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MONDAY EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 30 No. 39

Mystery of love on stage • Actors will read aloud a play about families this Saturday at Town Hall Theater. See Arts Beat on Page 10.

Seasonal fun on tap this weekend

• Middlebury will host WinterFest, including skating, movies, brews and more. See Page 2.

Road workers get new building

Middlebury, Vermont

Monday, February 11, 2019

36 Pages

$1.00

Church’s stained glass to get major makover City sidewalk upgrades also a part of St. Paul’s community service effort By ANDY KIRKALDY VERGENNES — St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Vergennes has two grants in hand to fund repair of the Main Street church’s three stained-glass windows that overlook the sidewalk across from the city green. The church also has successfully applied for a grant it hopes will move forward a joint sidewalk and landscaping project. Members of the downtown church’s Strategic Investment in Sacred Places committee are

optimistic both of those projects can be done this year. “We do hope that the sidewalk will be completed and that the windows will have at least started by the end of 2019,” said St. Paul’s committee member Sarah Stroup. Meanwhile the Strategic Investment committee is spearheading a larger vision for St. Paul’s, an 1834 church that sits on Main Street between Vergennes City Hall and the city’s central (See Windows, Page 28)

SARAH STROUP, LEFT, Sarah Cowan and Bo Price serve on a St. Paul’s committee that is coordinating efforts to repair three stainedglass windows and improve a sidewalk and landscaping outside the Vergennes church.

Independent photo/Andy Kirkaldy

• Construction has begun on a new Agency of Transportation garage. See Page 17.

Home cooking for Tiger hockey • Both the girls’ and boys’ teams hosted games Friday night as the season hits the home stretch. See Page 19.

Hangtime

MOUNT ABRAHAM UNION High School senior Shain Sargent races to the basket and goes airborne during Thursday night’s game in the Mount Abe gym. Commodores Ezekiel Palmer and Josias Salomao watch the Eagle fly. Read more about the game on Page 20.

Photos courtesy of Bill Clark

New faces take over boutique inn • A family that has purchased the historic Inn on the Green in Middlebury has plans for improvements. See Page 13.

Career Center offering voters no spending hike

Monkton teenagers make a splash with YouTube channel

By JOHN FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY — The Patricia A. Hannaford Career Center board next month will present county voters with a 2019-2020 budget proposal of $3,468,338, which reflects a $186 decline in total spending (compared to this year) for vocational and (See Career Center, Page 7)

By CHRISTOPHER ROSS MONKTON — Anybody concerned about the “future of boys” should take a look at “No Refunds,” a vigorously playful and wonderfully messy YouTube channel created by three freshmen at Mount Abraham Union High School.

Inspired by “Saturday Night Live” and their favorite sports commentators, Monkton residents Jonny Armell, George Collette and (when he can make it) Tristan Parker head down to George’s mom’s basement every Tuesday afternoon, sit at a plastic conference (See Teens, Page 29)


PAGE 2 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

Middlebury WinterFest to provide four days of fun MIDDLEBURY — The town of Middlebury hosts a four-day WinterFest celebration with a diverse lineup of events slated to kick off on Thursday, Feb. 14. Middlebury College will add to the festivities with some events of its own during the same timeframe, beginning with the traditional Winter Carnival fireworks show on campus Thursday at 7 p.m. Here’s a schedule of the other WinterFest and college events, courtesy of the Better Middlebury Partnership:

Friday, Feb. 15, 5-7 p.m. Join family, friends and neighbors in a beautiful procession of light around the Otter Creek Falls. The Lantern Walk (6-7 p.m.) is a free, family friendly, do-it-yourself community event. Come early for a flatbread buffet at American Flatbread, from 5-6 p.m., with RSVP required. Tickets/reservations can be secured by logging onto tinyurl. com/yat5ufpf. Saturday, Feb. 16, 10:30-4:30 p.m. Winter crafts and movies. Drop

in to the Ilsley Library for a winter-themed story and make your own snow measuring stick, beginning at 10:30 a.m. Then, head over to the Marquis Theater for “Penguin Saturday” to enjoy a free showing of “Happy Feet” at 12:30 p.m., and then “March of the Penguins” at 3 p.m. Both movies will be shown in the cafe space and everyone seeing the two penguin movies can also enjoy a small popcorn for free. Saturday, Feb. 16, 4 p.m. Middlebury College’s ice show is called “Spotlight on Broadway” and will feature music from muchloved theatrical and movie musicals along with choreographed numbers by skaters of all ages and abilities. At the Kenyon Arena. Tickets available at the Middle-

bury College box office or at the door ($6 each). Saturday, Feb. 16, 6-8:30 p.m. “Brews + BBQ” at Otter Creek Brewing. A $15 cover (under 21 free) gets you five tokens to sample an assortment of OCB beers and barbecue, plus games, fire pits, photo booth and live music. Full portions also available for purchase. Park at 700 Exchange St, across the road from OCB. Sunday, Feb. 17, noon-4:30 p.m. WinterFest activities continue on Sunday at the new Middlebury College park (across from Shafer’s) with snow carving, music, food, activities, horse and wagon rides and more! Horse and Wagon rides will begin at 2 p.m. Head over to the Marquis Theater for a free showing

of the movie “Frozen,” beginning at 3 p.m., and enjoy a free small popcorn while you watch the movie. Sunday, Feb. 17, 2:30 p.m. A repeat performance of Middlebury College’s “Spotlight on Broadway” ice show. Tickets available at the Middlebury College Box Office or at the door ($6 each). Monday, Feb. 18, 10 a.m. to 4 p.m. Enjoy the first day of school break with free ice skating at Memorial Sports Center (with free rentals) from 10 a.m.-noon. Then head over to the Parks and Recreation facility on Creek Road for an afternoon of winter fun with sledding (bring your own sled), cocoa, music, and lots of winter games and activities.

Arts center identity is simplified College coins new acronym for space By CHRISTOPHER ROSS MIDDLEBURY — When people head out for a night’s entertainment at Burlington’s Flynn Center for the Performing Arts, they go to “the Flynn.” Farther east, when audiences attend events at the Hopkins Center for the Arts at Dartmouth College, they go to “the Hop.” And at Middlebury College, when we catch brilliant student acting in the Seeler Arts Studio or marvel at world-class chamber music in Robison Hall or thrill at performances in the Dance Theatre, we go to “the MAC.” Sure, the building’s full name is

the “Kevin P. Mahaney ’84 Center IDENTITY CRISIS This isn’t the MAC’s first nickfor the Arts,” and Middlebury College likes it that way, but with name. When the building opened in 14 syllables it’s a bit of a mouthful. 1992 it was called The college underthe Center for the stands that. “The major thing Arts. People called So you can just it the CFA. call it the MAC. In we did here In 2007 the CFA fact, the college is was get rid of was renamed for asking you, please, the ‘for’ and the Mahaney and to use the building’s ‘the.’ We kept the Kevin the acronym became new nickname, MCA — Mahaney which is an acronym important stuff, Center for the Arts. for Mahaney Arts though.” But by then Center. — Liza Sacheli “CFA” had stuck. “The major thing Further confusing the issue for we did here was get rid of the ‘for’ and the ‘the,’” said MAC director many people is that MAC actually Liza Sacheli, who announced the stands for more than one thing. It new nickname last month. “We describes not only the building itkept the important stuff, though.” (See MAC, Page 3)

Teens paid to learn about financial literacy MIDDLEBURY — Handling money is an important skill for youth as they grow towards adulthood, but it’s not one that’s usually taught in

school. To counter that Vermont Adult Learning (VAL) is holding a seven-week series of financial literacy

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workshops, called “Project Money,” for teens. Participants will not only learn all the ins and outs of money management but will actually be paid to do so. The workshops will be beheld every Tuesday, from 3:45 p.m. to 5 p.m., beginning Feb. 26 and ending April 9, at the Teen Center in Middlebury. The teen center is a standalone building off Mary Hogan Drive between the elementary school and the tennis courts. David Roberts and Natalie Riegle from VAL will facilitate the workshops. For each workshop completed, participants will receive $10, courtesy of a grant from the National Bank of Middlebury. If they complete all seven workshops, they will receive a kicker of $15 extras, earning $75 in total. During the seventh and final workshop, all participants will be helped to open their own bank account, if they do not already have one. For more information and to sign up for “Project Money” head online to middteens.org. For further information contact David Roberts on 802-735-0867 or cell 617-512-3894


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 3

MAC windows,” she said, some of them (Continued from Page 2) self, but also the organization that inside the building. “They show curates and promotes the perform- that the arts are a process, not ing arts inside the building. MAC just a product. On your way to a is also home to four academic performance, if you look through arts programs — theater, dance, these windows you can see for music and art history — which yourself the messiness of learning have classrooms and and of creative works faculty offices onsite. in progress.” In other words, we “This building Soon, you’ll also go to the MAC for has a lot of see 11-by-15-inch windows. They MAC events. window clings anOne thing MAC is show that nouncing that “The not, however, is the the arts are a CFA is now the museum. process, not just MAC.” The Middlebury THE MAC IS FOR College Museum a product. On EVERYONE of Art (MCMA) — your way to a Hopeful as she whose collection performance, if is that the MAC’s of several thousand you look through new nickname will objects ranges from these windows provide some instituantiquities to contional clarity, Sacheli temporary art and in- you can see has a more important cludes distinguished for yourself the message regarding collections of Asian messiness of her organization, one art, photography, learning and of that requires constant 19th-century Euro- creative works in reiteration: pean and American “We’re open for progress.” sculpture, and conbusiness for the en— MAC director tire community,” she temporary prints — is Liza Sacheli said. neither in nor of the MAC. Every year the “I sometimes think of the two MAC hosts more than 300 events organizations as conjoined twins,” that are open to off-campus folks. Sacheli said. “The museum has its Year over year, the audience agown building envelope and organi- gregates break down pretty evenly zation. It shares a lobby with the into three groups, she added: MAC,” she added, but it has its students; faculty, staff and alumni; own separate entry. and community members. GETTING THE WORD OUT “We’re really happy with those With the help of marketing numbers,” Sacheli said. “We love student interns, Sacheli plans to that mix.” broadcast the new nickname as Two upcoming MAC events will far and as widely as possible, es- appeal especially to the non-colpecially on social media. She also lege community, she pointed out. wants to make sure performing On Feb. 22, the Christian Sands arts patrons know where they are Trio will bring to Robison Hall its when they get there. fresh take on the entire language “This building has a lot of of jazz music.

ADDISON COUNTY

School Briefs Matt Becker of Bridport has been named to the president’s list at Miami University in Oxford, Ohio, for the fall 2018 semester. Ranked in the top three percent of Miami University student, the honor reflects his academic excellence, Becker is majoring in Mechanical Engineering. Alexis Ouellette of Middlebury has joined the ranks of local students who have received recognition for their academic work. Ouellete was named to the dean’s list at Emmanuel College in Boston the for the Fall 2018 semester. To earn a spot on the dean’s list, Emmanuel students must achieve a grade point average of 3.5 or higher for a 16-credit semester. Congratulations to Mary Lynch of Middlebury, who has been named to the University of Hartford dean’s list for Fall 2018. Lynch is a 2018 graduate of Middlebury Union High School

“Jazz always scores high in our community surveys,” Sacheli said. “It’s always had a broad appeal here.” Pianist Sands has been nominated for five Grammy Awards. On Feb. 28 and Mar. 1, the Ragamala Dance Company will present “Sacred Earth” in the Dance Theatre. Inspired by Kolam sand painting

and Warli tribal art, as well as the Tamil Sangam literature of India, “Sacred Earth” is “a singular vision of the beautiful, fragile relationship between nature and man.” “The dancers pay special attention to where their bodies are positioned,” Sacheli said. “Whenever I watch it I’m always struck by the intricate hand movements.

It’s as if their hands are themselves dancers.” Both of these events will be hot tickets, Sacheli said. For more information about the MAC visit middlebury.edu/arts/ mac. Reach Christopher Ross at christopherr@addisonindependent.com.


PAGE 4 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

A D D IS ON INDE P E NDEN T

Guest editorial Fund clean water, now! Editor’s note: This commentary has been signed by Vermont Natural Resources Council, Vermont Conservation Voters, Audubon Vermont, Vermont Chapter of the Sierra Club, Lake Champlain Committee, The Nature Conservancy in Vermont, Connecticut River Conservancy, Watersheds United Vermont, and Conservation Law Foundation.

These days, it’s nice to have issues we can all agree on – like the need for clean, safe water for all Vermonters. Unfortunately, clean water is not something we can take for granted in Vermont right now. More than 100 of Vermont’s rivers, streams, lakes, and ponds are impaired due to water pollution. Polluted waters are resulting in cyanobacteria outbreaks, beach closures, loss of property value, and damage to our outdoor recreation and tourism economies... Fortunately, House Speaker Mitzi Johnson and Senate President Pro Tempore Tim Ashe highlighted clean water funding as a top priority for the year, and Governor Phil Scott reiterated his commitment to long-term funding to restore and protect water quality in his budget address. For the past two years, water funding has been cobbled together from a variety of sources, but lawmakers have punted on implementing a stable, long-term solution. Much of the short-term funding runs out this summer, so it’s essential that we establish new, dedicated clean water funding before lawmakers leave Montpelier this year. Reports from the Vermont Treasurer and Agency of Natural Resources have estimated the cost of clean water obligations of at least $115-$156 million per year. A portion of these costs will fall to regulated entities, or will be addressed through federal funding, and some initial funding has been approved (from the property transfer tax, unclaimed bottle deposits, and general obligation bonds through the capital bill). Nonetheless, we are continuing to fall far short of meeting our state funding needs. We support the State Treasurer’s recommendation of a minimum, initial investment of at least an additional $25 million per year in state investments beyond what is currently funded to pay for clean water efforts... Now we need to all roll up our sleeves and work together to develop a funding plan that legislators will support, and the Governor will sign into law. A range of organizations who focus on promoting policies and investments that ensure clean, healthy waters for all Vermonters – the Vermont Water Caucus – developed a series of principles that we believe should be applied to any proposed water funding sources. A key principle is that funding sources must be stable and sufficient to meet our needs... Funding must restore our degraded waters and also protect our river and lakes from future degradation. We also believe that funding sources must minimize negative economic impacts on lowerincome Vermonters, who already bear a disproportionate burden of the consequences of contaminated water. In his budget address, Gov. Scott laid out a proposal to use a portion of the Estate Tax for clean water funding, while also reducing the number of individuals who would be subject to paying the Estate Tax. His plan also included using some General Fund money generated from the Property Transfer Tax, and other sources. While we appreciate the shared acknowledgement that we need to implement long-term funding, we are concerned that the administration’s proposal – by moving around existing funding sources – is creating a funding gap for other state priorities. Further, we are concerned about the volatility of the Estate Tax, which data show fluctuates significantly over time. We believe we need a new, stable, dedicated funding source for clean water. Further, lawmakers need to implement a mechanism to distribute clean water funds in a manner that successfully gets money on-the-ground to projects to clean up and protect waters across the state, with transparency and accountability for how those investments are helping achieve our clean water goals. We are glad Vermont lawmakers of all political stripes are emphasizing the need for long-term clean water funding. While they haven’t yet figured out the details, we look forward to hammering out these issues in the next few weeks and establishing a funding plan so we can refocus our efforts from raising the money, to putting Vermonters to work implementing clean water projects across the state.

ADDISON COUNTY

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Keep on truckin’

THE JANUARY THAW headed back into the February deep freeze last week, and cars on Addison County roads just kept on making tracks.

Independent photo/John S. McCright

Letters to the Editor Sweden using market to reduce use of plastic bags On a recent trip to Sweden I was introduced to their very effective method of dramatically limiting the use of plastic bags and removing their use from the psyche of Swedes. Plastic bags are available only for items that absolutely need

them. Paper bags are purchased like any other item at the store and are extremely expensive on purpose. Reusable cloth bags are for sale at a deeply discounted rate being subsidized by paper bags. People naturally are motivated to carry cloth bags with them to the

store due to market forces. No new laws needed and plastic bags are largely a thing of the past due a thoughtful and intelligent process. Vermont should consider following suit. Anders Holm Portsmouth, N.H.

Health and hospice agency must act to retain staff In the late ’80s to the mid ’90s I had the honor of serving as executive director of Addison County Hospice (which then became Addison Volunteer Services which has recently joined

with ARCH to become End of Life Services). In my position, I frequently related professionally with the staff of the then called Addison County Home Health (which is now Addison County

Home Health and Hospice) who helped to train our hospice volunteers. To say that the staff and director of Home Health were devoted, (See Letter, Page 5)


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 5

UVM deserves support as an economic driver

By Stephen C. Terry UVM contributes $1.33 billion There is an urgent need for annually in direct and indirect ecoVermont to figure out how to nomic activity for Vermont. UVM develop ways the state can grow and its partner, the University of its declining labor force. Without Vermont Medical Center, are now the 10,000 new workers that we the state’s largest employer. need every year, between now and On an annual basis, UVM “im2040, to replace those leaving the ports” $136 million in grants and work force through retirement or contracts, mostly from out-of-state just leaving Vermont sources. Of the total for greener pastures, UVM student body of the state will continue nearly 13,400, over 90 on its slow economic percent of the graddecline. uates are employed, This week’s writer The warnings are or continuing their everywhere: our is Middlebury education in graduate state’s population is resident Stephen C. school within six stagnant; the median Terry, who has been months after graduage of the state’s a stalwart advocate ation. Importantly, residents is now the for a healthy 61 percent of in-state second oldest in the Vermont economy graduates and 26 nation at 42.6 years; and is a 1964 UVM percent of out-of-state and, with fewer wage graduate. graduates stay and earners, the cost of work in Vermont. This living in Vermont is rising, making is a meaningful way to build Verit increasingly difficult to invest in mont’s future workforce, assuming and support essential services. there are jobs available. AdditionEditorial writers and other ally, 33,614 UVM alumni live Vermont opinion leaders are now and work in the state and provide urging new strategies to create eco- a substantive educated foundation nomic development opportunities. upon which to build. Many of these Some, like Emerson Lynn, publish- graduates can and do contribute er of the St. Albans Messenger, sup- to Vermont’s educated work force port a proposal to radically revamp and many have built their own the Vermont Agency of Commerce businesses, employing others. and Community Development. It Yet, as far as state spending is his opinion, that the scatter-shot is concerned, higher education, efforts that we now do in the name which includes the Vermont State of economic development are not Colleges, was allocated only 1.52 productive. percent of the governor’s $6.1 The idea here is that by turning billion budget proposal. over the work of commerce to a On Monday, the chair of the non-governmental agency, all of UVM Board of Trustees, David Vermont’s diverse efforts at the Daigle, announced that it had regional and local level would be selected a sole finalist as UVM’s brought under one roof, with clear new president. He is Suresh Garigoals and accountability. mella, Ph.D., of Purdue University, Another idea is to make available the executive vice president for non-political and no-spin economic Research and Partnerships. data for policy-makers on a regular Professor Garimella will be in basis, so that they will keep their Vermont next week to meet faculty focus on rigorously measuring and state leaders. The Purdue proresults, and not making empty fessor of mechanical engineering promises. This is a goal of the is being recruited to replace UVM Vermont Futures Project, on which President Tom Sullivan, who will I serve as a board member. be retiring from that post in June, The Legislature’s two Appropri- after a very successful run of seven ations Committees are now poring years. over the details of Gov. Scott’s As president, Tom Sullivan Fiscal Year 2020 $6.1 billion State has been an articulate voice and Budget proposal. As it is budget steadfast advocate of UVM’s role time at the Statehouse, the time in creating a dynamic Vermont is ripe for their consideration of economy. Sullivan has also been innovative economic development a strong proponent of the liberal ideas and proposals. arts, too. It would appear the UVM There is not much visibility to trustees want to continue the role this important legislative work. of UVM as a positive force for the These meetings usually attract little Vermont economy in post-Sullivan or no media attention because of years. the often-tedious deliberations. I recognize that setting budget As a result, Vermont citizens must priorities is a key, and complex, job make their own effort to get behind for the Vermont Legislature. There the numbers. are many groups and other state My own view is that one of agencies advocating for their own the hidden economic engines for piece of the budget pie. That said, Vermont has been and still is the the Legislature should take a critiUniversity of Vermont. Some new cal eye to the governor’s fiscal year figures released this week by the 2020 budget proposal and should university tell a compelling story. advocate new investments in UVM UVM is a critical partner for because it is a powerful economic fueling the state’s economic future. driver for Vermont.

Community

Forum

Lawmakers continuing hard work

H.175 An act relating to prohibRep. Elder and our colleagues and I have been very busy. In these iting utilities from using eminent legislative updates, I will highlight domain for new fossil fuel infrajust a bit of what we’re working on. structure, legislature.vermont.gov/ Remember to sign up for email up- bill/status/2020/H.175. With constituent input, I dates at maricordes.org. am also in the process of Bills of interest: H.3 An act relating having two bills drafted to ethnic and social equity that address low-income studies standards for pubweatherization, and for lic schools, read it online a standardized voluntary at legislature.vermont. statewide energy labeling gov/bill/status/2020/H.3. process for buildings. H.39 An act relating Both bills include workto the extension of the force development. deadline of school district In my role on the House mergers required by the Health Care Committee: State Board of Education, We are currently taking legislature.vermont.gov/ stakeholder testimony Documents/2020/Docs/ by Rep. Mari Cordes, on Association Health CALENDAR/hc190206. Plans and a state IndiD/P-Lincoln pdf. vidual Mandate, both H.51 An act relating to having come about by fossil fuel infrastructure, legislature. federal rules changes that have had vermont.gov/bill/status/2020/H.51. a destabilizing impact on health care H.57 An act relating to preserv- markets. ing the right to abortion, legislature. Other: vermont.gov/bill/status/2020/H.57. 1. I was appointed to the House H.129 An act relating to a Discrimination Committee. universal, publicly financed pri2. In Vermont, legislators vote mary care program for Vermont, on the positions of UVM trustees, legislature.vermont.gov/bill/sta- as well as adjutant general for the tus/2020/H.129. Vermont National Guard. We have Bills that I am introducing: recently been very actively involved

Legislative Review

in interviewing the adjutant general candidates. I encourage you to become informed about the candidates as well. State Budget hearings: Monday, Feb. 25, 6-7 p.m. – The House and Senate Committees on Appropriations are seeking public input on the FY2020 recommended state budget and will hold joint public hearings at 6 locations across the state: Morrisville (People’s Academy High School), Rutland City (Longfellow School Building), St. Johnsbury (St. Johnsbury House), St. Albans City (St. Albans City School), Winooski (Community College of Vermont), and Springfield (Springfield Town Hall, 5:30-6:30 p.m. for this site). I encourage constituents to reach out to me by email or by phone, to attend our monthly forums, and to visit us in the statehouse. I am also happy to schedule time to meet with you face to face. Because of increased security risks over the past several years for elected leaders, it has been recommended to all legislators that we have a state-issued phone number. As soon as I get that number, I will publicize it. In the meantime, you can reach me at 802-828-2228.

Letter (Continued from Page 4) kind, skilled, resourceful, honest and underpaid is an understatement. They put their hearts into building a nonprofit agency every person in Addison County knew they could depend on for the highest level of care and

respect. Until now working people of our county were eager to work for this outstanding agency. Most managers of nonprofits around here understand that their staff is their most valuable resource. The only authentic way for the board of Addison

County Home Health and Hospice to begin to make up for this experiential brain drain and hurt feelings of long devoted staff is to take immediate action. Barbara Deal Bristol


PAGE 6 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

Obituaries

ADDISON COUNTY

Doris Strong, 89, native of New Haven RUTLAND — Doris E. Strong 89, died Saturday, Feb. 2, 2019, in Rutland. She was born Aug. 12, 1929, in New Haven, Vt., the daughter of Arthur and Nina (Garvey) Kimball. Doris married Russell E. Strong, Sr. on April 8, 1946. She worked for the Brandon Training School for over 35 years. She was an avid Red Sox fan, enjoyed playing Bingo and loved her cat Tate. Doris is survived by her children Judith Litchfield of Texas, Barbara Brown of Rutland, Russell Strong Jr. of California, Richard Strong of Milton, Kathy Porter of Colorado and Cheryl Ryan of Rutland, by her eight grandchildren and 10 great-grandchildren. She was predeceased by Russell, her husband of over 60 years, her parents and her brother Chester Kimball of New Haven. The family would like to say a special thank you to the VNA and Hospice of Rutland who provided such excellent care and comfort, Doris’ aids Patty and Lyz, and her special confidant Francie. As well as a sincere thank you to the 5th floor nurses at Rutland Regional Medical Center. A graveside memorial service will

DORIS E. STRONG be held at a later date in the Vermont Veterans Cemetery in Randolph. Memorial contributions may be made to the Visiting Nurse Association and Hospice, Southwest Region of Vermont, 7 Albert Cree Dr., Rutland, VT 05701. Arrangements are under the direction of the Sanderson-Ducharme Funeral Home. Online condolences at sandersonfuneralservice.com.◊

Dirk Visser Sr., formerly of Panton OXFORD N.Y. — Dirk Visser Sr. went to be with the Lord on Dec. 28, 2018, after a long struggle with Parkinson’s disease. Born in New Jersey and graduated from Vergennes Union High School in 1978. He was a dairy farmer in Panton and New York. Survivors include his wife Retha Visser; his four sons, Dirk Jr. and

wife Hannah of Ohio, Frank and wife Karie and Louis and wife Kim in New York, and Ray and wife Kristina; 18 grandchildren; brothers Samuel and Jarrig, and sisters Rena, Trina and Frances. He was predeceased by his parents, Louis and Harriet Visser; three brothers, Sijbren, Frank and Raymond; and sister Jenny.

Snow goose hunting to start in March MONTPELIER — Vermont’s spring balance with their habitat and reduce snow goose hunt will be held from crop depredation.” March 11 through April 26 this year. During spring migration, snow geese Since 2009, the U.S. Fish and typically move through the Champlain Wildlife Service has annually issued Valley in late March and early April. a “Conservation Order” to allow the They usually pass through Vermont reduction of the population of migrat- fairly quickly in route to their spring ing greater and lesser staging areas along snow geese as well the St. Lawrence as Ross’ geese. The “This increase River Valley. They numbers of these (in snow geese) remain there for geese have grown about a month so high that they are has resulted before moving on destroying habitat for in damage to to their nesting themselves and other areas in the Eastern agricultural species. Canadian Arctic. “The breeding crops and marsh Eight other population of greater states in the snow geese has vegetation in Atlantic Flyway grown from approxi- staging and — Delaware, mately 50,000 birds Maryland, New wintering areas.” in the mid-1960s to Jersey, New York, — David Sausville, North Carolina, 877,000 birds today,” Vermont’s waterfowl Pennsylvania, and said David Sausville, project biologist Virginia — will Vermont’s waterfowl project biologist. hold a similar “This increase has Spring Snow resulted in damage to agricultural crops Goose Conservation Order in 2019. and marsh vegetation in staging and The Vermont 2019 Spring Snow wintering areas from Quebec to North Goose Conservation Order will Carolina. The Atlantic Flyway has occur statewide. The daily bag limit established a goal of 500,000 greater is 15 snow geese, and there is no snow geese to bring populations in possession limit. Waterfowl hunting

ADDISON COUNTY

regulations in effect last fall will apply during the 2019 Spring Snow Goose Conservation Order with the exception that unplugged shotguns and electronic calls may be used and shooting hours will be extended until one half hour after sunset. A 2019 Spring Snow Goose Harvest Permit is required and is available at no charge on the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department’s website at vtfishandwildlife.com/hunt. Hunters may also call the Essex Junction Office at 802-878-1564 to request a permit. Hunters will also need a 2019 Vermont hunting license (residents $26, nonresident small game $50), a 2019 Harvest Information Program (HIP) number, a 2018 federal migratory hunting stamp ($25), and a 2019 Vermont migratory waterfowl stamp ($7.50). Hunters can register with the Harvest Information Program by going to the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department website or by calling toll free 1-877-306-7091. Hunters who obtain a permit will be required to complete an online survey after April 12 and prior to May 23, 2019, whether they hunted or not. Hunters without access to the internet may obtain a copy of the survey by calling 802-878-1564.

Business News

Vt. company lands global contract CORNWALL — A Vermont-based manufacturer that does its design work in Cornwall recently won a contract with Bell Flight (formally Bell Helicopter) to supply avionics equipment on that company’s 407 helicopter. Green Power Monitoring Systems, of GPMS, sells to some of the biggest aviation companies, and it has a distinctly Vermont feel, according to company CEO Eric Bechhoefer. That

was particularly true with its recent contract win “The design was done here, the packaging/boxes are manufactured by Heco Engineering in Essex, the box/packaging coatings are done by GSP Coatings in Brattleboro, and the assembly/build in done at Microwire in Essex,” Bechhoefer said. “I’m a local business that has global reach.” GPMS makes Foresight MX HUMS for the Bell 407GX/GXP, a four-blade, single-engine helicopter used in civil aviation. The HUMS

(Health and Usage Monitoring System) software and hardware monitors mechanical and operational systems on the craft while it is flying and give predictive information to tell technicians when the bird needs to be services. It weighs less than nine pounds, including all hardware, cable, and mounting components. GPMS also supports industrial monitoring in both power generation and heavy manufacturing, Bechhoefer said.

Obituary Guidelines The Independent will publish paid obitu‑ aries and free notices of passing. Paid obituaries cost 25 cents per word and will be published, as submitted, on the date of the family’s choosing. Paid obituaries are marked with a “◊” symbol at the end. The Independent offers a free notice of passing up to 100 words, subject to editing by our news department. Photos with either paid obituaries or free notices cost $10 per photo. Obituaries may be emailed to obits@addisonindependent.com, or call 802‑388‑4944 for more information.

TRADITION

Where our Roots Are Planted. From humble beginnings based on affordable, trustworthy services, we have grown into a reliable resource your family can depend on. Rooted in our traditions, we stay firmly connected to the families we serve and the care we provide. We continue serving all faiths and all families in the only way we know how – by staying true to our heritage.

Sanderson-Ducharme Funeral Home 117 South Main St. Middlebury, VT • 388-2311 sandersonfuneralservice.com


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 7

Career Center

ADDISON COUNTY

(Continued from Page 1) tuition rate of $22,102. technical education for area students. It should be noted that not all of It’s the fourth year in a row the Career Center’s students are fullthat Career Center directors will timers; some rotate in from the three be pitching a budget reduction to high schools to take a specific class residents in the 17 Addison County or two. There are actually around communities that send students to 350 students taking Hannaford the career center. The Career Center courses Career Center serves this year, but all of the juniors and seniors part-time attendees in the Addison add up to 123 FTE, Northwest, Addison Peterson noted. Central and Mount Tuition costs Abraham union are based on a sixschool districts. semester average of “I would say it’s students attending a very fair budget,” the Career Center, said Career Center Peterson noted. Superintendent The Career Center, Dana Peterson. like most other “The primary focus public schools in the is on students state, is dealing with and their learning declining enrollment, opportunities.” and has been for While overall “I would say it’s a several years. The spending is pegged very fair budget. center’s enrollment to go down, the The primary focus has fluctuated from estimated tuition is on students a high of 153 during rate for enrollees is the fall of 2015, to a projected to rise by and their learning low of 111 during the opportunities.” roughly 3 percent. spring of 2017. The — Dana Peterson six-semester averages “Given what I know about other during the past four school districts throughout the years have been 134, 135, 128 and state, a 3 percent increase over the 123, respectively, according to previous year is very much in line, Peterson. if not below some of the others,” Through it all, career center Peterson said. “For a tech center, leaders have tried to “right-size” the that’s pretty good.” school’s staff and offerings to serve a The amount to be raised by smaller population. taxes next year is being forecast at Peterson said the career center last $1,633,752, based on a projection year lost around 4.5 FTE employees of around 123 full-time equivalent through retirements or departures, (FTE) students. That would translate in the areas of instructional, into a new Career Center tuition rate administrative support and student of $13,289, representing an increase support staff. The school hired of $390 per FTE student. The state is three new FTE workers, leaving scheduled to kick in another $8,813 approximately 1.5 FTE spots per FTE student, producing a total unfilled.

“We were able to build those savings into the operating budget for this year,” he said. Those savings, coupled with a reorganization of staff, have allowed the Career Center to expand its offerings — a trend expected to continue next year. The school launched a Computer Science program last fall, and will introduce a Construction Technology course this coming fall, according to Peterson. Why offer new computer science and construction technology courses? Because the private sector needs workers to fill job vacancies in those areas, Peterson noted. New programs are introduced based on industry demand and are subject to approval by the Vermont Agency of Education and a local program advisory board. The Career Center partners with local industry leaders to help shape course curricula, according to Peterson. The Career Center’s current course offerings include Industrial Design and Fabrication, Human Services, Automotive Technology, Diesel Power Technology, Medical Professions, Addison Repertory Theater, Culinary Arts, and Engineering and Architecture Design. There are 16 programs in all, as well as an adult education school, according to the career center website. Career center officials are hoping the budget is heartily endorsed by residents on Town Meeting Day, March 5. “I think our budget addresses not only what’s fair for taxpayers, but it’s striving to meet the needs of the Addison County and Vermont workforce,” Peterson said. Reporter John Flowers is at johnf@addisonindependent.com.

Emergency Medical Responder Course Bridport Firehouse Bridport, VT March 6th- April 27th 2019

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Contact Paul or Chuck for more information paul.miller@pwmiller.com or cwelchjr5@gmail.com

School Briefs

Keagan M. Dunbar of Middlebury, was recently named to the highly selective dean’s list at Colby College in Waterville, Maine, for outstanding academic achievement during the fall semester of the 2018-19 academic year. Dunbar is one of 538 Colby students —26 percent of the student body —

to qualify for the list. A member of the Colby Class of 2022, Dunbar attended Middlebury Union High School and is the daughter of John Dunbar of Saxtons River, and Julie Dunbar of Middlebury, Vt. Dunbar earned a semester grade point average of 3.77 or higher to be included the list.

Reader Comments

Here’s what one reader has to say about us! One reader from S. Burlington, VT writes: “Best newspaper in Vermont! Look forward to its arrival every week”

Quotes are taken from reader comments submitted with subscription renewals.


PAGE 8 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

communitycalendar

Feb

12

TUESDAY

Age Well senior luncheon in Vergennes. Tuesday, Feb. 12, 10 a.m., Vergennes Area Seniors Armory Lane Senior Housing, 50 Armory Lane, Vergennes. Doors open at 10 a.m. for bingo and coffee hour. VASA monthly meeting at 11:30 am. Meal served at noon of ham and cheese stuffed chicken breast, mashed potatoes, baby whole beets, wheat dinner roll and strawberry yogurt cake. Bring your own place setting. $5 suggested donation. 72 hours advanced notice required. Call Michelle to reserve 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. Free ride may be provided. Call ACTR at 802-388-2287 to inquire. Pottery Show opening reception and student sale in Middlebury. Tuesday, Feb. 12, 5:30- 7:30 p.m., Middlebury Studio School, 2377 Route 7. Featured artists are Danya Pirie, Leslie Kameny, Kathy Carpenter and Kathy Clarke. The group show displays a range of distinctive works including vases, lamps, mugs, tea sets, Buddhas and rabbits. Work will be available for sale through the end of February. Refreshments served.

Feb

13

WEDNESDAY

“Young Picasso” on screen in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 13, 11 a.m. and 7 p.m., Town Hall Theater, 68 S. Pleasant St. What made Picasso in the first place? The film takes a look at Picasso’s early years — the upbringing and the learning that led to his extraordinary

achievements. Tickets $13 adults/$8 student (includes $1 preservation fee) available at townhalltheater.org or the THT Box Office at 802-3829222, Monday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. Age Well senior luncheon in Shoreham. Wednesday, Feb. 13, 11 a.m., Halfway House, Route 22A. Doors open and meal served at 11 a.m. until all are served. Menu includes spaghetti and meatballs, garlic toast, vegetable and dessert. 72 hours advanced notice required. Call Michelle to reserve at 802-377-1419. $5 suggested donation does not include gratuity. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. Free ride may be provided. Call ACTR at 802-388-2287 to inquire. “If Beale Street Could Talk” on screen in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 13, 1, 4, 7, and 8:30 p.m., Marquis Theater, 65 Main St. The third film of this year’s SURJ series is based on the acclaimed 1974 novel by James Baldwin. Academy Award winner (Moonlight) Barry Jenkins wrote the screenplay and directed the film. “Story Sampler” in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 13, 1 p.m., Community Room, Ilsley Public Library, 75 Main St. A new approach for telling, hearing, and seeing stories, at the “Story Sampler” Tricia Allen, Priscilla Baker, Daniel Houghton, M’Ellen Kennedy, and David Weinstock will tell stories before a listening audience. If you would like to be a listener and provide responses to help shape future offerings, come by 12:50 p.m. Mary Oliver tribute in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 13, 4:30-5:30 p.m., Community Room, EastView at Middlebury, 100 EastView Ter. An informal gathering to share in the legacy of poet Mary Oliver. Free and open to all. More info contact End of Life Services at 802-388-4111. Book Club meeting in Bridport. Wednesday, Feb. 13, 7 p.m., Bridport Highway Department Conference Room, Crown Point Rd. at Short St. A discussion of “Transcription” by Kate Atkinson. All interested readers welcome. More info call 802-758-2858.

Feb

14

THURSDAY

Age Well senior luncheon in Vergennes. Thursday, Feb. 14, 10 a.m., Vergennes Area Seniors Armory Lane Senior Housing, 50 Armory Ln. Doors open at 10 a.m. for bingo and coffee hour. Program by People’s Bank: Senior Fraud Prevention Class – Don’t be a Scam Victim, at 11:15 a.m. Join us for pork and vegetable stew, four bean medley, buttermilk biscuit and pineapple tidbits at noon. Bring your own place setting. $5 suggested donation. 72 hours advanced notice required. Call Michelle to reserve 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. Free ride may be provided. Call ACTR at 802-388-2287 to inquire. “Nuclear Negotiations: Back to the Future?” in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 14, 3-4:30 p.m., Community Room, EastView at Middlebury, 100 EastView Ter. The latest in eight weekly sessions of the “Great Decisions” program, a national discussion program on world affairs. Facilitated by Middlebury College Professor Emeritus Nick Clifford with guest speaker George Jaeger. Free and open to the public. “Antarctica Birding Adventure” in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 14, 7 p.m., Community Room, Ilsley Public Library. For the first lecture in Otter Creek Audubon’s 2019 Cabin Fever Lecture Series, join Gary and Kathy Starr for a presentation of their birdGARY STARR SNAPPED these two Chinstrap pening adventure in Argentina, the guins when he and his wife, Kathy, traveled to AntarcFalklands, South Georgia and tica and other southern polar areas. Hear about their the Antarctic Peninsula. The locatrek and see more of Starr’s photos when the couple tions, history, wildlife and birds presents “Antarctica Birding Adventure” in Middlebury are all outstanding and many on Thursday, Feb. 14, at 7 p.m., Community Room, are captured with Gary’s photoIlsley Public Library, 75 Main St. graphs. All are welcome.

Penguins calling

Photo/Gary Starr

Feb

15

FRIDAY

ACLU in Vermont talk in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 15, 11 a.m.-noon, Community Room, EastView at Middlebury, 100 Eastview Ter. Join Vermont’s ACLU Director James Lyall when he discusses the ACLU’s current work in Vermont, including litigation and advocacy in defense of immigrants’ rights and ACLU’s campaign for a smarter, fairer criminal justice system. Free and open to the public. Bistro concert with Rick Hawley in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 15, 3:30-4:30 p.m., EastView at Middlebury, 100 Eastview Ter. Hear master pianist Hawley when he presents a program of love songs — mostly recognizable for sure — representing the decades so pleasing to us all. Free and open to the public. Photography exhibit opening and gallery talk in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 15, 5-7 p.m., Vermont Folklife Center, 88 Main St. An opening reception for “Ice Shanties: Fishing, People & Culture — Photographs by Federico Pardo; Interviews by the Vermont Folklife Center.” Come see this exhibition about the structures, people and culture of ice fishing seen through the lens of Vermont-based Colombian photographer Federico Pardo. A Vermont Folklife Center Vision & Voice Exhibition. WinterFest in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 15, 5-7 p.m., Riverfront Park, Marble Works. Join family, friends, and neighbors in a beautiful procession of light around the falls. The Lantern Walk from 6-7 p.m. is a free, family friendly, do-it-yourself community event. Come early for a flatbread buffet at American Flatbread from 5-6 p.m. RSVP required on the Eventbrite event page. The Light Show opening reception in Middlebury. Friday, Feb 15, 5-7 p.m., The Jackson Gallery, Town Hall Theater, 68 S. Pleasant St. Come see an exhibit of unique lamps and lanterns created by Vermont artists. The exhibit features artful and surprising choices of design and materials to decorate each source of illumination. More info at 802-382-9222 or townhalltheater.org or StudioPerdue.com. Knights in Italy spaghetti dinner in Bristol. Friday, Feb. 15, 5-7 p.m., St. Ambrose Parish Hall, 11 School St. Menu includes all-you-can-eat spaghetti with sauce, garlic bread, salad, beverages and dessert. All proceeds will go toward furthering the Knights’ mission of aiding the community in a variety of ways from Coats for Kids to the Special Olympics. Tickets $10 adults/$5 children 12 and under/$25 family. Wheelchair accessible. Daddy-daughter dance in Bristol. Friday, Feb. 15, 6-7:30 p.m., Holley Hall, 1 South St. Dress up and dance with your dad, stepdad, grandpa, or that special someone in your life. The evening will be filled with music, dancing, and games. Light refreshments provided. Tickets $25 a couple and $5 for family member. More info at BristolVtRec. com. “The Barber of Seville” in Brandon. Friday, Feb. 15, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music, 62 Country Club Rd. Barn Opera l the 2019 Season of Love with a unique production of “The Barber of Seville.” Come see this romantic and fun-filled opera. More info at barnopera.com or call Edna at 802-247-4295. New Century | New Voices: Carlos Simon, “Young Lions” in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 15, 8 p.m., Robison Hall, Mahaney Arts Center, 72 Porter Field Rd. Underwood Commission winner Carlos Simon presents a program of dynamic young composers of color. Free. More info at 802-443-3168 or middlebury.edu/arts.

Feb

16

SATURDAY

Green Mountain Club hike or snowshoe in Essex County, N.Y. Saturday, Feb. 16, Treadway Mountain, Pharoah Lake Wilderness. A moderate hike, 3.3 miles one way (6.6 miles round trip). Elevation gain 1,100 ft., crosses the frozen pond to Treadway trail and goes up from Putnam Pond State Campsite to great views at the open rocky summit, elevation 2240 ft. Begins with an easy walk that then climbs to summit. Views of Pharoah Lake. Carpooling from the Crown Point Bridge arranged. Call or email leader Barry Francis at 802-349-9206 or barryfrancis@gmavt.net for start time and carpooling. More activities at gmcbreadloaf.org.

Brendon P. Cousino Med47 fundraiser in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 16, 8:30 a.m.-4 p.m., American Legion, 49 Wilson Rd. Come to this indoor yard sale to raise money for this fund set up by the family of Brendon Cousino, who was killed in 2015. The funds awards scholarships to area tech students entering the trades and to first response groups in small, underfunded towns. Donations for yard sale accepted. More info contact Cindy Cousino at 233-8334. Pancake breakfast in Shoreham. Saturday, Feb. 16, 8:30-10:30 a.m., Shoreham Congregational Church, 28 School Rd. Enjoy blueberry pancakes with Vermont maple syrup, French toast, sausage, home fries, quiche and beverages. Tickets $8 adults/$4 children/$20 families. Bring a nonperishable item for the Food Shelf to help those in need. American Red Cross Blood Drive in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 16, 9 a.m.-2 p.m., Church of Jesus Christ Latter Day Saints, 133 Valley View Dr. A donation shortfall over the winter holidays is prompting the American Red Cross to issue an emergency call for blood and platelet donors to give now to prevent a blood shortage from continuing throughout winter and affecting patient care. WinterFest in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 16, 10:30 a.m.-4:30 p.m., Downtown. Winter crafts and movies. Drop in to the Ilsley Library for a winterthemed story and make your own snow measuring stick, beginning at 10:30 a.m. Then head over to the Marquis Theater for Penguin Saturday. Enjoy a free showing of “Happy Feet” at 12:30 p.m. and then “March of the Penguins” 3 p.m. Both movies will be shown in the cafe space and everyone seeing the two penguin movies can also enjoy a free small popcorn. “Cold War” on screen in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 16, 3 and 8 p.m., Dana Auditorium, 2356 College St. Cold War is a passionate love story between a man and a woman who meet in the ruins of post-war Poland. With vastly different backgrounds and temperaments, they are fatefully mismatched and yet condemned to each other. Free. “Spotlight on Broadway” ice show in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 16, 4 p.m., Kenyon Arena, Middlebury College, Route 30. The college’s annual ice show will feature music from best-loved theatrical and movie musicals along with choreographed numbers by skaters of all ages and abilities. Tickets $6, available at the Middlebury College Box Office or at the door. Fully accessible. Valentine’s dinner and dance in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 16, 5 p.m., VFW post 7823, 530 Exchange St. Bring your sweetie to this Roast Pork dinner then dance the night away with Triple (B) DJ. Doors open at 5 p.m., dinner begins at 6 p.m. Tickets $15 in advance/$20 at the door. Open to the public. Only 100 tickets available. RSVP by Feb. 9 at 802-388-9468. Bingo in Vergennes. Saturday, Feb. 16, 5:30-8 p.m., St. Peter’s Parish Hall, 85 S. Maple St. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., Bingo starts at 6 p.m. All cash prizes, 50/50 raffle. Refreshments sold. All proceeds to benefit the on-going efforts for cemetery improvements. King Pede card party in Ferrisburgh. Saturday, Feb. 16, 6:30 p.m., Ferrisburgh Town Hall and Community Center, Route 7. The evening begins with a sandwich supper and then on to the games. King Pede is a unique game that involves “tricktaking” techniques such as in Hearts and Spades or Pitch. A game of fun and skill. Come prepared to use your strategic thinking. “The Barber of Seville” in Brandon. Saturday, Feb. 16, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music, 62 Country Club Rd. Barn Opera l the 2019 Season of Love with a unique production of “The Barber of Seville.” Come see this romantic and fun-filled opera. More info at barnopera.com or call Edna at 802-247-4295.

Feb

17

SUNDAY

All-you-can-eat pancake breakfast in Addison. Sunday, Feb. 17, 7-11 a.m., Addison Fire Station, Jct. Routes 17 & 22A. Menu includes plain and blueberry pancakes, sausage, bacon, home fries, coffee, hot chocolate and orange juice. Tickets $7 adults/$5 kids under 12. Benefit of the Addison Volunteer Fire Department. Funds will be used


communitycalendar

to purchase equipment. More info at 802-759-2237. Champlain Valley Fiddlers in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 11 a.m.-5 p.m., VFW, 530 Exchange St. Jam session 11 a.m.-noon, noon-5 p.m. music and dancing. $3 donation. All fiddlers welcome. Refreshments available. WinterFest in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, noon-4:30 p.m., Downtown. Snow carving, music, food, activities, horse and wagon rides and more begin at College Park, across from Shafer’s at noon. Horse and wagon rides begin at 2 p.m. Then Head over to the Marquis Theater for a free showing of “Frozen,” beginning at 3 p.m. and a free small popcorn. Bingo for meat in Bristol. Sunday, Feb. 17, noon-4 p.m., American Legion, Airport Rd. A steak shoot open house, where winners receive prizes of meat (steak, chicken, pork chops, hamburger and bacon) rather than cash. Bring a friend that has never been to the steak shoots and get five free raffle tickets. Baskets and gift certificate raffles and roasts raffles. More info contact Sharon at 802-453-4381. “What They Had” on screen in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 2 p.m., Town Hall Theater, 68 S. Pleasant St. In this potent and touching drama, Bridget returns home at her brother Nick’s urging to deal with her ailing mother and her father’s stubborn reluctance to let go of their life together. Featuring exceptional performances from Hilary Swank, Michael Shannon, Blythe Danner and Robert Forster, director Elizabeth Chomko’s debut feature is very sure handed. The latest installment of the MNFF Winter Screening Series. Tickets $13. Bob Recupero plays in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 2 p.m., The Residence at Otter Creek, 350 Lodge Rd. Come hear some wonderful live music. Recupero plays a wide range of tunes including jazz from the 1930s & 40s, some standards and some fun sing-a-longs. Maybe a cowboy song or two. Part of The Residence’s Sunday Music Series. Free, open to the public, and fully accessible. RSVP to Pat Ryan at 802-388-1220 or pryan@residenceottercreek.com. “Spotlight on Broadway” ice show in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 2:30 p.m., Kenyon Arena, Middlebury College, Route 30. The college’s annual ice show will feature music from best-loved theatrical and movie musicals along with choreographed numbers by skaters of all ages and abilities. Tickets $6, available at the Middlebury College Box Office or at the door. Fully accessible. Jazzou Jones plays ragtime in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 3-4 p.m., Community Room, EastView at Middlebury, 100 EastView Ter. Jazzou brings this vintage all-American music to life when his fingers touch the keys. Step back in time for some wonderful ragtime piano entertainment performed by one of America’s leading ragtime ticklers. Free and open to the public. “The Mystery of Love & Sex” staged reading in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 4 p.m., Byers Studio, Town Hall Theater, 68 S. Pleasant St. Middlebury Actors Workshop Cutting Edge Staged Reading Series, kicks off its 2019 season with this play by Bathsheba Doran, another boundarypushing play that speaks to our contemporary moment. Refreshments and a talkback follow the performance. Adult content: not recommended for children under the age of 16. Two free tickets to MAW’s April main stage production will be given away at this staged reading. $10 donation encouraged. “Connections: Natasha Koval Paden, Piano” in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 4 p.m., Robison Hall, Mahaney Arts Center, 72 Porter Field Rd. Koval’s program shows Debussy’s relationship with fellow composers Chopin and Liszt, focusing on compositions that reach beyond classical structures and journey into realms of color, tonality, and mood. Free. More info at 802-443-3168 or middlebury.edu/arts.

Feb

18

MONDAY

WinterFest in Middlebury. Monday, Feb. 18, 10 a.m.-4 p.m., Memorial Sports Center, 296 Buttolph Dr., and Middlebury Rec. Center, 154 Creek Rd. Enjoy the first day of school break with free ice

Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 9

Feb

Valentine vases and more

THE MIDDLBUERY STUDIO School is holding an opening reception and student sale for their latest Pottery Show on Tuesday, Feb. 12, from 5:307:30 p.m., at their studios at 2377 Route 7. The group show displays a range of distinctive works including vases, lamps, mugs, tea sets, Buddhas and rabbits. Work will be available for sale through the end of February.

Photo courtesy Middlebury Studio School

skating and skate rentals from 10 a.m.-noon. Then, head over to the Parks and Rec gym for an afternoon of winter fun with sledding (bring your own sled), cocoa, music, and lots of winter games and activities. American Red Cross Blood Drive in Brandon. Monday, Feb. 18, noon-5 p.m., Brandon American Legion Post 55, 55 Franklin St (Route 7 S). Call 1-800-Red-Cross (1-800-733-2767) or visit redcrossblood.org to schedule an appointment. Streamline your donation experience and save up to 15 minutes by visiting redcrossblood. org/rapidpass to complete your pre-donation reading and health history questions on the day of your appointment.

Feb

19

TUESDAY

Age Well Senior Luncheon in Vergennes. Tuesday, Feb. 19, 10 a.m., Vergennes Ares Seniors Armory Lane Senior Housing, 50 Armory Ln. Doors open at 10 a.m. for bingo and coffee hour. SASH Program 11:15 a.m. Meal served at noon of chopped beefsteak with mashed potatoes and gravy, peas and carrots, wheat bread and apple cake. Bring your own place setting. 72 hours advanced notice required. $5 suggested donation. Call Michelle to reserve 802-3771419. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. Free ride may be provided. Call ACTR at 802-388-2287 to inquire. Book talk in Brandon. Tuesday, Feb. 19, 7 p.m., Brandon Public Library, 4 Franklin St. Meet and discuss “Midwives” by Chris Bohjalian. Spencer Prize in Oratory: Grand Championship in Middlebury. Tuesday, Feb. 19, 7:30 p.m., Robison Hall, Mahaney Arts Center, 72 Porter Field Rd. Champions from Atwater, Brainerd, Cook, Ross, and Wonnacott Commons square off in the annual Spencer Prize in Oratory for first-year students. This annual speaking competition awards $1,500 in prizes, including a $500 top prize. Free. More info at 802-443-3168 or middlebury.edu/arts.

Feb

20

WEDNESDAY

Age Well Senior Luncheon in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 20, 11:15 a.m., Middlebury Rec Center, 154 Creek Rd. Doors open at 11:15 a.m. for program TBD. Meal served at noon of chicken-n-biscuits, mashed cauliflower, spinach and oranges. Bring your own place setting. $5 suggested donation. 72 hours advanced notice required. Call Michelle to reserve 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. Free ride may be provided. Call ACTR at 802-388-2287 to inquire. “Memory Loss and the Creative Arts Part 2: Film and Discussion – ‘Iris’” in Middlebury. Wednesday, Feb. 20, noon, The Residence at Otter Creek, 350 Lodge Rd. Lunch and a film screening followed by a discussion with Luella Richer, expressive writing educator. The Oscar-winning film “Iris” shares an intimate and poignant portrait of the unconventional marriage and lifelong love of philosopher and novelist Iris Murdoch and her literary critic husband John Bayley. Free and open to the public. Fully accessible. RSVP to Pat Ryan at 802-388-1220 or pryan@residenceottercreek.com.

Feb

21

THURSDAY

Age Well Senior Luncheon in Vergennes. Thursday, Feb. 21, Vergennes Area Seniors Armory Lane Senior Housing, 50 Armory Ln. Doors open at 10 a.m. for bingo and coffee hour. Program by People’s Bank: Senior Fraud Prevention Class – Don’t be a Scam Victim at 11:15 a.m. Meal served at noon of BBQ pork, vegetable rice pilaf, broccoli florets, wheat bread and applesauce. Bring your own place setting. $5 suggested donation. 72 hours advanced notice required. Call Michelle to reserve 802-377-1419. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. Free ride may be provided. Call ACTR at 802-388-2287 to inquire. “Decoding U.S.-China Trade” discussion in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 21, 3-4:30 p.m., Community Room, EastView at Middlebury, 100 EastView Ter. The fifth of eight weekly sessions of the “Great Decisions” program, a national discussion program on world affairs. Facilitated by Middlebury College Professor Emeritus Nick Clifford with guests. Free and open to the public. Green Mountain Club Taylor Outdoor Adventure Series in Middlebury. Thursday, Feb. 21, 7 p.m., Champlain Valley Unitarian Universalist Society, 2 Duane Ct. Come hear speakers Jeff and Diane Munroe of Middlebury when they present “From Gletscher to Gipfelkreuze: Exploring the natural and cultural landscapes of the Alps.” More info contact Ruth Penfield at 802-388-5407 or ruthpenfield@gmail.com. Light refreshments. Accessible parking at Middlebury Union High School. Free admission. Voluntary donations will benefit the GMC’s Education Fund. More activities at gmcbreadloaf.org.

Feb

22

an emerging jazz force to be reckoned with. Tickets $28 adults/$22 Middlebury College faculty, staff, emeriti, and alumni/$10 youth/$6 Middlebury College students, available at 802-443-MIDD (6433) or middlebury.edu/arts/tickets.

FRIDAY

Age Well Senior Luncheon at Rosie’s in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 22, Route 7 South. Doors open at 11:30 a.m., meal served at noon. Shepherd’s pie with mashed potatoes and vegetables, coleslaw, roll, gingerbread — 72 hours advanced notice required. Call Michelle to reserve 802-377-1419; $5 suggested donation does not include gratuity. Open to anyone age 60 and up and their spouse of any age. Free ride may be provided. Call ACTR at 388-2287 to inquire. Bistro concert with Connie and Chris in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 22, 3:30-4:30 p.m., EastView at Middlebury, 100 EastView Ter. Come hear Family Café guests Connie and Chris (bass, banjo, guitar, accordion, voice) when they perform songs and tunes with sing-alongs interspersed. Free and open to the public. Yamiche Alcindor speaks in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 22, 5 p.m., Mead Chapel, Middlebury College. PBS NewsHour White House correspondent Yamiche Alcindor will speak on “My Journey through Journalism: A perspective from PBS White House Correspondent.” Alcindor is also a political contributor to NBC News and MSNBC, and has worked as a reporter for USA Today and The New York Times. Alcindor has written mainly about politics and social issues. Christian Sands performs in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m., Robison Hall, Mahaney Arts Center, 72 Porter Field Rd. Come hear five-time Grammy Award nominee and Steinway artist Sands and his jazz trio. Not yet 30, Sands is

23

SATURDAY

Green Mountain Club hike or snowshoe in Weybridge. Saturday, Feb. 23, Bittersweet Falls, Hamilton Rd. Walk or snowshoe the TAM Blue Trail to Bittersweet Falls from the parking lot on Hamilton Road. 5.2 miles out and back, 2.5 hours. Mostly gentle slopes, good views of Snake Mountain and the countryside. More info contact leader David Andrews at 802-388-4894 or vtrevda@yahoo.com. More activities at gmcbreadloaf.org. Rummage Sale in New Haven. Saturday, Feb. 23, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., New Haven Congregational Church, Town Hill Rd. Held by the New Haven Ladies Union. Clothing and books only. More info call Carol at 802-453-5059. “The 20th Annual Animation Show of Shows” on screen in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 23, 3 an 8 p.m., Dana Auditorium, 356 College St. A showcase of 15 thought-provoking, poignant, and very funny animated shorts from around the world. Free. Richard Ruane and Beth Duquette in Brandon. Saturday, Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music, 62 Country Club Rd. Come hear this Vermont-based acoustic duo performing original music with a clear traditional-roots influence that is steeped in tradition, but of its own time. Concert begins at 7:30 p.m. Tickets $20. Pre-concert dinner available for $25. Reservations required for dinner and recommended for the show. Venue is BYOB. Call More info at 802-247-4295 or info@brandon-music.net. Jorge Martín & Friends on stage in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m., Town Hall Theater, 68 S. Pleasant St. Join the Opera Company of Middlebury for this premiere of operatic works by celebrated Cuban-American composer and Middlebury resident Jorge Martín. Martín will perform his works with tenor Brian Downen and mezzo-soprano Cherry Duke. A reception will follow the performance. Tickets $20/$30/$40 available at townhallteater.org, 802 382-9222, at the THT box office, Monday-Saturday, noon-5 p.m. or at the door, if available. Beaton/Plasse in concert in Bristol. Saturday, Feb. 23, 8 p.m., Walkover Gallery and Concert Room, 15 Main St. The second show of the Cabin Fever series will feature this Canadian fiddle duo. Tickets $15 in advance/and $20 day of show. For reservations call 802-453-3188 ex 2.

LIVEMUSIC Rick Hawley in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 15, 3:304:30 p.m., EastView at Middlebury. Twist of Fate in Middlebury. Friday, February 15, at 9 p.m., Notte. Carlos Simon in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 15, 8 p.m., Mahaney Arts Center. Bob Recupero plays in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 2 p.m., The Residence at Otter Creek Jazzou Jones in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 3-4 p.m., EastView at Middlebury. Natasha Koval Paden in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 17, 4 p.m., Mahaney Arts Center. Connie and Chris in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 22, 3:30-4:30 p.m., EastView at Middlebury. Christian Sands in Middlebury. Friday, Feb. 22, 7:30 p.m. Mahaney Arts Center. Richard Ruane and Beth Duquette in Brandon. Saturday, Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m., Brandon Music. Jorge Martín & Friends on stage in Middlebury. Saturday, Feb. 23, 7:30 p.m., Town Hall Theater. Beaton/Plasse in Bristol. Saturday, Feb. 23, 8 p.m., Walkover Gallery and Concert Hall. Moose Crossing in Middlebury. Sunday, Feb. 24, 2 p.m., The Residence at Otter Creek. See a full listing of

O N GO IN GEV ENTS in the Thursday edition of the

Addison Independent

and on the Web at www.addisonindependent.com


PAGE 10 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

‘The Barber of Seville’ in Brandon Feb. 15 and 16 Barn Opera announces its first 800-838-3006. The Brandon Music Center is production of 2019, Rossini’s comedic masterpiece “The Barber of located at 62 Country Club Road in Seville,” (sung in Italian with English Brandon. To learn more about this supertitles) at 7:30 p.m. on Friday, event or Barn Opera, contact Edna Feb. 15, and Saturday Feb. 16, at Sutton via email at barnopera@ brandon-music.net or at 802-247Brandon Music. After a successful first season, 4295. Barn Opera returns to the barn to “YOUNG PICASSO” AT stage a new concept production of TOWN HALL THEATER Pablo Picasso is one of the most Rossini’s work in the intimate venue of Brandon Music, with professional famous names in art history, his singers and piano. This new image and his art are everywhere, yet production will feature artists from few know the remarkable story of his rise to greatness. ”Young Picasso,” New England and beyond. The production and concept is part of Town Hall Theater’s Great Art directed and conceived by Nicholas Wednesdays series, takes an in-depth Tocci. A baritone who has appeared look at the journey of Picasso’s life with many regional organizations and traces his path to genius. The film in New England, Tocci, has been will be shown on Wednesday, Feb. instrumental in the creation of Barn 13, at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m. This detective story Opera. looks in detail at the Benjamin Robinson elements that drove one (Conte Almaviva) will small boy from southern be romantically joined Spain to such heights. by Mezzo-Soprano Three cities play a key Raphaella Medina role: Málaga, Barcelona (Rosina). Leading the cast by Greg Pahl and Paris. “Young will be internationally Picasso” explores each acclaimed conductor and illustrates why they and Barn Opera’s newly installed music director Maestro were so significant. In close collaboration with five Nicolas Giusti along with Vermont major European museums, “Young pianist Claire Black. The evening’s event will begin at Picasso” offers unique insight into 7 p.m., when guests will be invited the artist’s masterpieces at each of to partake in a glass of local beer or these remarkable institutions as well wine while waiting for the show to as additional insight from historians, curators, letters from friends and begin at 7:30 p.m. Invitations to attend the performance lovers and Picasso’s grandson Olivier will be delivered electronically to any Widmaier Picasso. The carefully crafted documentary person who makes a donation of $50 or more. There are no specific tickets was filmed over two years. While the available to the public and there is film includes two critical periods in extremely limited seating available as Picasso’s life — the Blue and Pink only the first 50 donors will be able to Periods — it also explores the years before those periods, which are, attend. Donations can be though much less well-known, made until Thursday, absolutely formative. The film Feb. 14, and can be culminates in New York, at made online via the Museum of Modern Art brownpapertickets where his “Les Demoiselles or by calling the d’Avignon” ticketing site has been on directly at permanent display since the 1930s. Painted by Picasso when he was just 25 years old,

arts beat

BEN ASH AND Becca Berlind are two of the actors performing a staged reading of “The Mysteries of Love and Sex” by Bathsheba Doran. The reading will take place in the Byers Studio at Town Hall Theater, 68 S. Pleasant St. in Middlebury on Sunday, Feb. 17 at 4 p.m.

Photo courtesy Middlebury Actors Workshop

“COLD WAR” TELLS the story of two lovers in post-war Poland in the 1950s. It screens at 3 and 8 p.m. on Saturday, Feb. 16, at Dana Auditorium, 356 College St. in Middlebury.

the painting is considered groundbreaking by the art world, yet at the time it was scorned and rejected. Tickets are $13/$8 students (includes fees) and may be purchased at townhallteater.org, by calling 802382-9222, at the THT box office (Monday-Saturday, noon to 5 p.m.) or at the door, if available. THE MYSTERY OF LOVE AND SEX AT THT “The Mystery of Love and Sex,” another boundary-pushing play that speaks to our contemporary moment, will take place on Sunday, Feb. 17, at 4 p.m. in the Byers Studio at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater. Middlebury Actors Workshop’s Cutting Edge Staged Reading Series kicks off its 2019 season and promises to heat up the room with this play by Bathsheba Doran. From the writer of HBO’s Boardwalk Empire and Showtime’s Masters of Sex comes a tender and funny story about love

in all its forms, and that blurry space between friendship, romance and erotic desire. “The Mystery of Love and Sex” is also about families — the family we are born into and the family we create. She’s white, he’s black. She’s Jewish, he’s Christian. Charlotte and Jonny, best friends since they were nine, are now exploring a more intimate relationship. What that means can be complicated — for them and for her parents who have their own issues. “The Mystery of Love and Sex” looks at secrets, race, the fluidity of identity and family dynamics. Directed by Rebecca Strum, the cast includes Geeda Searfoorce, Ben Ash, Alexis De Larosa and Becca Berlind; Frankie Dunleavy will read stage directions. A $10 donation is encouraged. Refreshments and a talkback follow the performance. Adult content: not

recommended for children under the age of 16. THE LIGHT SHOW AT JACKSON GALLERY A new exhibit of unique lamps by Vermont artists opens on Friday, Feb. 15, in the Jackson Gallery at Middlebury’s Town Hall Theater with a reception from 5 to 7 p.m. Emerging from the darkness of a chilly winter and in anticipation of the warmth and renewal of spring, The Light Show is an exhibit of unique lamps and lanterns created by Vermont artists. Among the group are Clay Mohrman, Kristian Brevik, York Hill Pottery artisans Elizabeth Saslaw and Susan Kuehnl and Cindi Duff. The exhibit features artful and surprising choices of design and materials to decorate each source of illumination. The exhibit will remain on display through March 24. The Jackson (See Arts Beat, Page 11)

BRIGHTEN UP YOUR week at the opening for The Light Show, an exhibit of unique lamps in the Jackson Gallery at Town Hall Theater on Friday, Feb. 15, from 5-7 p.m. THT is located at 698 S. Pleasant Street in Middlebury.

Photo Kristian Brevik


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of February 11

LEARN ABOUT PABLO Picasso’s earlier years when “Young Picasso” screens at Town Hall Theater, 68 S. Pleasant St. in Middlebury on Wednesday, Feb. 13, at 11 a.m. and 7 p.m.

Arts Beat Auditorium at Sunderland. It’s free. (Continued from Page 10) Gallery is in the lower level of the Some of the films in this series may Town Hall Theater located in the be inappropriate for children. center of Middlebury. Gallery hours PIANO RECITAL AT COLLEGE There will be a piano recital, are Monday through Saturday, noon to 5 p.m., and an hour before any “Connections,” by Natasha Koval public events in the building. For Paden in Robison Hall, at Middlebury further information call 802-382- College’s Mahaney Arts Center on Sunday, Feb. 17, at 4 p.m. 9222 or consult townhalltheater.org. The program shows Debussy’s INTERNATIONAL relationship with fellow composers FILM SERIES The 2018-2019 Hirschfield Chopin and Liszt, focusing on International Film Series continues compositions that reach beyond on Saturday, Feb. 16, at Middlebury classical structures and journey into College with the 2018 Poland/UK/ realms of color, tonality and mood. France film “Cold War,” directed by It’s free and the public is welcome. NEW CENTURY | NEW VOICES Pawel Pawlikowski. “Cold War” is a passionate love AT COLLEGE The series of performances, New story between a man and a woman who meet in the ruins of post-war Poland. Century | New Voices, continues at With vastly different backgrounds Middlebury College with “Young and temperaments, they are fatefully Lions” at 8 p.m. on Friday, Feb. 15, in Robison Hall mismatched and yet at the Mahaney Arts condemned to each Center. Underwood other. Set against the Commission winner background of the Cold Carlos Simon War in 1950s Poland, presents a program Berlin, Yugoslavia of dynamic young and Paris, it’s the tale composers of color. of a couple separated The performance is by politics, character free and the public is flaws and unfortunate welcome. twists of fate — an LIVE MUSIC impossible love story AT NOTTE in impossible times. There will be one live “Cold War” earned musical performance Pawel Pawlikowski the this week at Notte Best Director award at the 2018 Cannes Film NICHOLAS TOCCI Neapolitan Pizza Bar DIRECTS Barn Opera’s located downstairs Festival. The film, in Polish, opening production of at 86 Main Street in when French, German, 2019, Rossini’s “The Middlebury, Barber of Seville,” on Russian, Italian, and Friday, Feb. 15, and Twist of Fate takes to Croatian with English Saturday, Feb. 16, at the stage on Friday, subtitles, will be 7:30 p.m. at Brandon Feb. 15, at 9 p.m. For shown at 3 and again Music, 62 Country Club more information, call 802-388-0002. at 8 p.m. in Dana Rd., in Brandon.

ARIES: March 21-April 20. Spend more time daydreaming, Aries. Even though it may seem to run counter to being productive, you may actually find some inspiration to get things done. TAURUS: April 21May 21. You may not take the same path or go in the same direction as the masses, Taurus. But you find the finish line nevertheless. Keep on tracking your own trail. GEMINI: May 22June 21. A few blips on the radar may give you pause, Gemini. But no obstacle is going to keep you from your final goal this week. You are ready to forge ahead. CANCER: June 22July 22. No matter how much time you set aside, Cancer, you seem to keep playing catch up. You may need to realize that a few extra helping hands will make a lighter load of your tasks. LEO: July 23-Aug. 23. You can’t contain your excitement or keep a secret this week, Leo. Avoid seeking secrets because you might let the cat out of the bag and don’t want to disappoint. VIRGO: Aug. 24-Sept. 22. Do not try to take control of a situation on which you have a tenuous grasp, Virgo. Other things of greater importance require your attention. LIBRA: Sept. 23-

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Oct. 23. Domestic bliss describes your life at this point, Libra. You may have welcomed a new baby or pet into the family, and you are enjoying this new dynamic. SCORPIO: Oct. 24Nov. 22. Scorpio, even though you may have had to jump over many hurdles of late, you will come through stronger for having done so. SAGITTARIUS: Nov. 23-Dec. 21. A demand for your attention reaches a fever pitch, Sagittarius. You may not know what is spurring on this sort of popularity, but you are anxious to enjoy every minute of it. CAPRICORN: Dec. 22/-Jan. 20. Big changes are on the horizon, Capricorn. It could be a new job opportunity or maybe a relocation if you have been thinking of making a fresh start. AQUARIUS: Jan. 21Feb. 18. Aquarius, even though you may have to go out on a limb and out of your comfort zone, you may find that doing so gives you the fresh perspective you’ve been seeking. PISCES: Feb. 19-March 20. Pisces, ask someone to remind you of an important deadline, as you have been a little scatterbrained as of late. Don’t let this pass you by.

FAMOUS BIRTHDAYS FEBRUARY 10 - Chloe Grace Moretz, Actress (22) FEBRUARY 11 - Taylor Lautner, Actor (27) FEBRUARY 12 - Josh Brolin, Actor (51) FEBRUARY 13 - Robbie Williams, Singer (45) FEBRUARY 14 - Freddie Highmore, Actor (27) FEBRUARY 15 - Ross & Matt Duffer, Producers (35) FEBRUARY 16 - Elizabeth Olsen, Actress (30)


PAGE 12 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

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Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 13

Salisbury couple begins new era for Inn on the Green By JOHN FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY — Chris and Chelsea Griggs got their first taste of the hospitality industry a few years ago. They had purchased a “fixer-upper” on Lake Dunmore in Salisbury, which they lovingly rehabbed and began renting out to help subsidize their investment. But the experience turned into something much more than an income earning vacation rental. “We started meeting people, people from all different areas,” Chelsea Griggs recalled. “We had a book (at the lake house) and people would write messages about their stays. We started building these relationships with these complete strangers.” The Griggses were so inspired by that three-year experience that they decided to take their commitment as hoteliers to the next level — as the new owners of the Inn on the Green at 71 North Pleasant St. in Middlebury. Chelsea, 30, and Chris, 34, officially took the inn’s reins on Dec. 11, from former owners Bruce and Brenda Grove. The Griggses are looking forward to a long run as innkeepers, and will employ a staff of eight full- and part-time workers CHELSEA GRIGGS AND her to make sure guests have comforthusband, Chris, are welcoming able and memorable stays. new faces to Middlebury as the One of their employees, who’s new owners of the historic Inn on performed varied tasks at the inn for the Green, a 12-bedroom guestthe past 11 years, is Chelsea’s mom, house across from the Town Hall Wendy Martell. It was she who Theater. Independent photo/John Flowers provided the couple with some initial guidance while they were considering purchase of the Inn on the Green. which supports small business She’ll now be working for her entrepreneurs. “We had a great conversation and daughter, though the Griggses aren’t eventually found a way to make it quitting their respective day jobs. Chris owns East View Electrical happen,” she said. “We are full-on Services, an electrical contracting committed to welcoming guests for business in New Haven. Chelsea is what will probably be at least the front office manager for the Mount next 20 years of our lives. “It’s exciting.” Abraham Unified School District. They sold their beloved lake home The couple has a 5-year-old daughter named Emelia, and a 14-year-old to raise part of the capital to buy and black lab named Sadie. They live in renovate the Inn on the Green. Those renovations Salisbury, around have involved six homes away building a new, from the one they “We are full-on long-term-stay just sold. They both committed to unit into what serve on the Lake had historiDunmore-Fern welcoming guests cally been the Lake Association. for what will “innkeepers “We looked into apartment” on this place, and it probably be at the lower level was kind of like a least the next of the inn. The big dream,” Griggs new space is recalled for their 20 years of our equipped with first look at the inn lives.” a kitchenette with the prospect its own private of owning it. — Chelsea Griggs, owner entrance and is They gave being offered to themselves a year to plan for purchase and manage- clients who like to travel with their ment of the beautiful 216-year-old, pets. The addition of the new long-termfederal-style building that, true to its name, overlooks Middlebury’s town stay unit brings to eight the total green and sits comfortably across the number of guest rooms at the main inn building. An adjacent carriage road from Town Hall Theater. Chelsea spent the summer of 2018 house includes another four rooms. researching inns throughout New All the inn’s rooms are named after England, speaking with owners to the surrounding towns in Addison get a sense of the challenges and County. A fresh local breakfast is joys of the business. She liked what provided daily by the Middlebury she heard, and eventually spoke Bagel Bakery and delivered to each with an official at the Vermont room, according to Griggs, who Economic Development Authority, confirmed the inn is also offering a

hot breakfast option. Chelsea Griggs praised past ownership for being great stewards of the property. “The Groves did a wonderful job,” she said. “They ran a successful business for their entire duration here.” And the Griggses said they want to build on that success by partnering with other local businesses to allow Inn on the Green guests to get a taste of the community outside of their comfy rooms. For example, they’ve reached out to THT and Two Brothers Tavern to organize an interactive murdermystery game with dinner. “We’ve met with (THT Executive Director) Mark Bradley to see how we could build a stronger relationship, since we are right across the street from each other,” Griggs said. Other collaborations in place or in the offing include brew tours with Vermont Tasting Tours, guided flyfishing tours, guided hikes and snowshoe adventures. Inn clients can cash in on special deals for films shown

at the nearby Marquis Theater, wine tasting at Lincoln Peak Winery in New Haven, THT performances, and other local products and services. Guests receive a handout promoting local businesses and services, including Middlebury’s Dog Park off South Street. “We want to provide a Vermont experience,” she said. EXPANDED MARKETING The Griggses are using the Internet to expand their marketing efforts and are reaching out to organizers of special events — such as the Gran Fondo, Middlebury New Filmmakers Festival and Sodbusters horseshoe tourneys — to make sure attendees consider the Inn on the Green as a top place to stay while they’re in town. “The more people that we get right here, walking distance to downtown, the better off our stores and restaurants are going to be,” Griggs said. It’s a philosophy of entrepreneurial solidarity that will be more important than ever during the next three

years of at-times heavy construction on replacement of the Main Street and Merchants Row rail bridges. The Griggses have staked a considerable financial investment in their confidence they and other downtown Middlebury businesses will endure the challenges of the massive project and that the county’s shire town will emerge better than ever when the work has been completed in 2021. “We have a community that’s really coming together,” Griggs said. “Instead of looking at each other as competitors, we’re looking at each other as partners. That’s a great way to help each other move forward in a difficult time.” The couple is planning an open house for April 14 at which they will showcase the inn and some of its business partnerships. In the meantime, they’re getting great on-the-job experience as innkeepers. “We’re looking forward to welcoming new faces,” Griggs said. Reporter John Flowers is at johnf@addisonindependent.com.

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PAGE 14 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

Happy Valentines Day!

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Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 15

College launches master planning effort for its libraries Students, employees provide input MIDDLEBURY — A New York for more group-study space, more City architectural firm completed rooms for student collaboration, and a two-day site visit to Middlebury more quiet spaces. We are highly late last month in preparation for attuned to the way noise moves developing a master plan for the around inside Davis Family Library College’s Davis Family Library and and how students are affected by it,” Armstrong Science Library. Roy said. Representatives from Marble The architects also heard from Fairbanks met with dozens of faculty that there is “a great deal of Middlebury faculty, interest in active learnstudents, and staff to ing as a new mode of listen, observe, and There is “a teaching in which you take copious notes great deal of need to have highly about how the libraries interest in active flexible, reconfigusupport the academic rable spaces so people and study space needs learning as can work together in of students, and the a new mode small groups and then emerging research and of teaching reconvene again in a teaching space needs larger group,” Roy exin which you of faculty and staff. plained. The flexible The immediate need to have spaces, such as Wilson goal is to plan ahead highly flexible, Media Lab, have for the next 20 years, reconfigurable become very popular said Dean of Libraries locations. “We are Michael Roy. The spaces so fairly convinced, Armstrong Library, people can work although we are doing located inside Mc- together in small this study with Marble Cardell Bicentennial groups and Fairbanks to confirm Hall, opened in 1999, it, that our curriculum and the Davis Family then reconvene and the researchers Library, located on again in a larger who use our spaces Storrs Avenue, opened group.” would benefit from five years later in — Michael Roy having more of those 2004. flexible classrooms “Now is the right inside Davis Library,” time to take a holistic look at the Roy said. current uses of spaces within both Staff members who work inside libraries, and to create a multiyear the 135,000-square-foot main plan for making improvements,” Roy library — including stakeholders said. Rather than being reactive to from Media Services, Grants and the changes wrought by technology, Sponsored Programs, Instructional growth in the student body, and new Technology Services, and the Center pedagogies, Middlebury hired Mar- for Teaching, Learning, and Reble Fairbanks to help the college plan search — had opportunities to speak in a thoughtful way, the dean said. with the architects and make their The continued use of compact thoughts known. So too did the staff shelving, combined with the pos- of the Armstrong Library. sibility of reducing the number of Roy sees the development of a books, journals, and other physical master plan for both libraries as materials inside the library, has the first step in a multiyear process “given us the opportunity to rethink that will include the identification how we use space in the library, and of funding sources, the careful and how we can create more space for deliberative “deacquisition” of our future needs,” Roy said. no-longer-needed printed materials, “Conversations with students and the creation of designs and confirmed many things that we al- drawings. The final step, which ready knew. There is a strong desire could be as much as five years in

the future, will result in renovations what kind of resources they need, inside the footprint of the Davis and what adjacencies are important, Armstrong libraries. and what the emerging trends are In addition to the notes and im- for their teaching and research.” pressions Marble Fairbanks gath- She said students were quite forthered on campus Jan. coming as well about 14–15, the college “where they like to has provided the firm “We are highly study, how they use with floor plans, sur- attuned to the the building, where vey results and previ- way noise they like to sit, and ous reports on space how they like to work, usage in the libraries. moves around both individually and All members of the inside Davis in group settings.” Middlebury commu- Family Library The architect nity are encouraged continued: “This was and how to offer their input our general informaabout the libraries to students are tion-gathering time, Marble Fairbanks via affected by it.” a time for us to listen a Google document — Michael Roy hard to what people that can be accessed have to say about here. working in these The principals in the firm, Scott spaces and for us to look at every Marble and Karen Fairbanks, are nook and cranny in the buildings.” well acquainted with Middlebury, as Fairbanks, a cofounder of the their son, Lukas, was a member of firm, holds an endowed chair in the Class of 2017. architecture at Barnard College and Karen Fairbanks led the delega- is the department chair and a profestion making the two-day site visit to sor of professional practice within Middlebury, and said the firm had the Barnard + Columbia Colleges “productive sessions with faculty Architecture Program. about how they teach in the library, Marble Fairbanks is being assisted

on the ground by Middlebury sophomore Ben Johnson, an architectural studies student who is serving as an intern to the process. “Part of Ben’s brief is to watch closely how students use the library and talk to them about their preferences,” Roy said. “He is a great addition to the team because he has an easy rapport with fellow students and will share their perspectives with the team.” Formed in 1990, Marble Fairbanks has completed architectural projects for the New York Public Library, the Haverford College Library, the Hunter College Library, the Greenpoint (N.Y.) Library and Environmental Education Center, and several other libraries and academic buildings both in the U.S. and abroad. Middlebury selected the firm though an RFP (request for proposal) process that engaged 18 different architectural firms. The architects are expected to deliver a draft of the master plan to the College in April 2019. Editor’s note: This story courtesy of Middlebury College Communications.


PAGE 16 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

‘Steak Shoot’ Bingo set for Feb. 17 BRISTOL — American Legion Auxiliary of Bristol has organized a “Steak Shoot” for this coming Sunday, Feb. 17. You may ask yourself, what is a “Steak Shoot?” The short answer is, it’s Bingo, for meat. At the Steak Shoot, which will be held at the Legion Hall off Airport Drive in Bristol from noon to 4 p.m., players purchase one string for the day for $10 (you may switch your cards at any time in during the games.) The game administrators will play for 10 “Series.” Each series has four games to it, so there will be 40

chances to win. And the prizes will be steak, chicken, chops, hamburger or bacon. Participants may play as man strips as they want. There are three cards on each string. These are decks of cards that are all mixed up and on strings. If people bring in items that organizers call “freebies” then everyone will play a game for them as well. It’s fun; bring your friends and spend the day. There will be baskets and gift certificate raffles and roasts raffles. For more information call Sharon at 453-4381.

Bristol Beat

SUSAN BRUHL

BETSY KNOX

PATRICK REEN

Educators complete Leadership Project SHELBURNE — Three educators in the Mount Abraham Unified School District have graduated from the Snelling Center for Government’s Vermont School Leadership Project Monkton Central School Principal Betsy Knox, school district Director of Student Supports Susan Bruhl and Superintendent Patrick Reen joined 22 other educators from across the state in the Shelburne-based center’s Leadership Project. It is a unique program that offers intensive professional development for superintendents, principals, curriculum and special education

directors, as well as other education professionals who have proven leadership abilities and seriously aspire to leadership roles. The Class of 2018 embarked on their leadership journey in July 2017 and met for seven overnight sessions with a total of 18 seminar days before graduating in late 2018. Through theoretical discussions, experiential activities and personal reflection, Leadership Project participants considered and applied concepts related to leadership, education systems, organizational change and community. The final celebration for the Class of 2018 featured social

entrepreneur and educator Hal Colston as the keynote speaker. He inspired the group to remember to bring love into their work with students. Colston’s message highlighted the importance of their role and their work in not only the lives of students but also the needs of society. The Snelling Center for Government is a non-partisan, non-profit organization committed to fostering responsible and ethical civic leadership, encouraging public service by private citizens, and promoting informed citizen participation in shaping public policy in Vermont.

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BRISTOL — On Jan. 22 Bristol police arrested Caleb Newton, 23, of Bristol on an outstanding warrant for failing to appear in courts in both Chittenden and Franklin counties. Newton was transported to a holding cell at Addison Superior Criminal Court and is due to appear in Chittenden County court for a bond forfeiture hearing on Mar. 7. Between Jan. 14 and Feb. 3, Bristol police assisted Vermont State Police five times, Bristol Rescue Squad once, Bristol Fire Department once and Addison County Unit for Special Investigations twice. Officers in the Bristol department completed 46 foot patrols and more than eight hours of car patrols in various parts of town, some of which were part of the Governor’s Highway Safety Program. Bristol officers checked security at Mount Abraham Union High School 17 times, secured two unsecure buildings, processed 14 requests for fingerprints and verified one vehicle identification number. In other recent activity, Bristol

Bristol

Police Log

police: • On Jan. 14 started a property watch for a local resident. • On Jan. 14 checked an electronic device to verify it wasn’t stolen. • On Jan. 16 assisted with a vehicle unlock. • On Jan. 16 received a delayed report about a vehicle incident. • On Jan. 16 investigated a motor vehicle crash. • On Jan. 17 opened three truancy investigations. • On Jan. 17 investigated a report of disorderly conduct on social media and warned both parties to discontinue activity. • On Jan. 18 assisted a motorist with a disabled vehicle. • On Jan. 21 investigated a single-vehicle crash with no injuries. • On Jan. 21 assisted a motorist whose vehicle had slid off the road,

then provided traffic control during vehicle removal. • On Jan. 22 assisted a citizen with information and determined the incident had occurred in Vergennes. • On Jan. 22 investigated a report of suspicious activity and determined there were no issues or concerns. • On Jan. 23 investigated a motor vehicle complaint but was unable to locate the vehicle. • On Jan. 23 cited Ashley White, 20, of Starksboro for driving with a criminally suspended license. • On Jan. 24 facilited the return of a lost cellphone. • On Jan. 24 facilitated the return of a lost AAA card. • On Jan. 26 investigated a two-vehicle collision with no injuries on Prince Lane. • On Jan. 26, after receiving a complaint, stopped a vehicle and issued a ticket to the motorist. • On Jan. 28 investigated a stalking complaint and determined (See Police log, Page 17)


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 17

Bristol Beat

CBD Products Available! WORKERS HAVE BEGUN putting up the structural steel frame of the new six-bay Agency of Transportation District 5 garage off Route 17 about a half-mile east of Route 7. The $1.2 million building is due to be completed in May.

Photos courtesy of Wright Construction

Construction has begun on Route 17 state building NEW HAVEN — Workers from Wright Construction Company Inc. are spending the winter in New Haven constructing a new Vermont Agency of Transportation maintenance facility in New Haven. Construction began in late 2018 and is expected to continue through May 2019. The 8,400-square-foot, six-bay facility off Route 17 just east of Route 7 will be home to the District 5 maintenance crew and

replace the aging five-bay facility currently in use.

The $1.2 million facility consists of a structural steel frame with wood stud infill, membrane roofing and radiant floor heat. Wright Construction is no stranger to this type of project. This will be the third building for VTrans; it previously constructed new facilities in Wilmington and Chester. “It’s not often that we get to build the same building three times. With this being our third go around we

involving property damage on Main Street. • On Jan. 30, with funding from the Vermont Internet Crimes Against Children Task Force, presented technology-related information to parents. • On Jan. 31 started a property watch for a local resident. • On Jan. 31 investigated a threecar crash with property damage on

Prince Lane. • On Feb. 1 looked into a harassment complaint and determined that no action had risen to the level of an offense. • On Feb. 1 investigated a complaint involving an animal. • On Feb. 3 conducted a sobriety checkpoint on West Street, funded by Vermont Governor’s Highway Safety.

“It’s not often that we get to build the same building three times. With this being our third go around we know exactly what to do and how best to complete the project.” — Joseph Poston

know exactly what to do and how best to complete the project with a tight schedule and seamless project completion,” said Joseph Poston, CFO of Mount Holly-based Wright Construction.

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Police log (Continued from Page 16) that no action rose to the level of an offense. • On Jan. 29 investigated a citizen dispute and determined that no action rose to the level of a crime. • On Jan. 30 investigated a crash

Indoor yard sale to aid Cousino foudation effort BRISTOL — An indoor yard sale this Saturday will benefit a Bristol foundation set up in honor of a Bristol native who was killed in a July 2015 car crash. Proceeds from the Feb. 16 yard sale at Middlebury’s American Legion at 49 Wilson Road from 8:30 a.m. to 4 p.m., will go to the Brendon P. Cousino Med47 Foundation. The fund awards scholarships to local tech students entering trades and to small-town first-response agencies. Cousion attended the Patricia A. Hannaford Career Center, where he developed a passion for carpentry, and was a 2002 Mount Abe graduate. He was a member of the Richmond Rescue Squad at the time of his death, and had served on the Starksboro Rescue Squad before that. Donations are being accepted. Cindy Cousino may be reached at 233-8334 for information.

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PAGE 18 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

$7 million forestry grant applications now available MONTPELIER — Gov. Phil Scott and U.S. Sen. Patrick Leahy are encouraging Vermont communities struggling to overcome the decline in the forestry industry to consider applying for money from a new $7 million grant program that aims to

spur new economic opportunities. The NBRC (Northern Border Regional Commission) is seeking grant proposals through its newly launched Regional Forest Economy Partnership from governmental units and non-profit organizations across

the four-state region from New York to Maine, including Vermont. The grant program aims to address the economic shift produced by the consistent decline of the forest products industry that has contributed to the displacement of workers and

outmigration in the region. Through his work as vice chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee, Leahy directed the NBRC to support initiatives related to the forest-based economies and set aside a collective $7 million for this work.

“For generations, many communities across Vermont, northern New York and New England relied heavily on the economic benefits of the forest economy. But recent down-turns in wood markets have taken a toll,” Leahy said. “We need new solutions, new markets and sustained federal investment to ensure our rural communities can capitalize on new opportunities and retain their vibrancy. This new initiative will allow for demonstration for new wood products, such as mass timber construction, while also looking to help communities with critical needs such as closing the “We need digital divide.” new L e a h y solutions, i n c l u d e d new language in markets and the 2018 Farm Bill expanding sustained the Northern federal B o r d e r investment R e g i o n a l to ensure C o m m i s s i o n our rural territory to communities include every county in can Vermont. This capitalize new program on new will be the first opportunities NBRC grant and retain round open to c o m m u n i t i e s their across the vibrancy.” entire state of — Sen. Patrick Vermont. Leahy “As a competitive global market has put pressure on our forest-based businesses, Vermonters are doing great work to reinvent the forest economy. This includes investing in outdoor recreation, developing new forestbased products, like wood pellets for modern wood heat, and looking for ways to bring broadband and other modern infrastructure to rural communities,” said Scott, who is the state co-chair of the NBRC. “This federal-state partnership provides financial support to bring new ideas to scale.” Applicants may apply for up to $1 million if they can demonstrate that any one of four criteria are met: an industry change in employment due to a decline in the forest industry, a wage reduction, a mill closure in the past 20 years, or county level outmigration. The NBRC is encouraging applications that have a multi-state benefit. Interested applicants should go online to nbrc.gov/content/RegionalForest-Economy-Partnership for more information. The NBRC has announced multiple application rounds, with the first deadline for letters of intent on March 15. Created in the 2008 Farm Bill, the NBRC is a federal-state partnership with a mission to help alleviate economic distress and encourage private-sector job creation throughout portions of northern New England and New York. In Vermont it has funded 58 projects totaling $10.6 million.


SPORTS MONDAY

Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 19

BURR & BURTON GOALIE Lola Herzog flails at the puck but can’t stop the shot by Audrey Tembreull giving Middlebury a lead in the second period of the 4-0 home Tiger win on Friday. Independent photo/Steve James

Girls’ hockey runs streak to five games By ANDY KIRKALDY “We have some tough games left,” explained why. MIDDLEBURY — The he wrote. “It’s hard work, having good Middlebury Union High School But the Tigers, who have practices, and learning from each girls’ hockey team put the finishing freshmen and 8th-graders skating game,” Rollason said. “We’re touches on a 2-0 week on Friday regular shifts or at least spotting in, getting better every period. The evening by blanking visiting Burr & are playing well. Brush had to leave third period has been our strongest Burton, 4-0, behind strong defense immediately after Saturday’s win for the last few games.” and steady offensive pressure. a youth hockey gig, and assistants Robinson, who helps coach the On Monday the young Tigers had Duncan Rollason and Erin Robinson back line, praised the work on defeated the North Country/Lyndon cooperative squad, 4-3 in overtime, with the team’s only senior, Aleta Mathers, netting the extra-time game-winner. Mathers also scored twice on Friday to cap a big week. The Tigers have won five straight to improve to 9-5 and sit atop the Tier Two standings. But due to the set-up the hockey coaches agreed upon this season and Vermont Principals’ Association rules they will probably compete in the Division I playoffs. The coaches adopted a three-tier regular season format in which all 18 girls’ hockey teams will play each other at least once. Tiger Coach Matt Brush said in an email that plan successfully enhanced regular season play. But, he added, the VPA requires eight teams for postseason play, and with the Tigers atop the second tier (Stowe at 6-6-1 is in second), barring a late-season lull they look to be headed for the D-I, not the D-II playoffs. A BUNCH OF TIGERS celebrate Audrey Tembreull’s goal in the secBrush said nothing is set in stone, ond period of Middlebury’s home win over Burr & Burton. Independent photo/Steve James though.

Saturday the defenders — freshmen Carlisle Brush and Ryley Olsen, converted junior forward Merry Kimble and sophomore Audrey Schnoor made up the pairs. The Tigers allowed only eight shots on goalie Lydia Deppman in the shutout, while Brush picked up a goal and an assist. “I felt very good about the defensive effort tonight. The defense was en fuego,” Robinson said. “They were on fire tonight. They were communicating with each other. They were supporting the puck.” The defenders and Deppman did some of their best work in the first few minutes of Friday’s scoreless first period, as the Tigers took a few minutes to get settled in. Deppman made several sound position saves, and snatched one deflected puck out of the air. The Tigers began to turn the tide, and Taylor Moulton, Avery Gale, Mathers and Brush all created chances in the period. Bulldog goalie Lola Herzog made good mid-period stops on Mathers and Gale. The Tigers broke through with goals 12 seconds apart early in the second. Tembreull scored the first on a double deflection. Brush circled the net counter-clockwise and shot from between the circles. Isabella Pistilli first got a piece of the puck at the right side of the crease, and then (See Hockey, Page 21)

Girl’s hoop: Eagles top VUHS, OV earns split

ADDISON COUNTY — Mount Abraham won at Vergennes to headline local high school girls’ basketball action late last week. In other games Middlebury came up short and Otter Valley split a homeand-away series. EAGLES VS. VUHS At VUHS on Friday the Eagles outscored the Commodores by 10-3 in the decisive third quarter to earn a hard-fought road win. Chloe Johnston (14 points), Jalen Cook (13) and Cora Funke (10) provided the offense as the 14-2 Eagles won their 13th straight and maintained their lead in Division II. For the 7-8 Commodores, Brianna VanderWey notched 16 points and 12 rebounds, and Kate Gosliga contributed seven points and nine boards. TIGERS On Saturday North Country’s Mckenna Marsh led a balanced attack with 14 points as the 10-6 Falcons cruised past MUHS, 50-21. (See Basketball, Page 20)

ScoreBOARD HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Girls’ Hockey 2/6 MUHS at Hartford................ Ppd. to 2/19 2/8 MUHS vs. Burr & Burton.....................4-0 Boys’ Hockey 2/6 Rice at MUHS.............Postponed to 2/25 2/8 Rutland vs. MUHS..............................3-3 Girls’ Basketball 2/7 Hartford vs. OV...............................46-31 2/8 Mt. Abe vs. VUHS...........................47-41 2/9 North Country vs. MUHS................50-21 2/9 OV vs. Hartford...............................63-53 Boys’ Basketball 2/6 St. Albans at MUHS............. Ppd. to 2/23 2/7 Mt. Abe vs. VUHS...........................65-54 2/8 MSJ vs. OV.....................................52-36 2/8 MUHS vs. Enosburg.......................54-40 2/9 Missisquoi vs. Mt. Abe....................58-49 COLLEGE SPORTS Men’s Hockey 2/8 Williams vs. Midd................................2-0 2/9 Williams vs. Midd................................2-2 Women’s Hockey 2/8 Midd. vs. Colby...................................6-2 2/9 Colby vs. Midd....................................1-0 Women’s Basketball 2/8 Midd. vs. Hamilton..........................58-55 2/9 Amherst vs. Midd............................72-62 Men’s Basketball 2/8 Midd. vs. Hamilton..........................80-79 2/9 Amherst vs. Midd............................97-93

(See Schedule, Page 21)


PAGE 20 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

Boys’ hoop: Eagles beat rival VUHS; Tigers win

TIGER CAPTAIN Ben Turner has a close-up view as Cooper O’Brien’s shot beats Rutland goaltender Shailer Evans to give Middlebury the lead in the second period of Friday’s home 3-3 tie. Independent photo/Steve James

Boys’ hockey settles for tie in tough night

By ANDY KIRKALDY MIDDLEBURY — Friday was a difficult night for the Middlebury Union High School boys’ hockey team, as the host Tigers lost a twogoal third period lead in a 3-3 tie with last-place Rutland — and watched junior co-captain Kam Bartlett helped off the ice after he apparently was knocked unconscious in the first period. The good news was that Bartlett was talking and moving all his limbs after initially lying motionless after being checked into the boards. Tiger Head Coach Derek Bartlett left the Memorial Sports Center to monitor his son’s medical attention and reported the next day Kamrin had suffered no major injuries. The tie left the Tigers at 7-5-2 and in fourth place in Division I, with Rice (5-5-2) in fifth and South Burlington (5-6-1) in sixth. The Tigers were set to host Rice this past Wednesday, but that game was postponed until Feb. 25. The Tigers will visit South Burlington on Feb. 20, and their other four remaining games are against the teams above them in the standings. They are winless in their past five, including recent disappointing results against two weaker teams, Spaulding (a 1-1 tie) and Champlain Valley (a 6-5 loss in overtime). Assistant Coach Jim Derosia said the Tigers have struggled with injuries, losing sophomore Bode

Rubright to a longer-term issue vs. CVU and junior Hale Hescock with a one-game ailment vs. Spaulding. “We’ve got hit by the injury bug,” DeRosia said. “They’re all first- and second-liners, so we’ve been kind of

patch-working it together.” The Tigers also created some of their own problems on Friday against a 3-10-2 team they had earlier defeated, 7-1. In the second period three straight penalties left

them shorthanded for five minutes, and Derosia said the effort of killing them off took its toll. And the Raiders tying goal came from a Tiger giveaway. (See Tigers, Page 21)

ADDISON COUNTY — Mount Abraham topped visiting rival Vergennes to highlight boys’ basketball play late last week. In other games, Middlebury won at home, but the Eagles and Otter Valley lost on the road. EAGLES AT VUHS The host Eagles built on a 29-26 halftime lead to defeat the Commodores, 65-54, and snap a five-game losing streak. Liam Kelliher led four Eagles in double figures with 19 points. Shain Sargent and Logan Rodriguez tossed in 12 apiece, and Parker Hines contributed 11. Kevin Jackson poured in 26 points for the Commodores, who dropped to 3-11. On Saturday Ethan Creller poured in nine three-pointers and finished with 31 points for host Missisquoi as the 5-11 T-Birds knocked off the Eagles, 58-49. Kelliher tossed in 30 points, and Hines added nine as the Eagles dropped to 6-9. TIGERS On Friday the Tigers improved to 14-2 and remained in the top four in Division I by knocking off visiting Enosburg, 54-40. Parker Beatty led MUHS with 17 points, 18 rebounds, four assists and three blocked shots. Tyler Buxton added 10 points and three steals, Spencer Cadoret recorded 11 points and 11 rebounds, and Gabe Dunn chipped in five boards and four assists. The Tigers’ Wednesday home game vs. St. Albans was postponed until Feb. 23 at 12:30 p.m. OTTERS On Friday host Mount St. Joseph knocked off OV, 52-36, and leapfrogged them in the D-II standings. The 9-5 Mounties moved into fourth in a crowded field, while the 10-6 Otters saw a six-game winning streak snapped and fell into seventh. Logan Montilla scored 21 points to lead the Mounties, who took the lead for good in the second quarter, led by 25-18 at the break, and held the Otters to 18 points in each half. Tyler Rowe’s 12 points led OV, and Dylan Mackie added nine.

Basketball

MIDDLEBURY FORWARD Hale Hescock is surrounded by Rutland defenders as the Tigers looked for a winner in the 3-3 home tie on Friday. Independent photo/Steve James

(Continued from Page 19) Ivy Doran led the Tigers with nine points. OTTERS On Thursday visiting Hartford earned a 46-31 victory over the cold-shooting Otters. Leah Pinkowski’s 18 points were a bright spot for OV. Jay Jenkins led Hartford with 17. On Saturday at Hartford the Otters turned the tables on the Hurricanes, winning by 63-53. Livia Bernhardt poured in 24 points to spark the 5-10 Otters, a total Kennedy Mullen matched for the 3-13 Hurricanes.


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 21

Schedule

Tigers

MIDDLEBURY’S ALETA MATHERS celebrates after putting the puck in the back of the net for the Tigers’ second goal in Friday’s 4-0 home win over Burr & Burton. Mathers also tallied a goal in the third period. Independent photo/Steve James

Hockey (Continued from Page 19) Tembreull tipped it home at 2:11. Immediately after the faceoff Mathers picked up a loose puck inside the BBA blue line skated to her left around a defender, cut back to her right in front of the net and tucked the puck between Herzog’s pads to make it 2-0. Herzog held up for the rest of the period with 13 of her 22 saves, including good stops on Brush, Schnoor, Mathers (a glove save from the slot), and Gale (who hit Herzog’s helmet at 7:00). Early in the third Herzog stopped Mathers from the slot again, but couldn’t deny Brush shortly afterward. Brush, in the left circle, picked up a long rebound of 8thgrader Nyna Cole’s bid from the

inside of the right circle, skated leftto-right through the slot, and slid the puck back inside the left post. Herzog made a nice save on Anna McIntosh’s spinning forehand from the slot, but later couldn’t find Mathers’ blast through traffic from between the circles that wrapped up the scoring, with Gale assisting. Deppman made a strong stop on Bulldog Penelope Francomb with two minutes to go to preserve the shutout. On Monday against NVC/ Lyndon (7-7), Gale set up Mathers’ winning game-winning goal seven seconds into OT in the Tigers’ 4-3 win. Moulton scored twice for the Tigers, Camille Malhotra also found the net, and Deppman stopped 18 shots.

(Continued from Page 20) “We spent too much time killing penalties,” Derosia said. “And we just can’t do that. We run two, maybe three, lines, and every other shift they’re out there killing penalties and just burning up energy. So we’ve got to stay out of the box and (make) some better decisions.” The Tigers also fell behind quickly. Raider Noah Crossman picked up a loose puck at the Tiger blue line and broke in alone on MUHS goalie Jeffrey Stearns (18 saves) to make it 1-0 at 1:25. Raider Ryan Melen nearly made it 2-0 about a minute later, but Stearns deflected Melen’s point-blank bid over the bar. Then the Tigers countered. Hescock and Bartlett dug the puck out of the left corner of the Raider zone to Kolby Farnsworth, who streaked through the slot, and put it back inside the left post at 4:55. Thirty-four seconds later Bartlett went down, possibly from an uncalled cross-check, and both teams left the ice while he was attended to. Late in the period Stearns made two good stops on Raider captain Ben Simpson. The Tigers scored twice in the second to take the lead. Cooper O’Brien made it 2-1 at 1:57. Devon Kearns came out from behind the Raider net on the right side and shoveled the puck to O’Brien at the left post, and he flicked it high into the net. The Raiders skated from 6:52 to 1:52 on the power play, twice with five-on-three advantages, for 51 and nine seconds. Strong work by

MCTV SCHEDULE Channels 15 & 16 MCTV Channel 15 Tuesday, Feb. 12 12 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 7:30 a.m. Legislative Breakfast 9 a.m. Green Mountain Care Board 9:15 a.m. VT Digger 10 a.m. Selectboard 11:34 a.m. Bulletin Board 12 p.m. The Story Matters 12:30 p.m. Vermont State House 4 p.m. Congregational Church Service 7 p.m. Selectboard 10 p.m. Development Review Board (DRB) Wednesday, Feb. 13 2 a.m. Vermont State House 5 a.m. Development Review Board (DRB) 7:30 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 9 a.m. Energy Week 10 a.m. Selectboard, Vermont State House 5 p.m. Green Mountain Care Board 5:15 p.m. VT Digger 6 p.m. The Story Matters 6:30 p.m. Legislative Breakfast 8 p.m. Selectboard, DRB Thursday, Feb. 14 12 a.m. Green Mountain Care Board 5 a.m. Energy Week 6 a.m. Legislative Breakfast 7:30 a.m. Eckankar 8 a.m. Congregational Church Service 11 a.m. Green Mountain Care Board 11:15 a.m. VT Digger 12 p.m. Selectboard, Vermont State House 7:45 p.m. Bulletin Board 8 p.m. The Story Matters 8:30 p.m. Development Review Board Friday, Feb. 15 12 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 6 a.m. Green Mountain Care Board 8:15 a.m. VT Digger 9 a.m. FOCUS

10 a.m. Selectboard, DRB 4 p.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 5:30 p.m. Legislative Breakfast 6:48 p.m. Bulletin Board 7 p.m. Selectboard 9:30 p.m. On the Waterfront 10 p.m. Energy Week 11 p.m. Vermont State House Saturday, Feb. 16 5:30 a.m. Development Review Board 8:30 a.m. Energy Week 9:30 a.m. The Story Matters 10 a.m. Selectboard, Legislative Breakfast 4 p.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 6:45 p.m. Bulletin Board 7 p.m. Catholic Mass 8 p.m. The Story Matters 8:30 p.m. Development Review Board Sunday, Feb. 17 5 a.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 9 a.m. Catholic Mass 9:30 a.m. Public Affairs 11 a.m. Memorial Baptist Church Service 1:30 p.m. Energy Week 2 p.m. Legislative Breakfast 3:30 p.m. The Story Matters 4 p.m. Congregational Church Service 5:30 p.m. Eckankar 6 p.m. Bulletin Board 7 p.m. Catholic Mass 8 p.m. Energy Week 9 p.m. Public Affairs Monday, Feb. 18 12 a.m. Vermont State House 6:30 a.m. Green Mountain Care Board 9 a.m. The Story Matters 9:30 a.m. Lifelines 10 a.m. Selectboard, Public Affairs 4:30 p.m. Energy Week 5:30 p.m. Eckankar 6 p.m. The Story Matters

backs Abel Anderson, Ben Turner and Tucker Stearns and Kearns, Hescock and Farnsworth helped kill the penalties, and Stearns stopped two drives by Raider defender Eren Cetin. With 24 seconds left in the period Farnsworth made it 3-1 with a highlight-reel goal. He took a clearing pass from Anderson, outskated two Raiders down the right side, broke in alone on Raider goalie Shailer Evans, and ripped a forehand into the upper right corner. But the Raiders were unfazed. At 2:11 of the third Melen rammed home the rebound of a Cetin blast from the point, and it was 3-2. The tying goal at 7:00 was doubly painful. The officials, who didn’t have their best night, missed a Raider at least two feet offside on the entry to the zone. Still, the Tigers gained possession, but whiffed on a pass from the slot, a play that allowed Dillon Moore to swoop in and stuff home a backhand inside the right post. The Tigers had a chance down the stretch, but Turner’s cross from the right to Farnsworth was just out of his reach. In overtime Stearns stopped Cetin from the point one more time, but the Tigers did not test Evans (nine saves). Derosia credited the Raiders for a strong effort, but said the Tigers will have to regroup. “We’ve just got to learn to take care of our own net and our own zone, and make some better decisions,” he said.

(Continued from Page 19) HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Girls’ Hockey 2/13 MUHS at Harwood........................ 5 PM 2/15 MUHS at S. Burlington............ 7:30 PM 2/16 MUHS at U-32......................... 4:15 PM Boys’ Hockey 2/12 MUHS at St. Albans................. 5:15 PM 2/15 Stowe at MUHS............................ 7 PM 2/16 MUHS at Stowe............................ 7 PM Girls’ Basketball 2/11 Milton at VUHS............................. 7 PM 2/11 OV at Mill River............................. 7 PM 2/13 VUHS at Colchester..................... 7 PM 2/13 MUHS at Mt. Abe.......................... 7 PM 2/14 Windsor at OV.............................. 7 PM 2/16 Colchester at MUHS.............. 12:30 PM 2/16 Mt. Abe at Mt. Mansfield.......... 2:30 PM Boys’ Basketball 2/12 VUHS at Milton............................. 7 PM 2/12 St. Albans at Mt. Abe.................... 7 PM 2/12 Missisquoi at MUHS..................... 7 PM 2/15 Mt. Abe at MUHS.......................... 7 PM 2/15 VUHS at Missisquoi...................... 7 PM 2/15 Mill River at OV............................. 7 PM Gymnastics 2/16...............................State Meet at Essex Indoor Track 2/16................................ State Meet at UVM Dance 2/23................... State Competition at VUHS COLLEGE SPORTS Men’s Hockey 2/15 Midd. at Hamilton.......................... 7 PM 2/16 Midd. at Amherst........................... 3 PM Women’s Hockey 2/12 Midd. at Plattsburgh...................... 7 PM 2/15 Williams at Midd........................... 7 PM 2/16 Midd. at Williams.......................... 7 PM Women’s Basketball 2/16 NESCAC Quarterfinal.....................TBD Men’s Basketball 2/16 NESCAC Quarterfinal.....................TBD Late games were played after deadline. Spectators are advised to consult school websites for the latest schedule updates.

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please see the MCTV website, www.middleburycommunitytv.org, for changes in the schedule; MCTV events, classes and news; and to view many programs online. Submit listings to the above address, or call 388-3062.

6:30 p.m. Bulletin Board 7 p.m. Public Affairs MCTV Channel 16 Tuesday, Feb. 12 12 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 5:30 a.m. Foxes in Our Midst 6:30 a.m. Yoga 7 a.m. First Wednesday 9 a.m. Local School Board Meetings 1 a.m. Foxes in Our Midst 5 p.m. The World Fusion Show 8:30 p.m. Havana Fairfax Convention 9:30 p.m. Big House, Little House Wednesday, Feb. 13 12 a.m. VT State Board of Education 5:32 a.m. Foxes in Our Midst 6:30 a.m. Yoga 6:45 a.m. Big House, Little House 8:20 a.m. Poets Speak 10:30 a.m. Firsts Wednesday 12 p.m. Foxes in Our Midst 1 p.m. Extempo - Live Original Storytelling 2:30 p.m. Foxes in Our Midst 4:30 p.m. Yoga for You 5 p.m. Havana Fairfax Convention 6 p.m. Local School Board Meetings 11 p.m. Big House, Little House Thursday, Feb. 14 12:30 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 6 a.m. Yoga for You 7:27 a.m. Big House, Little House 9:30 a.m. Extempo - Live Original Storytelling 2 p.m. Big House, Little House 5 p.m. All Things LGBTQ 7:30 p.m. Local School Board Meetings 10 p.m. Foxes in Our Midst & more from VMX Friday, Feb. 15 12 a.m. New England Cooks & more from VMX 7:30 a.m. Yoga for You 8 a.m. The World Fusion Show

8:30 a.m. Osher - Marilyn Monroe 11:30 a.m. Poets Speak 1:06 p.m. Foxes in Our Midst 2:01 p.m. First Wednesday 5:30 p.m. Hannaford Career Center Board Meeting 8 p.m. All Things LGBTQ Saturday, Feb. 16 6 a.m. First Wednesday 7:30 a.m. Yoga for You 8 a.m. Foxes in Our Midst 9 a.m. Osher - Marilyn Monroe 10:35 a.m.HCC, ACSD Board Meetings 3 p.m. First Wednesday 5 p.m. Big House, Little House 6:33 p.m. Foxes in Our Midst 8 p.m. All Things LGBTQ 9 p.m. New England Cooks Sunday, Feb. 17 5 a.m. Havana Fairfax Convention 6 a.m. Yoga for You 6:45 a.m. Bulletin Board 7 a.m. LWV Constitutional Crisis? Series 8:35 a.m. Foxes in Our Midst 9:30 a.m. Osher - Marilyn Monroe 11:01 a.m. HCC, ACSD Board Meetings 4 p.m. First Wednesday 6 p.m. All Things LGBTQ 7 p.m. Poets Speak 7:36 p.m. Extempo & more from VMX Monday, Feb. 18 12:33 a.m. Vermont Media Exchange 5 a.m. First Wednesday 7 a.m. Yoga for You 7:27 a.m. Big House, Little House 9:30 a.m. Extempo - Live Original Storytelling 12:30 p.m. Yoga for You 1 p.m. First Wednesday 4:24 p.m. Poets Speak 5 p.m. All Things LGBTQ 6 p.m. Local School Board Meetings 7 p.m. Extempo & more from VMX


PAGE 22 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

Best of Luck in the future to all Addison County Students!

Congratulations! Mon-Fri 7am-6pm, Sat 7am-4pm

ADDISON COUNTY

802-388-Deli

INDEPENDENT

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VERMONT’S TWICE-WEEKLY NEWSPAPER Middlebury, VT 05753 • (802) 388-4944 • www.AddisonIndependent.com

Students of the Week from area High Schools Middlebury Union High School

Middlebury Union High School introduces Grace Widelitz as its Student of the Week. Grace resides in Middlebury with her parents, Sarah Bourne and Howard Widelitz, and has an older brother, Jason. An academically talented student, Grace’s name has consistently appeared on the school’s High Honor Roll throughout her four years at MUHS. By the time she graduates in June, Grace will have completed eight Advanced Placement classes and pursued studies in both Latin and Spanish. She is currently taking advantage of her Dual Enrollment voucher and is studying Women in U.S. History at the Community College of Vermont. Grace has contributed to the MUHS community in myriad ways and she has won the respect of the faculty, administration, and her peers. She captained the varsity field hockey team and will represent the Tigers on the Twin State team in June, when Vermont takes on New Hampshire. She has served as a peer leader coordinator in her senior year, mentoring ninth-graders as they transition to high school. Grace has been actively involved in the MUHS Neuroscience Club for four years and serves as a Nordic ski coach with the Special Olympics. She looks forward each year to the winter games assisting the Special Olympians at Killington. Grace Widelitz She has been playing the piano since the age of five and she is a MUHS member of the Middlebury College community choir. Grace has been practicing the Korean martial art of Tae Kwon Do for the last six years, culminating in a second-degree belt. Grace has enjoyed her involvement in the Hugh O’Brian Leadership program in Chicago, first as a participant and then as an ambassador representing Vermont. She served as a staff member for the three-day program on the campus of St. Michael’s College in Colchester prior to her junior year. Grace secured an internship last summer in Germany, further promoting her interest in neuroscience, a field she hopes to study in college. She worked at the Max Planck Institute for Brain Research in Frankfurt, focusing on memory and spatial navigation circuits. She worked on data analysis, built a Microdrive for monitoring neurons and helped with experiments. The teachers at MUHS value Grace’s keen intellect and her willingness to dive into academics with a natural curiosity. Grace, in turn, has appreciated the faculty and states that Mr. Krahn and Mr. Harrington have made a positive and lasting impression on her high school experience. She feels that their courses, along with her other classes, have prepared her well for college. She was admitted early decision to the University of Pennsylvania and is looking forward to her enrollment in the fall. Everyone at MUHS wishes Grace well on her academic journey.

Vergennes Union High School

Vergennes Union High School has recognized Hannah Philbrook as its Student of the Week. Hannah lives in Vergennes with her parents David and Kim Philbrook. Hannah was accepted into The Walden Project the beginning of her junior year and has been enrolled in it ever since. She has consistently been on high honors, and this past year was inducted into the National Honor Society. Hannah received two underclassmen awards, one sophomore year for exceeding the five guidelines in U.S. History and American Literature, along with the Sage College Award, which granted her $5,000 a year in merit based scholarships. Hannah recently finished her CCV Introduction to Psychology class with an A average, and thoroughly enjoyed the fast-paced work style of the class. Hannah also participated in The New England Young Writers Conference at Bread Loaf. Hannah was on the varsity softball team in 9th and 10 grade. She participated in chorus those years as well, and was in the school musical in grade 10. Through The Walden Project Hannah has participated in many volunteer and community service events, such as being on the board of a non-profit organization, Willowell. Hannah Philbrook Hannah has also been to many conferences, such as the Power VUHS Squared Conference, Personalized Learning Summit, Youth Rally for the Planet, and UVM Rally for Climate Action. “Where some may thrive in the mainstream school system, I found my voice through Walden,” she says of high school. “I discovered depths of myself through the vastness of the woods, the heat of a fire, and the separation of myself from the confines of a school building. I realized it’s important to question those in power, to question everything, because in that curiosity you will find what you are truly passionate about. Live and learn deliberately. Go outside more, stop being so sheltered, so scared. This life is now, live it.” Emily Rossier and Matt Schlein, teachers at The Walden Project say, “Hannah is an incredibly bright, creative, and caring young woman who cares deeply about her community. In her time out at Walden, we have enjoyed watching her cultivate her voice as a writer and speaker and then share this voice in a variety of contexts, including conferences, board meetings, and various public events. She has left an indelibly positive imprint on both the Walden community, as well as the community-at-large.” Following graduation Hannah plans to attend UVM as either a Psychology or Secondary English Education major. The faculty, staff and students of VUHS wish Hannah the very best in the future.

Students of the week from all area high schools will receive a gift certificate from Vermont Book Shop, and a gift card from 7 South Sandwiches. Students of the Week are chosen by school teachers and administration.

We’re proud to support all area students and want to say Thanks to those who volunteer with us!

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Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 23

Ferrisburgh town meeting to be held March 2 FERRISBURGH — March will available along with board games be here before we know it and that and video themed books. Attendees means voting and Town Meeting. are encouraged to bring their own Our in-person Ferrisburgh Town handheld systems and games to Meeting to vote articles and town play and share. Parent permission budget will be held at Ferrisburgh forms (available at bixbylibrary. Central School at 10 a.m. on org) need to be submitted five days Saturday, March 2. The Annual before the start of the program. A sign of spring is that the Ferrisburgh Town elections will be held on Tuesday, March 5. Polls Vergennes Area Youth League are open from 7 a.m.-7 p.m. at (VAYL) is preparing for the 2019 the Ferrisburgh Town Hall — the season. The VAYL provides the traditional Town Meeting Day, opportunity to learn the game Residents will vote by Australian of t-ball, baseball or softball in a fun-filled Ballot for public and supportive offices and school environment. budgets. Please The Little participate in League early bird both activities in Have a news tip? Call Sally order to support Kerschner at 877-2625 or email registration closes our town and our her at smwkersch@comcast.net on Feb. 17. After this date, fees community. NEWS increase by $10/ Support the Vergennes Union High School player and family caps will not Boosters. Basketball season is in apply (caps are set for families full force and the VUHS Booster with 3 or more registered players). Club would like to thank you for Register now and practices will your support. Varsity teams and start at the end of April, weather their families are helping with permitting. Registration is online concessions for the home games. at bit.ly/2019VAYL. Sign in to get If you would like to help out started and if you are new to VAYL, with supporting the school sports it is easy to create a personal activities, visit the Booster Club account. For questions and more contact Kelsey Facebook page at: facebook.com/ information, VergennesBoostersClub/. The Bradford, League President, at meetings are held on the second VAYLContactUs@gmail.com or Tuesday of each month at 7 p.m. in 802-349-2207. Rokeby Museum is open the VUHS library and everyone is on Sundays in February to welcome to join the group. Black History The Ferrisburgh Grange’s next commemorate King Pede card party is scheduled Month. Bring family and friends for Saturday, Feb. 16. All are to visit Rokeby Museum’s invited to participate in these get- award-winning “Free & Safe: The Underground togethers as held at in the Ferrisburgh Town Tuesday, Feb. 12, 7:00 Railroad Hall and Community p.m., VUHS Boosters Club Vermont” exhibit on Sundays, from noon Center. The evening Meeting, VUHS library. begins at 6:30 p.m. Saturday, Feb. 16, 6:30 to 5 p.m. throughout with a sandwich p.m., Ferrisburgh Grange February. “Free & introduces supper and then on to King Pede card party, Safe” Simon and Jesse, the games. King Pede Ferrisburgh Town Hall. is a unique game Tuesday, Feb. 19, 6:30 two fugitives from that involves “trick- p.m., Ferrisburgh Town slavery who were sheltered at Rokeby taking” techniques Selectboard meeting. such as in Hearts Saturday, March 2, 10 in the 1830s while and Spades or Pitch. a.m., Ferrisburgh Town on their journey from slavery to This is a game of fun Meeting, FCS. and skill so come Monday, March 4, 6:15 freedom. There is an admission fee of $8/ prepared to use your p.m., PTO meeting, FCS. strategic thinking. Tuesday, March 5, adult; $6/children The Ferrisburgh 7 a.m.-7 p.m., Voting, age 5 and up. On Feb. 10, from Skating Rink is Ferrisburgh Town Hall. 2-3 p.m., children open and will ages 7-12 will be be available to Ferrisburgh residents as long as given the opportunity to become the weather cooperates. There “History Detectives” as they meet are several stacked crates for the Simon, Jesse, Jeremiah Snowden, youngest beginner skaters. And, and others — all fugitives from as always, please stay off the ice slavery who were sheltered at when it is soft, and remove any Rokeby. Children will examine the equipment you use or bring with evidence, such as letters from the you (such as goals.) For updates museum collections, to discover on hours and ice conditions, what these people felt, what was follow the announcements in the important to them, and what they Ferrisburgh Front Porch Forum, did to improve their lives. For teen and adult audiences, on the Ferrisburgh Skating Rink Facebook page, or email to Martha Sunday, Feb. 24 at 2 p.m., historian and Rokeby Museum director Davis at marthand@gmavt.net. The Bixby Library is hosting emerita Jane Williamson will three teen video game nights on give an illustrated presentation, Feb. 7, 14, and 21. These will be “Finding Jesse: How Free & held from 7-10 p.m. for youth ages Safe: The Underground Railroad 14-18. Games such as Mario Kart 8 in Vermont Became a Reality.” and Super Smash Brothers will be She will discuss the research she

Ferrisburgh

performed to understand more fully the circumstances of fugitives who lived at, or passed through, Rokeby. The talk will not only illuminate the practice of studying original source material, it will also provide an understanding of the Underground Railroad from the point of view of the escapees

themselves. For more information, visit the museum’s website: rokeby.org. The Lake Champlain Maritime Museum may be closed for the winter, but it is now time to sign up for summer camps and expeditions. The museum’s Lake Adventure Camps and Expeditions offer a

variety of week-long activities designed for kids entering grades 2-12. These camps are led by highly knowledgeable and experienced program staff, using the fleet of watercraft, replica vessels, and teaching facilities at the four-acre lakeside campus. Events include (See Ferrisburgh, Page 24)

Hurry! Hurry! Hurry!

*6th Annual Free Brakes for Food* We are collecting food for Addison County Hope and are willing to bribe you!

Food

For

Yes, we start off with a Free Brake Inspection and Free Brake diagnosis. If you need brakes, we provide FREE Premium Centric Brake Pads and $34.50 off the Labor to Install the Pads.

FREE Brakes

All you have to do for your FREE BRAKE INSPECTION is bring a bag of

12 non-perishable food items for this fine organization!

Is the Brake Job Going To Be Absolutely Free? Of course not - BUT - this is the Best Deal you will get anywhere! You get Free Premium Centric Brake Pads and part of the labor to install them, then you pay for any other brake parts and other work needed with County Tire Center’s quality work and service, and you help out Hope of Addison County. Why Not Totally Free? No Cost Jobs would require us to use cheap parts and to do what we call in the industry a “pad slap” - throw on cheap pads as quickly as possible and not look at the rotors, calipers, master cylinders, brake lines and brake fluid. Cheap brake jobs have possible safety concerns, have a short life span, give poor performance, are noisy, plus they cost more in the long run! WE DO NOT DO “PAD SLAPS.” How Can You Give Such Big Discounts? We partnered with our Part Vendor and the Brake Manufacturer. They provide the brake pads, we provide part of the labor, and you provide the food! This is why we can only offer FREE Brakes for a limited time. You will save anywhere from $150-$375 depending on make, model & work needed. Go to hopevt.org Family owned & operated for over 30 years. Oldest locally owned and operated tire center!

Dates: January 21st thru March 1st

The under car care specialists.

In 2018 we donated 1,030 lbs. of food to Hope

33 Seymour Street • Middlebury, VT 05753 • 388-7620 • countytirecenter.com


PAGE 24 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

Ferrisburgh (Continued from Page 23) learning about boating, sailing, metal working, and snorkeling, and what life was like in the 18th century. The LCMM programs are well respected for their ability to promote learning, exercise, confidence and teamwork through outdoor, interactive fun. For more information, visit lcmm.org.

For the all the events and student activities at Ferrisburgh Central School, be sure to regularly visit: sites.google.com/a/ anwsd.org/fcs/. The FSC PTO is sponsoring two great learning opportunities. Volunteer students from Middlebury College will be running a three-week after school Science club for 3rd and

4th graders starting in March. The sessions will be held from 3-4 p.m. on March 16, April 6, and April 13. To inquire about this program and available slots, email Melanie Clark (melanieclarkvt@gmail. com) with your child’s name, parents’ names and phone numbers and any allergies/pertinent medical information. Space is limited to 10

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students and will be filled firstcome, first-served. Also, another session of Minecraft will run for grades 3-6 on Tuesdays from 3-4:15 p.m. from March 13 to May 15. Space is limited, so register early by emailing your child’s name, your name and phone number and any allergies/health issues you child may have to Steve Grimm at steveg@pincrafters.com. Minecraft is a game-based learning platform designed to promote creativity and problem solving. The FCS Minecraft program is looking for more parent volunteers, so if you are interested, please email the PTO at fscpto@gmail.com. NOTE: We are always interested in including a variety of Ferrisburgh-related news in this column, so if you have news that would be of interest, contact Sally Kerschner at smwkersch@ comcast.net. You are able to access these columns and other information about Ferrisburgh news and events by viewing the Ferrisburgh Town Website at www. ferrisburghvt.org.

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Pet of the week

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news@addisonindependent.com

Learn about tracking wildlife on March 3 ADDISON — Vermonters of all ages are invited to learn about winter wildlife tracking on Sunday, March 3, from 10 a.m. to noon at the Dead Creek Visitor Center in Addison, Vermont. This guided walk is free and open to the public, and registration is required. Ali Thomas, education manager for the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department, will be leading the walk. An experienced naturalist and tracker who has worked on conservation education projects throughout the country, Thomas studied under renowned wildlife tracker James Halfpenny. She currently manages the Vermont Fish & Wildlife Department’s popular summer youth conservation camp program, and trains teachers and other educators how to engage students with the natural world. According to Thomas, tracking wildlife is a great way to connect with nature and the outdoors and getting started requires no experience or equipment. “No special skills are necessary for participants,” said Thomas. “You need only the curiosity to witness stories wildlife leave behind in the snow. From the tracks of a fox catching a ruffed grouse in the snow to a mouse scurrying along whipping its tail behind, winter in Vermont is a great time to discover signs of wildlife.” Participants are asked to wear appropriate clothing and footwear for walking in the snowy woods. To register for this wildlife walk go to vtfishandwildlife.com.

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Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 25


PAGE 26 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

Pet Pages

PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUND

Addison County’s Humane Society Dizzle. 2 years, Jack Russell Terrier mix, neutered male. Dizzle is great with kids and has lived happily with other dogs. He is still such a puppy at heart and needs consistency, as well as both manners and house training. He is super sweet with a real zest for life, he wants nothing more than to play with you and then sack out on your lap. Dizzle would love to find an active family to call his own, so don’t waste another minute – come in and meet the little guy!

Odin. 2 years, Great Dane, neutered male. Odin is a BIG boy with a lot of potential and love to give. This guy needs a solid, dog-savvy home – ideally with a fenced space to play outside. Odin prefers to be the only pet in the home, but when spending time with people he is a sweet and gentle giant. Due to his size and strength, we require that his new home not be shared with young children. If you think he is the next member of your family, come and meet him!

Stone. 4 months, shorthaired tux, neutered male. Stone and his littermates Stella and Silver came all the way to Vermont from New Jersey to find a forever home in the Green Mountains! We don’t know much about his short past, but we do know he loves to play hard with his community roommates and then likes to collapse in a warm lap for a good snooze. He is quick to jump on his toys or chase his tail and be a plain silly kitten. Stone loves to ride on shoulders, and is destined to some family’s favorite form of comic relief!

Stella. 4 months, medium hair Tortie, spayed female. Stella is an active kitty who is always game for some playtimeshe is quick to pounce on a toy or leap in the air at whatever catches her eye! She loves snuggling with her littermate Silver and seems to get along with other cats. Stella and her brothers started their lives as street kittens and while her brothers have gotten used to people quickly, Stella is taking her sweet time and isn’t quite ready to be picked up yet. However with a little time and patience, Stella will be a stellar cat!

P et

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Microchip clinics scheduled MIDDLEBURY — Homeward Bound, Addison County’s Humane Society, has released the scheduled dates of their 2019 Open Door Microchip Clinics. New this year, the shelter is offering nail clipping at the clinics. The clinics will be offered on Saturdays from 10 a.m.- noon on the following dates: Feb. 23, April 20, June 22, Aug. 24, Oct. 26 and Dec. 14. A micro-chip is a small electronic chip (about the size of a piece of rice) that is inserted under the skin between a pet’s shoulder blades and contains all of the owner’s contact information. Most veterinary offices and shelters have the ability to scan for this chip and quickly identify the owner. The entire process takes less than two minutes and is almost painless. Last fall, a microchip was to thank for reuniting a local woman with her

beloved dog. She said, “Aspen got loose while I was out of town and I did not have his collar on him at the time … had it not been for the $35 microchip I got at Homeward Bound’s microchipping clinic earlier this year they wouldn’t have ever been able to find me, so microchip your pets.” The clinic is open to both dogs and cats. The cost of micro-chipping is $35 and this covers the microchip implant and initial registration. Nail clipping is available for an additional $10 fee. The clinics take place at the shelter, which is located at 236 Boardman Street in Middlebury. Shelter staff asks that all dogs be on leash and cats be in carriers for this event. Interested parties can call 802-388-1100 to pre-register. The service will be provided on a first come, first serve basis.


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 27


PAGE 28 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

St. Paul’s working with city to finance sidewalk upgrade By ANDY KIRKALDY VERGENNES — Representatives of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church met with the Vergennes City Council early last year about a joint sidewalk and landscaping project. Sarah Stroup and Sarah Cowan, members of the church’s Strategic Investment in Sacred Places committee, said they were thinking strategically about how the St. Paul’s west lawn is a pleasant community resource, and pitched upgrades in that spirit. The sidewalk runs along Park Street, past the city bandstand on one side and along church property on the other. The three-foot-wide sidewalk, which the plan calls to widen to five feet, is in fair condition at best. At that time the estimate to replace

the deteriorating Park that the church Street sidewalk and “In my new would pay the city its retaining wall with capacity as city back over five years, a wider sidewalk and manager I support and that further talks shorter wall stood at this initiative on could be held about $92,500. funding terms. They hoped the behalf of St. Paul’s, A year later, city would pay for a and I look forward finances are still full half of the cost, to working with not fully pinned with the VTrans them starting down. The church grant — awarded hopefully in late is still talking with in April 2018 in the officials about spring of this year.” city amount of $46,250, how much each — Matt Chabot partner should pay or half the thenestimated cost — for a cooperative paying the rest. sidewalk project now estimated at After debate, the council in $80,000, with the $46,250 VTrans February 2018 agreed to pay for grant in hand. $23,125, or 25 percent of the project, The council acknowledged the from the city’s Water Tower Fund, sidewalk needs replacing. and front the remaining $23,125 to City officials and committee the church with the understanding members will talk again after Town

Meeting Day. City Manager Matt Chabot, who as an alderman a year ago supported no more than a 25-percent city contribution, said he likes the plan. But he said it remains a council decision on the question of competing needs for the Water Tower Fund, such as work to the city pool and other recreation facilities, other downtown projects, and even to city hall. “In my new capacity as city manager I support this initiative on behalf of St. Paul’s, and I look forward to working with them starting hopefully in late spring of this year,” he said The council will make the call then on whether to alter the arrangement approved a year ago. “That will be determined when we get into budget sessions,”

Chabot said. “Our annual budget for sidewalk repair is $15,000, for example, and we might have an existing situation on South Water Street that might require those funds to be allocated down there. So, again, it will come down to the budget.” Cowan said St. Paul’s could dip into its own coffers, but possibly at the expense of other church needs or of the larger improvement plan, such as adding stone steps in the wall or an outside deck to provide seating near the entrance to the parish hall — a $20,000 item. “(In) a worst-case scenario, we have the resources,” Cowan said. She added that Chabot will solicit bids that could move the final project cost lower, thus possibly easing the burden for both parties

Windows (Continued from Page 1) downtown green. Church members — there are about 80, according to the committee members, and about half attend on Sundays — hope to create an extension of that city green on the lawn to the west of the church. Their plan includes refurbished stainedglass windows overlooking a new, more open space offering a Pantonstone sitting wall along the sidewalk, new plantings, and possibly steps up to the lawn. They see that space as a community-service offering to Vergennes, and came up with the plan a couple years ago after interviewing as many as 30 community members and holding a public design meeting in the church’s parish hall. “It was that long outreach process and series of conversations that led us to focus on this aspect of a community-connected project,” said Stroup. “We were thinking what is it we can offer. And what we have is this central location, right next to the green. It’s the sunniest spot in downtown. And in a summer afternoon our lawn is awesome, warm, bright, and right now perhaps a little overgrown and less welcome than it could be.” WINDOW REPAIR The church’s discussions of blending community service, building repair and a landscaping project began in 2014, when St. Paul’s became one of 10 Vermont churches chosen to work with Philadelphia nonprofit Partners For Sacred Places. That nonprofit consults with religious organizations of all denominations to, in committee member Sarah Cowan’s words, “work with the greater community to enhance their involvement with their buildings … to really try to maximize the use of the buildings, which has also ultimately the goal of preserving them.” The Partners organization helped connect St. Paul’s with Vermont’s Division for Historic Preservation

BEHIND THIS DRAB window covering on the exterior of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church facing Park Street in Vergennes is one of three colorful stained-glass windows badly in need of repair. A $67,500 project will fix the windows and replace the exterior coverings with transparent ones to create a pretty backdrop to a newly landscaped side lawn.

Independent photo/Andy Kirkaldy

and other agencies and nonprofit sources of grants and support. It also awarded St. Paul’s a $5,000 planning grant that led to the creation of the Strategic Investment committee and then the community outreach. Committee member Bo Price said during that phase people were surprised to see St. Paul’s interior after strolling or driving by it for so many years. “There were people who came who had never been inside this building ever,” Price said. “It really is in the center of Vergennes, but they had never walked in the door. So it really was nice to have people see that we exist here in Vergennes.”

The outreach helped form the plan and brought the church to the stained-glass windows, especially the three that face west toward the green. Cowan said their deteriorating exterior Plexiglas covers do not allow the colorful windows to be seen from the exterior, and also are not properly ventilated. As a result, the covers trap heat that has warped the glass, which is pulling it away from the soldering that holds individual panes in place. “The stained-glass expert we had look at them said these were by far the ones in the most immediate need,” Cowan said. “I sensed some panic, almost, in her notes.”

THIS COLORFUL STAINED-GLASS window is one of three the members of St. Paul’s Episcopal Church in Vergennes hope to repair this year as part of a $67,500 project. The church has two grants in hand, roughly enough to fund repair of two of the windows, and members are confident of further funding. Photo courtesy of St. Paul’s

This past August the Episcopal Diocese of Vermont gave St. Paul’s a $22,500 grant, and in December the state awarded the church another $20,000, leaving the funding, in Stroup’s words, “one window short.” The Walter Cerf Foundation turned down the church this past summer, but Stroup said the committee members were encouraged to reapply if St. Paul’s came closer to the $67,500 finish line. Stroup said the committee remains

confident that at some point park users and Park Street passers-by will be able to admire restored stainedglass windows through modern, transparent coverings. “We’d like to both repair the windows for historic preservation, but those will also be the backdrop for our green space,” she said. In the meantime, they also have a plan for repairing sidewalk between the church and the city green (see (See Preservation, Page 29)


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 29

Teens to a recent NFL playoff game (Continued from Page 1) between the Saints and the Rams in table, hit record and let it fly. Covering such topics as sports, which controversial officiating was food and animals, with occasional believed by many to have delivered character acting thrown into the mix, an undeserved win to the Rams. “Why’d you blow that call?” the boys are slowly creating a body of work that not only entertains but Jonny asks Bobby Ricky. “Because I don’t like the Saints,” also provides a compelling glimpse of the gears at work inside the Bobby Ricky says. “I don’t like Drew Brees. I don’t like that he did a evolving minds of young men. Levi’s commercial.” But not always. A debate then follows about “Dodgeball,” says George in one video. “It’s a fun game to play. Don’t which company or brand the Saints quarterback had actually starred in. take it too far.” Unlike their sports commentary, “Don’t get over competitive,” Jonny adds. “I usually get over which is delivered with swagger competitive, but then a gym teacher enough to satisfy ESPN or the yells at me because—” He pauses. Bleacher Report, their off-the-cuff discussions tend to “Yeah, I’m not going to reveal more of their go into that.” Hopeful signs sensitivities. Because they’re about “the future “What do you think sports fans, the topic the cutest animal in often dominates their of boys” can be discussions, and they read from various the world is?” George asks. have no shortage of angles in these Jonny’s stumped. opinions. videos, and “Corgis,” George In one episode Jonny viewers would do says. “They melt my and George lament well to focus on heart, bro. It drives me that professional nuts to see a Corgi.” sports stars are held how much these “A white baby seal,” to a lower standard of boys are listening Jonny finally decides, justice than regular to each other, and George seems people are. Players even through the about ready to change who beat their wives constant chatter. his mind. and girlfriends, or who “Oh my god, they’re take performanceenhancing drugs, should not be so adorable,” he says. The boys play close attention allowed to play, they say. Nor should players in the National Football the number of subscribers to their League kneel during the national YouTube channel, but it always feels anthem — it ruins a beautiful game good to get in-person feedback. Their Mount Abe advisory teacher, with politics. Sometimes, however, their Jess Little, subscribed to their channel and she loves it. commentary hits a lighter note. “They’re hysterical,” she said. “I “My dad is a Yankees fan,” Jonny confesses. “I don’t know what like watching the videos and then coming into school the next morning happened there.” Their most elaborate sports and poking fun at them.” Little told them they should do a commentary to date plays out in an episode called “Pick Up the Phone, video about food. The boys obliged. “Concession food!” George says in Roger.” Alone behind the table, Jonny announces that they will have that video. “Oh, man, that hits the spot,” Jonny a special guest on the show, a man named Bobby Ricky, who is blind. says, though he acknowledges that On cue, George walks on dressed it’s probably not the healthiest part of like an NFL referee, wielding a one’s diet. “Hot dogs,” he continues. “If plastic broom stick in lieu of a you like hot dogs, you’re a good walking cane. They devised this skit in response person. If not, what are you doing

MONKTON 14-YEAR-OLDS George Collette, left, and Jonny Armell take time out from their busy schedules in a Mount Abe classroom on Thursday to discuss and promote their video podcast, “No Returns.”

Independent photo/Christopher Ross

JONNY ARMELL, LEFT, and George Collette (along with friend Tristan Parker when he can make it) give insights into the life of the minds of 14-year-old boys in their YouTube videocast, “No Refunds,” which they record in George’s basement.

with your life?” (Folks in the Addy Indy newsroom unanimously agreed that this was a legit question.) George has become such a concessions connoisseur that he has developed a system of rules: “One: No popcorn.” That’s better left in movie theaters, he thinks. “Two: No puking.” (For a more detailed description of the history behind that rule, the more intrepid among our readers are encouraged to consult the video in question.) Jonny and George both love eating in local restaurants but not if they have to wait very long for their food, especially when it arrives too hot. They give a shout-out to Fire & Ice in Middlebury, which has a buffet, which means they don’t have to wait to get their food. “We’re going to open a restaurant, hopefully,” Jonny muses, though it’s not clear in the video how serious he is. Sort of serious, it turns out. “I love to cook,” Jonny told the Independent. “And George is really good at cooking.” When the two “interview” Tristan they brag on his behalf about his accomplishments on the football field and in the Boy Scouts. George calls him a “beast.” Similar moments of generosity and admiration sparkle throughout their videos, especially when they appear after rambunctious table pounding or prolonged name-calling or unfocused improvisation. It’s in these moments that the viewer understands just now much these friends, who’ve known each other since first grade, care about one another. “I’m probably wrong, like most of the time,” Jonny says when he can’t remember something. He might have elaborated, but George jumps immediately to his defense. “No you’re not,” he says, and the kindness in his tone suggests something his school principal, Jess Barewicz, recently said in the pages of this newspaper: I see you. I accept you. We’re in

this together. Then they go back to arguing about stuff, like whether pineapple belongs on pizza. Hopeful signs about “the future of boys” can be read from various angles in these videos, and viewers would do well to focus on how much these boys are listening to each other, even through the constant chatter. This is especially important when they hear themselves saying things they know they don’t mean. Those who hear the mistakes without also

hearing the learning aren’t getting the entire picture. “We’re going to edit all this out, hopefully,” Jonny says at one point. “But we might not get to it.” And they probably won’t. In spite of that there’s plenty in these videos to hold forth the promise that here, in the antics of young boys, we have the makings of good men. Episodes of “No Refunds” can be streamed at youtube.com/channel/ UCGeZx39Msdf4V8ijVqEh25g.

Preservation (Continued from Page 28) story on this page). LOOKING AHEAD Committee members acknowledge more needs to be done to fund longerrange plans, which include more extensive landscaping, such as the steps in the stone wall and even rain gardens along the Main Street side of church property. “We describe it as a four-part project,” said Price. They plan to talk further to the Vergennes Partnership about fundraising, plus publicize and

explain their plans at events such as this summer’s Vergennes Day as a way to further St. Paul’s community goals. Cowan summed up. “We are part of downtown Vergennes. And we see ourselves, and envision ourselves, being more of an extension of the green. Really, we want people to use our space,” she said. “We want there to be an opportunity for people to walk up on our side lawn here and sit in the sun.” Andy Kirkaldy may be reached at andyk@addisonindependent.com.

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Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Public Meetings

Public Meetings

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Public Meetings

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Public Meetings

ADULT ALL‑ RECOVERY Group Meeting for anyone over 18 who is struggling with addiction disorders. Wednes‑ days, 3‑4 p.m. at the Turning Point Center (54 Creek Rd). A great place to meet with your peers who are in recovery. Bring a friend in recovery. For info call 802‑388‑4249 or 802‑683‑5569 or visit turningpointaddisonvt.org.

AL‑ANON: FOR FAMILIES and friends affected by some‑ one’s drinking. Members share experience, strength and hope to solve common problems. Newcomers wel‑ come. Confidential. St. Ste‑ phen’s Church (use front side door and go to basement) in Middlebury, Sunday nights 7:15‑8:15 pm.

A LC OH OLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 2 MONDAY. As Bill Sees it Meeting, Ripton, Rip‑ ton Firehouse, Dugway Rd. 7:15‑8:15am. As Bill Sees it Meeting, Middlebury, The Turning Point Ctr, 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. Women of AA (Step/Speaker), Middle‑ bury, The Turning Point Ctr, 54 Creek Rd, 5:30‑6:30pm. Big Book Meeting, New Ha‑ ven, Congregational Church, Village Green, 7:30‑8:30pm. Discussion Meeting, Brandon, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Rte 7 South, 7:30‑8:30pm.

A LC OH OLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 4 WEDNESDAY. Big Book Meeting, Middle‑ bury, United Methodist Church, North Pleasant St. 7:15‑8:15am. Discussion Meeting, Middlebury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. 12 Step Meet‑ ing, Brandon, St. Thomas Episcopal Church, Rte 7 South, 7‑8pm. 12 Step Meet‑ ing, Bristol, Howden Hall, 19 West St. 7‑8pm.

A LC OHOLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 6 FRIDAY. Discus‑ sion Meeting, Middlebury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. Big Book Meeting, Bristol, Howden Hall, 19 West St. 6‑7pm. Discus‑ sion Meeting, Vergennes, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Park St. 8‑9pm.

ARE YOU BOTHERED BY SOMEONE’S DRINKING? Opening Our Hearts Al‑Anon Group meets each Wednes‑ day at 1:30 pm at Middlebury’s St. Stephen’s Church on Main St. (enter side door and follow signs). Anonymous and confi‑ dential, we share our experi‑ ence, strength and hope to solve our common problems. Babysitting available.

PARKINSONS SUPPORT GROUP meets on the last Thursday of every month from 10 am to 11:30 am. We meet at The Residence at Otter Creek in Middlebury. For info call APDA at 888‑763‑3366 or parkinsoninfo@uvmhealth. org.

AL‑ANON FAMILY GROUP ‑ For families and friends of problem drinkers. Anony‑ mous, confidential and free. At the Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, Middlebury. 7:30‑8:30 PM Friday eve‑ nings.

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ALCOHOLICS ANONY‑ MOUS, 1 SUNDAY. 12 Step Meeting, Middlebury, United Methodist Church, North Pleasant St. 9‑10am. Discussion Meeting, Bristol, Howden Hall, 19 West St. 4‑5pm. Women’s Meeting, North Ferrisburgh, United Methodist Church, Old Hol‑ low Rd. 6‑7pm. 12 Step Meet‑ ing, Vergennes, St. Paul’s Episcopal Church, Park St. 7‑8pm. AA 24‑Hour Hotline 802‑388‑9284, aavt.org.

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A LC OH OLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 3 TUESDAY. 12 Step Meeting, Middlebury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. Daily Reflec‑ tion Meeting, Vergennes, Con‑ gregational Church, Water St. 7‑8pm.

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A LC OH OLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 5 THURSDAY. 12 Steps and Traditions Meet‑ ing, Ripton, Ripton Firehouse, Dugway Rd. 7:15‑8:15am. Big Book Meeting, Middle‑ bury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. Noon‑1pm. Alternating Format Meeting, Ferrisburgh, Assembly of God Christian Center. Route 7, 7‑8pm.

A LC OHOLIC S A N ON Y‑ MOUS, 7 SATURDAY. Dis‑ cussion Meeting, Middlebury, United Methodist Church, North Pleasant St. 9‑10am. Discussion Meeting, Middle‑ bury, Beginner’s Meeting, Mid‑ dlebury, The Turning Point Ctr. 54 Creek Rd. 6:30‑7:30pm.

NA MEETINGS MIDDLE‑ BURY: Sundays, 3:00 pm, held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd.

NARCAN KITS are available at the Turning Point Center of Addison County FREE of charge. Narcan (Naloxone) is a nasal spray used to re‑ verse an opioid overdose in progress. These kits are spe‑ cifically intended for public distribution and can be used by anyone to save a life. Easy training is provided at Turn‑ ing Point Center, 54 Creek Rd, and takes approximately 10 minutes. Wednesdays between 9 a.m. ‑ noon, or call for an appointment (802) 388‑4249.

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NA (JUST IN TIME) Mondays, 6:30 pm, held at The Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd.

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Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted Adoption

Services C&I DRYWALL. Hanging, tap‑ ing, skim coat plastering. Also tile. Call Joe 802‑234‑5545 or Justin 802‑234‑2190. CONSTRUCTION: ADDI‑ TIONS, RENOVATIONS, new construction, drywall, carpentry, painting, flooring, roofing, pressure washing, driveway sealing. All aspects of construction, also property maintenance. Steven Fifield 802‑989‑0009.

Garage Sales INDOOR YARD SALE and silent auction. Feb. 16th, Sat‑ urday. 8:30am‑4pm. Ameri‑ can Legion, Middlebury, VT. Benefit Brendon P. Cousino Med47 Foundation. Break‑ fast sandwiches and muffins will be available in the a.m. Hot dogs and popcorn will be available in the p.m.

Want to be involved in your community? Is your 2019 resolution to give back? Always check this space for opportunities to get involved in local organizations. Use your skills to better your community.

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

REFUGE RECOVERY ‑ TUESDAYS 6‑7 p.m. A non‑theistic, Buddhist‑inspired approach to recovery from ad‑ dictions of all kinds. Dedicated to the practices of mindful‑ ness, compassion, forgive‑ ness, and generosity, this recovery meeting uses medi‑ tation and kindness to heal the pain and suffering that addiction has caused. Turning Point Center, 54 Creek Rd. (802) 388‑4249.

ADDISON INDEPENDENT 58 Maple St., Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

The Independent assumes no financial responsibility for errors in ads, but will rerun the ad in which the error occured at no charge. No refunds will be made. Advertisers will please notify us of any errors noted.

Number of words: Cost: # of runs: Spotlight Charge: Internet Listing: TOTAL:

$0.50


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 33

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

PAINTERS WANTED ‑ Acorn Painting is seeking two profes‑ sional painters for winter interior work. Excellent pay, great ben‑ efits. Reliable transportation, tools and a positive no nonsense attitude is a must. This is a great opportunity for people looking for full time work year round. A minimum of three years experi‑ ence necessary. Call 453‑5611 Serious applicants only.

THE BURLINGTON FREE PRESS is looking for a reli‑ able early morning riser to deliver copies of the newspa‑ per in Shelburne. Interested parties must have a reliable vehicle, valid driver’s license and liability insurance. Potential earnings of $1,600 plus tips. $150 contract incentive after 30 days. Please contact Monique at 802‑316‑7194 for more in‑ formation.

PT HOUSEKEEPING POSI‑ TION & FT Cook position available in a healthcare facil‑ ity located in Vergennes, VT. Must be able to pass a back‑ ground check & be able to pass drug screening. Email or call to set up an interview at MA3024@metzcorp.com or 802‑222‑5201 ext. 316.

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

BANKRUPTCY: CALL to find out if bankruptcy can help you. Kathleen Walls, Esq. 802‑388‑1156. HOPE HAS AN opening for a part time retail associate. 15 hours a week, reliable sched‑ ule, fun and active environ‑ ment. Must have good cash handling and math skills, and solid customer service abil‑ ity. We also have a part time opening in our warehouse. 29.5 hours a week to start, with the potential for moving to full‑time. Must have good customer service skills, be able to lift, stand, and walk for extended periods of time. Mechanical ability a plus. Send resume and cover let‑ ter, indicating the position for which you’re applying, to HOPE, 282 Boardman Street, Suite 1A, Middlebury, or email to receptionist@hope‑vt.org.

MiddState Towing Co. Hiring Full and Part Time Tow Truck Drivers. Duties include: (But not limited to) Towing and accident recovery of light to heavy-duty vehicles, flat tire changes, jump starts, vehicle unlocks and equipment hauling Job Requirements: • 23+ years of age minimum for insurance reasons • Take personal responsibility of company equipment and customer’s vehicles • Able to problem solve and communicate effectively (written & verbal) • MUST live in the proximity of New Haven due to on call coverage • CDL and driving experience preferred, Clean Driving record, pass Criminal Background Check and Drug Testing • Excel in a team work environment or alone, work in challenging, high energy recovery situations • Interact with customers and provide quality customer service Competitive hourly and commission based pay based on experience and license endorsements. Benefits package includes healthcare, IRA match, paid vacation, sick and holiday pay and uniforms. Work schedule is days and will include a rotation basis of nights and one weekend. Please contact Joe at 802-388-1110 for more information and to obtain an application. www.middstatetowing.com.

The Selectboard reserves the right to reject all applicants. Joan Huestis, Selectboard Chair, dated February 4, 2019

THE CITY OF Vergennes has an immediate position for a full‑time Administrative Assistant who will have the primary responsibility of accounts payable. The position is located in downtown Vergennes. Responsibilities include, but are not limited to: entering invoices into NEMRC AP software, print‑ ing checks, reconciling GL ac‑ count, warrant report, retrieving/ opening and sorting mail, weekly payroll administration, human resources and benefits adminis‑ tration. Please submit resume to mchabot@vergennes.org.

Opportunities STOREFRONT LOCATION, LOCATION, LOCATION. In the heart of downtown Mid‑ dlebury. Approved for seat‑ ing for 24. Plenty of parking, lots of possibilities. Available September 1. Text only to 802‑373‑6456.

Subscribe!

Town of Bridport — Town Clerk Position

The Town is accepting applications from applicants for the position of Town Clerk for the term of one year to commence in March of 2019. Job requirements include, but are not limited to: The Town Office shall be open to the public twenty-four hours weekly. The position involves having to work at elections and taking minutes at Selectboard meetings. In addition to demonstrating the highest ethical standards and attention to detail, applicant must demonstrate excellent writing and computer skills. The scope of duties will be established by the Selectboard and will include but not be limited to: All statutory requirements of the Town Clerk. Establish and maintain good community relations by answering questions and assisting Town residents and others seeking access to information in a friendly and collaborative manner. Preparation and posting of meeting notices for and assisting the Selectboard and other Town Boards, Commissions and Town Officers in completion of their duties. Read and utilize communications from Vermont League of Cities & Towns and Vermont Secretary of State’s Office. Needs to be a Notary Public while serving. Be willing to ask for help and seek additional training. Each sealed application, including resume part thereof, must be received either by mail or be hand delivered by February 25, 2019 to: Joan Huestis, Selectboard Chair at 3566 Basin Harbor Road Bridport, VT 05734. Applications delivered after such date will not be considered. For more information, email Joan Huestis at bridportdpw@gmavt.net. For the information in this notice and possible other information go to the Town’s website at www.bridportvt.org.

Help Wanted

to the Addison Independent

Call 388-4944 today! We’re thrilled you’re interested in working for the finest whiskey company in the world. Please visit www.whistlepigwhiskey.com/ work-with-us/ for a list of current openings and how to apply. All applicants may submit a resumé with 3 professional references to jobs@whistlepigrye.com. No phone calls please.

Help Wanted

ADDISON CENTRAL SCHOOL DISTRICT

Vacancies

Food Service Director/Cook 2018-2019 Addison Central School District is seeking a fulltime Food Service Director/Cook at Shoreham Elementary beginning March 11, 2019. The successful candidate should have experience in preparing nutritional meals, breakfast and lunch, and managing a meals program for 30-55 students. The candidate must also be organized, have strong communication, collaborative and computer skills, as well as an interest in participating in school wide health and nutrition initiatives. If you have questions, please contact Michael Lenox at 802-897-7181 or mlenox@acsdvt.org. Apply by submitting a letter of interest, resume, and three current reference letters via School Spring. Applications will be accepted until position is filled. E.O.E.


PAGE 34 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS For Rent

The Meadows Middlebury, VT

1 Bedroom

Handicapped Apartment

Available for Eligible Applicants

We currently are accepting applications for one or two bedroom apartments. These units are subsidized through the Department of HUD Section 8 Rental Assistance Program and are available for occupancy by elderly and/or handicapped persons. Eligible families will pay 30% of their adjusted income for rent. For more information, please write or call the management agent. Real-Net Managment, Inc. 26 Court Street Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4994

For Rent

For Rent

BRISTOL VILLAGE, HIGHLY Visible Retail/Office street level space on the Main Street. Ap‑ prox. 1,800 SF plus basement storage. Available March 1, 2019. $1,370 mo. Call Tom at Wallace Realty 453‑4670 or Tom@WallaceRE.com.

SHOREHAM: TORREY ISLAND. Daily sunsets, fishing on Lake Champlain. 1 bedroom, 1 bath studio layout. $700 month plus utilities. First and secu‑ rity. References. No pets. No smoking. Includes water and garbage. Evenings 897‑2385.

BRISTOL; 3 BEDROOM avail‑ able. Utilities included are: Heat, hot water, lawn care, snow removal, garbage and parking. Tenant pays electric. Small storage space included. 802‑453‑2566

MIDDLEBURY 1 BEDROOM, fully furnished apartment, all inclusive, W/D. $1,250/month. 802‑349‑8544.

CORNWALL 1 BEDROOM apartment, 1‑1/2 bath, sky‑ lights, private deck. $950/mo. includes heat and hot water. batesproperties@yahoo.com CORNWALL, UPSTAIRS 2 bedroom apt., all inclusive, w/d hookup, no pets, no smoking. $1,200 per month. 802‑462‑2924. DRY, WINTER/SUMMER STORAGE SPACE in Addi‑ son. Available storage space in my barn for summer/winter storage. The barn is structurally sound and weather‑tight with electricity. No heat or running water. The barn is also avail‑ able for lease. The entrance door measurements are 8’ wide by 7’ high. For more info: 802‑363‑3403 or rochon_m@ yahoo.com. FULLY EQUIPPED CAFE for Rent. Located in Kennedy Brothers building 11 Main Street, Vergennes. Contact Robert Feuerstein 802‑877‑2975, Robert@kennedybrothers.com.

For Rent

For Rent

It’s against the law to discriminate when advertising housing. Particularly on sites like Craigslist. And it’s easier to break the law than you might think. You can’t say “no children” or “adults only.” There is lots you can’t say. The federal government is watching for such discrimination. Let us help you sift through the complexities of the Fair Housing Law. Stay legal. Stay on the right side of the nation’s Fair Housing Law. Call the Addison Independent at (802) 388-4944. Talk to our sales professionals.

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONT’S TWICE-WEEKLY NEWSPAPER Middlebury, VT 05753 • (802) 388-4944 • www.AddisonIndependent.com

MIDDLEBURY 2 BEDROOM near downtown. Appliances, off street parking, lease. No pets. Real Net Management Inc. 802‑388‑4994. MIDDLEBURY, 2,600 SQ FT office space. Court St., central location, parking. Can be sub‑ divided. Real‑Net Management Inc. 802‑388‑4994. SMALL OFFICE SPACE, 656 Exchange Street, Middlebury. $500/month. 802‑388‑4831. VALLEY VIEW APARTMENTS is currently accept‑ ing applications for 1 and 2 BR apartments in Vergennes. All income/assets must be verified to determine monthly rent, but tenants only pay 30% of their income toward rent. Elderly or disabled only. W/D onsite. Call 802‑247‑0165 or visit our website www.sum‑ mitpmg.com. Equal Housing Opportunity.

Want to Rent MIDDLEBURY ROOM OR studio apartment wanted to rent. Locally‑employed man: handy, hard working and responsible, and can ex‑ change labor, maintenance for affordable rent. Can pro‑ vide solid references from employers and landlords. 978‑514‑0975.

Wood Heat FIREWOOD. CUT, SPLIT and delivered. $210/cord seasoned. $185/cord green. 802‑282‑9110.

Real Estate EAST MIDDLEBURY, DAISY Lane Lot #11. Beautiful, level 1/2 acre building lot with good southern exposure on a private lane. Town water, power and cable hookups at curbside. Site approved for four bedroom home with conventional (no mound necessary) septic system. $68,000. Call Jack Brown 388‑7350.

Att. Farmers 2018 PROCESSED CORN silage, 800 ton. Mix legume and grass, haylage, 800 ton. Call West Haven, VT. 802‑265‑8698 after 7pm. H AY F O R S A L E S m a l l square bales. First cut and mulch. Call 802‑349‑9281. HAY FOR SALE. 1st, 2nd and 3rd cut. Small squares $2.‑$4.; 4’ rounds $30.‑$50. Mike Quinn, Middlebury. 802‑388‑7828. LUMBER AT SAWMILL, hard and softwood, saw‑ dust. Rough and finished lumber also available. Book B r o s . We s t H a v e n , V t . 802‑265‑3675.

For Rent

WHITNEY’S CUSTOM FARM WORK. Pond agi‑ tating, liquid manure haul‑ ing, drag line aerating. Call for price. 462‑2755, John Whitney.

Wanted TENORS, BASS, BARITONE, alto, instrumental‑ ists, wanted for Heaven‑ song, a new small ensemble dedicated to uplifting spirits and building community. In‑ terfaith and secular music. 802‑324‑9149. TRUSTED 3RD GEN. VT Antique dealer specializing in jewelry, watches, silver, ublis (P s d A Classified art, military, antique collect‑ llege. Visit bittneran‑ ibles, etc. For Rent T EN Close to co . TM ed furbish OM APAR tiques.com or call Brian at 1 BEDRO Middlebury, newly re 00. , 00 Main Street , includes heat. 000802‑272‑7527. th ebury Consulting/ dl id $750/mon M of T, 00. mile north poservices APARTMEN tric, rubbish, 1appraisal sit. 000-00 available. M O de O us DR pl ec , el 1 BE onth cludes heat ly, $595/mHouse calls made free of upstairs, in Available immediate rence on Route 7. charge. sit and refe e ilities. Depo BILE hom ) hed: 5/5/11

plus ut OM MO 2 BEDRO Private lot. $650/mo. . in Salisbury 0-0000. quired. ferences re O required. 00 sement. Re USE/COND TOWNHO nes. Garage and ba 000-0000. M O O DR . en ts rg 2 BE pe mmons, Ve d heat. No Country Co excluding utilities an er, llite, wash etely pl $1,000/mo. m co , ternet, sate energy RN ry Hi-speed in OM, MODE 2 BEDRO ke Dunmore house. 85’ lake frontage. Ve rough June th ll, 6678. La furnished h, drilled we ting August 29, 2009 us utilities. 802-352ened porc ar dryer, scre 10 month rental; st tiable. $1,000/mo. pl r go Fo efficient. ing. Pets ne Non-smok 26, 2010.

Public Notices Index

Addison Northwest School District (1) Bristol (1) To publish a legal notice in the Addison Independent Hannaford Career Center (1) please email information to Housing Vermont (1) legals@addisonindependent.com or fax it to (802) 388-3100. Middlebury (2) TOWN OF BRISTOL PUBLIC HEARING NOTICE The Bristol Zoning Board of Adjustment will hold a hearing on February 26, 2019 at the Town Offices located at 1 South Street beginning at 7:00 P.M. to consider zoning permit #19-300, Rene Carpenter (Parcel #20-50-27.01), requesting a conditional use permit for a 3 unit, multifamily dwelling. Copies of the complete zoning applications are available for review at the Bristol Town Office during regular business hours. 2/11

REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONS GENERAL CONTRACTORS

Housing Vermont is requesting general contractor firms to submit qualifications for the rehabilitation of 9 apartments and associated site work for a project in Bristol, VT. General Contractors must have comparable experience and a bonding capacity of + $1,000,000. For additional information or to obtain a response form, call Lynn Mansfield at Housing Vermont, 802-861-3815 or lynn@ hvt.org. Completed qualification forms and attachments are due by 3:00 pm on Tuesday, February 19, 2019. Minorityowned, women-owned, locally-owned and Section 3 businesses are encouraged to apply. 2/7, 2/11

TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY ADVERTISEMENT FOR BIDS

Shard Villa Road, Middlebury, Vermont – Road Improvements Separate sealed BIDS for the construction of Shard Villa Road Improvements will be received by the Town of Middlebury Public Works Department (1020 S. Route 7, Middlebury, VT 05753; mailing address- 77 Main Street) until 11:00 AM, on February 15, 2019, and then at said office publicly opened and read aloud. Project will consist of Reclamation of road bed and paving of 2.5 inches of base course of Type II and 1.5 inches of Type III wear course. Driveway aprons shall be 10 feet deep and mailbox pull-offs shall be 2-feet deep. Existing pavement for Reclamation is a section of Shard Villa Road, beginning at the bridge over the Middlebury River and continues south for 2,700 feet. The Town recently improved drainage along the proposed road recycling project area, including ditching and a new RCP culvert replacement. These areas were repaired to a depth of 24 inches. Driveway aprons and field entrances will be paved to the same Town of Middlebury specifications as the road. There is a gravel pull off used as parking for swimming hole access just south of the bridge over the Middlebury River to be included in the paving project. Each BID must be accompanied by a certified check payable to the OWNER for five percent (5%) of the total amount of the BID. A BID BOND may be used in lieu of a certified check. The CONTRACT DOCUMENTS may be examined at the following locations: Works in Progress 20 Farrell St. South Burlington, VT 05403-6112

DuBois & King, Inc. 25 Union Street Brandon, Vermont 05733

Middlebury Public Works Department 1020 South Rt 7 Middlebury, Vermont 05753

ISSUING OFFICE: The Issuing Office for the Bidding Documents is: DuBois & King, Inc., 28 North Main Street, P.O. Box 339, Randolph, VT 05060, Contact: Dawn Conant at 802-728-3376, dconant@dubois-king.com. Bidding Documents may be obtained via one of the following methods: 1. Via Download Electronic Copy: Download Bid Documents as a pdf at www. dubois-king.com/projects-bidding-active for a non-refundable charge of $75.00. Note: When purchasing download bid documents, the purchaser will receive an e-mail notification with a link to the downloadable plans and specifications. Depending on individual computer settings, the e-mail may go to the spam folder. Please check the spam folder and allow e-mails from dubois-king.com 2. If Hard Copies are wanted: Please contact the Issuing Office Contact identified above to discuss the details of this method and to confirm cost. The date that the Bidding Documents are transmitted by the Issuing Office will be considered the prospective Bidder’s date of receipt of the Bidding Documents. Partial sets of Bidding Documents will not be available from the Issuing Office. Only Bid Documents obtained from DuBois & King, Inc. (Website or Issuing Office) shall be used for submitting a Bid. Neither Owner nor Engineer will be responsible for full or partial sets of Bidding Documents, including Addenda if any, obtained from sources other than the Issuing Office. IMPORTANT Any change to the Bidding Documents during the bid period will be made via addenda and posted at www.dubois-king.com/projects-bidding-active. The prospective Bidder is responsible for checking the web site as required to obtain any/all addenda that may be issued. The Issuing Office is NOT responsible for notifying prospective Bidders when addenda are posted. This responsibility lies with the prospective Bidder. A Non-Mandatory pre-bid meeting is scheduled at the site at 10:30AM on February 1, 2019. All prospective bidders are encouraged to attend this meeting. A Performance BOND and a Payment BOND each in an amount equal to one hundred percent (100%) of the contract price will be required. Kathleen Ramsay, Town Manager 1/31,2/4,7,11


Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019 — PAGE 35

Teachers: Submit World Water Day entries

GRAND ISLE — The Champlain Basin Education Initiative invites K-12 teachers throughout the Lake Champlain watershed in New York, Vermont, and Québec to submit entries for the local World Water Day event on March 21. The event will feature student water work and understanding through writing, art, photography, and videography. Dr. Danielle Garneau, a professor and researcher at SUNY Plattsburgh will present “Plastics in Lake Champlain: How Can You Help?” as the featured speaker. The World Water Day celebration of student work will be held from 4-6:30 p.m. on March 21, at Main Street Landing Performing Arts Center in Burlington. The event is open to the public. Up to three entries per classroom may be submitted. Educators may check contest rules at watershedmatters.lcbp.org/contest.html. Examples of entries from previous contests are posted on the website. The deadline for submitting entries is Feb. 21. Homeschoolers and youth programs are also invited to submit entries. “Champlain Basin Education Initiative partners host this event annually to feature the efforts of teachers and students to improve waterways and understand the pollution issues they face,” said Colleen Hickey, CBEI partner from the Lake Champlain Basin Program. Entries can be as simple as photographs about raising salmon or trout in their classroom to poems or journal entries about water, or highlighting a community project focused on water. The involvement of art, music, history, science or technology teachers allows many forms of student work to be featured. “We realized that the CBEI partnership provides training about watershed issues for teachers, but featuring student work in a public setting helps validate and celebrate their efforts with community members,” said Hickey. Examples

of awards for class participation may include boat rides, field naturalist visits to local schools, or classroom resources. World Water Day was initiated by the United Nations in 1992 to highlight the water crisis facing so many

AGENDA PATRICIA A. HANNAFORD CAREER CENTER WED., FEB. 13, 2019 5:00 PM – A208

Topic/Agenda Item 1. Introduction of Board Members 2. Approve Agenda 3. Visitors Comments 4. Correspondence Consent Agenda 5. Minutes of January 16, 2019 6. Monthly Accounts Payable for Jan. • Building & Equipment Reserve • General Fund • Revolving Account • McClure Grant • Makery Grant • Payroll Action Agenda 7. Policy 2.7 Compensation and Benefits 8. Accept a bid for a Milling Machine for industrial design and fabrication. Informational Agenda 9. Facilities Report 10. Budget/Policy Report 11. Community Engagement 12. Superintendent’s Report 13. Dean of Student’s Report 14. Adult Tech Ed Report 15. Policy 4.1 Governance Style 16. Executive Session • Negotiations • Personnel Upcoming Events Feb.13th Annual Meeting Following Feb. Board Mt’g @ 7pm Feb.14th Open House. Maker Faire & Repair Café 4-7pm Upcoming Committee Meetings Budget and Policy 2/25 5pm A208 Auditor Facilities 3/4 7:45am A106 Community Engagement 3/6 4pm A208 Board meeting 3/13 5pm A208 Budget and Policy 3/26 5pm Glass Onion

01/14

ADDISON NORTHWEST SCHOOL DISTRICT NOTICE TO ALL STUDENTS IN GRADES 8-11 PUBLIC HIGH SCHOOL CHOICE Vergennes Union High School, along with all other Vermont high schools, participates in a statewide system of high school choice. Under this system, students from VUHS may apply to transfer to any other high school in the state. For the 2019-2020 school year, the maximum number of students eligible to transfer is limited to ten (10). The actual number will depend on the number of students selected in prior years to continue their enrollment at other area high schools. To apply to participate in the program for the 2019-2020 school year (grades 9-12): • Complete an application available from the VUHS School Counseling Office; • All applications must be signed by a parent or guardian; • File the application with the School Counseling Office no later than March 1, 2019. Notification of decisions to all students who have applied to participate will be provided no later than April 1, 2019. Additional school choice information, including a timeline, is available from the School Counseling Office. A student’s enrollment application may be denied by another receiving school if the student has been expelled or received an extended suspension for violation of Vergennes Union High School’s alcohol, substance abuse, or weapons-in-schools policies during the year prior to enrollment in that regional partnership school. Upon enrollment in the receiving school, students are subject to the disciplinary policies and procedures of the receiving school. If selected to attend another high school in the regional partnership, students shall be guaranteed enrollment in that receiving school until graduation as long as they remain residents of the Addison Northwest School District and are not subject to expulsion as a result of the receiving school’s policy and federal and state law. 2/4, 11

Real Estate

populations around the world. For further details about participating in World Water Day event or program, contact the Lake Champlain Basin Program, 54 West Shore Road, Grand Isle, VT at 802-372-3213, 800-468-5227 or visit lcbp.org.

Public Notices can be found on Pages 34 & 35. ★★★★★★★★★★★★★★★ TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY SPECIAL SELECTBOARD MEETING TUESDAY, FEB. 12, 2019 • 7:00 P.M.

equal housing opportunity All real estate advertising in this newspaper is subject to the Federal Fair Housing Act of 1968 as amended which makes it illegal to advertise “any preference, limitation or discrimination based on race, color, religion, sex, handicap, familial status, national origin, sexual orientation, or persons receiving public assistance, or an intention to make any such preference, limitation or discrimination.” This newspaper will not knowingly accept any advertisement for real estate which is in violation of the law. Our readers are hereby informed that all dwellings advertised in this newspaper are available on an equal opportunity basis. To complain of discrimination, call HUD Toll-free at 1-800-424-8590. For the Washington, DC area please call HUD at 426-3500.

Wallace Realty 48 Mountain Terrace Bristol, VT 05443 PH: 802-453-4670 • Fax 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: www.wallacere.com www.greenbuiltvermont.com

Kelly

ROOM 116 - LARGE CONFERENCE ROOM 77 MAIN STREET

AGENDA

* Decision Item ** Possible Decision If you need special accommodations to attend this meeting, please contact the Town Manager’s Office at 388-8100 x-202 as early as possible. Additional information about most Agenda items is available on the Town’s website, www.townofmiddlebury.org, on the Selectboard page. 01/21

Tom

FEBRUARY 11 Puzzle Solutions

The Board of Civil Authority will conduct a brief meeting at 7:00 p.m. to designate the location for Town Meeting held each year on the Monday evening prior to the first Tuesday of March. 7:00 1. **Call to Order 2. *Approval of Agenda 3. *Approval of Minutes of January 22, 2019 Regular Business Meeting Minutes 4. **Citizen Comments [Opportunity to raise or address issues that are not otherwise included on this agenda] 7:05 5. *2019 Liquor License and Outside Consumption Permit Approvals 18. *Adjourn 7:10 6. **Maggie Eaton Regarding Town Meeting Article on Plastic Bag Ban 7:15 7. *Addison County Regional Planning Commission Request for Signature of Follow-up Letter regarding Route 125 Safety 7:20 8. *Approval of Facilities Use Agreement with the Patricia A. Hannaford Career Center for use of the Middlebury Recreation Facility as an Emergency Evacuation Shelter 7:25 9. **Preparation for Town Meeting, Including Town Meeting Poll and Update on Article 7 – Funding for Memorial Sports Center Improvements 7:40 10. **FY19 Year-to-Date Budget Reports 7:50 11. **FY18 Audit Report 8:00 12. *Approval of Check Warrants 13. **Town Manager’s Report 14. **Board Member Concerns 8:15 15. *Executive Session – Anticipated – Contracts & Personnel 16. **Action on Matters Discussed in Executive Session 8:45 17. *Adjourn

Claire

Please call Kelly, Claire, or Tom

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PAGE 36 — Addison Independent, Monday, February 11, 2019

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Monday, February 11, 2019  

Monday, February 11, 2019