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MONDAY   EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 25 No. 16

Baillie shows twin talents

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Ag expert recalls dairy distinctions

Middlebury, Vermont

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Monday, June 10, 2013

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40 Pages

75¢

1HZÀOPGRFXPHQWV &RUQZDOOKLUHV+DFNHWW \HDUVRI)HUULVEXUJKKLVWRU\ WRVHUYHDVQHZSULQFLSDO By  ANDY  KIRKALDY FERRISBURGH   —   From   the   critical  —  the  town’s  involvement  in   the  War  of  1812  —  to  the  whimsical   —  in  the  20th  century  a  Burlington-­ bound   train   crunched   a   loaded   ma-­ nure   truck   —   a   new   professionally   FUDIWHG¿OPRIIHUVDFRPSUHKHQVLYH look  at  Ferrisburgh’s  history. Produced   on   a   volunteer   basis  

E\ YHWHUDQ ¿OPPDNHU DQG 3DQWRQ resident  Ed  Dooley,  owner  of  Waits-­ ¿HOGœV 0DG 5LYHU 0HGLD ³)HUULV-­ burgh:  A  Vermont  Town  With  a  His-­ tory�   traces   the   town   from   its   days   before   European   settlers   arrived   until  its  250th  birthday  celebration  a   year  ago. The   hour-­long   DVD   will   make   6HH)HUULVEXUJK3DJH39)

By  JOHN  FLOWERS CORNWALL   —   Susan   M.   Hackett,  a  Rutland  County  educa-­ tor  and  past  principal  of  the  Plym-­ outh   and   Sunderland   elementary   schools,  has  been  named  the  new   top   administrator   of   Cornwall’s   Bingham  Memorial  School. “I’m  thrilled,�  Hackett,  53,  said   in   reaction   to   accepting   the   job,  

extended  to   her   by   the   Cornwall   School   Board   Thursday   evening   after  a  thorough  interview. “I  think  the  school  is  a  wonder-­ ful  match  for  me.� The   Cornwall   Search   Commit-­ tee   received   28   applications   for   the  job,  soon  to  be  vacated  by  cur-­ rent   Principal   Denise   Goodnow,   6HH+DFNHWW3DJH24)

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Collision  course MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  seniors  Meghan  Santry,  left,  and  Lisel  Peters-­deCourval  prepare  to  collide  with  Gabe  Laberge  and  his   overturned  raft  during  the  MUHS  senior  raft  race  on  Lake  Dunmore  last  Wednesday  afternoon.  See  more  photos  on  Page  2. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

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,QYDVLYHĂ€\VSHFLHVWKUHDWHQVEHUU\FURS By  XIAN  CHIANG-­WAREN ADDISON   COUNTY   —   Berry   growers  across  New  England  are  on   high  alert  for  a  new  invasive  insect   species  this  year.   “We’ve   been   hearing   all   about   it   for   the   last   few   years,â€?   said   Jon   Satz,  whose  Wood’s  Market  Garden   in  Brandon  sells  berries,  along  with   many   other   vegetables,   herbs   and   Ă€RZHUV The   spotted   wing   drosphila,   a  

smaller  relative   of   the   common   IUXLWÀ\KDVPXOWLSOLHGGUDPDWLFDOO\ DFURVV WKH FRXQWU\ LQ WKH SDVW ¿YH years.  First  detected  in  California  in   2008,   it   spread   to   the   southeastern   U.S.   by   the   following   year.   It   was   ¿UVWGHWHFWHGLQ1HZ(QJODQGLQODWH 2011  after  Hurricane  Irene,  though  it   stayed  in  the  southern  regions.  Blue-­ berries   and   raspberries   are   particu-­ larly  vulnerable,  according  to  UVM   Extension   berry   specialist   Vern  

Grubinger. “We  know   what   the   susceptible   crops   are   based   on   experiences   in   other  parts  of  the  country,â€?  he  said.   Last   year,   UVM   researchers   and   local  growers  learned  about  the  pest   ÂżUVWKDQG “In   2012,   it   was   in   most   of   New   England,â€?  he  said. But  the  pest’s  reach  into  northern   Vermont   and   the   Champlain   Valley   last   year   was   spotty.   That   was   at  

least  partially   because   some   of   the   crops  that  are  most  susceptible,  like   late-­season  blueberries  and  fall  rasp-­ berries,  are  not  as  common  because   of  early  frost. “I   would   say   almost   everyone   who   did   fall   raspberries   got   it,   but   raspberries   are   not   a   big   part   of   your  typical  northern  New  England   farm,â€?  Grubinger  said.   Nonetheless,   the   Champlain   Val-­ 6HH)UXLWĂ€\3DJH7)


PAGE  2  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Water sports THE  MIDDLEBURY   UNION   High   School   senior   class   held   its  annual  raft  race  and  family  picnic  at  Branbury  State  Park   on  Lake  Dunmore  last  Wednesday  afternoon.  The  sun  wasn’t   shining,  but  that  didn’t  stop  the  students  from  having  fun  on   the  water.  Pictured,  clockwise  from  above,  Trevor  Emilo,  left,   Mitchell   Clarke   and   Derek   Bagley   make   a   splash   with   their   paddlewheel   boat   after   colliding   with   another   raft;;   George   Mulcahy,  left,  Colin  Ryan  and  Christian  Higgins  power  off  the   start   line;;   Marrott   Weekes,   left,   and   Micah   Lynch   approach   WKH ¿QLVK OLQH HYHQWXDO ZLQQHUV$UO\Q 6XQGHUODQG OHIW 0DWW .DQVN\7DPDUD9RONHUWDQG0RUJDQ*OHQQFRPSHWHLQD¿UVW URXQGUDFH*DEH/DEHUJHOHIW+DLOH\5RXVHDQG9LFWRU)L¿HOG ¿QG WKHLU UK\WKP DQG %UH$QQD 0RUVH OHIW 7LIIDQ\ 'DQ\RZ and  Bailey  Mills  head  back  to  shore  after  capsizing. Independent  photos/Trent  Campbell


Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  —  PAGE  3

Cornwall student serves up cookbook to help children in Africa By JOHN  FLOWERS CORNWALL  —  When  9-­year-­old   Sarah   Holmes   did   some   research   on   Africa   earlier   this   year,   she   was   as-­ tonished  with  some  of  the  things  she   read. “I  looked  up  a  video  on  Africa  that   showed  how  kids  there  are  not  being   treated  as  well  as  they  are  here,”  she   said.  “There  are  sicknesses  there  that   are   preventable,   but   they   don’t   have   enough  money.” So   Sarah,   a   3rd-­grade   student   at   Cornwall’s   Bingham   Memorial   School,   brought   the   dilemma   to   her   young   classmates   and   teacher   Janne   Giles  to  see  what  they  could  do. Some   brainstorming   led   to   a   logi-­ cal  and  tasty  idea:  Why  not  compile   and   sell   a   cookbook,   a   food-­related   vehicle   to   raise   money   for   nour-­ ishment   and   medicine   for   African   children   who   are   ill   and   don’t   have   enough  to  eat? Sarah   took   the   idea   and   ran   with   it.  With  a  little  help  from  her  teacher   and  classmates,  Sarah  put  together  a   letter  this  past  March  requesting  reci-­ pes  from  Cornwall  students  in  grades   kindergarten-­6. Her  letter  pointed  out  some  alarm-­ ing   statistics:   An   African   child   dies   every   minute   from   malaria;;   one   in   four  African  children  have  never  been   to   school;;   and   more   than   300,000   children   worldwide   (mostly   in   Af-­ BINGHAM  MEMORIAL  SCHOOL  third-­grader  Sarah  Holmes  displays  the  new  cookbook  that  she  put  together  to  raise  money  for  African  children.   ULFD DUHIRUFHGWR¿JKWLQZDUV The  book  includes  recipes  from  her  Cornwall  classmates. (See  Cookbook,  Page  31) Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Free lunch  available  for  area  kids By  XIAN  CHIANG-­WAREN to  12  locations  and  we  would  love  to   BRISTOL/VERGENNES   —   Lo-­ serve  400  kids  a  day.  We  have  also   cal  schools  will  be  out  for  the  sum-­ extended  our  program  one  week  —   mer   this   week,   but   in   community   last   year   it   just   felt   like   too   long   a   centers   and   summer   time   between   the   camp   programs   end   of   our   pro-­ across   the   north-­ “Our program is set gram   and   the   start   ern   half   of   Addison   up to deliver meals. of  school.” County,   the   Addison   It’s what we do, we The   lunches   are   Northeast   Super-­ feed kids. If anyone available   to   any   visory   Union   Food   has a kid that needs child  regardless  of   Co-­op  will  be  hard  at   family  income. work   providing   free,   to be fed, we try to Who   pays   for   healthy   lunches   to   feed them.” these   hundreds   of   children   for   the   third   — Food Co-op Director free   lunches?   Not   year  running. Kathy Alexander Addison   County   “Last   year   we   fed   taxpayers   (at   least   an   average   of   300   not  directly).  Alex-­ kids   per   day,”   said   ANeSU   Food   ander  explained  that  the  federal  gov-­ Co-­op   Director   Kathy   Alexander.   ernment  will  reimburse  the  ANeSU   “This   year   we’ve   expanded   from   9   Food   Co-­op   for   all   of   the   expenses  

Marty

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Marty

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Retirement Card Shower for Marty Tewksbury Marty is  retiring  after  45  years   of  teaching  at  area  schools including  Salisbury  Village  &  Ferrisburgh  Central  Schools. Cards may be sent to: PO Box 469 Randolph, VT 05060

because under   the   federal   Summer   Food   Service   Program,   in   districts   where   over   50   percent   of   students   are   signed   up   for   free   and   reduced   meals,   the   government   guarantees   every  child  in  the  district  a  lunch  for   every  day  that  school  is  out. The   trouble   in   some   areas   is   that   few   organizations   are   set   up   to   ad-­ minister  summer  food  programs  that   have  that  kind  of  reach.  In  Addison   County,   the  ANeSU   Food   Co-­op   is   well  situated  to  do  so. “Our  program  is  set  up  to  deliver   meals,”   Alexander   said.   “It’s   what   we  do,  we  feed  kids.  If  anyone  has   a  kid  that  needs  to  be  fed,  we  try  to   feed  them.” Because   the   summer   program   is   zero-­cost,  it  is  not  just  limited  to  the   (See  Lunches,  Page  29)


PAGE  4  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

A DDIS ON   INDE P E NDEN T

Editorial

The  PSB’s  mandate  to  VGS 7RXQGHUVWDQGWKHSXVKVRXWKLQWR$GGLVRQ&RXQW\E\9HUPRQW*DV6\V-­ tems,  it’s  helpful  to  understand  their  mandate  as  dictated  by  the  Public  Ser-­ vice  Board.   6LPLODUWRXWLOLW\FRPSDQLHVLQWKHVWDWH9HUPRQW*DV6\VWHPVLVDKLJKO\ regulated  business.  It  earns  money  based  on  the  dollar  value  of  the  pipeline   WKDWLVODLGWKURXJKRXWWKHVWDWH QRWRQWKHIXHOWKDWÀRZVWKURXJKLWVSLSHV  DQGLWLVFKDUJHGZLWKVHUYLQJWKHSXEOLFJRRGE\H[SDQGLQJLQWRYLWDOPDU-­ NHWVLQDQHIIHFWLYHDQGFRVWHI¿FLHQWPDQQHU:KDWWKDWPHDQVLVWKDW9*6 LVFRPSHOOHGWRH[SDQGWKURXJKRXWWKHVWDWHDVORQJDVLWFDQPDLQWDLQFRP-­ SHWLWLYHUDWHVIRUH[LVWLQJFXVWRPHUV LQ&KLWWHQGHQDQG)UDQNOLQFRXQWLHV  and  push  into  new  markets  that  would,  in  turn,  offer  residents  and  businesses   more  options  to  control  heating  and  cooling  costs.   6HYHUDO\HDUVDJRWKH36%DJUHHGWRDGHDOWKDWDOORZHG9*6WRLQFUHDVH LWVUDWHVWRH[LVWLQJFXVWRPHUVLQ)UDQNOLQDQG&KLWWHQGHQFRXQWLHVE\DVPDOO SHUFHQWDJH UDWKHUWKDQSURYLGHWKHPZLWKIXUWKHUUDWHGLVFRXQWV LQRUGHUWR VWRFNSLOHHQRXJKFDVKWRIDFLOLWDWHH[SDQVLRQWR0LGGOHEXU\DQGRQVRXWKWR Rutland.  The  PSB  agreed  to  the  deal  because  it  furthered  the  state’s  objec-­ tive  of  providing  a  public  good  to  those  areas:  that  good  being  lower  priced   fuel  that  adds  less  pollution  into  the  atmosphere  than  the  fossil  fuels  that  are   FXUUHQWO\XVHG1DWXUDOJDVSULFHVDUHFXUUHQWO\DERXWSHUFHQWFKHDSHU than  oil  and  55  percent  cheaper  than  propane,  while  producing  25  percent   OHVVFDUERQPRQR[LGHSROOXWLRQ RUPRUH FRPSDUHGWRRWKHUIRVVLOIXHOV 7KHPDQGDWHWKDW9*6LVWU\LQJWRIXO¿OOZLWKWKH3KDVH,SURMHFWWR0LG-­ GOHEXU\WKHQLVWRGHYHORSWKDWSLSHOLQHDVHI¿FLHQWO\DVSRVVLEOHLQWHUPVRI money  spent  and  years  to  completion.   ,QWKHODWHVWWDONVZLWK0RQNWRQ9*6DQGWZRPHPEHUVRIWKHVHOHFWERDUG had  drafted  concessions  along  the  preferred  route  to  assure  that  landowners   ZKHUHWKHSLSHOLQHZDVSURSRVHGWRJR KDGDGHTXDWHVHWEDFNVIURPKRPHV and  buildings  to  provide  safety  and  provide  hook-­ups  where  feasible,  among   other  things.  The  selectboard  rejected  that  memorandum  of  understanding  in   a  3-­2  vote  last  week,  however,  which  could  leave  the  decision  in  the  hands  of   WKH36%WKDWLVVKDOOWKH36%GHQ\WKHSURSRVHGURXWHWKURXJK0RQNWRQEH-­ cause  they  agree  it  was  unfair  to  local  residents  there,  or  approve  it  because   it   serves   the   public   good   according   to   the   mandate   they   have   previously   HVWDEOLVKHGIRU9*6" Before  contemplating  that  answer,  it’s  good  to  know  what  other  circum-­ stances  the  PSB  would  consider  to  make  their  decision,  namely,  the  track   UHFRUG RI 9*6 LQ GHYHORSLQJ WKH SLSHOLQH WKURXJKRXW )UDQNOLQ DQG &KLW-­ tenden  counties.  There,  the  vast  majority  of  residents  and  all  towns  to  date   have  welcomed  the  gas  company  with  open  arms.  If  residents  there  have  so   warmly  embraced  natural  gas,  the  PSB  is  likely  to  reason,  what’s  going  on   LQ$GGLVRQ&RXQW\LVEDVHGPRUHRQXQIRXQGHGIHDUVDQGDELWRIQLPE\LVP than  it  is  a  fault  of  the  company.  That’s  just  logic. That  does  not  mean  area  residents  don’t  have  a  voice,  nor  that  the  pipeline   LVDGRQHGHDOUHJDUGOHVVRIZKDWUHVLGHQWVVD\2QWKHFRQWUDU\WKHVWDWHDQG the  gas  company  want  Vermont  residents  to  be  served  in  a  responsible  man-­ ner.  Hammering  out  the  details  that  assure  the  gas  company  is  responsible   in  its  delivery  of  the  natural  gas  is  the  public’s  business.  But,  like  providing   HOHFWULFWUDQVPLVVLRQOLQHVWKURXJKRXWWKH*UHHQ0RXQWDLQ6WDWHYLD9(/-­ &2WKHVWDWHKDVGHWHUPLQHGWKHUHLVDSXEOLFJRRGLQWKHEDVLFGLVWULEXWLRQ :KDWLVWKDWJRRG"7RGDWHLWKDVEHHQEDVHGRQFUHDWLQJDVWURQJHUHFR-­ nomic  base.  When  hospitals,  schools,  businesses,  institutions,  industries  and   KRPHRZQHUVFDQUHGXFHKHDWLQJDQGFRROLQJH[SHQVHVE\WRSHUFHQW WKDWLQFUHDVHVWKHTXDOLW\RIOLYLQJPDNHVEXVLQHVVHVPRUHFRPSHWLWLYHDQG meets   a   public   good.  When   the   state   can   attract   new   industry   and   jobs   to   WRZQEHFDXVHRIOHVVH[SHQVLYHIXHO DQGDPL[RIHQHUJ\UHVRXUFHVWKDWNHHS GRZQZDUGSUHVVXUHRQDOOIXHOSULFHV WKDWPHHWVDSXEOLFJRRG$QGZKHQ natural   gas   could   help   boost   the   economic   development   in   faltering   areas   OLNH5XWODQGDQGGHFUHDVHSROOXWLRQWKDWWRRIXO¿OOVWKHPLVVLRQ 7KHFRUHLVVXHKHUHLVDERXWWKH36%¶VPDQGDWHWR9*6WRVHUYHWKHSXEOLF JRRG7KHSXEOLF¶VUROHLQWKHSDVWKDVEHHQWRDVVXUH9*6GRHVLWZHOO7R argue  now  that  the  public  good  would  be  better  represented  by  denying  eco-­ QRPLFDQGHQYLURQPHQWDOEHQH¿WVIRUWKHQH[WFRXSOHRIGHFDGHVWR0LGGOH-­ bury,  Rutland  and  beyond,  and  instead  embrace  the  arguments  of  opponents   is  within  reason,  but  hardly  a  likely  outcome.   $QJHOR6/\QQ

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT Periodicals  Postage  Paid  at  Middlebury,  Vt.  05753

Postmaster,  send  address  change  to  Addison  Independent, 32%R[0DSOH6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQW‡‡)D[ (0DLOQHZV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP‡:HE6LWHZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP 3XEOLVKHGHYHU\0RQGD\7KXUVGD\E\WKH$GGLVRQ3UHVV,QF0HPEHU9HUPRQW3UHVV$VVRFLDWLRQ1HZ(QJODQG3UHVV$V VRFLDWLRQ1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ 68%6&5,37,215$7(69HUPRQW±0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV2XWRI6WDWH± 0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV'LVFRXQWHGUDWHIRU6HQLRU&LWL]HQVFDOOIRUGHWDLOV  7KH,QGHSHQGHQWDVVXPHVQR¿QDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURUVLQDGYHUWLVHPHQWVEXWZLOOUHSULQWWKDWSDUWRIDQ DGYHUWLVHPHQWLQZKLFKWKHW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURURFFXUUHG$GYHUWLVHUZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\WKHPDQDJHPHQWLPPHGLDWHO\RIDQ\ HUURUVZKLFKPD\RFFXU 7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636

Cap  and  gown  and  drums MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  senior  Ryan  Gyukeri  drums  with  the  school’s  marching  band  in   his  cap  and  gown  during  the  annual  senior  class  march  up  Court  Street  to  their  awards  ceremony  at  the   Memorial  Sports  Center  last  Friday. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Letters to the Editor Time  to  lobby  the  Senate  for  a  GMO  labeling  law Vermont  has  always  been  a   leader,  and  now  we  have  the  op-­ portunity  to  do  it  again.  Just  a  few   months  ago  the  Vermont  house   SDVVHGWKH¿UVWHYHU*02 JHQHWL-­ FDOO\PRGL¿HGRUJDQLVPV ODEHOLQJ legislation  in  the  country,  and  in   another  few  short  months,  the  same   bill  will  work  its  way  through  the   Vermont  Senate,  and  with  enough   grassroots  support,  land  on  the   governor’s  desk. I  am  proud  that  Vermont  is  tak-­ ing  such  a  strong  stand  to  protect   consumers.  We  have  a  right  to  know  

what  is  in  the  food  our  families   DUHHDWLQJ(YHU\\HDUWKHVH*02 foods  are  becoming  more  prevalent   in  our  grocery  stores,  and  still  there   are  no  studies  proving  they  are  safe.   There  are  studies,  however,  that   prove  they  are  not  safe  and  tell  the   damage  they  cause.  Your  legisla-­ tors  are  now  debating  whether  or   not  you  have  a  right  to  know  what’s   in  the  food  you  eat  and  feed  your   families.  You  elected  them,  now  tell   WKHPZKDW\RXWKLQN*HW\RXUGLV-­ WULFWWDONLQJDERXW*02VDQG\RXU legislators  will  have  to  take  notice.

*( JHQHWLFDOO\HQJLQHHUHG IRRGV RU*02V DUHEHFRPLQJPRUHDQG more  prevalent  in  our  foods  every   \HDU0DQ\RIWKHIRRGVRXUNLGVHDW KDYH*(LQJUHGLHQWVLQFOXGLQJEDE\ IRRG0DQ\RIWKHSRSXODUNLGV¶ cereals,  crackers,  and  frozen  entrees   FRQWDLQ*(LQJUHGLHQWV ‡ $SSUR[LPDWHO\SHUFHQW of  processed  foods  available  in  U.S.   grocery  stores  likely  contain  some   JHQHWLFDOO\HQJLQHHUHG *( PDWHUL-­ als. ‡ 0DQ\SRWHQWLDOKHDOWKFRQ-­ (See  Letter,  Page  5)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  —  PAGE  5

Some  health  care  barriers  remain

Vermont  has   taken   the   lead   by   ing  the  original  medicine.   EHFRPLQJ WKH ÂżUVW VWDWH WR UHOHDVH Fortunately   for   patients   in   Ver-­ proposed  health  plan  rates  through   mont,   some   relief   is   on   the   way   its   insurance   exchange,   Vermont   against  these  egregious  practices.   Health   Connect.   Providing   ac-­ Your   doctor   is   the   person   who   cess  to  quality  health  care  is  criti-­ knows   you   the   best.   He   or   she   cal   for   all   Vermonters   who   need   knows  what  your  condition  is,  what   medicines  essential  to  combat  life-­ your   medical   history   is   and,   there-­ altering   conditions.   But   while   the   fore,   what   the   right   medication   is   state   health   exchange   for   you.   No   one   else   seeks   to   provide   uni-­ should   have   the   au-­ versal   coverage   for   all   thority  to  tell  you  what   residents,  there  remain   treatments   you   should   barriers   to   access   for   follow,   especially   thousands   of   patients   someone  who  has  nev-­ This  week’s  writer   whose   ailments   are   is  Kelly  Stoddard,   er  met  you.   often   the   most   severe.   director  of  govern-­ For  people  with  can-­ The   goal   of   “insur-­ ment  relations  and   cer   or   other   chronic   ance  for  everyoneâ€?  is  a   advocacy  in  Vermont   illnesses,   the   medi-­ good  one,  but  the  real-­ for  the  American   cine   their   physician   ity  is  for  many  patients   Cancer  Society  Can-­ prescribes   can   be   a   it   will   come   at   a   cost   cer  Action  Network. lifeline.   But   currently,   that  will  squeeze  them   insurers   can   make   pa-­ even   further   in   an   al-­ tients   fail   on   multiple   ready  tight  economy. medications   through   step   therapy.   Barriers   to   access   come   in   many   That  means  more  trips  to  the  doctor,   different   forms.   Cost   shifting   in   a   if  those  drugs  fail  to  help  you,  more   way   that   could   negatively   affect   co-­pays   for   all   the   prescriptions,   patients  is  what  we’re  seeing  in  the   and   more   suffering   for   the   patient.   exchange,  but  there  are  many  more   For   someone   with   cancer,   time   is   roadblocks  a  patient  could  face.   not  on  your  side.   Known   as   “step   therapy,â€?   insur-­ Another   trend   by   insurers   is   the   ance  companies  —  as  a  regular  prac-­ requirement   for   a   patient   to   take   WLFH²UHTXLUHSDWLHQWVWRIDLOÂżUVWRQ a   medication   not   approved   by   the   a   medication   other   than   what   their   FDA  for  their  condition,  before  the   physician   prescribed   before   cover-­ patient   can   receive   a   medication  

Community

Forum

originally  prescribed   by   their   phy-­ sician.   That’s   not   health   care,   and   it’s  not  safe.   The   use   of   step   therapy   is   on   the   rise.   According   to   the   Phar-­ PDF\ %HQH¿W 0DQDJHPHQW ,QVWL-­ tute,   in   2012,   about   65   percent   of   HPSOR\HUSODQVXVHGWKHVHIDLO¿UVW requirements   to   control   costs   of   pharmaceuticals,  compared  with  50   percent   just   two   years   earlier.   But   Vermont  joined  several  other  states   this   year   in   passing   legislation   to   limit   the   step   therapy   a   patient   is   required  to  go  through.  The  legisla-­ WLRQVSRQVRUHGE\6HQ.HYLQ0XO-­ lin,  will  ensure  patients  have  access   to   the   medication   their   health   care   providers   prescribe   by   limiting   to   one   the   number   of   times   a   patient   has   to   fail   on   a   different   medicine   than   what   was   initially   prescribed.   The   bill   also   ensures   patients   are   not   required   to   take   a   medication   not   approved   by   the   FDA   for   their   condition.   :RUNLQJ DORQJVLGH 6HQ 0XO-­ lin,   we   owe   our   gratitude   to   Reps.   0LNH )LVKHU DQG *HRUJH 7LOO DQG Sens.  Virginia  Lyons  and  Tim  Ashe   for   their   help   in   shepherding   these   important   protections   for   patients   through   the   Legislature.   This   was   the  right  thing  to  do  for  patients  to   HQVXUH WKHLU KHDOWK FRPHV ¿UVW DQG to  keep  costs  down.  

Boarding & Daycare We keep your pet smiling! :]JJMZ.TWWZQVOÂŒ6W+WVKZM\M ;]XMZ^Q[ML8TIa\QUMÂŒ+TQUI\M+WV\ZWTTML =VTQUQ\ML1VLWWZ7]\LWWZ)KKM[[ 0RXQWDLQ5RDG‡$GGLVRQ 5W‡)HUULVEXUJK

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Letters to  the  editor

7KH $GGLVRQ ,QGHSHQGHQW HQFRXUDJHV UHDGHUV WR ZULWH OHWWHUV WR WKH editor.  We  believe  a  newspaper  should  be  a  community  forum  for  people   to  debate  issues  of  the  day Because  we  believe  that  accountability  makes  for  responsible  debate,   we   will   print   signed   letters   only.   Be   sure   to   include   an   address   and   telephone  number,  too,  so  we  can  call  to  clear  up  any  questions. ,I\RXKDYHVRPHWKLQJWRVD\VHQGLWWR/HWWHUVWRWKH(GLWRU$GGLVRQ ,QGHSHQGHQW32%R[0LGGOHEXU\972UHPDLOWRQHZV# addisonindependent.com

Letters to the Editor Children  should  get  vaccines  before  entering  school Though  many  children  get  their   proper  vaccines  before  they  enter   kindergarten,  there  are  a  few   families  that  refuse  due  to  fear   or  religious  beliefs.  This  is  not   acceptable;Íž  for  if  those  families   move  elsewhere,  an  outbreak  of   the  disease  they  weren’t  vacci-­ nated  for  could  cause  an  epidemic. ,QWKHSHUFHQWRIIXOO\ vaccinated  children  in  Vermont   HQWHULQJNLQGHUJDUWHQZDV SHUFHQW7KHSHUFHQWOHIWPD\ not  seem  like  a  lot,  but  those   children  could  be  those  that  risk   contamination  in  communities.   The  “herd  effect,â€?  or  “herd  immu-­ nity,â€?  states  that  if  85-­95  percent   of  the  community  is  immunized,   then  it  will  protect  the  other  10-­15   percent  from  illness.  However,  as   seen  in  the  2012  statistic,  Vermont   VFKRROVDUHDWSHUFHQWZKLFK is  at  the  bottom  end  of  this  range.   This  means  we  are  nearing  closer  

to  not  being  able  to  protect  the   community  as  a  whole,  so  getting   vaccinated  is  vital  for  the  health   of  our  community. Last  year,  a  bill  was  debated  on   that  proposed  that  all  children  en-­ tering  kindergarten  be  vaccinated   regardless  of  beliefs  if  the  school   they  are  entering  has  an  immuni-­ ]DWLRQUDWHRIXQGHUSHUFHQW,W ZDVWXUQHGGRZQEXW,EHOLHYHWKDW this  bill  should  have  been  put  into   effect.  By  not  vaccinating  your   children,  it  is  a  danger  to  others   around  you.  Kids  with  special   needs  that  can’t  get  vaccinations   for  medical  reasons  are  endangered   by  unvaccinated  children.  This   could  cause  death  for  not  just  your   child  who  isn’t  vaccinated,  but  oth-­ ers  around  them. Yes,  there  is  fear  that  children   that  get  vaccinated  are  at  risk  of   autism,  fevers,  pain,  and  multiple   injections  done  in  a  short  time  

period.  However,  just  last  April,   the  Journal  of  Pediatrics  per-­ formed  a  study,  looking  for  evi-­ dence  of  a  link  between  vaccines   VSHFL¿FDOO\005 DQGDXWLVP They  found  no  evidence,  and  lead   researcher  Dr.  Frank  DeStafano   assures  parents  and  children  that   the  vaccines  are  safe.  There  is  also   fear  of  getting  a  fever  after  the   immunization.  A  fever  after  get-­ ting  a  vaccine  is  actually  a  good   sign  because  it  shows  that  your   immune  system  is  cooperating.   These  excuses  are  unrealistic  and   only  spread  fear  of  an  actual  good   thing  that  us  lucky  Americans   have  available. So  —  those  that  are  enrolling   children  in  kindergarten  this  com-­ ing  fall,  do  the  right  thing  and  get   your  children  vaccinated  and  help   protect  our  community. Hannah  Jackman Bristol

tion  have  led  to  increased  use  of   pesticides  and  herbicides. ‡ *(FURSVKDYHLQFUHDVHGKHUEL-­ cide  use  by  more  than  400  million   pounds  in  the  U.S. ‡ 2YHUVSUD\LQJJHQHWLFDOO\ engineered  pesticide-­resistant  crops   is  breeding  new  super-­weeds,  which   threaten  farmers. ‡ /DEHOLQJ*02VKDVVWURQJ

popular  support.  Ninety  percent  of   Americans  support  labeling  geneti-­ cally  engineered  foods. ‡ 0RUHWKDQRWKHUFRXQWULHV DOUHDG\KDYH*02ODEHOLQJODZV 7KLVLVZKDWLVFRPHVGRZQWR We  have  a  right  to  know  if  we  are   IHHGLQJ*02VWRRXUIDPLOLHV Eliza  Desautels Addison

Letter (Continued  from  Page  4) cerns,  such  as  the  presence  of  aller-­ gens  and  toxins,  may  be  overlooked   under  current  testing  protocols. ‡ 6FLHQWLVWVUHFHQWO\IRXQGWKDW WKHLQVHFWLFLGHLQ*(FRUQLVQRZ showing  up  in  our  bloodstream  and   in  umbilical  cord  blood  of  pregnant   moms. ‡ ,QFUHDVHVLQ*(FURSSURGXF-­

Opinions:

Write  a  Letter  to  the  Editor. Send  it  to  news@addisonindependent.com


PAGE  6  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Obituaries

ADDISON COUNTY

Paul LaDuke, 69, Burlington BURLINGTON  —   A   graveside   committal  service  and  burial  for  Paul   Kenneth  LaDuke,  69,  of  Burlington,   who  died  on  Thursday,  June  6,  2013,   will  be  held  Tuesday,  June  11,  2013,   at  2  p.m.  in  the  family  lot  at  Mountain   View  Cemetery  in  Orwell.  The  Rev.  

Harry Forrest, 78, formerly of Brandon BRANDON/SUMTERVILLE,  Fla.  —  Harry  Leonard  Forrest,  78,   formerly   of   Brandon,   died   April   19,   2013,   at   Lane   Purcell   Hospice   House  in  Sumterville,  Fla. He   was   born   in   Weybridge   on   April  24,  1934.  He  was  the  son  of   Arthur  and  Verna  (Phillips)  Forrest.   Following   his   high   school   gradua-­ tion  he  enlisted  in  the  United  States   Air  Force  and  served  for  22  years.   Following   his   honorable   discharge   he   moved   to   Maine   and   joined   the   Limestone   Police   Department.   He   served   many   years   in   various   capacities   including,   undercover   agent   work.   He   afterwards   moved   to  Brandon  where  he  worked  at  the   Brandon  Training  School. After  retiring  he  and  his  wife  spent   winters   in   Florida   and   summers   in   Vermont.   He   was   a   member   of   Brandon  American  Legion  Post  55;͞   St.   Paul’s   Masonic   Lodge,   where   he   served   as   Master   of   the   Lodge;͞   and   Cairo   Shrine   Temple   serving   as  captain  of  the  Cycle  Corps.  His   he  rode  his  Harley  in  parades  with  

the  Shrine   Cycle   Corps.   His   rela-­ tives  say  he  was  an  avid  hunter  and   ÂżVKHUPDQ+HORYHGVSHQGLQJWLPH with   family   and   friends   at   cook-­ outs   and,   they   say,   played   a   mean   harmonica. Surviving   are   his   wife,   Barbara   (Dubois)  Forrest,  whom  he  married   June   24,   1984,   in   Las   Vegas,   BURLINGTON  —  Sudden  summer   Nev.;Íž   three   sons,   David   Forrest   of   rain   storms   can   quickly   change   Brandon,   Scott   Forrest   of   Lincoln   rivers,   tributaries   and   popular   swim-­ and  Mike  Forrest  of  California;Íž  three   ming   holes   in   Vermont   from   safe,   to   stepdaughters,   Sheryl   Kimball   of   hazardous,   to   potentially   fatal.    With   Bristol,   Donna   Forrest   of   Brandon   hot   summer   weather   and   the   record   and  Cathy  Bird  of  Forest  Dale;Íž  two   rainfall  in  May  that  has  swollen  water-­ brothers,  Harold  Forrest  and  Roger   ZD\V DURXQG WKH VWDWH RIÂżFLDOV DUH Forrest,   both   of   Brandon;Íž   a   sister,   urging   caution.   Nearly   100   drown-­ Shirley   Lamoureux   of   Brandon;Íž   ing   deaths   have   occurred   in  Vermont   his   former   wife   and   the   mother   of   between   1985   and   2012   in   natural   his   children,   Virginia   Cornell   of   water  settings  such  as  lakes  and  rivers,   Mechanicsville,  N.Y.;Íž  seven  grand-­ including   at   six   popular   swimming   HARRY  FORREST children;Íž   and   nine   great-­grandchil-­ holes:      Huntington  Gorge,  Huntington   dren.   Several   nieces,   nephews   and   (more   than   15   deaths);Íž   Cobb   Brook,   cousins  also  survive  him. Respecting   his   wishes   there   will   Jamaica  (12  deaths);Íž  Bolton  Potholes   He  was  predeceased  by  a  son,  Jeff   be  no  funeral  service  at  this  time. ÂżYH GHDWKV  'RJÂśV +HDG )DOOV Forrest;Íž  a  sister,  Joyce  Forrest;Íž  and   Memorial   gifts   may   be   made   to   Johnson;Íž   Twin   Falls,   Saxons   River;Íž   two   brothers,   Walter   and   Robert   Shriners   Hospital,   516   Carew   St.,   Hamilton  Falls,  Westminster;Íž  and  New   Forrest. 6SULQJÂżHOG0$ Haven  River,  Bristol. “There’s  always  a  risk  of  drowning   while   swimming,   but   if   the   water   is   high   and   fast   these   swimming   holes   are  far  from  safe,  and  everyone  should   stay   away   under   these   conditions,â€?   said   Health   Commissioner   Harry   Chen   MD.   “As   an   emergency   room   May  29,  2013,  at  the  Gosnell  House  in   Those  wishing  to  pay  their  respects   SK\VLFLDQ,NQRZÂżUVWKDQGWKHWUDJHG\ Scarborough,   Maine,   will   be   held   on   to  the  family  may  do  so,  on  Wednesday,   of  drowning,  and  in  most  cases  these   Wednesday,   June   12,   2013,   at   Forest   June  12,  from  2-­4  p.m.  at  the  home  of   deaths  are  preventable.  Swim  holes  are   Dale  Cemetery. Pike  &  Colleen  Mitchell  in  Forest  Dale. one  of  our  cherished  natural  resources,  

Swimming  holes  require   extra  caution  for  safety

!

"

Donald Mitchell graveside committal service FOREST  DALE  —  A  private  grave-­ side   committal   service   and   burial   for   Donald  W.  Mitchell,  64,  son  of  the  late   Harold   and   Betty   Mitchell,   who   died  

In loving Memory of

Linda Cyr Ferguson

at

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but  we   need   to   better   inform   people   about  the  serious  risks  involved.�   For  the  past  several  months,  a  group   dedicated   to   swimming   hole   safety   has   been   meeting   to   discuss   ways   to   improve   safety   and   increase   aware-­ ness  about  the  risks  of  high  water.  The   group   is   made   up   of   representatives   from  the  Vermont  River  Conservancy,   the   Burlington   Legacy   Project,   Place   Creative   Company,   the   Health   Department,   the   Agency   of   Natural   Resources,  including  the  Departments   of   Environmental   Conservation   and   Forest,   Parks   and   Recreation,   Bruce   Seifer,   and   attorneys   Mark   Kolter,   Brian  Dunkiel  and  Ken  Schatz.   The   group   is   working   to   identify   causes  of  drowning  deaths  and  deter-­ mine   actions   that   could   prevent   inju-­ ries  —  such  as  posting  warning  signs,   working   with   landowners   and   local   businesses   near   drowning   hazards,   providing  online  access  to  information   DERXW ULYHU VWUHDP ÀRZ ZLWK LQVWUXF-­ tions  on  how  to  use  this  information  to   prevent   injuries,   developing   a   public   awareness   campaign,   and   enhanced   monitoring.    Enacting   and   enforcing   existing   laws   or   policies   that   could   improve  safety  are  also  under  review.  

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  —  PAGE  7

)UXLWĂ&#x20AC;\ (Continued  from  Page  1) ley   was   not   immune.   Grubinger   re-­ membered  that  berry  growers  at  the   Intervale   in   Burlington   were   espe-­ cially  hard-­hit  last  summer. 7KLV \HDU KH H[SHFWV WKDW WKH Ă&#x20AC;\ will  be  â&#x20AC;&#x153;everywhere.â&#x20AC;?   Unlike   its   close   relation   the   fruit   Ă&#x20AC;\ ² ZKLFK OD\V LWV HJJV LQ RYHU-­ ULSH QHDUO\ URWWLQJ IUXLW ² WKH IH-­ male   spotted   wing   drosphila   has   a   razor-­sharp  egg-­laying  limb  that  can   penetrate  newly  ripe  berries,  particu-­ ODUO\ODWHLQWKHVHDVRQZKHQWKHĂ&#x20AC;\ÂśV numbers  get  larger.  Interestingly,  the   KDUP LVQÂśW GRQH E\ WKH HJJV RU ODU-­ vae,  which  are  so  miniscule  that  they   are  hard  to  see. Âł<RXFDQÂśWVHHLW´*UXELQJHUVDLG â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  called  up  last  year  and  said,   Âľ:KDWÂśV WKLV GLVHDVH HDWLQJ DOO P\ EOXHEHUULHV"Âś 7KH\ GLGQÂśW NQRZ LW was  an  insect.â&#x20AC;? Nor  should  anyone  be  too  worried   about  accidentally  consuming  a  ber-­ U\WKDWWKHĂ&#x20AC;\KDVDOUHDG\UHDFKHG Âł,W VRXQGV JURVV EXW WKHUHÂśV QR harm  to  humans  from  eating  them,â&#x20AC;?   Grubinger  said.   The  danger  to  the  fruit  is,  in  fact,   the  tiny  hole  the  female  makes  to  lay   JILL  KOPEL  OF  New  Leaf  Organics  in  Bristol  has  held  off  making  further  investments  in  her  berry  crop  this  year  in  part  because  of  the  threat  of   her  eggs,  which  exposes  the  inside  of   WKHVSRWWHGZLQJGURVSKLODDPLQLDWXUHUHODWLYHRIWKHIUXLWĂ&#x20AC;\WKDWKDVEHJXQPDNLQJLQURDGVLQWR9HUPRQW the  fruit  to  external  bacteria,  causing   Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell them  to  rot  very  quickly.  A  single  fe-­ an   investment   when   area   growers   can  leave  again.  The  science  has  not   limeter.  The  netting  can  be  costly,   farm  this  year,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. male  can  lay  hundreds  of  eggs. Kopel   said   she   had   been   â&#x20AC;&#x153;very   were  still  unsure  of  how  devastat-­ Grubinger   and   UVM   Extension,   yet  caught  up,  but  a  number  of  effec-­ KRZHYHU DQG GLIÂżFXOW WR ÂżQG in  collaboration  with  growers  in  ar-­ tive  spray-­free  techniques  have  been   Grubinger  knows  of  one  place  that   awareâ&#x20AC;?   of   the   threat   posed   by   the   LQJWKHQHZĂ&#x20AC;\ZRXOGEH Down   in   Brandon,   Satz   consid-­ eas   like   Connecticut   and   Rhode   Is-­ developed  already,  and  Grubinger  is   sells  it  in  bulk,  but  the  seller  is  lo-­ LQYDVLYHĂ&#x20AC;\DQGKDGDWWHQGHGVHY-­ eral   workshops   during   the   winter   ers   himself   lucky   that   he   mostly   ODQG²ZKHUHWKHSHVWKDVEHHQIRUD VXUH WKH FKHPLFDOV WKDW DWWUDFW Ă&#x20AC;LHV cated  in  Quebec. For   Jill   Kopel,   the   co-­owner   months   to   learn   how   to   make   her   has   June-­bearing   berries,   and   has   and   the   poisons   that   FRXSOH RI \HDUV ² DUH also  put  expansion  plans  on  hold. kill  them  will  become   of   New   Leaf   Organics   in   Bristol,   farm  less  vulnerable. researching   ways   to   which   offers   pick-­your-­own   ber-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   trying   to   very   proac-­ Âł,MXVWSHUVRQDOO\ZRXOGQÂśWZDQW LQFUHDVLQJO\UHÂżQHG minimize   the   impact   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Someone to  spray  berries  close  to  consump-­ In   the   meantime,   ries   as   well   as   vegetables,   the   tive,â&#x20AC;?  she  said. in  Vermont.   Grubinger   Ă&#x20AC;JXUHGRXWWKDW Kopel  said  that  she  and  her  hus-­ WLRQ´ KH VDLG Âł:HÂśUH FHUWLÂżHG a   set   of   instructions   QHWWLQJ ZRXOG KDYH EHHQ KHU ÂżUVW said   many   have   found   LI\RXSXWWZR IRU *UXELQJHUÂśV ODWHVW choice  but  the  cost  made  her  hesi-­ band   had   considered   expanding   RUJDQLF DQG LWÂśV DQ DZIXOO\ WRXJK that   simply   harvesting   their   berry   operations   this   year,   pest.   It   is   making   me   think   twice   berries  as  soon  as  they   JDOORQVRIVXJDU low-­cost,   do-­it-­your-­ tate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   had   already   made   a   couple   but  had  decided  not  to  in  large  part   about   expanding   my   raspberry   VHOI GHVLJQ ² ZKLFK are   ripe   does   a   lot   of   LQJDOORQV DWWUDFWV WKH Ă&#x20AC;LHV ZLWK of   big   capital   investments   on   the   because   it   seemed   like   too   costly   crop.â&#x20AC;? good.   RILQVHFWLFLGH a   mix   of   sugar,   yeast   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Clean  picking  is  the   WKH\¡OOHDWLWÂľ and   apple   cider   vine-­ way  to  go,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; 890([WHQVLRQ gar,  then  drowns  them   He   and   others   have   EHUU\VSHFLDOLVW in  a  mix  of  wine,  vine-­ also  experimented  with   9HUQ*UXELQJHU JDUDQGGHWHUJHQW²LV inventing   traps   for   the   available   on   his   web-­ insects,  which  will  stop   and  eat  sugar  the  moment  they  sense   site,   www.uvm.edu/vtvegandberry/ SWDInfo.html. it. â&#x20AC;&#x153;If   you   have   50   traps   and   100   Âł6RPHRQH ÂżJXUHG RXW WKDW LI \RX put   two   gallons   of   sugar   in   10   gal-­ berry  plants,  (the  traps)  make  a  dif-­ ORQVRILQVHFWLFLGHWKH\ÂśOOHDWLW´KH ference,â&#x20AC;?  he  said. The   most   thoroughly   effective   recalled. Continue  paying  the  electric  company  for   The   idea   is   to   devise   a   trap   that   and   environmentally   sound   option   your  electricity  or  do  something  different. WKH Ă&#x20AC;LHV ZLOO JR WR EHIRUH WKH IUXLW known  so  far  is  netting,  with  open-­ and   that   will   kill   them   before   they   ings  no  bigger  than  one  square  mil-­ Solar  is  more  affordable  than  ever!

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PAGE  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

communitycalendar

Jun

10

MONDAY

Addison  County   Right   to   Life   meeting   in   Middlebury.   Monday,   June   10,   7-­8   p.m.,   Grace   Baptist   Church,   Merchants   Row.   Visitors   welcome.   Info:  388-­2898  or  L2Paquette@aol.com.   Band   concert   rehearsal   in   Vergennes.   Monday,  June  10,  7-­9  p.m.,  VUHS  band  room.   Instrumentalists   of   all   ages   are   welcome   to   join  the  Vergennes  City  Band,  which  performs   every   Monday   night,   June   24-­Aug.   19,   in   the   Vergennes   City   Park.   Last   rehearsal   on   June   17.  Info:  877-­2938,  ext.  218.   Book   club   meeting   in   Bridport.   Monday,   June   10,  7-­8  p.m.,  Carl  Norton  Highway  Department   conference   room.   Discussing   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Winterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Boneâ&#x20AC;?   by  Daniel  Woodrell  and  discussing  recommen-­ dations  for  summer  reading.  Last  meeting  until   fall.  Info:  758-­2858.  

Jun

12

WEDNESDAY

GED  testing   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   June   12,   8:45   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Vermont   Adult   Learning,   282   Boardman   St.   Pre-­registration   required.   Call   388-­4392  for  info  and  to  register.   Foot  care  and  blood  pressure  clinic  in  Bristol.   Wednesday,   June   12,   10   a.m.-­noon,   Bristol   American  Legion.  One  of  a  series  of  free  clinics   for   seniors   offered   by   Addison   County   Home   Health  and  Hospice.  Bring  your  own  basin  and   towel.  Info:  388-­7259.   Addison   County   Retired   Teachers   meeting   in   Ferrisburgh.   Wednesday,   June   12,   10:30   a.m.-­noon,  Rokeby  Museum.  Take  a  tour  of  the   Robinson  house  and  see  the  exhibit  in  the  new   building.  Cost  $9.   Senior   luncheon   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,   June   12,   11:30   a.m.-­1:30   p.m.,   Bristol   American   Legion.   CVAA   sponsors   this   senior   meal   of   beef   steak   with   cheddar,   homefries,   broccoli   salad,   dinner   roll   and   chocolate   chip   birthday   cake.   Suggested   donation   $4   Bring   your   own   place   setting.   Reservations   required:   1-­800-­ 642-­5119,   ext.   610.   Transportation   via  ACTR:   388-­1946.   Gallery   talk   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   June   12,  noon-­1  p.m.,  Henry  Sheldon  Museum.  Bill   Brooks,  executive  director  of  the  Sheldon,  will   lead  a  gallery  talk  in  conjunction  with  the  muse-­ umâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  current  exhibit,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;From  Dairy  to  Doorstep:   Milk  Delivery  in  New  England.â&#x20AC;?  Museum  admis-­ sion   for   nonmembers,   free   to   members.   Info:   388-­2117  or  www.henrysheldonmuseum.org.   Senior   night   meal   and   silent   auction   in   Bridport.  Wednesday,  June  12,  4:30-­6:30  p.m.,  

Bridport  Grange.   CVAA   sponsors   an   evening   meal   of   roast   chicken,   potato   salad,   peas   and   maple   bread   pudding.   Silent   auction   and   teacup   auction   as   well.   Suggested   donation   $5.  Bring  your  own  place  setting.  Reservations   required:  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  615.   Historical   society   meeting   in   New   Haven.   Wednesday,   June   12,   7-­9   p.m.,   New   Haven   Congregational   Church.   The   New   Haven   Historical   Society   will   meet.   Guest   speaker   Charles  Palmer  will  talk  about  his  birdhouses.   Refreshments  follow.  Info:  989-­4066.   Poetry  reading  in  Salisbury.  Wednesday,  June   12,   7-­9   p.m.,   Salisbury   Free   Public   Library.   Come   share   your   favorite   published   poems   with  other  poetry  lovers.  

Jun

13

THURSDAY

Monthly  wildlife   walk   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   June   13,   7-­9   a.m.,   Otter   View   Park   and   Hurd   Grassland.   A   monthly   OCAS-­MALT   event,   inviting   community   members   to   help   survey   birds   and   other   wildlife.   Meet   at   Otter   View   Park  parking  area,  corner  of  Weybridge  Street   and  Pulp  Mill  Bridge  Road.  Shorter  and  longer   routes  possible.  Come  for  all  or  part  of  the  walk.   Beginning   birders   welcome.   Info:   388-­1007   or   388-­6829.   Foot   care   and   blood   pressure   clinic   in   Middlebury.  Thursday,  June  13,  10  a.m.-­noon,   The  Commons.  One  of  a  series  of  free  clinics   for   seniors   offered   by   Addison   County   Home   Health  and  Hospice.  Bring  your  own  basin  and   towel.  Info:  388-­7259.   Senior   luncheon   in   Bristol.   Thursday,   June   13,   11:30   a.m.-­1:30   p.m.,   Bristol   Masonic   Hall.   CVAA   sponsors   this   favorite   meal.   Homemade   soup,   broccoli   salad,   chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   salad   garnished   with   shrimp,   homemade   bread   and   strawberry   shortcake.   Suggested   dona-­ tion   $3.   Reservations   required:   453-­3451.   Transportation  via  ACTR:  388-­1946.   National   Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Audienceâ&#x20AC;?   in   Middlebury.  Thursday,  June  13,  2-­4  p.m.,  Town   Hall   Theater.   Helen   Mirren   stars   as   Queen   Elizabeth   in   this   live   broadcast   from   Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Gielgud   Theatre.   Tickets   $17,   $10   students,   DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  RU www.townhalltheater.org.   Young  Professionals  gathering  in  Middlebury.   Thursday,   June   13,   5:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Two   Brothers  Tavern.  Part  of  the  Better  Middlebury   Partnershipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   new   series   of   social   gather-­ ings  for  individuals  in  their  20s  and  30s  in  the   greater   Middlebury   area   to   share   ideas   and   connect   with   each   other.  Appetizers   provided;   cash  bar. Classic   Movie   Night   in   Shoreham.   Thursday,   June  13,  7-­9  p.m.,  Platt  Memorial  Library.  Enjoy   a  classic  movie,  popcorn  and  the  cool  air  condi-­ tioning  of  the  library.  Info:  897-­2647.   National   Theatreâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Audienceâ&#x20AC;?   in   Middlebury.  Thursday,  June  13,  7-­9  p.m.,  Town   Hall   Theater.   Helen   Mirren   stars   as   Queen   Elizabeth   in   this   broadcast   from   Londonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Gielgud   Theatre.   Tickets   $17,   $10   students,   DYDLODEOH DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  RU www.townhalltheater.org.  

Jun

14

FRIDAY

Senior  luncheon   and   bingo   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   14,   10:30   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Russ   Sholes   Senior   Center.   CVAA   sponsors   bingo,   starting   at   11   a.m.,   followed   by   a   lunch   of   roast   pork   cutlet   with   white   cider   sauce,   mashed   potatoes,   garden   peas   and   mushrooms,   dinner   roll   and   Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Day   cake.   Suggested   donation   $4.   Bring   your   own   place   setting.   Reservations  

7LPHWUDYHO YOUNG  MUSEUMGOERS   DRESS   up   in   period   cos-­ tume  at  a  past  Family  Fun  Day  at  the  Sheldon  Museum   in   Middlebury.   This   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   event   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   with   kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   history   activities  and  games,  live  music,  a  bake  sale  and  more   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  is  on  Saturday,  June  15,  from  10  a.m.-­2  p.m. Photo  by  Anne  Campbel

%UDVVEHQHÂżW 7+(6281',1*%5$66HQVHPEOHZLOOSHUIRUPDEHQHÂżWFRQFHUWDWSPRQ)ULGD\ June  14,  in  the  1851  Union  Church  in  New  Haven  Mills.  Proceeds  from  the  concert  sup-­ port  restoration  of  the  historic  church. required:  1-­800-­642-­5119,  ext.  634.  Free  trans-­ portation  via  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Senior   luncheon   in   Bristol.   Friday,   June   14,   11:30  a.m.-­1:30  p.m.,  Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  at  Baldwin  Creek.   CVAA   sponsors   a   monthly   luncheon   featur-­ ing   Chef   Doug   Mackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   talents.   Marinated   vegetable   salad,   chicken   and   broccoli   quiche   with   coleslaw,   roll,   and   strawberry   shortcake.   Suggested  donation  $5.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Must   Be   the   Milkâ&#x20AC;?   truck   visit   in   Middlebury.   Friday,  June  14,  4-­7  p.m.,  Sheldon  Museum.  In   celebration   of   Dairy   Weekend   at   the   Sheldon   Museum,   the   New   England   Dairy   Promotion   Boardâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  educational  truck  will  be  at  the  museum   to  offer  dairy  samples  and  interactive  activities.   Info:  388-­2117.   Arts   Walk   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   14,   5-­7   p.m.,   downtown   Middlebury   and   the   Marble   Works.   Monthly   outdoor   stroll   through   town   featuring  art,  music,  food  and  fun.  See  monthly   Ă&#x20AC;LHUDWZZZPLGGOHEXU\DUWVZDONFRP Exhibit  opening  reception  in  Brandon.  Friday,   June   14,   5-­7   p.m.,   Compass   Music   and   Arts   &HQWHU  -RQHV 'ULYH 7KH ÂżUVW H[KLELW opening   of   the   new   Compass   Music   and  Arts   Center.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Breaking  the  Iceâ&#x20AC;?  features  the  work  of   abstract  expressionist  Roger  Book.  The  center   will   host   exhibits,   performances,   programs,   workshops  and  more.  Info:  www.cmacvt.org  or   802-­247-­4295.   Exhibit   opening   reception   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   14,   5-­7   p.m.,   Edgewater   Gallery.   Celebrating   the   opening   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Anne   Cady:   Twenty   Years,â&#x20AC;?   a   solo   exhibit   of   20   of   Cadyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   new,  vibrantly  colored  oil  paintings.  On  exhibit   through   June.   Info:   802-­458-­0098   or   www. edgewatergallery-­vt.com.   Artist   demonstration   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   14,   5:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Deborah   Sharpe-­ Lunstead  Papermaking  Studio,  37  Washington   6W VHFRQG Ă&#x20AC;RRU 9LVLW D ZRUNLQJ DUWLVW VWXGLR Come   make   a   sheet   of   paper   and   see   how   Deborah   Sharpe-­Lunstead   turns   pigmented   paper  pulp  into  a  landscape  painting.   Free   community   concert   in   Monkton.   Friday,   June  14,  6-­8  p.m.,  Monkton  Rec  Field,  Hollow   Road.  Helen  Weston  and  the  Bessette  Quartet   and   special   guest   Pete   Sutherland   play   good   time   swing,   blues   and   rock.   Pack   a   picnic   or   get  a  burger  or  hot  dog  and  beverage  from  the   concession  stand.   History   of   dairy   lecture   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   14,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Sheldon   Museum.   Former   Vermont   Secretary   of   Agriculture   will   speak.  Offered  in  conjunction  with  the  Sheldonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   current   exhibit,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;From   Dairy   to   Doorstep:   Milk   Delivery  in  New  England.â&#x20AC;?  Info:  388-­2117.   Brass   band   concert   in   New   Haven.   Friday,   June   14,   7-­9   p.m.,   New   Haven   Mills   Church.   Ken   Westonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Sounding   Brass   will   perform.   $GPLVVLRQ  WR EHQHÂżW UHVWRUDWLRQ RI WKH church.   Additional   donations   welcome.   Info:   (802)  767-­3231.   9HUPRQW&RPHG\'LYDVEHQHÂżWLQ0LGGOHEXU\   Friday,  June  14,  8-­10  p.m.,  Town  Hall  Theater.   The  Divas,  the  countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  all-­female  touring  

VWDQGXSFRPHG\WURXSHJLYHVDEHQH¿WSHUIRU-­ mance  for   the   Foster   &   Adoptive   Families   of   Addison   County   Association.   Includes   adult   humor.   Tickets   $25   general/$20   foster   and   adoptive   parents,   available   at   the   THT   box   RI¿FHRUDWWKHGRRUZZZYHUPRQW-­ comedydivas.com.  

Jun

15

SATURDAY

Annual  church   porch/basement   sale  in  Bristol.  Saturday,  June  15,  8   a.m.-­3  p.m.,  Bristol  Federated  Church.   Âł(YHU\WKLQJ XQGHU WKH VXQ´7R EHQHÂżW FKXUFK missions.  Info:  453-­2420.   $QQXDO Ă&#x20AC;HD PDUNHW LQ 6RXWK 6WDUNVERUR   Saturday,   June   15,   8   a.m.-­2   p.m.,   Jerusalem   Schoolhouse,   Route   17,   behind   Jerusalem   Corners   Store.   Clothing,   housewares,   tools,   sporting   equipment,   books,   kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   toys   and   more.   Proceeds   will   be   used   for   maintenance   and   renovations   to   the   schoolhouse.   Info:   453-­4573.   Can   and   bottle   drive   in   Leicester.   Saturday,   June   15,   8   a.m.-­noon,   Leicester   Town   Shed.   To  support  Leicester  Central  Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Summer   Alive!  summer  camp.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Letâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Go   Birdingâ&#x20AC;?   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   June   15,   9-­11   a.m.,   Wright   Park,   Seymour   St.  Ext.  A  guided  walk  for  beginning  birders  of   all   ages   along   the   Quest   Trail,   a   spur   off   the   Trail   Around   Middlebury.   Bring   binoculars   or   borrow  ours.  Family-­friendly,  but  not  for  stroll-­ ers.  A  MALT/OCAS  event.  Weather  questions?   989-­7115.   Book   and   plant   sale   in   Shoreham.   Saturday,   June  15,  9  a.m.-­1  p.m.,  Platt  Memorial  Library.   Hundreds   of   titles,   paperbacks,   hardcovers,   SRSXODUÂżFWLRQNLGVÂśERRNVDQGPRUH$QQXDOV DQG SHUHQQLDOV IRU VDOH WR EHQHÂżW WKH OLEUDU\ Info:  897-­2647.   Museum   family   fun   day   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   June   15,   10   a.m.-­2   p.m.,   Sheldon   Museum.   Children   are   invited   to   play   old-­ fashioned   games,   learn   to   sew   a   patchwork   quilt   block,   enter   the   jump   rope   contest   and   enjoy   a   puppet   show,   plus   dress   in   18th-­   and   19th-­century   clothes,   write   on   slates,   and   try   the   trundle   bed.   Live   music.   Bake   sale.   Free   with  museum  admission.  Info:  388-­2117.   Historical  crafts  and  skills  demonstrations  in   Addison.   Saturday,   June   15,   1:30-­3:30   p.m.,   Chimney   Point   State   Historic   Site.   Site   inter-­ preter   Karl   Crannell   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blast   From   the   Past:   How   They   Made   It   in   New   France,â&#x20AC;?   a   hands-­on  demonstration  of  the  crafts  and  skills   practiced  by  those  living  her  on  the  frontier  of   New  France.  Wood  crafts,  tailoring  and  more.   Call  for  details:  759-­2412.   Church   dinner   in   Forest   Dale.   Saturday,   June   15,  5-­6:30  p.m.,  St.  Thomas  &  Grace  Episcopal   Church,  VT  Route  73.  Annual  ham  dinner  with   strawberry  shortcake.  Good  will  offering  at  the   door.  All  proceeds  go  to  outreach.   Free   community   supper   in   Ferrisburgh.   Saturday,   June   15,   5-­6   p.m.,   Crossroads  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  9

communitycalendar Chapel,  Route   7.   Summer   barbecue.   All   are   welcome.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Sip  Into  Summerâ&#x20AC;?  fundraiser  in  New  Haven.   Saturday,   June   15,   6-­8   p.m.,   Lincoln   Peak   Vineyard.   Lincoln   Peak   wines   paired   with   top   local  chefs.  Live  food  demo,  silent  art  auction,   OLYHPXVLFRQWKHGHFN7REHQHÂżW2WWHU&UHHN Child   Center.   Tickets   $30   each,   $50   couples,   $25  seniors.  Info:  388-­9688.   Ferrisburgh   documentary   screening   in   Ferrisburgh.   Saturday,   June   15,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Ferrisburgh   Town   Hall/Community   Center,   Route   7.   The   Ferrisburgh   Historical   Society  and  Mad  River  Media  have  completed   a   one-­hour   documentary   about   the   history   of   Ferrisburgh.   Refreshments   served.   DVDs   available  for  purchase.   Silent  movie  screening  in  Brandon.  Saturday,   June   15,   7-­9   p.m.,   Brandon   Town   Hall   and   Community   Center,   Route   7.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Best   of   Charlie  Chaplin,â&#x20AC;?  a  collection  of  comedy  short   ÂżOPV WKDW WUDFH &KDSOLQÂśV ULVH IURP XQNQRZQ comedian   to   the   most   popular   star   of   early   cinema.   Accompanied   by   live   music   by   Jeff   Rapsis.   Free,   but   donations   to   the   town   hall   restoration   fund   appreciated.   Info:   www.bran-­ dontownhall.org.   Guitarist   Don   Ross   in   concert   in   Vergennes.   6DWXUGD\-XQHSP9HUJHQQHV2SHUD House.   Two-­time   winner   of   the   U.S.   National   Fingerstyle   Guitar   Competition   performs.   2SHQLQJ IRU KLP DUH 7UHYRU *RUGRQ +DOO DQG 9HUJHQQHVÂśRZQ0DWWHR3DOPHU7LFNHWVLQ advance,  $25  at  the  door.  Info:  www.vergenne-­ soperahouse.org  or  877-­6737.   Viola   concert   with   piano   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   June   15,   8-­10   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.   London-­born   international   award-­ winning   viola   and   violin   player   Helena   Baillie   performs  with  pianist  Tanya  Gabrielian.  Tickets   $15,   available   at   382-­9222,   www.townhallthe-­ DWHURUJRUWKH7+7ER[RIÂżFH

Jun

16

SUNDAY

Chicken  barbecue   in   Lincoln.   Sunday,   June   16,   11:30   a.m.-­2:30   p.m.,  Lincoln  Fire  Station,  34  Gove  Hill   5RDG )DWKHUÂśV 'D\ IXQGUDLVHU IRU WKH /LQFROQ Volunteer   Fire   Company.  Adults   $10,   children   $5.  BBQ  goes  until  the  food  is  gone.   Antiques   evaluations   in   Bridport.   Sunday,   June  16,  noon-­1:30  p.m.,  Bridport  town  green.   The  Bridport  Historical  Society  welcomes  Joan   Korda  and  Howard  Graff  to  evaluate  antiques   GXULQJ WKH ÂżUHPHQÂśV %%4 0DJJLH 1RFFD ZLOO have   autographed   copies   of   her   new   book,   Âł7KH5HG%ULFN3DQWU\´IRU3URÂżWVEHQHÂżW the  historical  society.   Garden  tour  and  talk  in  Lincoln.  Sunday,  June   16,   2-­4   p.m.,   at   the   home   of   Suzanne   Allen.   Ed   Burke   of   Rocky   Dale   Gardens   will   give   a   talk   titled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Color:   The   International   Language   RI )ORZHUV´ 7RXUV RI $OOHQÂśV PHDGRZ DQG woodland  gardens.  Tea  and  light  refreshments.   )XQGUDLVHU IRU WKH 2QH :RUOG /LEUDU\ 3URMHFW Tickets   $25,   available   at   Lawrence   Memorial   Library  in  Bristol  or  by  calling  453-­4147.  Rain   GDWH -XQH  JR WR RQHZRUOGOLEUDU\SURMHFW org   after   9   a.m.   on   the   16th   if   the   weather   is   questionable.   Tricky  Britches  in  concert  in  Brandon.  Sunday,   -XQH   SP %UDQGRQ 0XVLF 2OGWLPH country   music   with   a   bluegrass   kick   and   the   VSLULW RI D VWUHHWFRUQHU MXJ EDQG $GPLVVLRQ $15.   Info:   (802)   465-­4071   or   info@brandon-­ music.net.  

Jun

17

MONDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Bristol.   Monday,   June   17,   10:30   a.m.-­12:30   p.m.,   Cubbers   Restaurant.   CVAA   sponsors   this   monthly   event   for   down-­home   cooking   and   friendly   service.   Menu   TBA.   Suggested  donation  $5.  Reservations  required:   1-­800-­642-­5119.   Summer   Reading   Program   kickoff   in   Middlebury.   Monday,   June   17,   5-­5:45   p.m.,   Ilsley   Library   front   lawn.   Kids   can   sign   up   for   summer   reading.   Teen   musician   Hollis   Long   will  entertain.  Rain  site:  Young  Adult  Room.  Info:  

materials.  Hands-­on  workshop  for  kids  capable   of  using  hand  tools.  Space  is  limited;  advance   registration   required   starting   June   1   at   www. ilsleypubliclibrary.org/kids   or   in   person.   Info:   388-­4097.   Percy   Jackson   &   the   Library   Olympians   for   teens  in  Middlebury.  Thursday,  June  20,  5-­7   p.m.,   Ilsley   Library.   Teens   in   grades   7-­12   are   LQYLWHGWRHQMR\DQDIWHUQRRQRIOLYHUROHSOD\LQJ inspired  by  the  books  by  Rick  Riordan.  Hosted   E\,OVOH\ÂśV9ROXQ7HHQV,QIR Concert   band   open   rehearsal   in   Orwell.   7KXUVGD\-XQHSP2UZHOO9LOODJH School   band   room.   Musicians   of   all   ages,   DELOLWLHV DQG LQVWUXPHQWV DUH LQYLWHG WR MRLQ LQ :HHNO\ FRQFHUWV ZLOO WDNH SODFH -XO\ $XJ RQWKH2UZHOOYLOODJHJUHHQ,QIRZZZIDFH-­ ERRNFRP2UZHOO7RZQ%DQG Growing   a   storytelling   movement   in   Middlebury.  Thursday,  June  20,  7-­9  p.m.,  Ilsley   Library.  Join  storytelling  expert  Barbara  Ganley   for   a   conversation   about   ways   to   engage   the   community   by   bringing   storytelling   to   existing   community   groups   and   events,   embedding   story   within   the   physical   environment   and   exploring   new   forms   of   storytelling,   including   digital   storytelling.   Hosted   by   Storymatters:   lar17g@comcast.net  or  388-­8410.   Historical  society  meeting  in  Bristol.  Thursday,   -XQH   SP +RZGHQ +DOO  :HVW 6W The  Bristol  Historical  Society  welcomes  Georg   Papp  Sr.,  a  genuine  outhouse  builder,  to  give  a   presentation   on   the   craft   of   building   â&#x20AC;&#x153;the   best   outhouses,  backhouses  and  privies  this  side  of   the  19th  century.â&#x20AC;?  Refreshments  follow.  

Jun

21

Fiddle  me  this OLD-­TIME  COUNTRY  BAND  Tricky  Britches  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  which  the  Portland  Phoenix  praises   IRULWVÂłWKUHHSDUWKDUPRQLHVÂżUHEUHDWKLQJÂżGGOHDQGPDQGROLQOLFNVDQGWKHWKXPS thump  to  the  gut  of  a  stand-­up  bassâ&#x20AC;?  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  brings  jug-­band  spirit  to  Brandon  Music  on   Sunday,  June  15,  at  7  p.m. 388-­4097.   Band   concert   rehearsal   in   Vergennes.   Monday,  June  17,  7-­9  p.m.,  VUHS  band  room.   Instrumentalists   of   all   ages   are   welcome   to   MRLQWKH9HUJHQQHV&LW\%DQGZKLFKSHUIRUPV every   Monday   night,   June   24-­Aug.   19,   in   the   Vergennes  City  Park.  Info:  877-­2938,  ext.  218.  

Jun

18

TUESDAY

Senior  luncheon   and   entertain-­ ment  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,  June   18,   10:30   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Russ   Sholes   6HQLRU &HQWHU /LYH PXVLF E\ WKH 6QRZĂ&#x20AC;DNH Brass   Band,   starting   at   11   a.m.,   followed   by   a   lunch   of   chicken   cordon   bleu,   mesclun   salad,   oven-­browned   potatoes,   whole   wheat   dinner   roll,   and   seasonal   mixed   berry   crisp.   Suggested  donation  $4.  Bring  your  own  place   setting.   Reservations   required   by   June   14:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   634.   Free   transportation   via  ACTR:  388-­1946.   Youth  media  lab  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,  June   18,   3-­4:30   p.m.,   Ilsley   Library.   Kids   enter-­ LQJJUDGHVDQGXSDUHLQYLWHGWRMRLQOLEUDU\ and   MCTV   staff   to   make   movies   and   learn   DERXW WHFKQRORJ\ XVLQJ 0&79ÂśV VWDWHRIWKH art   media   stations.   Tuesdays   through  Aug.   6.   Drop-­in.  Info:  388-­4097.   Tai  Chi  for  Seniors  class  in  East  Middlebury.   Tuesday,  June  18,  5:30-­6:30  p.m.,  Valley  Bible   &KXUFK 7KH ÂżUVW LQ DQ ZHHN VHULHV RI IUHH beginning   tai   chi   classes   meeting   Tuesdays   DQG 7KXUVGD\V WKURXJK $XJ  2XWGRRUV weather   permitting.   Sponsored   by   CVAA,   these  free  classes  for  people  age  50  or  older   FDQ KHOS LPSURYH EDODQFH Ă&#x20AC;H[LELOLW\ DQG muscle   strength.   Register   at   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.  1017.   Milk   &   Honey   Quiltersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Guild   meeting   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   June   18,   6-­9   p.m.,   American  Legion.  Potluck  dinner  at  6,  meeting   a   7.   The   2013-­2014   Program   Committee   will   present  the  program  for  the  next  year.  Chinese   auction.   Show   and   tell   as   always.   RSVP   with  

your  potluck   selection   to   Mary   Alice   Rath   at   388-­7347  by  Friday,  June  14.  

Jun

19

WEDNESDAY

Dr.  Dennis   Waring   performs   for   kids   in   Middlebury. :HGQHVGD\ June   19,   10:30-­11:30   a.m.,   Ilsley   /LEUDU\ 'U 'HQQLV :DULQJ ZRZV WKH FURZG with   musical   instruments   from   around   the   world.   Free   tickets   available   at   the   library   for   two   weeks   before   each   performance.   Info:   388-­4097.   Downloadable   eBooks   and   Audiobooks   Drop-­in   Day   in   Middlebury. :HGQHVGD\ June   19,   1-­5   p.m.,   Ilsley   Library.   Bring   your   .LQGOH 1RRN RU RWKHU HERRN UHDGHU DQG ZHœOO KHOS \RX ORDG LW ZLWK ERRNV IURP WKH OLEUDU\œV downloadable  collection.  Info:  388-­4095.   Blues   jam   in   Middlebury. :HGQHVGD\ -XQH   SP  0DLQ 'HQQLV :LOOPRWW IURP Left   Eye   Jump   will   provide   lead   guitar,   bass   and  drums  if  you  need  backup  or  take  a  break   and  let  you  play.  Bring  your  instrument  and  get   UHDG\WRMDP,QIRZZZJRPDLQFRP

Jun

20

THURSDAY

Senior  luncheon   in   Vergennes.   Thursday,   June   20,   10   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   6W 3HWHUÂśV 3DULVK +DOO &9$$ VSRQ-­ sors  this  special  senior  meal  of  baked  chicken   breast   in   tarragon   cream   sauce,   mixed   green   leaf  salad,  baked  stuffed  potato,  whole  wheat   dinner  roll  and  fresh  fruit  compote  over  pound   cake   with   whipped   cream.   Entertainment   to   be   announced.   Bring   your   own   place   setting.   Reservations   required:   1-­800-­642-­5119,   ext.   615.   Free   transportation   through   ACTR:   388-­1946.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Make   Your   Own   Box   Banjoâ&#x20AC;?   workshop   for   kids  in  Middlebury.  Thursday,  June  20,  1-­2:30   SP,OVOH\/LEUDU\'U'HQQLV:DULQJZLOOKHOS NLGV PDNH WKHLU RZQ EDQMRV RXW RI UHF\FOHG

FRIDAY

Foot  care   and   blood   pres-­ sure   clinic   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   21,   10   a.m.-­noon,   Russ   Sholes   6HQLRU &HQWHU 2QH RI D VHULHV RI IUHH FOLQLFV for   seniors   offered   by  Addison   County   Home   Health  and  Hospice.  Bring  your  own  basin  and   towel.  Info:  388-­7259.   Genealogy   database   lesson   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   21,   1:30-­3   p.m.,   Ilsley   LIbrary   reference  room.  Learn  how  to  use  the  Ancestry   Library  Edition  database  to  explore  your  family   history.  Bring  names  of  a  few  people  you  would   like  to  know  more  about  (including  one  or  two   who  might  be  in  the  1940  U.S.  Census).  Space   is   limited.   Register   at   the   circulation   desk   or   call  388-­4095.   %HQH¿W GLQQHU LQ 2UZHOO   Friday,   June   21,   5-­9   SP2UZHOO¿UHKRXVH0DLQ6W7KH2UZHOO )LUH'HSDUWPHQWLVKROGLQJDGLQQHUWREHQH¿W ORQJWLPH¿UH¿JKWHUDQG(07%RE/DGXFZKR has  fallen  ill.  Spaghetti  with  sauce  (with  meat,   meatless  or  Alfredo),  rolls  and  salad.  Cost  $8   adults,   $4   for   children   12   and   younger.   Info:   948-­2095.   Strumstick   gathering   in   Bristol.   Friday,   June   21,   6-­8   p.m.,   Recycled   Reading   of   Vermont,   25A  Main  St.  All  are  invited  to  come  for  a  great   evening   of   playing,   learning   and   sharing   this   awesome   instrument.   Strumsticks   available.   Drop  in  any  time  between  6  and  8  p.m.

LIVEMUSIC David  Bain  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  June  14,  5-­7   p.m.,  51  Main.   The  Benoits  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  June  14,  5-­7   p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   Michele  Fay  and  Tom  Price  in  Bristol.  Friday,   June  14,  6:30-­8:30  p.m.,  Recycled  Reading  of   Vermont   Hollis   Long   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   14,   7:30-­8:30  p.m.,  51  Main.   Nick   Marshall   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   June   14,   9-­10  p.m.,  51  Main.   Ten   Rod   Road   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   June   15,  6-­8  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   Geoffrey  DeMarsh  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  June   21,  6-­8  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   See  a  full  listing  of  

O N GO IN G EV ENTS in  the  Thursday  edition  of  the

Addison Independent and  on  the  Web  at  www.addisonindependent.com


PAGE  10  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Dining and Entertainment VERMONT  COMEDY  DIVAS

THT will roar with the Comedy Divas The  Vermont  Comedy  Divas  will   happens  to  be  co-­owner  of  the  Fly-­ bring   their   irreverent   comedy   to   ing  Pig  Bookstore. Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Town  Hall  Theater  on   Tracie   Spencer   was   selected   to   Friday  at  8  p.m. perform  in  Bostonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Com-­ Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   the   countryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   only   all-­ HG\)HVWLYDODQGKDVEHHQDÂżQDOLVW female   touring   stand-­up   comedy   in  the  Higher  Ground  Comedy  Bat-­ troupe.   And   they   do   their   hilarious   tles  for  four  years. thing   right   here   in   Ver-­ Autumn   Ingroff   mont.   Founded   in   2006,   Spencer  has  been  doing   WKHÂżYHZRPDQJURXSQRW stand-­up  for  four  years.   only   performs   in   theaters   She   lives   in   Burling-­ and  clubs,  but  enjoys  tak-­ ton  with  her  handsome   ing  part  in  fundraisers  for   husband   and   two   â&#x20AC;&#x153;hi-­ DUHD QRQSURÂżWV7KH7+7 lariousâ&#x20AC;?  children. VKRZZLOOEHQHÂżWWKH)RV-­ Sue  Schmidt  has  per-­ BY GREG PAHL formed   throughout   the   ter   &   Adoptive   Families   of  Addison   County  Asso-­ country   and   sidelines   ciation. as  a  drummer. Josie  Leavitt  got  her  start  in  New   Carmen   Lagala   was   crowned   the   York   City,   playing   clubs   like   Caro-­ winner  of  the  Higher  Ground  Come-­ lineâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   and   Stand-­Up   New.   Since   dy  Battle  in  2013,  and  is  a  co-­found-­ moving   to   Vermont   she   has   per-­ er  of  Levity,  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  only  comedy   formed   all   over   the   state.   She   also   club.

arts beat

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Tickets  are   $25   for   the   public,   $20  for  foster  and  adoptive  parents.   A  cash  bar  and  snacks  will  be  avail-­ able.   Adult   humor.   Tickets   may   be   purchased   at   townhalltheater.org,    DW WKH 7+7 %R[ 2IÂżFH (Monday-­Saturday,   noon   to   5   p.m.)   and  at  the  door. HELENA  BAILLIE  AT  THT With   her   â&#x20AC;&#x153;brilliance   and   poi-­ gnanceâ&#x20AC;?   (The   Strad),   Helena   Bail-­ lie   has   emerged   as   an   international   virtuoso   on   not   one   but   two   instru-­ ments  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  violin  and  viola.  The  Lon-­ don-­born  musician  will  play  both  at   a  concert  at  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Town  Hall   Theater  on  Saturday  at  8  p.m. A   prizewinner   in   international   competitions,  Baillie  has  performed   throughout   Europe   and   the   United   States,   including   collaborations   with  Pinchas  Zucherman,  the  Tokyo   Quartet  and  the  Beaux  Arts  Trio. On   piano   will   be   Tanya   Gabri-­ elian,   who   has   an   exciting   interna-­ tional   career   of   her   own.   The   Lon-­ (See  Arts  Beat,  Page  11)

HELEN  MIRREN IN  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;THE  AUDIENCEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of June 10

BESSETTE Â QUARTET

Arts  Beat (Continued  from  Page  10) don   Times   called   her   â&#x20AC;&#x153;a   pianist   of   powerful   physical   and   imaginative   muscle.â&#x20AC;? Their   ambitious   program   in-­ cludes   Lukas   Fossâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Capriccio,   tran-­ scribed   for   viola   from   the   original   for  cello,  by  Helena  Baillie;Íž  Robert   Schumannâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Sonata   in   A   minor   for   Violin   and   Piano;Íž   Suite   Italienne   from   Pulcinella   by   Igor   Stravin-­ sky,   transcribed   by   Dushkin/Silver-­ thorne;Íž  Antonin   Dvorakâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Romance   Op.11  for  Violin  and  Piano;Íž  and  Si-­ cilienne,  from   the   Flute   Sonata   No.   2,  1031,  by  J.S.  Bach. Tickets   are   $17   and   may   be   pur-­ chased  at  382-­9222,  townhalltheater. RUJ DW WKH 7+7 %R[ 2IÂżFH 0RQ-­ day-­Saturday,   noon   to   5   p.m.)   or   at   the  door. DON  ROSS  AT  VOH Acoustic  guitar  virtuoso  Don  Ross   will  perform  at  the  Vergennes  Opera   House  on  Saturday,  at  8  p.m.  Open-­ ing   for   him   will   be   Trevor   Gordon   Hall,   an   acoustic   instrumentalist   from   Philadelphia.   Vergennesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   own   0DWWHR3DOPHUZLOOVWDUWRIIWKHHYH-­ ning  with  a  small  set  of  his  own. In   1988,   Ross   won   the   U.S.   Na-­ tional   Fingerstyle   Guitar   Competi-­ tion.   He   won   the   Fingerstyle   com-­ petition   for   a   second   time   in   1996.   To  this  day,  he  is  still  the  only  player   to   have   won   the   competition   twice.   +H LV DOVR RQ &%& 0XVLFÂśV OLVW RI the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;25   Greatest   Canadian   Guitar-­ ists,  Ever.â&#x20AC;? Ross   has   recorded   and   released   over  12  albums  and  toured  regularly   since  1989,  across  Canada,  the  USA,   a   dozen   European   countries,   Japan,   Taiwan,  China,  Australia,  Russia  and   India.  He  has  played  with  symphony   orchestras   in   Canada   and   Germany,   and  collaborated  live  and  on  record-­ LQJ ZLWK $QG\ 0F.HH &DQDGLDQ

VLQJHUJXLWDULVW %URRNH 0LOOHU DQG Toronto  bassist  Jordan  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Connor. Tickets   are   $20   in   advance,   $25   at  the  door,  and  are  available  at  the   Opera   House,   Classic   Stitching   in   Vergennes,   or   online   at   vergenne-­ soperahouse.org.  For  more  informa-­ tion  contact  877-­6737  or  info@ver-­ gennes.operahouse.org. HELEN  MIRREN  AT  THT She   won   the   hearts   of   millions   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  and  an  Academy  Award  for  Best   Actress   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   when   she   played   Queen   (OL]DEHWK LQ WKH ÂżOP Âł7KH 4XHHQ´ The   good   news   for   theatergoers   is   WKDW +HOHQ 0LUUHQ UHWXUQV WR WKH role  once  again  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Audience,â&#x20AC;?   WKH QHZ SOD\ E\ 3HWHU 0RUJDQ WKDW is   the   hit   of   the   London   season.   It   will  be  shown  live  at  2  p.m.  and  re-­ broadcast   at   7   p.m.   on   Thursday   in   0LGGOHEXU\ÂśV7RZQ+DOO7KHDWHU The  play  is  a  tour  de  force  for  the   actress,   as   it   covers   the   entire   pe-­ riod   of   Elizabethâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   reign.   The   play   consists  of  a  series  of  audiences  the   queen  holds  regularly  with  her  prime   ministers.  We  see  her  with  Churchill,   7RQ\%ODLU0DUJDUHW7KDWFKHUDQGD KRVWRI30ÂśVWKURXJKRXWWKH\HDUV 7KHSUHVVIRU0LUUHQKDVEHHQHF-­ static.  The  Times  called  it  â&#x20AC;&#x153;funny  and   truthful,  good-­hearted,  spiky,  full  of   surprises.  I  loved  every  minute.â&#x20AC;? Tickets  are  $17,  $10  students,  and   may   be   purchased   at   townhallthe-­ ater.org,  382-­9222,  at  the  THT  Box   2IÂżFH 0RQGD\6DWXUGD\ QRRQ p.m.)  or  at  the  door. TRICKY  BRITCHES 2Q6XQGD\%UDQGRQ0XVLFSUHV-­ ents  an  evening  to  celebrate  Fatherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Day   featuring   the   Tricky   Britches   EDQGIURP3RUWODQG0DLQH$WKUHH course   dinner   will   be   served   before   the   show   with   the   performance   be-­ ginning  at  7  p.m.   (See  Beat,  Page  13)

*(0,1, 0$< -81(  -XVW ZKHQ WKLQJV ing  both  excited  and  anxious  at  the  same  time.  This   seem  hopeless,  a  small  ray  of  light  shines  through   is  perfectly  understandable  as  you  await  the  news. DQG \RX ÂżQG D VROXWLRQ WR \RXU SUREOHP 6FRUSLR $48$5,86 -$18$5< )(%58$5<  has   some   wise   words,   so   Vacation   plans   may   listen  up. have   been   elusive   un-­ &$1&(5 -81(  WLO QRZ EXW \RX ÂżQDOO\ -8/<2QFH\RXWKLQN have   the   funds   and   the   you   have   all   of   the   an-­ time  to  take  the  trip  you   swers,   something   pops   GHVLUH <RXU WUDYHOLQJ up   to   make   you   reassess   partner  is  still  up  in  the   a  situation.  It  could  take  a   air. IHZ GD\V IRU \RX WR ÂżQG 3,6&(6 )(%58-­ the   answer   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   look-­ $5< 0$5&+  ing  for. A   new   season   inspires   /(2 -8/< $8-­ you   to   make   changes   383  Exchange  Street *867 <RX PD\ KDYH and  reconsider  old  rela-­ fun   in   the   sun   on   your   tionships.   Call   it   a   late   Â&#x2026;ÂĄÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;¤Â?Â&#x161;­ª¹Ă&#x2C6;388-­2221 mind,   but   others   are   urg-­ spring   cleaning   of   your   ing   you   to   buckle   down   www.cacklinhens.com life.   and   focus   on   some   tasks   $5,(6 0$5&+ that   need   to   get   wrapped   $35,/  <RX up  before  you  leave. could   be   feeling   under   9,5*2 $8*867 the   weather   this   week.   6(37(0%(5  Even   if   your   to-­do   list   There   are   some   changes   is  a  mile  long,  you  need   FRPLQJDWZRUN<RXMXVW to  take  some  time  to  re-­ donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  know  if  they  will  be   cuperate   before   getting   to   your   advantage   or   be   back  to  business. RegalÂŽ Select Exterior NEW High-Build adheres something   that   could   tilt   7$8586 $35,/ SRZHUIXOO\IRUDGXUDEOHSURWHFWLYHĂ&#x20AC;QLVKWKDW¡V you  off  your  axis. 0$</LIHH[SHUL-­ PLOGHZDQGVWDLQUHVLVWDQW /,%5$ 6(37(0%(5 ence   is   your   advantage.   2&72%(5  <RX When   your   company   is   have   much   to   learn,   but   ORRNLQJWRÂżOODSRVLWLRQ you   cannot   cram   it   all   they   will   most   likely   &UHHN5G0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021;0)Â&#x2021;6DW into   one   week.   There   is   KLUH IURP ZLWKLQ 0DNH Â&#x2021;www.countrysidecarpetandpaint.com no   crash   course   on   life.   the   most   of   this   oppor-­ 0DNH WKH PRVW RI D JHW-­ tunity. away  opportunity. FAMOUS 6&253,22&72%(5 BIRTHDAYS 129(0%(5  <RX JUNE  9 canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   seem   to   focus   on   0LFKDHO-)R[$FWRU one   thing   for   very   long   

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PAGE  12  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Addison Independent Puzzles Bravo! By  Myles  Mellor  and  Sally  York

This  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  puzzle  is  rated Across 1.  Kingdom  ruled  by   Herod 6.  Special  disposition 10.  Magazine  for  pool   and  spa  pros 14.  Reversed 15.  Tissue  additive 16.  Indigenous   Brazilians 17.  Coveted  response 20.  Transformers,  e.g. 21.  Salon  creation 22.  Failed  to  act 23.  10-­year-­old,  for  one 26.  Match 29.  Tense 33.  ,WĂ&#x20AC;RZVLQWRWKH North  Sea 34.  Chinese  dynasty 37.  Torn  comic? 38.  Warm  response 42.  Long-­eared  beast 43.  Makes  a  scene? 44.  Japanese  cartoon  art 45.  &OHDQVLQDZD\ 48.  Carpentry  grooves 49.  Religious  instructor 54.  Member  of  the   Donner  party? 57.  Cross 58.  Enough,  for  some 62.  Spirited  responses 65.  Book  before   Nehemiah 66.  Le  ___,  city  in   6ZLW]HUODQG 67.  6WLFN\VZHHWHQHU Var. 68.  2002  Robbie   Williams  single 69.  Earth  barrier 70.  Puff  ___,  old  Combs   nickname

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Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  —  PAGE  13

Beat (Continued from  Page  11) Tricky   Britches   is   a   group   of   young   musicians   who   will   put   a   swing   in   your   step   as   soon   as   you   hear  them.  They  play  old-­time  coun-­ try  music  with  a  bluegrass  kick  and   the  spirit  of  a  street-­corner  jug  band. Members  of  the  band  are  Jed  Bre-­ sette,   Seth   Doyle,   Tyler   Lienhardt   and   Ryan   Wilkinson.   Each   plays   a   variety   of   instruments   with   honed   skill. General  admission  is  $15  with  the   pre-­concert  dinner  available  for  just   $15.   Reservations   are   encouraged.   Venue   is   BYOB.   Call   465-­4071   or   e-­mail   info@brandon-­music.net   for   reservations   or   information.   Bran-­ don  Music  is  located  at  62  Country   Club  Road  in  Brandon. LIVE  MUSIC  AT  51  MAIN There  will  be  three  musical  events   this   week   at   Middlebury’s   51   Main.   At  5  p.m.  on  Friday,  David  Bain  will   perform.   Bain   is   a   lifelong   musician   whose   solo   piano   and   singing   draws   from   all   aspects   of   American   roots   music,   from   Fats   Waller   to   Muddy   Waters  to  Ray  Charles  to  Louis  Jordan   to  Randy  Newman  to  Jerry  Lee  Lewis. Then,  at  7:30  p.m.  on  Friday  Hol-­ lis  Long  takes  to  the  stage.  Long  is   a   14-­year-­old   honors   high   school   sophomore,   singer/songwriter,   and   actress   from   West   Hartford,   Conn.   Her  lyrics  and  vocals  are  rich,  soul-­ ful   and   evocative   with   a   maturity   well   beyond   her   years,   speaking   to   audiences  both  young  and  old. Finally,  at  9  p.m.  on  Friday,  Nick   Marshall   will   perform.   A   Middle-­ bury  native  and  local  favorite,  Mar-­ shall  plays  acoustic  rock  with  under-­ tones  of  folk,  grunge  and  pop. All  ages,  no  cover.  For  additional   information   visit   www.go51main. com  or  phone  388-­8209. JOAN  CURTIS  EXHIBIT This   summer,   Brandon   Music  

showcases paintings   by   local   artist   Joan  Curtis  in  an  exhibit  titled    “At   One   with   Nature:   New   and   Revis-­ ited.”   In   describing   the   show,   the   artist   speaks   of   wanting   to   extend   an   earlier   theme:   imagining   (on   a   visionary   level)   that   human   beings   could   learn   to   co-­exist   with   earthly   climate   changes   and   increasingly   dramatic  weather  events. In  a  new  series  of  paintings,  titled   “Peaceable   Kingdom,”   that   opens   on  Friday,  Curtis  depicts  us  —  again   in  a  fantasy  vision  —  living  at  peace   with  the  animal  world  and  with  wild   creatures   in   danger   of   losing   tradi-­ tional  habitats. The  exhibit  runs  through  Sept.  2.   Brandon  Music  is  open  from  10  a.m.   to   6   p.m.   daily   (except   Tuesdays),   with  their  café  serving  lunch  and  af-­ ternoon  tea  from  noon  to  5:30  p.m.   Call  465-­4071  for  more  information,   or  visit  brandon-­music.net.   THE  SOUNDING  BRASS As  part  of  the  Music  at  the  Mills   Concert  Series,  The  Sounding  Brass   HQVHPEOH ZLOO SHUIRUP D EHQH¿W concert   at   7   p.m.   on   Friday   in   the   historic  1851  Union  Church  in  New   Haven  Mills. The   ensemble,   varying   from   four  to  nine  members,  performs  an   eclectic   variety   of   musical   pieces,   including   light   classical,   popular   standards   and   early   20th-­century   tunes  originally  composed  for  min-­ strels   and   the   vaudeville   stage.   In   many   cases,   the   band   has   adapted   arrangements   intended   for   larger   groups,  and  it  also  performs  pieces   that  have  been  re-­written  from  orig-­ inal  piano  works. The   Sounding   Brass   musicians   are  drawn  from  all  parts  of  Addison   County   and   they   perform   in   part   or   together   in   various   other   local   groups. Admission   is   $10,   with   all   pro-­

ceeds going  toward  the  building  res-­ toration. ROGER  BOOK  EXHIBIT Friday   marks   an   unprecedented   day  for  the  Compass  Music  and  Arts   Center   in   Brandon   —   it’s   the   day   WKHLU ¿UVW DUW H[KLELW RSHQV )URP Friday   to   Aug.   18,   the   center   will   present   “Breaking   the   Ice,”   featur-­ ing  the  work  of  abstract  expression-­ ist   Roger   Book.  An   opening   recep-­ tion   will   be   held   on   Friday   from   5   to  8  p.m. Book’s  journey  as  a  painter  didn’t   begin   until   the   age   of   43,   when   he   decided   to   take   a   risk,   leave   his   career   in   retail,   and   attend   Green   Mountain   College   in   Poultney.   He   graduated  with  a  B.F.A.  degree  and   went  on  to  earn  a  master’s  degree  in   painting  from  the  Rochester  Institute   of  Technology. For   more   information,   visit   cmacvt.org,   call   247-­4295   or   email   info@cmacvt.org.  CMAC  is  located   at  333  Jones  Drive  in  Brandon. TWO  BROTHERS  TAVERN There   will   be   two   live   musical   performances   this   week   at   Two   Brothers   Tavern   in   Middlebury.   On   Friday,   the   tavern   will   feature   The   Benoits,   offering   classic   rock   swagger   with   only   two   acoustic   guitars,  beginning  at  5  p.m.  Don’t   miss   this   free   Happy   Hour   show   in   support   of   the   Middlebury  Arts   Walk,  which  takes  place  upstairs  in   the  Tavern. Then,   on   Saturday,   the   tavern   presents   Ten   Rod   Road   at   6   p.m.   Hometown   heroes   Ten   Rod   Road   are  back  to  the  Lounge  for  a  night   of  taut  rock  heaven.  All  established   players   in   the   local   music   scene,   Two  Brothers  is  glad  to  have  them   back   for   a   night   of   dancing   with   long-­time   friends.   Reservations   and  walk-­ins  for  this  show  are  wel-­ come.  There  is  a  $3  cover  charge.  

HELENA BAILLIE For   more   information,   call   Two   Brothers  at  388-­0002. BESSETTE  QUARTET The   Monkton   community   pres-­ ents   Helen   Weston   and   the   Bes-­ sette   Quartet   with   Pete   Sutherland   in   a   kickoff-­to-­summer   concert   at   6   p.m.   on   Friday   at   the   Monkton   Recreational  Field  on  Hollow  Road  

in Monkton.   This   will   be   a   great   lineup   of   good-­time   swing,   blues   and  rock.  Pack  a  picnic,  or  visit  the   concession   stand,   which   will   offer   hamburgers,   hotdogs   and   bever-­ ages. The   event   is   free   and   open   to   the  public.  For  more  info  call  453-­ 6067.


PAGE  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Best of Luck in the future to all Addison County Students! ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

Students of the Week from area high schools 2012-2013 School Year

What are they doing after graduation? Middlebury Union High School

Vergennes Union High School

Taylor  Becker  .......... Miami  University,  biochemistry David  Burt  ............... Williams  College,  mathematics Eleanor  Eagan   gap  year,  followed  by  Middlebury  College,           international  studies Grace  Boucher  ........ Culinary  Institute  of  America,  baking  pastry  arts Molly  Wright  ........... University  of  New  England,  biochemistry Sawyer  Hescock  ...... Harvard  University,  pre-­med Megan  Santry  .......... Boston  College,  biology  and  pre-­med Lisel  Peters-­deCourval  ......... Connecticut  College,  English  and  foreign     languages Raphael  Desautels  ... University  of  Vermont,  biochemistry Nora  McLaughlin  .... Princeton  University,  engineering Connor  Collins  ........ Case  Western  Reserve  University Talon  Drown  ........... University  of  Vermont,  College  of  Arts  and  Sciences Micah  Lynch  ............gap  year,  followed  by  Hobart  College,  studio  art  and   architecture  and  environmental  science Sydney  Reigle  ......... University  of  Vermont,  kinesiology,  exercise  science Derek  Bagley  .......... working  at  K.A.  Bagley  Inc. D.J.  Piper  ................. Wheelock  College,  theater  education Maddy  Sanchez  ....... Middlebury  College,  Spanish  and  Japanese Marrott  Weekes  ....... Southern  Virginia  University,  engineering

We proudly acknowledge all our students & say

Congratulations Congratulations Taylor & Casey Students!

Congrats to the Students of the Week!

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Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  —  PAGE  15


PAGE  16  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Bristol Internal Medicine

Welcomes Dr. Lynn Wilkinson to the Practice.

Bristol Beat Mount Abe student artists showed work

Mt. Abe

BRISTOL  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   A   number   of   Mount   During   the   month   of   April,   the   Abraham   Union   High   School   student   Walkover  Gallery  in  Bristol  hosted  the   artists   have   been   featured   in   area   art   Advanced  Placement  Studio  Art  Show.   exhibits   in   recent   months.   In   March,   This  exhibit  recognized  the  hard  work   11   were   featured   at   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Emerging   of   talented   Mount   Abe   junior   Addy   Artistsâ&#x20AC;?   show   at   the   Art   on   Main   Campbell  and  senior  Amanda  Vincent.   Gallery   in   Bristol.   The   student   artists   Jessie  Lyons,  Rider  MacCrellish,  Reed   Addy   and   Amanda   followed   a   rigor-­ were   Maddy   Chester,   Fiona   Cole,   Martin,   Emma   Ober,   Rachael   Orvis,   ous  curriculum  in  their  AP  Studio  Art   William   Kittredge,   Eliza   Letourneau,   Morgan  Salter  and  Alicia  Stone. class,  which  culminated  in  the  submis-­ sion  of  an  extensive  portfolio  of  at  least   24   pieces   of   art   work   to   the   College   Board  as  well  as  the  art  exhibit  at  the   Walkover  Gallery.   Addy   Campbell   was   also   selected   for  exhibition  at  the  Annual  Burlington   Yoga  Conference  held  at  the  University   of  Vermont  in  May.  Congratulations  to   all  of  these  talented  students. In  other  news  at  Mount  Abe: Â&#x2021; WKJUDGHVWXGHQWV0DKOL.QXWVRQ and  Lane  Fisher  will  participate  in  the   American  Field  Services  (AFS)  foreign   study  program  for  10  months  next  year.   Mahli  will  be  living  in  China  and  Lane   will   be   living   in   France,   where   they   will  live  with  a  host  family  and  attend   VFKRRO$)6LVDQRQSURÂżWLQWHUQDWLRQDO exchange  organization  for  students  and   adults   that   operates   in   more   than   50   countries   and   organizes   intercultural   learning   experiences   with   the   goal   of   SUE  ALLENâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  LINCOLN  gardens  will  be  open  to  the  public  for  the   promoting   a   more   peaceful   and   just   One  World  Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  spring  fundraiser,  a  garden  tour  and  talk,  on  Sun-­ world  through  intercultural  learning.   day,  June  16. Â&#x2021; )LRQD &ROH D WK JUDGH VWXGHQW who   spear-­headed   the   creation   of   the   Dance  Club  at  Mount  Abe  almost  two   years  ago,  recently  led  the  Mount  Abe   LINCOLN   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   One   World   her  property  on  their  own  or  simply   'DQFH&OXELQRUJDQL]LQJDĂ&#x20AC;DVKPRE Library   Project   will   host   its   spring   enjoy  tea  and  light  refreshments  and   Faculty   and   staff   at   the   high   school   fundraiser,  a  garden  tour  and  talk,  on   admire  the  views. danced   side   by   side   with   students,   Sunday,   June   16,   from   2-­4   p.m.   in   Tickets   are   $25   and   should   be   surprising   the   students   in   the   lobby.   Lincoln  at  the  home  of  board  member   purchased   in   advance   as   numbers   The   event   was   received   with   excite-­ Suzanne  Allen.   Ed   Burke   of   Rocky   are  limited.  They  may  be  purchased   ment   and   high   spirits.   The   Dance   Dale   Gardens   will   give   a   talk   titled   at   the   Lawrence   Memorial   Library   Club   also   performed   in   the   Addison   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Color,   the   International   Language   LQ%ULVWRORUE\FDOOLQJ,I Northeast  Supervisory  Union  Fine  Arts   of  Flowers.â&#x20AC;?  Tours  of  Allenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  unique   the   weather   is   questionable,   check   )HVWLYDO )RU YLGHR RI WKH Ă&#x20AC;DVK PRE and  beautiful  meadow  and  woodland   RQHZRUOGOLEUDU\SURMHFWRUJ DIWHU  search  youtube  for  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mount  Abe  Flash   gardens   will   take   place   and   there   a.m.   on   the   16th   for   the   rain   deci-­ Mob.â&#x20AC;? will   be   plenty   of   time   before   and   sion.   The   rain   date   is   Sunday,   June   Â&#x2021; WKJUDGHVWXGHQW7D\ORU'XII\KDV after  the  talk  for  attendees  to  wander   23,  2-­4  p.m. (See  Emerging  Artists,  next  Page)

Teen Log

Gretchen  Gaida  Michaels,  MD

Lynn  Wilkinson,  MD

Emily  Glick,  MD Patricia  Lewis,  APRN

The providers at Bristol Internal Medicine look forward to accepting new patients and serving more people in the Bristol area. &Ć&#x152;Žž>Ä&#x17E;Ĺ&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝ZĹ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;Ä?ĹŹZĹ˝Ç Í&#x2014; >Ä&#x201A;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;'Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺ?Ć?Í&#x2022;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;DÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2013; :Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć?Ĺ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;,Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÍ&#x2022;ZEÍ&#x2013;WÄ&#x201A;ĆŠÇ&#x2021;KÍ&#x203A;DÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Í&#x2022; &Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2013;'Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹŻŽƾĆ?Ĺ?ŜŽÍ&#x2022;>WEÍ&#x2013; ŽŜŜÄ&#x201A;^Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2039;ĆľĹ?ĹśÍ&#x2022;&Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC; &Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;ZĹ˝Ç Í&#x2014;ĹśÇ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹľĆ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŜĹ?Í&#x2022;ZEÍ&#x2013; >Ä&#x201A;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ä&#x201A;DĹ?ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2022;&Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2013;ŽŜŜÄ&#x201A; ĆľĆ?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022;&Ć&#x152;ŽŜĆ&#x161;KĸÄ?Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC;

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  17

Bristol Beat School News

ADDISON Â COUNTY

Jordyn  Wells,   daughter   of   Tom   DQG &DURO :HOOV RI %ULVWRO JUDGX-­ ated   on   May   22   from   Columbia   8QLYHUVLW\ ZLWK D 06: LQ LQWHUQD-­ tional   social   work.   She   is   moving   WR $IULFD ZKHUH VKH ZLOO EH ZRUN-­ ing   full   time   for   Shining   Hope   for  

SUMMER  M EMBERSHIPS  O N  S ALE!

&RPPXQLWLHV D QRQSUR¿W IRFXVHG on  the   education   of   girls   and   community   development   in   Kibera,   Nairobi,  Kenya. Emily   Rule,   daughter   of   Chuck   and   Kathleen   Rule   of   New   Haven,   KDV EHHQ QDPHG WR WKH GHDQœV

OLVW IRU WKH VSULQJ  VHPHV-­ ter  at   the   University   of   Vermont.   Rule   is   enrolled   in   the   animal   science   program   in   the   College   of   $JULFXOWXUH DQG /LIH 6FLHQFHV ZLWK a   concentration   in   pre-­veterinary   medicine.  

Summer  Only  or  Regular  Memberships No  fee  to  join!

Come  Teachers, Come  Seniors,

Emerging  Artists (Continued  from  previous  Page) achieved   her   1st   degree   black   belt   in   karate.  She  studies  at  the  Villari  studio   and  has  taking  on  a  leadership  role  in   the  dojo,  including  creating  a  newslet-­ ter  for  her  karate  studio  and  mentoring   several  young  students. Â&#x2021; $ JURXS RI VWXGHQWV WUDYHOHG WR Costa  Rica  recently  to  do  Leatherback   Sea   Turtle   conservation   work.   They   also   donated   four   electric   fans   to   an   orphanage   serving   14   children   ages    PRQWKV WR ÂżYH \HDUV ROG DQG participated   in   a   reforestation   proj-­ ect   in   a   small   community   planting   more  than  90  trees  and  donating  new   shovels  to  the  community.  The  group   included  Nico  Salas,  Claire  Trombley,   $PEHU /HDYLWW %ULWWDQ\$WNLQV:KLW /RZHU,UD)LVKHU0HJKDQ+DKU$VD /HDUPRQWK$\OHH7XGHN,ULV'X3RQW

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PAGE  18  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Bristol Beat Bristol  kids  create  poetry  in  the  park Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   note:   This   piece   was   submitted  by  Michele  Lowy,  literacy   specialist   at   Bristol   Elementary   School. BRISTOL   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   On   Thursday,   May   30,   a   beautiful   spring   day   full   of   the   promise   of   summer,   Bristol   Elementary   School   students   were   out   on   the   town   green   celebrating   WKHLU ÂżUVW DQQXDO 3RHWU\ LQ WKH 3DUN )HVWLYDO6WXGHQWVIURPNLQGHUJDUWHQ through   sixth   grade   spread   tarps,   EODQNHWVDQGTXLOWVRQWKHJUDVVDQG listened  as  their  schoolmates  went  up   to   the   bandstand   to   read   and   recite   poetry. The   day   started   before   9   when   ÂżIWKDQGVL[WKJUDGHUVZDONHGIURP VFKRRO WR WKH SDUN WR OD\ RXW D SDWK RI ÂłVLPLOH VWRQHV´ DORQJ WKH ZDON way.   Students   had   gathered   stones   from  the  New  Haven  River,  and  with   partners  painted  and  decorated  them   with   similes   such   as   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Strong   as   an   ox,â&#x20AC;?   or   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Big   as   an   elephant.â&#x20AC;?   The   NLQGHUJDUWHQ VWXGHQWV DUULYHG QH[W IROORZHG FORVHO\ E\ WKH ÂżUVW DQG

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KATHY  JIPNER  READS  poetry  to  students  on  the  Bristol  town  green   during   the   Bristol   Elementary   Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   inaugural   Poetry   in   the   Park   Festival.

VHFRQGJUDGHUV (DFK NLQGHUJDU VHFRQGJUDGH FODVVHV KDG SUHSDUHG ten  class   read   or,   in   one   instance,   a   mixture   of   group   and   individual   VDQJ D JURXS SRHP 7KH ¿UVW DQG poems. $V WKH SULPDU\ VWXGHQWV ¿QLVKHG WKH\RSHQHGWKHLUVQDFNFRROHUVUHDG IURP ERRNV RI SRHPV DQG UHOD[HG with  their  friends  and  families  on  the   grass.   Throughout   the   day   Bristol   Elementary  families  joined  their  chil dren  to  share  poetry  and  the  beautiful   weather.   Residents   of   Living   Well   had   chairs   front   and   center   so   they   could  enjoy  the  presentations.  Marita   Schine   of   the   Lawrence   Memorial   Library  was  there  to  sign  up  children   for   the   summer   reading   program.   Her  popular  table  was  surrounded  by   signs   featuring   colorfully   decorated   poems.   San   Gordon,   music   teacher   extraordinaire,  not  only  set  up  and  ran   the  sound  system,  but  also  played  the   guitar   between   class   performances,   giving  an  extra  festive  air  to  the  day. %\  WKH WKLUG DQG IRXUWK me toll free 1-­866-­453-­7011 graders  had  arrived,  ready  for  poetry.   They   performed   humorous   choral   poems  they  had  practiced  in  class,  as  

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  19

Young knitters aid child care centers EAST  MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Knit-­ ters   in   the   Thursday   afternoon   Craft  Circle  at  Sarah  Partridge  Li-­ brary,  who  meet  weekly  from  3:30   to   5   p.m.,   have   now   completed   WKUHH EDE\ DIJKDQV 7KH ÂżUVW ZDV sent   to   Hume   Child   Development   Center   in   New   Orleans.  The   other   two   will   be   given   to   the   Parent/ Child  Center  in  Middlebury. Librarian  Mona  Rogers  hosts  the   Craft  Circle,  which  includes  young   knitters   and   more   experienced   helpers:   Allie   Nadeau;Íž   Laurel   Mecham;Íž   Allie   Johnson;Íž   Brianna   Wagner  and  her  grandmother,  Eliz-­ abeth;Íž   Linda   Kelton;Íž   and   Isabelle   Terk.  The  knitters  are  now  working   on  a  lap  robe  to  be  given  to  Project   Independence  in  Middlebury. From  June  20  to  July  25,  knitting   will  give  way  to  drop-­in  crafts  for   the  summer  reading  program,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Dig   Into   Reading.â&#x20AC;?   Craft   projects   will   include   pet   rocks,   egg   crate   cat-­ erpillars   and   worms,   fairy   houses,   shell  creatures,  jewelry,  watercolor   painting,  and  yarn  art. All   elementary   school   and   mid-­ dle   school-­age   children   are   wel-­ come.   The   last   session,   July   25,   will   be   a   party   with   board   games,   SUL]HVDQGUHDGLQJFHUWLÂżFDWHV LIBRARIAN   MONA   ROGERS   and   young   knitters   Allie   Nadeau,   left,   The  Sarah  Partridge  Library  is  at   and   Laurel   Mecham   pose   with   two   afghans   they   helped   make   during   431  East  Main  St.  in  East  Middle-­ the  weekly  Sarah  Partridge  Library  Craft  Circle.  The  afghans  will  be  do-­ bury. nated  to  the  Parent/Child  Center  in  Middlebury.

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PAGE  20  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

SPORTS MONDAY

Mount  Abeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Scott claims  Vt.  golf  title Eagles  miss  team  crown  by  one  stroke By  ANDY  KIRKALDY in   between   87   and   92   to   edge   the   WOODSTOCK   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Mount   Abra-­ Eagles,   who   Walch   said   rallied   on   ham  Union  High  School  senior  Jona   the  back  nine  to  make  it  close:  Scott   Scott   earned   Divi-­ shot   36-­33,   Valley   sion   II   and   overall   went   from   a   63   on   medalist   honors   at   the   front   nine   to   a   the   state   champi-­ RQWKHÂżQDOQLQH onship   meet   at   the   holes,  and  Sanchez   Woodstock   Coun-­ went  46-­38. try   Club   this   past   But   the   biggest   :HGQHVGD\ E\ ÂżU-­ story   was   Scott,   ing   a   69,   but   his   who   won   nine   of   Eagle  team  fell  one   10   events   he   en-­ stroke   short   of   a   tered   this   spring,   D-­II   team   champi-­ including   the   Met-­ onship. ro  Conference  two-­ Coach   Frank   man  best-­ball  tour-­ Walch   said   there   nament  on  May  31   was   confusion   at   with   Sweeney;Íž   the   the  end  of  the  tour-­ two   combined   to   nament,   and   for   a   shoot   even   par   at   JONA  SCOTT few   moments   the   that  best-­ball  event,   Eagles   thought   with  Sweeney  con-­ WKH\ KDG ZRQ %XW ZKHQ WKH ÂżQDO tributing  several  birdies,  Walch  said.   scores   were   tallied,   the   news   was   Scott  also  won  the  South  Section-­ disappointing:   Perennial   champion   al  tournament  and  all  regular  season   /\QGRQ ZLQQHU RI ÂżYH RI WKH SDVW Metro  events  except  one  that  he  lost   nine  D-­II  titles,  came  in  at  358  to  the   by  one  stroke.  Walch  said  his  senior   Eaglesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  359.   standout  picked  up  a  lot  of  hardware   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  all  knew  it  was  close,â&#x20AC;?  Walch   on   Wednesday,   when   his   closest   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  guys  handled  it  well.â&#x20AC;? overall   competitor   was   Rutlandâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   They  did  have  some  consolation.   'UDNH+XOOZKRÂżUHGD Âł,W ZDV WKH EHVW ÂżQLVK LQ 0RXQW Âł7KH\KDQGHGRXWOLNHÂżYHDZDUGV Abeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  history,  ever,â&#x20AC;?  Walch  said.   to  him  there,â&#x20AC;?  Walch  said.   After  Scott  the  Eagles  saw  fresh-­ By  the  time  Scott  approached  the   man   Carson   Sanchez   shoot   85,   and   last   hole   of   a   Wednesday   round   in   seniors  Matt  Sweeney  and  Reg  Val-­ ZKLFK KH ÂżUHG IRXU ELUGLHV DQG  ley   come   in   at   96   and   109,   respec-­ pars,   most   other   D-­II   golfers   and   tively.  Walch  said  only  about  a  doz-­ coaches  had  gathered  to  watch.   en  of  the  100  golfers  broke  80  on  the   Âł:KHQKHÂżQLVKHGXSKLVODVWSXWW challenging  Woodstock  course.   they   gave   him   a   standing   ovation,â&#x20AC;?   All  four  of  Lyndonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  golfers  came   Walch  said.

Score BOARD

TIGER  JUNIOR  EMILY  Robinson,  above,  beats  two  Mount  Man-­ V¿HOG GHIHQGHUV WR WKH JRDO GXULQJ 0LGGOHEXU\¶V  ZLQ ODVW )ULGD\5LJKWVRSKRPRUH-XOLD5RVHQEHUJRXWUXQVDQ008GH-­ IHQGHU0LGGOHEXU\ZLOOSOD\DWKRPHLQWKH'LYLVLRQ,VHPL¿QDOV 7XHVGD\DIWHUQRRQ ,QGHSHQGHQWSKRWRV7UHQW&DPSEHOO

Tigers trounce MMU in rain-soaked playoff By  ANDY  KIRKALDY MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  No.  2   Middlebury   Union   High   School   girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   lacrosse   team   on   Friday   VFRUHG IRXU WLPHV LQ WKH ÂżQDO RIWKHÂżUVWKDOIRQWKHZD\ to   a   rain-­soaked,   14-­7   Division   ,TXDUWHUÂżQDOYLFWRU\RYHU1R 0RXQW0DQVÂżHOG

The  Tigers  will  be  seeking  yet   DQRWKHUEHUWKLQD',ÂżQDOZKHQ they  host  No.  3  Mount  Anthony   (13-­6)  on  Tuesday  at  4  p.m.,  with   two-­time   defending   champion   South  Burlington  almost  certain-­ ly  awaiting  the  winner  at  Castle-­ ton  State  College  on  Friday.  The   (See  Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  lax,  Page  22)

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lacrosse D-­I Playoffs 6/7  #4  Brattleboro  vs.  #5  MUHS  ............11-­9 D-­II Playoffs 6/5  #5  U-­32  vs.  #12  VUHS    ...................15-­3 Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lacrosse D-­I Playoffs 6/7  #2  MUHS  vs.  #7  MMU    ...................  14-­7

Baseball D-­II Playoffs 6/6  #2  OV  vs.  #7  Lake  Region    ................6-­0   6/8  #5  Missisquoi  vs.  #4  VUHS  ...............6-­4 Softball D-­II Playoffs 6/5  #7  OV  vs.  #10  Lake  Region  .............12-­2 6/6  #1  Fairfax  vs.  #8  Mt.  Abe    ..............15-­10 6/7  #7  OV  at  #2  Lyndon  ...........  Ppd.  to  6/10   6/8  #3  VUHS  vs.  #6  U-­32    .......................8-­2

Schedule

HIGH SCHOOL SPORTS Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Lacrosse D-­I Playoffs 6/11  #3  Mt.  Anthony  at  #2  MUHS  .......4  p.m. 6/14  or  15    .......................  Final  at  Castleton Baseball D-­II Playoffs 6/11  #3  Lamoille  at  #2  OV  ............  4:30  p.m.

6/14  or  15    ............  Final  at  Centennial  Field Softball D-­II Playoffs 6/10  #7  OV  at  #2  Lyndon  ..............  4:30  p.m.   6/12  #3  VUHS  vs.  TBD  .................  4:30  p.m. 6/14  or  15    ........................  Final  at  Poultney Spectators   are   advised   to   consult   school   websites  for  the  latest  schedule  updates.  


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  21

Commodore  baseball  falls   to  Missisquoi   LQTXDUWHUÂżQDO By  MARSHALL  HASTINGS VERGENNES   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   As   a   few   rays   of  sunlight  fought  through  Saturday   DIWHUQRRQÂśVRPLQRXVFORXGVWKH9HU-­ gennes  Union  High  School  baseball   WHDPIRXJKWWRKROGRIIHOLPLQDWLRQ rallying  from  a  5-­0  hole  against  vis-­ iting  Missisquoi.  But  just  as  the  sun   IDGHG EHKLQG WKH FORXGV VR GLG WKH &RPPRGRUHVÂś UDOO\ DQG WKHLU VHD-­ son. ,QWKHLUTXDUWHUÂżQDOPDWFKXSZLWK WKH 1R 7KXQGHUELUGV WKH IRXUWK VHHGHG&RPPRGRUHVIHOOHQGLQJ their   bid   to   repeat   as   champions   of   Division  II  vs.  the  team  they  defeat-­ HGLQWKHÂżQDO â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   Missisquoi   outplayed   XV´VDLG98+6KHDGFRDFK*HRUJH Ringer.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  think  they  got  some  time-­ ly   hits.   Naturally   Matt   (St.  Amour)   pitched  a  great  game.  I  think  the  dif-­ ference   was   they   got   some   timely   KLWV:HZDLWHGDOLWWOHELWORQJHUWR start  coming  back.  It  just  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  work   RXWIRUXV´ 277(59$//(<81,21+LJK6FKRROÂśV5\DQ.HOOH\DERYHOHDSVEDFNWRÂżUVWEDVHWRDYRLGDWDJGXULQJSOD\RIIDFWLRQDJDLQVW/DNH5HJLRQODVW VUHS   pitcher   Charlie   Stapleford   7KXUVGD\%HORZ2WWHU3LWFKHU%UHWW3DWWHUVRQWKUHZDRQHKLWWHU7KH2WWHUVZRQWKHJDPHDQGDGYDQFHGWRWKH'LYLVLRQ,,VHPLÂżQDOV7XHVGD\ NHSW WKH 7KXQGHUELUG EDWV PXWH afternoon. Photos  by  Lee  Kahrs/Brandon  Reporter WKURXJK WKH ÂżUVW WZR IUDPHV EHIRUH MVU  mounted  a  threat  in  the  third.   (See  VUHS  baseball,  Page  23)

OV  softball   downs  LRU;;     then  rain  out %5$1'21 ² 7KH 1R  2W-­ ter   Valley   Union   High   School   soft-­ ball   team   broke   an   early   2-­2   tie   on   :HGQHVGD\RQWKHZD\WRDZLQ over  visiting  No.  10  Lake  Region  in   D'LYLVLRQ,,¿UVWURXQGJDPH 7KH  2WWHUV ZHUH VFKHGXOHG ZHDWKHUSHUPLWWLQJWRWUDYHOWR/\Q-­ GRQ RQ )ULGD\ WR WDNH RQ WKH 1R  9LNLQJV  LQDTXDUWHU¿QDOEXW weather   forced   postponement   of   that  game  until  Monday  at  the  same   KRXU7KHZLQQHURIWKDWJDPH²LI weather  allows  it  go  on  as  scheduled   ²ZLOOSOD\LQD:HGQHVGD\VHPL¿-­ QDODJDLQLIWKHZHDWKHUFRRSHUDWHV 2Q WKLV SDVW :HGQHVGD\ 29 SLWFKHU 7D\ORU $LQHV ZLOGSLWFKHG KRPHDUXQLQWKH¿UVWDQGDOORZHG DQRWKHUUXQLQWKHVHFRQGZKHQVKH LVVXHG WKUHH RI KHU ¿YH ZDONV %XW she  allowed  just  two  hits  and  struck   out  eight  and  shut  down  LRU  (8-­9)   the  rest  of  the  way.   0HDQZKLOH29XVHGKLWVHLJKW walks   from   LRU   starter   Michelle   7KLEDXOW ¿YHUXQVLQWKUHHLQQLQJV  and   reliever   Hannah   Leroux   (seven   runs  in  three  innings)  and  six  Ranger   errors  to  pile  up  their  runs. 7KH 2WWHUV EURNH WKH WLH LQ WKH third   when   Olivia   Bloomer   tripled   and  Cortney  Poljacik  followed  with   DQ LQ¿HOG KLW 3ROMDFLN VFRUHG RQ D wild  pitch  to  make  it  4-­2. Leadoff   hitter   Brittany   Bushey   UHDFKHGEDVH¿YHWLPHVVFRUHGWKUHH runs   and   stroked   two   hits   for   OV.   Bloomer  added  a  double  to  her  triple.  

Otter  nine  blanks  Rangers;Íž  Lyndon  next By  LEE  KAHRS BRANDON  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  A  school  could  get   used  to  this:  Otter  Valley  Union  High   School  pitcher  Brett  Patterson  threw  a   one-­hitter  in  the  No.  2  Ottersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  6-­0  win   over  visiting  No.  7  Lake  Region  in  a   'LYLVLRQ,,TXDUWHUÂżQDOVRQ7KXUVGD\ $ PRGHO RI HIÂżFLHQF\ 3DWWHUVRQ WKUHZMXVWSLWFKHVVWUXFNRXWQLQH and  walked  none  in  just  an  hour  and   20  minutes  to  send  Lake  Region  pack-­ ing.  And  the  senior  hurler  and  co-­ace   Justin   Owen   have   been   consistently   RQ WKHLU SLWFKLQJ DOO VHDVRQ KHOSLQJ the  Otters  to  a  17-­1  record. Patterson   was   good   at   the   plate   as   ZHOORQ7KXUVGD\DVZHUHVHYHUDORI WHDPPDWHV29KDGVL[KLWVLQFOXGLQJ DORQJGRXEOHE\3DWWHUVRQZKRGURYH in  two  runs.  Ryan  Kelley  also  had  two   KLWVDQGEURWKHUV-LPDQG-RKQ:LQ-­ slow  each  had  an  RBI. 7KH2WWHUVWRRNDOHDGLQWRWKH fourth   inning   before   Lake   Regionâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  

Kolby  George  spoiled  Pattersonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  po-­ tential   no-­hitter   with   a   looped   single   to  left.  But  the  Rangers  failed  to  capi-­ WDOL]H$EXQWVHQW*HRUJHWRVHFRQG EXW29WKLUGEDVHPDQ-RKQ:LQVORZ scooped  up  a  grounder  for  the  second   RXW RI WKH LQQLQJ DQG 3DWWHUVRQ WKHQ threw  yet  another  strikeout  to  end  the   inning. -RKQDQG-LP:LQVORZÂśVGHIHQVLYH skills   were   on   display   again   in   the   ÂżIWKZKHQ-RKQPDGHDWHUULÂżFVWRSRI a  shot  down  the  third  base  line  and  a   TXLFNWKURZWRÂżUVWIRUWKHRXW6KRUW-­ VWRS -LP :LQVORZ WKHQ PDGH D ORQJ VSULQWWRWKHOHIWÂżHOGIRXOOLQHWRJUDE a  pop-­up  for  another  out. 1H[W XS IRU WKH 2WWHUV LV 1R  /DPRLOOH  ZKLFKGHIHDWHG1R /\QGRQRQ)ULGD\29LVVFKHG-­ XOHGWRKRVWWKH/DQFHUVDWSP RQ7XHVGD\7KHZLQQHUZLOOKHDGWR &HQWHQQLDO)LHOGIRUWKH',,ÂżQDORQ HLWKHU)ULGD\RU6DWXUGD\

Paquette  shines  on  mound  as  VUHS  softball  wins,  8-­2 By  ANDY  KIRKALDY VERGENNES   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Another   strong   pitching   ef-­ fort   backed   by   timely   hitting   and   solid   defense   on   Saturday   means   another   trip   to   the   Division   ,,VHPLÂżQDOURXQGIRUWKH9HUJHQQHV8QLRQ+LJK School  softball  team. ,QWKHLUTXDUWHUÂżQDOZLQRYHU1R8 WKH1R&RPPRGRUHVÂśJRWWZRKLWSLWFKLQJIURP 7D\ORU3DTXHWWHDFRPELQHGVHYHQIRUVHYHQHI-­ fort  with  six  runs  and  three  RBIs  from  Nos.  4  and    KLWWHUV &DW &KDSXW DQG 'DQL %URZQ DQG IRXU 5%,VIURP1RKLWWHU7DPDUD$XQFKPDQ And  the  14-­4  Commodores  earned  a  date  in  a   SP:HGQHVGD\VHPLÂżQDOZLWKHLWKHU1R /\QGRQ  RU1R2WWHU9DOOH\  7KRVH two   teams   are   set   to   square   off   on   Monday   at   /\QGRQ,I/\QGRQSUHYDLOV98+6ZLOOWUDYHORQ :HGQHVGD\EXWLIWKH2WWHUVSXOORIIWKHXSVHWWKH

&RPPRGRUHV ZLOO KRVW7KH ÂżQDO ZLOO EH VFKHG-­ XOHG IRU HLWKHU )ULGD\ RU 6DWXUGD\ LQ 3RXOWQH\ XQGHIHDWHG GHIHQGLQJ FKDPSLRQ %)$)DLUID[ LV expected  to  be  there.   Paquette   said   the   Commodores   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   who   have   ZRQÂżYHLQDURZDQGHLJKWRUWKHLUSDVWQLQH² ZLOOEHFRQÂżGHQWRQ:HGQHVGD\ZKHWKHUWKH\JHW on  the  bus  or  walk  to  their  home  diamond. Âł(YHU VLQFH WKH EHJLQQLQJ RI WKH \HDU ZHÂśYH kept  it  in  our  heads  that  if  we  work  hard  and  play   OLNH ZH NQRZ KRZ ZH FRXOG ZLQ D FKDPSLRQ-­ VKLS´VKHVDLGÂł7KDWÂśVZKDWZHÂśUHUHDG\IRU´ 2QHUHDVRQWKH\FDQIHHOPRUHFRQÂżGHQWWKDQLQ LVWKDW&KDSXWDVHQLRUFDWFKHULVKHDOWK\ 7KH 98+6 FOHDQXS KLWWHU PLVVHG WKH SOD\RIIV ODVW\HDUZLWKDQLQMXU\EXWLVUHDG\WRJRDQGKDV been  an  offensive  force  this  spring.   2Q6DWXUGD\&KDSXW WZRGRXEOHVWZRVLQJOHV

IRXUUXQVVFRUHG GURYHLQWKH&RPPRGRUHVœ¿UVW run  with  one  of  many  two-­out  hits.  Paquette  sin-­ gled  with  two  out  off  losing  pitcher  Sophia  Gon-­ ]DOHV LQ WKH ¿UVW DQG UHDFKHG VHFRQG RQ D ZLOG pitch.  Chaput  then  laced  a  single  between  second   and  short  to  score  Paquette  on  a  close  play.  Brown   IROORZHGZLWKDQDOPRVWLGHQWLFDOKLWDQG98+6 took  a  2-­0  lead.   98+6 PDGH LW  LQ WKH VHFRQG ZLWK PRUH two-­out  magic.  K.C.  Ambrose  reached  on  a  two-­ RXW HUURU WKH RQO\ 8 ¿HOGLQJ PLVFXH RI WKH JDPH DQG (PLOHH 7UXGR ZDONHG 3DTXHWWH WKHQ singled  to  score  Ambrose. ,Q WKH WKLUG WKH &RPPRGRUHV VWUXFN PRUH quickly:   Chaput   and   Brown   led   off   the   inning   by  drilling  back-­to-­back  doubles  to  make  it  4-­0.   Phoebe  Plank  moved  Brown  to  third  with  a  sin-­ (See  VUHS  softball,  Page  22)


PAGE  22  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Girlsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  lax (Continued  from  Page  20) 14-­0   Rebels   will   host   No.   4   Brattleboro    LQ7XHVGD\ÂśVRWKHUVHPLÂżQDO The   Tigersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   decisive   surge   on   Friday   began   after   MMUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Alison   Chivers   took   advantage  of  a  failed  Tiger  clear  and  broke   in  alone  on  MUHS  sophomore  goalie  Bai-­ ly  Ryan  to  make  it  5-­3. The   Cougars   won   the   draw,   but   the   Tigers   forced   a   turnover   and   freshman   Emma  Best  scooped  one  of  her  game-­high   10  ground  balls  before  setting  up  a  goal  by   sophomore  middie  Katie  Holmes  at  4:16. A   minute   later,   junior   attacker   Kiera   Kirkaldy  picked  up  an  errant  pass  and  fed   sophomore   middie   Julia   Rosenberg   cut-­ ting   into   the   fan,   and   Rosenberg   made   it   7-­3.  At  2:45,  junior  middie  and  co-­captain   Emily   Robinson   cashed   in   a   behind-­the-­ net  feed  from  junior  attacker  Paige  Viens,   and  it  was  8-­4. The  Cougars  then  got  what  could  have   been  a  momentum-­changing  goal  at  1:13,   when   Marina   Bowie   connected   for   her   third  of  the  half. But   the   Tigers   got   the   ball   back   with   seconds  to  go,  and  tossed  to  Emily  Kier-­ QDQDWPLGÂżHOG.LHUQDQUHOD\HGWR9LHQV on  the  left  side  of  the  fan,  and  she  threw   the  ball  over  two  defenders  to  Kirkaldy  on   the   far   side,   and   her   20-­foot   shot   hit   the   twine  as  the  horn  sounded  to  make  it  9-­4. Sophomore  middie  Sophia  Peluso  then   VFRUHG WZR XQDVVLVWHG JRDOV LQ WKH ÂżUVW four   minutes   of   the   second   half,   and   the   Tigers  coasted  home. Robinson  acknowledged  it  took  the  Ti-­ gers   time   to   get   untracked,  but   said   their   determination  carried  them. TIGER  FRESHMAN  EMMA  Best  looks  for  some  running  room  during  last  Fri-­ Âł,W ZDV GLIÂżFXOW LQ WKH UDLQ ZLWK DOO WKH GD\ÂśVSOD\RIIJDPHDJDLQVW0RXQW0DQVÂżHOG Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell puddles,  and  we  werenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  connecting,â&#x20AC;?  Rob-­ inson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;But  I  just  think  we  had  a  lot  of   Kiernan  (two  goals  and  an  assist  apiece);Íž  Holmes  (two  goals);Íž   heart  going  into  this,  and  we  wanted  this,  and  we  showed  that.â&#x20AC;? Best  and  Kirkaldy  (goal  and  assist  each);Íž  junior  attacker  Julia   Balanced   scoring   boosted   MUHS.   Nine   Tigers   recorded   Cluss  (goal);Íž  and  Viens  (two  assists). points:   Peluso   (three   goals,   assist);Íž   Robinson,   Rosenberg   and   â&#x20AC;&#x153;That  was  one  of  our  team  goals,â&#x20AC;?  Robinson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  want-­ ed  a  lot  of  different  scorers  today.â&#x20AC;? Coach   Kelley   Higgins   also   pointed   to   the   Tiger   defenseâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   continued  improvement  on  stopping  solo  runs,  a  problem  high-­ lighted  when  Champlain  Valleyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Kate  Raszka  scored  11  times   vs.  MUHS  on  May  15. On   Friday,   the   MUHS   low   defense   of   senior   Tiffany   Dan-­ yow  and  juniors  Hannah  Hobbs  and  Olivia  Carpenter,  with  help   from  the  Tiger  middies,  rarely  allowed  the  Cougars  uncontested   looks  at  Ryan. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   working   really   hard,   probably   since   the   CVU   game   â&#x20AC;Ś   on   slowing   down   the   fast   break,   sliding   over   at   the   right  time,  that  kind  of  thing,  just  the  timing,  and  when  to  go,   when  to  stay,â&#x20AC;?  Higgins  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;And  I  just  think  even  in  these  wet,   slippery  conditions  they  kept  their  heads  about  them  and  played   really  smart.â&#x20AC;? Of   the   three   goals   managed   by   MMU   after   the   break,   two   came  from  Jess  Glenn  on  free  positions,  not  in  the  run  of  play.   Meanwhile,   the   Tigers   continued   to   get   good   looks   at   MMU   JRDOLH&ROE\.QLJKWZKRVWRSSHGÂżYHVKRWV At  the  other  end,  Ryan  made  11  saves,  some  of  them  routine   as  the  Tigers  pressured  Cougar  shooters.  But  some  were  chal-­ lenging,   none   better   than   on   Hope   Denison   on   a   second-­half   IDVWEUHDNZKHQ5\DQPRYHGTXLFNO\WRGHĂ&#x20AC;HFWDVKRWDIWHUD cross-­crease  pass. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Baily  came  through,â&#x20AC;?  Higgins  said. The  Tigers  struggled  at  times  to  clear  their  own  end,  but  Hig-­ gins  said  the  problem  is  correctable:  They  were  rushing  passes,   some  from  Ryan,  back  into  pressure. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Even  at  halftime  we  talked  about  it,â&#x20AC;?  Higgins  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  did   a  much  better  job  of  it  in  the  second  half.â&#x20AC;? Overall,  Robinson  said  the  Tigers  will  be  ready  on  Tuesday   for  the  Patriots,  a  team  they  defeated  on  the  road  early  this  sea-­ son,  15-­13. Âł:HKDYHDORWRIFRQÂżGHQFH:HKDYHDORWRIVSLULWJRLQJ LQWRRXUQH[WJDPHEXW,GRQÂśWWKLQNZHÂśUHWRRFRQÂżGHQW´5RE-­ inson  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  be  really  careful  and  really  smart   MUHS  SENIOR  TIFFANY  Danyow  breaks  out  with  the  ball   with  how  we  play,  I  hope.â&#x20AC;? DJDLQVW0RXQW0DQVÂżHOGODVWZHHN Andy  Kirkaldy  is  at  andyk@addisonindependent.com. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Tiger boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; lax takes two-­point loss to Brat. By  MARSHALL  HASTINGS BRATTLEBORO  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  The  Middlebury  Union  High  School   boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  lacrosse  teamâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  attempt  to  upset  No.  4  Brattleboro  in   D 'LYLVLRQ , TXDUWHUÂżQDO IHOO MXVW VKRUW )ULGD\ QLJKW DV WKH 7LJHUVORVWRQDPXGFRYHUHGÂżHOG $IWHUVFRULQJWKHÂżUVWJRDOMXVWVHFRQGVLQWRWKHJDPH the  Colonels  went  on  a  6-­1  run  to  end  the  half,  taking  a  6-­2   lead  into  the  intermission. The  Tigers  rallied  back  in  the  third  quarter,  scoring  three   XQDQVZHUHGJRDOVWRFXWWKHGHÂżFLWWR08+6DSSHDUHG WRWLHWKHJDPHZKHQ&KULVWLDQ+LJJLQVÂżUHGLQDVKRWIURP his  knees  just  in  front  of  the  goal,  but  a  referee  ruled  that  Hig-­ gins  was  in  the  crease  and  disallowed  the  goal. Brattleboro  then  went  on  a  run  to  extend  the  lead  to  10-­7   after  scoring  on  a  two-­man  advantage. MUHS  rallied  once  again  with  less  than  four  minutes  to   play,  when  Bobby  Ritter  found  a  cutting  Higgins  in  front  of   the  crease  at  3:49,  slicing  the  margin  to  10-­8. With  2:08  to  play,  the  Colonels  went  on  the  offensive  as   D%UDWWOHERURGHIHQGHUUDFHGWKHOHQJWKRIWKHÂżHOG$SDVV sailed   just   over   the   outstretched   stick   of   a   Tiger   defender   and  right  into  the  pocket  of  a  cutting  teammate  who  sank  the   close  range  shot. Just  30  seconds  later,  Higgins  scored  his  second  goal  of  the   game  after  a  Tiger  shot  bounced  off  Brattleboro  goalie  Rom-­ HOOR/LQGVH\+LJJLQVVQDUHGWKHORRVHEDOODQGÂżUHKRPHWKH shot  from  the  right  wing  to  pull  MUHS  once  again  with  two. :LWKWLPHZLQGLQJGRZQ+LJJLQVÂżUHGMXVWZLGHDQGWKH Tigers   were   unable   to   come   up   with   the   ball   in   a   muddy   scrum  in  front  of  the  net. With  less  than  a  minute  to  play,  Ritter  attempted  to  pass   the  ball  inside  to  Keenan  Bartlett,  but  as  Bartlett  turned  to   ÂżUHD&RORQHOGHIHQGHUNQRFNHGWKHEDOOIUHHWRHQGWKHODVW offensive  threat  the  Tigers  were  able  to  muster. &RQQRU4XLQQÂżQLVKHGZLWKWKUHHJRDOVDQGDQDVVLVWDQG Sam   Usilton   tallied   two   goals   and   an   assist   for   the  Tigers,   ZKR ÂżQLVKHG DW  WKHLU ÂżUVW ZLQQLQJ UHFRUG LQ VHYHUDO years.  The  Colonels  moved  to  13-­4.  

VUHS  softball (Continued  from  Page  21) JOHDQG$XQFKPDQSODWHGKHUZLWKDGHHSVDFULÂżFHĂ&#x20AC;\WROHIW to  make  it  5-­0. Meanwhile,   Paquette   was   mowing   down   the   Raiders.   Through   six   innings,   she   allowed   only   one   batter   to   reach,   Dakota  Clark,  who  singled  cleanly  in  the  third,  and  the  Com-­ modores  played  errorless  ball  behind  her.   Paquette  said  she  felt  strong  and  was  hitting  her  spots.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  was  going  in  there  ready  to  attack,  just  like  our  motto  is.   And  I  feel  like  I  trust  our  defense  behind  me,â&#x20AC;?  Paquette  said. The  defense  did  not  play  well  in  the  seventh,  when  after   /L]$WFKLVRQUHDFKHGRQDOHDGRIILQÂżHOGKLW GHVSLWHDWHU-­ ULÂżFSOD\E\$PEURVHDWVKRUW WZRLQÂżHOGHUURUVOHGWRWKH U-­32  runs. But  by  then,  VUHS  had  an  8-­0  lead,  courtesy  of  one  run  in   WKHÂżIWKDQGWZRLQWKHVL[WK,QWKHÂżIWK&KDSXWOHGRIIZLWK a  single,  and  Gonzales  walked  Brown,  Plank  and  Aunchman   to  force  in  a  run  before  Clark  relieved  her  and  worked  out  of   trouble. In   the   sixth,   VUHS   added   two   runs   off   Clark.   Chaput   doubled   with   two   out,   and   a   Brown   single   and   a   walk   to   Plank  loaded  the  bases  for  Aunchman,  who  singled  home  the   JDPHÂśVÂżIWKDQGVL[WKWZRRXW98+6UXQV Âł(YHQWKRXJKZHKDYHWZRRXWVZHÂśUHVWLOOJRLQJWRÂżJKW until  the  end,â&#x20AC;?  Paquette  said. VUHS   coach   Mike   Sullivan   said   Paquette   turned   in   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;great  performanceâ&#x20AC;?  on  the  mound,  and  he  appreciated  their   approach  at  the  plate. â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   kids   are   very   aggressive.  We   have   preached   attack,   attack   the   ball,â&#x20AC;?   Sullivan   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   something   we   will   continue  to  emphasize,  and  making  sure  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  swinging  at   good  pitches,  and  everything  usually  takes  care  of  itself.â&#x20AC;? +HWRRLVFRQÂżGHQWLQWKH&RPPRGRUHVEXWVDLGQHLWKHU he  nor  they  are  taking  anything  for  granted.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;At  this  point,  my  kids  are  ready  for  anything,  but  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   looking   past   anybody,â&#x20AC;?   Sullivan   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   always   one   pitch,  one  inning,  one  game  at  a  time.  So  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  just  go  and   practice  for  a  couple  days  and  try  to  get  prepared  for  Lyndon   or  Otter  Valley  and  go  from  there.â&#x20AC;?


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Bristol Electronics 453-­2500

Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  23

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PAGE 24  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Hackett (Continued from  Page  1) who  will  become  co-­principal  of  the   Thatcher   Brook   Primary   School   in   Waterbury.   Hackett   emerged   as   the   top  choice. A   Proctor   resident,   Hackett   cur-­ rently   works   as   a   reading   interven-­ tion   teacher   at   the   Rutland   Town   School  and  as  afterschool  site  coor-­ dinator  at  the  Clarendon  Elementary   School.   She   is   no   stranger   to   this   area,   having   served   as   director   of   the   Addison   County   branch   of   the   Building  Bright  Futures  early  child-­ hood  program  from  August  2007  un-­ til  March  of  2009.

She’s happy   to   return   to   the   area   and   head   a   school   with   which   she   is   very   impressed.   Hackett   made   a   daylong   visit   to   Bingham   Memo-­ rial  School  on  June  4,  during  which   she   sat   in   on   classes   in   each   grade   and  met  with  community  members.   During   that   visit   she   encountered   what   she   said   were   caring,  enthusi-­ astic   and   high-­achieving   students;;   a   “dedicated   and   knowledgeable   staff”;;   and   parents   and   community   members  who  are  clearly  invested  in   their  local  school. “I   was   very   impressed   with   the   involvement   of   the   community,”  

Hackett said. While  she  will  serve  primarily  as   an  administrator  at  Bingham  Memo-­ rial,  Hackett  is  prepared  to  do  some   VXEVWLWXWH WHDFKLQJ DQG IXO¿OO RWKHU roles  when  called  upon. “At   small   schools,   you   need   to   jump   in   as   needed,”   Hackett   said.   “You  wear  many  hats.” She   and   her   husband   Jimmy,   an   electrician,   will   continue   to   live   in   Proctor   with   their   dog,   Seamus.   +DFNHWW RI¿FLDOO\ EHJLQV KHU WZR year  Cornwall  contract  on  July  1. She’s   eager   to   get   to   work   with   what  she  perceives  as  a  very  inquisi-­ tive  student  body. “The   students   here   really   want   to   come   to   school,”   Hackett   said.   “What   more   could   a   principal   ask   for?” Cornwall   School   Board   Co-­ chairwoman   Maureen   Deppman   said  she  was  impressed  with  Hack-­ ett’s   background   and   interview   on   Thursday. “Susan   has   an   extensive   back-­ ground   in   education   and   an   un-­ derstanding   and   knowledge   of   the   Common   Core,”   she   said,   referring   to  a  set  of  education  standards.  “She   understands  the  key  elements  in  re-­ lationships  between  and  among  stu-­ dents,   teachers   and   parents.   I   was   impressed  at  the  parent  meeting  that   Susan  was  able  to  remember  names   and   interests   of   our   children   from   her   daylong   visit.   Susan   is   student-­ focused   and   approaches   each   sce-­ nario  with  care  and  student  learning  

SUSAN M.  HACKETT at  the  center.   “She   has   strong   curriculum-­de-­ velopment   skills   and   experience   with   supervision   and   evaluation   of   teachers.   Susan   clearly   displayed   her  sense  of  humor  and  her  commit-­ ment  to  teaching,  leading  and  learn-­ LQJ6KHLVUHÀHFWLYHLQKHUSUDFWLFH and   willing   to   learn   from   her   own   experiences   and   others.   Susan   was   knowledgeable   of   our   school.   She   is  willing  to  discuss  new  ideas  while   also   preserving   the   culture   of   the   Cornwall  school. “Her   skills   and   abilities   shared   in   the   interview   process   clearly   matched   the   criteria   of   the   hiring   committee,”  Deppman  continued. Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

6DS%HHUWREHQH¿W)RONOLIH&HQWHU SHELBURNE —   The   Fiddle-­ head   Brewing   Co.   in   Shelburne   will  host  a  Frog  Run  Sap  Beer  Pint   1LJKWIRUWKHEHQH¿WRI0LGGOHEXU\ based   Vermont   Folklife   Center   on   Wednesday,  June  12,  from  4-­8  p.m.   Live  music  will  be  provided  by  the   VFC,   featuring   legendary   Cham-­ SODLQ9DOOH\¿GGOHU3HWH6XWKHUODQG of  Monkton  and  Brass  Balagan,  the   radical  brass  street  band  from  Bur-­ lington.   For   generations   Vermont   sugar   makers   have   brewed   sap   beer   at   home  using  the  season’s  last  run  of  

maple sap   in   place   of   water.   In   the   winter   of   2012,   VFC   Co-­director   Andy   Kolovos   wandered   into   the   recently-­opened   Fiddlehead   Brew-­ ing  Co.  and  asked  owner  and  brewer   Matt  Cohen  if  he  had  ever  made  sap   beer.  Soon  after,  Frog  Run  Sap  Beer   was  born.  Now  the  public  will  have   WKHRSSRUWXQLW\WRJHWWKH¿UVWWDVWH of  the  2013  batch. A  portion  of  all  beer  sales  during   WKHEHQH¿WSLQWQLJKWZLOOEHQH¿WWKH Vermont   Folklife   Center.   For   more   information   contact   Rachel   Cleve-­ land  at  (802)  399-­2994.

Leicester Central  to  host  bottle  drive LEICESTER   —   Leicester   Central   School  will  hold  a  can  and  bottle  drive   on   Saturday,   June   15,   from   8   a.m.-­ noon  at  the  Leicester  Town  Shed. )XQGV UDLVHG ZLOO EHQH¿W WKH WK annual   Summer   Alive!   day   camp,   D ¿YHZHHN VXPPHU SURJUDP IRU Leicester  students  in  grades  K-­6.  This  

year’s theme  is  “Discover  the  Magic,”   through   which   children   can   discover   their   own   magic   with   opportunities   such  as  dance,  drama,  puppet-­making   music,   writing,   crafts,   sports   and   ad-­ ventures.   The   program   will   focus   on   nature   and   the   relationship   between   art  and  the  environment.  

Orwell Town  Band  readies  for  June ORWELL   —   Summer   is   almost   here,   and   the   Orwell   Town   Band   is   gearing   up   for   another   season   of   concerts   on   the   town   green.   Mike   Lenox  will  be  conducting  again  this   year.  As  always,  players  of  all  ages,   abilities,   and   instruments   are   en-­ couraged  to  join  in. The   band   will   rehearse   Thursday   evenings,  June  20  and  28,  in  the  Or-­ well  Village  School  band  room.  Con-­ certs   will   take   place   Thursday   eve-­

nings from  July  11  through  Aug.  8  at   7:30  p.m.  on  the  Orwell  village  green.   A   one-­hour   rehearsal   in   the   school   band  room  will  precede  each  concert. There   will   also   be   a   special   con-­ cert  for  the  Orwell  Town  Semiquin-­ centennial   (250th)   celebration   on   Sunday,  Aug.  18. For   up-­to-­date   information   (or   simply  to  “Like”  the  band)  check  out   the  Orwell  Town  Band  page  at  www. facebook.com/OrwellTownBand.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  25

Ferrisburgh

Have a news tip? Call Sally Kerschner at 877-2625or smwkersch@comcast.net or Katie Boyle at mirage9@myfairpoint.net NEWS

FERRISBURGH  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Ferris-­ and   hide   from   the   lynch   mobs.   burgh  Grangeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  schedule  for  Juneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   There   is   an   exhibit   about   the   trade   King   Pede   card   parties   is   still   be-­ and   agricultural   boom   that   Ferris-­ ing   determined.   Please   contact   burgh   experienced   in   the   1830s.   It   Weston   Spooner   at   877-­2827   for   was   considered   the   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Merino   wool   LQIRUPDWLRQ RQ WKH ÂżQDO GDWHV IRU craze.â&#x20AC;?   There   are   many   displays   June.   These   get-­togethers   are   held   of  books  that  the  Robinson  Family   at   the   Ferrisburgh   Town   Hall   and   both  wrote  and  owned. Community   Center   and   begin   with   In   addition,   the   exhibit   has   a   a   sandwich   supper   and   then   on   to   timeline   that   highlights   the   church   an   evening   of   fun   and   on  the  corner  of  Route  7   Summary   of   key   and   Middlebrook   Road   card  games.  All  are  wel-­ come   to   these   events.   events   in   our   com-­ with   the   maple   trees   The   Grange   requests   a   munity:   in   the   front.   Frederick   June  15-­16:  Lake   Douglass,   the   famous   donation   of   $2.50   from   Champlain   Mari-­ abolitionist,   spoke   on   attendees.   )&6ÂśV ÂżIWKJUDGH time  Museum  Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   the   steps   of   this   church   class   was   able   to   visit   Pirate  Festival   as  part  of  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;100  Con-­ June  22-­23:  Lake   ventionsâ&#x20AC;?   Rokeby  to  view  the  new   sponsored   special   exhibit,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Free   Champlain   Mari-­ by   the   American   Anti-­ and   Safe:   The   Under-­ time   Museum   Na-­ Slavery   Society.   Born   a   ground   Railroad   in  Ver-­ tive   American   En-­ slave,   he   escaped   when   mont.â&#x20AC;?   The   exhibit   has   campment he   was   18   years   old   by   EHHQ GHVLJQHG WR UHĂ&#x20AC;HFW impersonating   a   sail-­ the   history   of   Rokebyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Robinson   or.   He   eventually   went   on   to   be   a   family,   who   were   Quakers,   and   to   trusted   aide   to   President   Lincoln.   highlight   their   commitment   to   the   For   more   information   on   the   new   Underground   Railroad.   The   ex-­ education  center  and  all  the  exhib-­ KLELW ÂżOOV WKH FHQWHUÂśV VHFRQG Ă&#x20AC;RRU its,  call  the  museum  at  877-­3406  or   and  invites  visitors  to  follow  in  the   visit  www.rokeby.org. footsteps   of   Simon   and   Jesse,   two   The   Lake   Champlain   Maritime   fugitives   from   slavery   who   were   Museum  is  open  now  for  the  sum-­ sheltered  at  Rokeby  in  the  1830s. mer   season.   This   year,   along   with   There   are   several   interactive   ex-­ its   special   events   and   exhibits,   the   hibits  designed  to  teach  about  what   museum  will  feature  a  daily  special   it  was  like  for  the  slaves  to  escape   experience  for  visitors  that  will  in-­

clude  daily   morning   and   afternoon   mini-­workshops   and   hands-­on   ac-­ tivities.   Visitors   will   be   able   to   measure   a   sunline,   tie   a   monkeyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ÂżVW VHZ D GLWW\ EDJ RU KDXO RQ D winch. There   will   also   be   the   popular   blacksmithing   demonstrations,   horse   ferry   tread-­wheel,   and   lab   talks.  The  annual  Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Pirate  Fes-­

tival  will  be  held  on  the  weekend  of   June   15   and   16.   Come   in   costume   and   enjoy   exciting,   pirate-­themed   activities,   sing-­alongs,   dramatic   play,   and   make-­and-­take   crafts   for   the  whole  family.  There  will  be  two   daily   performances   by   the   Crab-­ grass   puppet   theater   and   also   chil-­ dren  can  build  a  kid-­sized  duct  tape   pirate  ship.

The  Native   American   encamp-­ ment   will   be   June   22   and   23.   Dis-­ cover   the   vibrant   native   culture   of   the   Champlain   Valley   region   as   members  of  Abenaki  tribes  present   singing,  drumming,  dancing,  wam-­ pum  readings,  craft  demonstrations   and   other   traditions.   Stay   updated   by  checking  the  daily  specials  at  the   museumâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  website:  www.lcmm.org.

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PAGE 26  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Clarkson names area graduates

ADDISON COUNTY

School News Briefs

Karen Rouse,   daughter   of   Dick   and   Lucy   Rouse   of   Brandon,   re-­ POTSDAM,  N.Y.  —  The  follow-­ ceived   a   bachelor’s   degree   in   pro-­ ing   local   students   graduated   from   fessional   studies   with   a   minor   in   Clarkson  University  on  May  11: psychology  from  Johnson  State  Col-­ Brett   Jipner   of   Bristol,   BS,   engi-­ lege  on  May  18.  She  will  pursue  her   neering  and  management;;  Dylan  G.   master’s  degree  in  September  at  the   Newton   of   Middlebury,   BS,   engi-­ College  of  Saint  Joseph  in  Rutland. neering   and   management;;   Peter   C.   Selby   of   New   Haven,   BS,   software   &KULVWRSKHU *ULI¿Q   of   Waltham   engineering;;   Michael   P.   Sundstrom   graduated   from   Green   Mountain   of   New   Haven,   BS,   mechanical   College  on  Saturday,  May  11,  with  a   engineering,   minors   in   mathemat-­ BA  degree  in  history. ics   and   sustainable   energy   systems;;   and   Courtney   L.   Webster   of   North   Rainer  Kenney  of  Brandon  grad-­ Ferrisburgh,   BS   with   distinction   in   uated   from   Bowdoin   College   with   computer   science,   minors   in   math-­ a   major   in   biology-­environmental   ematics  and  psychology.   studies.

George L.   Burgess   of   Middle-­ bury  earned  a  master  of  science  de-­ gree  in  chemistry  from  Oregon  State   University. Steven   Hill   of   Middlebury   re-­ ceived  a  bachelor  of  arts  degree  from   Curry   College   in   Milton,   Mass.,   on   May  19. Jonathan  D.  Wells  of  Middlebury   and  Jessica  R.  Gipson  of  Vergennes   were  named  to  the  dean’s  list  for  the   spring   2013   semester   at   St.  Anselm   College  in  Manchester,  N.H. Wells,  class  of  2015,  is  a  business   major.   Gipson,   class   of   2016,   is   a   nursing  major.

Neil MacKenzie  of  Brandon  was   Jessica   Sturtevant   of   Vergennes   awarded   a   bachelor   of   arts   degree   received  a  bachelor  of  arts  degree  in   from   Connecticut   College   May   19.   communication  from  Marist  College   He  majored  in  biological  sciences. the  weekend  of  May  24. Steel   White   of   Weybridge   re-­ Rebecca   Werner   of   Granville   cently  graduated  from  Choate  Rose-­ SARATOGA   SPRINGS,   N.Y.   graduated   from   Quinnipiac   Univer-­ mary  Hall.  This  spring  he  earned  All   —   The   following   local   students   re-­ sity  in  Hamden,  Conn.  She  received   Western  New  England  distinction  as   ceived  a  degree  from  Skidmore  Col-­ a   bachelor   of   science   degree   in   a   defenseman   on   the   school’s   Divi-­ health  science/occupational  therapy. sion  I  lacrosse  team  and  was  selected   lege  on  May  18: Eli  Cohen  of  Middlebury  received   to  play  in  the  Western  New  England   a  BA  degree. Luke   Mathewson   of   Ferrisburgh   All   Star   lacrosse   game.   He   was   a   Sonia   Hare   of   Middlebury   re-­ graduated   from   Beloit   College   on   co-­winner   of   the   team’s   Coaches’   ceived  a  BS  degree  cum  laude. May   12   with   a   bachelor   of   arts   de-­ Award   for   Dedication,   Enthusiasm   AURORA  SCHOOL  FOURTH-­GRADER  Mia  Thebodo  hikes  on  the  Trail   Anna   Tracht   of   Middlebury   re-­ gree.   Also,   he   was   named   to   the   and  Team  Spirit. Around  Middlebury  on  May  18.  Thebodo,  with  her  parents,  alumna  sis-­ ceived   a   BA   degree   summa   cum   dean’s   list   for   the   spring   2013   se-­ White   will   attend   St.   Lawrence   ter  and  even  the  family  dog,  hiked  over  16  miles  of  the  TAM  as  part  of   laude. mester. University  in  the  fall.   the  school’s  annual  fundraiser/cleanup  event.

Students earn their  degrees from  Skidmore

Aurora School  students clean  up,  walk  the  TAM MIDDLEBURY  —  Middlebury’s   Aurora  School  held  its  eighth  annual   Trail   Around   Middlebury   cleanup   and  fundraiser  on  Saturday,  May  18.   For  this  event,  the  school  walks  the   entire  Trail  Around  Middlebury  and   picks  up  trash  along  the  way. Twenty-­one   students   participated   along  with  teachers,  families,  alum-­ ni  and  even  one  pet.  Eleven  students,   ranging  from  second  to  sixth  grade,   walked  the  whole  TAM,  hiking  over   16  miles.  The  school  calculates  that  

the whole   group   effort   logged   350   miles.   While   walking,   the   school   collected  eight  garbage  bags  of  trash. This   year,   both   participation   and   VSLULWV ZHUH KLJK 6FKRRO RI¿FLDOV say   the   trail   and   weather   condi-­ tions  were  great  and  fundraising  ef-­ forts  went  well.  The  students  raised   $1,500  for  the  school  through  pledg-­ es   and   donations,   much   of   it   given   by  their  Middlebury  neighbors.  The   PRQH\ JRHV WRZDUGV IXQGLQJ ¿HOG WULSVDQG¿QDQFLDODLG


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  27

Chimney Point to offer new hands-on programs ADDISON  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   At   the   Chimney   lor.   The   previous   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   dirty   and   Point   State   Historic   Site   in   Addi-­ threadbare   coat   was   mended   and   son,   site   interpreter   Karl   turned,   which   means   Crannell   on   Saturday,   The previous taking  the  coat  apart  and   June   15,   will   offer   the   yearâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s dirty reassembling  it  with  the   ÂżUVW RI WKUHH KDQGVRQ and threadclean   side   of   the   cloth   monthly   third   Saturday   facing  out.  The  new  coat   programs,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Blast   from   bare coat was   worn   only   on   spe-­ the   Past:   How   They   was mended cial  occasions,  while  the   Made  It  in  New  France.â&#x20AC;?   and turned, old   coat   became   part   of   The   program   runs   be-­ which means the   soldierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   everyday   tween  1:30  and  3:30  p.m.   taking the dress. Juneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   program   looks   at   Using   a   completely   coat apart the   French   soldiers   who   cut-­apart   coat,   Cran-­ served  at  the  French  fort   and reassem- nell   will   demonstrate   at   Chimney   Point   in   the   bling it with the   techniques   used   by   1730s  and  their  clothing. the clean side 18th-­century   tailors   to   The   French   soldiers   of the cloth WUDQVIRUP DQ LOOÂżWWLQJ were   issued   a   white   facing out. coat   into   something   a   coat   as   part   of   their   an-­ French   soldier   would   nual   clothing   allowance.   be   proud   to   wear.   Visi-­ Before   they   could   wear   their   new   tors  will  be  invited  to  try  their  hand   FRDWVWKH\KDGWREHÂżWWHGE\DWDL-­ at  hand-­sewing  and  some  might  be  

asked  to  try  on  parts  of  the  coat  to   VHH KRZ LW ¿WV &UDQQHOO DOVR ZLOO discuss  some  of  the  recent  archaeo-­ ORJLFDO ¿QGLQJV DQG ZKDW WKH\ WHOO us   about   the   long   and   important   French  history  at  Chimney  Point. The   July   20   program   will   focus   on  military  engineering. The  Chimney  Point  State  Historic  

Site  is  located  at  8149  VT  Route  17,   at  the  foot  of  the  new  Lake  Cham-­ plain  Bridge.  It  presents  the  history   of  the  three  earliest  cultures  here  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Native  American,  French  Colonial,   and  early  American.  Call  802-­759-­ 2412  for  information.  Admission  is   $3   for   adults   and   free   for   children   under  15.  The  site  is  open  Wednes-­

days  through  Sundays  and  Monday   holidays  through  Oct.14,  9:30  a.m.   to  5  p.m. For  information  about  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   State-­Owned   Historic   Sites,   visit:   http://historicsites.vermont.gov.   Join   the   Vermont   State   Historic   Sites  conversation  on  Facebook.  

Vergennes  Lions  Club  to KROGEHQHÂżWSRUNULEVDOH VERGENNES   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  At   the   June   5   meeting   of   the   Vergennes   Lions   Club,   it   was   announced   that   there   is   a   rib   sale   starting   immediately,   for  delivery  on  June  25.  This  sale  is   another  way  the  club  raises  some  of   its  $30,000  in  funds  for  community   needs  each  year. The   various   options   are:   (1)   Pl-­ umrose   pork   baby   back   ribs   with   smoky   BBQ   sauce   containing   15   one-­pound   packages   per   case   for  

$85;͞  (2)   Plumrose   baby   back   ribs   pieces  with  smoky  BBQ  sauce  con-­ taining  six  3.3-­pound  packages  per   case  for  $60;͞  and  (3)  boneless  lean   hand-­pulled  pork  with  smoky  BBQ   sauce   containing   four   3-­pound   packages  per  case  for  $45. Orders   must   be   placed   no   later   than   Wednesday,   June   19,   by   call-­ ing   Bruce   Bushey   at   355-­1969   or   Tom  Brigan  at  324-­2158.

SUBSCRIBE, CALL 388-4944

MCTV  SCHEDULE  Channels  15  &  16 MCTV  Channel  15 Tuesday, June 11   5:30  a.m.   Public  Affairs   8  a.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard  11:47  a.m.   Legislative  Wrap-­up   1  p.m.   Public  Affairs   3  p.m.   Mid  East  Digest   4  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   4:30  p.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  Service   6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   7  p.m.   Selectboard  (May  28)   9  p.m.   Public  Affairs/Legislative  Wrap-­up Wednesday, June 12   6:06  a.m.   Midd  Energy  Update   6:30  a.m.   Mid  East  Digest   7:30  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   10  a.m.   Selectboard  11:47  a.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting  (June  4)   1:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs   3:30  p.m.   Midd  Energy  Update   4  p.m.   Salaam  Shalom   5  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   6  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   6:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   7  p.m.   Vermont  Blueprint  for  Health  Conference  10:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs Thursday, June 13   4:30  a.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting  (June  4)   6:30  a.m.   Salaam  Shalom   7:30  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast  (June  3)   10  a.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  11:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   Noon   Selectboard   1:47  p.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting  (June  4)   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6  p.m.   Public  Affairs   8  p.m.   Midd  Energy  Update   8:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   9:30  p.m.   Vermont  Blueprint  for  Health  Conference

Friday, June 14  4  a.m.   Public  Affairs  from  the  Vermont     Media  Exchange  (VMX)   5  a.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting   6:45  a.m.   Legislative  Breakfast  (June  3)   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   10  a.m.   Selectboard  11:47  a.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting   3:30  p.m.   Lifelines   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6:15  p.m.   Public  Affairs   7:30  p.m.   Public  Meeting   10  p.m.   Mid  East  Digest   11  p.m.   Public  Affairs Saturday, June 15   4:30  a.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting   8  a.m.   Midd  Energy  Update   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard  11:47  a.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Contractorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Meeting  12:47  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast  (June  3)   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   5:45  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast  (June  3)   7  p.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting  (June  4)  10:30  p.m.   Salaam  Shalom  11:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs Sunday, June 16   4:30  a.m.   Public  Affairs   7  a.m.   Words  of  Peace   7:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   8  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   8:30  a.m.   Midd  Energy  Update   9  a.m.   Catholic  Mass   11  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   1  p.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  Service   3  p.m.   Green  Mountain  Veterans  for  Peace   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please  see  the  MCTV  website,  www.middleburycommunitytv.org,  for  changes  in  the  schedule;  MCTV  events,   classes  and  news;  and  to  view  many  programs  online.  Submit  listings  to  the  above  address,  or  call  388-­3062.

 5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   Catholic  Mass   7:30  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast  (June  3)   10  p.m.   Words  of  Peace  10:30  p.m.   Green  Mountain  Veterans  for  Peace  11:30  p.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting Monday, June 17   5  a.m.   Green  Mountain  Veterans  for  Peace   6  a.m.   Public  Affairs   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Lifelines   10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6:30  p.m.   Legislative  Breakfast  (June  3)   7:15  p.m.   Railroad  Bridges  Meeting METV Channel 16 Tuesday, June 11   5  a.m.   Memorial  Day  Parade  Middlebury   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6:30  a.m.   Middlebury  Wind  Ensemble  Spring   Concert   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education  12:45  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   5  p.m.   DO  Bird  Banding     (from  VPT  Outdoor  Journal)   5:10  p.m.   Middlebury  College  Environmental       Colloquium  (MCEC)   6  p.m.   UD-­3  Board     9  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Talk  on  Palestine  10:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Union  High  School  Graduation   Wednesday, June 12   5  a.m.   PAHCC  Board   7:30  a.m.   Local  Performance   10  a.m.   UD-­3  Board  11:30  a.m.   ID-­4  Board   4:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   5  p.m.   MCEC   5:50  p.m.   DO  Bird  Banding     (from  VPT  Outdoor  Journal)

 6  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation   8  p.m.   UD-­3  Board  11:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Thursday, June 13   5  a.m.   MUHS  Graduation   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education  12:45  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   1:15  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley:  Talk  on  Palestine   4  p.m.   MCEC   5  p.m.   Local  Performance   9:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   10  p.m.   Studio  104:  St.  Patrickâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Day  Concert Friday/Saturday, June 14/15   4:30  a.m.   Local  Performance   6:30  a.m.   DO  Bird  Banding     (from  VPT  Outdoor  Journal)   6:45  a.m.   PAHCC  Board   9  a.m.   UD-­3  Board  10:30  a.m.   ID-­4   3  p.m.   From  the  College  (MCEC)   4  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley   5:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   6  p.m.   MUHS  Graduation   8  p.m.   From  the  Town  Hall  Theater Sunday, June 16   6  a.m.   From  the  College   9  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   9:30  a.m.   Gund  Institute  10:30  a.m.   First  Wednesday   Noon   From  the  College  (MCEC)   4  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley   5:30  p.m.   From  the  Town  Hall  Theater  11:30  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   Midnight   Festival  on-­the-­Green  Monday, June 17   5:30  a.m.   PAHCC  Board   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education  12:45  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   4  p.m.   First  Wednesday   7  p.m.   ID-­4  Board   11  p.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0  11:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education


PAGE  28  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

SERVICES DIRECTORY APPLIANCE REPAIR

DENTISTRY

Alexander Appliance Repair Inc. t!

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Washers Refrigerators Dishwashers Disposals

Dryers Ranges Microwaves Air Conditioners

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AUTO REPAIR Conscientious Service of Quality German Autos. Major service & extensive diagnostics focusing on VW and Audi. Antique and vintage British sports car service and restoration.

Thomas  A.  Coleman,  D.D.S. Ayrshire  Professional  Building 5  Carver  Street   Brandon,  VT  05733

(802)  247-­3336

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Hartland  Heffernan     802-­349-­0211 wiremonkeyelectric.com Middlebury,  VT  05753

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Specializing in Ductwork for Heating, Ventilating & Air Conditioning Systems Commercial/Residential . Owner Operated Fully Insured . Neat & Clean

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  try  our  best  to  give  superior   quality  and  comfort. Our  team  cares  about  your   dental  health.â&#x20AC;?

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www.brownswelding.com 275 South 116, Bristol, Vermont 05443  Â&#x2021;&HOO  

FLOOR CARE

Dennis Cassidy 388-­7633 63 Maple Street, Middlebury in the Marble Works

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Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  spend  your  hard-­earned  money   making  the  hot  water  or  electricity  that   you  use  todayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SOLAR  IS  MORE  AFFORDABLE  THAN  EVER! Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  here  for  you  for  41  years  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   Let  us  help  you  with  your  solar  projects  today.  

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  29

Lunches (Continued  from  Page  3) Five  Town  Area.  Alexander   has   a   long-­standing   relationship  with  Addison  Northwest  schools,  and   free  meals  will  be  offered  at  two  locations  in  Ver-­ gennes  this    summer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(ANeSU)  works  cooperatively  with  Vergennes   to  make  sure  that  the  whole  county  is  covered,â&#x20AC;?   said  Alexander,  noting  that  a  free  summer  meals   program   run   out   of   Middlebury   Union   High   School  covers  the  Middlebury  area. ANeSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free  summer  lunch  program  has  part-­

County  Summer  Meal  Drop-­in  Locations: nered  with  area  summer  recreation  camps,  where   children   have   to   be   enrolled   to   have   lunch,   but   also  will  host  ample  â&#x20AC;&#x153;drop-­inâ&#x20AC;?  locations  (see  list). Those  who  stop  in  for  lunch  can  expect  a  va-­ riety  of  healthy  and  kid-­friendly  options,  includ-­ ing   sandwiches,   fresh   fruits   and   vegetables   and   varied  creative  dishes  (a  popular  one  last  summer   was  the  chicken  fajita  salad.) â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   great   program,â&#x20AC;?   Alexander   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   staff  loves  to  do  it  and  people  love  to  know  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   there.  People  depend  on  it.â&#x20AC;?

Bristol Elementary School: June 17-Aug. 16, 11:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Bristol Recreation Program/Holley Hall: June 17-Aug. 16, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Mt. Abe High School: June 17-Aug. 16, 11:30 a.m.-noon. The Hub Teen Center and Skate Park: June 17-Aug. 16, 11:30 a.m.-12:15 p.m. Robinson Elementary School: June 17-Aug. 16, noon-12:30 p.m. Lincoln Town Center at the Fire House: June 17-Aug. 16, noon-12:30 p.m. Boys and Girls Club of Vergennes: June 17-Aug. 16, noon-12:30 p.m. Bixby Library: June 27-Aug. 15, 11:45 a.m.-12:15 p.m. (Thursdays only) Vergennes Union Elementary School: June 17-Aug. 16, 12:15-12:45 p.m. Vergennes Union High School: June 24-Aug. 6, 11:30 a.m.-noon. *Lunches  will  also  be  offered  at  two  area  summer  recreation  camps.

SERVICES DIRECTORY RENT-A-SPOUSE

SIDING

STORAGE

VINYL  SIDING &  ROOFING We  also  do SDLQWLQJ

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Stop in to the Addison Independent office in the Marble Works to view a wonderful selection of

We  also  now  have Boat,  Car  &  R.V. storage!

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PAGE  30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

$QQXDO5XII5LGHEHQHÂżW for  animals  on  June  30 MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Homeward   Bound   Animal   Welfare   Center   in   Middlebury   is   hosting   its   sixth   annual   Ruff   Ride,   a   bicycle   and   motorcycle   ULGH WR EHQHÂżW WKH DQLPDOV RQ 6XQGD\ June  30. The  bicycle  rides  will  start  at  10  a.m.   DW 6NLKDXV RI 9HUPRQW LQ 0LGGOHEXU\ There   will   be   three   bicycle   rides:   a   15-­mile   intermediate   ride,   a   30-­mile   advanced  ride,  and  a  family  ride  to  the   8900RUJDQ+RUVH)DUPZLWKWRXURI the  farm  included.  The  motorcycle  ride   will   start   at   8:30   a.m.   at   CycleWise   in   New   Haven.  All   rides   will   begin   with   UHJLVWUDWLRQ DQG FRQWLQHQWDO EUHDNIDVW DQGZLOOÂżQLVKDWWKH0LGGOHEXU\JUHHQ for  a  barbecue,  music,  prizes  and  lots  of   fun.  The  entrance  fee  for  the  ride  is  $25  

Pet of the Week

per  person   and   includes   the   barbecue   and  a  T-­shirt. Riders  can  raise  money  for  Homeward   Bound  through  sponsorship.  Riders  who   raise  at  least  $50  will  have  the  entrance   fee   waived   and   those   who   raise   $75   will  receive  a  free  commemorative  pin.   Those   who   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   ride   are   welcome   to   come   out   for   the   barbecue.  Admission   for   the   barbecue   for   non-­riders   is   $10   for  adults  and  $5  for  children  under  12.     Homeward  Bound  encourages  every-­ one  to  come  out  for  a  great  time  and  a   JUHDWFDXVH)XQGVUDLVHGIURPWKH5XII Ride   will   be   used   to   meet   the   rising   FRVWV RI FDULQJ IRU WKH DQLPDOV )RU more   information,   visit   www.home-­ wardboundanimals.org  or  call  Jessica  at   802-­388-­1443.  

Kidsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; food service program continues through summer B5$1'21²7KH62$5 6XFFHVV through  Opportunities,  Academics  and   Recreation)  summer  program  is  again   SDUWLFLSDWLQJ LQ WKH 6XPPHU )RRG 6HUYLFH3URJUDPIRU&KLOGUHQ )XQGHG E\ WKH 8QLWHG 6WDWHV Department   of   Agriculture,   the   program   is   designed   to   ensure   that   children  who  rely  on  free  or  reduced-­ price   meals   during   the   school   year   continue   to   have   adequate   nutrition   throughout   the   summer.   Meals   will   be   provided   to   all   children   without   charge   and   are   the   same   for   all   chil-­ dren  regardless  of  race,  color,  national   origin,  sex,  age  or  disability,  and  there  

will  be  no  discrimination  in  the  course   of  the  meal  service. Meals  are  available  to  all  children  18   years   of   age   or   younger.  They   will   be   RIIHUHGZHHNGD\V-XO\H[FHSWRQ July  4,  at  the  following  locations: Â&#x2021; /HLFHVWHU &HQWUDO 6FKRRO EUHDNIDVW  DP OXQFK  a.m.-­noon. Â&#x2021; 1HVKREH6FKRROEUHDNIDVW DPOXQFKQRRQSP Â&#x2021; %R\V  *LUOV &OXE RI %UDQGRQ lunch,  noon-­12:30  p.m. )RUDGGLWLRQDOLQIRUPDWLRQFRQWDFW   Nancy   Bird   at   802-­247-­3721,   ext.   105,  or  nbird@rnesu.org.

Does your dog or cat eat LOCAL, too? )DOORZ'HHU9HQLVRQDQGDQWOHUSHWFKHZV IRUVDOHIDUPGLUHFW 0DNH\RXURZQSHWIRRGXVLQJRXU RUJDQPHDWJURXQG VWHZ Summer special: Organ meat $1.69/lb (reg. $3.09/lb) We have venison for pet care givers also! 0XQJHU6W0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021; (PDLOOHGJHQGHHU#FRPFDVWQHW

Meet Hooligan! The appropriately named Hooligan Fisher is a true party animal who loves the good times. She is a 3-year-old Havanese (the breed is originally from Cuba) who loves to salsa dance, hike and steal table scraps that have been counter-surfed

by her best friend and partner in crime, Lello, a 3-year-old golden retriever. Jodi Fisher Panton

Your pet wants to be in the If youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d like to include your pet as â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pet of the Weekâ&#x20AC;? simply include your petâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s name, gender, approximate age (if you know it), and any particular stories or incidents you might like to share concerning your pet. Email a high resolution digital or scanned photo with your story

Addison INDEPENDENT

to news@addisonindependent.com, or pop a photo in the mail to us at Addison Independent, Pet Page, P.O. Box 31, Middlebury, Vt., 05753. Just include a return name and address with the submitted photo. All photos will be returned.

PETS IN NEED HOMEWARD BOUND ANIMAL WELFARE CENTER What  a   handsome   boy!   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   Dexter,   one   of   the   many   special   and   sweet   dogs   here   at   the   humane   society.     ,FDQEHDELWVK\DWÂżUVWEXWRQFH,DPFRPIRUWDEOHLQ my  surroundings,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  very  sweet  and  love  to  get  attention.  I   like  to  go  for  walks,  and  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  improved  greatly  on  my  leash   skills.  I  also  love  to  play  fetch!  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  had  a  rough  go  of  things   before  I  came  to  be  at  the  shelter,  so  I  will  need  for  my  new   owners  to  provide  me  with  leadership  and  a  good  routine.   Once  I  bond  with  you,  I  will  make  a  wonderful  friend!   I  can  be  selective  with  other  dogs  and  I  seem  to  be  shy   around  cats.  I  have  no  known  experience  with  children.     I  have  so  much  potential  and  am  so  deserving  of  a  loving   and  trusting  home.  Come  meet  me  today  and  see  what  a   special  and  cute  boy  I  am!    

Hi,  my   name   is   Roger.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   a   young,   smooth,   brown  and  black  coated  bunny  who  loves  to  play!   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  very  handsome  and  sweet  too!         Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  a  young  boy  at  only  1  year  old,  so  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  playful,   fun  and  love  to  run  around  and  stretch  my  legs!  I   would  be  a  good  playmate  for  another  bunny  buddy.   I   enjoy   being   petted,   and   I   also   enjoy   treats   such   carrots,  parsley  and  yummy  greens.   Please   come   meet   me   today.   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   such   a   handsome  boy!    

%RDUGPDQ6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;&DOORUFKHFNRXUZHEVLWH:HPD\KDYHDSHWIRU\RXZZZKRPHZDUGERXQGDQLPDOVRUJ   


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  31

ersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  markets  and  outside  public  ven-­ ues  in  Cornwall.  All  of  the  proceeds   from   the   book   will   be   donated   to   Save  The  Children.  Book  purchasers   DUHLQYLWHGWRYRWHRQDVSHFLÂżFDLG project   for   African   children,   from   such  options  as  giving  a  goat,  send-­ ing  an  orphan  to  school,  and  provid-­ ing  ready-­to-­use  food  and  mosquito   netting. Giles  is  proud  of  her  young  charge. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   have   to   say,   this   little   girl   has   such   compassion   for   this   project   and  for  understanding  what  it  is  that   children  go  through,  that  some  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   have   clean   water   and   arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   able   to   go  to  school  and  do  the  things  we  can   do,â&#x20AC;?  Giles  said. As  the  Addison  Independent  went   to  press  on  Friday,  book  sales  had  ex-­ ceeded  $200.  Most  of  the  purchasers  

BINGHAM  MEMORIAL   SCHOOL   third-­grade   teacher   Janne   Giles   helped  student  Sarah  Holmes  with  her  cookbook  project.

Cookbook (Continued  from  Page  3) â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   makes   me   feel   sad,â&#x20AC;?   she   wrote  in  her  letter.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;What  would  it  be   like  if  I  was  a  child  in  Africa?  I  want   to  help  and  I  hope  you  do,  too.â&#x20AC;? The   class   became   even   more   in-­ spired   to   help   following   a   personal   visit  by  Dr.  Charles  F.  MacCormack,   former   president   and   CEO   of   Save   The  Children,  and  a  Middlebury  Col-­ lege  student  from  the  African  nation   of  Burundi.  Save  The  Children  assists   children  in  Africa. She   asked   each   student   to   consult   with  their  folks  and  return  with  a  fa-­ vorite  dinner  and  dessert  recipe. Before  too  long,  she  had  received   more   than   30   recipes   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not  talking  about  pedestrian  fare. The  little  book  outlines  the  ingredi-­ ents  and  cooking  directions  for  com-­

Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

to  date  have  been  studentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  families,   though   Sarah   sold   some   additional   copies   at   her   older   sisterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lacrosse   game  in  Middlebury. Sarah   is   eager   to   try   some   of   the   recipes,  especially  a  chocolate  crepes   dish   submitted   by   one   of   her   class-­ mates. And   Sarahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   classmates   are   also   enthused  about  the  project. Julia  Bartlett,  9,  submitted  recipes   for   coconut   curry   cashew   soup,   key   lime   pie   and   homemade   rolls.   She   KRSHVSHRSOHZLOOÂżQGWKHIRRGWDVW\ and  the  cause  worthwhile. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  wanted  to  contribute  to  help  save   children  in  Africa,â&#x20AC;?  Julia  said. The   cookbook   assignment   carried   special  meaning  for  classmate  Solo-­ mon  Wells,  also  9.  Solomon  was  born   in  Ethiopia.

GARAGE SALE

â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  felt  pretty  good  helping  a  place   I   was   born   in,â&#x20AC;?   said   Solomon,   who   offered   recipes   for   chickpea   curry,   and  mangos  and  sticky  rice. Sarahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   mom,   Jessica   Holmes,   gave  a  lot  of  credit  to  Giles  for  help-­ ing  make  the  cookbook  a  reality. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Janne  is  truly  one  of  those  teach-­ ers  you  wish  every  child  could  have   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   passionate,   caring,   creative   and   wonderfully  generous  with  her  time,â&#x20AC;?   Jessica  Holmes  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  will  be  for-­ ever   grateful   for   her   energy   and   the   efforts   she   made   in   turning   Sarahâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   desires   into   a   reality.   The   project   would  not  have  happened  without  her   support  and  encouragement.â&#x20AC;? Meanwhile,  Sarah  will  continue  to   promote  the  cookbook. â&#x20AC;&#x153;(Sales)   are   getting   better   than   I   ever  hoped,â&#x20AC;?  she  said.

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PAGE  32  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Notice

Public  Meetings

DOG  TEAM   CATERING.   Seating   250,   plus   bar   avail-­ able.   Full   menus   available.   802-­388-­4831,  dogteamcater-­ ing.net.

AL-­ANON:  FOR   FAMILIES   and  friends  affected  by  some-­ oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drinking.  Members  share   experience,  strength  and  hope   to   solve   common   problems.   PARTY  RENTALS;  China,  flat-­ Newcomers  welcome.  Confi-­ ware,  glassware,  linens.  Deliv-­ dential.  St.  Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church   ery  available.  802-­388-­4831. (use  front  side  door  and  go  to   second   floor)   in   Middlebury,   TAI   CHI   FOR   SENIORS:   Sunday  nights  7:15-­8:15pm. CVAA.   No   cost.   Beginners   class  5:30-­6:30pm.  Starts  June   ALATEEN:   FOR   YOUNG   18.  16  classes-­8  weeks.  Valley   PEOPLE  whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  affect-­ Bible  Church  in  East  Middle-­ ed   by   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drinking.   bury.   Call   802-­388-­2651   for   Members   share   experience,   strength,  hope  to  solve  com-­ information. mon  problems.  Meets  Wednes-­ days  7:15-­8:15pm  downstairs   in  Turning  Point  Center  of  Ad-­ Cards  of  Thanks dison   County   in   Middlebury   Marbleworks.  (Al-­Anon  meets   THANK   YOU   HOLY   SPIRIT   at   same   time   nearby   at   St.   and  St.  Jude  for  prayers  an-­ Stephens  Church. swered.  AL.

Public  Meetings ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   FRIDAY:  Discussion  Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   Turn-­ ing  Point  in  the  Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Services The Volunteer Center, a collaboration of RSVP and the United Way of Addison County, posts dozens of volunteer opportunities on the Web. Go to www. unitedwayaddisoncounty .org/VolunteerDonate and click on VOLUNTEER NOW!

Services

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   SATURDAY:   Discussion   Meeting  9:00-­10:00  AM  at  the   Middlebury   United   Methodist   Church.   Discussion   Meeting   10:00-­11:00   AM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Begin-­ ners   Meeting   6:30-­7:30   PM.   These  three  meetings  are  held   at  the  Turning  Point  Center  in   the  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   TUESDAY:   11th   Step   Meet-­ ing   Noon-­1:00   PM.  ALTEEN   Group.   Both   held   at   Turning   Point,   228   Maple   Street.   12   Step  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.   12  Step  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.   Both  held  at  the  Turning  Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   NEW   HAVEN   MEETINGS:   Monday,   Big   Book   Meeting   7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the  Congre-­ gational  Church,  New  Haven   Village  Green.

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   THURSDAY:  Big  Book  Meeting   Noon-­1:00  PM  at  the  Turning   Point   Center   in   the   Marble-­ works,   Middlebury.   Speaker   Meeting   7:30-­8:30   PM   at   St.   Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,  Main  St.(On   the  Green). ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   WEDNESDAY:  Big  Book  Meet-­ ing   7:15-­8:15  AM   is   held   at   the   Middlebury   United   Meth-­ odist   Church   on   N.   Pleasant   Street.   Discussion   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting   5:30-­6:30   PM.   Both   held   at   The   Turning   Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Services

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   MONDAY:   As   Bill   Sees   It   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   PM.   Big   Book  Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.   Both  held  at  the  Turning  Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury. ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   MIDDLEBURY   MEETINGS   SUNDAY:   12   Step   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   held   at   the   Middlebury   United   Methodist   Church  on  N.  Pleasant  Street.   Discussion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00   PM  held  at  the  Turning  Point   Center   in   the   Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

Public  Meetings

ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   VERGENNES   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.   Friday,   Dis-­ cussion   Meeting   8:00-­9:00   PM.   Both   held   at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church,   Park   St.   Tuesday,   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   Discussion  Meeting  7:00-­8:00   RIPTON   MEETINGS:   Mon-­ PM,   at   the   Congregational   day,  As   Bill   Sees   It   Meeting   Church,  Water  St. 7:15-­8:15   AM.   Thursday,   Grapevine  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   PM.  Both  held  at  Ripton  Fire-­ NORTH   FERRISBURGH   house,  Dugway  Rd. MEETINGS:   Sunday,   Daily   Reflections  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   PM,   at   the   United   Methodist   BRANDON   MEETINGS:   Church,  Old  Hollow  Rd. Monday,  Discussion  Meeting   7:30-­8:30   PM.   Wednesday,   ARE   YOU   BOTHERED   by   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drinking?  Whatever   PM.  Friday,  12  Step  Meeting   your  problems,  there  are  those   7:00-­8:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   of  us  who  have  had  them  too.   St.  Thomas  Episcopal  Church,   We  invite  you  to  our  Opening   RT  7  South. Our  Hearts  Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Al-­Anon   group,  meeting  every  Wednes-­ ALCOHOLICS  ANONYMOUS   day   at   7:15   pm   upstairs   at   BRISTOL   MEETINGS:   Sun-­ St.Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  on  the  Green  in   day,   Discussion   Meeting   Middlebury. 4:00-­5:00   PM.   Wednesday,   12   Step   Meeting   7:00-­8:00   PM.  Friday,  Big  Book  Meeting,   6:00-­7:00  PM.  All  held  at  the   Federated  Church,  Church  St.

Services

Services

Services

Seeking COSA (Circle Of Support and Accountability) Volunteers Addison County Court Diversion and Community Justice Projects is looking for concerned, committed community members to make a difference in the lives of individuals convicted of serious offenses. Volunteers are fully trained and work in teams of 3-5 to support an offender who has been released from prison to successfully re-enter the community. They meet weekly to encourage the individual in his/her effort to repair relationships, manage everyday living and commit no further offenses. For more inforeYlagfYZgml`golgkmhhgjl;GK9keakkagflg]f`Yf[] community safety, please call 388-7044.

Suki  Fredericks  lives  in  Leicester  and  volunteers  with  the  

Everybody  Wins!  reading  mentoring  program,  at  the  Salisbury  Com-­ munity   School.     She   mentors   a   second   grade   student   in   a   weekly   session  of  reading  together  in  the  school  library.    When  asked  what   she  enjoys  most  about  Everybody  Wins!,  Suki  says:    â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  love  being   a   mentor   on   a   one-­on-­one   basis   in   this   thoughtfully   implemented   program.    It  is  an  honor  and  a  pleasure  to  get  to  know  this  wonderful   young  person  as  well  as  to  share  our  mutual  enthusiasm  for  reading   and  how  that  enhances  our  lives.â&#x20AC;?    Thank  you  so  much,  Suki.

Public  Meetings

BRAIN  INJURY   SUPPORT   GROUP:   Survivors,   family   members  and  care  givers  are   invited   to   share   their   experi-­ ence   in   a   safe,   secure   and   confidential   environment.   Meets   monthly   on   the   sec-­ ond   Tuesday   from   6:00pm   to   8:00pm   at   the   Hannaford   Career   Center,   Room  A214   (second   floor,   an   elevator   is   available)   in   Middlebury.   For   more  information,  contact  Beth   Diamond  802-­388-­9505. IS  LIFE  FEELING  like  a  con-­ stant  struggle?  In  addition  to   taking  over  your  life  and  who   you  are  as  a  person?  Do  you   remember  when  the  simplest   things  could  make  you  happy?   If   you   said   yes,   come   to   the   Turningpoint  Center  of  Addison   County  for  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Life  in  Transitionâ&#x20AC;?.   These  recovery  meetings  are   for  young  adults,  ages  16-­25,   with   any   kind   of   addiction.   Meetings   on   Mondays   and   Fridays,  4-­5  pm,  at  the  center   in  the  Marble  Works  in  Middle-­ bury.  Our  support  system  will   help  you  make  a  difference  in   your  life.  Stop  in,  even  if  it  is   just  to  talk.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  your  life,  choose   how  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  going  to  live  it. NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:   Mondays,   6pm,   held   at   the   Turning   Point   Center   located  in  the  Marbleworks. NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Fridays,  7:30pm,  held   at   the   Turning   Point   Center   located  in  the  Marble  Works. OVEREATERS   ANONY-­ MOUS:   SATURDAYS   at   Lawrence   Memorial   Library,   1:00pm.  40  North  Street,  Bris-­ tol.  For  info  call:  802-­453-­2368   or  802-­388-­7081. OVEREATERS   ANONY-­ MOUS:  TUESDAYS  at  Turn-­ ing   Point   Center,   5:15pm.   Marble   Works,   Middlebury.   For  info  call:  802-­352-­4525  or   802-­388-­7081.

L o c a l age n c ie s c a n p o s t t h e i r v o l u n te e r ne e d s w i t h Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r by c a l l i ng RSV P at 388-7044.

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  33

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Public  Meetings THE  HELENBACH  CANCER   Support  Group  is  an  indepen-­ dent  group  of  people  who  are   dealing   with,   have   dealt   with,   and   who   know   people   with   cancer.  We  meet  on  an  irregu-­ larly  regular  basis  (if  there  is  a   need,   we   meet!)   at   the   Mary   Johnson  Child  Care  Center  on   Water  St.  in  Middlebury.  Good   home-­made  treats  are  always   available  and  all  meetings  are   free.  Our  theme  song  has  been   Bill  Witherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lean  on  Me,  when   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   not   strong,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   be   your   friend,  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  help  you  carry  on..for   it  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  long,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;til  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  gonna   need,   somebody   to   lean   on.â&#x20AC;?   Come  be  a  leaner,  be  a  sup-­ porter,   be   part   of   something   that  gives  strength  by  sharing   love.   Call   802-­388-­6107   with   questions.

Services BOAT  DOCK   REPAIR   and   construction.  Experienced  and   reliable.   Fully   insured.   Call   802-­349-­6579,   Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Prop-­ erty   Management,   Leicester,   Vermont.

FREE  CAST   IRON   TUB:   In   DRIVERS   WANTED-­   VER-­ good  shape.  You  come  and  get   GENNES:  Local  Food  service   it.  802-­989-­8363. company  seeking  drivers  for  im-­ mediate  start.  Applicants  must   FREE  MANURE  AVAILABLE   be   available   to   drive   Sunday   from   locally   raised   rabbits.   and  Monday.  CDL  not  required.   Please  call  Mo  at  802-­349-­8040. Clean  driving  record  required.   Services Services Driving  experience  a  plus.  Must   C&I  DRYWALL.  Hanging,  tap-­ MELISSAâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  QUALITY  CLEAN-­ be  capable  of  loading  and  un-­ ing   and   skim   coat   plastering.   ING  Services.  Residential  and   loading   bins.   Good   customer   Garage  Sales Also  tile.  Call  Joe  802-­234-­5545. commercial.   Fully   insured.   service  skills,  problem  solving   Great  rates.  Reliable  and  thor-­ ability   and   attention   to   detail   CHAIN  SAW  CHAINS  sharp-­ ough  cleaning.  802-­345-­6257. critical.   Please   email   resume   ened.  Call  802-­759-­2095. GARAGE  SALE.  CORNWALL.   and  references  to  info@graze-­ Saturday.  8:30am-­noon.  Lots  of   delivered.com  .







COLLEGE  GRAD  AVAILABLE   for   babysitting,   dog   walking,   driving  /  transportation,  and  help   with  parties.  Certified  EMT,  certi-­ fied  bartender.  203-­570-­7994.

NOW  IS  THE  TIME  to  schedule   your  lawn  mowing.  Call  for  free   estimate.  We  also  offer:  brush   trimming,  hedge  trimming,  pow-­ er  washing,  light  trucking,  small   carpentry  jobs  and  repairs.  Con-­ crete  pads,  sidewalks;  new  and   repairs.   10%   off   all   work   for   senior  citizens.  Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Property   Management,   Leicester,   Vt.   802-­349-­6579.  Fully  insured.

CONSTRUCTION:  ADDI-­ TIONS,  RENOVATIONS,  new   construction,  drywall,  carpentry,   painting,   flooring,   roofing.  All   aspects   of   construction,   also   property  maintenance.  Steven   PAINTING  /  WALL  PAPERING.   Fifield  802-­989-­0009. Looking  for  a  quick  and  afford-­ able  way  to  make  your  home   look  fresh?  We  now  have  a  pro-­ fessional  painter  /  paper  hanger   DEVELOPMENTAL   HOME   on  staff.  Raymond  Renovation   PROVIDER   for   live-­in   client   &  New  Construction,  LLC.  Mark   or   respite   care.   36   years   ex-­ Raymond.  802-­388-­0742. perience.   State   background   check  completed.  State  Agency   PORTABLE  SAW  MILL.  Saw-­ and   past   client   family   refer-­ ing   of   your   logs   and   timbers.   ences   provided.   Call   Doreen   802-­989-­9170. at  802-­247-­4409.



Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GARAGE SALE Season...Let us get the word out for you!

household  items. GARAGE   SALE:   SATUR-­ DAY  6/15,  Federated  Church.   North   St.,   Bristol.   8am-­3pm.   Lots   of   stuff   from  A   to   Z.   Info   802-­453-­2420. LARGE  GARAGE  SALE.  Tools   and   hardware.   Many   more   items.   Call   520-­869-­4092   for   details. LAWN   SALE.   SATURDAY,   June  15,  9am-­3pm.  Wide  va-­ riety  of  useful  items.  48  North   Pleasant  St.,  Middlebury. ORWELL,   RAIN   OR   SHINE:   6/15-­6/16,  9am-­3pm.  3  Route   73,  West.  Array  of  items  for  sale. SALISBURY;  ROUTE  7,  across   from  the  fire  station.  Yard  Sale,   Friday,  Saturday,  Sunday.  May   14,  15,  16.  9am-­5pm.  House-­ hold  items.  Adult  and  childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   clothing.   Toys,   tools   and   lots   more.

SHARED  LIVING   PROVID-­ ER:   Man   with   developmental   disability   /  Aspergers   in   early   20s   seeking   home   in   central   to   northern  Addison   County.   Ideal  match  would  be  a  single   person   or   active   couple.   He   enjoys   spending   time   in   Burl-­ ington,  sporting  events,  biking,   the  beach  and  eating  out.  He   is  friendly,  talkative  and  has  a   part  time  job.  Eventually  wants   his   own   apartment   and   need   support  to  develop  independent   living  skills.  Annual  tax-­free  sti-­ pend  of  $22,000  plus  room  and   board  payment  of  around  $6000   and  respite  budget.  Call  Rocky   Fucile  at  Community  Associates   802-­388-­4021. CAR   WASHER:   Saratoga   Springs,  NY.  Part  Time.  Apply   Online  www.go.enterprise.com.   EOE  /  MFDV.

7 CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

$

Deadlines: Thursday Noon for Monday papers Monday 5pm for Thursday papers YOUR AD INFORMATION

TOWN: DATES & TIMES: STREET ADDRESS: DESCRIPTION: (Up to 10 words)

YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION NAME: PHONE: Mail in your classified ad with payment to : PO Box 31, Middlebury VT 05753 OR

Stop in and drop it off to Kelly, Vicki or Laurie at our 58 Maple St. location in the Marble Works, Middlebury

MAILING ADDRESS:

$7(ad w/out kit) x___#of runs* For just $3 more, $10 (ad plus kit) x___#of runs pick up an all-inclusive (*Kit comes FREE with 3 runs or more!) GARAGE SALE KIT with Additional words x # of runs everything you need for x 25¢ a successful sale. Total Payment Enclosed $

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

DAIRY  CATTLE   FEEDER.   Full   time   position.   Health   in-­ surance   and   retirement   plan.   Pay  based  on  experience.  Valid   driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  license  required.  Kay-­ hart   Brothers,  Addison.   Call   Tim   802-­3496676   or   Steve   802-­349-­6906.

EARN  $50.00:   PARTICIPA-­ TION   in   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Focus   groupâ&#x20AC;?   on   Saturday   July   20,   2013   from   10am  until  2pm.  Must  hold  valid   driverâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  license,  be  a  resident  of   Addison   County   and   be   over   the   age   of   18.   To   be   held   in   Middlebury,  VT.  Please  call  toll   free  at  877-­611-­9622  or  email:   shelly@nhvtlaw.com.   Space   is  limited.

TOWN OF NEW HAVEN HELP WANTED â&#x20AC;&#x201C; ROAD FOREMAN

This  person  will  be  the  working  supervisor  of  the  Town   of  New  Haven  Highway  Crew  (3-­4  people)  and  will  be   responsible  for  the  day-­to-­day  operations  of  the  High-­ way  Department.  The  Road  Foreman  will  work  with  the   supervision  of  the  Road  Commissioner  or  Selectboard. The  Road  Foreman  should  have  the  following  quali-­ ÂżFDWLRQV Â&#x2021;$ELOLW\WRVXSHUYLVHRWKHUVDQGZRUNZLWKWKHSXEOLF Â&#x2021;+DYHZRUNLQJNQRZOHGJHRIURDGFRQVWUXFWLRQDQG PDLQWHQDQFHFXOYHUWLQVWDOODWLRQHWF Â&#x2021;3RVVHVVDWOHDVWDKLJKVFKRROGLSORPDRU*(' Â&#x2021;&RPPHUFLDO'ULYHUÂśV/LFHQVHZLWKSURSHU HQGRUVHPHQWVDQG Â&#x2021;3RVVHVVSXEOLFZRUNVH[SHULHQFHRUUHODWHG    construction  work. 7KHSRVLWLRQLVIXOOWLPH0RQGD\)ULGD\DP WR  SP DQG LQFOXGHV KHDOWK LQVXUDQFH RSWLRQV DQGWZHOYHSDLGKROLGD\V,WUHTXLUHVDĂ&#x20AC;H[LEOHVFKHG-­ ule  which  may  include  nights,  weekends  and  holidays.   6DODU\DQGEHQHÂżWSDFNDJHZLOOEHQHJRWLDWHGZLWKWKH Selectboard.   If   interested,   please   contact   the   New   Haven   Town   &OHUNÂśVRIÂżFH0RQGD\Âą)ULGD\DPWRSP RUFRQWDFW5RJHU%RLVHDW$SSOLFDWLRQ form   and   job   description   can   be   found   at   www.ne-­ ZKDYHQYWFRP$SSOLFDWLRQZLWKUHIHUHQFHVWREHVXE-­ PLWWHGE\SPRQ-XQHth  to  Town  of  New  Haven,   1RUWK6WUHHW1HZ+DYHQ97 


PAGE  34  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Resident Centered, Locally Governed Professionally Managed by Wake Robin Part Time Staff Nurse Our  nursing  team  is  key  to  creating  a  comfortable  and  safe  home  for  the  residents  of   EastView.    This  professional  health  care  position  provides  direct  nursing  care  to  meet   the  needs  of  the  residents,  and  works  under  general  supervision  from  the  Residential   Care  Services  Director.    Primary  responsibilities  include  supervision  of  assigned  aides,   performance  of  skilled  treatments  and  procedures,  and  assisting  the  Residential  Care   Services  Director  with  oversight  of  activities  of  daily  living,  family/social  concerns  and   FRPSOHWLRQ RI DOO QHFHVVDU\ SDSHUZRUN DQG KHDOWK FDUH SODQV  4XDOLÂżHG FDQGLGDWHV will  have  an  Associates  Degree  in  Nursing,  Bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree  preferred,  with  current   9HUPRQWOLFHQVHDV5HJLVWHUHG1XUVHDQGDPLQLPXPRIWKUHH\HDUVRIVLJQLÂżFDQWO\UH-­ sponsible  clinical  experience  in  a  long-­term  care  setting  or  an  equivalent  combination  of   education  and  experience.    3  shifts  per  week  including  weekends  and  holidays.    Hours   FDQEHĂ&#x20AC;H[LEOH Part Time Concierge The  Concierge  serves  as  the  welcoming  â&#x20AC;&#x153;faceâ&#x20AC;?  of  EastView.  Through  gracious  hospitality   DQGDWWHQWLYHQHVVWKH&RQFLHUJHUHĂ&#x20AC;HFWVWKHYDOXHVDQGLPDJHRI(DVW9LHZWRRXUFRP-­ munityâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  residents  and  guests.  S/he  is  responsible  for  all  front  desk  functions  including   processing  calls,  receiving  guests  and  residents,  providing  assistance  and  information   relevant   to   the   community,   overseeing   reservations   for   programs,   transportation   and   GLQLQJDQGJHQHUDODGPLQLVWUDWLYHDVVLVWDQFHDQGPDLOGXWLHV4XDOLÂżHGFDQGLGDWHVZLOO have  a  High  school  diploma  or  equivalent,  a  minimum  of  2  years  of  professional  hospital-­ LW\H[SHULHQFHVROLGFRPSXWHUVNLOOV 0LFURVRIW2IÂżFHDQG4XLFNERRNV DQGH[SHULHQFH managing  multi-­line  phone  systems.    Evenings,  weekends,  and  holidays  required.     Business Operations Assistant The  Business  Operations  Assistant  supports  the  daily  business  activities  of  EastView.   Duties  include  payroll,  purchasing,  accounts  payable/receivable,  staff  recruitment,  ben-­ HÂżWVDGPLQLVWUDWLRQDQGFOHULFDOVXSSRUWZKHQUHTXHVWHG:HVHHNFDQGLGDWHVZLWKD minimum  of  2-­years  of  related  administrative  support  experience  with  a  focus  on  HR/ ÂżQDQFLDOFOHULFDOUHVSRQVLELOLWLHVDVWURQJVHQVHRIFXVWRPHUVHUYLFHDQGDQXQZDYHU-­ LQJFRPPLWPHQWWRFRQÂżGHQWLDOLW\3UHYLRXVH[SHULHQFHZLWK0LFURVRIWRIÂżFHSURGXFWV LQFOXGLQJVSUHDGVKHHWVDQG4XLFNERRNVH[SHULHQFH:HVHHNFDQGLGDWHVZKRFDQVXF-­ cessfully  balance  multi-­tasking  with  strong  attention  to  detail. For  more  information  about  EastView  at  Middlebury,  go  to: www.eastviewmiddlebury.com Interested  candidates  please  email  your  resume  and  cover  letter  to:   greatplacetowork@eastviewmiddlebury.com or  mail  to:   EastView at Middlebury 100 Eastview Terrace Middlebury, VT 05753      EOE

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

LOOKING  FOR   ALL   shifts   for   a   loving   and   kind   person   to  care  for  seniors  in  a  home   atmosphere.   Holistically   we   incorporate   organic   nutrition,   integrative   medicine   and   a   wide   variety   of   fun   activities.   LNA  or  equivalent  is  desired.  If   you  are  a  team  player  and  reli-­ able  please  send  your  resume:   info@livingwellvt.org.

FULL  TIME  NURSE  position:   Seeking  full-­time  experienced   and   dynamic   LPN   or   Medical   Assistant  to  join  our  fast  paced   team.   Work   one-­on-­one   with   a   doctor.   Job   includes   room-­ ing   patients,   giving   injections,   EKGs,  venipuncture  and  triag-­ ing  phone  calls.  Electronic  medi-­ cal  record  experience  a  plus  but   will  train  the  right  person.  Com-­ petitive  salary  benefits  included.   Position  is  3.5  days  per  week.   Send  resume  and  references  to:   Middlebury  Family  Health,  Attn:   Stacy  Ladd,  Practice  Adminis-­ trator,   44   Collins   Drive,   Suite   201,   Middlebury,   VT   05753   Fax:  38804  41.

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted

Assistant Cook Position Salisbury Community School seeks a part-time (about 20 hours per week) Assistant Cook for the breakfast and lunch programs. Responsibilities include food preparation, serving students and lunchroom/kitchen clean-up. Send letter of application and three current letters of references to: Dr. Conley, Superintendent Addison Central Supervisory Union 49 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 E.O.E

Mountain  View  Equipment  of  Middlebury,  VT seeks  Top  Quality

Small Engine Technician

Experience  Preferred DIESEL  ENGINE,  HYDRAULIC  &   ELECTRICAL  EXPERIENCE  AND   CLEAN  DRIVERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  LICENSE  REQUIRED.

Parts Person

KNOWLEDGE  OF  AGRICULTURE  AND   LAWN  &  GARDEN  EQUIPMENT  A  MUST

1137  Route  7  North Middlebury,  VT 0DLQWHQDQFH3/&7HFKQLFLDQÂ&#x2021;0LGGOHEXU\97

Agri-­Mark  has  a  full-­time  immediate  opening  for  a  PLC  Techni-­ cian  to  work  in  our  Middlebury,  VT  facility.    Flexible  work  sched-­ ule  required,  including  working  nights,  weekends,  and  holidays.   The  PLC  Technician  will  maintain  and  troubleshoot  PLC  control   systems,  motor  controls  and  VFDâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s,  instrumentation,  pneumat-­ ics,  networks,  and  production  plant  equipment.    Must  be  able  to   carry  out  routine,  scheduled  and  emergency  repairs  in  a  timely   manner;Íž  able  to  read  and  interpret  machine  manuals,  including   diagrams   and   drawings;Íž   and   able   to   work   both   independently   and  as  a  team  member.  The  candidate  must  have  an  accessible   home  telephone  or  cell  phone,  a  dependable  vehicle,  and  work-­ related  hand  tools  and  meter.    Strong  interpersonal,  written  and   oral  communication  skills  are  a  must,  and  the  ability  to  regularly   lift  and  carry  up  to  80  lbs.    Position  requires  an  associateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  de-­ JUHH %DFKHORUÂśV'HJUHHSUHIHUUHG LQUHODWHGÂżHOGZLWK\HDUV of  related  experience. Agri-­Mark  offers  a  competitive  starting  wage  and  an  excellent   EHQHÂżWVSDFNDJH Apply   in   person,   by   email   to   aleblanc@agrimark.net   or   send   your  resume  with  cover  letter  to:        

Agri-­Mark Attn:  Ashley  LeBlanc 869  Exchange  Street Middlebury,  VT  05753 EOE          M/F/D/V

Help  Wanted

SALISBURY COMMUNITY SCHOOL

Please  Apply  in  Person

                                                      

Help  Wanted

(802)388-­4482 Open  in  our  Middlebury  Location

HEAD CHEF           Two  Brothers  Tavern (www.twobrotherstavern. com)    in    Middlebury,  Vermont is   seeking   an   experienced   culinary   professional   to   lead   our   fast  paced    kitchen.  Two  Brothers  Tavern    is    a   full-­â&#x20AC;?service   restaurant   serving   homemade   Vermont   comfort   fare   made   from   ingredients   sourced  from  Vermont  farms  and  /  or  producers.   We   are   seeking   a   hands-­â&#x20AC;?on-­â&#x20AC;?chef   to   be   Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x2030;ŽŜĆ?Ĺ?Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;ĨŽĆ&#x152;Ĺ?ŜͲĹ&#x161;ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ä?ƾůĹ?ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ĆľÄ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2022;Ä?Ĺ˝Ć?Ć&#x161; management,   menu   and   recipe   development,   health   &   safety   standards,   cooking   on   the   line   and   all   aspects   of   kitchen   management,   including   ordering,   scheduling,   inventory   and   discipline.   The   ideal   candidate   should   Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć?Ć?Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć? Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2020;Ä?Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161; Ä?ƾůĹ?ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022; Ä?ŽžžƾŜĹ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ć&#x;ĹľÄ&#x17E;ͲžÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ĹľÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161; Ć?ĹŹĹ?ĹŻĹŻĆ?Í&#x2DC; dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2021; Ć?Ĺ&#x161;ŽƾůÄ&#x161; Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĆ?Ĺ˝ Ä?Ä&#x17E; Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x2030;ŽŜĆ?Ĺ?Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Í&#x2022; Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x152;ŽͲÄ&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E; Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x161; Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161; ĹľÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ĺ?Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ˝Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?Í&#x2DC;ŽžĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x;Ć&#x;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2022;Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;ŽŜ experience;  health  &  dental  insurance  and  paid   Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2DC;WĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ä&#x17E;ĨŽĆ&#x152;Ç Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161;Ç&#x2021;ŽƾĆ&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?ƾžÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ĺ?ŜĨŽÎ&#x203A; twobrotherstavern.com.   We   look   forward   to   Ć?Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĹŹĹ?ĹśĹ? Ç Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; Ç&#x2021;ŽƾÍ&#x2DC; WĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ä&#x17E; ŜŽĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2014; dĹ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć? Ć&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć?Ĺ?Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2039;ĆľĹ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?ĹśĹ?Ĺ?Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ç Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x17E;ĹŹÄ&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ć?Í&#x2DC;

Our

&ODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HG $GV:RUN Call 388-4944 to place one!


Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  —  PAGE  35

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

Help Wanted

OFFICE /  TECHNICIAN;   VER-­ GENNES  Large  Animal  Asso-­ ciates  is  looking  for  an  outgo-­ ing,  confident  individual  to  join   our  staff.  Duties  include  client   contact,   managing   inventory,   organizing   farm   visits   for   vet-­ erinarians,   clerical   duties   and   accounts   payable  /  receivable.   Technical  duties  include  surgical   instrument  care,  laboratory  and   some   animal   care   opportuni-­ ties.  Weekday  hours.  Computer   skills  required;  word  processing   /  Quick   Books   and   knowledge   of   the   dairy  /  livestock   industry   would   be   helpful.   Vergennes   Large  Animal  is  a  small,  food   and  fiber  animal  exclusive  vet-­ erinary  practice.  We  maintain  a   supportive,  friendly  atmosphere   of   respect   and   encourage   growth   and   lifelong   learning.   We  would  love  to  hear  from  you.   Please  forward  your  resume  via   mail@vergenneslargeanimal. com  or  mail  to  VLAA,  20  Main   Street,  Vergennes,  VT  05491.

STAFFED LIVING:   RESI-­ DENTIAL  Instructor  sought  for   home  in  Middlebury,  supporting   a  woman  in  her  30’s  with  mild   developmental  disability.  Most   important  skills  are  flexible  think-­ ing  and  the  ability  to  maintain   personal  boundaries.  Support   needed   in   learning   emotion-­ al   regulation,   gaining   home   management   skills,   building   friendships,  developing  interests   outside  the  home  and  improving   communication.  36  hours  with   one   overnight,   3   days   off   per   week.  Comprehensive  benefit   package  including  on-­site  gym   membership.  Respond  to  CSAC   HR,  89  Main  Street,  Middlebury   VT  05753,  802-­388-­6751,  ext.   425  or  visit  www.csac-­vt.org  .

MIDDLEBURY FAMILY  SER-­ VICES   is   seeking   people   in-­ terested   in   becoming   foster   parents  and  /  or  weekend  respite   providers  for  children  ages  8-­18   who   have   various   emotional   and  developmental  challenges.   Financial  compensation,  train-­ ing   and   support   provided.   If   interested   please   call   Bonnie   at  388-­4660.

PART TIME   CAREGIVER   for   13   year   old   disabled   boy,   Middlebury.  Applicants   must   have   child   care   experience,   references,  incredible  patience,   a  strong  back.  Flexible  hours.   Criminal   background   check.   Send   resume:   sstone7716@ gmail.com  .

Help Wanted

For Sale



2004 30’  CEDAR  CREEK  5th   wheel   camper.   Bunkhouse,   sleeps   8.   Arctic   package.   Large   slide-­out   and   awning.   Great   condition.   $13,900.   802-­759-­2238. 2008  CROSSROADS  ZINGER   21’  Travel  Trailer,  loaded,  used   4  days,  pristine.  Never  cooked   in!   Room   divider  /  queen   bed,   foldout   couch.   Dinette  /  bed,   sleeps  6,  MUST  SEE!  $12900.   802-­989-­6166.

For Sale

For Rent



1 BEDROOM   apartment   in   Salisbury  near  Lake  Dunmore.   Super  energy  efficient.  Bedroom   and  full  bath  on  second  floor.   Eat-­in   kitchen   with   stove   and   refrigerator;   and   living   room   on  first  floor.  Private  basement   with  washer  and  dryer  included.   Available  May  1.  $800  /  mo.  plus   utilities.  Yard  maintenance  and   snow  plowing  included.  Secu-­ rity   and   references   required.   Non-­smoking   property.  Abso-­ lutely   no   pets!   1   year   lease   required.  802-­352-­6678.

MO’S COUNTRY   RABBITS:   Fresh   Rabbit   Meat   for   sale.   Average  weight:  4-­5  lbs.  Charg-­ ing  $14.00  per  rabbit.  Also  sell-­ ing   live   adult   rabbits,   as   well   as  baby  rabbits  for  negotiable   price.   Many   different   breeds   including   “Giants”.   May   be   seen  by  appointment.  Call  Mo   O’Keefe  at  802-­349-­8040.  Great   Meat.  Great  Pets.  Great  Prices.

For Rent

WEYBRIDGE; 2   BEDROOM   house,  1  bath.  Sunporch  /  third   MIDDLEBURY  DOWNTOWN   bedroom.   Totally   renovated.   PROFESSIONAL   Offices   in   W/D  hookup.  Wooded  setting.   condominium  unit  with  recep-­ $1250  /  monthly   plus   utilities.   tion  area.  Utilities  included,  A/C,   802-­989-­0284. kitchenette,   restroom,   client’s   parking.  802-­462-­3373,  gisela@ shoreham.net  .



MIDDLEBURY DUPLEX   AVAILABLE:  June  1  at  94  Wey-­ bridge   Street:   two   bedrooms,   small  office,  one  bath,  kitchen,   THE   BARREL   MAN:   55   gal-­ living   room.   Shared   front   and   lon   Plastic   and   Metal   barrels.   back  porch.  Off  street  parking   4000  SQUARE  FEET  or  less.   Several   types:   55   gallon   rain   for  one  car.  No  smoking.  Pets   Professional   Office   space   in   barrels  with  faucets,  Food  grade   negotiable.  $950  /  month.  Lawn   Middlebury,  multi-­  room,  recep-­ with  removable  locking  covers,   mowing,   plowing   and   water   tionist  desk.  Ground  level,  park-­ plastic  food  grade  with  spin-­on   including.   Email:   stefunny@ ing,   handicapped-­accessible.   covers   (pickle   barrels).  Also,   me.com  . Available  now.  802-­558-­6092. 275   gallon   food   grade   totes   $125  each.  Delivery  available.   BRANDON  2  BR  $650  +  utili-­ ORWELL   APARTMENT;   1   bedroom,   single   occupancy,   802-­453-­4235. ties.  802-­773-­9107  www.thefuc-­ in   quiet   family   home,   country   cicompany.com  . U S E D   R E S TA U R A N T   setting.  $525  /  mo.  plus  utilities.   EQUIPMENT   available.   Call   BRANDON:   1   BEDROOM   No  pets.  First,  last  and  security   802-­388-­4831. Apartment.  Heat  /  hot  water  in-­ deposit.  References.  Evenings   cluded.   No   pets.   References.   802-­948-­2349. One   year   lease.   First,   Last,   RIPTON   TWO   BEDROOM   Vacation  Rentals Security  deposit.  $675  /  month.   apartment.   $600  /  month   plus   802-­247-­3708  Leave  message. utilities.  No  pets.  No  smoking.   PRIME   PRIVATE   LAKE   BRISTOL   OFFICE   SPACE:   Call  802-­382-­8567. Champlain   location.   Dates   F i r s t   F l o o r   2 / 3   r o o m s   available:   June   1-­   June   7,   SELF   STORAGE   And   Pal-­ Lights,   heat   included.   Call   Sept.   7-­   Sept.   28.   For   more   let   Storage   Available.   Call   802-­349-­6915. information,   visit   vermont-­ 802-­453-­5563. property.com   web   site.   Un-­ MIDDLEBURY   1   BEDROOM   der   Lake   Champlain   Rent-­ apartment.  heat  and  hot  water.   SELF-­STORAGE,  8X10  units.   als,  Addison,  Vermont;  3  BR   Ground  floor  parking.  Deposit   Your  lock  and  key,  $50  /  month.   Lake  House,  listing  162.  For   $675,   Rent   $675  /  month.   Call   Middlebury.  802-­558-­6092. further   details   or   more   pho-­ 802-­388-­1512. TWO-­   BAY   GARAGE,   de-­ tos,   call   386-­439-­6934   or   posit,   references.   Middlebury.   BRANDON;   QUIET   NEIGH-­ 630-­639-­7457   or   email   ab-­ 802-­558-­6092. BORHOOD,  completely  reno-­ dermody@yahoo.com  . vated   2   bedroom   apartment.   VERGENNES:   SPACIOUS   2   2  AND  3  BEDROOM  vacation   Heat  and  hot  water  included.  No   Bedroom.   Downtown.   $900  /   rentals  on  Lake  Dunmore.  By   pets.  Lease,  references,  credit   month   includes   heat   and   hot   the   week.   4-­6   person   maxi-­ check,  first,  last  and  security  de-­ water.  Off  street  garage  park-­ mum.   No   smoking  /  no   pets.   posit.  $875  /  mo.  802-­247-­3708,   ing.  Please  call  802-­393-­9080. All   modern   camps   with   most   leave  message. WEST   ADDISON:   2   story,   amenities.   Starting   at   $1000  /   MIDDLEBURY   COMMER-­ furnished   house   on   lakefront.   week.  802-­352-­6678. CIALLY   ZONED   House   with   Washer,   dryer.   No   smoking.   ADDISON:   LAKE   CHAM-­ maximum  exposure  and  access   Available   September   through   PLAIN   waterfront   camp.   to  Rt.  7  and  Foote  Street.  Cur-­ May.  860-­653-­8112. Beautiful  view,  gorgeous  sun-­ rently  a  physician’s  office.  Spa-­ sets,   private   beach,   dock,   cious  parking.  Handicap  acces-­ rowboat  and  canoe  included.   sible.  Available  August  1.  Please   $600.  weekly,  or  call  for  week-­ call  Darcy  at  802-­388-­9599. ends.  802-­349-­4212.

For Rent

For Rent

Wood Heat



FIREWOOD FOR  SALE:  Cut,   Split  and  Delivered.  $225  per   cord.  Call  Matt  at  802-­349-­9142. FIREWOOD;   CUT,   SPLIT   and   delivered.   Green   or   sea-­ soned.   Call   Tom   Shepard,   802-­453-­4285. MOUNTAIN   ROAD   FIRE-­ WOOD.  Green  and  dry  avail-­ able.  Oak,  ash,  maple,  beech.   Order   now   and   save   for   next   season.  Cut,  split  and  delivered.   Call  802-­759-­2095.

For Rent

For Rent

It’s against  the  law   to  discriminate  when   advertising  housing   related  activities.

2009 COACHMAN  WYOMING   Camper.  Plush,  Must  see.  Three   slides.  802-­388-­6764.

Particularly on  sites  like  Craigslist.

5 FT.   CEDAR   TREES   for   beautiful   privacy   hedges.   $24.95   each.   with   free   plant-­ ing.   Call   while   supplies   last.   518-­570-­0121.

And it’s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you  might   think.  You  can’t  say  “no  children”  or  “adults  only.”   There  is  lots  you  can’t  say.  The  federal  government   is  watching  for  such  discrimination.

A LARGE,   “EARLY  AMERI-­ CAN”   Style   dresser   with   a   stain-­proof  top,  recently  updated   with  new  hardware  and  lovely   green   drawer   fonts.   Matching   mirror   available.   May   also   be   YRC   FREIGHT   IS   hiring   PT   used   as   a   sideboard,   $175.   Casual   Combo   Drivers  /  Dock   802-­545-­2106. Workers!   Burlington   location.   CDL-­A  w/  Combo  and  Hazmat,   1  year  T/T  exp,  21yoa  required.   EOE-­M  /  F  /  D/V.  Able  to  lift  65  lbs.   req.  APPLY:   www.yrcfreight. com  /  careers.

For Rent

Let us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities  of  the  Fair   Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the  right  side  of  the   nation’s  Fair  Housing  Law.   Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

A Classified

ds (Publish

ed: 5/5/11

)

llege. For Rent Close to co TMENT furbished. OM APAR 1 BEDRO Middlebury, newly re 00. , 00 Main Street , includes heat. 000-­ th ury $750/mon of Middleb T, EN mile north posit. 000-­0000. TM rubbish, 1 OM APAR 1 BEDRO udes heat, electric, $595/month plus de cl ly, upstairs, in Available immediate nce on Route 7. and refere e m ho s. Deposit LE plus utilitie OM MOBI 2 BEDRO Private lot. $650/mo. . in Salisbury 0-­0000. d. ces require required. 00 t. Referen ONDO HOUSE/C arage and basemen 00. N W TO M G O 2 BEDRO mons, Vergennes. heat. No pets. 000-­00 d om Country C excluding utilities an r, o. /m 00 llite, washe $1,0 mpletely co , N ternet, sate energy ER ry Hi-­speed in OM, MOD 2 BEDRO ke Dunmore house. 85’ lake frontage. Ve rough June th 6678. La ell, furnished h, drilled w ting August 29, 2009 us utilities. 802-­352-­ ened porc ar dryer, scre 10 month rental; st tiable. $1,000/mo. pl r go Fo ne . efficient ing. Pets Non-­smok 26, 2010.


PAGE  36  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Real  Estate

Att. Â Farmers

2  B E D R O O M   C H A -­ LET-­STYLE   camp,   com-­ pletely   furnished,   monitor   heater,   woodstove.   South   Lincoln   on   town   road   with   year  round  access.  Surveyed   21.99  acres,  possible  subdivi-­ sion.   Water,   power,   broad-­ band,  1  acre  pond.  $499,900.   802-­324-­5177.

145  ACRES  AVAILABLE  for   five  year  lease.  Organic  pre-­ ferred.  $5500  per  year.  First   and  last  year  rent  paid  at  sign-­ ing  of  contract.  619-­208-­2939.   www.landwoodwater.com  .

4  ACRE   CORNWALL   Hill-­ top  building  site  with  expan-­ sive  view-­  Camelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Hump  to   Killington.  Approved   septic   design.  All   permits   on   file.   220   acres   also   available.   www.landwoodwater.com   619-­208-­2939.   oppa6@ya-­ hoo.com  .

Boats

ANTIQUE  STARCRAFT  14   FT.  1957  Aluminum  run  about   boat.   Needs   little   cosmet-­ ics.   40hp   Johnson.   Runs   excellent.   Trailer,   new   tires,   was   asking   $1000.   First   of-­ fer   over   $500   cash   takes   HAY  FOR  SALE:  First  cut  $3   it   where   it   sits.   Pretty   boat.   /   square   bale.   Mike   Quinn,   802-­453-­4235. end  of  South  Munger  Street,   Middlebury.  802-­388-­7828. HAY   FOR   SALE:   Small   square   bales.   First   cut   and   mulch.  Delivery  available.  Call   for   pricing.   802-­453-­4481,   8 0 2 -­ 3 4 9 -­ 9 2 8 1 ,   o r   802-­989-­1004.

Cars



2005  CHEVY   IMPALA   Se-­ NEW   HOLLAND   T1530-­   dan.  Excellent  condition.  68k,   250TL   Loader,   200   hours.   4  DR,  V6,  3.4L,  FWD,  A/C,   LEICESTER,   6.8   ACRES,   Winco  PTO  Generator.  Call   power  L/W.  $6800.  Call  Rob   802-­425-­3526. $59,000.   Very   nice   building   802-­247-­6735. site  surveyed,  septic  design   SAWDUST;   STORED  AND   FREE  JUNK  CAR  REMOV-­ included.   Ready   to   build   undercover.   Large   tandem   AL.  Cash  paid  for  some  com-­ on,   with   all   permits.   Own-­ silage  truck  $600,  delivered.   plete  cars.  Call  388-­0432  or   er   financing.   Call   Wayne   Large  single  axle  dump  $250,   388-­2209. 802-­257-­7076. delivered.  Single  axle  dump   MIDDLEBURY;   INDUS-­ $185,  delivered.  Pick  up  and   TRIAL   PARK.   Available   2   loading  also  available.  Phone   Trucks acres,  lease  or  build  to  suit.   order  and  credit  cards  accept-­ ed.   802-­453-­2226.   Bagged   802-­558-­6092. 1997   GMC   SONOMA,   4.3   shavings  in  stock.  $5.50  per   liter   V-­6.   Needs   battery.   MOBILE   HOME   IN   Bristol   bag. $1500.  Vehicle  can  be  seen   park.  Renovated  inside.  3BR,   in  Leicester.  518-­637-­5602. WANTED:  TO  PURCHASE   full   kitchen   and   bath,   large   living   room.   New   furnace,   from  owner,  open  land,  20+   water   heater,   new   roof   and   acres.  802-­558-­6092. trim   boards.  All   appliances.   Fenced  in  yard,  outside  needs   painting.  $17,000  firm.  For  ap-­ pointment,  call  860-­839-­8019   after  2pm. NEW   DISPLAY   MODELS,   Custom   Modular   Homes,   Double   Wides   &   Single   Wides.   No   pressure   sales   staff.   FactoryDirectHome-­ sofvt.com  600  Rt  7  Pittsford,   VT   1-­877-­999-­2555   tflan-­ ders@beanshomes.com  .



WHITNEYâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  CUSTOM   FARM   WORK.   Pond   agi-­ tating,   liquid   manure   haul-­ ing,   mouldboard   plowing.   462-­2755,  John  Whitney

Motorcycles 2001  HARLEY   DAVIDSON   Sportster  Hugger  883.  4300   miles.  Solo  seat.  HD  leather   saddlebags.   Too   many   ex-­ tras   to   list.   $4500   firm.   Call   802-­388-­6869,   leave   mes-­ sage.

RUSTIC  2  BEDROOM  year   round   cottage   on   3/4   acre   level   land   in   Salisbury   with   deeded   access   across   the   road   from   Lake   Dunmore   with   private   dock.   Partially   furnished.   Fireplace   and   screened   porch.   $139,900.   Cash  only.  802-­352-­6678.



1998  FORD  RANGER  XLT,   super  cab,  white.  4x4,  4  liter   V-­6.  Automatic  transmission   102,500   miles.   Inspected.   $3850.   Call   802-­758-­2377   for  information.

Wanted WANTED  TO   BUY   1   item   or  houseful.  Also  old  books.   Call   Blue   Willow  Antiques.   802-­247-­5333. WANTED:  TWO-­  TWO  draw-­ er  single  file  cabinets.  Good,   clean  condition.  Call  Pam  at   802-­388-­4944.

Public Notices Index Public  notices  for  the  following  can  be  found  in  this     ADDISON  INDEPENDENT  on  Pages  36,  37  and  38.

Addison  County  Superior  Court  (4) Leicester  (1) Middlebury  (2) Monkton  (1) P.  Hannaford  Career  Center  (1) Ripton  (1)

TOWN OF LEICESTER NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

The  Leicester  Zoning  Board  of  Adjust-­ ment  will  hold  a  public  hearing  Tuesday,   June  25,  2013  at  the  Leicester  Town  Of-­ ¿FHDWSPWRFRQVLGHUDSSOLFDWLRQV (20-­13-­ZBA) from Richard & Jaime Schneider,  2283  Hooker  Road,  Leices-­ ter  for  front  yard  setback  waiver  for  front   porch  on  summer  home,  parcel  #202001   RQ+RRNHU5RDGLQ=RQLQJ'LVWULFW/ (21-­13-­ZBA) from Michael Lennon/ Dara Altman,QGLDQ7UDLO/HLFHVWHU for  setback  waiver  for  new  construction   of   35   sq   ft   shed,   on   parcel   #202111   in   =RQLQJ'LVWULFW/ These  applications  are  available  for  in-­ VSHFWLRQ DW WKH 7RZQ &OHUN¶V 2I¿FH  6FKRROKRXVH 5G /HLFHVWHU 97 GXULQJ UHJXODUO\VFKHGXOHGKRXUV Participation  in  these  proceedings  is  a   prerequisite  to  the  right  to  take  any  sub-­ VHTXHQWDSSHDO Peter  Fjeld,  ZBA  Chairman June  10,  2013 

TOWN OF RIPTON, BOARD OF LISTERS: NOTICE TO TAXPAYERS As  of  June  3,  2013  the  abstract  of  the    *UDQG /LVW LV ¿OHG ZLWK WKH WRZQ FOHUN *ULHYDQFHV PXVW EH UHFHLYHG LQ ZULWLQJ E\  SP 0RQGD\ -XQH  *ULHYDQFH KHDULQJV DUH E\ DSSRLQWPHQW &RQWDFWWKHOLVWHUVDWOLVWHUV#ULSWRQYWRUJ RU32%R[5LSWRQ97

REQUEST FOR QUOTES (RFQ) MIDDLEBURY PARKS & RECREATION DEPARTMENT

Project  Description:   The   removal   and   disposal   of   existing   folding   partition   wall   panels   in   the   Town   Gymnasium   including   disposal   of   panels   but   not   the   removal   of   track,   motor   or   SO\ZRRG VRI¿W  &XUUHQW SDUWLWLRQ ZDOO PHDVXUHV¶OHQJWKE\¶KHLJKW7KHUH are  a  total  of  20  (twenty)  3â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  wide  x  20â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  tall   partition  sections  that  require  removal  and   GLVSRVDOE\QRODWHUWKDQ$XJXVW  The  Town  Gymnasium  is  located  at  94  Main   Street,  Middlebury,  VT  and  is  available  for   viewing    Monday  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Friday,  8:30  am  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  4:30   SP    Quotes/bids  will  be  accepted  until    Friday,   June  21,  at  NOON  at  the  Town  Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   2I¿FH &2 %HWK 'RZ  0DLQ 6WUHHW Middlebury,  VT    05753        For  more  information,  please  contact:    Terri   Arnold,  Director,  388-­8100  x205  TArnold@ WRZQRIPLGGOHEXU\RUJ                               6/10

To publish a legal notice in the Addison Independent please email information to legals@ addisonindependent.com or fax it to (802) 388-3100.

Vermont  Secretary  of  State  (1) Waltham  (1)

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 329-­12-­09 Ancv

U.S.  Bank  National  Association,  as  Trustee  for  the  Banc  of  America  Funding  2007-­1  Trust,   Plaintiff   v. Donald  C.  Patch,  Wendy  Sue  K.  Patch, Mortgage  Electronic  Registration  Systems,  Inc.,   American  Home  Mortgage  and  Occupants  residing  at  861  Monkton  Road,  Ferrisburgh,  VT   Defendants NOTICE OF SALE      By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given  by   Donald  C.  Patch  and  Wendy  Sue  K.  Patch  to  Mortgage  Electronic  Registration  Systems,   Inc.,   as   nominee   for  American   Home   Mortgage   dated   November   2,   2006   and   recorded   in   Volume   121,   Page   232,   which   mortgage   was   assigned   from   Mortgage   Electronic   Registration   Systems,   Inc.,   as   nominee   for   American   Home   Mortgage   to   U.S.   Bank   National  Association,  as  Trustee  for  the  Banc  of  America  Funding  Corporation  2007-­1  Trust   by  an  instrument  dated  November  30,  2007  and  recorded  on  June  12,  2008  in  Volume  127,   Page  281  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh,  which  mortgage  was  further   assigned  from  U.S.  Bank  National  Association,  as  Trustee  for  the  Banc  of  America  Funding   Corporation  2007-­1  Trust  to  U.S.  Bank  National  Association,  as  Trustee  for  BAFC  2007-­1   by  an  instrument  dated  December  17,  2009  and  recorded  on  December  30,  2009  in  Volume   133,  Page  438  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh,  corrective  assignment  from   U.S.  Bank  National  Association,  as  Trustee  for  BAFC  Trust  2007-­1  to  U.S.  Bank  National   Association,  as  Trustee  for  the  Banc  of  America  Funding  2007-­1  Trust  was  recorded  on   August  9,  2012  in  Volume  142,  Page  92  of  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Ferrisburgh,   of  which  mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of   said  mortgage  and  for  the  purposes  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at   10:00  A.M.  on  June  19,  2013,  at  861  Monkton  Road,  Ferrisburgh,  Vermont  all  and  singular   the  premises  described  in  said  mortgage:        To  Wit: Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Donald  Patch  and  Wendy  Sue  K.   Patch  by  virtue  of  a  Warranty  Deed  from  Richard  A.  Panton  dated  October  21,  2003  and   recorded  October  22,  2003  in  Volume  107,  Page  43  of  the  Ferrisburgh  Land  Records.    Terms  of  Sale:    $10,000.00  to  be  paid  in  cash  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  by  purchaser  at  the  time   of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the   Town  of  Ferrisburgh.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.    Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale  or  inquire  at  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  30  Kimball   Avenue,  Ste.  306,  South  Burlington,  VT  05403,  (802)  660-­9000.    DATED  at  South  Burlington,  Vermont  this  22nd  day  of  May,  2013. U.S.  Bank  National  Association,  as  Trustee By:  Joshua  B.  Lobe,  Esq.  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  PLC   30  Kimball  Ave.,  Ste.  306 5/27,  6/3,  10   South  Burlington,  VT  05403

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 191-­6-­10 Ancv

U.S.  Bank  National  Association,  as  Trustee  for  Structured  Asset  Securities  Corp.  Mortgage   3DVV7KURXJK&HUWL¿FDWHV6HULHV%&   Plaintiff   v. &KDG+/LEEH\.HUL/%URZQ'DQLHO-&RXJKODQDQG2FFXSDQWVUHVLGLQJDW/LQFROQ Road,  Ripton,  Vermont,   Defendants NOTICE OF SALE  By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given  by   Chad  H.  Libbey  and  Keri  L.  Brown  to  Mortgage  Electronic  Registration  Systems,  Inc.,  as   QRPLQHHIRU)LHOGVWRQH0RUWJDJH&RPSDQ\GDWHG0D\DQGUHFRUGHGLQ9ROXPH 3DJHZKLFKPRUWJDJHZDVDVVLJQHGIURP0RUWJDJH(OHFWURQLF5HJLVWUDWLRQ6\VWHPV Inc.,   as   nominee   for   Fieldstone   Mortgage   Company   to   U.S.   Bank   National  Association,   DV 7UXVWHH IRU 6WUXFWXUHG $VVHW 6HFXULWLHV &RUS 0RUWJDJH 3DVV7KURXJK &HUWL¿FDWHV 6HULHV%&E\DQLQVWUXPHQWGDWHG-XQHDQGUHFRUGHGRQ-XO\LQ 9ROXPH3DJHRIWKH/DQG5HFRUGVRIWKH7RZQRI5LSWRQRIZKLFKPRUWJDJHWKH undersigned  is  the  present  holder,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of  said  mortgage  and  for   WKHSXUSRVHVRIIRUHFORVLQJWKHVDPHZLOOEHVROGDW3XEOLF$XFWLRQDW$0RQ-XQH DW/LQFROQ5RDG5LSWRQ9HUPRQWDOODQGVLQJXODUWKHSUHPLVHVGHVFULEHG in  said  mortgage:  To  Wit: Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Chad  H.  Libbey  and  Keri  L.  Brown   by  virtue  of  a  Warranty  Deed  from  Marjorie  A.  Webb  f/k/a  Marjorie  A.  Manning,  Susan  M.   Manning  a/k/a  Susan  M.  Armell  and  Peter  P.  Manning  dated  May  3,  2006  and  recorded  May   8,  2006  in  Volume  40,  Page  165  in  the  Land  Records  of  the  Town  of  Ripton. 7HUPVRI6DOHWREHSDLGLQFDVKRUFDVKLHU¶VFKHFNE\SXUFKDVHUDWWKHWLPH of  sale,  with  the  balance  due  at  closing.    The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the   Town  of  Ripton.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale. 2WKHUWHUPVWREHDQQRXQFHGDWWKHVDOHRULQTXLUHDW/REH)RUWLQ 5HHV.LPEDOO $YHQXH6WH6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ97    '$7('DW6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ9HUPRQWWKLVndGD\RI0D\ U.S.  Bank  National  Association,  as  Trustee By:  Joshua  B.  Lobe,  Esq.,  Lobe,  Fortin  &  Rees,  PLC .LPEDOO$YH6WH  6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ97

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Former ag secretary to talk dairy history MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   In   recogni-­ tion   of   Dairy   Month,   Roger   All-­ bee,   former   Vermont   secretary   of   agriculture,   will   present   a   talk   on   the   history   of   dairy   in  Vermont   on   Friday,  June  14,  at  6:30  p.m.  at  the   Sheldon   Museum   in   Middlebury.   The  talk  is  presented  in  conjunction   with   the   Sheldonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   current   exhibit   â&#x20AC;&#x153;From   Dairy   to   Doorstep,â&#x20AC;?   a   part-­ nership  with  Historic  New  England.   Admission  is  free  but  donations  are   welcome. Allbee   is   chair   of   the   University   of   Vermont   College   of  Agriculture   and  Life  Sciences  Advisory  Board.   He   was   Vermont   secretary   of   Ag-­ riculture,   Food   and   Markets   under   Gov.  Jim  Douglas  and  in  2012  was   inducted  into  the  Vermont  Agricul-­ tural   Hall   of   Fame.  Allbee   was   an   early  advocate  for  buying  local  and   direct  from  the  farmer.  He  received   his   B.S.   in   agricultural   economics   from   the   University   of   Vermont,   and   a   masterâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   in   agricultural   eco-­ nomics   from   the   University   of   Massachusetts.   He   has   completed   the  Cornell  University  Agricultural   Executives   Program,   and   the   Har-­ vard  Business  School  Agribusiness   Seminars. Allbeeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  career  in  agriculture  in-­ cludes  a  stint  as  executive  director   of  the  USDA  Farm  Services  Agency   for  the  state  of  Vermont  and  a  long-­ time  consultant  in  agribusiness  and  

++++++++++++++ AGENDA PATRICIA A HANNAFORD CAREER CENTER WED., JUNE 12, 2013 5:00PM -­ ROOM A208 # of Minutes

Agena Item

  3  Min.   10  Min.      5  Min.   10  Min.            5  Min.                     10  Min.          5  Min.              5  Min.                    5  Min.          5  Min.           10  Min.       20  Min.  

 Introduction  of  Board  Members    Visitors  Comments    Correspondence  Report  from  the  Chair  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;    Board  Retreat  

  5  Min.      5  Min.      5  Min.   60  Min.      5  Min.    

Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Report Assistant  Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Report   Facility  Committee  Repor Alumni  Discussion Policy  4.1  Governing  Style  â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Board  Evaluation

Consent Agenda

 1.  Minutes  of  May  8,  2013  2.  Monthly  Accounts  Payable              for  June        a.  Adult  Program    b.  Revolving        c.  Directorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Orders Action Agenda

 Policy  2.4  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Financial  Planning      and  Budgeting  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Monitoring  Act  on  Recommendation  of     2013-­14  Revenue  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Regulatory Anticipation  Note   Approve  a  Line  of  Credit  in   Anticipation  of  Tuition  Payments â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Regulatory  Act  on  Mobile  Poultry      Processing  Unit  (MPPU)  Loan Approve  Issuance  of  Contract     for  1.0  FTE  Human  Services     Instructor  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Agreement Teacher  Resignation  (Tabled)  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;     Agreement Executive  Session  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  if  needed Informational Agenda

610

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international  trade.   He   co-­founded   AGTECH,   an   agricultural   trade   and   export   concern   that   was   the   ÂżUVW86FRPSDQ\WRPDUNHWFUDQ-­ berries   and   cranberry   products   in   Hungary   and   the   Czech   Republic.   As   secretary   of   agriculture,  Allbee   administered   one   of   the   agencies   with   the   most   diverse   and   publi-­ cally  watched  responsibilities  in  the   state  of  Vermont.  Under  his  leader-­ ship,   the   agency   oversaw   animal   health  and  welfare;Íž  agricultural  de-­ velopment,   weights   and   measures;Íž   water  quality  and  nutrient  manage-­ ment;Íž  invasive  and  exotic  pests  and   SHVWLFLGH FHUWLÂżFDWLRQ VHHG IHHG and  fertilizer  testing;Íž  milk  and  meat   SURFHVVLQJ LQVSHFWLRQFHUWLÂżFDWLRQ and   food   safety;Íž   and   international   trade  and  policy. It  has  been  said  that  his  work  on   the   Vermont   housing   and   conser-­ vation   board   brought   a   â&#x20AC;&#x153;working   landscapeâ&#x20AC;?  perspective  to  farmland   conservation.   He   linked   tourism   and  economic  development  to  agri-­ culture  in  a  very  public  way.

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  37

$PRQJ KLV PDQ\ DIÂżOLDWLRQV previously  he   was   a   member   of   the   U.S.   House   of   Representatives   committee   on   agriculture   and   ex-­ ecutive  director  of  the  USDA  Farm   Service   Agency   in   Vermont.   Al-­ bee   developed   strong   relationships   with  Quebec  and  France  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  both  of   which   celebrate   and   promote   their   place-­based   foods.   He   was   lauded   DV DPRQJ WKH ÂżUVW WR HQYLVLRQ WKDW application  for  Vermont  products. Allbee   was   also   vice   president   and  senior  staff  of  the  former  Farm   &UHGLW %DQNV RI 6SULQJÂżHOG DQG D Cornell   University   Extension   spe-­ cialist.  Today  he  is  a  senior  scholar   in  residence  and  adviser  on  agricul-­ ture  and  food  systems  to  the  presi-­ dent  of  Vermont  Technical  College,   an  author,  and  an  opinion  columnist   of   the   well-­known   â&#x20AC;&#x153;What   Ceres   Saysâ&#x20AC;?  blog.  Allbee  resides  in  Town-­ shend. FORMER   VERMONT   SECRETARY   of   Agriculture   Roger   Allbee   will   For   more   information   about   the   speak  about  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  dairy  history  at  the  Sheldon  Museum  in  Middle-­ exhibit   and   related   programs,   visit   bury  on  June  14. Photo  by  Sylvia  Fagin www.henrysheldonmuseum.org   or   call  802-­388-­2117.

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 68-­3-­13 Ancv

JPMC  SPECIALTY  MORTGAGE  LLC  F/K/A  WM  SPECIALTY  MORTGAGE  LLC v. PENNY  J.  DANYOW,  CAPITAL  ONE  BANK OCCUPANTS  OF  45  WEST  MAIN  STREET,  VERGENNES,  VT SUMMONS & ORDER FOR PUBLICATION THIS  SUMMONS  IS  DIRECTED  TO:    Penny  J.  Danyow   1. YOU ARE BEING SUED. The  Plaintiff  has  started  a  lawsuit  against  you.  A  copy  of   WKH3ODLQWLIIÂśV&RPSODLQWDJDLQVW\RXLVRQÂżOHDQGPD\EHREWDLQHGDWWKHRIÂżFHRIWKH clerk  of  this  court,  Addison  Unit,  Civil  Division,  Vermont  Superior  Court,  7  Mahady   &RXUW0LGGOHEXU\979HUPRQW'RQRWWKURZWKLVSDSHUDZD\,WLVDQRIÂżFLDO paper  that  affects  your  rights. 2. PLAINTIFFâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S CLAIM. Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   claim   is   a   Complaint   in   Foreclosure   which   alleges   WKDW3HQQ\-'DQ\RZKDVEUHDFKHGWKHWHUPVRID3URPLVVRU\1RWHDQG0RUWJDJH 'HHGGDWHG$SULO3ODLQWLIIÂśVDFWLRQPD\DIIHFW\RXULQWHUHVWLQWKHSURSHUW\ GHVFULEHGLQWKH/DQG5HFRUGVRIWKH7RZQRI9HUJHQQHVDW9ROXPH3DJH7KH &RPSODLQWDOVRVHHNVUHOLHIRQWKH3URPLVVRU\1RWHH[HFXWHGE\3HQQ\-'DQ\RZ$ FRS\RIWKH&RPSODLQWLVRQÂżOHDQGPD\EHREWDLQHGDWWKH2IÂżFHRIWKH&OHUNRIWKH Superior  Court  for  the  County  of  Addison,  State  of  Vermont. 3. YOU MUST REPLY WITHIN 41 DAYS TO PROTECT YOUR RIGHTS.  You  must  give   or  mail  the  Plaintiff  a  written  response  called  an  Answer  within  41  days  after  the  date   RQZKLFKWKLV6XPPRQVZDVÂżUVWSXEOLVKHGZKLFKLV-XQH<RXPXVWVHQG DFRS\RI\RXUDQVZHUWRWKH3ODLQWLIIRUWKH3ODLQWLIIÂśVDWWRUQH\$PEHU/'RXFHWWH (VT RI %HQGHWW DQG 0F+XJK 3& ORFDWHG DW  )DUPLQJWRQ $YHQXH 6WH  )DUPLQJWRQ&7<RXPXVWDOVRJLYHRUPDLO\RXU$QVZHUWRWKH&RXUWORFDWHG DW0DKDG\&RXUW0LGGOHEXU\97 4. YOU MUST RESPOND TO EACH CLAIM.  The  Answer  is  your  written  response  to  the   Plaintiffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Complaint.  In  your  Answer  you  must  state  whether  you  agree  or  disagree   ZLWKHDFKSDUDJUDSKRIWKH&RPSODLQW,I\RXEHOLHYHWKH3ODLQWLIIVKRXOGQRWEHJLYHQ everything  asked  for  in  the  Complaint,  you  must  say  so  in  your  Answer. 5. YOU WILL LOSE YOUR CASE IF YOU DO NOT GIVE YOUR WRITTEN ANSWER TO THE COURT. If  you  do  not  Answer  within  41  days  after  the  date  on  which  this   6XPPRQVZDVÂżUVWSXEOLVKHGDQGÂżOHLWZLWKWKH&RXUW\RXZLOOORVHWKLVFDVH<RXZLOO not  get  to  tell  your  side  of  the  story,  and  the  Court  may  decide  against  you  and  award   the  Plaintiff  everything  asked  for  in  the  complaint. 6. YOU MUST MAKE ANY CLAIMS AGAINST THE PLAINTIFF IN YOUR REPLY. Your   Answer  must  state  any  related  legal  claims  you  have  against  the  Plaintiff.  Your  claims   against  the  Plaintiff  are  called  Counterclaims.  If  you  do  not  make  your  Counterclaims   LQZULWLQJLQ\RXUDQVZHU\RXPD\QRWEHDEOHWREULQJWKHPXSDWDOO(YHQLI\RX KDYHLQVXUDQFHDQGWKHLQVXUDQFHFRPSDQ\ZLOOGHIHQG\RX\RXPXVWVWLOOÂżOHDQ\ Counterclaims  you  may  have. 7. LEGAL ASSISTANCE. You  may  wish  to  get  legal  help  from  a  lawyer.  If  you  cannot   DIIRUGDODZ\HU\RXVKRXOGDVNWKHFRXUWFOHUNIRULQIRUPDWLRQDERXWSODFHVZKHUH\RX can  get  free  legal  help.  Even if you cannot get legal help, you must still give the court a written Answer to protect you rights or you may lose the case. ORDER 7KH$IÂżGDYLWGXO\ÂżOHGLQWKLVDFWLRQVKRZVWKDWVHUYLFHFDQQRWEHPDGHZLWKGXHGLOLJHQFH E\DQ\RIWKHPHWKRGSURYLGHGLQ5XOHV G  I  N RU O RIWKH9HUPRQW5XOHVRI&LYLO 3URFHGXUH$FFRUGLQJO\LWLV25'(5('WKDWVHUYLFHRIWKH6XPPRQVVHWIRUWKDERYHVKDOO EHPDGHXSRQWKHGHIHQGDQW3HQQ\-'DQ\RZE\SXEOLFDWLRQDVSURYLGHGLQ5XOH>V@> G

O DQG@ J RIWKRVH5XOHV 7KLVRUGHUVKDOOEHSXEOLVKHGRQFHDZHHNIRUZHHNVEHJLQQLQJRQ-XQHLQWKH Addison  Independent,   a   newspaper   of   the   general   circulation   in  Addison   County,   and   a   FRS\RIWKLVVXPPRQVDQGRUGHUDVSXEOLVKHGVKDOOEHPDLOHGWRWKHGHIHQGDQW3HQQ\- Danyow,  if  an  address  is  known.     'DWHGDW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQWWKLVthGD\RI0D\ Helen  M.  Toor,    Hon.  Presiding  Judge  Addison  Unit,  Civil  Division

SUPERIOR COURT Addison Unit

STATE OF VERMONT

CIVIL DIVISION Docket No. 232-­9-­10 Ancv

HSBC  BANK  USA,  N.A.,  AS  INDENTURE  TRUSTEE    FOR  THE  REGISTERED  HOLDERS   OF   THE    RENAISSANCE   HOME   EQUITY   LOAN   ASSET-­    BACKED   CERTIFICATES,   SERIES  2005-­1    Plaintiff    v.    JOSHUA  LARAWAY;Íž    MICHELLE  BOOSKA  F/K/A  MICHELLE  M.  LARA  WAY;Íž    Defendants NOTICE OF SALE  By  virtue  and  in  execution  of  the  Power  of  Sale  contained  in  a  certain  mortgage  given  by   Joshua  Laraway  and  Michelle  Booska  f/k/a  Michelle  M.  Laraway  to  Mortgage  Electronic   Registration  Systems,  Inc.,  as  nominee  for  Delta  Funding  Corp.  dated  December  30,  2004   and  recorded  in  Book  62  at  Page  631  of    the  City/Town  of  Shoreham  Land  Records,  of  which   mortgage  the  undersigned  is  the  present  holder  by  Assignment  of  Mortgage  recorded  on   June  1,  2009  in  Book  72  at  Page  228,  for  breach  of  the  conditions  of  said  mortgage  and  for   the  purpose  of  foreclosing  the  same  will  be  sold  at  Public  Auction  at  10:00am  on  June  24,   2013  at  1048  North  Cream  Hill  Road,  Shoreham,  VT  05770  all  and  singular  the  premises   described  in  said  mortgage,    To  Wit:    Being  all  and  the  same  lands  and  premises  as  were  conveyed  to  Joshua  W.  Laraway  and   Michelle  M.  Laraway  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Thomas  Cuomo,  Barton  T.  Cuomo  and  Jeffrey   C.  Cuomo  dated  August  10,  1999  and  recorded  in  Book  50,  Page  360  of  the  Shoreham   Land  Records.      Being  a  PORTION  of  the  same  lands  and  premises  conveyed  to  Thomas   Cuomo,  Barton  T.  Cuomo  and  Jeffrey  P.  Cuomo  by  Quit  Claim  Deed  from  Thomas  Cuomo   dated  December  8,  1997,  and  recorded  in  the  Shoreham  Land  Records  in  Book  47  at  Page   426.      The  parcel  herein  conveyed  is  shown  as  Lot  5  on  a  survey  entitled  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Map  of  a  portion   of  lands  owned  by  Thomas,  Jeffrey  &  Barton  Cuomo,  Shoreham,  Vermont,â&#x20AC;?  prepared  by   John  F.  Grady,  RLS  No.  516,  dated  July  14,  1999,  to  be  recorded  in  the  Shoreham  Land   Records,  and  being  more  particularly  described  as  follows:      Beginning  at  a  point  marked   by  an  iron  rod  located  in  the  easterly  edge  of  Town  Road  No.  14,  North  Cream  Hill  Road,   so-­called,  which  point  is  the  southwesterly  corner  of  the  parcel  herein  conveyed  and  the   northwesterly  corner  of  Lot  4;Íž      Thence  going  along  the  easterly  edge  of  Town  Road  No.  14,   North  Cream  Hill  Road,  so-­called,  in  the  following  courses  and  distances:      North  38°  46â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  50   East  a  distance  of  200.00  feet  to  a  point;Íž    North  33°  15â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  50â&#x20AC;?  East  a  distance  of  165.00  feet  to   a  point;Íž    North  22°  30â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  40â&#x20AC;?  East  a  distance  of  189.33  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  rod,   which  point  is  the  northwesterly  corner  of  the  parcel  herein  conveyed;Íž      Thence  turning  and   going  along  other  lands  of  the  Grantor  herein  South  63°  29â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  20â&#x20AC;?  East  a  distance  of  643.07   feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  rod,  which  point  is  the  southeasterly  corner  of  the  parcel   herein  conveyed;Íž      Thence  turning  and  going  along  other  lands  of  the  Grantor  herein  South   20°  35â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  40â&#x20AC;?  West  a  distance  of  866.01  feet  to  a  point  marked  by  an  iron  rod,  which  point  is   the  southeasterly  corner  of  the  parcel  herein  conveyed;Íž      Thence  turning  and  going  along   the  northerly  boundary  of  Lot  No.  4,  North  24°  18â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  50â&#x20AC;?  West  a  distance  of  371.25  feet  to  a   point  marked  by  an  iron  rod;Íž      Thence  continuing  along  the  northerly  boundary  of  Lot  No.  4,   North  54°  25â&#x20AC;&#x2122;  20â&#x20AC;?  West  a  distance  of  499.49  feet  to  the  point  and  place  of  beginning.      The   parcel  herein  conveyed  contains  10.15  acres  together  with  farmhouse  and  barn.    Plaintiff  may  adjourn  this  Public  Auction  one  or  more  times  for  a  total  time  not  exceeding   30  days,  without  further  court  order,  and  without  publication  or  service  of  a  new  notice  of   sale,  by  announcement  of  the  new  sale  date  to  those  present  at  each  adjournment.  Terms   RI6DOHWREHSDLGLQFDVKRUE\FHUWLÂżHGFKHFNE\WKHSXUFKDVHUDWWKHWLPHRI VDOHZLWKWKHEDODQFHGXHDWFORVLQJ3URRIRIÂżQDQFLQJIRUWKHEDODQFHRIWKHSXUFKDVHWR be  provided  at  the  time  of  sale.  The  sale  is  subject  to  taxes  due  and  owing  to  the  Town  of   Shoreham.      The  Mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the  full  amount  due  under  the  mortgage,  including  the  costs  and  expenses  of  the  sale.      Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale.    HSBC  Bank  USA,  N.A.,  as  Indenture  Trustee  for  the  registered  holders  of  the  Renaissance   +RPH (TXLW\ /RDQ $VVHW%DFNHG &HUWLÂżFDWHV 6HULHV  .DWKU\Q 'RQRYDQ (VT Shechtman,   Halperin,   Savage,   LLP,   1080   Main   Street,   Pawtucket,   RI     02860,   877-­575-­ 1400,  Attorney  for  Plaintiff.                                                                      6/3,  10,  17  


PAGE  38  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

7RZQ+DOO7KHDWHUWRFHOHEUDWHÂżYH\HDUVZLWKJDODHYHQW MIDDLEBURY  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   seems   like   we   opened   just   yesterday,â&#x20AC;?   says  Town   Hall  Theater   executive   director   Douglas   Anderson.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   come   as   a   shock   to   all   of   us   that   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   at   this   for   5   years.   I   guess   time   passes   when   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   having  fun.â&#x20AC;? Once  it  opened  in  the  summer  of   2008,  Town   Hall  Theater   quickly   changed   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   cultural  

and  social   landscape.   Not   only   has   it   provided   a   state-­of-­the-­art   home  for  the  performing  arts,  but   it   has   also   become   a   center   for   a   variety  of  community  events,  such   as  fundraisers  for  area  nonprofits,   weddings,   conferences,   meet-­ ings,   book   readings,   classes   and   even   the   Middlebury   Union   High   School   junior   prom.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   performing   arts   center   but   also  

a  vibrant   community   center   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   something  its  creators  envisioned   all  along. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  town  needs  a  big  room,â&#x20AC;?  says   Anderson.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  try  to  put  no  limits   on   what   can   happen   in   this   build-­ ing.â&#x20AC;?     Big-­name   performers   like   Ed   Asner   and   Judy   Collins   have   played   THT   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   as   well   as   school   children   and   local   performers   big   and  small.

PROPOSED STATE RULES By  law,  public  notice  of  proposed  rules  must  be  given  by  publication  in  newspapers  of  record.    The  purpose  of  these  notices  is  to  give   the  public  a  chance  to  respond  to  the  proposals.    The  public  notices  for  administrative  rules  are  now  also  available  online  at  http://vermont-­ archives.org/aparules/ovnotices.htm.    The  law  requires  an  agency  to  hold  a  public  hearing  on  a  proposed  rule,  if  requested  to  do  so  in  writing   by  25  persons  or  an  association  having  at  least  25  members. To  make  special  arrangements  for  individuals  with  disabilities  or  special  needs  please  call  or  write  the  contact  person  listed  below  as   soon  as  possible. To   obtain   further   information   concerning   any   schedule   hearing(s),   obtain   copies   of   proposed   rule(s)   or   submit   comments   regarding   proposed  rule(s),  please  call  or  write  the  contact  person  listed  below.  You  may  also  submit  comments  in  writing  to  the  Legislative  Committee   on  Administrative  Rules,  State  House,  Montpelier,  Vermont  05602  (828-­2231). Methods, Standards and Principles for Establishing Medicaid Payment Rates for Longâ&#x20AC;? Term Care Facilities Vermont  Proposed  Rule:  13P019 AGENCY: Human  Services,  Division  of  Rate  Setting   CONCISE SUMMARY:9HUPRQWXVHVDFDVHPL[FODVVLÂżFDWLRQV\VWHPIRUVHWWLQJQXUVLQJKRPH0HGLFDLGUDWHVWKDWDOORFDWHVQXUVLQJ resources  based  on  residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  clinical  needs.  This  rule  is  necessary  to  replace  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  outdated  Resource  Utilization  Group  (RUG)  III   FDVHPL[FODVVLÂżFDWLRQV\VWHPZLWKWKHQHZIHGHUDO58*,99HUPRQWÂśV58*,,,V\VWHPZDVUHQGHUHGREVROHWHZKHQWKHIHGHUDOJRYHUQPHQW changed  the  Minimum  Data  Set  (MDS)  form  from  MDS  2.0  to  MDS  3.0,  which  is  used  to  record  resident  clinical  information  and  which   translates  into  a  RUG  for  each  resident.  The  MDS  3.0  form  was  not  compatible  with  Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  RUG  III  system.  In  April  2011,  Vermont  began   its  transition  from  RUG  III  to  RUG  IV  with  a  transitional  rule  that  allowed  the  Division  to  use  RUG  IV  case-­mix  data  to  set  rates  in  combination   ZLWK58*,,,GDWD7KLVQHZUXOHDOORZVWKH'LYLVLRQWRWUDQVLWLRQFRPSOHWHO\IURPWKHROG9HUPRQWÂąVSHFLÂżF58*,,,WR58*,9 FOR FURTHER INFORMATION, CONTACT: Leslie  Wisdom,  Agency  of  Human  Services  Division  of  Rate  Setting,  103  South  Main   Street,  Waterbury,  VT  05671â&#x20AC;&#x201C;2201  Tel:  802-­652-­6528  Fax:  802-­652-­6538  Email:  leslie.wisdom@state.vt.us    URL:  www.humanservices. YHUPRQWJRYGHSDUWPHQWVRIÂżFHRIWKHVHFUHWDU\DKVGUV FOR COPIES:  Kathleen  Denette,  Agency  of  Human  Services  Division  of  Rate  Setting,  103  South  Main  Street,  Waterbury,  VT  05671-­ 2201  Tel:  802-­652-­6528  Fax:802-­652-­6538  Email:  kathleen.denette@state.vt.us   6/10

To  celebrate   the   5-­year   land-­ mark,   THT   is   bringing   back   performers   who   brought   down   the  house  in  productions  since  the   building   opened.   On   the   bill   are   Kim   Anderson   (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Funny   Girlâ&#x20AC;?);Íž   the   cast   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Annieâ&#x20AC;?;Íž   Judith   Dry   (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Gypsyâ&#x20AC;?);Íž   dancer/choreographer   Patty   Smith;Íž   bluegrass   wonders   The  Connor  Sisters;Íž  pianist  Diana   Fanning;Íž   the   Hadippa   Dancers;Íž   Nikki   Juvan   (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Music   Manâ&#x20AC;?);Íž   Leigh   Guptill   (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Smokey   Joeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   CafĂŠ,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Middlebury   Does   Soulâ&#x20AC;?);Íž   the   Maiden   Vermont   chorus;Íž   Chuck  Miller  and  the  house  band;Íž   and  many  more.   To   meet   the   demand   for   tick-­ ets,   the   gala   performance   will   be   presented   twice,   at   5   p.m.   and   8   p.m.  on  Saturday,  June  22. Between   the   performances,   part   of   Merchants   Row   will   be   roped   off  to  create  space  for  a  street  party,   complete   with   food,   music   and   a   birthday  cake.  Those  attending  the  

TOWN OF WALTHAM INVITATION TO BID

Paving  on  Green  Street  from  Vergennes   city   line   to   Vermont   Route   17.   No   re-­ claimed  asphalt  to  be  used.  Bids  to  close   July   1   at   7p.m.   Contact   Francis   Warner   for  more  information  at  545-­2546.

Public Notices can  be  found  on Pages  36,  37  and  38.

6/10

TOWN OF MONKTON ADVERTISEMENT AND  NOTICE OF TAX SALE  32 V.S.A. § 5253 The  resident  and  nonresident  owners,  lien  holders  and  mortgagees  of  lands  in  the  Town   RI0RQNWRQLQWKH&RXQW\RI$GGLVRQDUHKHUHE\QRWL¿HGWKDWWKHWD[HVDVVHVVHGE\VXFK WRZQIRUWKH\HDUVWKURXJK'HFHPEHUUHPDLQHLWKHULQZKROHRULQSDUWXQSDLGRQ WKHIROORZLQJGHVFULEHGODQGVLQVXFKWRZQWRZLW 3DUFHO%HLQJDOODQGWKHVDPHODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVFRQYH\HGWRPaul R. Astle  by   :DUUDQW\'HHGRI$QWKRQ\(7KRPDVDQG0DGLQH57KRPDVGDWHG6HSWHPEHU DQGUHFRUGHGLQWKH9ROXPHDW3DJHRIWKH0RQNWRQ/DQG5HFRUGV6DLGSURSHUW\ EHOLHYHGWREHORFDWHGDW:HLVHQEDFK5RDG0RQNWRQ9HUPRQW 3DUFHO%HLQJDOODQGWKHVDPHODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVFRQYH\HGWRJocelyn Bolick  by   4XLW&ODLP'HHGRI+DUROG*RUH\GDWHG0D\DQGUHFRUGHGLQWKH9ROXPHDW 3DJHRIWKH0RQNWRQ/DQG5HFRUGV6DLGSURSHUW\EHOLHYHGWREHORFDWHGDW %ULVWRO5RDG0RQNWRQ9HUPRQW 3DUFHO%HLQJDOODQGWKHVDPHODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVFRQYH\HGWRTimothy James Bora E\ :DUUDQW\ 'HHG RI 1LOHV ( %RUD DQG -R\ 0 %RUD GDWHG 2FWREHU   DQG UHFRUGHGLQWKH9ROXPHDW3DJHRIWKH0RQNWRQ/DQG5HFRUGV6DLGODQGVDQG SUHPLVHVDUHEHQH¿WHGE\DQHDVHPHQWFRQYH\HGWR7LPRWK\%RUDE\(DVHPHQW'HHGRI (GZDUG5:LOOLDPVDQG0DU\%:LOOLDPVGDWHG$XJXVWDQGUHFRUGHGLQ9ROXPH DW3DJHRIWKH0RQNWRQ/DQG5HFRUGV6DLGSURSHUW\EHOLHYHGWREHORFDWHGDW %RUR+LOO5RDG0RQNWRQ9HUPRQW 3DUFHO%HLQJDOODQGWKHVDPHODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVFRQYH\HGWRRoderick R. Boutin   and  Wilma G. Boutin  by  Warranty  Deed  of  Anthony  E.  Thomas  and  Madine  R.  Thomas   GDWHG6HSWHPEHUDQGUHFRUGHGLQWKH9ROXPHDW3DJHRIWKH0RQNWRQ/DQG 5HFRUGV6DLGSURSHUW\EHOLHYHGWREHORFDWHGRQ-RFNH\/DQH0RQNWRQ9HUPRQW 3DUFHO$FHUWDLQ0RELOHKRPHGHVFULEHGDVDJUH\5HGPDQZLWKGLPHQVLRQVRI ¶[¶PRGHO33DQGVHULDOQR6DLGPRELOHKRPHZDVFRQYH\HGWR William and Joy Bradley  and  Amy BurkettE\9HUPRQW0RELOH+RPH8QLIRUP%LOORI6DOH RI-RKQ'+HUJHQURWKHUGDWHG2FWREHUDQGRIUHFRUGLQWKH7RZQRI0RQNWRQ6DLG PRELOHKRPHLVEHOLHYHGWREHORFDWHGDW9DXJKQ&RXUWLQ0RQNWRQ9HUPRQW 3DUFHO%HLQJDOODQGWKHVDPHODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVFRQYH\HGWRRoyce A. Dendler   and  Susan Deming DendlerE\:DUUDQW\'HHGRI6\OYHVWHU'HPLQJDQG0DU\(OL]DEHWK 'HPLQJGDWHG$XJXVWDQGUHFRUGHGLQWKH9ROXPHDW3DJHRIWKH0RQNWRQ /DQG5HFRUGV5HIHUHQFHLVPDGHWRD4XLW&ODLP'HHGIURP6XVDQ'HPLQJ IRUPHUO\ 'HQGOHU WR5R\FH$'HQGOHUGDWHG-XO\DQGUHFRUGHGLQ9ROXPHDW3DJH RIWKH0RQNWRQ/DQG5HFRUGV6DLGSURSHUW\EHOLHYHGWREHORFDWHGDW0RXQWDLQ 5RDG0RQNWRQ9HUPRQW 3DUFHO%HLQJDOODQGWKHVDPHODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVFRQYH\HGWRRobert L. Hart  and   Judith M. HartE\:DUUDQW\'HHGRI3DWULFN-&R\OHGDWHG-XO\DQGUHFRUGHG LQ WKH 9ROXPH  DW 3DJH  RI WKH 0RQNWRQ /DQG 5HFRUGV  7RJHWKHU ZLWK D  &RPPRGRUH PRELOH KRPH PRGHO QR 1RYD6.$ DQG VHULDO QR &=$%  6DLG SURSHUW\EHOLHYHGWREHORFDWHGDW0RQNWRQ5RDG0RQNWRQ9HUPRQW 3DUFHO$&RORQ\PRELOHKRPHVHULDOQR68ORFDWHGLQ9DXJKQ0RELOH+RPH 3DUNLQWKH7RZQRI0RQNWRQWRJHWKHUZLWKDOOLPSURYHPHQWVWKHUHLQRUDWWDFKHGWKHUHWR DQGFRQYH\HGWRArthur HathawayE\)DLUODQH0RELOH+RPHVE\9HUPRQWPRELOHKRPH XQLIRUPELOORIVDOHGDWHG6HSWHPEHUDQGRIUHFRUGLQWKH0RQNWRQ/DQG5HFRUGV 6DLGSURSHUW\EHOLHYHGWREHORFDWHGDW9DXJKQ&RXUW0RQNWRQ9HUPRQW 3DUFHO%HLQJDOODQGWKHVDPHODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVFRQYH\HGWRRoger A. Heir  and   Susan Jane HeirE\:DUUDQW\'HHGRI7KRPDV$0F&RUPLFNGDWHG-XO\DQG UHFRUGHGLQ9ROXPHDW3DJHRIWKH0RQNWRQ/DQG5HFRUGV7RJHWKHUZLWKD ZKLWH 3LQH *URYH PRELOH KRPH ZLWK GLPHQVLRQV RI ¶ E\ ¶ VHULDO QR *3$( FRQYH\HGWR5RJHU$DQG6XVDQ-+HLUE\7RZQ &RXQWU\+RPHVE\9HUPRQWPRELOH

5  p.m.   performance   will   exit   the   show  directly  into  the  street  party.   Those  attending  the  8  p.m.  perfor-­ mance   will   come   early   (around   6:30   p.m.)   to   the   street   party   and   then   move   into   the   theater   for   the   performance. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   street   party   gives   us   all   a   chance  to  whoop  it  up  a  bit,â&#x20AC;?  says   Anderson.   And   thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   lot   to   cheer.   Seven   Days   recently   wrote   that  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Addison  Countyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  shire  town   is   becoming   one   of   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   premiere   cultural   destinations.â&#x20AC;?   Town  Hall  Theater  is  a  real  grass-­ roots  success  story,  and  the  model   for   many   other   communities   who   are   trying   to   restore   and   revive   their  historic  theaters. Tickets  are  $35,  and  include  the   show  and  food  at  the  street  dance.   Tickets   are   available   at   www. townhalltheater.org,   (802)   382-­9222 DW WKH 7+7 %R[ 2IÂżFH (noon-­5   p.m.,   Monday-­Saturday)   or  at  the  door,  if  available.

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+++++++++++++++ TOWN OF MIDDLEBURY

REGULAR SELECT BOARD MEETING 7XHV-XQHÂ&#x2021;30 TOWN  OFFICES  CONFERENCE  ROOM 94  MAIN  STREET

Agenda 7:00 1.  Call  to  Order     2.  *Approval  of  Minutes  of  the       May  28,  2013  Working  Session     3.  *Approval  of  Agenda   4.  Citizen  Comments  [Opportunity       to  raise  or  address  issues  that  are   not  otherwise  included  on  this   agenda] 7:10   5.  *Update  on  ACORN  Solar  Project     at  Middlebury  Police  Station 7:20      Project  Updates:  D7RZQ2IÂżFHV   6b.  *Main  Street  &  Merchants  Row     Railroad  Overpass  Bridge     Replacements  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Bi  Weekly  Report     &  Follow-­up  from  June  4,  2013     Preferred  Alternatives  Meeting 7:45    7.  **Research  To-­Date  on  the  Abbey   Pond  Road  Gate 7:55  8.  **Middlebury  Business         Development  Advisory  Board     Meeting  of  May  30,  2013 8:05    9.  **Middlebury  Energy  Committee     Meeting  of  June  5,  2013 8:15  10.  **Parks  &  Recreation  Committee     Meeting  of  June  6,  2013 8:25  11.  *Approval  of  Check  Warrants                12.  *Change  in  Capitalization  Policy                13.  Town  Managerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Report                14.  Board  Member  Concerns                15.  *Executive  Session  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  Legal  &                      Contract  Matters                16.  **Action  on  Matters  Discussed  in                    Executive  Session 8:45  17.  *Adjourn* Decision  Item      **  Possible  Decision  Item If   you   need   special   accommodations   to   attend   this   meeting,   please   contact   WKH 7RZQ 0DQDJHUÂśV 2IÂżFH DW  x-­202   as   early   as   possible.       Additional   information   about   most   Agenda   items   is   available   on   the   Townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   website,   ZZZPLGGOHEXU\JRYRIÂżFHFRP,   on   the   Selectboard  page. 6/10


Addison Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013  —  PAGE  39

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5XVVHOO6HQDWH2I¿FH%OGJ Washington, D.C.  20510 senator_leahy@leahy.senate.gov

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Contact Your U.S. Senators Sen. Patrick Leahy 1-­800-­642-­3193

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GEORGE ROBINSON,  IN  a  historic  image  from  the  Rokeby  Museum   collection,  manages  a  herd  of  Merino  sheep  on  the  Rokeby  homestead   in  Ferrisburgh.  The  museum  will  celebrate  Vermont’s  wool  heritage  with   Wool  Day  on  Saturday,  June  22.

DQHZFRQVWUXFWLRQSURMHFWDIWHUWKH EXLOGLQJLVRQHRIVHYHUDOGHVWUR\HG LQ DQ DUVRQ VSUHH$W ¿UVW WKH ¿OP QRWHV SHRSOH ZHUH DQJU\ EXW ZKHQ WKH\ UHDOL]HG ZKR KDG VHW WKH ¿UHV ²DUHVLGHQWZKRZDVWKHYLFWLPRI KHDGWUDXPD²WKH\IHOWFRPSDVVLRQ LQVWHDG ³7KLV LV DFWXDOO\ RQH RI WKH PRVW SRVLWLYH VWRULHV ,¶YH KHDUG DERXW )HUULVEXUJK´ 'RROH\ VDLG ³3HRSOH ZHUHVD\LQJµ7KLVJX\QHHGVKHOS¶´ 8OWLPDWHO\ RQH RI %DOGZLQ¶V FRPPHQWV PLJKW EHVW H[SODLQ ZK\ 'RROH\DQGWKHKLVWRULFDOVRFLHW\DUH H[FLWHGDERXWWKH¿OP ³2QFH\RX NQRZ WKHKLVWRU\RI D SODFHWKDW\RXNQRZZHOO´%DOGZLQ VD\V³LWFRPSOHWHO\FKDQJHVKRZLW IHHOVWREHWKHUH´ Andy Kirkaldy  may  be  reached  at   andyk@addisonindependent.com.

Sen. Bernie Sanders 1-­800-­339-­9834

SRC-­2 United  States  Senate Washington,  D.C.  20510 www.sanders.senate.gov


PAGE 40  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  June  10,  2013

Monday, June 10, 2013  

Addison Independent Newspaper

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