservations required. Call Michelle to reserve 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. “The Art of Storytelling: Folktales for the Imagination” talk in Middlebury. Friday, April 20, 3 p.m. The Residence at Otter Creek, 350 Lodge Rd. Come experience the art of live storytelling with librarian Ruth Gilbert. Free, open to the public and fully accessible. Refreshments and social hour to follow. RSVP to Pat Ryan at 802-388-1220 or pryan@residenceottercreek.com. Addison County Right to Life annual dinner in Vergennes. Friday, April 20, doors open at 6 p.m. for 6:30 start, St. Peter’s Church. Adults $15, students $6, up to 5 years old free. Reserve pork or mac & cheese dinner by sending list of names and a check payable to ACRTL to Mr. Lee Comly, 2012 Carlstrom Road, Bristol, VT 05443. More info: call Lee at 453-6302. Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble celebrates spring in Bristol. Friday, April 20, 7-8 p.m., Auditorium, Mt Abraham Union High School, Airport Rd. Come hear Copland, Ticheli, Grundman and Gjeilo. The Middlebury College Community Chorus will also perform at the event. Free. Danika & The Jeb on stage in Brandon. Friday, April 20, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music, 62 Country Club Rd. Come hear this dynamic, uplifting, and fun duo, whose music is a soulful combination of artfully written songs and powerful musical phrasing. Concert tickets $20. Pre-concert dinner available for $25. Reservations required for dinner and recommended for the show. Venue is BYOB. More info call 802-247-4295 or e-mail info@brandonmusic.net. “4.48 Psychosis” on stage in Middlebury. Friday, April 20, 8 p.m., Hepburn Zoo, Middlebury College. A suicidal woman fights for sanity as the lines between reality and her mind disappear. Senior work of Roxy Adviento in directing/choreography and of Stephen Chen in lighting design. Tickets $6, available at middlebury.edu/arts or 802-443-3168.

Apr

21

SATURDAY

Green Mountain Club hike in Charlotte. Saturday, April 21, Mt. Philo State Park, 5425 Mt. Philo Rd. An easy to moderate two-mile hike and with an elevation gain of 636 feet with breathtaking views of the Lake Champlain Valley and New York’s Adirondack Mountains. Wear appropriate clothing for hiking and bring water, a snack and hiking poles, if used. More info contact Ralph Burt at rburt@gmavt.net or 802-355-4415. More activities at gmcbreadloaf. org. Dead Creak volunteer training in Addison. Saturday, April 21, Conference Room, Dead Creek Visitor Center The Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department is seeking volunteers to serve as department ambassadors and greet visitors at the new Visitor center. Volunteers and participants must be 18 years of age, attend the entire two-day training, and agree to a background check. Free. All curriculum materials provided. Pre-registration is required by April 15 by calling 802-759-2398 or emailing amy.alfieri@vermont.gov. Pancake breakfast fundraiser in Vergennes. Saturday, April 21, 8-11 a.m., American Legion Post 14, 100 Armory Ln. Help support Vergennes Union High School Commodore Wrestling while eating a great breakfast. Pancakes, real local VT Maple Syrup, sausage, bacon, OJ, and coffee. Tickets $8. Welcome spring breakfast in Shoreham. Saturday, April 21, 8-10 a.m., Shoreham Congregational Church, 28 School Rd. Feast on blueberry pancakes or French toast with Vermont maple syrup, sausages, home fries, egg casseroles, beverages and more. Bring family and friends. Tickets $8 adults/$4 children 12 and under/$20 for families. A donation of non-perishable items for the food shelf is always appreciated. Vernal pool field trip in Salisbury. Saturday, April 21, 9 a.m.-noon, Keewaydin parking lot. Join in this field trip to these common woodland pools, the preferred breeding locations for Wood Frogs, Spotted Salamanders, and other amphibians. Part 2 of a two-part event to help The Salisbury Conservation Commission locate and map the vernal pools in their community. Free and open to the public. Ripton’s 188-year-old post office talk in Ripton.

Jenni Johnson jazz in Middlebury. Sunday, April 22, 2 p.m., The Residence at Otter Creek, 350 Lodge Rd. Delight in Johnson’s smooth voice and unique style as she performs versatile renditions of American Jazz Classics Part of The Residence’s Sunday music series. Free, open to the public and fully accessible. RSVP to Pat Ryan at 802-388-1220, or pryan@ residenceottercreek.com.

Apr

23

Big cat is back

COUGARS LIKE THIS one (they’re called “catamounts” in Vermont) were wiped out in this part of the country. On Tuesday, April 17, at 6:30 p.m., naturalist Susan Morse will talk at Holley Hall in Bristol about how this large cat is returning to the East Coast.

Saturday, April 21, 10-11 a.m., Ripton Community Church, Route 125. Hilda Billings, Ripton’s last commissioned postmaster, will recount the history of the institution at the heart of her community, including some remarkable episodes involving poet Robert Frost. The talk will be highlighted with photos, images, and artifacts documenting post office work in small, rural towns like Ripton. More info at 802-388-0338. Annual Teen Center all-nighter in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21-Sunday April 22, Teen Center, 77 Mary Hogan Dr. Kick off April break with our first annual all-nighter. Open to female-identifying students grades 7-10 for a night of crafts, games, makeovers, dancing, food, and conversations. Sleeping bags will be provided. Agenda, registration, and waivers are available at middteens.org/ all-nighter. More info at zoe@middteens.org. “Things to Come” on screen in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21, 3 and 8 p.m., Dana Auditorium, 356 College St. Philosophy professor Nathalie Chazeaux (Isabelle Huppert) faces a midlife crisis after learning that her husband wants a divorce and that her mother’s health is declining. Free. More info at middlebury.edu/arts or 802-443-3168. Anna & Elizabeth, with special guest Moira Smiley in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21, 6 p.m., Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, Duane Ct. Join the Vermont Folklife Center for a benefit performance by these Smithsonian Folkways recording artists. Doors open at 6 p.m. Performance begins at 7 p.m. Tickets $30, limited seating, available at brownpapertickets.com/ event/3357710. A few tickets available at the door for $40 each. All Proceeds support the Folklife Center’s mission to document, sustain and present the diverse cultures of Vermont. Michele Fay Band plays Brandon. Saturday, April 21, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music, 62 Country Club Rd. Michele Fay leads this energetic and unpretentious group with a comfortable groove of folk, swing, and bluegrass-influenced songs, woven seamlessly together. Concert tickets $20. Pre-concert dinner available for $25. Reservations required for dinner and recommended for the show. Venue is BYOB. More info call 802-2474295 or e-mail info@brandon-music.net.

Swing dancing and Sound Investment in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21, 7:30 p.m., Town Hall Theater, 68 S. Pleasant St. Middlebury College’s big band brings the tradition of Duke Ellington and the Dorsey Brothers to THT to benefit Project Independence/Elderly Services. Snacks and a cash bar. Tickets are $12 general/$5 students, with a $1 preservation fee added, and may be purchased at townhalltheater.org, 802 382-9222, at the THT Box Office (MondaySaturday, noon-5 p.m.) or at the door. “4.48 Psychosis” on stage in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21, 8 p.m., Hepburn Zoo, Middlebury College. A suicidal woman fights for sanity as the lines between reality and her mind disappear. Senior work of Roxy Adviento in directing/choreography and of Stephen Chen in lighting design. Tickets $6, available at middlebury.edu/ arts or 802-443-3168. Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble celebrates spring in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21, 7-8 p.m., Auditorium, Middlebury Union High School, Airport Rd. Come hear Copland, Ticheli, Grundman and Gjeilo. The Middlebury College Community Chorus will also perform at the event. Free.

Apr

22

SUNDAY

All-you-can-eat pancake breakfast in New Haven. Sunday, April 22, 7-10:30 a.m., New Haven Town Hall, North St. The New Haven Volunteer Fire Department will serve up plain or blueberry pancakes, French toast, pure Vermont maple syrup, scrambled eggs, bacon, sausage, home fries, coffee, tea, and juice. Tickets adults (12+ years) $10/children 5-11 $5/under 6 free. All proceeds benefit the Fire Department. Green Mountain Club Young Adventurers Club hike in Ripton. Sunday, April 22, 10 a.m., Spirit in Nature Trails, Ripton-Goshen Rd. Enjoy Earth Day on this gentle hike. While the pace is geared towards younger adventurers (ages 4-8), everyone is welcome. Contact YAC Leader Lauren Bierman for details at 802-349-7498 or laurenbierman1218@gmail.com. More activities at gmcbreadloaf.org.

MONDAY

Legislative breakfast in New Haven. Monday, April 23, 7-8:45 a.m., Congregational Church, Town Hill Rd. Meet with Addison County legislators and discuss issues important to Addison County. Purchase of breakfast not required to attend but helps our hosts to defray the cost of opening their hall. Sponsored by Bridport Grange 303 and the Addison County Farm Bureau. “The Year of Living Dangerously: Donald Trump In The White House” talk in Middlebury. Monday, April 23, 10:30 a.m.-noon, Community Room, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St. Matt Dickinson, Middlebury College Professor of Political Science will assess President Trump’s record so far, and what we might expect going forward. American Red Cross Blood Drive in Brandon. Monday, April 23, noon-5 p.m., Brandon American Legion, 550 Franklin St. Walk in or for an appointment visit redcrossblood.org or call 1-800-RED CROSS (1-800-733-2767). Start the donation process ahead of time by completing an on-line pre-donation and health history questionnaire. Learn more at redcrossblood.org/RapidPass. Movement Matters master class in Middlebury. Monday, April 23, 4-5:30 p.m., Dance Theatre, Mahaney Center for the Arts, 72 Porter Field Rd. In “Butoh: Triality of Dark, Light, & Self” Julian Barnett explores this internationally recognized physical art form that embodies Japanese postwar expressionism. Class will be accompanied by visiting musician Kenta Nagai. Free and open to all ages and experience. More info at middlebury. edu/arts or 802-443-3168. “Practicing Music, Practicing Culture: Exercising Bodies and Civic Activism” in Middlebury. Monday, April 23, 7 p.m., Room 221, Mahaney Center for the Arts, 72 Porter Field Rd. Dr. Carlos Odria of the University of Massachusetts Boston explores how the pasacalle of Villa El Salvador, a communal art form that incorporates Peru’s indigenous ritual practices and Afro-Brazilian-derived drum music, strengthens Andean values of mutuality and reciprocity. Free. More info at middlebury. edu/arts or 802-443-3168.

LIVEMUSIC The Avant-Garde Dogs in Middlebury. on Wednesday, April 18, 6:30-9 p.m., American Flatbread. Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble in Bristol. Friday, April 20, 7-8 p.m., Mt Abraham Union High School Danika & The Jeb in Brandon. Friday, April 20, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. The Eschatones in Middlebury. Friday, April 20, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Notte. Anna & Elizabeth, with special guest Moira Smiley in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21, 6 p.m., Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society. Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21, 7-8 p.m., Middlebury Union High School Michele Fay Band in Brandon. Saturday, April 21, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. Twist of Fate in Middlebury. Saturday, April 21, 10 p.m.-1 a.m., Notte. Jenni Johnson Jazz in Middlebury. Sunday, April 22, 2 p.m., The Residence at Otter Creek. Carlos Odria Ensemble in Middlebury. Tuesday, April 24, 7:30 p.m., Mahaney Center for the Arts.

See an extended calendar and a full listing of

ONGOINGEV EN TS

on the Web at

www.addisonindependent.com


PAGE 10 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

Soulful combo of Danika & the Jeb to play Friday When you hear the term “acoustic duo” do you imagine two people sitting on stools, lightly strumming guitars, singing about how life has treated them poorly” Think again. Danika & the Jeb are dynamic, uplifting and fun, while their music is a soulful combination of artfully written songs and powerful musical phrasing. The duo performs at Brandon Music on Friday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m. When asked about why she has never applied to American Idol, Danika Holmes said “I never looked at the music by Greg Pahl industry like a lottery. I don’t need to buy a ticket. I simply need to be an artist.” Holmes’s belief is that a well written song can embody all emotions of human existence, and she articulates that beautifully with her slightly raspy yet warm voice and truthful lyrics. Grand-nephew to the great country guitarist Clyde Moody, Jeb Hart can craft a story with six strings. Despite a car accident that left him unable to play for several years, Hart’s determination to overcome prevailed. After listening to Hart perform, the two most common responses from fans are “The best guitar player I’ve ever heard” and “It sounds like there’s two of him.” Concert tickets are $20. A preconcert dinner is available for $25. Reservations are required for dinner and recommended for the show. Venue is BYOB. Call 802-247-4295 or e-mail info@brandon-music.net for reservations or for more information. Brandon Music is located at 62 Country Club Road in Brandon. MICHELE FAY BAND IN BRANDON Catch the Michele Fay Band, featuring original and Americana music, at Brandon Music on Saturday, April 21, at 7:30 p.m. This energetic and unpretentious group brings forth a comfortable groove of folk, swing and bluegrassinfluenced songs, woven seamlessly together. Fay’s heartfelt lyrics are central to the ensemble, as she sings with a clear, authentic voice. The Rutland Herald called her voice “smooth and entrancing” and says “While the band’s playing is topnotch, there’s a reason it’s called the Michele Fay Band, and that’s Michele’s voice.” Michael Santosusso, on upright bass adds a dynamic beat and perfectly matched harmonies. Fay’s husband, Tim Price, contributes accomplished, melodic instrumentals on mandolin and guitar. Local fiddler extraordinaire, Freeman Corey, will be joining them on stage for this special occasion. Tickets are $20, with an optional pre-concert dinner for $25. Reservations are required for dinner and recommended for the show. The venue is BYOB. Call 802-2474295 or email info@brandon-music. net. Brandon Music is located at 62

arts beat

IN A BENEFIT for Project Independence/Elderly Services, Middlebury College’s Sound Investment will play some of the greatest tunes of the Big Band era at Town Hall Theater in Middlebury on Saturday, April 21, at 7:30 p.m. Be ready to dance.

Country Club Road in Brandon. SWING DANCE BENEFIT AT TOWN HALL THEATER Dancing the night away to a big band is one of the great pleasures of life, but Vermonters don’t often get the chance. The Sound Investment, Middlebury College’s big band, brings the tradition of Duke Ellington and the Dorsey Brothers to Town Hall Theater for dancing and listening on Saturday, April 21, at 7:30 p.m. This special evening will benefit the work of Project Independence/Elderly Services, at the request of the band and its director, jazz musician Dick Forman. The seats and platforms at Town Hall Theater will be cleared for the event, creating a huge dance floor, but seating will be available in the theater and the balcony for those who simply want to listen to the swinging sounds. “This band has been top-flight for five or six decades, and it just seems to get better and better,” says THT executive director Douglas Anderson. Doors open at 7 p.m. Snacks and a cash bar will be available. Tickets are $12 general/$5 students, and may be purchased at townhalltheater.org, 802-382-9222, at the THT box office (MondaySaturday, noon to 5 p.m.) or at the door. INT’L FILM SERIES The 2017-2018 Hirschfield International Film Series continues on Saturday, April 21, at Middlebury College with the 2016 France/ Germany film, “Things to Come,” directed by Mia Hansen-Løve. What happens when the life you’ve worked so hard to build falls apart all at once? Nathalie (Isabelle Huppert, in a radiant performance) is a philosophy teacher with a seemingly settled existence, juggling a rich life of the mind with the day-to-day demands of career and family (including frequent visits to her drama queen mother, played by the legendary Édith Scob). But beginning with the bombshell

revelation that her husband of twentyfive years is leaving her, one by one the pillars of Nathalie’s life start to crumble. The film, in French with English subtitles, will be shown at 3 and again at 8 p.m. in Dana Auditorium on College Street (Route 125). It’s free. Some of the films in this series may be inappropriate for children. FACULTY DANCE CONCERT The Middlebury College Dance Program offers samples of faculty choreography on Thursday, April 19, at 8 p.m. in the Dance Theater of the Mahaney Center for the Arts. This year’s new works from Julian Barnett, Christal Brown, Karima Borni, Laurel Jenkins and Lida Winfield offer a wide range of aesthetics and artistic voices, representing the breadth and depth of the college’s resident dance scholars and creators. A discussion will follow the performance. Tickets are $15 for the general

DANIKA & THE JEB break the mold when it comes to “acoustic duo.” This dynamic twosome will bring their uplifting and fun performance to Brandon Music on Friday, April 20, at 7:30 p.m.

public; $12 for Middlebury College faculty, staff, alumni, emeriti, and other ID card holders; $8 for youth

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Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of April 16

WHEN IT COMES to Americana music, the Michele Fay Band provides some of the best in an energetic and unpretentious way. Catch the quartet this Saturday, April 21, 7:30 p.m. at Brandon Music.

Arts Beat (Continued from Page 10) The Mahaney Center is located at 72 Porter Field Road, just off Route 30 south (South Main Street). Free parking is available in the Center for the Arts parking lot. COMMUNITY WIND ENSEMBLE The Middlebury Community Wind Ensemble, conducted by Catherine Ott, celebrates spring this week with two performances. The first will take place at 7 p.m. on Friday,April 20, at the Mount Abraham Union High School Auditorium, 220 Airport Drive, in Bristol. The second performance will be at 7 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, at the Middlebury Union High School Auditorium, located at 73 Charles Ave. in Middlebury. The Wind Ensemble will be joined by the Middlebury College Community Chorus conducted by Jeff Rehbach, featuring soloist Tim Guiles on piano. Come hear music of Copland, Ticheli, Grundman and Gjeilo. Both concerts are free. LIVE MUSIC AT NOTTE There will be three live musical performances this week at Notte Neapolitan Pizza Bar located downstairs at 86 Main St. in Middlebury. On Wednesday, April 18, The Open Mic is hosted at 9 p.m. by the ever talented Mark Sikora. Play solo or join Sikora and friends for a jamming good time. All talent levels

are welcome. It’s free to enter and there is no cover charge. Then, at 10 p.m. on Friday, April 20, Notte presents The Eschatones. Finally, at 10 p.m. on Saturday, April 21, Twist of Fate take to the stage. Twist of Fate originated in 2012 from Addison County and has been rocking and rolling ever since. There is a $3 cover. For more information, call 802-388-0002. COLLEGE STUDENT ART A new exhibit, “Scratching the Surface: Intaglio Prints,” opens on Tuesday, April 17, in the Mezzanine of Middlebury College’s Johnson Memorial Building, 78 Chateau Road off College Street (Route 125) in Middlebury. Students in Hedya Klein’s ART315 class explore traditional and contemporary methods of printmaking. Imagery is developed through drawing, layering and hand-coloring applications. In intaglio, ink is applied to a “plate,” then transferred onto paper by pulling it through a press. The exhibit, which runs through Tuesday, April 24, is free and the public is welcome. For more information, call 802-443-3168. COLLEGE ORCHESTRA The Middlebury College Orchestra will perform at 8 p.m. on Tuesday, April 17, in Robison Hall at the Mahaney Center for the Arts. On the (See Beat, Page 13)

ARIES: March 21-April 20. Aries, you may have to admit that the master plan you have set up has a few flaws. You don’t have to abandon it, just modify. These modifications may be relatively simple. TAURUS: April 21May 21. Taurus, you may think that you have missed an important opportunity, but don’t get too worried just yet. With a few new strategies, you can regain your momentum. GEMINI: May 22-June 21. Gemini, you may be easily swayed this week by someone who is smooth-talking. Figure out if this person can be believed or not, but give them a chance. CANCER: June 22July 22. You may find yourself in a position where you can take on a leadership role, Cancer. Do not hesitate to jump onboard because this can be just what’s needed for your career. LEO: July 23-Aug. 23. Responsibilities will soon be easier to handle, Leo. Not because the tasks are less difficult, but because you have more people on your side helping you out. VIRGO: Aug. 24-Sept. 22. Planning a vacation can be almost as fun as traveling, Virgo. When someone asks for your help drawing up a travel itinerary, put all of your effort into the task. LIBRA: Sept. 23-Oct. 23. Some sort of breakthrough in your life is soon to become a reality, Libra. It may be a financial windfall or a new job opportunity. Keep your eyes open to any and all possibilities. SCORPIO: Oct. 24Nov. 22. You can achieve great things this week,

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Scorpio. Ultimately, your accomplishments depend on how much you can focus on the tasks at hand. The ball is in your court. SAGITTARIUS: Nov. 23-Dec. 21. Sagittarius, you are on the move this week, but it is best to have a plan and not leave things to chance. Look ahead to all the possible scenarios that have the potential to trip you up. CAPRICORN: Dec. 22-Jan. 20. Capricorn, it is easy to get carried away with an idea. Just do not mistake obsession for focus. You need to pace yourself if you are going to be effective. AQUARIUS: Jan. 21Feb. 18. You may need to postpone something you had hoped to finish this week, Aquarius. As long as it does not get pushed too far onto the back burner you should be fine. PISCES: Feb. 19-March 20. Pisces, a setback of some kind may occur this week. Don’t get too worried just yet. Adversity can be a learning experience. FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS APRIL 15 Luis Fonsi, Singer (40) APRIL 16 Martin Lawrence, Actor (53) APRIL 17 Victoria Beckham, Designer (44) APRIL 18 Conan O’Brien, Comic (55) APRIL 19 Kate Hudson, Actress (39) APRIL 20 Miranda Kerr, Model (35) APRIL 21 Tony Romo, Athlete (38)


PAGE 12 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

PUZZLES

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help keep the mind independent and active throughout life.

This week’s puzzle is rated Across

70. Drops

1. Complain

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Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 13

LIDA WINFIELD WILL join with four other Middlebury College Dance Program instructors for a presentation of faculty choreography on Thursday, April 19, at 8 p.m. in the Dance Theater of the Mahaney Center for the Arts.

Beat (Continued from Page 11) program are “An Outdoor Overture” by Aaron Copland; and “Symphony No. 8, Op. 88, B. 163” by Antonin Dvorak. The performance is free and the public is welcome. STUDENT PIANO RECITAL AT COLLEGE A piano recital by Gloria Breck, will

take place at 4 p.m. on Sunday, April 22, in Middlebury College’s Mead Chapel. Breck, a Middlebury College senior and piano student of Diana Fanning, presents the culmination of four musical years at Middlebury with a recital of solo works by Bach, Chopin, Rachmaninov and Tan Dun. It’s free and the public is welcome.

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VERMONT’S TWICE-WEEKLY NEWSPAPER Middlebury, VT 05753 • (802) 388-4944 • www.AddisonIndependent.com

Students of the Week from area High Schools Otter Valley Union High School Mount Abraham Union High School Otter Valley Union High School is happy to name Robert Cook as its latest Student of the Week. Robert’s parents are Kate Cook of Brandon, with whom he lives, and David Cook of Florence. His brother Brady Cook is a mechanic at New England Kenworth. Robbie has always worked as hard as he could in high school. He did his best to challenge himself. A consistent presence on the OVUHS Honor Roll is clear evidence of his success. He has also been a member of Otter Valley’s football team since freshman year. Robbie keeps busy outside of school as well, holding down a job doing auto detailing at G. Stone Motors since summer 2016 and another at Basin Sugar Works since 2017. He also volunteers at the Brandon Fire Department and has loved every second of it. In his spare time he enjoys hunting and fishing, as well as going on ATV rides with his friends. Robbie’s advice to his fellow students? “Take your time through high school and really enjoy it. Grades 9-11 all I Robert Cook wanted to do was graduate and wanted nothing to do with OVUHS school. Now that senior year has hit you start to realize all the stuff you’ll never be able to do again, and it really sinks in hard, so just take your time and enjoy every moment of high school, because you will miss it someday.” After graduation Robbie plans on getting a job and working. “Robbie is a hard-working and well-rounded student,” says teacher Chas Hall. “Beyond doing well in school Robbie was a senior captain of the Otter Valley Football team. He also works several jobs and enjoys hunting and fishing as well. Robbie has been a joy to have as both a student and a student-athlete.” Michelle Cioffredi adds, “Robert is one of those students who always greets people with a smile. While in my class he was a hard worker, but more importantly, he was an asset to the class because of his easy going nature and willingness to work with anyone in class. In class and as a team member on the football team he could be counted on to do his part and encourage others to do their best.” The students, faculty and staff at OVUHS all wish Robbie the best of luck in all his future plans.

Mount Abraham Union High School is pleased to recognize Emily Aldrich as its latest Student of the Week. Emily lives in Monkton with her parents Elizabeth and Bob Aldrich and her sister Ashley, a junior at Mt. Abe. Her older brother, Will, graduated from Mt. Abe last year and is now in the Navy for Nuclear Power Training. Emily has been on Mt. Abe’s honor roll with highest honors and received academic excellence since her freshman year. Last year she was named to the National Honor Society. Currently she is enrolled in French 5 and AP United States History. Sports are a big part of Emily’s life. She has played softball and field hockey all four years of high school. She has played in three state championships and was a captain of both teams this year. She was the Addison Independent Player of the Year for field hockey. During the off seasons she plays for recreational field hockey leagues and a travel softball team. Emily serves on the Mt. Abraham Athletic Leadership Council and represented Mt. Abe at the Athletic Leadership Conference. After three years of trying, this year she has fit Yearbook into her class. Emily served as class vice president freshman through junior year and helped coordinate Emily Aldrich homecoming, winter ball, and prom. She also helped behind the scenes MAUHS in the spring musical in her junior and senior year, filming each show and doing hair. She has been working at the Bristol Cliffs Café since October 2016. Before that, she had a few other part time jobs. Over the winter of her junior year, she worked at Monkton Central School supervising and helping students with their homework in the Expanded Learning Program. She says being a student-athlete and having a part-time job can be difficult to manage sometimes, but it has given her a better work ethic and time management skills. And then there’s volunteering. The Humane Society, softball clinics, the local food shelf and “Feed My Starving Children” have all benefitted from her help. Does she have free time? Yes. She likes to go out with friends, read a good book, go online shopping, or be outside. She is also a huge baseball fan, so you can probably find her catching up on the Red Sox or watching a local game. Community Mentor Kathleen Clark comments, “Emily is focused on her goals in life, she knows what she wants and sets her priorities to make sure she achieves it. She has made us all proud!” In the fall Emily will attend Endicott College and major in Sports Management. Everyone at MAUHS wishes her all the best.

Otter Valley Students of the week receive a gift certificate from the Book & Leaf Bookstore. Mt. Abe Students receive a free pizza from Cubbers. Students of the Week from ALL area high schools will receive a gift certificate from Vermont Book Shop. Students of the Week are chosen by school teachers and administration.

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Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 15

Hemp (Continued from Page 1) sunflower seeds. That’s because Full Sun and its assets have been purchased by a Kentucky-based company called Victory Hemp Foods. Using hemp seeds grown in Addison County and beyond, the former Full Sun headquarters will soon be producing around 8,000 gallons of hemp seed oil and 50,000 pounds of hemp seed powder per month in what will ultimately be a non-GMO, certifiedorganic, food-safe production facility, according to Victory Hemp CEO and founder Chad Rosen. “He was looking for a space and we were looking for a buyer,” White said of the fortunate chain of events that led to last week’s closing on the deal. “It’s good to be back to work.” White will stay on as Victory Hemp’s Middlebury production manager. He knows the equipment, farmers and other key contacts in the Vermont agricultural industry. The seeds for Victory Hemp were planted at the end of 2014, following passage of the federal Farm Bill. That legislation legalized hemp for industrial research purposes. In spite of the fact that hemp doesn’t possess the same high-inducing VICTORY HEMP IS based in Kentucky and has expanded into the former Full Sun facility in Middlebury. The company produces hemp seed oil properties as its cannabis cousin, and hemp seed powder, used primarily as a healthful additive for foods ranging from baked goods to smoothies. Independent photo/John Flowers federal authorities have historically classified hemp as a controlled substance. Rosen and others ready-to-eat products, according to have long seen the healthful and Rosen. “We are actually working with utilitarian applications for hemp, and continue to push for elimination of quite a few breweries that are using legal roadblocks that are preventing the hemp seeds and adding them the crop’s return to the industrial to their mash fill,” Rosen said. “A couple of companies are using hemp mainstream. That 2014 Farm Bill gave Rosen seed oil in their salad dressings. There are a myriad of possibilities the green light he needed. “Our (Kentucky) legislators said with these essential building blocks for healthy foods.” we’re going to let private The health benefits enterprise bring this crop “Hemp has of hemp seed are many, into the rotation and an incredibly according to Rosen. find out what the market powerful bevy “Hemp has an looks like,” Rosen said. incredibly powerful “We threw our hat into of nutritional bevy of nutritional the ring and thought, ‘If properties in properties in it that we’re going to do this, it that make make it what we like to we need to do it now, it what we call a ‘functional superbecause it’s going to be like to call a food,’” he said. “It has in the research phase more digestible protein and that means big agri- ‘functional Subscribe online at addisonindependent.com than soy; it also has all business is going to super-food.’” — Chad Rosen nine essential amino stand on the sidelines, so or fill out this form and mail it in w/payment acids in the protein.” it will give entrepreneurs It also has more gram-for-gram who have idealistic ideals about how NEW! ALL ACCESS SUBSCRIPTION – PRINT & ONLINE the world should work a head start in protein than “any plant-based protein on the market,” according to Rosen, how to set it up right.’” Victory hemp is starting small, who says hemp “has a great ratio” of Name: _____________________________ Phone: _________________________ with a short list of products that are Omega 6 and Omega 3s. “A lot people take fish oils for derived from the hemp seed. The Address: __________________________________________________________ company processes and sells hemp their Omega 3s, not realizing the hearts — the little germ inside the fish don’t actually make omegas; Town: ____________________________State: _________ Zip: _______________ hemp husk. It also makes cold- the fish get it from eating algae or pressed hemp seed oil, and hemp from eating plankton that eat algae,” Email: ___________________________________________________________ protein powder. The powder is the Rosen noted. “It’s a plant-based (email address required for online subscription) IN STATE byproduct of the seed cake, left over polyunsaturated fatty acid. We like OUT-OF-STATE when the oil is squeezed out of the to cheekily tell customers to cut out Mail to: 58 Maple Street, Middlebury VT 05753 $50/year $60/year the stinky middle man — which is seed. 65+ $45/year 65+ $55/year the fish — and get to the sustainable “It’s an ingredient for your food,” Method of payment: source.” Rosen said, noting that hemp hearts ADDISON COUNTY Victory Hemp officials saw the Check enclosed $ ______________________ or hemp protein powder is often added to smoothies, baked goods and Middlebury location as being very r Visa r MC r Amex Exp.date ___________ VERMONT’S TWICE-WEEKLY NEWSPAPER other dishes. Some manufacturers attractive from the standpoint that Middlebury, VT 05753 • (802) 388-4944 • www.AddisonIndependent.com it’s surrounded by a lot of organic are now using hemp as they would Credit Card # ___________________ CCV___ IN THE MARBLE WORKS any other raw ingredient for their (See Middlebury, Page 20)

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PAGE 16 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

Mud season is here, help protect the fragile trails MONTPELIER — Recently the Green Mountain Club (GMC), maintainer and protector of Vermont’s Long Trail and Vermont’s hiking trails advocate, along with the Department of Forests, Parks and Recreation (FPR), manager of Vermont State Forests and Parks, and the Green Mountain National Forest (GMNF), announced the return of mud season to the Green

Mountains. The wet soils on and around hiking trails are very susceptible to erosion at this critical time of year. To protect fragile soil and surrounding vegetation, the land manager may close some trails during this time. Please respect the signage you see. Hikers walking on saturated soils or on the sides of trails cause damage to surrounding

vegetation, widen trails, and inhibit natural drainage of our beloved hiking trails. “It can take hours for a volunteer or trail crew to fix what takes just moments to damage by hiking on muddy trails,” says Jessica Savage, FPR’s recreation program manager. “In between spring showers, we are all ready to hit the trails after a long, cold winter. But even as your yard

is drying out, soils are still thawing at higher elevations. Saving your mountain hikes until the trails are dry will ensure a better, longer hiking season for all.” The period of snowmelt and muddy trails varies considerably throughout Vermont depending on elevation, solar orientation, depth of snowpack and amount of spring rainfall. Even as it warms up in

town, our mountains are hiding cold, wet, snowy and icy conditions that may persist deep into spring. Hikers who find themselves at high elevations will need better traction and warmer clothes than the valley may hint at. The GMC encourages hikers to use their best judgment. If you encounter conditions you are not prepared for, please turn around. The mountain will be there another day. If a trail is muddy, even if it is not officially closed, please find an alternative area to hike in. “Dry trails at lower elevations, dirt roads, and recreation paths all provide excellent opportunities for spring activities,” says Mike DeBonis, executive director of the Green Mountain Club. “Until the end of May, consider hiking on south-facing slopes and lower elevations where the sun can dry out the trails sooner.” For information on mud season and alternative hike suggestions, contact the GMC’s visitor center at 802-244-7037 or email gmc@ greenmountainclub.org, or the Vermont State Parks call center at 888-409-7579, MondayFriday, 9 a.m.-4 p.m. In addition, a weekly trail update with the latest conditions and a list of alternative hikes will be posted on the Vermont State Parks website at vtstateparks.com/hiking. html#mudSeasonHiking.

Lecturers in Hancock to discuss child labor HANCOCK — Inspired by reading of “Bread and Roses, Too,” Rochester resident George Moltz is helping bring local labor history to life. Moltz will be giving two lectures on Vermont in the era of child labor on Wednesday, May 9, at 11:30 a.m. at the Hancock Town Hall and again on Wednesday, May 16, a 7 p.m. at the same location. In the talk Moltz examines whether Vermont was a leader in creating child labor laws or lagged behind the rest of the country. Moltz has an extensive background in history, including labor history. He taught social studies at Rochester School for more than 30 years, and always emphasized the “story” in “history” with his students. He will be focusing on working conditions in Vermont, and will also be exploring the history of the mill in Hancock. Plan to join Quin-Town Center for Seniors for lunch afterwards, but please call ahead and make a reservation at 802-767-3763. There is a suggested donation of $3.50 for those over 60. The cost is $5 for all others. Contact Jill Jesso-White, Friends of the Hancock Free Public Library, at (802) 767-4128 with questions.


SPORTS MONDAY

Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 17

VERGENNES UNION HIGH School catcher Jeffrey Stearns makes a spectacular diving catch of a pop-up. The sophomore also tallied a run and a sacrifice fly in the 6-3 VUHS loss to Middlebury in Vergennes on Friday. Photo by Steve James

Tiger baseball puts chill on Commodores By ANDY KIRKALDY VERGENNES — In a cold and toward the end rainy high school baseball game on Friday, visiting Middlebury got a near no-hitter from junior Wyatt Cameron to get past Vergennes, 6-3, in an event in which the spring elements played a role. Not only did the cold and wet conditions factor directly, but also the teams had barely been outside gymnasiums and hockey rinks to practice tracking fly balls and bouncing grounders before last week’s opening games. Still, the Tigers dealt with the conditions better than the Commodores, thanks in part to Cameron, who struck out 11, walked three, all in the seventh, and allowed just one hit, senior Will Wormer’s seventh-inning RBI single. Cameron got stronger after allowing an unearned run in the first inning: He retired 15 straight batters from the second through sixth innings. “I was getting a little looser, and my arm started to warm up along the way,” Cameron said. “It was still pretty cold, but my arm loosened up, really.” Coach Charlie Messenger came to the mound in the seventh after Cameron walked the leadoff hitters, Jeffrey Stearns and Casey Kimball, and tossed a wild pitch and made a

throwing error on a pickoff, all of which put the runners on first and third. They worked a double steal to make it 6-2, and then Wormer singled home Kimball. Messenger said Cameron still felt good after the two walks, but had another issue. “When I went out his arm wasn’t tired. It was getting real muddy out there, so when his plant foot was landing it was slipping,” Messenger said. “So he was not happy.” Cameron said at that point he just wanted to nail down a win, especially with the Tigers coming off a one-win season a year ago and an opening loss the day before. “I was just telling myself I had to throw strikes. I couldn’t let the game slip away, because they’re still a good-hitting ballclub,” Cameron said. He got help from catcher Brian Foote, who caught Wormer trying to steal second on a close play, and then after a walk got the last out on a ground ball. It was all about getting the W, Cameron said. “I have a lot of confidence in this team this season, so I’m glad we got a win,” he said. Cameron outdueled VUHS junior starter Jake Gonyeau, who went 4.1 creditable innings. Gonyeau allowed five runs, three earned, on three hits and three walks while striking

out five. Ethan Bissonette tossed the final 2.3 innings, allowing one unearned run on two hits, striking out one batter, hitting another and walking none. VUHS Coach Dwight Burkett praised Gonyeau’s effort. “Gonyeau had a little bit of a slow

start, but he picked it up, got back in it,” Burkett said. “He had a good outing.” MUHS scored in the first when Hale Hescock walked, stole second, moved to third on a grounder, and came home on a Cameron’s (See Baseball, Page 19)

MIDDLEBURY’S NICK CLARK hustles down the line in the top of the fifth inning to score a run for the Tigers at VUHS Friday.

Photo by Steve James

MUHS boys’ lax stings the Wasps MIDDLEBURY — The Middlebury Union High School boys’ lacrosse team on this past Wednesday edged visiting Woodstock, 5-4. The Tigers improved to 3-1 heading into games scheduled this Monday and Wednesday at South Burlington and home vs. Champlain Valley, weather and field conditions permitting. The Tigers’ home game this past Friday vs. Rutland was moved to May 2. Against rival Woodstock, Kam Bartlett and Sam Hodges paced the Tiger attack with two goals apiece. Thatcher Trudeau also found the net, and Kolby Farnsworth set up three goals. MUHS goalie Cam Devlin stopped six shots. Woodstock goalie Gabe Marsicovetere kept his team in the game with 13 saves, and four Wasps scored a goal apiece.

Score BOARD HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Girls’ Lacrosse 4/11 U-32 vs. VUHS.............................14-10 4/13 MUHS vs. Hanover.......................11-10 4/13 Chelsea/Randolph at VUHS.......... Ppd. Boys’ Lacrosse 4/11 Randolph at Mt. Abe...............Canceled 4/11 MUHS vs. Woodstock.......................5-4 4/13 Rutland at MUHS........Postponed to 5/2 Baseball 4/12 Essex vs. MUHS.............................10-2 4/12 Rice vs. VUHS..................................8-1 4/13 MUHS vs. VUHS..............................6-3 Softball 4/12 Essex vs. MUHS.............................10-2 4/12 CVU vs. VUHS...............................30-6 4/13 MUHS vs. VUHS............................38-1 COLLEGE SPORTS Women’s Lacrosse 4/14 Midd. vs. Trinity...............................14-8 4/15 Hamilton at Midd.......Postponed to 4/22 Men’s Lacrosse 4/11 Midd. vs. Springfield.....................12-11 4/14 Midd. vs. Trinity.............................13-12 Baseball 4/13 Amherst at Midd..........Postponed to 5/4 4/14 Amherst at Midd. (2)...Postponed to 5/5 4/15 Midd. at Plymouth St........... Ppd. to 5/2 Softball 4/13 Midd. vs. Hamilton............................8-0 4/13 Midd. vs. Hamilton..........................10-2 4/14 Hamilton at Midd. (2)............Postponed

(See Schedule, Page 18)


PAGE 18 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

Tiger girls’ lacrosse slips past Hanover

HANOVER, N.H. — The Middlebury Union High School girls’ lacrosse team preserved its winning streak in dramatic fashion on Friday, scoring twice in the final 20 seconds to defeat host Hanover, N.H., 11-10. The Tigers tied the game with 20 seconds left, and then middie Isabel Rosenberg controlled the draw, worked the ball down the field and set up Ella Nagy-Benson’s gamewinner. The Tigers improved to 3-0 with their third road win of this spring, and the defending Division I champions pushed their overall winning streak to 21 games. Rosenberg led MUHS with four goals and controlled seven draws. Satchel McLaughlin (two assists) and Emily Laframboise (assist) chipped in two goals apiece.

TIGER GWEN STAFFORD breaks for third after a throwing error during Middlebury’s five-inning thumping of Vergennes Union High School in Vergennes this past Friday. Stafford scored seven times in the Tiger victory.

Photo by Steve James

Schedule Middlebury softball tallies a victory at VUHS HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Girls’ Lacrosse 4/17 CVU at MUHS......................... 4:30 PM 4/18 Hartford at VUHS..................... 4:30 PM 4/20 MUHS at Essex....................... 4:30 PM 4/21 Milton at VUHS............................11 AM Boys’ Lacrosse 4/16 MUHS at South Burlington........... 4 PM 4/18 CVU at MUHS.............................. 4 PM Baseball 4/16 OV at Rutland............................... 4 PM 4/17 Mt. Abe at Colchester.............. 4:30 PM 4/17 Milton at MUHS....................... 4:30 PM 4/17 VUHS at Fairfax....................... 4:30 PM 4/18 OV at Fair Haven..................... 4:30 PM 4/19 MUHS at Spaulding................. 4:30 PM 4/19 Mt. Abe at VUHS..................... 4:30 PM Softball 4/17 Mt. Abe at Colchester.............. 4:30 PM 4/17 Milton at MUHS....................... 4:30 PM 4/17 VUHS at Fairfax....................... 4:30 PM 4/18 OV at Fair Haven..................... 4:30 PM 4/19 MUHS at Spaulding................. 4:30 PM 4/19 Mt. Abe at VUHS..................... 4:30 PM 4/20 OV at Springfield..................... 4:30 PM Track 4/17 Mt. Abe at Burlington............... 3:30 PM 4/17 MUHS at South Burlington...... 3:30 PM 4/19 VUHS at CVU.......................... 3:30 PM COLLEGE SPORTS Women’s Lacrosse 4/14 Trinity at Midd............................... 2 PM 4/15 Hamilton at Midd........................... 1 PM 4/21 Midd. at Tufts................................ 2 PM 4/22 Hamilton at Midd........................... 1 PM Men’s Lacrosse 4/21 Tufts at Midd................................. 1 PM Baseball 4/17 Midd. at Norwich...................... 3:30 PM 4/19 Midd. at Castleton......................... 4 PM 4/21 Bowdoin at Midd. ......................... 4 PM 4/22 Bowdoin at Midd. (2)..................... Noon Softball 4/16 Midd. at Johnson (2)...............Canceled 4/18 Union at Midd. (2).................... 3:30 PM 4/20 Midd. at Williams.......................... 5 PM 4/21 Midd. at Williams (2)..................... Noon Late events occurred after deadline. Spectators are advised to consult school websites for the latest schedule updates.

By ANDY KIRKALDY VERGENNES — The Middlebury Union High School softball team on Friday cruised to a 38-1, five-inning victory over shorthanded Vergennes, a result that evened the Tigers’ record at 1-1 and dropped the Commodores to 0-2. The Tigers knocked out eight hits off losing pitcher Ema Gernander, including three by Ashley Sunderland, a homer by Kyra Roberts, and a double by winning pitcher Bridget Audet. Audet struck

out nine and allowed four hits and one walk. Gernander struck out five, but had difficulty with her control and the Commodores struggled in the field as the Tigers scored 14 runs in the second inning and 20 in the third. VUHS Coach Mike Martin said the Commodores were missing starters who were away on a school trip. Senior shortstop Megan Tarte’s first-inning home run, the first of her career, provided the VUHS scoring. Gernander doubled

and Sarah Rathbun and Sky Thayer singled for the Commodores. Leadoff hitter Gwen Stafford scored seven times for MUHS, and Carly Larocque and Abby LaRock crossed the plate six times apiece. The Tigers were coming off a 16-1 loss on Thursday to Division I title contender Essex, which reached double digits in runs for the second time in two days. Sarah Knickerbocker led the Hornets with four hits and four RBIs, and winning pitcher Caitlyn Toth fanned nine Tigers in the five-inning contest.

The Commodores were coming off a 30-6 four-inning loss to visiting Champlain Valley on Thursday. Martin said he conceded the result rather than ask for a suspension even though the game did not reach the legal five innings. VUHS took advantage of CVU starting pitcher Riley Canty’s nine walks in three innings to score its runs. Maria Malaney had the only VUHS hit, and Gernander took the loss. Kristy Carlson led the Redhawks with three hits.

Raiders outlast VUHS girls’ lax Young team falls in four-point loss VERGENNES — Visiting U-32 took a big lead over the collective Vergennes-Mount Abraham girls’ lacrosse team on Wednesday and then hung on for a 14-10 victory over the Commodores in both teams’ opener. The Raiders led at the half, 10-2, before the young Commodores made a strong run after the break, according to Coach Marikate Kelley. “We made some adjustments on defense at halftime, and our many ninth-graders became more comfortable playing at the high-school level,” Kelley said.

Freshman Sydney Weber led the Commodores in her debut with five goals. Also finding the net for VUHS were Erin Lawrence, who notched two goals and two assists, and Norah Deming, Jalen Cook and Marley Keith, with a goal apiece. Cook and Deming also picked up assists. Freshman Commodore goalie Ashley Tierney stopped 18 shots in her first varsity game. The Commodores’ weekend home game with the ChelseaRandolph joint team was postponed.

VERGENNES SENIOR MEGAN Tarte gets a hand from Coach Mike Martin as she rounds the bases after a first-inning homer — her first ever — in the Commodores’ home game vs. MUHS on Friday. Photo by Steve James


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 19

Baseball (Continued from Page 17) sacrifice fly. VUHS tied the score in the bottom of the inning with an unearned run. Cooper O’Brien reached second base on an infield error, got to third on an infield out, and trotted home on a Stearns sacrifice fly. Shaky defense cost VUHS in the fourth. Devon Kearns led off with a bloop single, and then three straight infield errors allowed Kearns and Sean Deering to round the bases and make it 3-1. The Tigers added two more runs in the fifth. Cameron and Foote singled to lead off, and Cameron scored on the front end of a double steal with courtesy runner Nick Clark. Skyeler Devlin’s single off Bissonette made it 5-1. Hescock led off the Tiger sixth and reached second base on another VUHS miscue, moved up on a groundout, and scored on Cameron’s RBI grounder to make it 6-1. Then as the rain and wind picked up in the seventh the Commodores made a run at Cameron and MUHS,

but the rally came up short. Burkett, whose team lost at Rice the day before, 8-1, despite decent pitching by Wormer, said the spring weather has been especially challenging for his inexperienced team, but that he expects improvement. “It’s been a screwy spring. The weather stinks. It’s cold out. We’re young. We’ve got stuff to work on,” he said. “We’re going to be better. We’ll be around come the end of the season,” Messenger, whose team lost at Essex, 10-2, on Thursday, despite two hits apiece by Deering and Kearns, had a similar, but happier message. “We have some things to work on,” he said. “We’ve got some signals to work on. We’ve got some execution to work on. But, again, we’re not outside yet. Every time we get outside it’s a game. But I’m pleased. I’m happy for them.” Andy Kirkaldy may be reached at andyk@addisonindependent.com.

MIDDLEBURY JUNIOR SEAN Deering slips under a tag by Vergennes catcher Jeffrey Stearns and scores on an error while Tiger sophomore Devon Kearns, who had just scored the go-ahead run, looks on. MUHS won the game, 6-3, on Friday. Photo by Steve James

Panther women’s lacrosse team stops Trinity Bantams MIDDLEBURY – In a Saturday matchup of top NCAA Division III and NESCAC teams, the No. 9 Middlebury women’s lacrosse team scored the final 10 goals to erase a four-goal second-half deficit and rally past No. 8 Trinity, 14-8. The Panthers (10-2, 6-1 NESCAC) face another key league game this coming Saturday, when they visit No. 6 Tufts. The Jumbos are 10-2, 6-1 in NESCAC, but are coming off a loss at Amherst on Saturday and are likely to drop in the rankings

while the Panthers will rise. A win at Tufts would put the Panthers in the driver’s seat for first place in the league, while a loss would give the edge to Amherst. On this past Saturday Trinity (94, 5-3 NESCAC) scored the game’s first four goals. The Bantams still led, 8-4, at 21:16 of the second half after scoring the first two goals after the break. But the Panthers then took over the game. Fifty seconds after Trinity scored to make it 8-4 Erin

Nicholas buried a free-position. Kirsten Murphy closed the gap to 8-6 by scoring off a turnover, and 43 seconds later Hollis Perticone converted a free position to make it 8-7 with 17:53 left to play. The hosts tied the game 17 seconds later, when Georgia Carroll jumped high to quick-stick home a pass from Emma McDonagh. Murphy then gave the Panthers their first lead of the game at 9-8, scoring at 14:34 on another free position after a Bantam foul.

MCTV SCHEDULE Channels 15 & 16 MCTV Channel 15 Tuesday, April 17 5 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 8:30 a.m. Green Mt. Veterans for Peace 9:30 a.m. Betty Nuovo 10 a.m. Selectboard 11:40 a.m. Legislative Breakfast 2 p.m. Risky Business (CCTV) 4 p.m. Congregational Church Service 5:30 p.m. Development Review Board 7 p.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs Wednesday, April 18 6 a.m. Legislative Breakfast 7:17 a.m. Community Bulletin Board 7:30 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 9 a.m. Vote for Vermont 10 a.m. Selectboard, DRB, Public Affairs 5 p.m. Betty Nuovo 5:30 p.m. Legislative Breakfast 10:30 p.m.Human Trafficking Recognition Training 11 p.m. Green Mountain Care Board Thursday, April 19 7:30 a.m. Development Review Board 8 a.m. Congregational Church Services 9:30 a.m. Eckankar 10 a.m. Legislative Breakfast 12 p.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 6 p.m. Selectboard 8 p.m. Betty Nuovo 9:30 p.m. Vote for Vermont 10:30 p.m. Energy Week 11:30 p.m. Vermont Media Exchange Friday, April 20 5 a.m. Green Mt. Veterans for Peace 8:45 a.m. Development Review Board 9 a.m. Human Trafficking Recognition Training

9:30 a.m. Betty Nuovo 10 a.m. Selectboard 12 p.m. Legislative Breakfast 4 p.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 5:30 p.m. Eckankar 6 p.m. Bulletin Board, Public Affairs 8 p.m. Green Mt. Care Board Saturday, April 21 5 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 8:15 a.m. Development Review Board 8:30 a.m. Legislative Breakfast 9:47 a.m. Community Bulletin Board 10 a.m. Selectboard 12 p.m. Green Mt. Veterans for Peace 4 p.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 5:30 p.m. Energy Week 7 p.m. Catholic Mass 7:30 p.m. Vermont Media Exchange Sunday, April 22 5 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 11 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 12:30 p.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 4 p.m. Congregational Church Services 5:30 p.m. Eckankar 6 p.m. Bulletin Board 6:30 p.m. Betty Nuovo 7 p.m. Catholic Mass 7:30 p.m. Public Affairs Monday, April 23 5 a.m. Green Mt. Care Board 10 a.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 5:30 p.m. Eckankar 6 p.m. Bulletin Board, Public Affairs 6:30 p.m. Legislative Breakfast 8 p.m. Vermont State House

Thirteen seconds later Middlebury scored again, as Perticone won the draw and set up Casey O’Neill. Nicholas and McDonagh added back-to-back free positions strikes, and Jenna McNicholas capped off the surge with two quick-stick shots set up by McDonagh and Murphy. Murphy led all players with four goals and an assist, while Perticone contributed two goals, an assist, seven ground balls and seven draw controls. McDonagh reached the 100-point

plateau for her career (71 goals, 30 assists in 55 games) by notching a goal and two assists. Panther defender Alex White caused three turnovers, and goalie Julia Keith made nine saves. Most stats were even, but the Bantams were flagged for 35 fouls to 21 for the Panthers. Kiley Coffey, Grace O’Donnell and Mary French each scored twice for the Bantams, and goalie Zoe Ferguson made four saves.

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please see the MCTV website, www.middleburycommunitytv.org, for changes in the schedule; MCTV events, classes and news; and to view many programs online. Submit listings to the above address, or call 388-3062.

MCTV Channel 16 Tuesday, April 17 5 a.m. First Wednesday 7:45 a.m. Beekeeper Talk at Richmond Senior Center 9 a.m. UVM Extension - Growing Berries 4 p.m. The Story Matters 4:30 p.m. Stories by the Fire 5:10 p.m. First Wednesday 9 p.m. Hannaford Career Center (HCC) Wednesday, April 18 5 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange (VMX) 10 a.m. The Story Matters 11 a.m. HCC & ACSD Board Meetings 4 p.m. Vermont Media Exchange 6 p.m. First Wednesday 7:30 p.m. Vermont Bach Ensemble 10 p.m. Matt Dickinson – Trump’s 1st Year (GNAT-TV) 11:30 p.m. VT State Board of Education Thursday, April 19 5:20 a.m. The Story Matters 6 a.m. First Wednesday 7 a.m. Vt State Board of Education 2:45 p.m. ACSD Board Meeting 5 p.m. All Things LGBTQ 6 p.m. Hannaford Career Center 8 p.m. Risky Business 10 p.m. How Will It Compete? Friday, April 20 6 a.m. UVM Extension - Growing Berries 8 a.m. New England Review 10 a.m. ACSD & HCC School Board Meetings 2:15 p.m. Beekeeper Talk at Richmond Senior Center 4 p.m. First Wednesday 5 p.m. Matt Dickinson – Trump’s 1st Year (GNAT-TV) 6:30 p.m. New England Review 8 p.m. All Things LGBTQ

9 p.m. The Story Matters 9:33 p.m. First Wednesday Saturday, April 21 5 a.m. Matt Dickinson - Trump 1st Year (GNAT-TV) 7 a.m. All Things LGBTQ 8 a.m. Gardening in Vermont 10 a.m. Beekeeper Talk at Richmond Senior Center 11:30 a.m. HCC & ACSD School Board Meetings 3 p.m. The Story Matters 3:30 p.m. First Wednesday 4:30 p.m. Beginning Beekeeper 6 p.m. UVM Extension - Growing Berries 8 p.m. New England Review Sunday, April 22 6 a.m. All Things LGBTQ 7 a.m. The Story Matters 7:30 a.m. HCC Board Meeting 12 p.m. UVM Extension - Growing Berries 2 p.m. First Wednesday 4 p.m. Supporting Native Pollinators (CATV) 6 p.m. Matt Dickinson – Trump’s 1st Year (GNAT-TV) 7:30 p.m. Vermont’s Current Use Program (CATV) 9:07 p.m. Beginning Beekeeper 10:30 p.m. Human Trafficking Recognition Training Monday, April 23 5 a.m. First Wednesday 6:30 a.m. ACSD & HCC Board Meetings 10 a.m. Music Program from VMX 12 p.m. Vermont State Board of Education 7 p.m. All Things LGBTQ 8 p.m. New England Review 10 p.m. Human Trafficking Recognition Training


PAGE 20 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

Ripton students present Capoeira April 19 RIPTON — Capoeira is coming to Ripton Elementary School. As part of the school-wide thematic study, “How We Express Ourselves,” and thanks to grants from Vermont Arts Council and Friends of Ripton School, the school will welcome Fabio (Fua) Nascimento to Ripton from Thursday, April 12, through

Thursday, April 19. Capoeira is a blend of dance and martial arts originating from Brazil and continuing today as an important practice and way of life in Brazilian culture. A native of Brazil, Fua Nascimento has been performing and teaching on three continents for more than a decade, introducing capoeira

to thousands of people through workshops, classes, and residencies. There will be a dress rehearsal from 1:45-3p.m. on Thursday, April 19. Families are welcome to attend. The program will culminate with an evening performance for family and community members on Thursday, April 19, at 6 p.m.

C L E A N E R E N E R G Y. C L E A N E R A I R.

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• EVERY THURSDAY IN YOUR ADDY INDY

NETAKA WHITE, LEFT, and Victory Hemp CEO Chad Rosen stand in front of the former Full Sun headquarters off Middlebury’s Exchange Street. Victory Hemp has purchased Full Sun, where it will soon begin producing 8,000 gallons of hemp seed oil and 50,000 pounds of hemp seed powder per month. Independent photo/John Flowers

Middlebury (Continued from Page 15) Addison County. Victory Hemp acreage in the Northeast, from New will source its raw materials from York to Maine, Rosen said. And it throughout the country. also possessed the right infrastructure “A lot of the challenge for farmers to transition fairly is getting their products seamlessly from to market,” he said. “An processing sunflower “A lot of the essential part of any seeds to hemp seeds. challenge for agricultural system is Victory Hemp is farmers is having a processor and adding some additional getting their marketer in place.” equipment to the products to Victory Hemp places production line. a premium on pristine “(Full Sun) market. An land suitable for organic quintuples our capacity essential crops. Rosen explained from where we are now part of any that hemp plants can and gives us a little agricultural absorb and pull a lot of bit of room to grown,” system is things out of the soil — Rosen said. “We know including heavy metals having a we’ll be in the facility and chemicals. for at least the next processor and “You really want to three- to five years marketer in make sure that when without having to add place.” you’re growing hemp, much more equipment.” — Chad Rosen you’re growing it in Victory Hemp will clean fields that haven’t maintain its Kentucky been exposed to heavy facility. The new Middlebury facility metals,” Rosen said. “There will likely employ up to 10 workers are a lot of those clean, pristine within the next three- to five years, fields we’ve identified (in the according to Rosen. Northeast).” Hemp plants are already being And Rosen realizes that Vermont grown in New York, Maine and has become synonymous with Vermont, so the Middlebury plant “clean” and “pristine.” It’s a will have relatively easy access to reputation that many businesses that inventory. have sought to associate with their Rosen is working with the products. Vermont Hemp Company to find “Vermont stands for quality, it farmers willing to grow the crop. At stands for transparency in the mind’s this point, the company has “a few eye of the consumer, and we’re hundred acres” and more than five excited to become a part of that great Vermont farmers under contract to story,” Rosen said. supply hemp seeds. He anticipates Reporter John Flowers is at some of the supply will come from johnf@addisonindependent.com.


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 21

Welcome!

Twenty-six people from 18 countries took the oath of U.S. citizenship in a naturalization ceremony at the New Haven town gym this past Thursday afternoon. U.S. Magistrate John M. Conroy presided over the ceremony, with family and friends of the new citizens, as well as students at Beeman Elementary School, watching. Pictured, clockwise from bottom left, are, Winnie Nguyen (Vietnam); Rodrick Mpouki Kiesse (Congo); Jorge Edison Morales Caseres (Equador); multi-ethnic audience; Maria Gieda (Belarus), Jarrod Andrew Dixon (United Kingdom), Nguyen, Leonardo Romario Clayton (Jamaica); Glenys Licelot Hernandez (Dominican Republic); and Beeman kindergarteners, from left, Alyk-John Berkner, Arianna Lawrence, Christopher Barry, Bentley Luong, Kennedy Courtemanche and Emma Rule.

Independent photos/John S. McCright


PAGE 22 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUND

Addison County’s Humane Society Debbie. 7 years, Black Lab mix, spayed female. Sweet, middle-aged pup seeking an experienced dog companion who enjoys long walks in the woods, sunset car rides, and snuggles on the couch. Debbie an incredibly smart, assertive dog who knows several commands and loves to learn, especially if she can trade tricks for treats! She needs a human companion who will provide her with firm guidance, plenty of mental and physical exercise, and who doesn’t mind a four-legged shadow. Debbie gets along with cats, but needs to go to a home where there aren’t children or other dogs. Debbie is currently staying with her guardian while we help her find a new home. For more information or to arrange a visit with Debbie, please contact her guardian Judi by phone at 802-728-4567. Mitzy. 4 years, mixed breed, spayed female. Mitzy isn’t so itsy-bitsy but she thinks she is- Mitzy’s previous owner said she tries her hardest to be a lap dog! They described her as very active and playful. She loves to be outside, especially in cold weather, but she will let you know when she is ready to come inside. Mitzy loves toys and likes to play fetch. In Mitzy’s previous home, she did well with submissive dogs and does great with them along the fence line here at the shelter. Mitzy can be fearful in new situations, so we recommend her new guardians be patient and willing to spend time on training. In order to make the best match for Mitzy, we require that her a 13+ home with a family who will respect her need for space. Maybelline. 2 years, Pit Bull/Terrier mix, spayed female. “Maybe she’s born with it? Maybe it’s Maybelline.” Maybelline is a gorgeous red and white pup who was definitely born with it; she got her looks from genetics, not cosmetics! Maybelline is an energetic, affectionate young dog who wants nothing more than to be her person’s shadow. Maybelline loves to ride in cars and enjoys playing with her human. Maybelline is very smart and learns tricks and commands incredibly quickly. She would like a home where she will have many appropriate outlets for her energy and would LOVE to have a guardian who works from home or could take her to work with them. In order to make the perfect match for Maybelline, we require that she be adopted into a home without cats and with an experienced dog owner.

e h t W f o eek t e P Stella

is a service dog who lives with her mom, Laurie Myrick. Laurie says, “I love that Stella’s always with me — I can’t leave the room without her coming to find me. She never lets me out of her sight.” Stella is a Great Dane, which is a breed that loves to run. When she’s let outside she does what her family calls the “Stella 500” as she runs as fast as she can around and around our house.  And, as the photo shows, she’s ALWAYS messing with the kitties. What you can’t see in the pic is our kitten in the top of the cat tower! Shanon Atkins Vergennes

Let YOUR pet be the next Pet of the Week! Send the photo and story to the Addison Independent, Pet Page, 58 Maple St., Middlebury, Vt., 05753, or email a highresolution jpeg to news@addisonindependent.com.

Lewis & Clark. 12 & 13, shorthair tigers, neutered males. Lewis and Clark are strongly bonded kitties looking for loving new guardians. Lewis and Clark are super sweet! They love affection and attention so much that they will make cute little grunting noises to show their satisfaction when they receive pets. Lewis and Clark are on the shyer side and talk to each other when they are feeling nervous. They did not like the small children in their previous home but we think they might do well with respectful, older children. They are wonderful kitties looking for a compassionate family who will love them for the remainder of their years. Smokey. 2 years, longhaired grey tiger, spayed female. Smokey is a playful, active, curious young cat who likes to rub against legs when she’s looking for attention! She really likes her toys, especially those that crackle or that she can fetch. Her previous guardians said she loves to play with water! Smokey does great with other cats and although she has been around kids of all ages, we think she would do best in a home with older kids. Smokey will need some time to adjust to new surroundings but once she does, we think she will make for a very fun companion! Ally. 9 years, shorthair black & white, spayed female. Who would have thought that after being abandoned, Ally would be so forgiving? Affectionate and friendly are just a couple of words to describe this wonderful girl! Ally LOVES to be brushed, and doesn’t mind being picked up and held. Although she may be shy when she first meets you, Ally will warm up quickly to show you her true happy self. Ally will do really well in a laid-back home with loving guardians.

Call or check our website. We may have a pet for you ... 388-1100 • www.homewardboundanimals.org 236 Boardman Street, Middlebury

Dog Obedience & Agility

Hand-in-Paw Training & Boarding Kennel Route 74, Cornwall • 462-2992


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 23

Gun rights (Continued from Page 1) can own guns (see box with story). Like other vocal gun owners, Pidgeon thinks these laws violate rights protected by the Second Amendment, which reads, “A well regulated Militia, being necessary to the security of a free State, the right of the people to keep and bear Arms, shall not be infringed.” Two other gun dealers declined to talk to the Independent about the new laws. For his part, many of Pidgeon’s criticisms of the bills transcend Second Amendment complaints and extend to more practical concerns. “If someone gets their gun taken away but doesn’t get entered into the system right away, they can come in and buy another gun the next day,” he said, referring to H.422, which allows law enforcement to confiscate firearms from individuals cited for domestic assault. And who is going to keep track of all these confiscated guns? Pidgeon wondered. Law enforcement was already struggling with storage guidelines. “There are 1,191 guns the state of Vermont has in storage,” he said. That number, according to Vermont State Police Lt. Garry Scott, is actually closer to 1,400. An expert on the state’s Firearms Storage Program, which was created in 2014 to manage “the relinquishment and storage of firearms, ammunition and weapons when a court orders such relinquishment as part of a relief from abuse order,” Lt. Scott said the state has 410 weapons stored in a rented vault in Montpelier and an

Vermont’s new gun laws

The three bills Gov. Scott signed into law last week are: • S.221 immediately prohibits individuals from possessing firearms for up to a year if they pose a significant danger to themselves or others. • H.422 gives police power to remove firearms from individuals cited for domestic assault. Goes into effect Sept. 1. • S.55 immediately expands background checks to private gun sales, raises the minimum age for purchasing firearms to 21 — unless the buyer has taken a hunter safety course (which is already required to obtain a hunting license), is a veteran, or is a law enforcement official or in the military. Section 9 of the bill bans bump stocks, which simulate fully automatic firing; it will go into effect Oct. 1. average of maybe 100 weapons in storage at each of the 10 state police barracks. About 130 of these are weapons seized in connection with temporary restraining orders, which as temporary evidence must be stored separately. At times this can pose a “significant problem,” said Lt. Scott. “At the New Haven barracks this is less of an issue, because it’s newer and can handle it, but most barracks are not equipped for the storage of both short- and long-term

evidence.” The new laws will probably not have a noticeable impact on the Firearms Storage Program, Lt. Scott said. Could someone cited for domestic assault turn around and buy another gun the next day? Theoretically, yes, said Lt. Scott, but only in very rare cases. Such individuals are typically taken into custody by law enforcement, preventing them from accessing firearms of any kind, he noted. The new laws require background checks on private gun sales, but the rules for how that will work are still being worked out. As spelled out in the law, firearms dealers may perform background checks for private firearms sales — and charge “reasonable fees” for the service. But Pidgeon said he’ll refuse to do so. He doesn’t want to deal with the extra paperwork or have to manage the storage of firearms whose sellers and buyers run into problems with the FBI’s National Instant Criminal Background Check System. IMPACT ON GUN SALES Although he has misgivings about the new gun laws, Pidgeon is not worried about his business drying up. Pidgeon’s Gun Shop typically does well during tax season, when some customers use their returns to finance larger purchases. Since the new laws were signed in April, Pidgeon expects he will see his business increase. “I started to see more business after the first of the year. When the bills were passed, I had a lot of ‘panic

A LIFELONG GUN owner and licensed gun seller, David Pidgeon doesn’t think the gun-control bills Gov. Scott signed into law last Wednesday are going to make anyone safer. Independent photo/John S. McCright

buy-in’ customers” who wanted to stock up on accessories that would soon become illegal.

DAVID PIDGEON, STANDING in Pidgeon’s Gun Shop in New Haven, does not like Vermont’s new gun laws, but he expects they will spur more sales at his store, which he has run since 1959.

Independent photo/John S. McCright

During an interview with the Addison Independent, Pidgeon assisted two customers, both of whom were making or planning purchases directly in response to the new laws. “Financially, it probably won’t make a difference,” Pidgeon said. “Gun manufacturers don’t give a crap. They’ll sell a gun for the same price whether it has a high-capacity magazine or not.” A lifelong hunter, Pidgeon has been in the firearms business for nearly 60 years. He opened his gun shop part-time in 1959 to supplement his income as a dairy farmer, then went full-time in 1986. Now in his late 70s, Pidgeon said he’s lived to see the best of Vermont. “But it’s slowly going downhill. People are leaving because they can’t afford to stay,” he said. “I’m getting calls from people who moved to Vermont to escape New York gun laws, and now we have the same laws as they do. “I never thought I’d see this in Vermont. Certainly not from a Republican governor.” Gov. Scott at his signing ceremony on Wednesday acknowledged that some of his constituents would be angry with him. “I understand I may lose support over the decision to sign these bills today. Those are consequences I’m prepared to live with.” Reach Christopher Ross at christopherr@addisonindependent. com.


PAGE 24 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

SERVICES DIRECTORY CARPENTRY/CONTRACTOR

Whip-Poor-Will Home Services • Small Construction • Light Backhoe Work • Remodel • Repair • Clearing • Brush Hog

EQUIPMENT RENTALS 40 types of rental equipment to choose from

• material forklifts • excavators • bulldozers • mini-excavators • skidsteers

• Man lifts up to 80’ • man basket w/crane up to 188

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CONTRACTOR New Construction Remodels and Additions Window and Siding Installation Smaller Home Repairs

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Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 25

SERVICES DIRECTORY PROPERTY MANAGEMENT

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PAGE 26 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Public Meetings

Public Meetings

ADULT ALL‑ RECOVERY Group Meeting for anyone over 18 who is struggling with addiction disorders. Wednes‑ days, 3‑4 p.m. at the Turning Point Center (54 Creek Rd). A great place to meet with your peers who are in recovery. Bring a friend in recovery. For info call 802‑388‑4249 or 802‑683‑5569 or visit turningpointaddisonvt.org.

AL‑ANON: FOR FAMILIES and friends affected by some‑ one’s drinking. Members share experience, strength and hope to solve common problems. Newcomers wel‑ come. Confidential. St. Ste‑ phen’s Church (use front side door and go to basement) in Middlebury, Sunday nights 7:15‑8:15 pm.

A LC OH OLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 2 MONDAY. As Bill Sees it Meeting, Ripton, Rip‑ ton Firehouse, Dugway Rd. 7:15‑8:15am. As Bill Sees it Meeting, Middlebury, The Turning Point Ctr, 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. Women of AA (Step/Speaker), Middle‑ bury, The Turning Point Ctr, 54 Creek Rd, 5:30‑6:30pm. Big Book Meeting, Middle‑ bury, The Turning Point Ctr, 54 Creek Rd. 7:30‑8:30pm. Big Book Meeting, New Ha‑ ven, Congregational Church, Village Green, 7:30‑8:30pm. Discussion Meeting, Brandon, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Rte 7 South, 7:30‑8:30am.

A LC OH OLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 3 TUESDAY. 12 Step Meeting, Middlebury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. Daily Reflec‑ tion Meeting, Vergennes, Con‑ gregational Church, Water St. 7‑8pm. 12 Step Meet‑ ing, Middlebury, The Turn‑ ing Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. 7:30‑8:30pm. Spiritual Awak‑ ening Meeting, Middlebury, St. Stephen’s Church, Main St. (on the Green) 7:30‑8:30am.

A LC OHOLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 5 THURSDAY. 12 Steps and Traditions Meet‑ ing, Ripton, Ripton Firehouse, Dugway Rd. 7:15‑8:15am. Big Book Meeting, Middle‑ bury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. Alternating Format Meeting, Ferrisburgh, Assembly of God Christian Center. Route 7, 7‑8pm. Speaker Meeting, Middlebury, St. Stephen’s Church, Main St. (on the Green) 7:30‑8:30pm.

A LC OH OLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 7 SATURDAY. Dis‑ cussion Meeting, Middlebury, United Methodist Church, North Pleasant St. 9‑10am. Discussion Meeting, Mid‑ dlebury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. 10‑11am. Beginner’s Meeting, Middle‑ bury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. 6:30‑7:30pm.

MAKING RECOVERY EAS‑ IER (MRE). Wednesdays, 1‑2 p.m. at the Turning Point Center (54 Creek Rd). This will be a facilitated group meeting for those struggling with the decision to attend 12‑Step Programs. It will be limited to explaining and discussing our feelings about the 12‑Step Programs to create a better understanding of how they can help a person in recovery on his/her life’s journey. A certificate will be issued at the end of all the sessions. Please bring a friend in recovery who is also contemplating 12‑Step Programs.

AL‑ANON FAMILY GROUP ‑ For families and friends of problem drinkers. Anony‑ mous, confidential and free. At the Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury. 7:30‑8:30 PM Friday eve‑ nings.

Addy Indy Classifieds are online: addisonindependent.

ALCOHOLICS ANONY‑ MOUS, 1 SUNDAY. 12 Step Meeting, Middlebury, United Methodist Church, North Pleasant St. 9‑10am. Came to Believe Meeting, Middle‑ bury, The Turning Point Ctr, 54 Creek Rd. 1‑2pm. Discussion Meeting, Bristol, Howden Hall, 19 West St. 4‑5pm. Women’s Meeting, North Ferrisburgh, United Methodist Church, Old Hollow Rd. 6‑7pm. 12 Step Meeting, Vergennes, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Park St. 7‑8pm. AA 24‑Hour Hotline 802‑388‑9284, www.aavt.org .

com/classifieds Services

Learn more about local volunteer opportunities! If you are 55 and older, contact RSVP @ 388-7044, rsvpaddison@ volunteersinvt.org or visit www.volunteermatch.org. Volunteers of any age can contact The United Way of Addison County’s Volunteer Center at www. unitedwayaddisoncounty.org and click on VOLUNTEER!

Services

Buy it! Sell it! Find it!

Check the Classifieds twice a week in the Addison Independent. Services

A LC OH OLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 4 WEDNESDAY. Big Book Meeting, Middle‑ bury, United Methodist Church, North Pleasant St. 7:15‑8:15am. Discussion Meeting, Middlebury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. 12 Step Meet‑ ing, Brandon, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Rte 7 South, 7‑8pm. 12 Step Meet‑ ing, Bristol, Howden Hall, 19 West St. 7‑8pm.

A LC OHOLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 6 FRIDAY. Spiritual Awakening Meeting, Middle‑ bury, St. Stephen’s Church, Main St. (on the Green) 7:30‑8:30am. Discussion Meeting, Middlebury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. Big Book Meeting, Bristol, Howden Hall, 19 West St. 6‑7pm. Discus‑ sion Meeting, Vergennes, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Park St. 8‑9pm.

RATES

Addy Indy Classifieds are online: addisonindependent.

com/classifieds

Services

Services

Services

Concerned, Committed Community Members Needed! Addison County Restorative Justice Services, Inc. is looking for concerned, committed community members to make a difference in the lives of individuals convicted of serious offenses. Volunteers will become part of a team that supports an offender who has been released from prison successfully re-enter the community through positive connections and encouragement. Additionally, by holding the offender, or core member, accountable to established expectations for community behavior, volunteers help interrupt the cycle of criminal offending. The commitment to do this work comes from our understanding that it is through relationships of compassion and accountability that those who have been damaging to others (often resulting from trauma) can change. Trained COSA volunteers work in teams of 3-5 and meet weekly with the core member and COSA Coordinator to support his/her return to the community. Those interested in volunteering can speak with a current volunteer about their experiences with the program.

NA (JUST IN TIME) Wednes‑ days, 9 am, held at The Turn‑ ing Point Center, 54 Creek Rd. NA MEETINGS MIDDLE‑ BURY: Fridays, 7:30 pm, held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd. NA MEETINGS MIDDLE‑ BURY: Sundays, 3:00 pm, held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd. OPIATE OVERDOSE RES‑ CUE KITS are distributed on Wednesdays from 9 am until 12 pm at the Turning Point Center of Addison County, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury, VT. A short training is required. For info call 802‑388‑4249 or 802‑683‑5569 or visit turningpointaddisonvt.org. OVEREATERS ANONY‑ MOUS (OA) big book meeting. Thursday’s, 5:30 pm, held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd.

For more information please call Tracy Corbett at 802-388-7189 or visit our volunteer site at: http://unitedwayaddisoncounty.galaxydigital.com/need/detail/?need_id=172234

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM • 25¢ per word • minimum $2.50 per ad • 50¢/issue internet listing • minimum 2 insertions Cash in on our 4-for-3 rates! Pay for 3 issues, get 4th issue free! Example: A 20-word ad is just $5.00. An ad placed for consecutive issues (Mondays & Thursdays) is run 4th time free. Cost is $17.00 for 4 issues includes $2.00 internet charge. (Special 4 for 3 rates not valid for the following categories: Help Wanted Services, Opportunities, Real Estate, Wood heat, Attn. Farmers, & For Rent).

Name: Address: Phone: Email:

ARE YOU BOTHERED BY SOMEONE’S DRINKING? Opening Our Hearts Al‑Anon Group meets each Wednes‑ day at 1:30 pm at Middlebury’s St. Stephen’s Church on Main St. (enter side door and follow signs). Anonymous and confi‑ dential, we share our experi‑ ence, strength and hope to solve our common problems. Babysitting available.

D E A D L I N E S Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

CATEGORIES Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost & Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities

Work Wanted Public Meetings** For Sale Help Wanted For Rent Want to Rent Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals

Spotlight with large ✓$2

** No charge for these ads

Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted Adoption

ADDISON INDEPENDENT 58 Maple St., Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

The Independent assumes no financial responsibility for errors in ads, but will rerun the ad in which the error occured at no charge. No refunds will be made. Advertisers will please notify us of any errors noted.

Number of words: Cost: # of runs: Spotlight Charge: Internet Listing: TOTAL:

$0.50


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 27

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Public Meetings

For Sale

For Rent

OVEREATERS ANONY‑ MOUS (OA) Monday’s at 5:30pm. Located at the Bris‑ tol Federated Church in the conference room, 37 North St., Bristol. Enter the church from Church St.

DEBBIE MEYER’S GREEN BOXES, food storage contain‑ ers. Never used. 20 containers with lids. $20. 802‑382‑9105.

CHARMING STUDIO APART‑ MENT in the heart of down‑ town Middlebury. Tile bath and kitchen. Available immediately. Baba, 802‑388‑6456.

PARKINSONS SUPPORT GROUP meets on the last Thursday of every month from 10 am to 11:30 am. We meet at The Residence at Otter Creek in Middlebury. For info call APDA at 888‑763‑3366 or parkinsoninfo@uvmhealth. org.

Services C&I DRYWALL. Hanging, tap‑ ing, skim coat plastering. Also tile. Call Joe 802‑234‑5545 or Justin 802‑234‑2190. CONSTRUCTION: ADDI‑ TIONS, RENOVATIONS, new construction, drywall, carpentry, painting, flooring, roofing, pressure washing, driveway sealing. All aspects of construction, also property maintenance. Steven Fifield 802‑989‑0009. PAINTING SEASON IS here. Wet Paint, interior and exte‑ rior quality painting. 30 years experience. References and insured. 802‑458‑2402.

3

PROFESSIONAL PAINTING; interior/exterior, residential/ commercial, pressure wash‑ ing. 20 years’ experience. Best prices. References. 802‑989‑5803. VALLEY HANDYMAN SER‑ VICE: electrical, plumbing, carpentry. Resolve projects and that honey‑to‑do list to‑ day. Property management upon request. Mowing, land‑ scaping, snow removal. Qual‑ ity workmanship and refer‑ ences. 802‑458‑2402.

Lost and Found

FOR SALE: LAZY BOY sec‑ tional sofa, excellent con‑ dition. Color blue, L‑shape. 10ftx8ft. Has both a recliner and sofa bed. Must pick up. Price: $100. Call 388‑8035. TERRA COTTA COLORED, food grade 55 gallon pickle barrels with spin‑off covers. Hundreds of uses. On sale for $25. each. 802‑453‑4235. THE BARREL MAN; plastic and metal barrels, 275 gallon food‑grade totes. 55 gallon plastic food‑grade barrels with spin‑on covers. Great for rain barrels. A barrel for every need. 802‑453‑4235. USED RESTAURANT EQUIP‑ MENT plus chairs, tables and hood systems. 802‑388‑4831.

For Rent 1,800 SQ. FT. WAREHOUSE commercial space. As is or renovate to suit. Creek Road, Middlebury. 802‑558‑6092. 2 BEDROOM CONDO‑ Coun‑ try Commons, Vergennes. 1 bay in garage. No pets. No smoking. $1,300/mo. plus heat and utilities. 347‑443‑1682. BRANDON: PARK VILLAGE is now accepting applications for 1, 2 and 3 bedroom apart‑ ments. Rents starting at $700, includes heat and trash. No pets. Laundry on site. Income restrictions apply. Call Summit Property Management Group at 802‑247‑0165 or visit our website, summitpmg.com.

For Rent

DRY, WINTER/SUMMER STORAGE SPACE in Addi‑ son. Available storage space in my barn for summer/winter storage. The barn is structur‑ ally sound and weather‑tight with electricity. No heat or running water. The barn is also available for lease. The entrance door measurements are 8’ wide by 7’ high. For more info: 802‑363‑3403 or rochon_m@yahoo.com. EXECUTIVE 1 BEDROOM APT with office (not a bed‑ room) in Brandon. Beautiful location, close to town. All brand new. Complete with all appliances: stove, refrigera‑ tor, microwave, dishwasher, washer and dryer; energy star rated. Long term lease. No smoking and no pets on property. $850/mo. plus utilities. Credit check, refer‑ ences and deposit required. 802‑352‑6678. FOR RENT: BRIDPORT, Commercial/retail office. 1,200 Sq. Ft. High traffic visibility. tbrought@middlebury.edu. FURNISHED APARTMENTS. BEAUTIFULLY furnished 1 and 2 bedroom suites in re‑ stored 1840 home. Private baths. 1 suite with private entrance and deck. Shared kitchen. Situated in stunning wooded area overlooking the Middlebury river and adja‑ cent to the National Forest. 5 miles to downtown Middle‑ bury. Included; utilities, wifi, w/d, parking. $800.‑$1000./ month. Security and refer‑ ences required. Call/text Su‑ san at 802‑989‑8941.

For Rent

FOUND ‑ SKIS AND poles. Mt. Philo area. Call 802‑233‑8012 and describe via voicemail.

Opportunities BEEKEEPING CLASS ‑ MAY 19‑20 in Lincoln taught by Ross Conrad. $120 fee in‑ cludes Natural Beekeeping book. Call 802‑349‑4279 to register. STOREFRONT LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION. In the heart of downtown Mid‑ dlebury. Approved for seat‑ ing for 24. Plenty of parking, lots of possibilities. Available September 1. Text only to 802‑373‑6456.

Newly Constructed Loft, One Bedroom and Two Bedroom Apartments in Downtown Middlebury Historic Building | Air Conditioning European Appliances, Quartz Countertops & Washer/Dryer Off-Street Parking | Pet friendly Walk to Middlebury College campus Short term leases available Contact: Christine Golden, Nedde Real Estate 802-373-5893 • battellllc@gmail.com www.BattellBlock.com

For Rent

For Rent

MIDDLEBURY 1 BEDROOM apartment. Close to college. $800/month plus deposit. Some utilities included. 388‑0401.

NEW HAVEN, VERMONT ‑ spacious 2nd floor, one‑bed‑ room apartment located on 12 private acres on the New Haven River. Includes bed‑ room, small office, living room, dining space, kitchen and full bath. Building is separate from main house. Small pond on property. Includes heat and electricity – shared laundry. Private driveway. Located only 5 minutes north of downtown Middlebury. Available May 15th. Can show after April 8th. Call for appointment and details – 2 days’ notice for showing, please. Pho‑ tos available. Monthly rental: $1095 Deposit $1095. No pets, please. No smoking. Call 802‑388‑0504 for ap‑ pointment and details or email: percival@madriver.com.

MIDDLEBURY 1, 2 AND 3 BR apartments available. All inclusive except internet/ TV. $1250. ‑ $1800. Call 802‑388‑4831. MIDDLEBURY 2 BEDROOM near downtown. Appliances, off street parking, lease. No pets. Real Net Management Inc. 802‑388‑4994. M I D D L E B U RY O F F I C E SPACE for rent. 400 sq.ft., second floor. Available Janu‑ ary 1, 2018. Contact Eric at 802‑388‑6054.

For Rent

MIDDLEBURY: RETAIL/OF‑ FICE space for rent. 1,303 square feet. Front door park‑ ing. Contact Eric at 388‑6054. (Countryside Carpet and Paint) NEW HAVEN, SUNNY, ef‑ ficient apartment. Views, hard wood floors. No pets, no smoking. References. $925/month plus utilities. 802‑236‑2040.

For Rent

BATTELL BLOCK MIDDLEBURY OFFICE SPACE FOR LEASE Beautiful, historic building located right in downtown Middlebury. Features heat and air conditioning, extra tall ceilings, lots of natural light and a highly customizable space. Walking distance to all downtown amenities. Available January 1st, 2018. $800/ Month gross including electric and heat. Contact Christine cgolden@neddere.com or 802-651-6888 Listed by Nedde Real Estate 747 Pine Street, Suite 501, Burlington, VT 05401 www.NeddeRealEstate.com

For Rent

3

MONKTON ‑ HARDWOOD FLOORS, tile bathroom and lots of natural light. Open floor plan with lg. bedroom and 1 full bath. Upstairs over prop‑ erty owners garage with high ceilings, open views, private entrance, parking and yard. Garbage,recycling, snowplow, and lawn inc, as well as gar‑ den space. Full laundry and well insulated. Tenant pays propane and electric. Deposit and 1 year lease. $1100 per month. 802‑598‑4105.

P.O. Box 156 • Vergennes, VT 05491 MIDDLEBURY, VT 2 BEDROOM APARTMENT Income Limits Apply. All basic utilities included except electricity. Modern apartment, carpet/tile/hardwood floors, laundry facility and elevator onsite. Covered parking garage. Includes trash, recycling, lawn care, snow removal, professional management and 24-hour emergency maintenance. References required. To request an application visit www.addisontrust.org, call (802) 877-2626 or email info@addisontrust.org Equal Housing Opportunity

For Rent

It’s against the law to discriminate when advertising housing Particularly on sites like Craigslist. And it’s easier to break the law than you might think. You can’t say “no children” or “adults only.” There is lots you can’t say. The federal government is watching for such discrimination. Let us help you sift through the complexities of the Fair Housing Law. Stay legal. Stay on the right side of the nation’s Fair Housing Law. Call the Addison Independent at (802) 388-4944. Talk to our sales professionals.

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONT’S TWICE-WEEKLY NEWSPAPER Middlebury, VT 05753 • (802) 388-4944 • www.AddisonIndependent.com

A Classified

ds (Publis

hed: 5/5/11

)

llege. For Rent Close to co TMENT furbished. OM APAR 1 BEDRO Middlebury, newly re 00. , 00 Main Street , includes heat. 000th ury $750/mon of Middleb T, EN mile north posit. 000-0000. TM rubbish, 1 OM APAR 1 BEDRO udes heat, electric, $595/month plus de cl ly, upstairs, in Available immediate nce on Route 7. and refere e m ho s. Deposit LE plus utilitie OM MOBI 2 BEDRO Private lot. $650/mo. . in Salisbury 0-0000. d. ces require required. 00 t. Referen ONDO HOUSE/C arage and basemen 00. N W TO M G O 2 BEDRO mons, Vergennes. heat. No pets. 000-00 d om Country C excluding utilities an o. washer, /m 00 ,0 $1 mpletely et, satellite, co , N ER peed intern e. Very energy MOD , i-s M H O e. O R us ne 2 BED ore ho frontag Lake Dunm drilled well, 85’ lake 29, 2009 through Ju 802-352-6678. furnished st h, us utilities. ened porc arting Augu dryer, scre 10 month rental; st tiable. $1,000/mo. pl r go efficient. Fo -smoking. Pets ne Non 26, 2010.


PAGE 28 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS For Rent

Wood Heat

Att. Farmers

ONE BEDROOM, FIVE‑STAR energy efficient apartment in Salisbury, close to Lake Dunmore. One half of duplex. Large bedroom with full bath up. Living room and kitchen with all appliances on first floor. Heated basement with W/D. Private sun deck. $850/ month, plus utilities. Abso‑ lutely non‑smoking, no pets on premises. Deposit and references required. One year minimum lease. Available 4/1/2018. Call 802‑352‑6678.

FIREWOOD. CUT, SPLIT and delivered. $210/cord seasoned. $185/cord green. 802‑282‑9110.

WHITNEY’S CUSTOM FARM WORK. Pond agitating, liquid manure hauling, drag line aer‑ ating. Call for price. 462‑2755, John Whitney.

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O N E R O O M , P R I VAT E bath, private entrance. New Haven, VT. $600/mo. Rent and $300 security deposit. 802‑453‑4525. PROCTOR, VT: $850 per month, 2 bedroom townhouse duplex, washer/dryer hook‑ ups. Parking, snow and trash removal included. Available early to mid April. Call Kathy 855‑1570 or Tony 855‑1531.

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SHOREHAM 2‑BEDROOM, 2nd floor apartment. 920 Square feet. Pine floors. Eat‑in kitchen. Huge living room. Propane heat & stove; electric hot water. Walking distance to elementary school. 20 min‑ ute ride to Middlebury. No smoking. No pets. Available April. $775/mo + utilities. 802‑388‑5411. WEST ADDISON: 2 STORY, furnished house on lakefront. Washer, dryer. No smok‑ ing. Available September through May. $1,000/month. 860‑878‑9580.

SIMPLY READY‑2‑BURN™ Everyday low prices; free delivery ‑ free kindling; sea‑ soned, clean, split, mixed hardwood. Small orders OK. Click www.MIDDMEN.com or call 1‑855‑MIDDMEN™.

Real Estate NEW 2018 ENERGY Star dis‑ play models, modular, double‑ wides and singlewides. Open 7 days a week. Beanshomes. com. 600 Rte. 7, Pittsford, VT. 1‑802‑773‑2555. tflanders@ beanshomes.com. REAL ESTATE FOR SALE. The building season is upon us. If you’re considering a new home you should look at our two remaining lots on East Middlebury’s Daisy Lane. This is an established residen‑ tial development with town water, nearby tennis courts, playground and only minutes away from the Snow Bowl and Lake Dunmore. Call Jack at 388‑2502 or 388‑7350.

Att. Farmers CORN SILAGE, SAWDUST at the farm. Book Bros. West Haven, Vt. Call after 7pm, 802‑265‑8698. FIRST CUT HAY for sale. Small square bales. Call 802‑349‑9281. FOR SALE‑JOHN DEERE 3950 chopper with 2 row head and hay head and Brillion 18ft spring tooth. Proctor, VT 802‑558‑8370. FOR SALE: KILN dried pine shavings and pine sawdust. Delivered in 50 cubic yard loads. Call and leave a mes‑ sage at 802‑623‑6731. HAY FOR SALE 4X4 round bales. Certified organic, first cut. Bump Farm, Orwell. 802‑948‑2946. HAY FOR SALE small first cut, $2.50. Small second cut, $3.50. 802‑377‑5455. LUMBER AT SAWMILL, hard and softwood, sawdust. Book Bros. West Haven, Vt. 802‑265‑3675. ROUND BALES BALEAGE for sale. First cut. Proctor,Vt. 802‑558‑8370.

Wanted LIONS CLUB NEEDS ‑ stuff for their annual auction. Please NO appliances or electronics. Call for pick up, 388‑7124. Help us, help oth‑ ers. TRUSTED 3RD GEN. VT Antique dealer specializing in jewelry, watches, silver, art, military, antique collectibles, etc. Visit bittnerantiques.com or call Brian at 802‑272‑7527. Consulting/appraisal services available. House calls made free of charge.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

ADDISON COUNTY COM‑ MUNITY Trust is seeking a full‑time Maintenance Techni‑ cian for our affordable residen‑ tial properties in Middlebury and Vergennes. Individual must be able to perform main‑ tenance & repair work, re‑ spond at odd hours, work with‑ in budgets & time constraints & maintain records. High School and minimum 3 years related experience, reliable transportation & insurance, valid driver’s license, clean driving record, your own hand tools & ability to move appli‑ ances & lift up to 100Ibs up or down stairs. For details visit addisontrust.org/news‑events/ maintenance‑tech‑opening. Cover letter and resume to: PO Box 156, Vergennes, VT 05491 or jobs@addisontrust. org. EOE.

BANKRUPTCY: CALL to find out if bankruptcy can help you. Kathleen Walls, Esq. 802‑388‑1156.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

3

EVERGREEN PRESCHOOL IS hiring a full time Teacher’s Aide for the 2018‑19 school year. Details: evergreenpre‑ schoolvt.com/teachers or contact Ashley Bessette at 877‑6702.

WANTED TO BUY: Food grade 275 gallon plastic totes, wholesale. 802‑453‑4235.

Help Wanted 802 FENCE IS hiring. We are looking for seasonal fence installers; experience a plus but willing to train. Solid, com‑ petitive wages. Must have a valid driver’s license/CDL a plus. Heavy equipment opera‑ tion a plus. Solid work ethic. Consent to background check. Please call 1‑802‑897‑5658 for more information.

Addy Indy Classifieds are online: www. addisonindependent.com/ classifieds

Help Wanted

HOPE has three new employment opportunities.  Resale Store Associate, 29.5 hours per week. Solid cash handling and customer service skills required. Warehouse Associate, 29.5 hours per week. Solid communication skills, ability to multitask. Duties include answering phone, assisting donors, cleaning, repairing, and more. Holiday Shop Coordinator, 20 hours per week . This new year-round position will include a variety of tasks,  beginning this  summer  with  assisting  at HOPE’s  reception desk, as well as  holiday program prep, including soliciting items needed for the Holiday Shop. In the fall, the job will shift to  focus solely on  managing the setup and implementation of the Holiday Shop. Strong interpersonal  and organizational skills required. To apply for one of these jobs, send resume and cover letter to  receptionist@hope-vt.org  or mail to  282 Boardman Street, Middlebury. Be sure to clearly indicate the position for which you are applying.

PT/NIGHTS & WEEKENDS We are seeking people with winning personalities and great attitudes to join our team. Part-time positions available with flexible scheduling. Must be willing to work nights & weekends. Part-time Cashiers & Deli Employees needed. Apply in person or pick up an application at: Maplefields –– Shoreham Service Center

Corner of Routes 22A and 74 • Shoreham, VT EOE

PRODUCTION KE Durasol Awnings, in Middlebury, is seeking a motivated individual to join our manufacturing team as a manufacturing associate. Qualified candidates should have a valid driver’s license, be familiar with electric handtools, be willing to work overtime, and have an aptitude for layout work. Experience in carpentry and welding a plus. We are looking for flexible, self-motivated individuals that have the character and integrity to thrive in a team-oriented environment. KE Durasol offers an excellent benefits package with wages commensurate with experience. Both full-time and seasonal candidates will be considered. Please apply in person or send your resume to KE Durasol Awnings, 38 Pond Lane Suite B, Middlebury, VT 05753. An equal opportunity employer.

TOWN OF MONKTON HIGHWAY ROAD FOREMAN The Town of Monkton is seeking qualified applicants for Highway Department Road Foreman. This position is to serve as the working supervisor of the Highway Crew and is responsible for day-to-day operations of the Highway Department. Experience in highway maintenance and repair, mechanical ability, record keeping and communication skills required. The position is fulltime, 40 hours per week, requiring a flexible schedule which may include nights, weekends and holidays, as well as overtime. Must have CDL, pass a drug test, and be dependable and willing to be on call during winter hours and live within 15 minutes of the Town Garage. Salary range of $55,000 to $65,000 depending on qualifications and experience. Full job description is available at Town Hall or online at monktonvt. com/road-foreman. For more information or to submit a resume please contact Sharon Gomez, Town Clerk at 802-453-3800, email TownClerk@monktonvt.com or mail at P.O. Box 12 Monkton, VT. 05469-0012


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 29

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

3

Monument Farms

DRIVER

Full-time Delivery Driver CDL-Clean Record Apply in person: 2107 James Road • Weybridge, VT 802.545.2119

FARM HANDY‑PERSON needed at our fruit and veg‑ etable farm, Brandon, VT. Seeking mechanically inclined individual. Job involves an ever‑changing range of activi‑ ties: shop work, maintaining equipment, light construction, tractor field work. Flexible part or full‑time depending on right applicant. Must be self‑motivated, reliable, have valid drivers license. Submit resume to: woodsmarketgar‑ den@me.com or email for an application.

Help Wanted

DR Power JOB FAIR! Wednesday, April 18th 2pm - 6pm 75 Meigs Rd. Vergennes, VT Seasonal positions in our Vergennes call center! Entry Level, full time On the spot interviews Paid holidays & time off

SIGN O BONUSN !

Product discounts! Questions? 802.870.1491 -orjobs@drpower.com

Can’t make it? Apply online!

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

TOWN HALL THEATER, the busiest little theater in Ver‑ mont, seeks an Executive Director. The ideal candidate will have five years’ senior management experience in the cultural sector, preferably in a performing arts venue. A degree in arts and/or business administration or equivalent experience in the field is de‑ sirable but not a prerequisite. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. Comprehensive benefits pack‑ age. Deadline for applications: Friday, April 27, 2018. For full job description: genovesevan‑ derhoof.com/opportunities/ executive‑director‑2/. To apply, submit a cover letter and re‑ sume with a list of references and salary requirements in confidence to: gvasearch@ gmail.com.

SUMMER GARDENING HELP NEEDED for Panton Ridge. Raking, mulching, planting and care of flowers and garden. Also, looking for lawn care maintenance. Full time. Drivers license a must. May call 802‑475‑2974 or 802‑363‑0082.

DENTAL OFFICE SEEKING per diem hygienist in Ver‑ gennes to fill in periodically. Please email your CV and availability to drcongalton@ yahoo.com .

WHISTLEPIG CURRENTLY HIRING FOR full time bottler. Eye for detail and accuracy. Flexible duties and hours Monday‑Friday. Be able to stand on feet for 8 hours a day with unassisted lifting of 25 pounds. Please send resume and 3 professional references to info@whistlepigrye.com.

THE LARGEST, FAMILY owned, Commercial Cleaning Company in Addison County is continuing to grow. We are looking to hire independent, self motivated and reliable in‑ dividuals who are able to work nights. All applicants must pass a background check. Ap‑ plications are available online at mrmikescleaningservicevt. com or in person at Mr. Mike’s Cleaning Service, Monday‑Fri‑ day from 9am‑3pm. $1,500 Sign on Bonus to eligible in‑ dividuals. RETAIL SALES STAFF‑ Looking for two friendly sales‑ people to work in a Vermont products/gift shop in Bristol Suites in downtown Bristol. Meet new people, help with re‑stocking and store displays. Hours would be generally from 2 to 6 pm three or four days a week, including some week‑ end hours. Approximately, 12‑16 hrs/week. Starting pay is $12/hr. Send resume to carol@wellsmountain.com.

3

GREEN MOUNTAIN ELEC‑ TRIC Supply is looking for a full‑time driver in our Mid‑ dlebury, VT store. Individual needs to have a current li‑ cense, a clean driving record, able to lift and/or move up to 50 lbs. and be self motivated. Please apply online at: gmes. com/careers.

www.chp.com/careers

Would you like to inform our community about an event? news@addisonindependent.com

email us:

Public Notices can be found in this ADDISON INDEPENDENT on this Pages 29 & 30.

Addison County Courthouse Ethan Allen Highway Storage (1) (1) Ferrisburgh (1) Addison Northwest School Dis‑ Middlebury (2) trict (1) Addison Rutland Supervisory Rutland Superior Court (1) Union (1) Vermont Agency of Transporta‑ tion (1) Cornwall (1)

ORWELL VILLAGE SCHOOL DISTRICT NOTICE OF SALE OF MUNICIPAL REAL ESTATE

Notice is hereby given to the legal voters of the Orwell Village School District, pursuant to 24 V.S.A. § 1061, that the Orwell Village School District (the “School District”) proposes to convey to the Town of Orwell (the “Town”) all of its right, title and interest in two (2) separate parcels of land located northernly of Vermont Route 73. The first parcel includes 1.21 acres of land, more or less, at 436 Main Street in Orwell, said parcel being the location of the Orwell Town Clerk’s Office, and being all and the same lands and premises conveyed to the School District by Warranty Deed of Lucy Wright Helmer, dated October 30, 1970, and recorded in Book 32, Page 312 of the Town of Orwell Land Records. The second parcel includes 1/27 acres of land, more or less, commonly referred to as the Orwell Town Green, and being a portion of the lands and premises conveyed to the School District by the Condemnation Order of the Orwell Town School District, dated September 30, 1961, and recorded in Book 30, Page 217 of the Town of Orwell Land Records. Said conveyance will have the following terms and conditions: Sale Price: $1.00 Terms: Warranty Deed delivered at closing Closing: As soon as practicable after May 17, 2018 [30 days from publication date] The property will be sold on the terms specified unless a petition objecting to the sale, signed by at least five percent (5%) of the legal voters of the Orwell Village School District, is presented to the Orwell Village School District Clerk within thirty (30) days to the date of publication and posting of this notice. If such a petition is presented, the School District shall cause the question of whether the School District should convey the real estate to the Town of Orwell on the terms set forth above to be considered at a Special School District Meeting called for that purpose, or at the next Annual School District Meeting. This is not a solicitation for bids, nore an offer to sell this real estate to any person on any particular terms or conditions. Dated at Orwell, Vermont, this 13 day of April 2018. Orwell Village School District By:Glen Cousineau Glen Cousineau, School Board Chair and Duly Authorized Agent 4/16

NEIGHBORS TOGETHER WEBSITE REDESIGN & DEVELOPMENT REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL

This RFP is for design and development services for a redesign of the website ExperienceMiddlebury.com, a site highlighting the attractions, businesses and events of the Middlebury, Vermont community. The current website, ExperienceMiddlebury.com was designed around the concept of attracting telecommuters and others to relocate to the Middlebury area. As our needs as a community have shifted in the last few years, so too has the targeted audience for the Experience Middlebury website. The site redesign needs to speak to an audience of both locals and tourists/visitors to the Middlebury area. Our budget for the web portion of this project for this project is $25,000-$35,000. All proposals that fall reasonably within this range will be considered and weighed based on their merits. Proposals that offer flexibility in billing for non-required elements added to the website after initial launch will also be considered, as we may be able to budget for additional funding for these additional website elements or ongoing marketing efforts in the next two fiscal years. All invoices for this project must be billed before August 15, 2018, per grant requirements. Please review the full RFP by visiting http://experiencemiddlebury.com/experiencemiddleburyrfp. All bids due by April 30. Contract will be awarded by May 9, 2018. Target completion date for website August 15, 2018. If you have any questions, please contact Karen at (802) 345-1366 or karen@ bettermiddleburypartnership.org 4/16


PAGE 30 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

Public Notices can be found on Pages 29 & 30.

NOTICE TOWN OF CORNWALL LAWN MOWING BIDS The Town of Cornwall is accepting bids for all town lawn mowing, which includes; 3 cemeteries, the town green, DAR building, land adjacent to the town hall and the athletic field on Peet Road. Bids will be opened at the Selectboard Meeting on Tuesday, May 1, 2018. For further information, please contact Sue Johnson, Town Clerk at 462-2775.

4/12,16

ETHAN ALLEN HIGHWAY STORAGE NOTICE OF SALE

REQUEST FOR PROPOSAL FOR LEGAL SERVICES

The Addison Northwest School District seeks proposals for services by qualified attorneys. This RFP is issued as part of a process to ensure that the District selects the firm that will provide a combination of the best services, at a fair and competitive price. All respondents agree, by submitting a response to the RFP, that the decision of the Addison Northwest School District is final. Addison Northwest School District, Vergennes, VT To include the following locations: Addison Central School Ferrisburgh Central School Vergennes Union Elementary School Vergennes Union High School For a bid packet, please contact JoAn Canning, Superintendent at 802-8773332 ext 101 or email at jcanning@ anwsd.org 4/16

TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY LADDER TRUCK FOR SALE

Here is notification of sale of property of Andy Neil – unit #197, Stephanie Morrill – unit #93 and Joy Alexander – unit #132 at Ethan Allen Highway Storage at 229 Ethan Allen Highway in New Haven, VT 05472. To be sold at public auction on April 28, 2018 at 9:00 am to the highest cash bidder. All sales are final. Unit must be broom cleaned. 4/12

The Town of Middlebury will receive sealed bids for the sale of its 1993 Pierce Ladder Truck. 13,279 miles, in excellent shape with the exception of an issue with the swivel in the waterway, which must be replaced in order to use the waterway. Complete specifications on the ladder truck are available on the Town’s website, www.townofmiddlebury.org. On the home page, go to Public Notices > Bids, Advertisements & RFPs. 4/16

TOWN OF FERRISBURGH NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ZONING BOARD OF ADJUSTMENT

A public hearing before the Zoning Board of Adjustment of the Town of Ferrisburgh will be held at the Town Clerk’s Office on Wednesday, May 2, 2018 to consider the following applications and other business: 6:00 PM Site visit for 18-015 (Town & Country Homes, Inc.), property ID # 15/01/06.1; 1908 U.S. Route 7 7:00 PM Approval of minutes from April 4, 2018. 7:05 PM Application # 18-015 (Town & Country Homes, Inc.) for a modular and mobile home sales lot; property ID # 15/01/06.1; 1908 U.S. Route 7; conditional use permit, continued from April 4 meeting. 7:25 PM Application # 18-020 (Thomas Sheeran) for a 26 x 24’ garage adjacent to existing barn; property ID # 04/01/28; 3078 Hawkins Road; conditional use permit. 7:35 PM Other business. The above applications are available for inspection at the Town Clerk’s Office. Persons wishing to appear and be heard may do so in person or be represented by an agent or an attorney. PLEASE NOTE: Participation in the local proceeding is a prerequisite to the right to take any subsequent appeal. Communications about the above applications may be filed in writing with the Board or at such hearing. 4/16

VERMONT AGENCY OF TRANSPORTATION PUBLIC NOTICE HERBICIDE SPRAYING

The Vermont Agency of Transportation (VTrans) has requested from the Secretary of Agriculture, Food and Markets, a permit to apply the following herbicides: Garlon 4 ULTRA, Garlon 3A, Oust Extra, Escort, Krenite S and Rodeo to control unwanted vegetation along all State highways and at State airports. Operations are authorized to start approximately May 14, 2018 but will not begin until the appropriate notification requirements are completed. The application will be made by certified pesticide applicators using mechanically controlled equipment and hand-controlled methods. The methods employed are intended to avoid or eliminate drift. Residents along the rights-of-way (ROW) are encouraged to protect sensitive environments or water supplies within 100 feet of the ROW limits. Residents should notify VTrans of the existence of any water supplies within 100 feet of the State’s ROW. Citizens wishing to inform VTrans are urged to contact the nearest District TransportationAdministrator as follows: District 1 - Bennington - (802) 447-2790, District 2 - Dummerston - (802) 254-5011, District 3 - Mendon - (802) 7865826. District 4 - White River Junction - (802) 295-8888, District 5 -Colchester - (802) 655-1580, District 7 - St. Johnsbury - (802) 748-6670, District 8 - St. Albans – (802) 524-5926, District 9 – Derby – (802) 334-7934. The contact person at the State Maintenance and Operations Bureau Headquarters is Jennifer Callahan, Stormwater Technician, Dill Bldg, 2178 Airport Rd – Unit A, Barre, VT, 05641, (802) 498-4947 or Jennifer.Callahan@vermont.gov. Contact can also be made using the VTrans Internet Webpage at www.aot.state.vt.us/maint/mainthome.htm The appropriate place to contact with comments, other than VTrans, is the Agency of Agriculture, Food and Markets, Agriculture Resource Management and Environmental Stewardship, 116 State Street, Montpelier, VT 05602, (802) 828-2431. The link to their web page that would describe the VTrans herbicide application permit request can be found at www.VermontAgriculture.com 4/16

STATE OF VERMONT RUTLAND UNIT, CIVIL DIVISION

VERMONT SUPERIOR COURT DOCKET NO: 192-12-16 ANCV

U.S. BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR IN INTEREST TO BANK OF AMERICA, NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE, SUCCESSOR BY MERGER TO LASALLE BANK NATIONAL ASSOCIATION, AS TRUSTEE FOR MERRILL LYNCH MORTGAGE INVESTORS TRUST, MORTGAGE LOAN ASSET-BACKED CERTIFICATES, SERIES 2006-FM1 v. GIOVANNI CAMALICH AKA GIOVANNI N. CAMALICH AND GINA CAMALICH AKA GINA G. CAMALICH FKA GINA G. BURTON OCCUPANTS OF: 5971 Snake Mountain Road, Weybridge VT MORTGAGEE’S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY UNDER 12 V.S.A. sec 4952 et seq. In accordance with the Amended Judgment Order and Decree of Foreclosure entered 8 in the above captioned action brought to foreclose that certain mortgage given by Giovanni Camalich and Gina Camalich to Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Fremont Investment & Loan, dated February 21, 2006 and recorded in Book 44 Page 419 of the land records of the Town of Weybridge, of which mortgage the Plaintiff is the present holder, by virtue of the following Assignments of Mortgage: (1) Assignment of Mortgage from Mortgage Electronic Registration Systems, Inc. as nominee for Fremont Investment & Loan to LaSalle bank, NA as Trustee for the MLMI Trust Series 2006-FM1 dated May 10, 2007 and recorded in Book 46 Page 74 and (2) Assignment of Mortgage from Bank of America, N.A. Successor by Merger to LaSalle Bank, N.A., as Trustee for the MLMI Trust 2006-FM1 to U.S. Bank National Association, as Trustee, successor in interest to Bank of America, National Association, as Trustee, successor by merger to LaSalle Bank National Association, as Trustee for Merrill Lynch Mortgage Investors Trust, Mortgage Loan Asset-Backed Certificates, Series 2006-FM1 dated June 28, 2016 and recorded in Book 52 Page 630, all of the land records for breach of the conditions of said mortgage and for the purpose of foreclosing the same will be sold at Public Auction at 5971 Snake Mountain Road, Weybridge, Vermont on April 25, 2018 at 10:00 AM all and singular the premises described in said mortgage, To wit: A CERTAIN PIECE OF LAND IN WEYBRIDGE IN THE, COUNTY OF ADDISON AND STATE OE VERMONT, DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS, VIZ: BEING ALL AND THE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES DESCRIBED IN A WARRANTY DEED DATED MAY 16, 1977, FROM GIOVANNI N. CAMALICH AND GINA G. CAMALICH, THE GRANTEES HEREIN, TO JAMES C. FOLEY, THE GRANTOR HEREIN, TO WHICH DEED AND THE DEEDS REFERRED TO THEREIN, REFERENCE IS HEREBY MADE FOR A FURTHER AND MORE PARTICULAR DESCRIPTION OF THE LANDS AND PREMISES HEREIN CONVEYED. THIS DEED. TOGETIIER WITH A COMPANION DEED. IS INTENDED TO EFFECT A TRANSFER OF TITLE FROM GINA G. CAMALICH, FORMERLY GINA G. BURTON, TO GIOVANNI N. CAMALICH AND GINA G CAMALICH THROUGH A STRAW. BEING ALI. AND TIIE SAME LANDS AND PREMISES DESCRIBED IN A WARRANTY DEED OF LEMON FAIR INVESTORS TO GINA G. BURTON, ONE OF THE GRANTORS HEREIN, DATED JUNE 10, 1975 AND RECORDED IN BOOK 20, PAGE 453 OF THE WEYBRIDGE LAND RECORDS, AND THEREIN DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: “BEING A PORTION OF THE SAME LAND AND PREMISES CONVEYED TO THE HEREIN GRANTOR BY WARRANTY DEED OF HELEN HIGHHOUSE, INDIVIDUALLY, AND AS EXECUTRIX OF THE ESTATE OF HENRY HIGHHOUSE DATED 12 NOVEMBER 1973, RECORDED IN BOOK 20, PAGE 256 OF THE WEYBRIDGE LAND RECORDS. THE PORTION HEREIN CONVEYED IS MORE PARTICULARLY DESCRIBED AS FOLLOWS: BEGINNING AT A POINT AT OR NEAR THE CENTERLINE OF VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY #23 WHICH POINT LIES S 41 DEGREES 41 MINUTES E 64.33 FEET FROM AN IRON PIPE SET IN WHAT IS BELIEVED TO BE TIIE WESTERLY EDGE OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY #23: THENCE PROCEEDING ALONG THE CENTERLINE OF VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY #23 IN AN ARC AS FOLLOWS: N 10 DEGREES 24 MINUTES W 98.49 FEET: N 03 DEGREES 18 MINUTES W 99.88 FEET: N 01 DEGREES 12 MINUTES E 99.68 FEET: N 10 DEGREES 12 MINUTES E 99.94 FEET; N 17 DEGREES 21 MINUTES E 100.00 FEET TO A POINT; N 24 DEGREES 18 MINUTES E. 100.07 FEET TO A POINT; N 27 DEGREES 25 MINUTES E 26.15 FEET TO A POINT; N 42 DEGREES 21 MINUTES W 33.77 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE SET IN WHAT IN BELIEVED TO BE TIIE WESTERLY EDGE OF TIIE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF VERMONT STATES HIGHWAY #23; THENCE PROCEEDING N 42 DEGREES 21 MINUTES W 34.43 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE SET IN WHAT IS BELIEVED TO BE THE EASTERLY EDGE OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF WEYBRIDGE TOWN ROAD #5: THENCE PROCEEDING N 42 DEGREES 21 MINUTES W 25.00 FEET TO A POINT WHICH IS BELIEVED TO BE THE CENTERLINE OF WEYBRIDGE TOWN ROAD #5; THENCE S 60 DEGREES 32 MINUTES W 79.34 FEET TO A POINT; THENCE N 37 DEGREES 28 MINUTES W 22.00 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE SET AT OR NEAR TIIE EDGE OF THE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF WEYBRIDGE TOWN ROAD #5: THENCE PROCEEDING N 37 DEGREES 28 MINUTES W 39.58 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE SET AT THE FENCE CORNER; TIIENCE PROCEEDING N 41 DEGREES 41 MINUTES W 894.07 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE PROCEEDING S 48 DEGREES 19 MINUTES W 387.00 FEET TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE PROCEEDING S 41 DEGREES 41 MINUTES E A DISTANCE OF 900.00 FEET CROSSING WEYBRIDGE TOWN ROAD #5 TO AN IRON PIPE; THENCE CONTINUING S 41 DEGREES 41 MINUTES E 499.81 FEET TO A POINT MARKED BY AN IRON PIPE SET IN A FENCE LINE WHICH PIPE IS ALSO SET AT WHAT IS BELIEVED TO BE THE WESTERLY EDGE OF TIIE RIGHT-OF-WAY OF VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY #23; THENCE PROCEEDING S 4I DEGREES 41 MINUTES E 64.33 FEET TO THE POINT OR PLACE OF BEGINNING. SAID PARCEL. CONTAINS 10.50 ACRES, MORE OR LESS, EXCLUSIVE OF ROAD RIGHTS-OF-WAY. IT IS BELIEVED THAT VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY #23 HAS A FOUR ROD RIGHT-OF-WAY, AND WEYBRIDGE TOWN ROAD #5 HAS A THREE ROD RIGHT-OF-WAY. ANY LANDS LYING WITIIIN THE AFORESAID RIGHTS-OF-WAY OF VERMONT STATE HIGHWAY #23 AND TOWN ROAD #5 ARE CONVEYED BY QUIT CLAIM ONLY, AND AS TO THEM THE HEREIN CONTAINED WARRANTIES DO NOT APPLY. THERE IS ALSO INCLUDED HEREIN THE RIGHTS TO THE USE OF A CERTAIN SPRING LOCATED ON OTHER LANDS OF THE HEREIN GRANTOR, INCLUDING, THE RIGHT TO [SIC] THE USE OF THE PRESENT PIPE LINE LEADING FROM SAID SPRING TO TIIE BUILDINGS SITUATE ON THE HEREIN CONVEYED PARCEL. INCLUDED WITH THE SPRING RIGHT IS THE RIGHT TO REPAIR AND MAINTAIN SAID SPRING AND THE PIPE LINE LEADING FROM IT, SUBJECT TO THE CONDITION THAT THE HEREIN GRANTEE, HER SUCCESSORS AND ASSIGNS SHALL RESTORE THE SURFACE OF ANY OTIIER LANDS OF THE HEREIN GRANTOR WHICH ARE DISTURBED BY ANY SUCH REPAIR ACTIVITIES TO THEIR ORIGINAL STATE.” SUBJECT TO RESTRICTIONS, RESERVATIONS. EASEMENTS, COVENANTS, OIL, GAS OR MINERAL RIGHTS OF RECORD, IF ANY. Reference is hereby made to the above instruments and to the records and references contained therein in further aid of this description. Terms of sale: Said premises will be sold and conveyed subject to all liens, encumbrances, unpaid taxes, tax titles, municipal liens and assessments, if any, which take precedence over the said mortgage above described. TEN THOUSAND ($10,000.00) Dollars of the purchase price must be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check at the time and place of the sale by the purchaser. The balance of the purchase price shall be paid by a certified check, bank treasurer’s or cashier’s check within sixty (60) days after the date of sale. The mortgagor is entitled to redeem the premises at any time prior to the sale by paying the full amount due under the mortgage, including the costs and expenses of the sale. Other terms to be announced at the sale. DATED: March 22, 2018 By: /S/Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Rachel K. Ljunggren, Esq. Bendett and McHugh, PC 270 Farmington Ave., Ste. 151 Farmington, CT 06032 4/2


Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018 — PAGE 31

Real Estate equal housing opportunity

Porter renovation

JOEL MILLER, REPRESENTING the Addison Respite Care Home (ARCH) board, presents a check for $65,000 to Ron Hallman from UVM Health Network/Porter Medical Center in support of the forthcoming renovation project at Helen Porter Rehabilitation and Nursing. The $900,000 project will result in a new ARCH suite and state-of-the art short-term rehabilitation unit.

All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 as amended which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or persons receiving public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-424-8590. For the Washington, DC area please call HUD at 426-3500.

Wallace Realty 48 Mountain Terrace Bristol, VT 05443 PH: 802-453-4670 • Fax 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: www.wallacere.com www.greenbuiltvermont.com

Kelly

Claire

Tom

Please call Kelly, Claire, or Tom

A U C T I O N S

Repos, Trades, Consignments, Donations & More!

Wednesday, April 18 @ 5:30PM (Register to Bid for Free from 3:30PM)

298 J. Brown Drive, Williston, VT

’09 Subaru Legacy ’08 Subaru Forester ’08 Jeep Liberty ’08 Ford Escape ’08 Chevy Impala ’08 Chevy Cobalt ’07 Subaru Forester ’07 Nissan Murano ’07 Jeep Grand Cherokee ’07 Ford F-150

’07 Chevy Impala ’07 Chevy Cobalt ’06 VW Passat ’06 VW Jetta ’06 Volvo V50 ’06 Subaru Legacy ’06 Subaru Impreza ’06 Jeep Commander ’06 Ford F-150 ’05 Subaru Forester

’05 Honda Odyssey ’05 Honda Civic ’05 Ford F-150 ’04 Volvo XC70 ’04 Honda Civic ’04 GMC Sierra 1500 ’04 Chevy Malibu ’01 Audi allroad quattro AND MORE! Subject to Change

EMAILED ADVERTISEMENT ADVERTISING INSERTION ORDER Sudoku Solution April 16 Thomas Hirchak Company From: Terra Keene Puzzle Solutions Phone: 800-634-7653 • advertising2@thcauction.com

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TO: Sue & Anna PHONE: 802-388-4944 COMPANY: Addison County Independent 1=2.0625; 2=4.25; 3=6.4375 FAX TO: 1-802-388-3100 TODAY’S DATE: 04/12/2018 NAME OF FILE: VEH_AI DATE(S) TO RUN: 04/16/2018 SIZE OF AD: 2x4

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ANNUAL SPRING MACHINERY CONSIGNMENT SALE 10AM SHARP - WEDNESDAY MAY 5, 2018 AT ACCS BARNS • RT 125 EAST MIDDLEBURY, VT

WE ARE ACCEPTING GOOD CONSIGNMENTS NOW!

FARM MACHINERY TRACTORS – BALERS – TEDDERS - HAYING EQUIP- WAGON PLOWS - BRUSH HOGS & MUCH MORE!! LAWN AND GARDEN ITEMS, LAWN MOWERS- MANY SMALL ITEMS TOO NUMEROUS TO MENTION! Les Rublee of Starksboro VT, Consignments (2) 500 HS Forage Wagon, one for 5230 International 4 w dr. w/ 700 7000 JD 4 Row Corn Planter parts bucket loader 8D984 Brillion Spring Tooth harrows (3) HS Steel Hay Wagons 185 Allice Chalmers 70 h 1312 Gehl Manure Spreader (2) Hay Elevators 185 Allice Chalmers 70 h 1500 Manure Spreader 1800 GAL JD Seeder JD B 1949 w/ saw 3 Bottom Plow JD plow FC 283TG Kuhn Mower 9ft (2) 718 New Holland chopper, one for Ford Back Blade 311 New Holland Hayliner Baler parts 28 New Holland Blower 370 International Disc Harrows 790 New Holland Chopper New Holland corn head 1 row Ford Side Mower 256 New Holland Rake P 400 Fertilizer (2) Sap Tanks GF5001THA Kuhn Tedder THIS IS A MUST SALE TO ATTEND! FOR MORE INFO. ACCS 802-388-2661 SALE MANAGED BY T.G.WISNOWSKI • WWW.ACCSCATTLE.COM

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ads@addisonindependent.com

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PAGE 32 — Addison Independent, Monday, April 16, 2018

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Monday, April 16, 2018  
Monday, April 16, 2018