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MONDAY    EDITION

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

Vol. 25 No. 24

Middlebury, Vermont

X

Monday, August 5, 2013

X

32 Pages

75¢

Police  nab  suspect  in  burglary  spree Hear Strauss in German ‡0LGGOHEXU\/DQJXDJH 6FKRROVWXGHQWVZLOOVLQJ´'LH )OHGHUPDXV¾LQLWVRULJLQDO ODQJXDJH6HH3DJH

By  JOHN  FLOWERS ADDISON  —  Vermont  State  Po-­ lice  have  collared  a  man  they  believe   might   be   responsible   for   dozens   of   burglaries  that  have  occurred  in  Ad-­ dison  County  since  the  beginning  of   this  year. Raymond   Ritchie,   37,   of   Addi-­

son   pleaded   not   guilty   in   Addison   County  Superior  Court  on  Aug.  1  to   three   counts   each   of   unlawful   tres-­ pass  into  an  occupied  residence  and   possession   of   stolen   property.   But   based  on  what  state  police  said  were   “thousands�   of   suspected   stolen   items   recovered   during   a   search   of  

Ritchie’s  property  at  151  Algonquin   Drive,   authorities   believe   Ritchie   could   be   linked   to   many   more   of   the   103   burglaries   that   have   been   reported   in   Addison   County   so   far   this  year. If   convicted   of   the   crimes   for   which  he  has  been  charged,  Ritchie  

could  spend  the  rest  of  his  life  in  jail,   according   to  Addison   County   Dep-­ uty   State’s   Attorney   Chris   Perkett.   That’s  because  Ritchie  already  has  a   lengthy   rap   sheet   featuring   10   past   felony  convictions  for  such  offenses   as  burglary,  aggravated  assault  on  a   (See  Suspects,  Page  19)

Route 7 farm to combine sheep and solar arrays

Bristol gets bill for free movies ‡2UJDQL]HUVRI´0RYLHVRQ WKH3DUN¾ZHUHVXUSULVHGWRJHW DQELOOIRUVKRZLQJVL[ ÀOPVWKLVVXPPHU6HH3DJH

Preserve  New  Haven’s   working  landscape

Softball squad wins 1 in Conn.

By  XIAN  CHIANG-­WAREN NEW   HAVEN   —   Commuters   on   Route   7   through   New   Haven   are   starting   to   notice   rows   of   solar   ar-­ rays   going   up   on   the   west   side   of   the  highway,  north  of  the  Lime  Kiln   Road  intersection Soon,   those   who   take   a   second   look  will  also  notice  something  un-­ usual   on   the   solar   farm:   a   herd   of   sheep. The   solar   array,   which   has   been   four  years  in  the  making,  ultimately   will   host   178   solar   panels   on   a   40-­ acre   portion   of   a   180-­acre   property   formerly  owned  by  the  Freyer  fam-­ ily.   Engineers   at   Cross   Pollination,   the   Williston-­based   renewable   en-­ ergy   company   installing   the   new   technology,  envisioned  a  solar  farm   with   dual   uses:   generating   renew-­ (See  Solar,  Page  22)

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New  ACSU leader  maps   out  priorities   for  district

Field Days hosts annual contest ‡7KH+RPHDQG*DUGHQ'H SDUWPHQW¡V/HRQD7KRPSVRQ %RZOZLOOEHXSIRUJUDEVWKLV ZHHN6HH3DJH

Happy  camper TOBY   BAKER-­ROUSE   is   all   smiles   during   Middlebury  Area   Land   Trust   Jumping   Mouse   Camp   for   preschoolers  last  Tuesday  morning  in  Weybridge.  For  more  photos  from  the  camp,  see  Page  2. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY  —  New  Addison   Central  Supervisory  Union  Superin-­ tendent  Peter  Burrows  has  only  been   on  the  job  for  a  short  time,  but  that   has   not   stopped   him   from   thinking   big. Burrows,  42,  last  week  unveiled  a   series  of  goals  for  the  ACSU  that  in-­ clude  a  long-­term  action  plan,  boost-­ ing  the  district’s  technology  resourc-­ es  and  programming,  and  increasing   public  outreach  to  students  and  their   (See  Burrows,  Page  21)


PAGE  2  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

Into the Woods

A  GROUP  OF  10  preschoolers  had  grand  adventures  in   the  woods  last  week  during  Jumping  Mouse  Camp  spon-­ sored  by  the  Middlebury  Area  Land  Trust.  On  Tuesday  the   kids  met  with  teachers  Katie  McEachen,  Joe  Schine  and   Emily  Robinson  at  a  Trail  Around  Middlebury  entry  point  in   Weybridge  and  hiked  into  the  woods  for  a  morning  of  fun.   Pictured,  clockwise  from  above,  Avery  Hohenschau  builds  a   fairy  house  at  the  base  of  a  tall  pine  tree;;  Schine  helps  Toby   Baker-­Rouse  shimmy  down  a  rock  to  reach  a  small  stream;;   )LRQD*RQJDQG&XOOHQ0\HUVVLWDURXQGWKH¿UH)LRQDDQG Campbell  Gong,  Hohenschau  and  Berkeley  Graham-­Gurland   URDVWKRWGRJVRYHUWKH¿UHDQG&DPSEHOO*RQJORRNVIRU sticks  with  which  to  build  a  fairy  house. Independent  photos/Trent  Campbell


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  —  PAGE  3

Thompson Bowl part of Field Days tradition By  DEVON  J.  VILA ADDISON   COUNTY   —   There   are  those  in  Addison  County  that  live   off   of   tradition   and   excellence.  The   Leona  Thompson  Bowl  offers  both.   Since   1974   the   Leona   Thompson   Bowl   has   been   presented   annually   to   the   best   all-­around   participant   in   the   Home   and   Garden   Depart-­ ment   competitions   at   the   Addison   County   Fair   and   Field   Days.   Every   summer   at   the   fair,   which   this   year   runs   this  Tuesday   through   Saturday   at   the   fairgrounds   in   New   Haven,   the   public   is   invited   to   compete   in   Home   and   Garden   categories   that   range   through   various   handicrafts   and   foods,   which   include   knitting,   Christmas  crafts,  doughnuts,  canned   vegetables  and  many  more  . Points   are   awarded   in   each   cat-­ egory   and   class   —   10   points   for   a   *UDQG5RVHWWHÂżYHSRLQWVIRUDEOXH ribbon,  etc.  In  the  event  of  a  tie,  of-­ ÂżFLDOV IURP WKH +RPH DQG *DUGHQ Department  determine  the  winner.   The  pewter  bowl  trophy  is  etched   with  the  names  of  proud  winners  of   this  coveted  trophy  honoring  Leona   Thompson,  a  former  Addison  Coun-­ ty   Extension   Service  Agent.   Except   during   the   week   of   Field   Days,   the   Leona  Thompson  Bowl  is  displayed   at   Middlebury   Sew-­N-­Vac   in   Mid-­ dlebury. Cheryl   Morrison,   the   director   of   the   Field   Days   Home   and   Garden   Department,   said   Addison   County   residents  who  take  part  in  the  com-­ petition   take   it   seriously   —   they   have  to  if  they  want  to  win. “It’s   a   lot   of   work,â€?   she   said.   Âł6RPH WKLQJV \RX FDQ ÂżQLVK XS WKH night   before,   but   some   you   have   WR SXW WKH ÂżQLVKLQJ WRXFKHV RQ WKH morning   of   the   competition.  We   al-­ ways   have   people   rushing   in   at   the   last  minute.â€? Morrison   explained   the   type   of   baked  good  exhibits  that  vie  for  the   Leona  Thompson  Bowl. “Because   of   the   way   the   fair   is,   people   bring   cookies,   cakes,   pies,â€?   she  said.  “Stuff  that  has  to  last  for  a   little  while.â€? The   Bowl   has   a   long   history   of   competitors  that  enter  yearly,  as  well   as  some  new  ones  each  year.  Contes-­ tants   can   range   from   four   years   old  

Hollywood puts the bite on free movies in Bristol

NANCY   PECCA   OF   Waltham   accepts   the   Leona   Thompson   Bowl   at   the  2010  Field  Days  Home  and  Garden  Department  awards  ceremony.

to  into  their  nineties. “We   get   about   400   competitors   each   year,â€?   Morrison   said.   “With   around   700   exhibits.   Most   people   submit  more  than  one  entry  in  each   category.â€? Everybody   who   helps   set   up   the   exhibits   and   all   of   the   judges   are   volunteers.  The  entire  exhibit  hall  is   set  up  the  day  before  with  competi-­ tors   bringing   their   goods   that   day.   Around   700   exhibits   are   set   up   the   day   before,   a   major   operation   that   takes  the  entire  day,  and  the  exhibit   hall  is  ready  for  the  around  400  oc-­ cupants  that  come  and  go  the  day  of   the  competition. Leona   Thompson   was   a   member   of   the   Addison   County   Extension   Homemakers   Council   in   the   1960s   and   early   ’70s,   She   was   a   woman   who  believed  in  passing  down  skills.   “She   taught   a   lot   of   people   quilt-­ ing,â€?  Morrison  said.  “She  organized   the   Home   Demonstration   group.   People  would  get  together  and  learn   upholstering  or  quilting,  or  some  of   the  other  craft  activities  that  maybe   they  hadn’t  learned  from  their  moth-­ ers  or  grandmothers.â€? Lucien   Paquette,   who   founded   Field   Days   in   1948,   knew   Leona   Thompson  and  worked  with  her. “She  was  an  excellent  educational   person,â€?   Paquette   said.   “She   was   a   diligent   worker   and   very   conscien-­ tious.   She   worked   with   women   and   entire   families.   She   was   well-­quali-­ ÂżHGDQGDKDUGZRUNHU´ The   competition   to   have   one’s  

Winners of the Leona Thompson Bowl 1974  Diane  Cobb 1975  Marilyn  Smith 1976  Sandy  Foote 1977  Yvonne  Gingras 1978  Barbara  Wagner 1979  Betty  Cyr 1980  Karen  Husk 1981  Peggy  Lyons 1982  Gussie  Levarn 1983  Barb  Brown 1984  Marion  Sullivan 1985  Julie  Jordan 1986  Phyllis  Bowdish

1987  Karen  LeRoy 1988  Maria  Provencher 1989  Donna  Evans 1990  Margaret  Reed 1991  Marguerite  Senecal 1992  Gussie  Levarn 1993  Judith  Sinnock 1994  Jodi  Provoncha 1995  Muffy  Kashkin 1996  Jodi  Provoncha 1997  Myrna  Trombley 1998  Judith  Sinnock 1999  Jodi  Provoncha

2000  Julia  Ranney 2001  Julie  Hogan 2002  Phyllis  Bowdish 2003  LaNell  DeCosta 2004  Carla  Berno 2005  LaNell  DeCosta 2006  Kathy  Sargent 2007  LaNell  DeCosta 2008  Kathy  Sargent 2009  Jodi  Provoncha 2010  Nancy  Pecca 2011  Debbie  Whitman 2012  Rose  Curran

name   etched   on   the   Bowl   started   at  around  the  same  time  that  Leona   Thompson  was  retiring  from  the  Ex-­ tension  Homemakers  Council.  Mor-­ rison  recalled  her  modest  response  to   the  suggestion  that  her  name  should   be   linked   to   the   Home   and   Garden   Department  competition. “She   said,   ‘No,   don’t   name   it   af-­ ter   me,’�   Morrison   explained.   “But   the   Home   Dem   committee   decided   to  name  it  after  her.  She  was  active   for  quite  a  long  time  teaching  people   a   lot   of   things.   She   was   still   teach-­ ing  people  after  she  retired  from  the   Homemakers  Council.� The   Leona  Thompson   Bowl   40th   anniversary   presentation   ceremony   will  be  held  this  Thursday  at  8  p.m.   at   the   fairgrounds   in   the   Home   and   Garden  Department  Building.

By  JOHN  FLOWERS No  one  is  sure  how  the  distributor   BRISTOL   —   Bristol’s   long-­run-­ got  wind  of  the  outdoor  movie  series. ning   “Movies   on   the   Parkâ€?   series   “We   thought   we   were   doing   it   UHFHQWO\ WRRN D ÂżQDQFLDO KLW EXW WKH right,â€?   Bryant   said.   “We   had   this   li-­ show(s)  will  go  on  —  at  least  for  the   cense   and   thought   we   were   good   to   rest  of  this  summer. go.â€? 7KH KLW FDPH YLD QRWLÂżFDWLRQ All   of   a   sudden,   Movies   on   the   through   a   movie   distributor   that   the   Park   was   on   the   hook   for   $1,800   in   Bristol  Recreation  Department  need-­ fees   that   were   certainly   not   in   the   ed  to  pay  fees  for  the  mov-­ budget. ies   it   has   been   showing   Event orga“We  don’t  even  have  18   for  free  on  a  big  screen  in   extra   dollars   in   the   bud-­ the  park.  This  year’s  titles   nizers were get,â€?  Senecal  quipped. have  included  “The  Love   stunned Enter   Champlain   Val-­ Bugâ€?  and  “Jumanji.â€?  The   when they re- ley   Telecom,   a   company   series   includes   a   total   of   ceived a call that  has  agreed  to  pick  up   six  summer  movies  on  se-­ last month the   $1,800   tab   this   year   lect   Thursdays   beginning   a   sponsor.   Bryant   and   from a movie as   at  dusk,  offering  what  or-­ Senecal   are   thankful   for   ganizers  tout  as  a  “drive-­ distributhe   support   and   are   now   in   experience   without   tor, Swank considering   the   future   of   the   driving.â€?   An   average   Motion the  popular  Movies  in  the   of   50   to   100   spectators   Pictures Inc., Park  series,  an  event  they   have   been   attending   the   indicating the want  to  remain  free. movies,   with   viewership   “I’ll   continue   to   search   dependent   on   the   title,   town was for   sponsors   for   the   se-­ weather   and   mosquitoes,   obliged to ries,â€?  Senecal  said.  “It’s  a   according  to  Bristol  Rec-­ pay fees for beloved  event  ...  We  want   reation   Director   Darla   screening the people   to   be   able   to   par-­ Senecal. ticipate.â€? Ă€OPVLQWKH Event   organizers   were   It   is   in   that   spirit   that   park. stunned   when   they   re-­ Bristol  Recreation  tries  to   ceived   a   call   last   month   offer  as  many  free  events   from  a  movie  distributor,  Swank  Mo-­ as  it  can.  Among  them:  The  “Parties   tion  Pictures  Inc.,  indicating  the  town   in   the   Parkâ€?   series   featuring   month-­ was  obliged  to  pay  fees  for  screening   ly,   family-­friendly,   free   luncheons   WKHÂżOPVLQWKHSDUN%ULVWRORIÂżFLDOV held  from  noon  to  1  p.m.  at  the  park.   EHOLHYHG WKH ÂżOPV FRXOG EH VKRZQ June’s  party  was  a  “Teddy  Bear  Pic-­ without  paying  royalties  as  part  of  a   nic.â€?  A   few   weeks   ago,   there   was   a   movie   screening   license   held   by   the   “Hometown   Heroesâ€?   luncheon,   fea-­ Lawrence  Memorial  Library.  But  fur-­ WXULQJÂżUHSROLFHDQGUHVFXHSHUVRQ-­ ther   scrutiny   of   the   license   revealed   nel.  And  on  Aug.  21,  there  will  be  a   the   fee   exemption   only   applied   to   “Prince   and   Princess   Teaâ€?   that   will   movies  shown  inside  the  library,  ac-­ include  storytelling. cording   to   Bristol   town  Administra-­ “It’s  the  right  thing  to  do,â€?  Senecal   tor  Bill  Bryant. said  of  the  free  events.

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PAGE  4  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

A DDIS ON    INDE P E NDEN T

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,I+HQU\.LVVLQJHUZDVFRUUHFWZKHQKHVDLGWKDWSRZHUZDVWKH³XOWL PDWHDSKURGLVLDF´WKHQZHKDYHRXUDQVZHUWRZK\LWLVWKDWWKHFRUUXSWHG LQ,FDUXVIDVKLRQSXWRQWKHLUZD[HQZLQJVLJQRUHWKHZLVHPDQ¶VFRXQVHO DQGÃ&#x20AC;LUWZLWKWKHKHDWRIWKHVXQ¶VUD\V 7KH\GRVREHFDXVHWKDW¶VZKHUHWKH\VHHWKHJUHDWHUUHZDUGDUHZDUG EDFNHGE\RXUFXOWXUH :KHQZHFKDPSLRQWKHHJRWKDW¶VZKDWZHUHFHLYH 7KDWZLOOFKDQJHZKHQZHEHJLQWRFHOHEUDWHWKHGHHGGRQHDQGQRWWKH GRHURIWKHGHHG %XWWKDWGRHVOLWWOHWRSURPRWHWKHFRFNWDLOFKDWWHU,W¶VPXFKPRUHIXQWR WDONDERXWSHRSOHDQGWKHLUPDQ\G\VIXQFWLRQV6RZHZLOOFRQWLQXHZLWK WKH:HLQHUVDQG6SLW]HUV â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Emerson  Lynn St.  Albans  Messenger

ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT Periodicals  Postage  Paid  at  Middlebury,  Vt.  05753

Postmaster,  send  address  change  to  Addison  Independent, 0DSOH6WUHHW0LGGOHEXU\9HUPRQWÂ&#x2021;Â&#x2021;)D[Â&#x2021;:HEZZZDGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP (0DLOQHZV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRPÂ&#x2021;(0DLO$GYHUWLVLQJDGV#DGGLVRQLQGHSHQGHQWFRP 3XEOLVKHGHYHU\0RQGD\7KXUVGD\E\WKH$GGLVRQ3UHVV,QF0HPEHU9HUPRQW3UHVV$VVRFLDWLRQ1HZ(QJODQG3UHVV$V VRFLDWLRQ1DWLRQDO1HZVSDSHU$VVRFLDWLRQ 68%6&5,37,215$7(69HUPRQW±0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV2XWRI6WDWH± 0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV0RQWKV'LVFRXQWHGUDWHIRU6HQLRU&LWL]HQVFDOOIRUGHWDLOV  7KH,QGHSHQGHQWDVVXPHVQR¿QDQFLDOUHVSRQVLELOLW\IRUW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURUVLQDGYHUWLVHPHQWVEXWZLOOUHSULQWWKDWSDUWRIDQ DGYHUWLVHPHQWLQZKLFKWKHW\SRJUDSKLFDOHUURURFFXUUHG$GYHUWLVHUZLOOSOHDVHQRWLI\WKHPDQDJHPHQWLPPHGLDWHO\RIDQ\ HUURUVZKLFKPD\RFFXU 7KH$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQW8636

Triple  threat A  MANURE  SPREADERâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  three  oversized  tires  provide  support  for  a  heavy  and  potent  cargo. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Letters to the Editor Natural  gas  is  just  a  poor,  stop-­gap  energy  solution 9HUPRQW*DVQHYHUWLUHVRI WRXWLQJWKHEHQH¿WVRIQDWXUDOJDV WRKHDWLQJRLOEXWLVQ¶WLWWLPHWR PRYHEH\RQGIRVVLOIXHOV"*DV LVVWLOOSHUFHQWDVGLUW\DV RLOHYHQE\9HUPRQW*DV¶RZQ HVWLPDWHV

:K\DUHQ¶WZHFRPSDULQJJDVWR VRODURUJDVWRELRPDVV",QYHVW LQJLQDKLJKFDSDFLW\QDWXUDOJDV SLSHOLQHWKDWRQO\VHUYHVDIHZ WKRXVDQGKRPHVIDLOVWRVROYHRXU ORQJWHUPDGGLFWLRQWRIRVVLOIXHOV 7KDQNIXOO\QHLJKERUVDQG

RUJDQL]DWLRQVDUHUHYHDOLQJWKHWUXH FRVWVRIWKLVSLSHOLQHEHIRUHZHJHW VWXFNZLWK\HDUVRIIUDFNHGJDV VKRYHGGRZQRXUWKURDWV John  K.  Webb Montpelier

7RZQRI¿FHH[SDQVLRQSODQVPXVWUHFRJQL]HOLEUDU\ I  am  perplexed  and  disconcerted   by  the  initial  response  of  the  town   committee  and  this  newspaper  to   concerns  raised  about  the  new  town   RI¿FHVSODQ6LPSO\SXWWKHSODQ DVFXUUHQWO\FRQ¿JXUHGGRHVQRW take  into  account  the  needs  of  the   WRZQOLEUDU\DQGLQGHHGLIFDUULHG RXWPLJKWPDNHORQJWHUPH[SDQ

VLRQRIWKHOLEUDU\PRUHGLI¿FXOWLI QRWLPSRVVLEOH I  understand  the  committee  was   IRFXVHGRQWKHWRZQRI¿FHVDQG QRWWKHOLEUDU\EXW,ZRXOGKDYH WKRXJKWWKHUHDFWLRQWRWKHLVVXH EHLQJUDLVHGVKRXOGPRUHORJLFDOO\ KDYHEHHQ³:HGLGQ¶WWKLQNDERXW WKDW/HW¶VVHHLIZHFDQSODQIRU

future  library  expansion  while  still   SXWWLQJWKHWRZQRI¿FHVLQWKHSODFH ZH¶YHFKRVHQ´ ,QVWHDGZHKDYHVWRQHZDOOLQJ DQGGHQLDOVRIUHDOLW\7KHUHVSRQVH DYRLGVFRQVLGHUDWLRQRIORQJWHUP WRZQQHHGV,WDOVRLQFUHDVHVRS position  to  the  proposed  plan  and   (See  Letter,  Page  5)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  5

Teamwork  needed  in  war  on  drugs Letter 7KH GDQJHU LQ EHOLHYLQJ ZH DUH and  many  small  towns  in  Vermont   special   is   that   it   can   blind   us   to   DUH DOVR XQGHU VLHJH IURP KHURLQ ZKDWÂśV ULJKW XQGHU RXU QRVHV :H dealers  and  they  are  not  included  in   PL[ DQG GULQN RXU .RRO$LG DQG WKHDERYHÂżJXUHV then   bask   in   our   self-­esteem.   Ver-­ If  you  doubt  these  numbers,  just   mont  is  a  wonderful  place.  It  is  not,   NQRZ WKDW WKHLU VFDOH LV UHĂ&#x20AC;HFWHG however,  special  or  immune. both   in   the   increase   in   reported   Our   lack   of   trans-­ property   thefts   and   parency   has   led   to   a   the  waitlist  for  addicts   rash   of   community   VHHNLQJ PHWKDGRQH HPEH]]OHPHQWV 6XS-­ treatment  at  the  How-­ posedly,   we   all   know   DUG&HQWHULQ%XUOLQJ-­ This  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  writer   and  trust  one  another,   ton.   Remember,   too,   until   we   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   any-­ is  Bill  Schubart,  a   that  this  is  just  heroin.   Vermont  entrepre-­ more. $GG LQ PHWKDPSKHW-­ We  have  the  health-­ neur,  author  and   amine,   alcohol   and   iest  and  best-­educated   commentator  on   pharmaceutical   opi-­ children   in   the   na-­ VPR.  He  writes   ate  addictions  and  the   tion,  until  â&#x20AC;Ś  we  look   about  Vermont  and   picture  of  our  children   WKHQDWLRQLQÂżFWLRQ deeper. and   ourselves   no   lon-­ %XUOLQJWRQ 3ROLFH humor  and  opinion   JHU ORRNV VR VSHFLDO Chief  Michael  Schirl-­ pieces. The   waitlist   for   alco-­ LQJUHFHQWO\HVWLPDWHG hol  treatment  at  Maple   WKDW DW DQ\ JLYHQ WLPH LQ QRUWKHUQ Leaf  Farm  in  Underhill  is  over  100   9HUPRQW WKHUH DUH  WR  RUJD-­ and  these  waitlists  are  people  who   QL]HG FUHZV VRPHWLPHV ZLWK URRWV have   already   hit   bottom   and   are   WRVWUHHWÂłJDQJV´LQODUJHFLWLHVOLNH VHHNLQJKHOS New   York,   Philadelphia,   Detroit   Most   law   enforcement   profes-­ DQG &KLFDJR GLVWULEXWLQJ XS WR VLRQDOVVD\WKDWWKHÂł:DURQ'UXJV´  EDJV RI KHURLQ HYHU\ ZHHN KDVEHHQDQH[SHQVLYHĂ&#x20AC;RSDQGWKDW (DFKEDJFRVWV7KLVDPRXQWV LQWHUGLFWLRQLVQÂśWSRVVLEOHDVORQJDV WRPLOOLRQDZHHNRUPLO-­ DUREXVWPDUNHWH[LVWV'UXJJDQJV lion  in  annual  heroin  sales  in  north-­ market  their  product  just  as  tobac-­ HUQ9HUPRQWDQGDJURZLQJVWUHDP co,   junk   food   and   alcohol   compa-­ of   new   addictions.   Rutland,   Ben-­ nies  do. QLQJWRQ RWKHU VPDOO XUEDQ DUHDV 7KHUH LV QR VLQJOH VROXWLRQ WR

Community

Forum

this   problem.   Solutions   are   more   QXDQFHG WKDQ LOOHJDOL]DWLRQ DQG D Âł-XVW6D\1R´FDPSDLJQVLQFHWKH causes   are   deeply   intertwined   in   RXUFKDQJLQJFXOWXUHDQGLQWKHGH-­ WHULRUDWLQJ HFRQRPLF IDEULF RI RXU country. $GGUHVVLQJEXUJHRQLQJGUXJDG-­ GLFWLRQZLOOGHPDQGVWUDWHJLFFRRS-­ eration  rather  than  the  old  jurisdic-­ tional   competition   for   money   that   so  often  dooms  initiatives.  Vermont   has  more  than  60  law  enforcement   DXWKRULWLHV$GGLWLRQDO RYHUODS H[-­ LVWV LQ VRFLDO DJHQFLHV KHDOWKFDUH and  education.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  hard  to  be  strate-­ JLFDQGORFDODWWKHVDPHWLPH The  heroin  problem  will  only  be   VROYHG E\ D KLJKOHYHO FRQVHQVXV derived  from  law  enforcement,  the   MXGLFLDU\ WKH /HJLVODWXUH HGXFD-­ tors,   recovery   and   mental   health   SURIHVVLRQDOV VRFLDO VHUYLFH RUJD-­ QL]DWLRQV JRYHUQPHQW DJHQFLHV EXVLQHVVHV ULJKWV ZDWFKGRJV OLNH WKH$&/8DQGZHOOLQIRUPHGFLWL-­ ]HQV 1R VLQJOH VHFWRU RU DJHQF\ has   a   comprehensive   solution   and   all   will   need   to   be   heard   before   consensus   action   is   taken.   Educa-­ tion  and  media  will  be  critical  parts   of  the  solution,  but  every  sector  will   KDYHWKHLUWDVNLQVROYLQJWKLVLVVXH Otherwise,   one   day   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   special   and  then,  all  of  a  sudden,  one  day,   weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not  anymore.

Letters to the Editor Municipal  building  plan  presents  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;win-­winâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  situation The  vitality  and  economic   prosperity  of  our  town  and  that  of   0LGGOHEXU\&ROOHJHDUHLQH[WULFD-­ bly  linked,  so  I  appreciate  the  fact   that  our  town  administrators,  and   many  current  and  recent  members   of  the  Middlebury  selectboard,   KDYHZRUNHGGLOLJHQWO\RYHUWKH last  several  years  to  foster  and   VWUHQJWKHQWKHWRZQJRZQUHODWLRQ-­ VKLS7KHLUUHFHQWHIIRUWVLQZRUNLQJ toward  a  creative,  collaborative   DQGÂżVFDOO\UHVSRQVLEOHVROXWLRQWR WKHFKDOOHQJLQJWRZQRIÂżFHLVVXHLV particularly  laudable,  and  one  that  I   believe  should  be  well  received  by   the  voters. 5HFRJQL]LQJWKDWWKHUHDUHPDQ\

GHWDLOVWREHZRUNHGRXW,VWURQJO\ believe  that  the  plan  as  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  currently   FRQWHPSODWHGZRXOGVLJQLÂżFDQWO\ enhance  the  prospect  of  sustained   downtown  economic  prosperity  by   FUHDWLQJDZHOOGHVLJQHGWUDQVLWLRQ EHWZHHQWKHWRZQDQGWKHFROOHJH â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  one  that  innately  links  the  two   entities  and  creates  a  welcome  invi-­ tation  to  students,  their  families  and   others  to  explore,  shop,  dine  and  en-­ joy  our  town.  This  is  a  unique  and   exceptional  opportunity  to  invest  in   the  economic  future  of  our  town  at   minimal  cost  to  us  as  taxpayers,  and   one  that  we  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  afford  to  pass  up. In  recent  years,  Middlebury   &ROOHJHKDVFRQVLVWHQWO\GHPRQ-­

strated  its  commitment  to  the  best   interests  of  our  town.  Without   their  substantial  investment,  the   &URVV6WUHHW%ULGJHZRXOGQÂśWH[-­ LVWWKH\ÂśYHFRPPLWWHGVLJQLÂżFDQW time,  resources  and  money  toward   the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  business  development   LQLWLDWLYHDQGQRZWKH\ÂśUHRIIHULQJ to  make  a  considerable  contribution   WRWKHUHYLWDOL]DWLRQRIRXUWRZQ RIÂżFHV$QGZKLOHWKHFROOHJHZLOO XQGRXEWHGO\DOVREHQHÂżWIURPWKLV latest  collaboration,  that  doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  in   DQ\ZD\GLPLQLVKWKHEHQHÂżWWRWKH WRZQ$V,VHHLWLWÂśVDFODVVLFZLQ win  situation. Bill  Townsend Middlebury

Many  sunny  days  in  store  for  Bristol  Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Market :KLOH,DPDIDQRI;LDQ&KLDQJ :DUHQÂśVÂżQHZULWLQJKHUDUWLFOH RQFKDQJHVDIRRWDWWKH%ULVWRO Farmersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Market  (Addison  Indepen-­ dent,  -XO\ KDGDQRGGO\JORRP\ tone  that  neither  the  president  nor   ,LQWHQGHGWRFRQYH\$Q\PDUNHW UXQQLQJOLNH%ULVWROÂśVIRUDOPRVW 20  consecutive  years  is  a  successful   market. It  is  successful  because  of  patron-­ DJHE\IDLWKIXOFXVWRPHUVIURP WKHÂżYHWRZQDUHD:HDUHKXJHO\

JUDWHIXOWRWKHPDQGKDGKRSHGRXU expansion  to  Wednesdays  and  to   an  earlier  â&#x20AC;&#x153;pre-­seasonâ&#x20AC;?  at  Mount   $EHLQ0D\ZRXOGVHUYHWKHPEHW-­ ter.  The  rainy  weather  early  in  the   VHDVRQFRQVSLUHGDJDLQVWXV$WWHQ-­ GDQFHKDVEHHQGRZQ2XUÂżQDQFLDO situation  does  indeed  necessitate   that  we  function  without  a  paid   PDQDJHUEXWRWKHUPDUNHWVGRVR ZLWKRXWKXJHSUREOHPV 1RZWKHZHDWKHULVLPSURYLQJ and  hopefully  better  promotion  

will  eliminate  confusion  about  our   schedule  (open  Wednesdays  3-­6   SP$1'6DWXUGD\VDP p.m.).  We  expect  to  be  able  to   continue  to  offer  the  freshest  local   SURGXFHEUHDGKRQH\PHDWHJJV and  other  products  on  the  beautiful   %ULVWROJUHHQIRU\HDUVWRFRPH We  invite  all  area  residents  to  let   us  know  how  we  can  serve  them   better. Eugenie  Doyle Monkton

Have  an  opinion?  Send  it  in,  news@addisonindependent.com

(Continued  from  Page  4) alienates  potential  supporters  un-­ necessarily. The  need  for  library  expansion   is  a  fact  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  well-­documented,  and   HDVLO\YHULÂżHG7KHOLEUDU\EXLOGLQJLV jammed  with  people  space,  computer   space,  and  library  materials.  Despite   the  addition  of  virtual  materials,  new   physical  materials  (books,  DVDs,   CDs,  etc.)  continue  to  be  published.   3HRSOH QRWVXUSULVLQJO\ GHPDQGQHZ materials  as  well  as  older  materials.   7KHUHIRUHGHVSLWHUHJXODUDQGVHYHUH SUXQLQJWKHFROOHFWLRQVZLOOFRQWLQXH to  increase  and  need  more  space. The  1987  library  addition  was   expected  to  provide  for  30  yearsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   JURZWKDQGLWFDQGRVREXWZHÂśUHDW 26  years  now.  We  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  afford  to  build   QRZ WKRXJKZHFRXOGXVHLW EXWLW ZRXOGEHVKRUWVLJKWHGQRWWRSODQIRU the  eventuality.  If  we  do  not  consider   KRZWRSXWERWKWRZQRIÂżFHVDQGD library  addition  in  the  small  space   EHLQJFRQVLGHUHGZHOHDYHRXUWRZQ in  the  future  with  the  dilemma  of   QHHGLQJWREXLOGDZKROHQHZOLEUDU\ in  order  to  expand  it.  Not  only  is  that   far  more  expensive,  but  where  is  the  

VSDFHWRSXWLW",IDQ\WKLQJQHHGVWR be  in  the  town  center,  it  is  the  library,   ZKLFKEULQJVVRPHWKLQJOLNH people  a  day  into  the  downtown.  My   SDWURQDJHRIGRZQWRZQEXVLQHVVHV is  certainly  increased  because  I  am   JRLQJWRWKHOLEUDU\DQ\ZD\ ,IZHLQJRRGIDLWKLQYHVWLJDWH the  placement  of  both  a  library   DGGLWLRQDQGWRZQRIÂżFHVLQWKH FXUUHQWOLEUDU\ORFDWLRQDQGÂżQGWKH\ are  not  compatible,  then  it  is  time   to  consider  a  different  site  for  the   RIÂżFHV:HZRXOGVWLOOQHHGWKHFRO-­ OHJHEXLOGLQJIRUOLEUDU\H[SDQVLRQ 7KRXJK,XQGHUVWDQGWKHGHVLUHWR NHHSWKHWRZQRIÂżFHVLQWKHFHQWHURI town,  it  cannot  be  the  only  and  non-­ QHJRWLDEOHFULWHULRQ$QG,ZRXOG VXJJHVWWKDWWKHJHRJUDSKLFDUHDWKDW LVWKHZDONLQJFHQWHURIWRZQKDVH[-­ panded  with  the  advent  of  the  Cross   6WUHHW%ULGJH Let  us  keep  all  of  the  townâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ORQJWHUPQHHGVLQWKHIRUHIURQWRI our  minds  and  devise  a  plan  that  will   serve  the  town  best  both  now  and  in   the  future. Cynthia  Watters Middlebury


PAGE  6  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

ADDISON COUNTY

Obituaries

Beatrice Gagnon-Tucker-Briggs, New Haven NEW   HAVEN   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Beatrice   S.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Beaâ&#x20AC;?   Gagnon-­Tucker-­Briggs   of   New   Haven   died   at   her   home   last   Oct.  4,  2012. A   formal   memorial   service   is   being   held   for   her,   at   her   home   on   Saturday,  Aug.  10,  at  2  p.m. Immediately  following  the  service   will  be  a  celebration  of  her  life.  The  

family   encourages   all   to   attend   and   enjoy  the  good  foods  and  conversa-­ tion.   Those   who   cannot   make   the   service   are   still   welcome   to   stop   by   for  the  celebration. If   you   have   any   questions   call   her   son   Pete   at   903-­879-­5267   or   her   granddaughter   Hilary   at   ¸

StudentBRIEFS

ADDISON COUNTY

Dana   Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Brien   of   Ferrisburgh   graduated   from   Paul   Smithâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   College  in  May  with  a  bachelor  of   professional  studies  degree  in  culi-­ nary  arts  and  service  management. Rebecca   Gemignani   of   Middlebury  graduated  from  UMass   Lowell  on  May  18. Bailee   Desforges   of   Bridport   was  named  to  the  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list  for  the   spring   2013   semester   at   Franklin  

Pierce   University   in   Rindge,   N.H.   Desforges   is   majoring   in   liberal   arts. Stuart   Sutherland   of   Brandon   and   Alyssa   Stearns   of   Lincoln   graduated   from   Franklin   Pierce   University. Sutherland   earned   a   master   of   physician   assistant   studies   degree.   Stearns   earned   a   bachelor   of   arts   degree  in  biology.

Helping  hand TEACHER  KATIE  MCEACHEN  helps  camper  Cullen  Myers  provide  some  protective  cover  for  a  bright   orange  newt  they  found  scampering  around  a  small  stump  during  an  outdoor  camp  for  preschoolers  last   week. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbel

Bread  Loaf  Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Conference  starts  up  August  14 RIPTON   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Middlebury   College   Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference,   the   oldest   writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   conference   in   the   country,   will   begin   Wednesday,   Aug.   14,   and   continue   through   Saturday,   Aug.   24.   Held   every   summer   since   1926   on   the   collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Bread   Loaf   campus   in   Ripton,   the   conference   remains   one   of   Americaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   most   respected  literary  institutions. Ten  days  of  workshops,  lectures,   classes  and  readings  provide  writ-­ ers   with   rigorous   practical   and   theoretical   approaches   to   their   craft,   and   offer   a   model   of   liter-­ ary  instruction.  A  dynamic  setting,   the  mountain  campus  has  attracted   many  renowned  authors  and  poets   such   as   Robert   Frost,   Carson   McCullers,   John   Irving,   Terry   Tempest   Williams,   Ted   Conover  

and  Julia  Alvarez.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lighthead,â&#x20AC;?   won   the   National   progress,â&#x20AC;?   said   Michael   Collier,   This   summer   the   conference   Book  Award  for  Poetry  in  2010. director   of   the   conference.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;No   faculty   will   include   such   liter-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   one   who   has   experienced   Bread   DU\ ÂżJXUHV DV &KHU\O 6WUD\HG DQG Conference   provides   a   stimulat-­ Loaf,   with   its   beautiful   wilder-­ Terrance   Hayes.   Both   ness   setting   and   intensive   Strayed   and   Hayes   have   programming,  has  failed  to   attended   the   conference   â&#x20AC;&#x153;No one who has experienced be   inspired,   encouraged   or   multiple   times   as   fellows   changed  by  it.â&#x20AC;? Bread Loaf, with its beautiful in  the  past  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Strayed  for   This  year,  more  than  300   WKH ÂżUVW WLPH LQ  DQG wilderness setting and intenwriters,   students,   faculty,   Hayes   in   2000   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   and   sive programming, has failed literary   agents   and   editors   both  have  gone  on  to  have   will   gather   to   participate   distinguished   careers.   to be inspired, encouraged or in   the   88th   session   of   the   Strayedâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   best-­selling   changed by it.â&#x20AC;? conference.   The   general   memoir,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Wild,â&#x20AC;?   was   public  is  invited  to  attend  a   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Michael Collier, daily  schedule  of  free  read-­ published   in   2012   and   Bread Loaf Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Conference director ings   and   lectures   that   take   was   a   number-­one   New   York   Times   best   seller.   place  in  the  Little  Theatre,   The  paperback  edition  is  currently   ing   community   of   diverse   voices   located  on  the  Bread  Loaf  campus   number   two   on   the   Timesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   paper-­ in   which   writers   test   their   own   on  Route  125. back   best-­seller   list.   Hayesâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   assumptions   regarding   litera-­ The  2013  session  of  public  events   most   recent   collection   of   poems,   ture   and   seek   advice   about   their   will   open   on   Wednesday,   Aug.  

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The Addison Independent consid-­ ers obituaries community news and does not charge to print them, as long as they follow certain guidelines. These guidelines are published on our web site: addisonindependent. com. Families may opt for unedited paid obituaries, which are designat-­ ed with â&#x20AC;&#x153;šâ&#x20AC;? at the end.

14,   at   8:15   p.m.,   with   a   welcome   by  Collier.  He  is  the  author  of  six   books   of   poems,   including   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   /HGJH´ ZKLFK ZDV D ÂżQDOLVW IRU the   National   Book   Critics   Circle   Award  in  2000,  and,  most  recently,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;An   Individual   History.â&#x20AC;?   After   Collierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   opening   remarks,   Bread   Loaf  faculty  members  Linda  Bierds   and  Randall  Kenan  will  give  read-­ ings.   The   public   events   will   wrap   up   with   readings   by   Collier   and   Ted  Conover  on  Friday,  Aug.  23,  at   8:15  p.m. For   a   complete   schedule   of   lectures   and   readings,   see   the   Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference   web   page,   www.middlebury.edu/ blwc.  Events  are  subject  to  change.   &DOOWRFRQÂżUPGDWHVDQGWLPHVDW 802-­443-­5286   through   Aug.   12;Íž   802-­443-­2700  after  Aug.  12.

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  7

OH,  DARN! Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   note:  Due   to   a   software   glitch,  the   beginning  of   reporter  Luke  Whelanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Page   1A   story  in  last  Thursdayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  edition  was  garbled  on  the  front  page.  Here  is  how  we  intended  for  the   story  to  begin.  You  can  read  the  story  in  its  entirety  for  free  at  addisonindependent.com.

Advocates  seek  animal  cruelty  solution Better  response  and  enforcement  is  key Note:  In  this,  the  last  in  a  three-­part  se-­ ries,   experts   discuss   ways   to   improve   en-­ forcement  of  existing  animal  cruelty  laws. By  LUKE  WHELAN ADDISON   COUNTY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   When   ani-­ PDO FRQWURO RIÂżFHU %ULDQ:HEE VHL]HG DQ animal   living   in   unsanitary   conditions   in   Leicester  several  years  ago,  he  did  it  with   a   twinge   of   uncertainty.  After   all,   he   had   not  received  any  training  in  animal  cruelty   response  and  did  not  know  how  he  would   represent   himself   in   court   if   the   owners   disputed   that   the   state   of   the   animal   war-­ UDQWHGLWVVHL]XUH â&#x20AC;&#x153;There  is  really  no  training,  so  if  there  is   someone  that  is  brought  in  to  be  a  civilian   DQLPDOFRQWURORIÂżFHUDQGKHGRHVQÂśWKDYH any   background   in   law   enforcement   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  

UHDOO\ GLIÂżFXOW IRU WKHP WR SHUIRUP WKHLU job,â&#x20AC;?  Webb  said.   In   this   case,   the   owners   did   not   appeal   WKH VHL]XUH EXW :HEEÂśV H[SHULHQFH VWLOO highlights  some  areas  that  animal  welfare   advocates  are  looking  to  address  in  the  fu-­ ture.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   really   enjoy   my   job,   but   it   would   be   nice   if   (I)   would   be   able   to   go   to   these   calls   and   be   more   professional   and   have   more  resources  at  hand,â&#x20AC;?  Webb  added.   Parts   1   and   2   of   this   series   looked   at   how  Addison  County  and  Vermont  handle   animal  cruelty  cases  and  the  shortcomings   and  gray  areas  of  enforcing  animal  welfare   ODZV,QWKLVWKLUGDQGÂżQDOLQVWDOOPHQWWKH Independent  looks  more  deeply  into  ways   to  improve  animal  cruelty  response  and  to  

support  humane  workers  like  Webb  in  car-­ rying  out  their  jobs. TEAMWORK  APPROACH While  Vermont  does  not  have  the  infra-­ structure  and  resources  for  animal  cruelty   response   that   many   other   Northeastern   states   do,   animal   welfare   advocates   con-­ tinue   to   work   to   achieve   a   functioning   system   to   address   animal   abuse.   Joanne   %RXUEHDX+XPDQH6RFLHW\RIWKH8QLWHG States   Northeastern   regional   director   and   Vermont  Humane  Federation  (VHF)  board   member,  is  one  of  those  people.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   have   had   to   be   a   little   bit   creative   ZLWK KRZ ZH XWLOL]H WKH H[LVWLQJ UHVRXUF-­ es,  and  we  do  that  through  communication   and  coordination  between  agencies,â&#x20AC;?  said   %RXUEHDX DERXW HQIRUFLQJ DQLPDO FUXHOW\

laws  in  Vermont. 6RXWK%XUOLQJWRQ&KLHIRI3ROLFH7UHYRU Whipple   represents   the   chiefs   of   police   on   the   Vermont   Cruelty   Response   Coali-­ tion,   a   diverse   group   of   animal   welfare   DGYRFDWHV DQG H[SHUWV ZKR GLVFXVV DQG push   for   ways   to   improve   animal   cruelty   response  in  the  state.  The  group,  of  which   %RXUEHDXLVDIRXQGLQJPHPEHUEHJDQLQ 2000  as  the  Vermont  Animal  Cruelty  Task   Force  but  has  recently  joined  the  VHF  as   the   Cruelty   Response   Coalition.   Whipple   DJUHHVZLWK%RXUEHDXRQWKHQHHGIRUFR-­ operation  among  law  enforcement  and  hu-­ PDQHRI¿FHUV For  the  rest  of  this  story,  and  to  read  Parts   1  and  2,  go  to  addisonindependent.com.


PAGE  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

communitycalendar

Aug

5

jazz  keeping  the  toe-­tapping  music  of  the  1920s,   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;30s  and  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;40s  alive.  Admission  $15.  Reservations   encouraged:   (802)   465-­4071   or   info@brandon-­ music.net.   Russian   School   Choir   concert   at   Middlebury   College.   Sunday,   Aug.   11,   8-­10   p.m.,   McCullough   Social   Space.   Students   in   the   Middlebury   College   School   of   Russian   Choir   sing,   dance,   play   folk   instruments   and   reenact   various   Russian   folk   rituals   during   this   exciting   performance.  Free.  

MONDAY

Band   concert   in   Vergennes.   Monday,  Aug.  5,  7-­9  p.m.,  Vergennes   City   Park.   The   City   Band   plays   in   the   park  every  Monday  night  through  Aug.  19.  

Aug

6

TUESDAY

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weed   and   feedâ&#x20AC;?   gardening   get-­ together   in   Monkton.   Tuesday,   Aug.   6,   9:30   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Willowell   Foundation   (Stoney   Meadow   Lane   and   Bristol   Road).   Weekly   summer   gathering   for   all   ages   and   levels   of   experience   to   lend   a   hand   at   the   Willowell   Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   teaching   garden   and   farm,   followed   by   a   lunch   of   brick-­oven   pizza.   Produce   harvested   goes   to   local   schools   and   food   shelves.   Check   for   weather-­based   deci-­ sions:  www.willowell.org  or  info@willowell.org.   Youth  media  lab  in  Middlebury.  Tuesday,  Aug.  6,   3-­4:30  p.m.,  Ilsley  Library.  Kids  entering  grades   4   and   up   are   invited   to   join   library   and   MCTV   staff  to  make  movies  and  learn  about  technology   using   MCTVâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   state-­of-­the-­art   media   stations.   Drop-­in.  Info:  388-­4097.   Poetry  readings  in  Bristol.  Tuesday,  Aug.  6,  6-­8   p.m.,  ARTSight  Studios  and  Galleries.  Readings   by  Ernesto  Livorni,  Karla  Van  Vliet,  Basha  Miles   and  Rachel  Baird.  Gallery  and  studios  open  at  6,   readings  begin  at  7.   American  Longboards  in  concert  in  Castleton.   Tuesday,  Aug.  6,  7-­10  p.m.,  Castleton  Pavilion.   Part   of   the   2013   Castleton   Summer   Concert   Series.   Free.   Rain   or   shine.   Free.   Info:   www. castleton.edu/concerts.  

Aug

7

WEDNESDAY

Restoration   meeting   in   Salisbury.   Wednesday,   Aug.   7,   10   a.m.-­ noon,   start   at   Salisbury   Town   Hall.   Representatives   from   three   grant   organizations   will   meet   with   local   representatives   to   review   the   restoration   needs   of   the   town   hall   and   the   Salisbury  Congregational  Church.  All  are  invited.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Maker   Day:   Science   With   a   Twistâ&#x20AC;?   for   kids   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   Aug.   7,   10:30   a.m.-­ noon,   Ilsley   Library.   Investigate   the   forces   of   nature   with   fun   science   stations   and   the   raw   materials  to  make  your  own  inventions.  Drop-­in.  .   Band   concert   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,   Aug.   7,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Bristol   town   green.   Free   weekly   band   concert,   weather   permitting,   through   the   end  of  August.   Starry  Starry  Night  in  Hubbardton.  Wednesday,   $XJSP+XEEDUGWRQ%DWWOHÂżHOG6WDWH Historic  Site.  Experienced  stargazers  share  their   WHOHVFRSHVDQGNQRZOHGJH%ULQJEODQNHWVĂ&#x20AC;DVK-­ lights   and   your   own   binoculars   or   telescopes.   Marshmallows  on  us.  In  case  of  rain,  there  will  be   an  inside  program.  Free  but  donations  welcome.   Info:  (802)  273-­2282.  

Aug

8

THURSDAY

Monthly  wildlife  walk  in  Middlebury.   Thursday,  Aug.  8,  7-­9  a.m.,  Otter  View   Park   and   Hurd   Grassland.   A   monthly   OCAS-­MALT  event,  inviting  community  members   to  help  survey  birds  and  other  wildlife.  Meet  leader   Craig   Zondag   at   Otter   View   Park   parking   area,   corner  of  Weybridge  Street  and  Pulp  Mill  Bridge   Road.   Shorter   &   longer   routes   possible.   Come   for  all  or  part  of  walk.  Beginning  birders  welcome.   Info:  388-­1007  or  388-­6019.   YMCA   Diabetes   Prevention   Program   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,  Aug.   8,   4:30-­5:30   p.m.,   Porter   Hospital,   Collins   Building   Conference   5RRP $ 7KH ÂżUVW PHHWLQJ LQ D IUHH <0&$ program   through   Vermont   Blueprint   for   Health.   Reduce   your   risk   of   Type   2   diabetes   and   gain   tools  for  healthy  living.  Continues  weekly  through   Nov.  20.  To  see  if  you  qualify,  call  382-­3468,  ext.   2,  or  email  moneill@portermedical.org.   NER   Vermont   Reading   Series   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   Aug.   8,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Carolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Hungry   Mind  Cafe.  The  New  England  Review  welcomes   writers   Partridge   Boswell,   Michael   Collier,   Cleopatra   Mathis   and   Angela   Palm,   who   will  

Aug

12

MONDAY

Band   concert   in   Vergennes.   Monday,  Aug.  12,  7-­9  p.m.,  Vergennes   City   Park.   The   Vergennes   City   Band   plays   in   the   park   every   Monday   night   through   Aug.  19.  

Aug

13

Fay  on  Friday THE  MICHELE  FAY  Band  plays  at  Two  Brothers  Tavern  in  Middlebury  on  Friday,  Aug.  9,   from  5-­7  p.m.  Stop  in  while  strolling  downtown  during  the  monthly  Middlebury  Arts  Walk. read  from  their  work.  Free.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Die   Fledermausâ&#x20AC;?   operetta   on   stage   in   Middlebury.  Thursday,  Aug.  8,  7:30-­10:30  p.m.,   Town  Hall  Theater.  Middlebury  College  Summer   Language  Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  German  for  Singers  program   presents  Johann  Straussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  most  famous  operetta   at  8  p.m.  Pre-­show  talk,  in  English,  at  7:30  p.m.   Balcony  seats  available  to  the  public,  $15,  at  the   7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  RU ZZZWRZQKDOOWKH-­ ater.org,  or  at  the  door.  Also  on  Aug.  9.   Band  concert  in  Orwell.  Thursday,  Aug.  8,  7:30-­ 8:30  p.m.,  Orwell  village  green.  Weekly  summer   concerts.  Rehearsal  in  the  Orwell  Village  School   band  room  preceding  each  concert  at  6:30  p.m.   Info:  www.facebook.com/OrwellTownBand.   Movies  on  the  Park  in  Bristol.  Thursday,  Aug.  8,   8-­10   p.m.,   Bristol   town   green.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Jumanji.â&#x20AC;?   Free   movie   on   a   theater-­sized   screen,   starting   at   dusk.  Suitable  for  all  ages.  Desserts  and  refresh-­ ments  will  be  available.  Bring  a  blanket  and  bug   spray.  Rain  location:  Holley  Hall.  Info:  www.bris-­ tolrec.org  or  453-­5885.  

Aug

9

FRIDAY

Senior  luncheon  in  Bristol.  Friday,   Aug.   9,   11:30   a.m.-­1:30   p.m.,   Maryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   at   Baldwin   Creek.   CVAA   sponsors   a   monthly   luncheon   featuring   Chef   Doug   Mackâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   talents.   Chicken   piccata   with   pasta   and   mush-­ rooms,   fresh   vegetables,   tomato   and   bread   salad  (panzanella)  grilled  peaches  with  balsamic   glaze,   and   ice   cream.   Suggested   donation   $5.   Reservations  required:  1-­800-­642-­5119. Arts  Walk  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Aug.  9,  5-­7  p.m.,   downtown   Middlebury   and   the   Marble   Works.   Monthly  outdoor  stroll  through  town  featuring  art,   PXVLFIRRGDQGIXQ6HHPRQWKO\Ă&#x20AC;LHUDWZZZ middleburyartswalk.com.   Carillon   concert   at   Middlebury   College.   Friday,   Aug.   9,   5-­6   p.m.,   Mead   Chapel   and   surround-­ ing  grounds.  Gordon  Slater,  Canadian  Dominion   Carillonneur   Emeritus,   performs.   Free.   Info:   443-­3168  or  www.middlebury.edu/arts.   Meeting   about   gas   pipeline   proposal   in   Mid-­ dlebury.   Friday,   Aug.   9,   6:30-­9   p.m.,   Town   Gym.   Some   residents   of   other   towns   affected   by  the  Phase  I  proceedings  have  been  invited   to  speak  and  share  their  stories.  In  an  effort  to   keep  focused  on  residentsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  concerns,  organiza-­ tions,  companies  and  state  agencies  have  not   been  invited  to  be  panelists.  Everyone  is  wel-­ come.  Info:  Jason  Kaye  at  275-­2979. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Die   Fledermausâ&#x20AC;?   operetta   on   stage   in   Middlebury.   Friday,   Aug.   9,   7:30-­10:30   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.   The   Middlebury   College   Summer  Language  Schoolâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  German  for  Singers   program  presents  Johann  Straussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  most  famous   operetta   at   8   p.m.   Pre-­show   talk,   in   English,   at   7:30  p.m.  Balcony  seats  available  to  the  public,    DW WKH 7+7 ER[ RIÂżFH  RU ZZZ

townhalltheater.org,  or  at  the  door.   Point   CounterPoint   faculty   concert   in   Salisbury.  Friday,  Aug.  9,  7:30-­9  p.m.,  Salisbury   Congregational   Church.   A   chamber   music   concert  by  the  2013  PCP  faculty,  in  celebration   of  the  campâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  50th  season  on  Lake  Dunmore.  

Aug

10

SATURDAY

&KXUFK Ă&#x20AC;HD PDUNHW LQ +DQFRFN   Saturday,   Aug.   10,   9   a.m.-­2   p.m.,   Hancock  Town  Hall,  Route  100.  Annual   Ă&#x20AC;HD PDUNHW SOXV EDNH VDOH DQG IRRG ERRWK Donations  currently  being  taken;  tables  available   for  rent.  Info:  767-­9157.   Church   supper   in   Vergennes.   Saturday,   Aug.   10,   5-­6:30   p.m.,   Vergennes   United   Methodist   Church.   Spiral-­cut   ham,   baked   beans,   broccoli   salad,   roll,   blueberry   crisp   with   ice   cream   and   beverage.   Served   buffet-­style.   Cost   $8   adults,   $4  children.  Takeout  available.  Info:  877-­3150.   Summer  Reading  Series  in  Rochester.  Saturday,   Aug.  10,  5:30-­6:30  p.m.,  BigTown  Gallery.  John   Elder  and  Woon-­Ping  Chin  read  from  their  own   work.  Free.  Refreshments  follow.  Info:  767-­9670.   King  Pede  party  in  Ferrisburgh.  Saturday,  Aug.   10,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Ferrisburgh   Community   Center  &  Town  Hall.  Sandwich  supper  followed   by   an   evening   of   fun   and   card   games.   Come   planning   to   play   King   Pede   or   bring   your   own   favorite  card  game.  Requested  donation:  $2.50.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fill  the  Voidâ&#x20AC;?  screening  at  Middlebury  College.   Saturday,  Aug.   10,   7-­9   p.m.,   Dana  Auditorium.   The   Middlebury   College   Language   Schools   International   Film   Festival   continues   with   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lemale   et   haâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;halal,â&#x20AC;?   (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fill   the   Voidâ&#x20AC;?).  A   devout   18-­year-­old   Israeli   is   pressured   to   marry   the   husband   of   her   late   sister.   Declaring   her   inde-­ pendence   in   her   ultra-­Orthodox   community   is   not   an   option.   Free.   In   Hebrew   with   English   subtitles.  Discussion  follows  the  screening.  

Aug

11

TUESDAY

Special   Effects   Spectacular   for   kids   in   Middlebury.   Tuesday,   Aug.   13,  9  a.m.-­noon,  Ilsley  Library.  Four-­day   class,  Aug.   13-­16,   for   kids   in   grades   4   and   up   who   have   attended   a   Lights,   Camera,   Action!   FDPSRUDWOHDVWÂżYHVHVVLRQVRIWKH<RXWK0HGLD Lab.   Learn   how   to   add   special   effects   to   your   movies.  Advance  registration  required;  space  is   limited.  Register  online  starting  June  1  at  www. ilsleypubliclibrary.org.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Weed   and   feedâ&#x20AC;?   gardening   get-­together   in   Monkton.  Tuesday,  Aug.   13,   9:30   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Willowell  Foundation  (Stoney  Meadow  Lane  and   Bristol  Road).  Weekly  summer  gathering  for  all   ages  and  levels  of  experience  to  lend  a  hand  at   the  Willowell  Foundationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  teaching  garden  and   farm,   followed   by   a   lunch   of   brick-­oven   pizza.   Produce   harvested   goes   to   local   schools   and   food   shelves.   Check   for   weather-­based   deci-­ sions:  www.willowell.org  or  info@willowell.org.  

SUNDAY

Mark  Twain  living  history  presen-­ tation   in   Brandon.   Sunday,   Aug.   11,   3-­4:30   p.m.,   Brandon   Town   Hall.   Mark  Twain  lookalike  Eric  Rotsinger  brings  this   historic  author  and  his  personality  to  life.  Tickets   $5,  available  at  Carrâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Florist  and  Gifts  or  at  the   door.   Free   yoga/meditation   in   Middlebury.   Sunday,   $XJ   SP 2WWHU &UHHN <RJD LQ WKH Marble   Works.   Monthly   community   gathering   with   gentle   yoga,   meditation   and   reading   the   Five  Mindfulness  Trainings  of  Thich  Nhat  Hanh.   Beginners  welcome.  Info:  388-­1961.  No  charge   but   donations   are   accepted.   This   class   is   a   EHQHÂżWIRU+23( Jeremy   Mohney   Quartet   in   Brandon.   Sunday,   Aug.   11,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Brandon   Music.   Hot  

Music  in  the  air ADIRONDACK   CHAIRS   DOT   the   Middlebury  College  lawn  around  Mead   Chapel.   They   offer   a   comfortable   spot   from   which   to   hear   the   chapelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   bells,   which  will  be  played  by  Canadian  caril-­ lonneur  Gordon  Slater  on  Friday,  Aug.   9,  at  5  p.m.  as  part  of  the  collegeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free   Summer  Carillon  Series.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  9

communitycalendar

Satin  and  Steel  in  concert  in  Castleton.  Tuesday,   Aug.   13,   7-­10   p.m.,   Castleton   Pavilion.   Part   of   the   2013   Castleton   Summer   Concert   Series.   Free.  Rain  or  shine.  Free.  Info:  www.castleton. edu/concerts.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Telling  Amyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Storyâ&#x20AC;?  screening  at  Middlebury   College.   Tuesday,   Aug.   13,   7:30-­9:30   p.m.,   Twilight   Hall,   50   Franklin   St.   Presented   by   the   Addison  County  Council  Against  Domestic  and   Sexual  Violence.  Free.  

Aug

14

WEDNESDAY

GED   testing   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   Aug.   14,   8:45   a.m.-­1   p.m.,   Vermont   Adult   Learning,   282   Boardman   St.   Pre-­registration   required.   Call   388-­4392  for  info  and  to  register.   Fourth   annual   Family   Tie-­Dye   in   Middlebury.   Wednesday,   Aug.   14,   10:30   a.m.-­noon,   Ilsley   Library.   Bring   in   your   own   pre-­washed   shirts,   pillowcases,   socks,   etc.,   for   this   fun   end-­of-­ summer  tradition.  Drop-­in.  Info:  388-­4097.   UVM   Morgan   Horse   Farm   open   house   in   Weybridge.   Wednesday,  Aug.   14,   10:30   a.m.-­ 2:30  p.m.,  UVM  Morgan  Horse  Farm.  Free  and   open  to  the  public.   St.  Ambrose  Lawn  Party  and  Chicken  Barbecue   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,   Aug.   14,   5-­8   p.m.,   %ULVWRO WRZQ JUHHQ %%4 FKLFNHQ DQG Âż[LQJV pie  contest  and  sale,  fried  bread  dough,  baked   goodies,   white   elephant   table.   In   the   event   of   rain,  the  church  hall  will  be  open  for  dining.  Info:   453-­2488.   Lego  Night  in  Shoreham.  Wednesday,  Aug.  14,   5:30-­7   p.m.,   Platt   Memorial   Library.   See   what   you   can   make   with   the   libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   amazing   Lego   collection,   and   enjoy   a   little   friendly   competi-­ tion  in  the  process.  For  anyone  5  or  older.  Info:   897-­2647.   Jubilee   Jazz   Band   concert   in   Brandon.   Wednesday,   Aug.   14,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Central   Park.   Six-­piece   band   plays   Dixieland   jazz.   Info:   247-­6401   or   www.brandon.org.   Part   of   Brandonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free  summer  concert  series.   Band   concert   in   Bristol.   Wednesday,   Aug.   14,   7-­8:30   p.m.,   Bristol   town   green.   Free   weekly   band   concert,   weather   permitting,   through   the   end  of  August.   Book  discussion  group  in  Lincoln.  Wednesday,   Aug.  14,  7-­9  p.m.,  Lincoln  Library.  This  monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   book:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Tell  the  Wolves  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  Homeâ&#x20AC;?  by  Carol  Rifka   Brunt.  Info:  453-­2665.   Historical   society   meeting   in   Salisbury.   Wednesday,   Aug.   14,   7-­9   p.m.,   Salisbury   Congregational   Church.   The   Salisbury   Historical   Society   welcomes   Bill   Powers,   who   will   speak   about   and   share   photos   of   the   Sucker  Brook  sawmill  community,  including  the   Newton  &  Thompson   sawmill,  Aunt  Jenny  and   her  teahouse,  artist  Charles  Wesley  Sanderson,   farmer  Loyal  Kelsey  and  others.   Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference   welcome   and   reading  in  Ripton.  Wednesday,  Aug.  14,  8:15-­ 9:15   p.m.,   Little  Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.  

Early  birds OTTER  CREEK  AUDUBON  and  Middlebury  Area  Land  Trust  offer  their  next  monthly  wild-­ life  walk  on  Thursday,  Aug.  8,  at  7  a.m.  at  Otter  View  Park,  on  the  corner  of  Weybridge  Street   and  Pulp  Mill  Bridge  Road.  The  guided  walk  is  a  great  opportunity  for  beginning  birders. Welcome   by   Michael   Collier   and   readings   by   Linda  Bierds  and  Randall  Kenan.  Free.  Events   subject   to   change;   call   443-­5286   through  Aug.    RU  DIWHU $XJ  WR FRQ¿UP )XOO schedule  at  www.middlebury.edu/blwc.  

Aug

15

THURSDAY

Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference   lecture   in   Ripton.   Thursday,   Aug.   15,  9-­10  a.m.,  Little  Theatre,  Bread  Loaf   Campus.   Alan   Shapiro   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Mark   Twain   and   the   Creative   Ambiguities   of   Expertise.â&#x20AC;?   Free.  Events  subject  to  change;  call  443-­5286   through  Aug.   12   or   443-­2700   after  Aug.   12   to   FRQÂżUP )XOO VFKHGXOH DW ZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGX blwc.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Munch   150â&#x20AC;?   exhibition   broadcast   in   Middlebury.  Thursday,  Aug.  15,  11  a.m.-­12:45   p.m.,   Town   Hall   Theater.   Audiences   will   get   a   closeup   view   of   the   full   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Munch   150â&#x20AC;?   exhibi-­ tion   of   the   lifetime   works   of   Edvard   Munch,   broadcast   from   Norwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Munch   Museum   and   National   Museum,   shown   on   the   THT   big   screen.   Broadcast   includes   a   virtual   tour   of   Norway.   Tickets   $10/$6,   available   at   the   THT   ER[ RIÂżFH  RU WRZQKDOOWKHDWHURUJ RU at  the  door.  Also  showing  at  7  p.m.   Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference   reading   in   Ripton.   Thursday,   Aug.   15,   4:30-­5:30   p.m.,   Little  Theatre,  Bread  Loaf  Campus.  Reading  by   Frank   Bidart.   Free.   Events   subject   to   change;   call   443-­5286   through   Aug.   12   or   443-­2700   DIWHU$XJWRFRQÂżUP)XOOVFKHGXOHDWZZZ middlebury.edu/blwc.   3UHPLHUH RI 7URSLFDO 6WRUP ,UHQH ÂżOP LQ Middlebury.   Thursday,   Aug.   15,   6:30-­8:30   p.m.,   Vermont   Folklife   Center.   Filmmaker   Joe   DeFelice   will   screen   his   new   documentary,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;After   the   Floods:   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Rivers   and   the   Legacy  of  Irene.â&#x20AC;?  In  conjunction  with  the  VFCâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   FXUUHQWH[KLELWÂł7KH3RZHURI:DWHU5HĂ&#x20AC;HFWLRQV on  Rivers  and  Lessons  from  Irene,â&#x20AC;?  on  display  

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through  Sept.  7.  Info:  388-­4964.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Munch   150â&#x20AC;?   exhibition   broadcast   in   Middlebury.   Thursday,   Aug.   15,   7-­8:45   p.m.,   Town  Hall  Theater.  Audiences  will  get  a  closeup   view   of   the   full   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Munch   150â&#x20AC;?   exhibition   of   the   lifetime   works   of   Edvard   Munch,   broadcast   from   Norwayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Munch   Museum   and   National   Museum,   shown   on   the   THT   big   screen.   Broadcast   includes   a   virtual   tour   of   Norway.   7LFNHWVDYDLODEOHDWWKH7+7ER[RIÂżFH 382-­9222  or  townhalltheater.org,  or  at  the  door.   Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference   readings   in   Ripton.   Thursday,   Aug.   15,   8:15-­9:15   p.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Readings   by  Jamie  Quatro,  Robert  Boswell  and  Jennifer   Grotz.   Free.   Events   subject   to   change;   call   443-­5286   through   Aug.   12   or   443-­2700   after   $XJ  WR FRQÂżUP )XOO VFKHGXOH DW ZZZ middlebury.edu/blwc.    

Aug

16

FRIDAY

Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference   lecture   in   Ripton.   Friday,   Aug.   16,   9-­10   a.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Charles   Baxter   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   Request  Moment,  or  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Something  I  Want   You   to   Do.â&#x20AC;&#x2122;â&#x20AC;?   Free.   Events   subject   to   change;   call   443-­5286   through   Aug.   12   or   443-­2700   DIWHU$XJWRFRQÂżUP)XOOVFKHGXOHDWZZZ middlebury.edu/blwc. Senior  luncheon  in  Ferrisburgh.  Friday,  Aug.  16,   11:30  a.m.-­1:30  p.m.,  Basin  Harbor  Club.  CVAA   sponsors   this   luncheon   of   turkey   and   roast   vegetable   quiche,   heirloom   tomato   gazpacho,   wheat   rolls,   fruit   salad   and   Vermont   blueberry   tart.   Suggested   donation   $5.   Reservations   required:  1-­800  642-­5119. End-­of-­summer   reading   party   for   kids   in   Lincoln.   Friday,   Aug.   16,   2-­4   p.m.,   Lincoln   Library.   Ice   cream,   a   dinosaur   bone   hunt,   games  and  prizes.  Drawing  for  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pizza  with   Debiâ&#x20AC;?  prize.  Info:  453-­2665.  

Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference   readings   in   Ripton.   Friday,   Aug.   16,   4:15-­5:15   p.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Readings   by   Emilia  Phillips,  Terrance  Hayes  and  Lia  Purpura.   Free.   Events   subject   to   change;   call   443-­5286   through  Aug.   12   or   443-­2700   after  Aug.   12   to   FRQÂżUP )XOO VFKHGXOH DW ZZZPLGGOHEXU\HGX blwc.   Carillon   concert   at   Middlebury   College.8/16   Friday,   Aug.   16,   5-­6   p.m.,   Mead   Chapel   and   surrounding  grounds.  George  Matthew  Jr.,  caril-­ lonneur   at   Middlebury   College   and   Norwich   University,   performs   the   last   concert   in   a   summer-­long  series  of  carillon  concerts  featur-­ ing   guest   carillonneurs   from   around   the   world.   Info:  443-­3168  or  www.middlebury.edu/arts.   Teddy   Bear/Stuffed   Friend   Sleepover   in   Shoreham.   Friday,   Aug.   16,   6-­7   p.m.,   Platt   Memorial   Library.   Kids   ages   3   and   older   are   invited  to  come  in  their  PJâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  for  a  bedtime  snack   and   story   time   before   dropping   their   favorite   stuffed  animal  off  for  a  sleepover.  Kids  can  pick   up  their  animals  the  next  morning  from  9  a.m.-­1   p.m.  Info:  897-­2647.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nordic   Visionsâ&#x20AC;?   classical   concert   in   Rochester.  Friday,  Aug.  16,  7-­9  p.m.,  Rochester   Federated   Church.   The   Rochester   Chamber   Music   Society   presents   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Nordic   Visions:   Music   from   Norway,   Sweden   and   Finland,â&#x20AC;?   with   soprano  Mary  Bonhag,  Evan  Premo  on  double   bass,   and   Cynthia   Huard   on   piano.   Free,   but   donations   welcome.   Info:   767-­9234   or   rcmsvt. org.   Teen  movie  night  in  Lincoln.  Friday,  Aug.  16,  7-­9   p.m.,   Lincoln   Library.   This   monthâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   title:   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Pitch   Perfectâ&#x20AC;?  (PG-­13).  Free  to  all  teens  grades  7  and   up.  Refreshments  served.  Info:  453-­2665.   Bread   Loaf   Writersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   Conference   readings   in   Ripton.   Friday,   Aug.   16,   8:15-­9:15   p.m.,   Little   Theatre,   Bread   Loaf   Campus.   Readings   by   Vievee   Francis-­Olzmann,   Anthony   Marra   and   Helena  MarĂ­a  Viramontes.  Free.  Events  subject   to   change;   call   443-­5286   through   Aug.   12   or   DIWHU$XJWRFRQÂżUP)XOOVFKHGXOH at  www.middlebury.edu/blwc.  

LIVEMUSIC Michele  Fay  Band  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Aug.  9,   5-­7  p.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   The  Will  Patton  Ensemble  in  Middlebury.  Friday,   Aug.  9,  5-­7  p.m.,  51  Main.   The  Bumping  Jones  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Aug.   9,  10  p.m.-­2  a.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   Cooper  &  LaVoie  in  Middlebury.  Saturday,  Aug.   10,  8-­10  p.m.,  51  Main.   Hot   Neon   Magic   in   Middlebury.   Saturday,   Aug.   10,  10  p.m.-­midnight,  Two  Brothers  Tavern.   3  Sheets  2  the  Wind  in  Middlebury.  Friday,  Aug.   16,  10  p.m.-­2  a.m.,  Two  Brothers  Tavern. See  a  full  listing  of  

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Fine country and period (c.1700-1870) furnishings, folk art, early lighting, paintings, prints and appropriate, 17th, 18th and early 19th century furniture and collectables.


PAGE  10  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

Dining and Entertainment tĹ?ĹŻĹŻWÄ&#x201A;ƊŽŜĹśĆ?Ä&#x17E;ĹľÄ?ĹŻÄ&#x17E; Friday,  August  9,  5  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  7pm Led  by  renowned  jazz  mandolinist   tĹ?ĹŻĹŻWÄ&#x201A;ƊŽŜÍ&#x2022;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć?ĹśĆ?Ä&#x17E;ĹľÄ?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Í&#x203A;Ć? Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ĺ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĨÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?ÄŽÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?Ä&#x201A;Ĺś Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹľÄ?Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;ĨŽůŏÇ Ä&#x201A;ĹŻĆ&#x161;Ç&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Í&#x2022;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x17E; Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć&#x161;'Ç&#x2021;Ć&#x2030;Ć?Ç&#x2021;ĹŠÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ç&#x152;Í&#x2DC;

ŽŽĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Î&#x2DC;>Ä&#x201A;sĹ˝Ĺ?Ä&#x17E; Saturday,  August  10,  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  10pm ŽŽĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Î&#x2DC;>Ä&#x201A;sĹ˝Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĹľĹ?Ç&#x2020; ŽĨÄ&#x201A;Ä?ŽƾĆ?Ć&#x;Ä?Ä?ĹŻĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;ĨŽůŏÄ?ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ć?Ć?Ĺ?Ä?Ć?Í&#x2022; ĨÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ĺ˝Ä?ZÄ&#x17E;Ä?ĆľĆ&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝ŽŜĹ?ĆľĹ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152; Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;DÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;ĹŹ>Ä&#x201A;sĹ˝Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ŽŜĹ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;žŽŜĹ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Í&#x2DC;

Andric  Severance  Quartet Thursday,  August  15,  7  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  10pm dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ä?^Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;YĆľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161; Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĨŽĆ&#x152;ĹľĆ?Ä&#x201A;ÄŽÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ç ŽĨ>Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ĹśÍ&#x2022; ĨĆ&#x152;ŽͲĆľÄ?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?Ä&#x201A;ŜŊÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ç&#x152;Í&#x2DC;

ĹŻĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?:Ä&#x201A;Ĺľ Wednesday,  August  21,  8  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;  10pm :Ĺ˝Ĺ?ŜƾĆ?Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;ĎŻrd  Wednesday   ĨŽĆ&#x152;ĹŻĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?:Ä&#x201A;ĹľÍ&#x2DC;Ä&#x17E;ŜŜĹ?Ć?tĹ?ůůžŽƊ ĨĆ&#x152;Žž>Ä&#x17E;Ĺ&#x152;Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x17E;:ƾžĆ&#x2030;Ç Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻĆ&#x2030;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ?Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E; ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?ĆľĹ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Í&#x2022;Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć?Ć?Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x161;Ć&#x152;ƾžĆ?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?ĆľÇ&#x2021;Ć?Ç Ĺ?ĹŻĹŻÄ?Ä&#x201A;Ä?ĹŹÇ&#x2021;ŽƾĆľĆ&#x2030;Ĺ˝Ć&#x152; Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;ĹŹÄ&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ç&#x2021;ŽƾĆ&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2DC; ĹŻĹŻžƾĆ?Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĹśĆ?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä?ĹŻĆľÄ&#x17E;Ć?ĨÄ&#x201A;ĹśĆ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E; Ç Ä&#x17E;ĹŻÄ?ŽžÄ&#x17E;Í&#x160;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ç&#x2021;ŽŜÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ĺ˝Ć&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Í&#x2DC;

EÍ&#x203A;Ĺ?ŽŜĹ?ZĹ˝Ä?ĹŹ Friday,  August  23  |  8-­â&#x20AC;?11pm &Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?ĹľÄ&#x17E;ĹľÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?ŽĨÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?ĹŹÄ&#x201A;Í&#x2022; ZĆľÄ?Ä?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä?ĆľÄ?ĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;ŽŜŏĹ?ĹŻĹ˝Í&#x160;ĨĆ&#x152;Ĺ˝ &ƾŜŏKĆ&#x152;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Í&#x2022;EÍ&#x203A;Ĺ?ŽŜĹ?ZĹ˝Ä?ĹŹŽčÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć? Ä&#x201A;ƾŜĹ?Ć&#x2039;ĆľÄ&#x17E;ĨƾĆ?Ĺ?ŽŜŽĨtÄ&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;ĨĆ&#x152;Ĺ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÍ&#x2022; ĹŠÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ç&#x152;Í&#x2022;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;ĨƾŜŏĆ&#x152;Ĺ&#x161;Ç&#x2021;Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;ĹľĆ?Í&#x2DC;

Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;dĹ&#x161;ŽžÄ&#x201A;Ć?YĆľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161; Saturday,  August  24  |8-­â&#x20AC;?11pm dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;dĹ&#x161;ŽžÄ&#x201A;Ć?YĆľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161; ĨÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?žƾĆ?Ĺ?Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĹśĆ?ĨĆ&#x152;ŽžĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E; Ĺ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĆľĆ&#x152;ĹŻĹ?ĹśĹ?Ć&#x161;ŽŜÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x2021;Ĺ?ĹśĹ? ĹŠÄ&#x201A;Ç&#x152;Ç&#x152;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x161;Ć?Ç Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x201A;ĹŻ Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;žŽÄ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĹśĹ?ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ?Í&#x2DC;

German students sing Strauss auf Deutsch Middlebury  College  is  famous  for   its   â&#x20AC;&#x153;total   immersionâ&#x20AC;?   summer   lan-­ guage   program,   in   which   students   are  required  to  speak,  read  and  even   think  in  the  language  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  study-­ ing  for  the  length  of  their  stay. The   German   for   Singers   program   takes   this   a   step   further,   combining   music   and   vocal   instruction   with   the   traditional   language   curriculum.   This   year   the   school  will  feature  its  talented   young  singers  in  Johann  Straussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  fa-­ mous   operetta,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Die   Fledermaus,â&#x20AC;?   which  will  play  two  performances  at   Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Town  Hall  Theater  on   Thursday  and  Friday,  at  8  p.m. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Die  Fledermausâ&#x20AC;?  (â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Batâ&#x20AC;?)  is   a   mischievous   delight,   a   tale   of   re-­ venge  and  mistaken  identity  with  in-­ spired  silliness  and  a  luscious  score   by  Strauss.  This  very  Viennese  plot   is   bathed   in   some   of   Straussâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   most   famous   music,   a   whole   bouquet   of   musical   idioms   that   perfectly   cap-­ ture   the   Austro-­Hungarian   Empire   in  late  19th  century. The  production  is  directed  by  Bet-­ tina  Matthias  with  Stephan  Boving.   The  musical  director  is  Stefan  Rut-­ ter.   The   production   is   in   German   with  no  supertitles,  but  there  will  be   a  pre-­performance  talk  in  English  at   7:30  p.m. The   main   section   of   the   theater   is  reserved  for  language  school  stu-­ dents,   but   seats   in   the   balcony   will   be   made   available   to   anyone   in   the   community  for  $15.  Tickets  may  be   purchased   at   townhalltheater.org,    DW WKH 7+7 %R[ 2IÂżFH (daily   except   Sunday,   noon-­5   p.m.)   and  at  the  door,  if  available. HOT  JAZZ  IN  BRANDON The  swinging  beats  of  the  Jeremy   Mohney  Quartet  bring  their  hot  jazz   sound  to  Brandon  Music  on  Sunday   at  7:30  p.m. Hot  jazz  started  in  New  Orleans  in   the  early  20th  century  with  a  blend   of   ragtime,   blues,   and   brass   band   marches   and   was   the   precursor   to  

JOHANN   STRAUSS

swing  music.   Louis   Armstrong   once   said,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   two   kinds   of   music,   the   good   and   the   bad.   I   play   the   good   kind.â&#x20AC;?   Mohney   and   his   quartet   do,   too,   following   in   the   footsteps   of   such   artists   as   Armstrong,   Count   Basie,  Benny  Goodman,  Django  Re-­ inhardt  and  Glenn  Miller.  However,   Mohney  adds  his  original  composi-­

tions  and  vocals  into  the  mix  as  well. The   quartet,   typically   featuring   two  guitars  and  a  string  bass  in  the   rhythm  section  with  Mohney  on  sax-­ ophone   and   vocals,   is   keeping   the   toe-­tapping  music  of  the  1920s,  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;30s   and  â&#x20AC;&#x2122;40s  alive.  Their  music  is  tight,   while   leaving   ample   room   for   im-­ provisation,   and   their   sound   proves   that  the  emotion  and  joy  of  this  mu-­

ĆľWŽŜĆ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć? Saturday,  August  31  |  8-­â&#x20AC;?11pm dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĆľWŽŜĆ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć?ŽčÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ĹŻĆľĆ?Ĺ&#x161; ÄŽĹśĹ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ͲĆ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x2021;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ĺ?ĆľĹ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ç Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;ĹŹĆ&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ĺ?Ć? Ä?ŽžĆ&#x2030;ĹŻĹ?ĹľÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ä?Ç&#x2021;Ä&#x201A;Ç&#x20AC;Ĺ˝Ä?Ä&#x201A;ĹŻÄ?ĹŻÄ&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä?ŽƾůÄ&#x161;ŽŜůÇ&#x2021;Ä?Ä&#x17E;ĹľÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161; Ä?Ç&#x2021;Ä?ůŽŽÄ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĹŻÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2DC;dĹ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?Ć&#x152;Ć?ŽƾŜÄ&#x161; Ĺ?Ć?sÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;žŽŜĆ&#x161;ͲžÄ&#x201A;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĨŽůŏͲĆ&#x152;Ĺ˝Ä?ŏͲ ĹľÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ç Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ć?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽŜĹ?Ç Ĺ˝Ć&#x152;ĹŻÄ&#x161; Ĺ?ĹśĹ&#x2021;ĆľÄ&#x17E;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ć?Í&#x2DC; Cleverly located at 51  Main  Street    Middlebury,  V T

go51main.com

Thursdays  3-­â&#x20AC;?6:30pm at  the  Town  Green www.yourfarmstand.com

GORDON  SLATER

sic   has   not   and   will   not   fade   away. General   admis-­ sion   is   $15   with   a   pre-­concert   dinner   available   for   just   $15.   Reservations  are  encour-­ aged.  Venue  is  BYOB.  Call   465-­4071   or   e-­mail   info@ brandon-­music.net  for  reserva-­ tions  or  information.  Brandon  Music   is  located  at  62  Country  Club  Road   in  Brandon.  For  additional  informa-­ tion,  visit  brandon-­music.net. TWO  BROTHERS  TAVERN There   will   be   three   live   musical   performances   this   week   at   the   Two   Brothers  Tavern  located  at  86  Main   St.  in  Middlebury.   On  Friday,  The  Michele  Fay  Band   will  perform  at  5  p.m.  The  Michele   Fay  Band  is  a  Vermont-­based  acous-­ tic  quartet  that  features  original  and   roots   music.   Fayâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   heart-­felt   lyrics   are   central   to   the   ensemble,   which   brings  forth  a  comfortable  groove  of   IRONVZLQJDQGEOXHJUDVVLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHG (See  Arts  Beat,  Page  11)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  11

Cosmic Forecast For the week of August 5

JEREMY  MOHNEY  QUARTET

Arts  Beat   (Continued  from  Page  10) songs   that   are   seamlessly   woven   to-­ gether.  Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  playing  upstairs  in   the  tavern  for  a  special  Arts  Walk  live   music  happy  hour  show.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  free. Then,   at   10   p.m.   on   Friday,   Two   Brothers   presents   The   Bumping   Jones.  Playing  a  wide  variety  of  mu-­ sic   seeped   in   rock,   soul,   funk,   jazz   and  surf  styles,  The  Bumping  Jones   concoct  their  own  blend  of  interest-­ ing   music.   With   the   addition   of   a   KRUQVVHFWLRQWKHEDQGKDVVROLGLÂżHG their   lineup   and   have   been   relent-­ lessly   writing   and   gigging   around   Vermont  to  packed  venues.  There  is   a  $3  cover. Finally   at   10   p.m.   on   Saturday,   Hot   Neon   Magic   takes   to   the   Tav-­ ernâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   stage.   Simply   put,   Hot   Neon   Magic   is   the   best   â&#x20AC;&#x2122;80s   cover   band   in  Vermont.  Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  miss  their  trium-­ phant  return  to  the  Lounge.  There  is   a   $3   cover.   For   more   information,   call  388-­0002. LIVE  MUSIC  AT  51  MAIN There  will  be  two  musical  events   this  week  at  Middleburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  51  Main.   At  5  p.m.  on  Friday,  in  conjunction   with   the   Middlebury   Arts   Walk,   there   will   be   an   exhibit   of   a   series   of  photographs  by  Sandy  Pratt,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;In-­ spired   by   Nature,â&#x20AC;?   along   with   live   music  by  the  Will  Patton  Ensemble.   Led   by   renowned   jazz   mandolinist   Will   Patton,   this   ensembleâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   reper-­ WRLUHIHDWXUHVÂżHU\%UD]LOLDQVDPEDV and  folk  waltzes,  gentle  choros  and   hot  Gypsy  jazz. Then,  at  8  p.m.  on  Saturday,  local   favorites   Cooper   &   LaVoie   take   to   the  stage  for  an  encore  performance.   Cooper  &  LaVoie  play  a  great  mix  of   acoustic  blues  and  folk  classics,  fea-­ turing   Bob   Recupero   on   guitar   and   Mark  LaVoie  on  harmonica. All  ages,  no  cover.  For  additional   information   visit   www.go51main. com  or  phone  388-­8209. POINT  COUNTERPOINT On  Friday,  at  7:30  p.m.  the  Salis-­ bury   Church   will   host   a   chamber   concert   by   the   Point   CounterPoint   faculty   ensemble   under   music   di-­ rector   Randy   Hiller.   Their   program   will   emphasize   their   educational   mission,   their   performance   exper-­ tise,   and   their   international   range,   and   will   begin   with   a   lecture/per-­ formance   of   Beethovenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Grosse   Fugue.  Also  included  will  be  a  series   of   Turkish   songs   featuring   faculty   members   Beste   Tiknaz   and   Lacin  

Modiri  from  Istanbul  with  cellist  Ja-­ vier  Caballero. 7KLV ZLOO EH WKH VL[WK DQG ÂżQDO event   in   Salisburyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   34th   annual   Summer   Performance   Series   at   the   historic,   but   handicap-­accessible,   1838   church   in   Salisbury   Village.   Although  admission  is  free,  a  dona-­ tion  in  support  of  the  series  will  be   appreciated. INTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;L  FILM  FESTIVAL The   exciting   Middlebury   College   Language   Schools   International   Film  Festival  concludes  on  Saturday   ZLWKWKH,VUDHOLÂżOPâ&#x20AC;&#x153;Lemale   et  haâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;halalâ&#x20AC;?  (â&#x20AC;&#x153;Fill  the  Voidâ&#x20AC;?),  direct-­ ed  by  Rama  Burstein. A   devout   18-­year-­old   Israeli   is   pressured   to   marry   the   husband   of   her  late  sister.  Declaring  her  indepen-­ dence  is  not  an  option  in  Tel  Avivâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   ultra-­Orthodox   Hasidic   community,   where   religious   law,   tradition   and   the  rabbiâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  word  are  absolute.   7KHÂżOPLQ+HEUHZZLWK(QJOLVK subtitles,  will  be  shown  at  7  p.m.  in   Dana  Auditorium  on  College  Street.   ,WÂśV IUHH 6RPH RI WKH ÂżOPV LQ WKLV series   may   be   inappropriate   for   children.   Filmgoers   from   the   com-­ munity  are  invited  to  participate  in  a   discussion  after  the  screening. CARILLON  SERIES The   Middlebury   College   Summer   Carillon  Series  continues  its  28th  year   of  concerts  with  a  5  p.m.  performance   on  Friday  in  Mead  Chapel  by  Gordon   Slater,   Canadian   Dominion   caril-­ lonneur   emeritus.   Enjoy   the   sounds   of   the   carillon   bells   from   inside   the   chapel  or,  weather  permitting,  on  the   surrounding   lawns.   The   free   series   continues  every  Friday  through  Aug.   16  with  a  different  performer. Mead  Memorial  Chapel  is  located   on  the  college  campus  at  75  Hepburn   Road.   Free   parking   is   available   on   College   Street   and   on   Old   Chapel   Road. RUSSIAN  SCHOOL  CHOIR There  will  be  a  performance  by  the   Middlebury  College  School  of  Rus-­ sian   Choir   at   8   p.m.   on   Sunday   in   the   social   space   at   the   McCullough   Student  Center  on  Old  Chapel  Road.   Directed   by   Elena   Sadina   and   Ser-­ gei   Grachev,   the   School   of   Russian   Choir,   made   up   of   students,   will   sing,   dance,   play   folk   instruments   and   reenact   various   Russian   folk   rituals   during   this   exciting   perfor-­ mance.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   free,   and   the   public   is   welcome.

LEO:  JULY  23-­AUGUST  23  A  travel  opportunity   be  called  on  to  make  a  lot  of  decisions.  Take  advan-­ is  just  over  the  horizon,  so  have  your  bags  packed  and   tage  of  this  opportunity. ready  to  depart  at  a  momentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  notice.  You  can  certain-­ ARIES:  MARCH  21-­APRIL  20  Try  not  to  pick   ly  use  some  time  away. sides   when   asked   for   VIRGO:   AUGUST   your  opinion  on  a  dispute   24-­SEPTEMBER   22   between   close   friends.   MoorGardÂŽ Once   you   think   you   have   Giving  the  impression  of   HYHU\WKLQJ ÂżJXUHG RXW D picking  sides  may  strain   Choose an exterior paint few   variables   get   thrown   a  friendship. with superior adhesion, into   the   mix.   You   will   TAURUS:  APRIL   21-­ thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s mildew & fade resistant MAY   21   Many   positive   show  your  ability  to  solve   problems   if   you   can   han-­ things   are   on   the   hori-­ even in humid conditions. dle  the  task. zon.   You   just   have   to   LIBRA:   SEPTEMBER   get  through  a  few  rough   23-­OCTOBER   23   Some-­ spots   before   it   is   clearer   one   close   to   you   puts   sailing  this  week.  Pisces   their   faith   in   your   ability   is  a  pivotal  player. to  get  a  job  done.  Devote   GEMINI:   MAY   22-­ all   of   your   attention   to   &UHHN5G0LGGOHEXU\Â&#x2021;Â&#x2021;0)Â&#x2021;6DW JUNE   21   Challenge   FRXQWU\VLGHFDUSHWDQGSDLQWFRP completing   this   task,   and   yourself  this  week.  Now   it   will   only   enhance   your   is  a  great  time  to  take  on   resume. a  new  hobby  or  task  and   SCORPIO:   OCTOBER   test  your  mettle.  You  will   tÄ&#x2DC;PXFST 24-­NOVEMBER   22   Oth-­ be   glad   you   did   when   tQMBOUT ers   are   quick   to   look   to   you   accomplish   your   you   for   help   because   of   goals. tEFTJHOT your   work   ethic,   experi-­ CANCER:   JUNE   22-­ tHJÄ&#x2122;T ence   and   attention   to   de-­ JULY   22   Trust   those   tail.  Embrace  these  oppor-­ around   you   as   they   can   tunities   as   they   can   help   be   a   valuable   source   of   your  career.   support   and   encourage-­ SAGITTARIUS:   NO-­ ment.   Work   to   be   there   VEMBER   23-­DECEM-­ for   them   as   much   as   BER   21   It   could   be   in   they  have  been  there  for   your   best   interest   to   re-­ you. main   out   of   the   spotlight   1663 RT 7 South, Middlebury, VT at   the   next   social   gather-­ FAMOUS middleburyfloralandgifts.com ing.   You   might   have   a   BIRTHDAYS more   enjoyable   time   as   a   AUGUST  4 Ă&#x20AC;\RQWKHZDOO Billy  Bob  Thornton, CAPRICORN:   DE-­ Actor  (58) CEMBER   22-­JANUARY   AUGUST  5 20  Tight  deadlines  at  work   Lolo  Jones, will   have   the   pressure   on   Athlete  (31) you   and   your   cowork-­ AUGUST  6 ers.  But  stick  to  the  task  at   Soleil  Moon  Frye, hand,  and  you  will  reap  the   Actress  (37) rewards  in  the  near  future. AUGUST  7 AQUARIUS:   JANU-­ John  Glover, ARY   21-­FEBRUARY   18   Actor  (69) 383  Exchange  Street Hard   work   will   get   you   AUGUST  8 Â&#x2026;ÂĄÂ&#x153;Â&#x153;¤Â?Â&#x161;­ª¹Ă&#x2C6;388-­2221 ahead.   Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   shy   away   Scott  Stapp, from   an   opportunity   that   Singer  (40) comes  your  way,  even  if  it   www.cacklinhens.com AUGUST  9 seems  less  than  promising   0HODQLH*ULIÂżWK DWÂżUVWJODQFH Actress  (56) PISCES:  FEBRUARY  19-­MARCH  20  You  may   AUGUST  10 ÂżQG\RXUVHOILQDOHDGHUVKLSUROHWKLVZHHNDQGZLOO Suzanne  Collins,  Author  (51)

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PAGE  12  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

PUZZLES

Sponsored  by:

help keep the mind independent and active throughout life.

Very  Good By  Myles  Mellor  and  Sally  York

This  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  puzzle  is  rated Across

65.  Spot  check?

1.  Peewee

66.  Prepares  to  be  shot

5.  Frog  or  year  starter

67.  Like  a  bird?

Hard

1

1.  Skirt  style

16.  Assoc.  of  nations

2.  Busy

17.  Club  fees

3.  Extremely

53.  Shot  up

19.  ___  fraiche

4.  Condition  sometimes   treated  by  hypnosis

54.  Radio  host,  to  friends 55.  To  be,  in  old  Rome

32

20.  Does  a  mediocre  job

5.  Absorbed,  in  a  way

56.  )OLJKWOHVVĂ&#x20AC;RFN

38

23.  SS  ___  Fitzgerald

6.  Slowly  merged  (into)

57.  3UH¿[ZLWKVFRSHRUPHWHU

24.  Row  producer

7.  Mozartâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Madamina,â&#x20AC;?  e.g.

58.  All  alternative

35.  German   municipality

20

52.  Wavelike  design

21

9

26

34

27

35

12

13

28

29

30

31

36

39

41

8.  ___  du  jour

48

9.  Hairy-­chested

43 46

45

37 40

42 47

49

50

53

11.  Request

59

60

61

62

63

64

65

66

67

13.  Half  of  binary  code

38.  Worldâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  largest   ocean  predator

21.  Invitees

41.  Emeritus:  Abbr.

26.  Yellow  shade

42.  Capture

27.  ___  meridiem

43.  Approval

29.  Passable

44.  It  may  be  due

30.  Haughtiness

46.  Boiling  blood

31.  Ocean  menace

47.  Mont  Blanc,  e.g.

32.  Blackguard

48.  Attention

33.  Bailiwick

9

50.  Tooth  type

34.  Fixes

53.  Dramatic  downturn

35.  Engine  sound

59.  Actress  Renee

36.  Gauge

7 4

60.  Encounter

39.  Bizarre

61.  MÊlange

40.  Leave  it  alone!

62.  City  near  Dßsseldorf

45.  Movie  preview

63.  Constellation  animal

47.  Goddess  of   devotion

55

56

51

10.  Kamakawiwoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ole 12.  British  title

54

11

24 25

33

10

22

23

44

37.  Sedona  maker

64.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Charlotteâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Webâ&#x20AC;?   girl

8

19

15.  Ladyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  man

32.  English  rock  band

7

18

Down

28.  Farm  soil

6

17

50.  Extract 51.  Edmonton  skater

5

16

14.  Barge  ___

26.  ___  jacket

4

15

49.  Answer

25.  Fishing  aid

3

14

9.  Bungle

18.  Flu  source

2

52

57

58

22.  Excelled

8 1

1

9

3

6

3

5 8

8

3 9 3

6 8

5 4

7

7

5 4 6

1 2

1 5

1

2

This  weekâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  puzzle  solutions can  be  found  on  Page  31.

Sudoku

8

Each  Sudoku  puzzle  consists  of  a  9x9  grid  that  has  been   subdivided  into  nine  smaller  grids  of  3x3  squares.  To  solve   the  puzzle  each  row,  column  and  box  must  contain  each  of   the  numbers  1  to  9.  Puzzles  come  in  three  grades:  easy,   PHGLXPDQGGLI¿FXOW

9

Level:  Medium.    

4

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s time for our annual

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  13

ADDISON   COUNTY

Business News

EMILY  JACKE

STU  FRAM

Vermont  Community   Foundation  hires  two   for  2-­year  fellowships MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Vermont   Community   Foundation,   the   High   Meadows   Fund   and   Middlebury   College   announce   that   two   recent   Middlebury   College  graduates  have  been  hired   for  two-­year  fellowships  with  the   Vermont   Community   Foundation   and  the  High  Meadows  Fund.  The   fellowship   program   was   estab-­ lished   in   2007   with   the   support   of   Community   Foundation   fund-­ holders  Carl  and  Judy  Ferenbach.   For   the   current   fellowships,   the   J.   Warren   and   Lois   McClure   Foundation   is   also   providing   support. Community   Foundation   President   Stuart   Comstock-­Gay   says,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   hope   is   that   these   fellowships  will  instill  a  belief  in   the  value  of  philanthropy  to  build   community  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  a  belief  the  fellows   can  take  with  them  wherever  they   go  in  life.  Each  fellow  brings  their   own   interests,   skills,   and   fresh   perspective   to   the   role,   some-­ thing   that   has   proven   invaluable   over  the  past  six  years  in  helping   us   achieve   our   mission   of   build-­ ing   healthy   and   vital   Vermont   communities.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   are   delighted   that   the   Vermont   Community   Foundation   values   the   talents   and   commit-­ ment   of   our   graduates.   In   return,   our   alumni   have   a   wonderful   opportunity   to   learn   a   number   of   skills   and   bring   that   experi-­ ence   to   whatever   challenge   they   pursue   next,â&#x20AC;?   said   Tracy   Himmel   Isham,  assistant  director  of  career   services  at  Middlebury  College.   Emily   Jacke   (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;12.5)   is  

the   2013-­2015   Community   Philanthropy   Fellow   and   will   work   with   the   communications,   grant-­making   and   philanthropy   teams   to   build   the   public   profile   of   philanthropy   in   Vermont.   She   will   be   introduced   to   the   fields   of   community   development,   communications,   public   rela-­ tions,   community   research,   and   marketing. As  a  theater  major  with  a  passion   for   anthropology   and   environ-­ mental   studies,   Jacke   brings   to   her   new   role   a   background   in   storytelling   and   collaboration,   and  a  strong  belief  in  the  power  of   philanthropy  to  create  change  and   inspire  others. Stu   Fram   (â&#x20AC;&#x2122;13)   is   the   2013-­ 2015  Environmental  Philanthropy   Fellow  at  the  High  Meadows  Fund,   a   supporting   organization   of   the   Vermont   Community   Foundation.   This  fellowship  is  connected  to  the   Princeton-­based   High   Meadows   Fellowship  program,  and  Stu  will   work   with   the   staff   and   board   of   the  High  Meadows  Fund  on  grant-­ making,   convening,   research   and   engagement   in   support   of   the   fundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mission  to  promote  vibrant   communities   and   a   healthy   natu-­ ral   environment   while   encourag-­ ing  long-­term  economic  vitality  in   Vermont. As  a  human  ecology  major  with   a  particular  interest  in  community   food   systems,   Fram   has   a   lot   to   offer   and   a   lot   to   learn   from   the   fundâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   focus   on   sustainable   agri-­ culture,   the   working   landscape,   and   efficient   and   renewable   energy.

/HLFHVWHUMRLQVLQYDVLYHVSHFLHVÂżJKW LEICESTER   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   town   of   Leicester   has   been   awarded   a   $28,000   grant  from  the  Vermont  Department  of   Environmental  Conservation  (DEC)  to   help   control   invasive   species   on   Lake   Dunmore   and   Fern   Lake,   located   in   the   towns   of   Leicester   and   Salisbury.   The  control  program  is  coordinated  and   operated   by   the   Lake   Dunmore/Fern   Lake  Association. The   award   from   DECâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Watershed   Management   Division   will   help   the   association   fund   Eurasian   milfoil   control  in  both  lakes  during  the  spring,   summer   and   fall   of   2013.   The   asso-­ FLDWLRQD F QRQSURÂżWFRUSRUDWLRQ has  a  total  annual  budget  of  $140,000,   funded  by  the  Vermont  Department  of   Environmental   Conservation   grant-­ in-­aid,   the   Lake   Champlain   Basin  

Program,   lake   residents,   friends   of   the   lakes   and   the   towns   of   Leicester   and   Salisbury. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our  lakes  are  tremendous  economic   resources  for  the  region  and  the  gener-­ ous  grant  from  the  Agency  of  Natural   Resources  means  we  will  be  able  to  be   even  more  aggressive  in  our  efforts  to   ÂżJKWQRQQDWLYHVSHFLHVWKDWHDFK\HDU threaten  our  lakes,â&#x20AC;?  said  Allen  Wilson,   volunteer   coordinator   for   the   associa-­ tion.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   funds,   in   conjunction   with   our   incredible   volunteer   resources,   means   we   can   enhance   our   efforts   to   control   the   spread   of   Eurasian   water   milfoil.   To   date   EWM   is   the   only   invasive  species  known  to  exist  in  our   lakes.â&#x20AC;? The   grant   supports   a   control   proj-­ ect   that   incorporates   volunteer   lake  

monitoring,   the   use   of   diver-­operated   suction   harvesting,   the   hand   pulling   of   milfoil   and   a   public   boat   access   greeter   program.  A   volunteer   program   was   established   in   1994   hand   pull-­ ing  Eurasian  water  milfoil  in  an  effort   to   control   the   spread   of   the   inva-­ sive   species.   Currently   the   program   employs  a  staff  of  10  who,  with  the  help   of  volunteers,  harvested  approximately   5,000   bushels   of   EWM   and   inspected   in  excess  of  780  boats  prior  to  entering   our  lakes  for  invasive  species For  more  information  about  the  DEC   grant,   contact   Julie   Delphia,   Leicester   town  clerk,  at  (802)  247-­5961,  ext.  3. For  more  information  about  LDFLA   and   the   invasive   species   control   program,  contact  Allen  Wilson  at  (802)   483-­2269  or  awilsonski@yahoo.com.


PAGE  14  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

7KHÂżHOGVRI:KLWLQJZKHUHWKHEXIIDORURDP :RRGIDPLO\VHHVIXQDQGSURÂżWSRWHQWLDOLQUDLVLQJZRRO\EHKHPRWKV By  LEE  J.  KAHRS Brandon  Reporter WHITING  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  good  boy,  but  of  course,  heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  kill  you.â&#x20AC;? On   a   beautiful  Vermont   summer   day,   Jeanne   Lamoureaux  Wood   ZDV VWDQGLQJ RXWVLGH WKH HLJKWIRRWKLJK HOHFWULÂżHG fence  with  her  husband,  Bob,  on  their  Whiting  farm  ad-­ miring  their  bull  buffalo,  Sparky. Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   nothing   like   standing   next   to   a   buffalo   to   make  you  feel  American.  And  very  small.  Having  a  buf-­ falo  on  your  farm  is  like  keeping  a  bald  eagle.  They  are,   by  their  nature,  symbolic  of  America.  They  are  majestic,   stoic  and  quixotic,  and  they  harken  back  the  Old  West,  Na-­ tive  Americans,  sandstone,  cowboys  and  wagon  trains.  They   elicit  patriotism.  They  are  American. And   like   so   many   things  American,   buffalo,   or   bison   as   they   are   more   properly   known,   are   valuable   commodities.   The  Native  Americans  used  every  bit  of  the  buffalo,  from  eat-­ ing  the  meat  and  organs  to  using  the  hides  for  blankets  and   clothing,   the   bones   for   weapons,   the   horns   for   medication,   and   the   manure   for   fuel.   If   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   willing   to   take   on   the   re-­ sponsibility  and  the  risk  involved  with  raising  buffalo,  there  is   DPDUNHWIRUWKHPHDWDQGWKHÂżEHUIURPWKHLUWKLFNFRDWV$QG it  makes  sense  that,  much  like  the  Native  Americans,  pragmatic   Vermonters  see  the  value  and  multiple  uses  for  buffalo,  which   may  be  a  burgeoning  market  on  a  smaller  scale,  right  here  in  the   Green  Mountain  State. Sparky  does  attract  attention,  and  the  three  female  buffalo  on   the  farm  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Freona,  Veona  and  Lucky  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  do  as  well.  Their  pas-­ ture  at  Wood  Roan  Ranch  sits  along  Route  30  adjacent  to  Bob   and  Jeanneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  farmhouse  and  barnyard.  Across  the  road  is  a  mil-­ lion  dollar  view  of  the  Green  Mountains  and  Brandon  Gap.   And   you   just   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   expect   to   see   buffalo   driving   through  Ver-­ mont. â&#x20AC;&#x153;People  stop  all  the  time,â&#x20AC;?  Jeanne  said. People   from   New   Jersey   to   Iowa,   and   California   to   Switzerland   pull  over  to  get  a  closer  look. Bob   and   Jeanne   live   on   the   farm   with   their   son,   Shane,   14.  The   farmhouse,  barnyard  and  pasture  sit  on  nine  acres  on  the  east  side  of   Route  30,  with  another  25  acres  across  the  road. In  addition  to  the  buffalo,  Bob  and  Jeanne  keep  two  Jersey  cows   DQG D FDOI HLJKWKRUVHV D Ă&#x20AC;RFN RI OD\LQJ KHQV WZR UHG$XVWUDOLDQ

%2%$1'-($11(:RRGFDQSHWDQGKDQGIHHGWKHLUEXOOEXI IDOR 6SDUN\ EXW WKH\ NHHS LW EHKLQG DQ HLJKWIRRWKLJK HOHFWULF IHQFHEHFDXVHEXIIDORFDQEHYRODWLOHDQGXQSUHGLFWDEOH 3KRWRE\/HH-.DKUV

cattle  dogs,  and  a  gray  pot-­bellied  pig  named  Daisy  May. They   also   maintain   a   sugarbush   and   produce   about   45   gallons   of   ZRRGÂżUHGPDSOHV\UXSIRUVDOHHDFKVHDVRQ 6SDUN\LVWZR\HDUVROGDQGDERXWWRHPEDUNXSRQKLVÂżUVWEUHHG-­ ing  season.  If  he  mates  successfully,  Bob  and  Jeanne  will  add  a  few   buffalo   calves  to   their  farm  anytime  between  April   and   July   after  a   nine-­month  gestation  period. RISK/BENEFIT Bob  and  Jeanne  estimate  that  Sparky  weighs  about  1,500  pounds,   but  he  will  continue  to  grow,  topping  out  around  2,800  pounds.  Buf-­ falo  are  forever  wild  animals,  Jeanne  said,  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  important  to  keep   them  contained.  At  a  full  run,  they  can  reach  30-­40  miles  per  hour.   One  off  day,  and  a  bull  buffalo  can  seriously  hurt  or  kill  a  human  being   in  a  matter  of  seconds.  To  that  end,  Bob  created  a  pasture  area  by  sink-­ LQJIRRW[LQFKSUHVVXUHWUHDWHGSRVWVÂżYHIHHWLQWRWKHJURXQG DQGVWULQJLQJHLJKWVWUDQGVRIHOHFWULFIHQFLQJFUHDWLQJDQHOHFWULÂżHG (See  Buffalo,  Page  15)

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  15

Buffalo butchered. (Continued  from  Page  14) â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  two  bulls,â&#x20AC;?  Jeanne   eight-­foot  high  fence.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  they  can  get  their  head  through   said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d  try  to  kill  each  other.â&#x20AC;? Now   Sparky   has   his   harem   of   something,   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   go   through   it,â&#x20AC;?   Jeanne  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;If  they  got  out,  I  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   cows   and   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   a   matter   of   wait-­ think   we   could   get   them   back   in.   ing   to   see   if   any   or   all   of   them   get   7KH\ÂśOOUXQ:HKDYHWKHULĂ&#x20AC;HVUHDG\ pregnant.   It   may   not   be   evident   for   I  think  thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  what  it  would  come  to,   some   time.   Turns   out,   buffalo   like   their  privacy. unfortunately.â&#x20AC;? â&#x20AC;&#x153;Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   actually   quite   modest,â&#x20AC;?   Standing  next  to  the  fence,  which   has   been   temporarily   turned   off,   Jeanne   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   might   do   it   at   with   Bob   scratching   Sparkyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   thick   night  when  no  oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  looking. They   are   also   very   close   knit   in   head  of  hair  and  feeding  him  sweet   the   herds,   even   after   the   cracked   oats,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   easy   to   calves  are  born. forget   for   a   moment   that   â&#x20AC;&#x153;If they â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   all   stay   togeth-­ the   bull   is   a   1,500-­pound   er,   24/7,â&#x20AC;?   Jeanne   said.   weapon.   Jeanne   and   Bob   can get â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   are   very   social.   try  to  keep  that  fact  in  the   their head When  a  calf  is  born,  the   forefront  of  their  minds  at   through whole  herd  comes  to  see   all  times. something, it.  The  bulls  will  not  hurt   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   tame   them,   the  calves.â&#x20AC;? and  you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  trust  them,â&#x20AC;?   theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll go Another   little   known   Jeanne  said. through it.â&#x20AC;? fact:   Buffalo   are   very   THE  RULES â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeanne Wood susceptible  to  sheep  dis-­ Sparky   came   from   a   eases. ranch   in   Freona,   Texas,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   mix   with   sheep,   and   and   was   thusly   named   when   his   mother  was  killed  by  a  bolt  of  light-­ you  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  pasture  them  too  close  to  a   ning.  He  was  three  months  old  at  the   sheep  farm,â&#x20AC;?  Jeanne  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;You  want   time.   Last  August,   Bob   and   Jeanne   to  be  far  away  from  sheep.â&#x20AC;? But  ironically,  when  a  buffalo  calf   hooked   a   trailer   to   their   pick-­up   truck   and   drove   2,000   miles   to   a   needs   to   be   nursed   away   from   its   Texas  ranch  owned  by  Bill  Bollinger   mother,  it  canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  cowâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  milk. â&#x20AC;&#x153;You   have   to   give   them   lambâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   to   pick   up   Sparky,   another   yearling   bull  calf,  a  female  yearling  calf,  and   milk  replacement,â&#x20AC;?  Jeanne  said. Buffalo   also   do   not   require   any   a   horse.  At   the   time,   Bollinger   had   hoof   maintenance,   which   is   fortu-­ about  100  head  of  buffalo. They   made   the   long,   memorable   nate   because   they   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be   handled   journey   home   to   Vermont.   Buffalo   that  way. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   excess   hoof   just   falls   off,â&#x20AC;?   always   have   to   be   in   a   controlled   environment,  be  it  a  fenced  pasture,   Jeanne  said. a  chute  or  a  trailer.  They  arenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  ani-­ FABULOUS  FIBER, mals  you  can  take  out  on  a  lead  for  a   SWEET  MEAT 7KHUH LV DQRWKHU EHQHÂżW WR EXIID-­ stretch  of  the  legs,  which  made  for  a   ORKLJKO\SUL]HGÂżEHUIURPWKHQHFN long  trip  home  with  no  sightseeing. â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  an  adventure  and  itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  still   ruff  they  shed  each  spring. -HDQQHFROOHFWHGEDJVRIWKHÂżEHU an  adventure,â&#x20AC;?  Jeanne  said. When   they   got   back   to   Whiting,   in   the   spring   just   by   scratching   the   Sparky  lived  and  the  other  bull  was   necks  of  Sparky  and  Lucky.  Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  very  

TWO-­YEAR-­OLD  SPARKY,  shown  in  his  Whiting  pasture,  weighs  1,500  pounds  now,  and  is  expected  to  top   out  at  the  2,500-­pound  mark. Photo  by  Lee  J.  Kahrs

soft,  and  very  durable. much  fat  as  cattle.   And  hereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  a  shout  out  to  all  you   A   three-­ounce   serving   of   buffalo   ÂżEHUDUWLVWVZHDYHUVDQGNQLWWHUVRXW meat  has  93  calories  and  1.8  grams   there. of   fat   compared   to   183   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m   looking   for   buy-­ calories  and  8.7  grams  of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;You canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t ers,â&#x20AC;?  Jeanne  said. fat  in  the  same  serving  as   Bison   meat   is   consid-­ tame them, beef. ered   â&#x20AC;&#x153;exoticâ&#x20AC;?   according   and you The   Woods   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   sell   to   the   USDA.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   also   canâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t trust their   buffalo   meat   un-­ gaining   in   popularity   in   less   they   pay   to   have   it   restaurants   around   the   them.â&#x20AC;? butchered  at  a  USDA-­ap-­ country.  It  is  a  sweet  and   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Jeanne Wood proved   slaughterhouse.   tender  meat  with  a  unique   But   right   now,   Jeanne   taste   and   fetches   up   to   $8   a   pound.   said  they  are  concentrating  on  breed-­ Bison   is   very   lean,   low   in   choles-­ ing  and  selling  calves. terol   and   high   in   protein.   In   1997,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   plan   to   get   anymore   the  American  Heart  Association  rec-­ buffalo,â&#x20AC;?   Jeanne   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Having   just   ommended  buffalo  or  bison  as  more   the  four  is  plenty.â&#x20AC;? heart-­healthy   than   chicken   or   beef.   NOT  FOR  EVERYONE The  meat  is  high  in  nutrients  such  as   Having   buffalo   on   her   farm   is   a   protein,  zinc  and  vitamin  B12,  and  is   considered  a  healthier  alternative  to   beef  because  buffalo  do  not  store  as  

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dream   come   true   for   Jeanne   Wood.   On   the   one   hand,   getting   started   was  as  easy  as  typing  in  â&#x20AC;&#x153;bisonâ&#x20AC;?  in   a   computer   search.   But   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   a   learning   experience   for   Jeanne   and   Bob,  and  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  still  learning. As   the   summer   sun   shone   down   and  a  cool  breeze  blew  through  the   farm,  visiting  time  was  over.  Sparky   left   the   fence   line   and   headed   out   into   his   pasture.   The   electric   fence   was  turned  back  on  as  the  bull  qui-­ etly  grazed  with  his  cows. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;d   wanted   to   do   buffalo   for   30   years,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   guess   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   the   beauty  of  them.  Watch  out  what  you   wish   for.   Thereâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   just   something   PDJQLÂżFHQWDERXWWKHPEXW,NQRZ in  my  heart  and  my  head  that  theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   kill  you.â&#x20AC;?


PAGE  16  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

SPORTS MONDAY

Street  style MIDDLEBURY  UNION  HIGH  School  boys’  hockey  coach  Derek  Bartlett  led  his  third  annual  Middlebury   Recreation  Department  street  hockey  camp  last  week  at  the  Memorial  Sports  Center.  Pictured  from  a   game  played  last  Thursday  morning  are,  clockwise  from  above,  Nicholas  Carrara  between  the  pipes;;   Alexis   Bartlett   and   Lucas   Nelson   battling   for   the   ball;;   Kolby   Farnsworth   trying   to   score   past   Carson   %DUQHVDQG%RGH5XEULJKWVHQGLQJDSDVVDFURVVWKHVSRUWFHQWHU¶VFRQFUHWHÀRRU Independent  photos/Trent  Campbell

State  asks  for  assistance  in  counting  young  turkeys VERMONT   —   How   many   broods   of  wild  turkeys  are  you  seeing  in  Ver-­ mont,   and   how   many   young   turkeys,   or   poults,   are   roaming   with   their   mothers? The  Vermont  Fish  &  Wildlife  De-­ partment   is   asking   people   who   see   turkeys   during  August   to   report   their   sightings  in  the  state’s  seventh  annual  on-­ line  turkey  brood  survey. The   turkey   brood   survey   can   be   found   on  

WKH GHSDUWPHQW¶V ZHEVLWH ZZZYW¿V-­ handwildlife.com).  The  survey  allows   entry   of   the   numbers   of   adult   males,   adult  females  and  poults  as  well  as  the   date,   time   and   location   of   the   obser-­ vations. The  data  you  report  will  help  estab-­ lish   long-­term   trends   in   turkey   repro-­ duction  and  recruitment.  This  information   will  be  extremely  useful  in  the  management  of   the  wild  turkey  population.  It  will  help  answer  

questions   concerning   the   impacts   of   spring   and   winter   weather   on   the   survival   of   poults   and   adult   turkeys.   It   will   help   with   the   set-­ ting  of  turkey  seasons  and  harvest  limits  that   are  designed  to  manage  the  Vermont’s  turkey   population. Vermont  has  excellent  turkey  hunting  across   PRVW RI WKH VWDWH WKDW EHQH¿WV WKH SHRSOH RI Vermont   by   providing   hunting   opportunity,   economic  activity  and  carefully  regulated  con-­ trol   of   turkey   numbers.   Overabundant   turkey  

populations   can   result   in   nuisance   situations   when  crops  or  properties  are  damaged  by  tur-­ keys. Management  of  wild  turkeys  seeks  to  maxi-­ PL]HWKHEHQH¿WVRIKDYLQJWXUNH\VZKLOHPLQ-­ imizing   the   liabilities.   More   than   6,200   wild   turkeys   were   harvested   in   Vermont   this   past   spring   —   the   highest   harvest   to   date   by  Ver-­ mont   hunters   in   both   the   May   spring   season   and  the  youth  turkey  hunting  weekend  during   (See  Turkey,  Page  17)


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  17

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Bristol-­area softball team impresses BRISTOL,   Conn.   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Mount   Abraham   11-­and-­12-­year-­old   Little   League   softball   all-­star   team   that   won  the  Vermont  champions  in  early   July  posted  a  1-­3  record  at  the  East-­ ern   Regional   Tournament,   which   was   played   in   Bristol,   July   20-­24.   ,WZDVWKHÂżUVWWLPHLQPHPRU\WKDW a   Vermont   Little   League   team   had   scored  a  victory  in  a  regional  tourna-­ ment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  girls  had  an  experience  of  a   lifetime,â&#x20AC;?  said  Lisa  Hoff,  mother  of   a  team  member.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  was  amazing  to   be  one  of  11  teams  representing  over   600  Little  Leagues  in  11  states  in  the   Eastern  Region.â&#x20AC;? Hoff  said  the  competition  was  stiff   but  the  girls  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  from  Bristol,  Vt.,  and   surrounding  towns  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  hung  in  there   and  played  with  heart.   Offense   dominated   in   Mount   $EHÂśVÂżUVWJDPHRQ-XO\YVWKH team  from  Scarborough,  Maine.  The   Mainers   won,   10-­8.   The   next   day,   the  Cumberland  (R.I.)  National  team   dominated,  scoring  a  10-­1  victory. After  a  rest  day,  Mount  Abe  came   back  strong  and  fought  a  back-­and-­ forth   battle   with   Charlton   (Mass.).   The  Massachusetts  club  claimed  the   victory,  5-­2. ,QWKHÂżQDOJDPHRQ-XO\WKH Mount   Abe   offense   was   too   much   for  the  Derry  (N.H.)  American  Little   League.   The   mercy   rule   was   insti-­

The  Middlebury  Parks  and  Rec-­ Smith  and  Zachary  Stagg,  and   reation  Departmentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Middlebury   a  few  other  players  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Mitchell   Mayhem  Basketball  camp  was  a   Clarke  and  Bobby  Ritter  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  also   huge  success.  We  had  38   stopped  by. kids,  13  in  the  younger   The  kids  learned  funda-­ group  and  25  older  kids.  I   mentals  in  dribbling,  pass-­ wanted  to  thank  everyone   ing  and  shooting,  and  they   who  helped  out. of appreciation scrimmaged.  The  last  day   Coach  Matt  Fave,  as-­ the  kids  played  three-­on-­ sistant  coach  from  Castle-­ three,  and  had  slam-­dunk,   ton  State  College;Íž  Martin  Beatty,   foul  shooting,  and  three-­point   Middlebury  college  track  coach;Íž   shooting  contests.  I  would  also  like   Gene  Delorenzo;Íž  and  Middlebury   to  thank  Terry  Arnold  and  Dustin   College  basketball  coach  Jeff   Hunt  of  the  Rec  Department.  A   Brown  were  are  special  guest   special  thank  you  to  Val  Costello   speakers.  We  had  help  from  high   IRUPDNLQJWKHFHUWLÂżFDWHV school  basketball  players  and   Randy  Stockwell former  players,  including  Tyler   Middlebury  Mayhem  Basket-­ Provencher,  Oakely  Gordon,  Aaron   ball  camp  coach

Notes

Turkeys

HEAD  COACH  JEFF  Muratorri  and  the  rest  of  his  coaching  staff  share   KLJK¿YHVZLWKWKH0RXQW$EUDKDP/LWWOH/HDJXHVRIWEDOOWHDPEHIRUH D JDPH D WKH (DVWHUQ 5HJLRQDO 7RXUQDPHQW LQ &RQQHFWLFXW ODWH ODVW PRQWK

tuted   in   the   fourth   inning,   at   which   themselves  and  will  look  back  on  the   point  Mount  Abe  led,  10-­0. week   as   something   very   special,â&#x20AC;?   â&#x20AC;&#x153;They   should   be   so   proud   of   Hoff  said.

MCTV  SCHEDULE  Channels  15  &  16 MCTV  Channel  15 Tuesday, Aug. 6   5:30  a.m.   Public  Affairs   7:30  a.m.   Home  Energy  Challenge   8  a.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard   Noon   Home  Energy  Challenge/Public  Affairs   3  p.m.   Mid  East  Digest   4  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   4:30  p.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  Service   6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   7  p.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs Wednesday, Aug. 7   6:30  a.m.   Mid  East  Digest   7:30  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   1:30  p.m.   Home  Energy  Challenge   2  p.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  Service   3:30  p.m.   Words  of  Peace   4  p.m.   Salaam  Shalom   5  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   6  p.m.   Chronique  Francophone   6:30  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   7  p.m.   Selectboard/Home  Energy  Challenge   8:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs   11  p.m.   Lifelines Thursday, Aug. 8   4:30  a.m.   Public  Affairs   6:30  a.m.   Salaam  Shalom   7:30  a.m.   End  of  Life  Series   10  a.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  Service  11:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   Noon   Selectboard/Home  Energy  Challenge   3  p.m.   Vermont  Today   8:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9  p.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo  Friday, Aug. 9   4  a.m.   Public  Affairs   8:15  a.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios

  10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   3:30  p.m.   Lifelines   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   8:30  p.m.   Vermont  Today   10  p.m.   Mid  East  Digest   11  p.m.   Public  Affairs Saturday, Aug. 10   6:30  a.m.   Vermont  Today   8  a.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   9:30  a.m.   Rep.  Betty  Nuovo   10  a.m.   Selectboard/Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   5:45  p.m.   Home  Energy  Challenge/Public  Affairs  10:30  p.m.   Salaam  Shalom  11:30  p.m.   Public  Meeting/Public  Affairs Sunday, Aug. 11   7  a.m.   Words  of  Peace   7:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   8  a.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   8:30  a.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   9  a.m.   Catholic  Mass   11  a.m.   Memorial  Baptist  Church  Service   1  p.m.   Vershire  Bible  Church  Service   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   5:45  p.m.   Public  Affairs   6:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios   7  p.m.   Catholic  Mass   7:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs   10  p.m.   Words  of  Peace Monday, Aug. 12   5  a.m.   Green  Mountain  Veterans  for  Peace   6  a.m.   Public  Affairs   8:30  a.m.   Chronique  Francophone   9  a.m.   Lifelines   10  a.m.   Selectboard   11  a.m.   Public  Affairs   4  p.m.   Congregational  Church  Service   5:30  p.m.   Las  Promesas  de  Dios

(Continued  from  Page  16) the  last  weekend  in  April. Despite  the  high  harvest  numbers,   the   Fish   &   Wildlife   Department   is   concerned   with   turkey   nesting   suc-­ cess  this  year  due  to  record  amounts   of  precipitation.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Turkey   poults   are   very   suscep-­ WLEOH WR PRUWDOLW\ GXULQJ WKHLU ÂżUVW two   weeks   of   life   from   extended   periods  of  rain,â&#x20AC;?  says  turkey  biolo-­ gist   Forrest   Hammond.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Although   hen   turkeys   will   often   re-­nest   if   WKH\ ORVH WKHLU ÂżUVW FOXWFK RI HJJV nest  success  is  usually  lower  for  the   second   attempt,   especially   if   wet   conditions   persist   as   they   did   this   year.â&#x20AC;?

Hammond   reports   that   nesting   conditions   were   good   the   last   two   years,   which   helped   boost   overall   turkey  numbers  but  he  says  that  he   wouldnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  be  surprised  if  numbers  are   lower  in  2014.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Results   of   the   August   online   turkey   brood   survey   helps   track   WKH SRSXODWLRQ Ă&#x20AC;XFWXDWLRQV´ DGGHG +DPPRQGÂł3OHDVHKHOSXVVFLHQWLÂż-­ cally  manage  the  turkey  population   by   reporting   your   turkey   sightings   during   the   month   of   August.   Your   help  is  appreciated.â&#x20AC;? Results  of  past  citizen  reports  on   turkey  broods  can  be  seen  by  going   WR ZZZYWÂżVKDQGZLOGOLIHFRPWXU-­ key_survey.cfm.

MIDDLEBURY COMMUNITY TELEVISION: P.O. Box 785, Middlebury, Vt. 05753

Please  see  the  MCTV  website,  www.middleburycommunitytv.org,  for  changes  in  the  schedule;  MCTV  events,   classes  and  news;  and  to  view  many  programs  online.  Submit  listings  to  the  above  address,  or  call  388-­3062.

  6  p.m.   Community  Bulletin  Board   6:30  p.m.   Public  Affairs METV Channel 16 Tuesday, Aug. 6   5  a.m.   Authors  at  the  Aldrich   6  a.m.   The  Forgotten  Ferries  of  Lake  Champlain   7:15  a.m.   Otter  Creek:  Archaeology   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education    11:30  a.m.   Festival  on-­the-­Green  2013:     Bob  Amos  and  Catamount  Crossing  12:40  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Vignola  &  Raniolo   2  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Ellis   3:15  p.m.   Otter  Creek:  Archaeology   4  p.m.   Green  Mountain  Club:     Through  Hiker  Panel   5:58  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   7:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   8:15  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Clayfoot  Strutters  10:30  p.m.   State  Board  of  Education Wednesday, Aug. 7   5:29  a.m.   Festival  2013:  The  Holmes  Brothers   7  a.m.   Festival  2013:  Vignola  and  Raniolo   8:30  a.m.   Festival  2013:  Ellis   10  a.m.   UD-­3  Board   Noon   State  Board  of  Education  (June  25)   3:21  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Lake  Street  Dive   5  p.m.   The  Forgotten  Ferries  of  Lake  Champlain   7  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   7:15  p.m.   Otter  Creek:  Archaeology  SP +RZDUG&RI¿Q9HUPRQWDW*HWW\VEXUJ   9  p.m.   A  Tribute  to  Pina  Bausch   10  p.m.   Middlebury  College  Solar  Decathlon Thursday, Aug. 8   6  a.m.   Middlebury  Five-­0   7  a.m.   Authors  at  the  Aldrich   8  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education    11:30  a.m.   A  Tribute  to  George  Stoney   2  p.m.   Authors  at  the  Aldrich   4  p.m.   At  the  Ilsley   5:30  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6  p.m.   Middlebury  College  Environmental     Colloquium  (MCEC)

  7  p.m.   Festival  2013:  After  the  Rodeo   8  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Lake  Street  Dive   10  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Ellis  11:10  p.m.   Otter  Creek:  Archaeology Friday/Saturday, Aug. 9/10   4:15  a.m.   CRV:  The  Future  of  Education   6  a.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6:35  a.m.   Festival  2013:  Kobo  Town   8  a.m.   Otter  Creek:  Archaeology   8:45  a.m.   Otter  Creek  Audubon  Society   10  a.m.   UD-­3  Board   Noon   Festival  2013:  Kobo  Town   1:30  p.m.   Festival  2013   4  p.m.   Green  Mountain  Club:     Through  Hiker  Panel   6  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6:30  p.m.   Local  Performance Sunday, Aug. 11   7  a.m.   Green  Mountain  Club:     Through  Hiker  Panel   9  a.m.   Festival  2013:  Raz-­de-­MarÊe   Noon   Otter  Creek:  Archaeology   1  p.m.   A  Tribute  to  George  Stoney   3:30  p.m.   Festival  2013:  After  the  Rodeo   4:30  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Kobo  Town   6  p.m.   Lights,  Camera,  Action   6:30  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Brooks  Williams   9  p.m.   Green  Mountain  Club:     Through  Hiker  Panel   11  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Lake  Street  Dive  Monday, Aug. 12   6:30  a.m.   Festival  2013   9:30  a.m.   State  Board  of  Education   1  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Bob  Amos     and  Catamount  Crossing   2:15  p.m.   Festival  2013:  Raz-­de-­MarÊe   3:30  p.m.   The  Forgotten  Ferries  of  Lake  Champlain   5  p.m.   Green  Mountain  Club:     Through  Hiker  Panel   8:30  p.m.   UD-­3  Board   9  p.m.   Local  Performance


PAGE  18  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

0LGGOHEXU\KLUHVQHZSROLFHRIÂżFHUVFKLHIWDNHVOHDYH By  JOHN  FLOWERS MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Middlebury   Police   Department   in   the   coming   months   will   phase   in   two   newly   hired   police   offi-­ cers  to  replace  two  members  who   have   left   the   force.   It   is   a   transi-­ tion   that   will,   in   the   meantime,   require   some   creative   scheduling   to   ensure   shift   coverage   during   the  coming  months  while  the  new   recruits  are  in  training. Meanwhile,   longtime   Middlebury   police   Chief   Tom   Hanley  on  July  31  began  what  he   suspected  would  be  an  eight-­week   medical   sabbatical   to   undergo   a   heart   bypass   procedure.   Veteran   Sgt.   Michael   Christopher   will   direct   the   department   during   the  

chiefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  absence. basis.   Mogerly   had   previously   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  be  rough  for  the  next  five   worked   for   the   Vergennes   force   months,  but  weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll  get  through  it,â&#x20AC;?   before   joining   the   Middlebury   Hanley  said. PD   full-­time   around   a   year   ago,   The   depart-­ according   to   mentâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   two   police   Hanley. officer   vacancies   M i d d l e b u r y   surfaced   this   past   police   posted   the   April.   Officer   vacancies   on   its   Michelle   Magee   website.   More   announced   she   than   20   people   was   leaving   the   applied. force   after   more   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  had  a  really   than   four   years   in   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Middlebury police strong   applicant   order  to  return  to  a   Hanley   &KLHI7RP+DQOH\ pool,â&#x20AC;?   job   in   the   health-­ said,   a   pleasant   care   field.   And   departure   from   Officer   Neil   Mogerly   followed   what   he   noted   had   been   a   dearth   suit,  in  order  to  join  the  Vergennes   in   applicants   for   other   vacancies   Police   Department   on   a   full-­time   that  had  popped  up  during  the  past  

â&#x20AC;&#x153;Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll be rough for the next Ă&#x20AC;YHPRQWKV but weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll get through it.â&#x20AC;?

five  years. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Suddenly,   this   past   winter,   we   started  seeing  this  boom  in  people   wanting   to   become   police   offi-­ cers,â&#x20AC;?   he   added.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   quality   of   applicants   are   folks   who   are   able   to   get   through   all   the   screenings.   Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  encouraging.â&#x20AC;? Two   names   floated   to   the   top   of   the   applicant   pool:   Bruce   Meacham,   a   former   Middlebury   Water   Department   worker,   and   Connor   Sousa   of   Rutland.   Both   will   be   attending   Vermont   Police   Academy   training   during   the   coming   months   to   become   fully   certified   and   road-­ready   by   the   end   of   this   year   or   early   2014,   according   to   Hanley.   The   depart-­ ment  will  make  sure  first-­response  

patrol   shifts   are   filled   by   using   part-­time  officers  and  redeploying   personnel   from   other   functions.   For   example,   School   Resource   Officer   Chris   Mason   has   been   rotated   into   patrol   duties   since   school  is  not  in  session  right  now. Hanley  said  the  department  has   also   been   recruiting   some   part-­ time   officers   and   dispatchers   to   fill  current  vacancies. When   fully   staffed,   the   Middlebury   Police   Department   consists   of   14   uniformed   person-­ nel  and  four  part-­time  officers. Hanley   plans   to   begin   working   from   home   a   few   weeks   after   his   medical  procedure. Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

Sgt.  Poynter  returns  to   Addison  Co.  Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Dept. MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Sheriff   Don   Keeler   has   announced   the   return   of   Paul   H.   Poynter   to   the   Addison   County  Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Department  after  an   18  year  absence. Poynter   began   his   law   enforce-­ ment   career   at   the   Addison   County   Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Department   in   1988.   Deciding  that  he  wished  to  pursue  a   full-­time  career  in  law  enforcement,   he   attended   and   graduated   from   the   Vermont  Police  Academy  in  1995. Poynter   has   experience   working   for  Vergennes,  Bristol  and  Shelburne   police   departments,   and   the   U.S.   Marshal   Service.   Most   recently   he   worked   for   the   Lexington,   S.C.,   Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Department,   where   he   VHUYHG IRU WKH SDVW ÂżYH \HDUV DV D Road   Patrol   Shift   Supervisor   of   six   WRRIÂżFHUVDWDQ\RQHWLPH â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   welcome   Paul   back   to   the   Addison   County   Sheriffâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Department   where   he   will   assume   the  duties  of  patrol  supervisor  hold-­ ing  the  rank  of  sergeant,â&#x20AC;?  Keeler  said.

SGT.  PAUL  POYNTER

Bristol Electronics 453-­2500

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  19

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presents:

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³:HœUH HODWHG´ VKH VDLG DGGLQJ VKH KRSHV 5LWFKLH LV SURVHFXWHG WR WKHIXOOH[WHQWRIWKHODZ³7KLVKDV EHHQDYHU\ORQJWLPHWKDWRXUFRP-­ PXQLW\ KDV EHHQ WHUURUL]HG E\ WKLV SHUVRQ´ Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.

2013 Garden Game

7KH*DUGHQ*DPHLVĂ&#x20AC;QDOO\WDNLQJRII Chris Gariepy is a new player to our garden game! She brought in a big summer squash from her garden in Whiting. We were very impressed since our squash at home is still very, very small. This summer squash was 17â&#x20AC;? long by 14.5â&#x20AC;? around! She says â&#x20AC;&#x153;This is for you, Sid!â&#x20AC;?

Gary Miller has been a regular winner in our garden game for the longest string bean. This year he had special help from some little garden gnomes named Bridget and Charlotte Graham, Autumn and Maggie Miller and Daisy Madden. They must have had the magic touch because this bean is a whopping 31 inches long!

Beeman  Academy  alumni   celebrated  with  reunions Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  note:  This  piece  was  sub-­ mitted  by  Bev  Landon. 1(:+$9(1²%HHPDQ$FDG-­ HP\ DOXPQL DQG IULHQGV FHOHEUDWHG WKHLU DQQXDO PHHWLQJ -XO\  DW WKH 9):RQ([FKDQJH6WUHHWLQ0LGGOH-­ EXU\ 7KLV DQQXDO HYHQW KDV FRQWLQXHG IRURYHU\HDUVQRZZLWKFODVVHV YDU\LQJ LQ VL]H IURP WKUHH WR  SOXV0HPEHUVRIWKHDQG FODVVHV DWWHQGHG FHOHEUDWLQJ WKHLU WKDQGWKUHXQLRQVUHVSHFWLYHO\ +RQRUHGDWWKLVPHHWLQJZDV&XO-­ OHQ %XOODUG IRU KLV PDQ\ \HDUV RI VHUYLFHWRWKHWRZQRI6KHOEXUQHDV

POLICE  ARE  DISPLAYING  thousands  of  items,  found  at  the  Raymond   Ritchie   residence,   that   they   suspected   were   stolen   during   a   spree   of   home  break-­ins  this  year.

CATEGORIES Â&#x2021;%HHWV (circumference) Â&#x2021;%URFFROL(diameter) Â&#x2021;&DEEDJH(circumference)

George Biscoe, Bridport, 30â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2021;&DQWDORXSH(circumference) Â&#x2021;&DUURW(length x circumference) Â&#x2021;&DXOLĂ RZHU(diameter)

Â&#x2021;&XFXPEHU (length x circumference) Â&#x2021;(JJSODQW(circumference x circumference) Â&#x2021;*UHHQ%HDQ(length)

Â&#x2021;3XPSNLQ(circumference x circumference) Â&#x2021;5XWDEDJD(circumference) Â&#x2021;6XPPHU6TXDVK (length x circumference)

Gary Miller, Middlebury, 31â&#x20AC;? Chris Gariepy, Whiting, 17â&#x20AC;? x 14.5â&#x20AC;? Â&#x2021;%HOO3HSSHU(circumference x circumference) Â&#x2021;6XQĂ RZHU(diameter) Â&#x2021;2QLRQ(circumference) Â&#x2021;7RPDWR(circumference) Â&#x2021;3RWDWR(length x circumference) Â&#x2021;7XUQLS(circumference) Â&#x2021;=XFFKLQL(length x circumference) ADDISON COUNTY

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PAGE  20  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

Hi, my name is Toulouse Foucault.

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o  not  be  fooled  by  my  French-­sounding  name,   I  am  a  Vermonter  through  and  through!  My   three  moms,  all  Middlebury  College  students,   adopted  me  from  Homeward  Bound  in  February  when   ,ZDVDÂżYHPRQWKROGEDUQFDWDQG,KDYHEHHQ UHVLGLQJRQ%DNHU\/DQHHYHUVLQFH,ZDVQDPHGDIWHU WZRLPSRUWDQWUROHPRGHOV  7RXORXVHWKHEUDYH RUDQJHNLWWHQIURP'LVQH\ÂśVKLJKO\DFFODLPHGÂżOP â&#x20AC;&#x153;The  Aristocatsâ&#x20AC;?;Íž  and  (2)  Michel  Foucault,  the  critical   social  theorist  and  philosopher  whose  work  on  the   dialectical  relationship  between  power  and  knowledge  

KDVLQĂ&#x20AC;XHQFHGP\RZQZRUNRQWKHLQWHUVHFWLRQDOLW\RI speciesism  and  the  infantilization  of  house  pets  through   the  process  of  neutering  (forthcoming  book:  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Me?Ow!   Toulouse  Foucault  on  Sexuality,  Lacan,  and  the   ([SHULHQFHRI%HLQJÂľ)L[HGϫ :KHQ,DPQRWZULWLQJ I  can  be  found  tending  to  the  beans  in  my  raised  bed,   PRELOL]LQJVWXIIHGPLFHIRUWKHUHYROXWLRQDQGLJQRULQJ P\PRWKHUV Hanna Mahon, Sara Bachman and Kristina Johansson

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  21

Burrows (Continued  from  Page  1) the   community,   and   be   active   in   families. the   community,â&#x20AC;?   Burrows   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   Burrows,   former   principal   of   see   our   work   at  ACSU   as   prepar-­ Willamette  High  School  in  Eugene,   ing  students  to  be  active  leaders  in   Ore.,  began  his  job  as  the  ACSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Middlebury  and  beyond.â&#x20AC;? top   administrator   on   July   1.   Heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   With   that   in   mind,   Burrows   currently   scrutinizing   the   various   wants   students   to   embrace   the   policies  and  systems  in  place  with   traditional   Vermont   traits   of   civic   the   districtâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   seven   elementary   engagement,   community   involve-­ schools  and  two  secondary  schools   ment,   caring   about   oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   town   to  make  sure  they  are  in  synch. and  school,  and  caring  about  other   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   true   of   any   incom-­ people. ing   leader,   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   essen-­ In   addition   to   at-­ tial   that   before   you   tending   a   variety   of   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Part of (it) is start   making   changes   school   board   meet-­ and   start   moving   in   engaging that ings   and   other   pub-­ a   direction   you   think   digital landscape lic   events,   Burrows   makes  sense,  you  look   and â&#x20AC;Ś bringing plans   to   engage   the   at   things   that   are   cur-­ in media and community   through   rently   in   place,â&#x20AC;?   Bur-­ technology in a a  blog,  possibly  Twit-­ rows  said. ter   and   commentary   Though   heâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   been   way that isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t in   the   Addison   Inde-­ on   board   for   only   a   just writing pendent.  He  will  seek   month,   Burrows   likes   a report on a   lot   of   input   as   he   what   he   sees   in   terms   a computer, puts   together   a   long-­ of   the   schools   and   but actually term   action   plan   for   personnel   that   make   the   ACSU   that   will   changing the up   the   ACSU.   Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   among   other   things   supervisory   union   way students scrutinize   the   current   that   includes   the   el-­ learn to curriculum   and   set   ementary   schools   in   incorporate â&#x20AC;&#x201D; forth   the   mandated   Middlebury,   Ripton,   what for them transition   to   Com-­ Bridport,   Salisbury,   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; is second mon   Core   and   the   Shoreham,   Cornwall   Smarter  Balanced  As-­ and   Weybridge,   along   nature.â&#x20AC;? sessment,   which   will   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Superintendent soon  replace  the  New   with   Middlebury   Peter Burrows England   Union   middle   and   Common   high  schools. Assessment   Program   â&#x20AC;&#x153;My   initial   impressions   have   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  the  standardized  testing  system   been  well-­founded,â&#x20AC;?  Burrows  said.   currently   used   to   measure   student   â&#x20AC;&#x153;This   community   is   very   commit-­ performance. ted   and   behind   education,   and   the   The   ACSUâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   action   plan   must   potential   for   innovation   and   sup-­ prepare   students   to   be   successful   port  for  all  students  is  immense.  It   into  their  20s  and  not  just  through   feels   like   everyone   is   behind   stu-­ the   12th   grade,   according   to   Bur-­ dents   and   ready   and   willing   to   do   rows. anything  to  make  sure  students  are   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Our   job   really   runs   beyond   successful.  I  feel  so  fortunate  to  be   graduation,   to   make   sure   students   in  this  position  to  help  to  lead  this   are  successful  once  they  leave  the   supervisory  union.â&#x20AC;? high   school,â&#x20AC;?   Burrows   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;We   He   vowed   to   be   a   visible   and   want   to   make   education   engaging   accessible   leader   during   what   he   and  relevant  for  all  students.â&#x20AC;? hopes  will  be  a  lengthy  tenure. And  technology  must  play  a  key   â&#x20AC;&#x153;One   of   the   big   things   I   want   role  in  making  education  more  en-­ to  do  is  I  want  to  be  a  presence  in   gaging   and   relevant   for   students,  

Hey! I saw you in the paper!

NEW  ADDISON  CENTRAL  Supervisory  Union  Superintendent  Peter  Burrows  has  only  been  on  the  job  for   a  month  and  already  has  big  plans  to  improve  education  in  the  district. Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

he  said. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Part   of   establishing   the   action   plan   is   engaging   that   digital   land-­ scape   and   really   thinking   about   ways   to   take   the   traditional   struc-­ ture   of   the   classroom   and   bring   in   media   and   technology   in   a   way   that   isnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   just   writing   a   report   on   a   computer,   but   actually   changing   the  way  students  learn  to  incorpo-­ rate  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  what  for  them  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  is  second   nature,â&#x20AC;?  Burrows  said. The   ACSU   has   been   working   to   shore   up   its   computer   network.   Burrows   hopes   the   district   will   soon  have  the  ability  to  ensure  each   student  has  access  to  a  computer. â&#x20AC;&#x153;Establishing   technology   as   the   medium   through   which   learning   happens   is   essential,â&#x20AC;?   Burrows   said. The   new   superintendent   would   also  like  to  see  more  partnering  be-­ tween   the   ACSU   and   Middlebury   College   and   the   Community   Col-­ lege  of  Vermont.

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â&#x20AC;&#x153;Middlebury   College   is   a   huge   resource,â&#x20AC;?  Burrows  said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;I  can  see   great  potential  for  partnership.â&#x20AC;? Burrows  realizes  that  he  has  also   inherited  some  weighty  issues  that   should   garner   a   lot   of   discussion   during   the   coming   months.   They   include  the  prospect  of  governance   consolidation   within   the   ACSU,   which  currently  has  nine  boards  to   which  the  superintendent  must  an-­ swer;Íž  and  the  concept  of  introduc-­ ing   foreign   language   instruction   throughout   the   districtsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   schools   so  younger  students  are  better  pre-­ pared  for  such  offerings  at  the  mid-­

dle-­  and  high  school  levels. The  ACSU   Study   Committee   is   working  with  a  consultant  on  a  re-­ port   that   could   eventually   lead   to   a   district-­wide   vote   to   change   the   governance   structure.   A   panel   is   also   looking   at   the   feasibility   and   costs   of   a   district-­wide   world   lan-­ guages  program. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   there   are   a   lot   of   posi-­ tives   ahead,â&#x20AC;?   Burrows   said   of   his   early   appraisal ��  of   the   ACSU.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   feel  good  about  where  we  are  and   where  we  are  headed.â&#x20AC;? Reporter   John   Flowers   is   at   johnf@addisonindependent.com.  

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PAGE  22  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

CARS  ON  ROUTE  7  pass  a  new  40-­acre  solar  array  nearing  completion  in  New  Haven.  

Independent  photo/Trent  Campbell

Solar (Continued  from  Page  1) able   electricity,   while   continuing   to   use  the  land  for  agriculture.   The   Freyer   property,   which   had   been   purchased   by   the   family   in   1968   and   run   as   a   dairy   farm   until   WKH PLGV ZDV LGHQWL¿HG IRU

its   proximity   to   a   central   power   line,   its   viability   for   an   agricultural   operation,   and   exposure   to   the   sun.   Because  the  electricity  was  going  to   go  into  the  state  power  grid,  the  proj-­ ect  was  under  the  jurisdiction  of  the   Vermont   Public   Service   Board   and  

not  subject  to  local  licensing  review. The  project  encountered  one  sub-­ stantial  roadblock  when  New  Haven   resident   John   Madden   appealed   the   SURMHFWœV&HUWL¿FDWHRI3XEOLF*RRG to  the  PSB.  Though  the  appeal  was   ultimately  thrown  out  by  the  board,  

it  did  delay  the  project  for  a  year. Mount  Abraham  Union  High  School,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It  has  been  a  journey,â&#x20AC;?  said  Paul   WKH*DLOHU6FKRRODQGWKH8QLYHUVLW\ Lekstutis,   a   principal   of   Cross   Pol-­ of  Vermont.  She  heads  up  the  farmâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   lination.   animal   operation,   while   Freund,   a   The  company  had  won  a  spot  with   native  of  Middlesex,  is  in  charge  of   the  stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Standard  Offerâ&#x20AC;?  program   the   vegetables   and   the   maple   syrup   in   2009,   which   selected   renewable   production.   energy   projects   to   be   eligible   for   The  duo  met  in  high  school  on  the   state   subsidies   via   a   state   lottery.   Vermont  Youth  Conservation  crew. The   2009   legislation   creating   this   Hulbert  said  the  solar  project  had   program   had   put   a   subsidy   for   pro-­ enabled  them  to  have  access  to  farm-­ ducing   12.5   megawatts   ing   land   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   a   challenge   of  solar  electricity  gener-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;We have to in   Addison   County   for   ation  up  for  grabs.  It  re-­ those  who  donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  have  ac-­ quired  a  utility  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  in  this   do something cess  to  family  land.   FDVH *UHHQ 0RXQWDLQ about energy â&#x20AC;&#x153;A  lot  of  people  com-­ Power  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  to  pay  a  premi-­ â&#x20AC;Ś (The solar plain   about   the   panels   um  for  renewable  energy   panels) are and   say,   â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Oh   it   doesnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   generated   by   new   solar   providing a look   good,â&#x20AC;&#x2122;   and   farmers   farms,   thereby   helping   sometimes  complain  that   good service, its  developers  pay  for  the   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   a   waste   of   good   ag-­ and the sheep ricultural   land,â&#x20AC;?   Hulbert   projects. Once  it  its  fully  opera-­ graze around said.  â&#x20AC;&#x153;My  point  of  view   tional   by   mid-­Septem-­ them so the is   that   we   have   to   do   ber,   the   New   Haven   so-­ land is still something   about   energy   lar  farm  will  put  enough   being used for â&#x20AC;Ś  (The  solar  panels)  are   electricity   into   the   state   providing   a   good   ser-­ power  grid  to  power  400   agriculture.â&#x20AC;? vice,  and  the  sheep  graze   â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Anna Hulbert around  them  so  the  land   homes  each  year. TWO  KINDS  OF   is  still  being  used  for  ag-­ FARMING riculture.â&#x20AC;? Cross   Pollinationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   founding   vi-­ Hulbert,  who  learned  about  sheep   sion  of  having  renewable  energy  and   production  while  studying  abroad  in   sustainable   agriculture   go   hand-­in-­ New   Zealand,   is   optimistic   that   the   hand  is  also  becoming  a  reality.  They   sheep  and  the  solar  panels  will  coex-­ have  granted  agricultural  use  of  the   ist  nicely. land   to   Open   View   Farms,   run   by   She  added  that  the  contract  for  the   Vermont   natives   Anna   Hulbert   and   solar   panel   was   25   years,   at   which   Ben  Freund,  both  27.  Open  View  is   point   they   could   hypothetically   be   DGLYHUVLÂżHGRUJDQLFIDUPWKDWUDLVHV changed  or  removed.  But  she  didnâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   lamb  and  meat  birds  along  with  cer-­ think   that   would   be   in   the   publicâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   WLÂżHGRUJDQLFYHJHWDEOHV,WDOVRKDV best  interest. a  sugarhouse. â&#x20AC;&#x153;I   think   this   is   a   good   develop-­ â&#x20AC;&#x153;Their  vision  was  to  give  a  group   ment   use,â&#x20AC;?   she   said.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Without   the   access   to   a   piece   of   land   to   farm,â&#x20AC;?   solar   project,   the   use   of   this   land   said   Hulbert,   who   was   raised   in   for  farming  would  be  unlikely,  any-­ Bristol  and  Middlebury  and  attended   way.â&#x20AC;?


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  23

Association reaches out to all MHS/MUHS alumni This   year   marks   the  33rd   year   of   trust   fund   from   generous   donations   the   Middlebury   High   School/Mid-­ of   alumni.   This   interest   from   this   dlebury  Union  High  School  Alumni   trust   fund   provides   the   revenue   for   $VVRFLDWLRQ7KHÂżUVW+RPHFRPLQJ the   yearly   scholarships.   The   asso-­ DIWHUWKHDVVRFLDWLRQZDVIRUPHGZDV ciation  has  been  supported  by  many   on   Sept.   14,   1985,   at   the   MHS/MUHS   alumni   but,   Middlebury   Recreation   OLNH PDQ\ RUJDQL]DWLRQV Since the Park.   Activities   included   is  feeling  its  age.   volleyball,  horseshoes  and   inception )RUWKHÂżUVWWLPHLQKLV-­ DEDUEHFXH7KHÂżUVWSUHVL-­ of the WRU\ WKH ZRUNSODFH QRZ dent   of   the   association   association, enjoys   four   distinct   age   ZDV %XVWHU %UXVK FODVV scholarships groups.  The  Greatest  Gen-­ RIDQGWKHÂżUVWYLFH have been HUDWLRQ ZDV ERUQ SULRU WR SUHVLGHQW ZDV &DWKHULQH %RRPHUVZHUHERUQ )LW]SDWULFNFODVVRI given to EHWZHHQ  DQG  'XHV WKDW ÂżUVW \HDU ZHUH sons and This   group   is   the   begin-­  ZLWK DSSUR[LPDWHO\ daughters ning   of   the   Millennial   650   alumni   joining   the   of alumni Cycle   in   the   generational   association.   Prior   to   the   totaling groups.   They   are   also   re-­ IRUPDORUJDQL]DWLRQRIWKH IHUUHG WR DV WKH ÂłĂ&#x20AC;RZHU just under alumni   association,   gath-­ childrenâ&#x20AC;?   or   the   Hippies   erings  took  place  after  the   $40,000. and  Yuppies  of  the  cycle.   football   game   at   the   old   I   am   an   MUHS   graduate   American  Legion  and  one  year  at  the   DVZHOODVD%RRPHU airport.  The  associationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mission  is   Generation  X,  or  13th  Generation,   to  raise  funds  for  scholarship  and  to   ZDV ERUQ EHWZHHQ  DQG  provide  an  opportunity  for  alumni  to   7KH\ DUH NQRZQ DV WKH ÂłUHDFWLYH´ gather   and   celebrate   their   common   JHQHUDWLRQ0\ZLIHZKRLVDOVRDQ heritage  at  MHS/MUHS.   MUHS  graduate,  is  a  Gen  Xâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;er.  The   Since  the  inception  of  the  associa-­ Millennial   Generation,   or   Genera-­ tion,  scholarships  have  been  given  to   WLRQ<ZDVERUQEHWZHHQDQG sons  and  daughters  of  alumni  total-­ 7KLVJURXSKDVH[SORGHGLQWR LQJMXVWXQGHU7KHÂżUVW\HDU the   technological   age   in   the   21st   RIWKH+DOORI)DPHVDZDOXPQL century  and  is  taking  over  the  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Age   inducted.  Each  year  alumni  are  con-­ of   Information   Sharingâ&#x20AC;?   globally.   sidered   for   induction   to   the   Hall   of   7KH\ DUH LQ WRXFK ZLWK RWKHUV ORQJ )DPHEDVHGXSRQDFKLHYHPHQWVDQG GLVWDQFH ZLWK FHOOXODU SKRQHV WH[W service   to   community.   There   have   messaging   and   other   social   media   DOVREHHQÂżYHKRQRUDU\PHPEHUVLQ-­ outlets.   Electric   icons   are   part   of   GXFWHGLQWRWKH+DOORI)DPH0HP-­ their  everyday  life. bers   of   the   MHS/MUHS   Alumni   While   the   mission   of   the   alumni   $VVRFLDWLRQ DOVR UHFHLYH D QHZVOHW-­ association   can   be   a   shared   goal   ter   several   times   per   year   keeping   across   all   generations   of   MHS/ WKHPXSWRGDWHRQQHZVDERXWWKHLU MUHS   graduates,   our   methods   of   classmates   and   other   alumni.   The   sending  that  message  have  changed.   alumni   association   has   built   a   solid   The  alumni  association  is  adapting  to  

Open  house,  adopt-­a-­ton  to  be  held at  Homeward  Bound  Center,  Aug.  17 0,''/(%85< ² +RPHZDUG Bound   Animal   Welfare   Center   in   0LGGOHEXU\ZLOOKROGDQRSHQKRXVH and   adopt-­a-­thon   on   Saturday,   Aug   17,  from  10  a.m.  to  3  p.m.  The  shelter   LVFHOHEUDWLQJLWVÂżUVW\HDULQLWVQHZ EXLOGLQJ ZLWK HQWHUWDLQPHQW IUHH food,  adoption  discounts,  and  more.   7KHUHZLOOEHJXLGHGWRXUVRIWKHID-­ cility,  a  live  broadcast  from  WVTKâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Bruce  and  Hobbes,  free  food,  a  DIY   GRJ ZDVK ORZFRVW PLFURFKLSSLQJ and   discounted   adoption   fees   for   all   RI WKH DQLPDOV 7KH HYHQW LV D ZD\ RIWKDQNLQJDOOWKRVHZKRVXSSRUWHG the   center   before,   during,   and   since   WKH+RPHZDUG%RXQG&DSLWDO&DP-­ paign. Since   1975,   the   Addison   County   +XPDQH 6RFLHW\ GED +RPHZDUG Bound   Animal   Welfare   Center   has  

provided  temporary  shelter  for  more   than  20,000  lost,  abandoned,  abused   or   surrendered   animals.  As   the   only   animal  shelter  in  Addison  County,  its   SURJUDPV DQG VHUYLFHV PHHW D ZLGH DUUD\RIFULWLFDODQLPDOZHOIDUHQHHGV DQG ZH SURYLGH WKHP ZLWKRXW DQ\ county,  state  or  federal  funding.     The  centerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  mission  is  to  educate   the  community  and  improve  the  lives   of   animals,   alleviate   their   suffer-­ ing,   and   elevate   their   status   in   soci-­ ety.   The   center   safeguards,   rescues,   shelters,  heals,  adopts  and  advocates   IRU DQLPDOV LQ QHHG ZKLOH LQVSLULQJ community   action   and   compassion   on  their  behalf. +RPHZDUG%RXQG$QLPDO:HOIDUH &HQWHU LV DW  %RDUGPDQ 6W )RU PRUH LQIRUPDWLRQ YLVLW KRPHZDUG-­ boundanimals.org  or  call  388-­1100.

ADDISON COUNTY

School News Briefs

Benjamin  Chamberlain  of  Gosh-­ en  graduated  magna  cum  laude  from   7XIWV 8QLYHUVLW\ RQ 0D\  ZLWK D bachelorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  degree  in  chemical  engi-­ QHHULQJ +H ZDV DOVR QDPHG WR WKH spring  2013  deanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  list.

Alexander   Korda   of   Bridport,   D VWXGHQW DW )DLUOHLJK 'LFNLQVRQ 8QLYHUVLW\œV &ROOHJH DW )ORUKDP Campus  in  Madison,  N.J.,  has  been   LQGXFWHG LQWR )'8œV 3KL 2PHJD Epsilon  senior  honor  society  for  the   spring  2013  semester.  

the  changing  means  of  communicat-­ LQJRXUPHVVDJHE\ZRUNLQJWRDGRSW VRFLDOPHGLD,WœVLURQLFWKDWZHDUH ZULWLQJDVWRU\DERXWWKHDOXPQLDV-­ sociation  and  our  need  to  reach  out   to   younger   graduates,   but   yet   pub-­ lishing  it  in  a  traditional  sense.  The   bottom   line   is   that   all   graduates   of   MHS/MUHS  share  a  common  heri-­ WDJH DQG DV DQ DVVRFLDWLRQ ZH QHHG to   get   our   message   out   across   all   generations. Our   message   remains   the   same,   but   the   means   of   sending   that   mes-­ VDJH KDYH JURZQ H[SRQHQWLDOO\ $V WKH DVVRFLDWLRQ FRPHV RI DJH ZH QHHG QHZ PHPEHUV WR FRQWLQXH WR provide  opportunities  for  homecom-­

Ilsley postpones Teen Top Chef

ing  reunions  and  scholarship.  We  are   looking   for   MHS/MUHS   graduates   ZKRZRXOGOLNHWRJHWLQYROYHGDQG VHUYH RQ FRPPLWWHHV )RU LQVWDQFH ZH ZRXOG OLNH WR VHW XS DQ DOXPQL DVVRFLDWLRQ )DFHERRN DFFRXQW DQG SHUKDSVDZHEVLWH$OVRLI\RXUFODVV is   holding   a   reunion   this   summer,   SOHDVHFRQWDFWXVVRWKDWZHFDQSRVW DQ\SLFWXUHVLQRXUIDOOQHZVOHWWHU If   you   are   interested   in   continu-­ ing  to  build  on  the  strong  foundation   that  other  MHS/MUHS  alumni  have   provided,   contact   Bill   Cunningham   at   William.cunningham@comcast. net  or  call  802-­457-­9151. Editorsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;   note:   This   article   was   provided  by  Bill  Cunningham.

GARAGE SALE

MIDDLEBURY   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   The   Il-­ sley   Libraryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Teen   Top   Chef   competition,   originally   planned   for  Thursday,  Aug.   8,   has   been   rescheduled  for  Thursday,  Sept.   19,   from   5-­7   p.m.   so   as   not   to   FRQĂ&#x20AC;LFWZLWK)LHOG'D\V 7ULFLD$OOHQWKH,OVOH\ÂśVQHZ youth   services   librarian,   tells   DVSLULQJ FXOLQDU\ ZL]DUGV LQ grades  7-­12  to  come  hungry  and   ready  to  create  a  delectable  deli-­ cacy. Sign   up   at   in   the   Childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Room  or  call  the  library  at  388-­ 4095.

KITS

Now Available at The Addison Independent

We have everything you need to promote your sale!

For as low as $10 youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll receive: Â&#x2021;$FODVVLĂ&#x20AC;HGOLQHDGLQWKH$GG\,QG\ & online Â&#x2021;KHDY\GXW\DOOZHDWKHUVLJQV Â&#x2021;3UHSULFHGODEHOV Â&#x2021;7LSVIRUDVXFFHVVIXOVDOH Â&#x2021;6DOHVUHFRUGIRUP

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PAGE  24  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

SERVICES DIRECTORY Alexander Appliance Repair Inc. t!

â&#x20AC;&#x153;We  try  our  best  to  give  superior   quality  and  comfort. Our  team  cares  about  your   dental  health.â&#x20AC;?

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Dryers Ranges Microwaves Air Conditioners

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DENTISTRY

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Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t  spend  your  hard-­earned  money   making  the  hot  water  or  electricity  that   you  use  todayâ&#x20AC;&#x201C; SOLAR  IS  MORE  AFFORDABLE  THAN  EVER! Weâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve  been  here  for  you  for  41  years  â&#x20AC;&#x201C;   Let  us  help  you  with  your  solar  projects  today.  

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  25

4-­H  will  run  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;Cards  for  Soldiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  booth  at  Field  Days Editorâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   note:   This   story   was   supplied   by   MaKayla   Foster,   president   of   the   Cornwall   Musketeers  4-­H. NEW   HAVEN   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   Addison   County   Fair   and   Field   Days   in   New   Haven   is   quickly  

approaching   and   for   the   third   straight   year,   the   Cornwall   4-­H   Musketeers   of   Middlebury   are   hoping   that   youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   stop   by   their   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Cards   for   Soldiersâ&#x20AC;?   booth   in   the   4-­H   Youth   Exhibit   Hall   sometime   between   Aug.   6-­10  

to   make   a   handmade   card   with   some  encouraging  words  for    an   American   soldier   to   say   thank   you  for  fighting  for  our  freedom. Collected   cards   will   be   donated   to   Soldiersâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;  Angels   and   will   be   distributed   to   deployed  

soldiers  around  the  globe.  In  the   event   that   you   will   be   unable   to   attend,  there  will  be  a  card  table   set   up   in   the   childrenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   room   at   the   Ilsley   Public   Library   for   the   week  as  well. If   you,   or   an   organization  

youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re   affiliated   with,   would   like  to  help  the  Musketeers  reach   their  goal  of  3,000  cards  by  Sept.   1,  please  contact  the  event  orga-­ nizer,  MaKayla  Foster,  via  email   at   makayla.foster@comcast.net   for  details.

SERVICES DIRECTORY RENT-A-SPOUSE

SIDING

STORAGE

VINYL  SIDING &  ROOFING We  also  do SDLQWLQJ

Al  LeMay :LQGRZVÂ&#x2021;'RRUV 5HSDLUV 3UHVVXUH:DVKLQJ ,QVXUHGa1R-RE7RR6PDOO

Â&#x2021;518-­499-­0281

ROOFING

roofing Michael Doran As  seen  at  Addison  County  Field  Days!

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WEDDING

Storage  Units  Available!

Stop in to the Addison Independent office in the Marble Works to view a wonderful selection of

We  also  now  have Boat,  Car  &  R.V. storage!

Under  new  management!

NEW   HAVEN SELF  STORAGE

Now  owned  by  Mikeâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Auto  &  Towing 2877  ETHAN  ALLEN  HWY.  (RT.7) 1(:+$9(197Â&#x2021;  

SEPTIC

STAMPS

Wedding Invitations for Your Special Day!

388-4944

     For  more  info  call      

WELDING Vermont Dragonfly

Septic  Tank  &  Cesspool  Pumping Septic  Tank  &  System  Inspections New  Septic  Systems  Installed Septic  System  Repairs Drain  &  Pipe  Cleaning Full  Excavation  Service

Self    Inking  &  Hand  Stamps

MADE TO ORDER

Wood and Iron Works

Blacksmithing & Fabrication â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Mobile Welding

Forging and Fabricating for Home, Residential and Commercial Construction

NO JOB TOO SMALL  

                             Available  at  the                                Addison  Independent in  the  Marble  Works,  Middlebury

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; David Matesi â&#x20AC;&#x201C; 802.877.2337 dvdmatesi@gmail.com

388-4944

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PAGE  26  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS Notice

Notice

DOG   TEAM   CATERING.   Seating  300,  plus  bar  avail-­ able.   Now   available,   Mid-­ dlebury   VFW.   Full   menus   available.   802-­388-­4831,   dogteamcatering.net.

HUNTING   AND   RECRE-­ ATIONAL   LEASE   seeks   member.  730  acres  border-­ ing   45,000   acres   of   state   land.   New   camp.   Excellent   hunting.   Family   friendly.   518-­597-­3270.



THERE   WILL   BE   a   free   viewing   of   Telling   Amyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Story  on  August  13,  7:30p.m.   in  Twilight  Hall,  50  Franklin   St.,  Middlebury  College.  Tell-­ ing  Amyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Story   is   a   docu-­ mentary  hosted  by  actress,   Mariska   Hargitay,   and   told   by  Detective  Deirdri  Fishel.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Telling  Amyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Storyâ&#x20AC;?  follows   the   time-­line   of   a   domestic   violence  homicide.  This  story   brings  to  light  the  difficult  and   emotional  issues  of  domes-­ tic  violence  and  community   response.  Following  the  film   will   be   a   board   of   service   providers   who   will   lead   a   discussion  on  community  re-­ sponse  to  domestic  violence   facilitated   by   A.C.   Council   Against  Domestic  and  Sexual   Violence   coordinator.   Re-­ freshments  will  be  available.

Services The Volunteer Center, a collaboration of RSVP and the United Way of Addison County, posts dozens of volunteer opportunities on the Web. Go to www. unitedwayaddisoncounty .org/VolunteerDonate and click on VOLUNTEER NOW!

Public  Meetings

ALATEEN:   FOR   YOUNG   PEOPLE   whoâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ve   been   af-­ fected  by  someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  drink-­ ing.  Members  share  experi-­ ence,  strength,  hope  to  solve   common   problems.   Meets   Wednesdays   7:15-­8:15pm   downstairs  in  Turning  Point   PARTY   RENTALS;   China,   Center   of   Addison   County   flatware,   glassware,   lin-­ in  Middlebury  Marbleworks.   ens.   Delivery   available.   (Al-­Anon   meets   at   same   802-­388-­4831. time  nearby  at  St.  Stephens   Church.

Public  Meetings AL-­ANON:  FOR  FAMILIES   and   friends   affected   by   someoneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   drinking.   Mem-­ bers   share   experience,   strength   and   hope   to   solve   common  problems.  Newcom-­ ers   welcome.   Confidential.   St.   Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church   (use   front   side   door   and   go   to   second  floor)  in  Middlebury,   Sunday  nights  7:15-­8:15pm.

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   M E E T I N G S   S A T U R -­ DAY:   Discussion   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   at   the   Mid-­ dlebury   United   Methodist   Church.  Discussion  Meeting   10:00-­11:00   AM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.  Be-­ ginners   Meeting   6:30-­7:30   PM.   These   three   meetings   are  held  at  the  Turning  Point   Center  in  the  Marbleworks,   Middlebury. A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS   FRIDAY:   Dis-­ cussion  Meeting  Noon-­1:00   PM   at   the   Turning   Point   in   the  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

Services

Services

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

Public  Meetings

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS  THURSDAY:  Big   Book  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM   at  the  Turning  Point  Center  in   the  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.   Speaker  Meeting  7:30-­8:30   PM  at  St.  Stephenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Church,   Main  St.(On  the  Green).

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS  MONDAY:  As  Bill   Sees   It   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   P M .   B i g   B o o k   M e e t i n g   7:30-­8:30  PM.  Both  held  at   the  Turning  Point  Center  in   the  Marbleworks,  Middlebury.

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ MOUS   BRANDON   MEET-­ INGS:   Monday,   Discussion   Me e ti n g   7 :3 0 -­ 8 :3 0   PM .   Wednesday,  12  Step  Meet-­ ing  7:00-­8:00  PM.  Friday,  12   Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.   All   held   at   the   St.   Thomas   Episcopal   Church,   RT   7   South.

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ MOUS   NORTH   FERRIS-­ BURGH   MEETINGS:   Sun-­ day,  Daily  Reflections  Meet-­ ing   6:00-­7:00   PM,   at   the   United   Methodist   Church,   Old  Hollow  Rd.

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS   SUNDAY:   12   Step   Meeting   9:00-­10:00   AM   held   at   the   Middlebury   United  Methodist  Church  on   N.  Pleasant  Street.  Discus-­ sion  Meeting  1:00-­2:00  PM   held   at   the   Turning   Point   Center  in  the  Marbleworks,   Middlebury.

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   MEETINGS   WEDNESDAY:   Big  Book  Meeting  7:15-­8:15   AM  is  held  at  the  Middlebury   United  Methodist  Church  on   N.  Pleasant  Street.  Discus-­ sion  Meeting  Noon-­1:00  PM.   Womenâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Meeting  5:30-­6:30   PM.  Both  held  at  The  Turning   Point  Center  in  the  Marble-­ A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ works,  Middlebury. MOUS  NEW  HAVEN  MEET-­ A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ INGS:   Monday,   Big   Book   M O U S   M I D D L E B U R Y   Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM  at  the   MEETINGS  TUESDAY:  11th   Congregational  Church,  New   Step   Meeting   Noon-­1:00   Haven  Village  Green. PM.   ALTEEN   Group.   Both   held   at   Turning   Point,   228   A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ Maple  Street.  12  Step  Meet-­ MOUS  RIPTON  MEETINGS:   ing  Noon-­1:00  PM.  12  Step   Monday,  As  Bill  Sees  It  Meet-­ Meeting  7:30-­8:30  PM.  Both   ing  7:15-­8:15  AM.  Thursday,   held   at   the   Turning   Point   Grapevine  Meeting  6:00-­7:00   Center  in  the  Marbleworks,   PM.  Both  held  at  Ripton  Fire-­ house,  Dugway  Rd. Middlebury.

Services

Services

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ M O U S   V E R G E N N E S   MEETINGS:   Sunday,   12   Step  Meeting  7:00-­8:00  PM.   Friday,   Discussion   Meeting   8:00-­9:00  PM.  Both  held  at   St.   Paulâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Church,   Park   St.   Tuesday,  Discussion  Meeting   7:00-­8:00  PM,  at  the  Congre-­ gational  Church,  Water  St.

Services

Walk to End Child Abuse On the morning of Saturday, September 14th, people will gather on the Green in Middlebury to walk together in support of eliminating child abuse. Every step taken will raise money for and awareness about this issue and help to promote healthy relationships between children and the people who care for them. Walk organizers are seeking both participants and volunteers to help out with logistical details such as registration, photography, course maintenance and face painting. Children on bikes or in strollers are welcome to join in the fun! To register for the walk, please call: 802-461-7538. To sign up as a volunteer, please call 388-7044. Thank you!

L o c a l age n c ie s c a n p o s t t h e i r v o l u n te e r ne e d s w i t h Th e Vo l u n te e r C e n te r by c a l l i ng RSV P at 388-7044.

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Name: Address: Phone:

D E A D L I N E S Thurs. noon for Mon. paper Mon. 5 p.m. for Thurs. paper

CATEGORIES Notices Card of Thanks Personals Services Free** Lost & Found** Garage Sales Lawn & Garden Opportunities

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Work Wanted Public Meetings** For Sale Help Wanted For Rent Want to Rent Real Estate Real Estate Wanted Vacation Rentals



$2

Wood Heat Animals Att. Farmers Motorcycles Cars Trucks SUVs Snowmobiles Boats Wanted

** No charge for these ads

NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Mondays,  6pm,  held   at  the  Turning  Point  Center   located  in  the  Marbleworks. NA   MEETINGS   MIDDLE-­ BURY:  Fridays,  7:30pm,  held   at  the  Turning  Point  Center   located  in  the  Marble  Works. OVEREATERS   ANONY-­ MOUS:   SATURDAYS   at   L a w r e n c e   M e m o r i a l   L i-­ brary,   1:00pm.   40   North   Street,   Bristol.   For   info   c a l l :   8 0 2 -­ 4 5 3 -­ 2 3 6 8   o r   802-­388-­7081. OVEREATERS   ANONY-­ MOUS:  TUESDAYS  at  Turn-­ ing   Point   Center   (upstairs   meeting   room),   6:00-­7:00   Marble   Works,   Middlebury.   For  info  call:  802-­352-­4525   or  802-­388-­7081.

Ginny  Ashenfelter,  of  Bristol,  has  been   an  invaluable  volunteer  at  Living  Well  Residen-­ tial  Care  Home  since  the  Fall  of  2011.    She  helps   out   with   various   activities   including   teaching   Bone  Builders  Classes,  providing  transportation   to   Bristol   Fitness   Center   and   developing   con-­ nections  within  the  community  by  reaching  out   to  local  community  members  and  organizations,   such  as  Bristol  Elementary  School  (BASK  pro-­ gram)  and  the  Lawrence  Memorial  Library.    Her   commitment  is  apparent  through  her  service  and   how  much  our  elders  appreciate  her!    She  said   about  her  experience:    â&#x20AC;&#x153;Every  time  I  get  a  smile   or  thank  you,  it  makes  my  day.  Theyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  precious   people  and  they  deserve  the  best.â&#x20AC;?    Thanks  so   much  Ginny!  

CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

RATES

A L C O H O L I C S   A N O N Y-­ MOUS   BRISTOL   MEET-­ INGS:   Sunday,   Discussion   Me e ti n g   4 :0 0 -­ 5 :0 0   PM .   Wednesday,  12  Step  Meet-­ ing   7:00-­8:00   PM.   Friday,   Big  Book  Meeting,  6:00-­7:00   PM.  All  held  at  the  Federated   Church,  Church  St.

BRAIN  INJURY  SUPPORT   GROUP:   Survivors,   family   members   and   care   givers   are   invited   to   share   their   experience   in   a   safe,   se-­ cure   and   confidential   envi-­ ronment.  Meets  monthly  on   the   second   Tuesday   from   6:00pm   to   8:00pm   at   the   Hannaford   Career   Center,   Room   A214   (second   floor,   an   elevator   is   available)   in   Middlebury.  For  more  infor-­ mation,   contact   Beth   Dia-­ mond  802-­388-­9505.

ADDISON INDEPENDENT P.O. Box 31, Middlebury, VT 05753 802-388-4944

email: classifieds@addisonindependent.com

PLEASE PRINT YOUR AD HERE

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Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  PAGE  27

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

Public  Meetings

Services

Help  Wanted

THE  HELENBACH  CANCER   Support  Group  is  an  indepen-­ dent   group   of   people   who   are   dealing   with,   have   dealt   with,   and   who   know   people   with  cancer.  We  meet  on  an   irregularly   regular   basis   (if   there  is  a  need,  we  meet!)  at   the  Mary  Johnson  Child  Care   Center  on  Water  St.  in  Middle-­ bury.  Good  home-­made  treats   are   always   available   and   all   meetings  are  free.  Our  theme   song   has   been   Bill   Witherâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Lean  on  Me,  when  youâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;re  not   strong,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   be   your   friend,   Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;ll   help  you  carry  on..for  it  wonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t   be  long,  â&#x20AC;&#x2DC;til  Iâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;m  gonna  need,   somebody  to  lean  on.â&#x20AC;?  Come   be  a  leaner,  be  a  supporter,  be   part  of   something   that   gives   strength  by  sharing  love.  Call   802-­388-­6107  with  questions.

ASK  BRONWYN  INTERIORS   LLC.   No   longer   with   Coun-­ tryside   Carpet.   My   interior   design   services   and   work-­ rooms  are  now  available  full   time.  Your  ideas.  Your  home.   My   solutions!   askbronwyn@ gmail.com.  802-­349-­8448.



Garage  Sales

BOAT   DOCK   REPAIR   and   construction.  Experienced  and   reliable.   Fully   insured.   Call   802-­349-­6579,  Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Prop-­ erty  Management,  Leicester,   Vermont. C&I   DRYWALL.   Hanging,   taping   and   skim   coat   plas-­ tering.   Also   tile.   Call   Joe   802-­234-­5545. CHAIN  SAW  CHAINS  sharp-­ ened.  Call  802-­759-­2095. CONSTRUCTION:   ADDI-­ TIONS,  RENOVATIONS,  new   construction,  drywall,  carpen-­ try,  painting,  flooring,  roofing.   All   aspects   of   construction,   also   property   maintenance.   Steven  Fifield  802-­989-­0009.

Opportunities



OWNER  /  OPS.   A.Duie   Pyle   offers   excellent   income   with   no   touch   freight.   Home   weekends.  Call  Dan  or  Jon  at   1-­800-­477-­0020  ext.  7  or  ap-­ ply  at  www.driveforpyle.com  .

FREE  HOUSE  CATS!  Many   to  choose  from.  Spayed  and   Neutered.  Good  homes  only.   Call  802-­388-­1410.  1683  Dog   Team  Rd.,  New  Haven.

FREE   MANURE   AVAIL-­ ABLE   from   locally   raised   DEVELOPMENTAL   HOME   rabbits.   Please   call   Mo   at   PROVIDER  for  live-­in  client  or   802-­349-­8040. respite  care.  36  years  experi-­ ence.  State  background  check   completed.  State  Agency  and   Lost/Found past  client  family  references   provided.   Call   Doreen   at   L O S T   P R E S C R I P T I O N   802-­247-­4409. S U N G L A S S E S   o n   A b -­ bey   Pond   Trail   two   weeks   ago.   Tortoise   shell   frames   in   hard   green   case.   Please   LAWN   MOWING,   BRUSH   call  802-­458-­0654  and  leave   trimming,   hedge   trimming,   message  if  by  chance  you  saw   power   washing,   light   truck-­ them.  Thanks. ing,  small  carpentry  jobs  and   repairs.  Concrete  pads,  side-­ walks;  new  and  repairs.  10%   Opportunities off  all  work  for  senior  citizens.   Geneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Property   Manage-­ D R I V E R S -­ O W N E R   O P -­ ment,  Leicester,  Vt.  Fully  in-­ ERATORS.   Local  /  r egional   sured.  802-­349-­6579.  Call  for   freight,   average   $150,000  /   a  free  estimate. year.   No   touch   freight,   no   forced   dispatch,   minimum   2   MOUNTAIN   VIEW   MAIN-­ yr   T/T   experience.   Call   BTT   TENANCE:   All   phases   of   877-­378-­4288. home  improvement.  All  jobs,   small  to  large.  35+  years  ex-­ EXP.   REEFER   DRIVERS.   perience.   Great   references.   Great  pay,  freight  lanes  from   Free   estimates.   Call   Rick   at   Presque  Isle,  ME,  Boston-­Le-­ 802-­453-­5210. high,   PA.   800-­277-­0212   or   primeinc.com  .

Garage  Sales

Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s GARAGE SALE Season...Let us get the word out for you!

Free

Help  Wanted

Burlington Free Press delivery routes available in Lincoln, Bridport, Vergennes, Middlebury and Bristol.

Work  Wanted



EXPERIENCED,  RELIABLE   CAREGIVER  of  20-­plus  years   is  looking  for  work.  Referenc-­ es  available  upon  request.  For   more  information,  please  call   802-­377-­1770,  ask  for  Sue.



Garage  Sales

Help  Wanted

Help  Wanted BANKRUPTCY:  CALL  to  find   out   if   bankruptcy   can   help   you.   Kathleen   Walls,   Esq.   802-­388-­1156. COSTELLOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S   MARKET   IS   looking   for   an   experienced   person   to   wrap   subs,   to   do   prep-­work,   deep   frying,   dish   washing   and   other   duties.   Please   apply   in   person   to   Costelloâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Market,   Marble-­ works,  Middlebury. DUMP  TRUCK  DRIVER  want-­ ed.   Class   B   CDL   required.   Minimum  5  years  driving  dump   truck   experience   required.   Contact  Gene  802-­373-­8053.

Garage  Sales

Garage  Sales

7 CLASSIFIED ORDER FORM

$

Deadlines: Thursday Noon for Monday papers Monday 5pm for Thursday papers YOUR AD INFORMATION

TOWN: DATES & TIMES:

Call 802-651-4829 MIDDLEBURY UNION HIGH SCHOOL JUNIOR VARSITY FIELD HOCKEY COACH Middlebury Union High School is seeking a Junior Varsity Field Hockey Coach. The applicant must have a strong knowledge of ½IPHLSGOI]GSEGLMRKTVMRGMTPIW[MXLTVIZMSYW coaching experience preferred. Must possess strong organizational skills and the ability to communicate and relate to student athletes. Apply by sending a letter of interest and resume to: Sean Farrell, Activities Director Middlebury Union High School 73 Charles Avenue Middlebury, VT 05753 Position Open Until Filled. E.O.E.

Ć&#x152;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ć&#x161;ÍŹ Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ĺ?Ĺ?ĹśÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152; Vermont  Integrated  Architecture,  P.C.  of  Middlebury   seeks   architect   with   experience   in   design,   Ä?ŽŜĆ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;ĆľÄ?Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ä&#x161;Ĺ˝Ä?ƾžÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2022; Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ć?Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ĺ?ÄŽÄ?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜ Ç Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ć&#x;ĹśĹ? ĨŽĆ&#x152; Ä?ŽžžÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä?Ĺ?Ä&#x201A;ĹŻ Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ĺ?ĹśĆ?Ć&#x;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x201A;ĹŻ Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x152;ŽŊÄ&#x17E;Ä?Ć&#x161;Ć?Í&#x2DC; Candidate   must   be   capable   of   leading   commercial   Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ĺ?ĹśĆ?Ć&#x;Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x;ŽŜÄ&#x201A;ĹŻ Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x152;ŽŊÄ&#x17E;Ä?Ć&#x161;Ć? ĨĆ&#x152;Žž Ä?ŽŜÄ?Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x161;ĆľÄ&#x201A;ĹŻ Ä&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ĺ?Ĺ?Ĺś Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161;Ć&#x152;ŽƾĹ?Ĺ&#x161;Ä?ŽŜĆ?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;ĆľÄ?Ć&#x;ŽŜÄ?ŽžĆ&#x2030;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2DC;WĹ˝Ć?Ĺ?Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2039;ĆľĹ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć? Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2020;Ä?Ä&#x17E;ĹŻĹŻÄ&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä?ŽžžƾŜĹ?Ä?Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜĆ?Ć?ĹŹĹ?ĹŻĹŻĆ?ĨŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ç&#x2020;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ?Ĺ?Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ä?ĹŻĹ?Ä&#x17E;ĹśĆ&#x161; Ĺ?ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ä?Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2022; Ä?ŽŜĆ?ƾůĆ&#x161;Ä&#x201A;ĹśĆ&#x161; Ä?ŽŽĆ&#x152;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ć&#x;ŽŜÍ&#x2022; Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ĺľ management.     Candidate   must   be   a   resourceful   and   independent   worker   while   also   being   a   team   player.    Commitment  to  and  experience  with  energy   Ä&#x17E;ĸÄ?Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ?Ç&#x2021; Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; Ć?ĆľĆ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ĺ?ĹśÄ&#x201A;Ä?Ĺ?ĹŻĹ?Ć&#x161;Ç&#x2021; Ć?Ć&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;Ć? Ĺ?Ĺś Ä?ĆľĹ?ĹŻÄ&#x161;Ĺ?ĹśĹ?Ć? Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x2039;ĆľĹ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Í&#x2DC;  Ç&#x2020;Ć&#x2030;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ?Ä&#x17E; Ç Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ĺ&#x161; ĆľĆ&#x161;Ĺ˝ Ä&#x201A; žƾĆ?Ć&#x161;Í&#x2DC; <ĹśĹ˝Ç ĹŻÄ&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ĺ?Ä&#x17E; ŽĨ Ä&#x161;Ĺ˝Ä?Ä&#x17E; Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E; ^ĆľĹ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E; Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161; ^ĹŹÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x161;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;ͲƾĆ&#x2030; Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x152;Ĺ˝Ĺ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;ĹľĆ?Ć&#x2030;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;ĨÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Í&#x2DC;^Ä&#x17E;ĹśÄ&#x161;ĹŻÄ&#x17E;ĆŠÄ&#x17E;Ć&#x152;ŽĨĹ?ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?Ć&#x161;Í&#x2022;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ć?ƾžÄ&#x17E;Í&#x2022; and  three  references  to:   Ä&#x201A;ĹśÄ&#x161;Ć&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x201A;Î&#x203A;Ç&#x20AC;Ä&#x17E;Ć&#x152;žŽŜĆ&#x;ĹśĆ&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ĺ?Ć&#x152;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä&#x161;Ä&#x201A;Ć&#x152;Ä?Ĺ&#x161;Ĺ?Ć&#x161;Ä&#x17E;Ä?Ć&#x161;ĆľĆ&#x152;Ä&#x17E;Í&#x2DC;Ä?ŽžÍ&#x2DC;

STREET ADDRESS: Vergennes Union High School 2013-14

DESCRIPTION: (Up to 10 words)

V.U.H.S. is seeking a

JV BOYS SOCCER COACH YOUR CONTACT INFORMATION NAME: PHONE: Mail in your classified ad with payment to : PO Box 31, Middlebury VT 05753 OR

Stop in and drop it off to Kelly, Vicki or Laurie at our 58 Maple St. location in the Marble Works, Middlebury

MAILING ADDRESS:

$7(ad w/out kit) x___#of runs* For just $3 more, $10 (ad plus kit) x___#of runs pick up an all-inclusive (*Kit comes FREE with 3 runs or more!) GARAGE SALE KIT with Additional words x # of runs everything you need for x 25¢ a successful sale. Total Payment Enclosed $

If interested, please contact: Peter Maneen, Student Activities Director

pmaneen@anwsu.org 877-2179

8/1,  5

MIDDLEBURY UNION MIDDLE SCHOOL Boysâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; Soccer Coach Middlebury Union Middle School is seeking a KVEHI&S]W´7SGGIV'SEGL5YEPM½IHETTPMGERXW [MPP FI žI\MFPI ERH IRIVKIXMG ERH TSWWIWW XLI EFMPMX]XSGSQQYRMGEXI[MXLERHVIPEXIXSQMHHPI WGLSSP WXYHIRXW  /RS[PIHKI SJ QMHHPI PIZIP WSGGIVGSEGLMRKTVMRGMTPIWVIUYMVIH[MXLTVIZMSYW GSEGLMRKI\TIVMIRGITVIJIVVIH   %R]SRI MRXIVIWXIH WLSYPH GSRXEGX .IRRIJIV )EXSR(IERSJ7XYHIRXW%GXMZMXMIW(MVIGXSVEX 382-1202. 4SWMXMSRSTIRYRXMP½PPIH


PAGE  28  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

Addison Independent

CLASSIFIEDS

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JOURNALIST The   Addison   Independent   in   Middlebury,   Vt.,   is   seeking   an   energetic  reporter/editor/web  producer  to  join  the  award-­winning  twice-­ a-­week  newspaperâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  staff.  The  ideal  candidate  will  have  demonstrated   excellence  in  reporting  and  producing  stories  in  text,  audio  and  video   formats.   This  position  will  feature  a  mix  of  classic  print  media  and  cutting-­ edge  online  news.  As  such,  those  applying  should  have  demonstrated   experience   in   journalism   and   understanding   of   news   writing   and   feature  writing,  as  well  as  be  interested  and  engaged  in  social  media   with  an  eye  toward  understanding  the  community  and  building  reader   loyalty.   Some   knowledge   and   experience   with   posting   stories   and   content   management   systems   a   big   plus.   The   job   will   include   a   lot   of  hands-­on  work  improving  the  website,  so  candidates  should  bring   ideas  for  doing  that.  Addisonindependent.com  has  been  named  the  best   news  site  in  Vermont  for  three  years  running  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  our  new  hire  will  be   responsible  for  making  sure  we  make  it  four  years.   The  person  we  hire  will  be  intelligent,  curious,  indefatigable  and   work  well  as  part  of  a  team.  Also,  the  candidate  must  have  a  car,  as  in-­ person  interviews  are  a  must. 6HQGDOHWWHURXWOLQLQJ\RXUTXDOLÂżFDWLRQVUHVXPHDQGH[DPSOHVRI your  work  to:  news@addisonindependent.com. ADDISON COUNTY

INDEPENDENT

VERMONTâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S TWICE-­WEEKLY NEWSPAPER 0LGGOHEXU\97Â&#x2021;  Â&#x2021;ZZZ$GGLVRQ,QGHSHQGHQWFRP

Bristol Recreation Department Position Title:  Hub  Teen  Center  Director Hub Teen Center Mission: 7KH%ULVWRO+XELVDQRQSURÂżWWHHQFHQWHUVHUYLQJ\RXWKXSWRDJHZLWKWKHPLVVLRQRI SURYLGLQJDVDIHVXSHUYLVHGVXEVWDQFHIUHHHQYLURQPHQWZKHQVFKRROLQQRWLQVHVVLRQ :HSURYLGHDQDOWHUQDWLYHWRWUDGLWLRQDODIWHUVFKRRODFWLYLWLHVE\JLYLQJWHHQVDSODFHRI WKHLURZQWRVRFLDOL]HVWXG\DFFHVVWKHLQWHUQHWKHDUPXVLFH[SORUHLQWHUHVWVOLNHYLVXDO DUWVRUYLGHRJUDSK\IHHOVDIHDQGH[SHULHQFHWKHVXSSRUWDQGVXSHUYLVLRQRIDGXOWVZKR UHVSHFWWKHFKDOOHQJHVRI\RXQJDGXOWKRRG Salary: $30,000 dependent on education and experience Reports to: Recreation Department Director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²IURPVRFLDO HFRQRPLFFXOWXUDO SHUVRQDOSHUVSHFWLYHV²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nowledge and Experience: 3RVVHVVD%DFKHORUV'HJUHHLQDUHODWHGÂżHOG<HDUVRIH[SHULHQFHLQUHODWHGÂżHOGPD\ EXWQRWQHFHVVDULO\ZLOORIIVHWHGXFDWLRQUHTXLUHPHQW 0LQLPXPRIRQH\HDUH[SHULHQFHLQVWDIIPDQDJHPHQWVXSHUYLVLRQ 0LQLPXPRIWZR\HDUVH[SHULHQFHLQGHVLJQLQJLPSOHPHQWLQJDQGHYDOXDWLQJ 7HHQ3URJUDPV 7RDSSO\SOHDVHVXEPLWDFRYHUOHWWHUUHVXPHDQGWKUHHOHWWHUVRIUHIHUHQFHWR%ULVWRO 5HFUHDWLRQ'HSDUWPHQW$WWQ'DUOD6HQHFDO32%R[%ULVWRO97RUHPDLO WRGDUOD#JPDYWQHW $SSOLFDWLRQVPXVWEHUHFHLYHGEHIRUH$XJ 3KRQH)D[Â&#x2021;)RUPRUHLQIRUPDWLRQSOHDVHYLVLWEULVWROUHFRUJ

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For  Sale

EXPERIENCED  COOK,  part   time,   weekends   required,   noon  to  8pm.  Apply  in  person,   Halfway   House   Restaurant,   Route  22A,  Shoreham.

KITCHEN   STAFF   Middle-­ bury   Natural   Foods   Co-­op   has  2  full-­time  positions  in  our   kitchen.  Both  require  profes-­ sional   kitchen   experience.   Ideal   candidate   has   experi-­ ence  with  salad  bar  prep  and   deli   counter   service   work.   More  details  on  our  web-­site.   Complete  application  online  at   www.middleburycoop.com  .

SHARED   LIVING   PROVID-­ ER:   Woman   with   develop-­ mental   disability   in   her   late   30s   seeks   supportive   home   in  Middlebury  area  to  continue   her  growth  and  increase  inde-­ pendence.   She   is   employed   part   time   and   very   active   in   Special   Olympics   and   com-­ munity  activities.  Ideal  match   would   be   a   couple   without   children  living  at  home.  Easy   access   to   public   transporta-­ tion   is   a   plus   or   willingness   to  transport  to  work.  Excellent   team  support  provided.  Annual   tax-­free   stipend   of   $28,500,   room  and  board  payment  of   $8300  and  respite  budget.  Call   Sharon  Tierra  at  Community   Associates  802-­388-­4021.

RED   OAK   ROUGH   sawn   select   lumber.   Also   white   ash.   Approximately   1000   board  feet  of  each.  $.50  per   board   foot.   Call   evenings   802-­877-­8365.

EXPERIENCED  WAITSTAFF,   HOSTS  and  bussers  wanted   at   Fire   and   Ice   Restaurant.   Apply  in  person  at  26  Seymour   St.  Do  not  call  restaurant. HELP  NEEDED  TAKING  Care   of  gentleman  in  wheel  chair.   Please  call  for  more  informa-­ tion.  802-­771-­7153. FOODSERVICE   COMPANY   IN  Vergennes  seeking  multiple   positions  including  line  cooks,   dishwasher   and   production   pack.   If   you   are   a   go-­getter   with  a  positive  attitude,  come   work   with   us   in   a   fun   and   busy  environment.  We  need   part-­time   and   full-­time   posi-­ tions,   Wednesday   through   Sunday.   Competitive   pay.   Interviewing   for   immediate   start.   Please   email   resume   and   3   references   to   info@ grazedelivered.com  . GARDEN   MAINTENANCE   Experienced   landscape   gar-­ dener   needed   for   seasonal   care   of   gardens   in  Addison   and  Rutland  counties.  Basic   knowledge   of   trees,   shrubs   and   perennials   is   required.   Must   have   valid   drivers   li-­ cense.   Able   to   work   inde-­ pendently.  The  Inner  Garden   Inc.,  Middlebury.  Send  inquiry   to  joan@theinnergarden.com   or  fax  888-­823-­3389. OFFICE  MANAGER  NEEDED   immediately  for  Brandon  Se-­ nior  Center.  Must  be  computer   literate,  billing,  and  be  able  to   serve  Meals  on  Wheels.  MTW   9am-­2pm.  Call  for  interview,   247-­3121.

LEAD   BAKER,   Middlebury   Natural  Foods  Co-­op,  full  time   (32   hours).   Ideal   candidate   has  professional  baking  expe-­ rience,  familiarity  with  natural   products  and  ServSafe  train-­ ing.  Ability  to  oversee  in-­house   bakery   program,   order   and   receive,  plan  seasonal  menus,   and  implement  new  products.   Proven   success   with   daily   production,  multi-­tasking  and   working   as   part   of   a   team.   Computer  skills  to  price  and   label  products,  maintain  rec-­ ipe  database  and  implement   sales.   To   apply   either   com-­ plete   an   application   online   at  www.middleburycoop.com   or  ask  a  staff  member  for  an   application   in   our   store   at   9   Washington  Street.

SMALL   COMPANY   IN   Ad-­ dison  County  seeks  part-­time   bookkeeper.   Duties   include   handling   receivables   and   payables,  filing,  running  end   of  month  reports,  and  more.   Must   be   proficient   in   Quick-­ Books.   Days   and   hours   are   flexible.  Approximately  10-­12   hours  per  week.  Please  send   resume   and   3   references   to   bookkeeper7293@gmail. com  .

NEED  EXPERIENCED  CARE   GIVER  for  elderly  stroke  pa-­ VERMONT  SOAP  IS  LOOK-­ tient  in  Brandon.  References   ING   for   the   right   people   to   required.  802-­989-­3097. add  to  our  team  of  full  time,   honest,  hard-­working,  friendly,   PART-­TIME   CONSTRUC-­ long-­term   employees.   Must   TION  WORKER  20-­30  hours   be  good  with  numbers,  have   /  week.  Roofing,  painting,  car-­ good  computer  skills,  and  be   pentry.  Some  experience  pre-­ able   to   lift   50lb.   boxes.   Will   ferred.  453-­7324. train.   Please   email   resume   PERSONAL  CARE  ATTEN-­ to  Hilde@vermontsoap.com  . DANT,   full   time,   11pm-­7am   shift,   every   other   weekend.   Must   be   reliable,   compas-­ For  Sale sionate   and   possess   posi-­ tive  attitude.  Call  Shard  Villa   MAXIM   OUTDOOR   WOOD   PELLET  Furnace  by  Central   802-­352-­4369. Boiler.   Heat   your   home   and   Water.  Buy  NOW  and  save  up   to  $400!  Boivin  Farm  Supply.   802-­236-­2389.

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Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Inc. of Bristol Heating  Tech  Wanted Looking  for  an  experienced  service  tech.  with  oil  and   SURSDQHFHUWLÂżFDWLRQV3OXPELQJ7\SH6/LFHQVHDQG$& &HUWZRXOGEHJUHDW\HWZLOOLQJWRWUDLQWKHULJKWSHUVRQ /RRNLQJIRUWKHULJKWWHDPSOD\HUZLWKDJUHDWZRUNHWKLF DWWLWXGHDQGVHQVHRIKXPRU0XVWEHDEOHWRVKLIWJHDUV DQGGRPXOWLSOHWKLQJVLQDIDVWSDFHGHQYLURQPHQWZKLOH EHLQJKRQHVWDWHDPSOD\HUDQGUHOLDEOH3RVLWLRQZLOOEH ÂżOOHGZKHQWKHULJKWSHUVRQDSSOLHV)XOOWLPHSRVLWLRQZLWK IXOOEHQHÂżWVLQFOXGLQJUHWLUHPHQWDQGKHDOWKLQVXUDQFH 3D\EDVHGXSRQH[SHULHQFH/RRNLQJIRUWKDWULJKW SHUVRQWRMRLQRXUWHDPDVZHPRYHIRUZDUG 3OHDVHVHQGFRYHU/HWWHUWR Jackmanâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  Inc.    P.O.  Box  410,  Bristol,  VT  05433

 

PHARMACY TECHNICIANS PART TIME RITE AID, one of the nationâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s leading retail drugstore chains, is looking for responsible individuals to fill the PART TIME positions of PHARMACY TECHNICIAN in the local area. Applicant must be able to work days, nights & weekends. Experience preferred but will train appropriate candidate. Please apply in person to the store manager at: 5,7($,'Â&#x2021;3ULQFH/DQH%ULVWRO97 ,QWHUHVWHGFDQGLGDWHVSOHDVHDSSO\RQOLQHWRWKH SRVLWLRQLQWKHFDUHHUVVHFWLRQRIRXUFRPSDQ\ ZHEVLWHZZZULWHDLGFRPFDUHHUV is an Equal Opportunity Employer



MOâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S  COUNTRY  RABBITS:   Fresh   Rabbit   Meat   for   sale.   Average   weight:   4-­5   lbs.   Charging  $14  per  rabbit.  Also   selling   live   adult   rabbits,   as   well   as   baby   rabbits   for   ne-­ gotiable  price.  Many  different   breeds  including  â&#x20AC;&#x153;Giantsâ&#x20AC;?.  May   be  seen  by  appointment.  Call   Mo  Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Keefe  at  802-­349-­8040.   Great  Meat.  Great  Pets.  Great   Prices.

SAWMILLS   FROM   ONLY   $4897.  Make  and  save  money   with   your   own   bandmill.   Cut   lumber   any   dimension.   In   stock  ready  to  ship.  Free  info   /  D VD:   www.NorwoodSaw-­ mills.com   1-­800-­578-­1363   ext.  300N. VINTAGE   VERMONT   LIFE   MAGAZINES.  Winter  1947-­48   to  summer  1975.  Only  6  miss-­ ing.  Plus  a  few  1980â&#x20AC;&#x2122;s.  Best   offer,  all  only.  802-­352-­4528.

Vacation  Rentals ADDISON:   LAKE   CHAM-­ PLAIN   waterfront   camp.   Beautiful  view,  gorgeous  sun-­ sets,   private   beach,   dock,   rowboat  and  canoe  included.   $600.  weekly,  or  call  for  week-­ ends.  802-­349-­4212.

For  Rent ADDISON;   2   BEDROOM+   house,   located   on   beautiful   Lake  Champlain.  Central  air,   washer  /  dryer,  inviting  decks,   garage,  great  yard  with  awe-­ some   view.   Pet   negotiable.   References   and   security   deposit   required.   $1500  /  mo.   388-­7218. BRANDON   2   BR   $650   +   utilities.  802-­773-­9107  www. thefuccicompany.com  . BRISTOL   3   BEDROOM   house:  2  bath,  2  living  rooms,   2   fireplaces,   2   porches,   ga-­ rage  and  undercover  parking.   2250sq.ft.  Private  with  views.   New   stainless   steel   flat   top   stove.   Washer*  /  dryer.   Free   Wifi.   Extra   storage.   Garden   space.   Lawn   maintenance   and  snow  removal*.  No  pets  /   smoking.  Security,  references,   lease.  Available  September  1.   $1225  /  month.  802-­453-­4838,   leave  message. BRISTOL,  ONE  BEDROOM.   $550  per  month,  includes  hot   water,   trash   and   lawn   care.   Tenant   pays   heat   and   elec-­ tric.   No   Pets.   Deposit   and   references   required.   Call   802-­349-­5268.

BRISTOL;   1   BEDROOM   apartment.   Heat,   hot   water,   excellent   condition.   Lease,   ORGANIC  HIGH  BUSH  black-­ references,   credit   check,   no   berries.  pick  your  own,  $5.00   pets.  $610  /  mo.  802-­453-­3712. /  qt.   Hand   picked   $6.00  /  qt.   Please  call  for  picking  condi-­ tions.  388-­7141.



RAINY   SUMMER   BARREL   SALE  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  THE  BARREL  MAN:   55   gallon   Plastic   and   Metal   barrels.  Several  types:  55  gal-­ lon  rain  barrels  with  faucets,   Food   grade   with   removable   locking   covers,   plastic   food   grade   with   spin-­on   covers   (pickle  barrels).  Also,  275  gal-­ lon   food   grade   totes   $125   each.   Delivery   available.   802-­453-­4235.



CORNWALL;  4  BEDROOM,   2  bath  apartment  located  on   12  acre  property.  Easy  access   to   Rutland   and   Burlington.   Heat,  hot  water.  References,   credit   check.   Available   im-­ mediately.   Call   for   appoint-­ ment.   347-­390-­1843   days,   802-­238-­1993  after  6pm. FERRISBURGH;   3   BED-­ ROOM   house   with   attached   2  bay  garage  and  nice  deck.   Located   1/2   mile   south   of   Button  Bay  State  Park.  $1300.   plus  utilities.  Must  have  refer-­ ences.  802-­475-­2176.


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  —  PAGE  29

Addison Independent

Wood  Heat

CLASSIFIEDS For  Rent

For  Rent

FURNISHED  ROOM  for  rent   2   miles   south   of   Middlebury   College.   $600  /  mo.   utilities   included.  802-­343-­4635.

M I D D L E B U RY,   N E W LY   RENOVATED   two   bedroom   apartment.   All   inclusive.   $1300  /  month.   Close   to   the   college.  Available  August   1.   Call  802-­388-­4831.

LAKE  DUNMORE;  WINTER-­ IZED   2   bedroom   cottages   available   September  —  June,   shorter   period.   Smaller,   heated,   seasonal   cottages   open  until  late  October.  Fully   equipped  kitchens,  bathrooms   with   showers,   comfortable   furnishing,  WIFI,  satellite  TV,   plowing,  trash  collection,  re-­ cycling.  10  minutes  to  Middle-­ bury  or  Brandon.  Email  info@ northcovecottages.com  or  call   352-­4236. MIDDLEBURY   COMMER-­ CIALLY  ZONED  House  with   maximum   exposure   and   ac-­ cess  to  Rt.  7  and  Foote  Street.   Currently  a  physician’s  office.   Spacious   parking.   Handicap   accessible.   Available   Au-­ gust   1.   Please   call   Darcy   at   802-­388-­9599. M I D D L E B U RY   H O U S E   SHARE.  Walking  distance  to   downtown.   Quiet   area   near   TAM   trail.   View.   Utilities   in-­ cluded.   No   smoker   or   pets.   References.   First,   last   and   security  deposit.  Credit  check.   $550  /  mo.  6  month  to  1  year   lease.  802-­989-­3097.

For  Rent

802-­453-­2276.

NEW  HAVEN;  EXCELLENT   1   bedroom   apartment   with   appliances,   heat,   trash   re-­ moval   included.   $800  /  m o.   plus  security.  Pets  negotiable.   802-­453-­2184.

For  Rent

For  Rent

FIREWOOD:   CUT,   SPLIT,   delivered.  Call  802-­388-­7300. FIREWOOD;   CUT,   SPLIT   and  delivered.  Green  or  sea-­ soned.   Call   Tom   Shepard,   802-­453-­4285.

Real  Estate 4   ACRE   CORNWALL   Hill-­ top  building  site  with  expan-­ sive  view-­  Camel’s  Hump  to   Killington.   Approved   septic   design.   All   permits   on   file.   220   acres   also   available.   www.landwoodwater.com   619-­208-­2939.   oppa6@ya-­ hoo.com  . BEST   VALUE   IN   MIDDLE-­ BURY;  4  bedroom,  4-­1/2  bath,   energy   efficient   home.   Ex-­ cellent  condition.  Built  2008.   Want  to  Rent Located   within   walking   dis-­ PROFESSIONAL   WOMAN   tance   to   schools,   shopping,   WITH   excellent   credit   and   TAM   trail,   central  A/C,   2-­car   references   seeks   house   or   garage.   Asking   $359,000.   apartment   to   rent   in   Middle-­ 802-­388-­3937. bury  area.  Call  860-­501-­3724   or  email  obsc12@verizon.net  .

.

D ! OL ou

S ank  Y Th

For  Rent

For  Rent

Trucks





HAY  FOR  SALE:  First  cut  $3   /   square   bale.   Mike   Quinn,   1981   T-­TOP   CORVETTE   end  of  South  Munger  Street,   original   title,   70,893   miles,   Middlebury.  802-­388-­7828. needs   small   cosmetic   work.   HAY   FOR   SALE:   Small   $5500,  call  Bill  at  475-­2535. square   bales.   First   cut   1997  HONDA  ACCORD  LX.   and   mulch.   Delivery   avail-­ Automatic,  sunroof.  130,000   a b l e .   C a l l   f o r   p r i c i n g .   miles.   runs   well.   $1784.   802-­453-­4481,  802-­349-­9281,   802-­349-­5900. or  802-­989-­1004. 2001  HONDA  CIVIC.  4  mount-­ NEW   HOLLAND   T1530-­   ed   winter   tires.   Good   condi-­ 250TL   Loader,   200   hours.   tion.   No   A/C.   $3250   OBO.   Winco   PTO   Generator.   Call   802-­388-­2483. 802-­247-­6735.

Wanted BUYING   ANYTHING   OLD   Postcards,   coins,   jewelry,   books,   pottery,   old   photos,   toys,  antiques.  Good  prices.   Rick  Wyman,  236-­3240. WANTED   TO   BUY   1   item   or   houseful.  Also   old   books.   Call   Blue   Willow   Antiques.   802-­247-­5333. WANTED:  TWO-­  TWO  drawer   single   file   cabinets.   Good,   clean  condition.  Call  Pam  at   802-­388-­4944.

Public Notices Public  notices  for  the  following  can  be  found  in  this   ADDISON  INDEPENDENT  on  Pages  29  &30.

Addison  County  Regional  Planning   Commission  –  Bristol  (1) Addison  County  Superior  Court  (1) Ferrisburgh  (1) Orwell  (1) Vergennes  (1)

Particularly  on  sites  like  Craigslist. And  it’s  easier  to  break  the  law  than  you  might   think.  You  can’t  say  “no  children”  or  “adults  only.”   There  is  lots  you  can’t  say.  The  federal  government   is  watching  for  such  discrimination.

Call  the  Addison  Independent  at  (802)  388-­4944. Talk  to  our  sales  professionals.

GOLDEN  RETRIEVER  PUP-­ PIES,  9  weeks  old.  First  shots   and  wormed.  Asking  $500.  3   females,   2   males.   Ready   to   go.  Call  Tim  802-­349-­8932  or   Ellie  914-­489-­7873.



2006  JEEP  GRAND  Cherokee   Laredo;  60,500  miles;  silver,   automatic,  3.7L  V6.  Summer   and   studded   winter   tires.   Moon   roof,   excellent   condi-­ tion.  $11,500.  802-­388-­0320,   willem.jewett@gmail.com  .

FORD   RANGER   XLT   1998,   Boats super  cab,  white.  4x4,  4  liter   V-­6.  Automatic  transmission,   PELICAN   BASS   RADAR   102,500   miles.   Inspected.   BOAT.  Good  condition.  With   $3500.   Call   802-­758-­2377   extras.  $400.  OBO.  349-­5139. for  information.

Att.  Farmers

It’s  against  the  law   to  discriminate  when   advertising  housing   related  activities.

Let  us  help  you  sift  through  the  complexities  of  the  Fair   Housing  Law.  Stay  legal.  Stay  on  the  right  side  of  the   nation’s  Fair  Housing  Law.  

Animals

2002  FORD  FOCUS  WAGON,   five  speed  manual,  109k,  good   tires   plus   four   good   snows.   Economical,   drives   great.   $3500.  802-­388-­2594.



RIPTON   TWO   BEDROOM   apartment.   $550  /  month   plus   utilities.  No  pets.  No  smoking.   Call  802-­382-­8567.

SHOREHAM   VILLAGE-­   2   Bedroom,  second  floor  apart-­ ment.   20   minutes   from   Mid-­ dlebury.  Walking  distance  to   school.  Huge  living  room,  big   eat-­in  kitchen.  Non  smoking.   No   pets.   $720  /  month   plus   utilities.  Available  after  August   4.  802-­388-­5411.



FIREWOOD  FOR  SALE  Cut   and   split,   2   cord   minimum.   Mixed  green  hardwood,  ready   to  go.  No  delivery  charge.  Dry   will  be  ready  end  of  August.   Limited  amount,  place  orders   now.  Log  loads  still  available.   802-­453-­3606,  Lathrop  Forest   Products.

SAWDUST;   STORED   AND   undercover.   Large   tandem   silage  truck  $627,  delivered.   Large  single  axle  dump  $259,   delivered.   Single   axle   dump   $1  92,  delivered.  Pick  up  and   loading  also  available.  Phone   M I D D L E B U RY;   I N D U S -­ order  and  credit  cards  accept-­ TRIAL   PARK.   Available   2   ed.   802-­453-­2226.   Bagged   acres,   lease   or   build   to   suit.   shavings  in  stock.  $5.50  per   802-­558-­6092. bag. NEW   DISPLAY   MODELS,   WANTED:   TO   PURCHASE   Custom  Modular  Homes,  Dou-­ from   owner,   open   land,   20+   ble  Wides  &  Single  Wides.  No   acres.  802-­558-­6092. pressure  sales  staff.  FactoryD-­ irectHomesofvt.com  600  Rt  7   WHITNEY’S  CUSTOM  FARM   Pittsford,  VT  1-­877-­999-­2555   WORK.  Pond  agitating,  liquid   tflanders@beanshomes.com  . manure  hauling,  mouldboard   plowing.   462-­2755,   John   Whitney

Cars

MOUNTAIN   ROAD   FIRE-­ WOOD.  Green  and  dry  avail-­ able.  Oak,  ash,  maple,  beech.   ZEBRA  FINCHES  Cages  not   Cars Order  now  and  save  for  next   included.  802-­377-­0207. PLOW   TRUCK.   1982   GMC   season.  Cut,  split  and  deliv-­ (6)  240  VOLVOS  :  Rust  free.   3/4  ton,  350  4  speed  with  plow.   ered.  Call  802-­759-­2095. $1500  and  up.  802-­316-­7119. $1000.  OBO.  802-­453-­3118.

RIPTON  STREAMSIDE  COT-­ TAGE,  close  to  Ripton  Village.   Studio   with   loft,   deck,   plus   large  room  downstairs.  Snow  /   lawn  included.  $825  /  mo.  plus   utilities.   Yearly   lease   plus   1   mo.  security  deposit  required.   Call  802-­388-­0863.

SELF   STORAGE   And   Pal-­ let   Storage   Available.   Call   802-­453-­5563.

Att.  Farmers

CUT,   SEASONED,   DRY   LEICESTER,   6.8   ACRES,   wood.   Split   to   order.   $255  /   $59,000.   Very   nice   building   cord  delivered.  802-­453-­4387. site  surveyed,  septic  design  in-­ FIREWOOD   CORDS   $250   cluded.  Ready  to  build  on,  with   to  $325.  Delivery  depending   all  permits.  Owner  financing.   on   mileage.   802-­462-­3313;   Call  Wayne  802-­257-­7076.

SOUTH   STARKSBORO:   LOOKING   for   quiet   tenants   for  a  two  bedroom,  1  bath,  mo-­ bile  home  on  owner  occupied   property.  No  pets.  No  smok-­ ing.   $875  /  mo.   plus   utilities.   Deposit  and  credit  references   M I D D L E B U RY,   N E W LY   required.  Call  802-­453-­4856,   RENOVATED   two   bedroom   leave  message. apartment.  All  inclusive.  $1300   /  month.  Close  to  the  college.   THREE   BEDROOM,   2   bath   Available   September   1.   Call   home  in  Shoreham,  furnished,   802-­388-­4831. on  Lake  Champlain  until  June   2014.  $1000  /  mo.  Pet  allowed.   NEW   HAVEN;   2   bedroom   Pam  802-­380-­6058. apartment.  All  appliance,  heat,   rubbish   removal.   No   pets,   no  smoking.  $775  /  mo.  $800.   deposit.  802-­453-­2275.

MIDDLEBURY   ONE   BED-­ ROOM  apartment.  First  floor   apartment  with  shared  deck,   $800   month   plus   utilities.   Beautiful  wood  floors.  Secu-­ rity  deposit,  credit  application   required.  No  pets,  no  smoking.   1457   Route   7   South.   See   Craigslist  ad  for  photos.  Call   802-­349-­7432.

Real  Estate

Ads Classified

(Published

: 5/5/11)

llege. For Rent Close to co TMENT furbished. OM APAR 1 BEDRO Middlebury, newly re 00. , 00 et Main Stre , includes heat. 000-­ th ury $750/mon of Middleb 0000. mile north TMENT, 0-­ OM APAR , electric, rubbish, 1 th plus deposit. 00 O R D BE 1 on cludes heat ly, $595/m upstairs, in Available immediate e d referenc on Route 7. me Deposit an MOBILE ho 50/mo. plus utilities. M O O R D t. $6 2 BE . Private lo in Salisbury 0-­0000. required. eferences required. 00 DO sement. R USE/CON TOWNHO nes. Garage and ba 000-­0000. M O O R D 2 BE pets. Vergen d heat. No ommons, Country C excluding utilities an her, y el et tellite, was pl $1,000/mo. m co internet, sa ry energy ERN, OM, MOD e house. Hi-­speed Ve O e. R D ag nt BE ne 2 or fro Lake Dunm drilled well, 85’ lake 29, 2009 through Ju 802-­352-­6678. furnished ilities. porch, August ut g ed tin us en ar pl re st o. ; sc rental ,000/m dryer, r 10 month gotiable. $1 efficient. Fo -­smoking. Pets ne Non 26, 2010.

To publish a legal notice in the Addison Independent please email information to legals@ addisonindependent.com or fax it to (802) 388-3100.

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The Orwell Development Review Board will meet Wednesday, August 21, at 7:30 pm at the Town Clerk’s Office to conduct the following business: 1. Dave Kent, application for Conditional Use to sell hot-­dogs from a cart on Route 22A by the ballfield, Permit # 7-­27-­13. Information pertaining to these matters may be viewed M, T, Th, 9:30-­12:00 and 1:00-­3:30 and Fr 9:30-­12:00 and 1:00-­6:00 at the Town Clerk’s Office. David King, Chair 8/5 Orwell DRB


PAGE  30  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013

Local  snake  populations  threatened  by  Snake  Fungal  Disease By  MICHAEL  J.  CADUTO In   the   case   of   snake   fungal   disease,   if   the   Jedi   Knight   from   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Star   Wars,â&#x20AC;?   Obi-­Wan   Kenobi,   summoned   the   power   of   nature   by   utter-­ ing,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;The   spores   be   with   you,â&#x20AC;?   he   would   be   spot   on.   This   infectious   organ-­ ism  features  minute  spores   that   produce   a   fungus   capable   of   defeating   powerful  venomous  snakes.  Virtually   unheard  of  in  the  wild  prior  to  2006,   Ophidiomyces   ophiodiicola   has   been   found  on  wild  snakes  in  nearly  a  dozen   states,  including  New  Hampshire  and   Vermont.  It  is  suspected  of  wiping  out   half   the   population   of   timber   rattle-­ snakes   in   New   Hampshire   between   2006  and  2007.   Snake   fungal   disease,   or   SFD,   causes   snakes   to   develop   opaque   eyes,   scabby   scales   and   misshapen   nodules   on   their   heads   and   bodies.   Their  skin  swells  and  thickens,  devel-­ ops   ulcers,   and   sheds   prematurely.   Because   SFD   occurs   on   animals   in   captivity,   where   it   thrives   in   warm,   moist   conditions,   some   scientists   suspect   that   the   fungus   may   have   migrated   into   the   wild   as   tempera-­ tures   and   humidity   have   increased.   Climate   change   may   also   make   it   easier   for   diseases   to   spread   during   the  winter,  when  many  snakes  hiber-­ nate  en  masse  underground. Dr.  Jeffrey  Lorch  of  the  University   of  Wisconsin  Madison  has  conducted   most  of  the  recent  fungus  cultures  on   snakeskins   for   the   U.S.   Geological   Surveyâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   National   Wildlife   Health   &HQWHU +H VD\V WKDW DQHFGRWDO ÂżHOG reports  suggest  that  SFD  has  been  in   North  America  â&#x20AC;&#x153;for  quite  some  time,â&#x20AC;?   and   may   even   be   a   native   species.   (Lorchâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  previous  research  was  instru-­ mental   in   identifying   the   fungus   that  

The

causes   white-­nose   syndrome,   which   has  killed  millions  of  bats  throughout   the  Northeast.) SFD  infects  all  kinds   of   snakes   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   from   rat   snakes   to   rattlers.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   is   likely   that   most   snake   species   in   east-­ ern   North  America   can   contract   SFD,â&#x20AC;?   says   Lorch,   â&#x20AC;&#x153;but   we   really  do  not  know   the   population-­ level   impacts   at   this   time   or   how   the   infec-­ tion   varies   b e t w e e n   s p e c i e s . â&#x20AC;?   The   great-­ est   concern   has  arisen  with   snake   species   that  occur  in  small,   isolated   populations,   for   which   losses   of   even   a   few   animals   could   severely   limit   the   ability   of   those   populations   to  persist  or  recover.   These   vulnerable   species   include   timber   rattlesnakes.   Endangered   in   Vermont  and  New  Hampshire,  rattle-­ snakes   survive   as   relict   populations   that   harbor   little   genetic   diversity,   so   itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   less   likely   that   an   individual   will   emerge   that   is   resistant   to   SFD.   Vermontâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s   Rutland   County   is   home   to   two   populations   that   contain   the   last  few  hundred  individuals.  In  New   Hampshire,   rattlesnakes   have   been   reduced  to  a  single  population.   The   best   way   to   minimize   SFD   is   to  report  sightings  of  infected  snakes   to   the   appropriate   state   or   federal   agency.   Take   photographs,   if   you   can   do   it   safely.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;Citizen   reporting,â&#x20AC;?  

Outside Story

CITY OF VERGENNES BOND SALE NOTICE

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says  Lorch,  â&#x20AC;&#x153;can  help  determine  how   widespread   SFD   is,   which   species   are  affected,  and  whether  the  disease   SRVHV D VLJQLÂżFDQW ULVN WR VQDNHV across  the  Eastern  U.S.â&#x20AC;? Lorch   urges   precautions   to   avoid   spreading   the   disease,   such   as   disin-­ fecting   equipment,   clothing   and  

hands  after  handling  captive  and  wild   snakes.   â&#x20AC;&#x153;It   is   a   good   idea   to   prevent   wild  and  captive  (particularly  exotic)   snakes  from  having  any  sort  of  contact   with  one  another  if  one  of  the  animals   may  be  released  back  into  the  wild.â&#x20AC;? But  why  care  if  snakes  disappear?  

As   predators   that   slither   along   the   middle   links   of   the   food-­chain,   snakes   keep   populations   of   prey   in   check,   including   grasshoppers,   mice,   voles,   rats   and   other   critters   that   frequently  damage  and  destroy  crops   and  gardens.  Snakes  provide  food  for   larger   animals,   such   as   hawks,   owls,   coyotes,   raccoons   and   foxes.  As   part   of   the   natural   diversity   of   life,  they  help  ecosys-­ tems   to   be   more   resilient. S n a k e s   also   have   medical   u s e s .   Several   d r u g s ,   includ-­ i n g   HSWLÂżED-­ tide   and   tirofiban   â&#x20AC;&#x201D;   used   to   prevent   blood   clots   in   patients   with   symptoms   of   chest   pains   and   minor   heart  attacks  â&#x20AC;&#x201D;  are  based  on  snake   venom   proteins.   When   administered   in   time,   these   drugs   help   prevent   a   full-­blown  infarction. And  where  would  humans  be  with-­ out  these  iconic  animals  to  challenge   us  and  serve  as  a  force  against  which   we  take  our  measure?  Although  many  

MORTGAGEEâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;S NOTICE OF FORECLOSURE SALE OF REAL PROPERTY       As   ordered   by   the   Court   set   forth   below   and   in   connection   with   a   certain   mortgage   given  by  Richard  Burnett  and  Cindy  Burnett  to  Mortgage  Electronic  Registration  Systems,   Inc.,   acting   solely   as   nominee   for   Clearlight   Mortgage   Corporation,   its   successors   and   assigns   dated   November   17,   2006   and   recorded   in   Book   64   Page   137-­141   of   the   Land   Records   of   the   Town   of   Vergennes,   of   which   mortgage   the   CitiMortgage,   Inc.   is   now   the   present   holder,   and   in   accordance   with   the   Judgment   Order   and   Decree   of   Foreclosure   entered   September   6,   2012   in   the   action   entitled   CitiMortgage,   Inc.   v   Richard   Burnett,   Cindy   Burnett   and   The   Secretary   of   Housing   and   Urban   Development,   by   the  Addison   Unit,   Civil   Division,   Vermont   Superior   Court,   Docket   No.   297-­11-­09  Ancv   for   breach   of   the   conditions   of   said   mortgage   and   for   the   purpose   of   foreclosing   the   same   will   be   sold   at   Public   Auction   at   47   Booth   Woods   Road,   Vergennes,   Vermont   on   August   16,   2013   at   9:00   am   all   and   singular   the   premises   described   in   said   mortgage,        To  wit:   1-­00372393    A   certain   interest   in   land   in   Vergennes   in   the   county   of  Addison,   and   State   of   Vermont   described  as  follows,  vis: Being   Unit   #6   of   Booth   Woods   Condominiums   as   shown   on   a   plan   entitled   â&#x20AC;&#x153;boundary   Plat   and   Site   Plan,   Booth   Woods   Condominiums,   Vergennes,  Addison   County,   Vermontâ&#x20AC;?   prepared   by   Donald   L.   Hamlin,   Consulting   Engineers,   Inc.,   Essex   Junction,   VT.,   dated   'HFHPEHU   DV UHYLVHG  RQ 0D\   DQG -DQXDU\   DQG ÂżOHG RQ January  28,  1988  at  Book  37  Page  1-­12  in  the  Vergennes  Land  Records,  together  with  an   undivided  16.66  percent  interest  in  the  Common  Areas  and  Facilities  and  a  16.66  percent   share  of  common  costs  and  expenses  in  accordance  with  the  Declaration  and  Bylaws  of   WKH&RQGRPLQLXP5HIHUHQFHVKRXOGDOVREHKDGWRD3ODQHQWLWOHGÂł7\SLFDOÂżUVWĂ&#x20AC;RRUSODQ Booth  Woods  Condominium  Vergennes,  Addison  County,  Vermontâ&#x20AC;?  prepared  by  Donald  L.   +DPOLQFRQVXOWLQJ(QJLQHHUV,QF(VVH[-XQFWLRQ97GDWHG'HFHPEHUÂżOHGDW Map  Book  1,  page  50  of  the  Vergennes  Land  Records. 7KHZLWKLQFRQYH\HGODQGVDQGSUHPLVHVDUHVXEMHFWHGWRDQGEHQHÂżWHGE\WKH'HFODUDWLRQ and   Bylaws   of   the   Booth   Woods   Condominium   dated   January   22,   1988,   and   recorded   January  28,  1988  at  Book  37  Page  1  of  the  Vergennes  City  Land  Records,  and  Amendment   No.   1   to   Declaration   of   Condominium   dated   May   26,   1988   and   to   be   recorded   in   the   Vergennes  Land  Records.    Parcel  ID#  300374-­06   Reference   is   hereby   made   to   the   above   instruments   and   to   the   records   and   references   contained   therein   in   further   aid   of   this   description.    Terms  of  sale:  Said  premises  will  be  sold  and  conveyed  subject  to  all  liens,  encumbrances,   unpaid  taxes,  tax  titles,  municipal  liens  and  assessments,  if  any,  which  take  precedence  over   the  said  mortgage  above  described. 7(17+286$1'  'ROODUVRIWKHSXUFKDVHSULFHPXVWEHSDLGLQFDVKFHUWLÂżHG check,  bank  treasurerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  or  cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  at  the  time  and  place  of  the  sale  by  the  purchaser.   7KHEDODQFHRIWKHSXUFKDVHSULFHVKDOOEHSDLGLQFDVKFHUWLÂżHGFKHFNEDQNWUHDVXUHUÂśVRU cashierâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s  check  within  thirty  (30)  days  after  the  date  of  sale.    The  mortgagor  is  entitled  to  redeem  the  premises  at  any  time  prior  to  the  sale  by  paying   the   full   amount   due   under   the   mortgage,   including   the   costs   and   expenses   of   the   sale.          Other  terms  to  be  announced  at  the  sale.     DATED:  July  16,  2013     Amber  L.  Doucette,  Esq.,  Bendett  and  McHugh,  PC 270  Farmington  Ave.,  Ste.  151    Farmington,  CT  06032 7/22,  7/29,  8/5   Tel  860-­677-­2868,  x  1090    Fax  860-­409-­0626

people   revile   them,   snakes   and   other   reptiles  inspire  a  sense  of  excitement,   awe   and   mystery.  As   the   Goliaths   to   our   David,   they   keep   us   strong   and   make  us  feel  alive. Michael   J.   Caduto   is   an   author,   ecologist,   and   storyteller   who   lives   in   Reading.   The   illustration   for   this   column   was   drawn   by   Adelaide   Tyrol.   The   Outside   Story   is   assigned   and   edited   by   Northern   Woodlands   magazine   and   sponsored   by   the   Wellborn   Ecology   Fund   of   New   Hampshire   Charitable   Foundation:     wellborn@nhcf.org

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING ADDISON COUNTY REGIONAL PLANNING COMMISSION â&#x20AC;&#x201C; REVIEW OF BRISTOL TOWN PLAN

The  Addison  County  Regional  Planning   Commission   (ACRPC)   will   hold   a   joint   public   hearing   on   with   the   Bristol   Plan-­ ning  Commission  on  August  20,  2013  at    SP DW WKH %ULVWRO 7RZQ 2IÂżFH WR review  the  Bristol  Town  Plan  and  consult   with   Bristol   regarding   its   planning   pro-­ cess.  The  Town  of  Bristol  has  requested   that   ACRPC   grant   regional   approval   of   their  Town   Plan   pursuant   to   24   V.S.A.   §   4350(b).  The  purpose  of  the  review  is  to   determine  whether  the  Plan: (1)   is   consistent   with   the   goals   estab-­ lished  in  24  V.S.A.  §  4302; (2)  is  compatible  with  its  regional  plan; (3)  is  compatible  with  approved  plans  of   other  municipalities  in  the  region;  and (4)  contains  all  the  elements  included  in   24  V.S.A.  §4382(a)(1)-­(10). The  plan  encompasses  the  entire  Town   of  Bristol.  Copies  of  the  Bristol  Town  Plan   FDQEHYLHZHGDWWKH%ULVWRO7RZQ2IÂżFH DQG DW WKH$&53& 2IÂżFH  6HPLQDU\ Street,  Middlebury. Adam  Lougee,  Executive  Director   Addison  County  Regional  Planning   &RPPLVVLRQÂ&#x2021;

8/5

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The Town of Ferrisburgh will be holding Grievance Hearings on Thursday, August 8th, and Friday, August 9th, 2013 at the Ferrisburgh Town Clerks Office between the hours of 11:00 a.m. and 7:00 p.m. according to V.S.A. Title 32, §4111(G). A public information meeting for all property owners will be held on Wednesday, July 31, 2013 from 6:00 to 8:00 p.m. at the Ferrisburgh Town Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office. The meeting will be used as an opportunity for general questions and answers, as well as an explanation of some of the sales data used in the appraisal approach. Listers will be available at the Ferrisburgh Town Office to answer any questions and to provide information on Friday, August 2, 2013 from 11:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. Additional appointments are available upon request. Please call the Ferrisburgh Town Clerkâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Office at (802)877-­3429 to schedule an appointment. â&#x20AC;&#x153;A person who feels aggrieved by the action of the listerâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s and desires to be heard by them, shall, on or before the day of the grievance meeting, file with them his objections in writing and may appear at such grievance meetings in person or by his agents or attorneys. Upon hearing of such grievances the parties thereto may submit such documentary or sworn evidence as shall be pertinent thereto.â&#x20AC;? Town of Ferrisburgh, Board of Listers, Carl Cole, Joseph Blasius, John Bull 7/29, 8/1, 5,8


Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013  —  PAGE  31

#4 in the nation for purchase units in 2012* Mortgages without Obstacles Lindsey Wing, Producing Branch Manager Direct: 802.846.0029 Fax: 802.908.8344 Iwing@primelending.com www.LindseyWingVT.com 33 Blair Park, #202 Williston, VT 05495 NMLS: 491711 $VOLVWHGE\0DUNHWUDF®3RZHUHGE\&RUH/RJLFIRU-DQ'HF $OOORDQVVXEMHFWWRFUHGLWDSSURYDO5DWHVDQGIHHVVXEMHFWWRFKDQJH0RUWJDJH¿QDQFLQJSURYLGHGE\3ULPH/HQGLQJD3ODLQV&DSLWDO ©   &RPSDQ\(TXDO+RXVLQJ/HQGHU 3ULPH/HQGLQJD3ODLQV&DSLWDO&RPSDQ\3ULPH/HQGLQJD3ODLQV&DSLWDO&RPSDQ\ 10/6 LVDZKROO\RZQHGVXEVLGLDU\RIDVWDWHFKDUWHUHGEDQNDQGLVOLFHQVHGE\97'HSWRI%DQNLQJ,QVXUDQFH 6HFXULWLHVDQG+HDOWK&DUH$GPLQLVWUDWLRQ±OHQGHUOLFQRDQGEURNHUQR0%9

EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

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All  real  estate  advertising  in  this  newspaper   is   subject     to   the   Federal   Fair   Housing  Act   of   1968   as   amended   which   makes   it   illegal   to   advertise   “any   preference,   limitation   or   discrimination  based  on  race,  color,  religion,   sex,  handicap,  familial  status,  national  origin,   sexual  orientation,  or  persons  receiving  public   assistance,  or  an  intention  to  make  any  such   preference,  limitation  or  discrimination.” This  newspaper  will  not    knowingly  accept   any  advertisement  for  real  estate  which  is  in   violation  of  the  law.  Our  readers  are  hereby   informed  that  all  dwellings  advertised  in  this   newspaper  are  available  on  an  equal  opportu-­ nity  basis.    To  complain  of  discrimination,  call   HUD  Toll-­free  at  1-­800-­669-­9777.

WALLACE REALTY 48 Mountain Terrace Bristol, VT 05443 0(    s FAX 802-453-5898 Visit our websites at: www.wallacere.com www.greenbuiltvermont.com

Kelly

Claire

Tom

Please  call  Kelly,  Claire,  or  Tom

August 5 Puzzle Solutions

8

5

4

7

1

6

9

3

2

2 3

9 7

1 6

4 2

3 9

8 5

6 8

5 4

7 1

9

3

8

6

2

4

1

7

5

7 4

6 1

2 5

8 9

5 7

1 3

3 2

9 8

4 6

6

2

7

3

4

9

5

1

8

1 5

8 4

9 3

5 1

6 8

7 2

4 7

2 6

3 9


PAGE  32  —  Addison  Independent,  Monday,  August  5,  2013


Monday, August 5, 2013