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SURVIVAL GUIDE

The BLUE BOOK ISSUE Inside Insert

University of Michigan SPORTS GUIDE p. 8


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fyi

Collette Jacobs cjacobs@ecurrent.com Publisher / Editor in Chief Mark Jacobs mjacobs@ecurrent.com Co-publisher / Chief Financial Officer EDITORIAL Scott Recker scott@ecurrent.com Arts & Entertainment Coordinator Alia Orra editor@ecurrent.com Assignment Editor Matt Desmond mattd@ecurrent.com Staff Writer Julian Garcia calendar@ecurrent.com Calendar Editor

Non-Moto City

The City of Ann Arbor is taking a step towards the future by leaving automobiles behind. They’ve launched a new blog aimed at highlighting the city’s non-motorized transportation options. Ann Arbor  was recently named the 14th most bike-friendly city in America by Bicycling Magazine, and is ranked as a Gold level Walk Friendly Community. The Ann Arbor Non-Motorized Transportation Blog, features fun and easy ways to navigate the city by foot, bicycle or otherwise, (horses, skateboards, unicycles perhaps?) as well as providing cool ideas for pedestrian adventures that make you active and keep your expensive car parked at home. They’re looking for your feedback, too! Check out the blog at a2nonmoto.tumblr.com, and email kmulder@a2gov.org  —JG

green corner Down on the farm  

The Community Farm of Ann Arbor is Michigan’s oldest establishment organized under the CSA (Community Supported Agriculture) model. The farm celebrated its twenty-fifth/silver anniversary earlier this spring, and is preparing yet another celebration, a fundraising gala dinner to be held from 6-9pm on Thursday, September 13 at Cobblestone Farm.  For more information and to purchase tickets to the event—which will feature spectacular food from Zingerman’s Road House, live entertainment, and a silent auction— visit communityfarm2012benefit.eventbrite.com. The farm, under the care of founders and master gardeners, Annie Elder and Paul Bantle, grows a wide variety of fruits and vegetables (all raised biodynamically), and boasts a sizeable apiary, which produces and supplies honey and beeswax products for nearly a hundred member families every year. The farm provides food to Avalon Housing, Faith in Action and the Women’s Center of Southeastern Michigan. To learn more visit www.communityfarmofaa.org —SS

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ADVERTISING Aubrey Hornsby ahornsby@adamsstreetpublishing.com Sales Manager Kelly Schwarck kelly@ecurrent.com Sales Representative Shannon Reiter sales@adamsstreetpublishing.com Sales Coordinator Emily Gibb classifieds@ecurrent.com Classified and Display Advertising ART & PRODUCTION Kristi Polus kristi@adamsstreetpublishing.com Art Director Megan Anderson manderson@adamsstreetpublishing.com Graphic Designer Sarah Baird production@adamsstreetpublishing.com Graphic Designer Alex Beat abeat@adamsstreetpublishing.com Graphic Designer Brittney Koehl adsin@ecurrent.com Graphic Designer Jake Ziolkowski Jake@adamsstreetpublishing.com Graphic Designer ADMINISTRATION Robin Armstrong rarmstrong@ecurrent.com Accounting Michelle Flanagan distribution@ecurrent.com Distribution INTERNS Marisa Rubin mrubin@adamsstreetpublishing.com Intern Jennie Barker intern@ecurrent.com © 2012 by Adams Street Publishing Co., All rights reserved. 3003 Washtenaw Ave., Suite 3, Ann Arbor, MI 48104, Phone (734) 668-4044, Fax (734) 668-0555. First class subscriptions $28 a year. Distributed throughout Ann Arbor, Ypsilanti and neighboring towns.

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Bake up!

Summer has come to a close, but with school starting Ann Arbor is about to get busy. With the influx of students comes a slew of new businesses. Whether you have the cravings of Cookie Monster or you're looking for the perfect gift item, local business owners do their best to make A2 the regional hub to buy anything!

n You don't have to stay up late to enjoy a good cookie, but it can help! Insomnia Cookies is a fun new addition to downtown Ann Arbor, offering late-night goodies until 3 am, and delivery within a five mile radius. And if you've got a birthday party in the works, Insomnia has cookie cakes and bulk discounts for big orders. So when your sweet tooth keeps you up at night, give them a call. 1229 S. University. 734-769-1011. www.insomniacookies.com. n Ace a big exam, get a big job promotion or just need some comfort? Try some Fresh Baked Confidence! Run by two moms – Melissa, Chief Motivator, and Gingie, Chief Baker – the home-based company delivers baskets and care packages to kids and adults who could use motivation. The difference: not only are the delicious treats in the basket nutritious and energyproviding, they come complete with a motivational message tailored to the recipient’s situation. Find them at the Chelsea and Ann Arbor Farmer's Markets, or place an order by calling 734-657-1094 or visiting www.freshbakedconfidence.com. n You may have eaten at a food cart inspired by a restaurant. But a restaurant inspired by food carts? That’s the concept behind Chela’s, a new family-run eatery on Maple near the corner of Liberty. Adrian Iraola wanted to share not just the food, but also the culture of his beloved home town, Mexico City. Taking inspiration from the street vendors he remembers from his youth, Adrian and his wife Lori offer tacos, burritos, and quesadillas, but without the American staples of hard shells or ground beef—just freshly made ingredients. Chela’s is located at 693 S. Maple Road, and is open 7 days from 10:30am until 9pm, except on Sundays, when it closes at 8pm. www.chelas.com.

ecurrent.com / september 2012   7


T

Photo Credit: U-M Photo Services

he Wolverines are back. Not just back in school or back on the field, but back on top, back in our high hopes and back on every other teams concern list. And as there is a rising sense of fan excitement, we know it's even more intense in the locker room — after some bumps and bruises over the past few years, these players are hungry as hell, fresh off a strong momentumbuilding season. It's a good time to bleed maize and blue.

Back in the high life  

Football

UofM football works to keep the momentum  

By Nick Roumel   If you have tickets to the “Cowboy Classic” on Saturday, September 1, call me. Michigan plays last year’s national champion, Alabama, coached by the devilish Nick “Satan,” former Michigan State mastermind. It just may be a classic that lives up to its name.  How did Michigan go in recent years from a national embarrassment, to the season opening marquee game, fresh off last year’s 11-2 record and Sugar Bowl victory? Two words: Brady Hoke. This former Michigan Assistant was handed the job last year after the Wolverines’ embarrassingly unsuccessful courtships of Jim Harbaugh (Stanford coach and former starting QB) and Les Miles (former assistant and LSU coach). Never mind that Harbaugh and Miles were a little crazy. Both were wildly successful, and in this business, that’s what counts.  Brady Hoke shows that you can be level headed and still be successful, though the word on the street is that he can be intense when he needs to be. He has turned a couple of programs around, at Ball State and San Diego State, and after the humiliatingly pathetic Rich Rodriguez era, that’s just what the doctor ordered Will UM be as successful as they were last year? After marquee wins over Notre Dame, Nebraska, Ohio State, and an overtime win over Virginia Tech in the Sugar Bowl, “Hoke Springs Eternal” — as MGoBlog’s banner reads. But 2012 presents a tougher challenge, starting with the Alabama matchup followed by rematches with Notre Dame, Nebraska, and Ohio State that are all on the road. Perhaps the biggest test is Michigan’s most anticipated home game, the October 20 matchup with the Spartans, who have beaten the Wolverines four straight times, and continue to treat the annual Michigan game as their Super Bowl. Michigan is led by Denard Robinson, RichRod’s greatest legacy and contribution to the program. Robinson is not only an electrifying and charismatic leader at quarterback, but just may be one of the best ever at representing the team off the field. He mingles with regular folks at basketball games and other campus and town

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Senior wide receiver Roy Roundtree will spark the Woverines’ aerial attack

events; he is unfailingly friendly and accessible.   Robinson continues to grow as he adjusts from Rodriguez’ spread offense to Hoke’s multiple pro-style formations. “Shoelace” remains the only player in NCAA history to pass and run for more than 1500 yards each in the same season. If he can cut down on his interceptions, he can expect his senior year to be his best ever.  Robinson’s main target at wide receiver will be senior Roy Roundtree, who needs to have a breakout season to ensure that Michigan has a breakout offense. Backup QB Devin Gardner moves to wide receiver, assuming Robinson remains healthy. The tailback slot will be filled by last year’s 1000 yard rusher (and greatest name on the team) Fitzgerald Touissant, but Touissant’s recent drunk driving arrest leaves his status Cont. on p. 10


ecurrent.com / september 2012   9


FACTS

U of M hockey Schedule TIME

Yost Ice Arena Yost Ice Arena

7:35 p.m. ET 7:35 p.m. ET

Yost Ice Arena 7:35 p.m. ET Yost Ice Arena 7:35 p.m. ET Yost Ice Arena 7:35 p.m. ET Marquette, Mich. 7:30 p.m. ET Yost Ice Arena 7:35 p.m. ET East Lansing, Mich. 7:05 p.m. ET Yost Ice Arena 7:35 p.m. ET Yost Ice Arena 7:35 p.m. ET New York, N.Y. 8:00 p.m. ET (Madison Square Garden) Big Rapids, Mich. 7:05 p.m. ET Big Rapids, Mich. 7:05 p.m. ET Yost Ice Arena 7:35 p.m. ET

Great Lakes Invitational Thu., Dec. 27 vs. Michigan Tech Detroit, Mich. (Comerica Park) Fri., Dec. 28 Western Michigan Detroit, Mich. or Michigan State (Comerica Park) Fri., Jan. 4 vs. U.S NTDP Under-18 ex Yost Ice Arena Tue., Jan. 8 vs. Bowling Green * Yost Ice Arena Fri., Jan. 11 & 12 vs. Alaska * Yost Ice Arena Fri., Jan. 18 & 19 at Lake Superior State * Sault Ste. Marie, Mich. Fri., Jan. 25 & 26 at Western Michigan * Kalamazoo, Mich. Fri., Feb. 1 vs. Michigan State * Yost Ice Arena Sat., Feb. 2 vs. Michigan State * Detroit, Mich. (Joe Louis Arena) Fri., Feb. 8 & 9 at Notre Dame * South Bend, Ind. Fri., Feb. 22 &23 at Ohio State * Columbus, Ohio Fri., Mar. 1 vs. Ferris State Yost Ice Arena Sat., Mar. 2 vs. Ferris State * Yost Ice Arena Fri., Mar. 8, 9 &10 CCHA Playoffs Campus Sites First Round Fri., Mar. 15, 16 & 17 CCHA Playoffs Campus Sites Quarterfinals CCHA Playoffs Detroit, Mich. Fri., Mar. 22 & 23 Championships (Joe Louis Arena) Fri., Mar. 29, 30 &31 NCAA West Regional Grand Rapids, Mich. Thu., Apr. 11 NCAA Frozen Four Pittsburgh, Pa. Sat., Apr. 13 NCAA Frozen Four Pittsburgh, Pa.

TBA TBA

Football, hockey, and men’s basketball seem to get all the press, but the University of Michigan boasts many other successful teams.

27

sport

T &

3 T & T &

Men’s lacrosse was elevated to a varsity sport after three consecutive national championships (MCLA) from 2008-2010.

7:35 p.m. ET 7:35 p.m. ET 7:35 p.m. ET 7:05 p.m. ET 7:05 p.m. ET 7:35 p.m. ET 7:05 p.m. ET 7:05 p.m. ET 7:05 p.m. ET 7:35 p.m. ET 7:35 p.m. ET TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA TBA

The men’s swimming and diving team has won more national championships than any other varsity sport — 18 in all — in the history of the university.

other

sports

Tue., Oct. 9 vs. Windsor ex Thu., Oct. 11 &12 vs. Rochester Institute of Technology Fri., Oct. 19 vs. Bentley Fri., Oct. 26 vs. Miami * Sat., Oct. 27 vs. Miami * Fri., Nov. 2 & 3 at Northern Michigan * Fri., Nov. 9 vs. Michigan State * Sat., Nov. 10 at Michigan State * Thu., Nov. 15 & 16 vs. Notre Dame * Wed., Nov. 21 vs. Bowling Green * Sat., Nov. 24 vs. Cornell Fri., Nov. 30 & DEC. 1 at Ferris State * Sat., Dec. 1 at Ferris State * Fri., Dec. 14 & 15 vs. Western Michigan *

LOCATION

va r s i t y

OPPONENT

Photo credit: Michigan Athletic Media Relations.

DATE

18

Carol Hutchins in Louisville for NCAA’s, talking with Ashley Lane.

Women’s softball coach Carol Hutchins has won more games than any coach, man or woman, in UM history. ecurrent.com / september 2012   11

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Main Lot 7070 E. Michigan Ave at the corner of Mich. Ave. and State in Saline 888-693-5001

Value Center 750 Michigan Ave 734-944-9999 45 vehicles all priced under $13,000.

You can view the entire inventory online at www.briarwoodford.com

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O ly m p i c s

#19

U of M athletics is an Olympic medal magnet. And, while the victory totals rival those of some nations, Wolverine contenders have left their mark on The Games with more than just hardware. Here's a tribute to our modern gladiators:

M EDA L C O UNT

149

If the University of Michigan were a country, it would qualify as the nineteenth most successful in Olympic History

S wimmi n g Wolverine swimmers have found the most success — the most prolific, of course, being Michael Phelps, with his world record of 18 gold medals totaling 22 metals overall.

medals

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Swimmers Tom Dolan, Carl Robie, Peter Vanderkaay and Joan Spillane have each earned two golds.

Jul 1912: Ralph Rose of the USA preparing to throw the shot during the Shot event at the 1912 Olympic Games in Stockholm, Sweden. Rose won the silver medal in this event.

Photo Credit: IOC Olympic Museum/Allsport.

Henry Jamison “Jam” Handy who earned a pair of bronze medals 20 years apart, in 1904 for the 440 breaststroke, and in 1904 1924 for water polo.

U of M grad Gustavo Borges, who swam for Brazil from 1992-2000, earned four medals

1924

23 228

d in the students compete ndon Lo in 2012 games hes students and coac in ed at cip rti pa have cs pi ym modern ol

^ Ralph Rose, who won 3 golds, 2 silvers, and a bronze from 1904 – 1912 in the shotput, discus, and hammer throw. Ralph was a giant at 6’5 ½” and 250 lbs., and was the first to break 50’ in the shotput. ^ Rose was the 1908 flag bearer who refused to dip his flag to the English Queen, starting a tradition that continues to this day. ^ Tragically, Rose died of typhoid fever at 28.

Be sure to check out our NEW website at

www.ecurrent.com

ecurrent.com / september 2012   13


food After Dinner Drink Essentials An intro to Amaro and Eau De Vie

by Robyn Cleveland (Barman at The Ravens Club) September is synonymous with a bountiful harvest, and with that usually comes a large feast. Coincidentally, some of my favorite after dinner drinks fit into this kind of occasion quite nicely. After a large harvest dinner, nothing satisfies quite like the subtle essences of an eau de vie or the robust flavors of an Amaro. Eau De Vie (French for “Water of Life”) or fruit brandy is usually a clear un-aged spirit made from the distillation of fermented whole fruits or juice. Popular throughout the world, these are perfect for an after-dinner tipple. Many say that the high alcohol content of these spirits will aid in the digestion of a heavy meal (hence the French term for after dinner drinks: “digestif”). Aside from that, the delicately captured fruit flavors make for a real celebration of the season since most are produced between the peak and end of growing time. Popular examples include Grappa (grape pomace) and Slivovitz (eastern European plum brandy) as well as pear, cherry, and apple (often aged a bit). Amaro, the Italian word for bitter, is often consumed before a meal as an aperitif to open the palate, but many are reputed to work wonderfully after a meal as well. Usually based in eau de vie (mostly grappa) or neutral grain spirits, there seems to be an Amaro for every region of Italy. These highly spiced and herbal preparations of roots, citrus peels, and plants are categorized as liqueurs. This is because they contain added sugar, but don’t be fooled, as the sweetness can often be a moot point. The most aggressively bitter offender is Fernet Branca from Milan. While some are more approachable, it should be noted that the “roots” (if you will) of Amaro lie in the world of medicine. These medicinal properties lend to Amaro’s folk reputation of being able to aid in digestion, cure an upset stomach, or even reduce a fever! I find the bitter aspect of these aromatic wonders A few Amaro favorites: to be a side note. • Nonino Amaro Quintessentia (try The true beauties with a shot of espresso) are subtle, unique • Averna Amaro Siciliano and the perfect • Fernet Branca exclamation point • R. Jelinek or Navip slivovitz to a great meal. • B.lo Nardini Aquavite di Vinaccia Bianca Grappa • Laird’s Old Apple Brandy aged 7 * yrs

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Fermented 50th

A celebration of five decades is traditionally honored with gold, but Ann Arbor is far too unique for such mundane conventionalities. In honor of Fraser’s Pub’s 50th anniversary, Arbor Brewing Company made “Fraser’s 50th,” an imperial rye brew especially for the A2 mainstay. “I thought it was a very endearing, wonderful thing,” says John Fraser, Fraser’s co-owner. “They thought the 50th was something very special, and it’s really incredible to have them make a beer.” Fraser’s has always been John’s stomping grounds — his father, grandfather and uncle founded the pub in 1962. Stop by and enjoy a taste before its gone, and congratulate Fraser and company on half a century of fun. $5.99 for a pint. 2045 Packard Rd. 734-665-1955. www.fraserspubaa.com. —AO

4 tuesday Phil’s Wine Discoveries

4-6pm. Free. Whole Foods Market, Cranbrook Village 990 W. Eisenhower Pkwy. 734-7946255.www.wholefoodsmarket.com/ stores/cranbrook

Whole Foods Market’s resident wine specialist, Phil, will teach wine lovers how to get the best bang for their buck, with samples from three high-quality value wines.

6 thursday Brew For The River

5-7:30pm. Blue Tractor BBQ & Brewery, 205 E. Washington St. 734-769-5123. www.hrwc.org

Check out Tim Schmidt’s Hay Creek beer — made with water from the Huron River, it’s an artisan brew made in honor of the Huron River Watershed Council. Meet Schmidt and pick his brain on the why and how

of such a beer while you bond with other brew lovers (and water conservationists). Being eco-friendly has never been tastier.

8 saturday 11th Annual Harvest Party 5-9pm. $7. Lone Oak Vineyard Estate 8400 Ann Arbor Rd., Grass Lake. 517-522-8167. www.loneoakvineyards.com

A 3,200 square foot tent will host Lone Oak Vineyard Estate’s biggest party of the year. Bone Island Grille will provide delicious food complements for the newlyreleased wines that will be on hand.

12 wednesday A Farmer’s Feast

7-10pm. $55. Zingerman’s Roadhouse, 2501 Jackson Ave. 734-663-3663. www.zingermansroadhouse.com

James Beard award-winning chef Alex Young will celebrate


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music

Bringing it all back home   Madcat brings Manfra to the Ark   by Sandor Slomovits    

Peter Madcat Ruth teams up with Brazilian guitar hero Big Joe Manfra, magic ensues

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For over forty years Peter Madcat Ruth has been widely acknowledged as one of the finest blues harp players on the globe. He’s brought his mastery of just about every style of blues, along with intriguing forays into folk, rock, jazz (he’s toured with jazz legend, Dave Brubeck) and even classical music, (he’s won an Emmy for his contribution to Pulitzer Prize winning Ann Arbor composer, Bill Bolcom’s Songs of Innocence) to destinations all over the US and to many other parts of the world. Now, he’s carrying a bit of that world home, bringing one of the musicians he’s worked with overseas back to his adopted hometown of Ann Arbor. When Big Joe Manfra, one of Brazil’s finest blues guitar players, joins Madcat at the Ark on Thursday, September 27, it will be the start of a new phase of a musical friendship that is well into its second decade. Madcat met Manfra in 1998 when Ruth was on tour in Brazil with another of his longtime musical partners, Shari Kane. Manfra and Madcat hit it off immediately and, “the next year Manfra invited me back” says Madcat.  “Since then we have done ten tours of Brazil and have played over eighty shows together including three appearances on The Jô Soares TV show which is Brazil’s equivalent of The Tonight Show, or The Letterman Show.” In 2004 Madcat recorded a CD, “Madcat Live in Rio” with Manfra and his blues band. The recording features the hard rockin’ electric Chicago blues that has long been a hallmark of Madcat’s style, and Manfra and his band are more than equal to the challenge of jamming with the master. Manfra’s blistering electric guitar riffs perfectly complement Madcat’s high voltage harp solos on all the blues tracks, and he and his band also smoothly follow Madcat when he goes offthe-beaten-blues-path on tunes such as the Beatles’ Ticket to Ride, Desmond/Brubeck’s jazz classic, Take Five, or the folky 500 Miles (which they play, appropriately enough, in 5/4 time) and even the R&B classic, Hit the Road Jack. Manfra will be coming to the US without his band, but Madcat has invited a superb rhythm section to join them for their gigs together. Sitting in on bass and drums will be another pair of Madcat’s collaborators, Mark Schrock and Mike Shimmin of Maxwell Street. “Manfra LOVES Blues” says Madcat.  “When we toured around together in Brazil, the music soundtrack in the van was strictly blues.  I’d be seeing beautiful beaches and palm trees out the window of the van but the sound-track was Muddy Waters, Howlin’ Wolf, John Lee Hooker, etc.” The Manfra/Madcat Blues Band plays at 8pm on Thursday, September 27 at the Ark, 316 S. Main St. Tickets are $15. 734-761-1818. www.theark.org


Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Nicholas James Thomasma Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room

Nik professes real love for the region in earthy, countryimbued songs drenched in honesty and authenticity. Kind, approachable, thoughtful and passionate, he is the embodiment of that socially conscience songwriter with a guitar strapped to his back. 8:30pm. Free

4 tuesday Jazz, Blues & R&B

Ruthie Foster - The Ark

Her blend of gospel, blues, folk, and soul has drawn comparisons to Aretha Franklin, Tracy Chapman, and Joan Armatrading. 8pm. $20

5 wednesday Rock, Pop & Hip-Hop Trevor Hall - Blind Pig

Hall’s signature blend of catchy pop/rock songs infused with tasteful shades of reggae has made this diverse 24-year-old one of the most lauded up-and-coming musicians on the American music scene. 9pm. $15

Jazz, Blues & R&B Jake Reichbart The Earle Restaurant

Reichbart is an Ann Arbor jazz institution, delighting audiences for almost 20 years, every Wednesday. 7pm.

6 thursday Country & Bluegrass

Chuck Mead - The Ark

He was the co-founder of the three-time Grammy nominated BR5-49, the honky-tonk heroes that almost singlehandedly lit and carried the blowtorch for the mid-1990s alternative country explosion. 8pm. $15

Michigan Theater / Saturday, September 15

Last time Glen Hansard was in town he was fresh from a friend’s funeral and playing with The Swell Season for the first time since his romantic breakup with the other half of that duo, Marketa Irglova. His sadness seemed to continue into this year’s first solo release, Rhythm and Repose — an ambient collection of heartbreakers that wallow on the same grounds as his “holy trinity” he grew up on: Bob Dylan, Leonard Cohen and Van Morrison. And coming to age in 1980s Dublin probably will sculpt bonechilling yearning into his tunes for the rest of his days. 8pm. $40. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. www.michtheater.org —SR

7 friday Jazz, Blues & R&B

Alex Quartet Kerrytown Concert House

The band’s focus is the performance of original music by Levine, but also has a special fascination with the music of American creative music icon Thelonious Monk, among other great composers in the jazz lineage. The group’s musical vision is to expand upon the foundational musical elements of the African Diaspora, and to create using the sounds of their own life experience. 8pm. Free

Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Ellen Keyt & Deb Fedon Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room

Ellen’s music tells stories -inspiring, sad and silly stories. Her style is best described as urban folk, rock/blues with lyrical sophistication, folk with an edge, rock with a gentle heart. Deb Fedon will be accompanying Ellen on the cajon and providing harmonies and background vocals. 8:30pm. Free.

Frontier Ruckus - The Ark

What’s unique about this band is that they use country instrumentation to depict not a rustic utopia but life along the interstate as most of us live

Photo by Connor Masterson

1 saturday

music

Glen Hansard

it. They’ve got a deep lyrical streak, and each of their albums so far has been brilliantly original in concept. 8pm. $10

8 saturday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Scott Cook Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room

He brings honesty, humor, years of roads and a deep love of humanity to his songcraft and storytelling. His straighttalking tunes weave together folk, roots, blues, country, soul and reggae influences, framed by finger-picked acoustic guitar, banjo, ukulele, and foot percussion. 8:30pm. Free

9 sunday Rock, Pop & Hip-Hop ZZ Ward - Blind Pig

Blending a soulful love of smokey music of yesteryear with everything from contemporary pop and hip-hop, ZZ certainly needs to be seen to behold. 9pm. $10 adv./ $12 door

11 tuesday Rock, Pop & Hip-Hop Saul Williams - Blind Pig

This poet, artist, musician puts on a performance that’s sure to entertain. 9pm. $15

14 friday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

John Finan & Sharon Tse - Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room

John is a singer/songwriter/guitarist based in the Detroit area, known for his mix of introspective and funny songwriting, as well as his improvisational guitar work. Award-winning singer/songwriter Sharon Tse combines the influences of folk, pop and jazz into her own unforgettable sound. 8:30pm. Free

cont. on page 20

For more music events visit www.ecurrent.com

Icon Of Coil - NECTO

Icon Of Coil live in concert with special guest [:SITD:] and local support to be announced. 8pm. $13

ecurrent.com / september 2012   19


music cont. from pg 19

15 saturday Jazz, Blues & R&B

as part of the duo The Swell Season. 8pm. $35-$40

16 sunday

Root Doctor Guy Hollerin’s

Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

The Arb and Gardens is partnering with the School of Music and the Residential College for an afternoon of world music in different areas of the Arb. Performances, in the peony garden and at the amphitheater near the Dow Prairie includes, Argentine music, gamelan ensemble, and others. 1pm.

The deeply rooted, soulful connection shared by founding members Freddie Cunningham (lead vocals) and James Williams (bass guitar & vocals) anchors the band’s sound. Root Doctor plays a diverse mix of classic soul and R&B alongside traditional blues and inspired original material. 8pm. $5

Indian Tabla Music with John Churchville Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room

Local tabla player John Churchville hosts an evening of Indian classical, light classical, fusion, and folk music in the wonderful Crazy Wisdom Tea Room. Come hear the sounds of a musical tradition that dates back over 2000 years. 8:30pm. Free

Glen Hansard & Iron and Wine - Michigan Theater

This landmark double bill brings together arists from two of the most memorable Ann Arbor Folk Festival sets of recent years: Iron and Wine headlined the 2010 Ann Arbor Folk Festival with a solo show, and Glen Hansard was a 2011 headliner

Music in the Arb Matthaei Botanical Gardens & Nichols Arboretum

Todd Snider wsg Amy LaVere - The Ark

Whether he’s writing about death or politics, about going to jail or growing old, Todd Snider’s fearless, lay-it-on-theline songwriting never loses its keen sense of life’s turning points. A bit of a charming outlaw, he’s been one of the key shapers of Americana music over the last decade and a half, and a lot has been said and written about him. 7pm. $30

21 friday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Mark Jewett & Shannon Linsea -

Jason Dennie

Crazy Wisdom Tea Room / Friday, September 28

Finger-picker extraordinaire Jason Dennie will be taking a break from the acclaimed bluegrass band Wayward Roots to do a rare solo show at Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room. Dennie is renowned for his folk instrumental work and uses his mastery of finger-style guitar to delve into jazz, country, blues and rock n’ roll. Although Dennie has made his name as a trusty sideman and teacher, this vetran musician can sure put on a treat of a show when flying solo. Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room, 114 South Main St.734-665-2757. www.crazywisdom.net—JG Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room

With roots and influences spanning genres too numerous to name, Mark Jewett’s musical DNA has taken on the flavors and textures of his favorite writers and performers, resulting in what he likes to call “Music Without Boundaries.” With influences similar to Mark’s, Shannon Linsea has enjoyed singing and performing music in various Michigan venues as a solo performer, with groups of friends and with the band “Wellfire.” 8:30pm. Free

a heady mix of roots music through his creative use of the harp, and the haunting drone of the didgeridoo. 8pm. $5

Classical & Spiritual

Parisian Soirée Kerrytown Concert House

This annual gala season opener is fun, full of surprises, and features a program that focuses on repertoire with a connection to all things Parisian. Champagne included! 8pm. $15-$35

Rock, Pop & Hip-Hop

Chris Bathgate - Blind PIg Bathgate flexes his chops as A2’s premier folk troubadour that likes to roll in a little rock. 9:30pm. $8 / $11 under 21

22 saturday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Judy Insley & Floyd Raeon Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room

The duo provides a listening experience of pure acoustic music enriched by the variety of stringed instruments they employ. Intricately woven guitar arrangements, fun banjo/ guitar romps, and melodic guitar/mandolin textures are the fabrics of their sound. 8:30pm. Free

Jazz, Blues & R&B

Harper and Midwest Kind - Guy Hollerin’s

An amalgamation of blues, rock, funk, soul and world music, Australian singer/ songwriter “Harper” creates

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24 monday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

BeauSoleil avec Michael Doucet - The Ark

You can come to a BeauSoleil concert to party or to experience musical history through the group’s mix of Cajun, zydeco, country, blues, bluegrass, Tex-Mex, and Afro-Caribbean sounds! 8pm. $25

25 tuesday Rock, Pop & Hip-Hop First Aid Kit - Blind Pig

These two young ladies have hit the folk circuit in the US hard and their memorizing harmonies have instantly made them a force in the genre. 9pm. $18 adv./ $20 door

cont. on pg 22


music cont. from pg 20

26 wednesday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

The Devil Makes Three The Ark

With a slightly punky perspective on vintage American blues and bluegrass, The Devil Makes Three is a breath of fresh musical air. Laced with elements of ragtime, country, folk and rockabilly, this critically praised, drummer-less trio brings a genuine approach to acoustic music that is deeply steeped in rhythm. 8pm. $17.50

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27 thursday Rock, Pop & Hip-Hop Blood Red Shoes Blind Pig

This thirsty duo brings the rock full force, and makes you wonder how much sound two people can truly generate. 9pm. $10 adv./ $12 door

28 friday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Jason Dennie Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room

He’s a solo artist, soughtafter sideman, teacher; singer-songwriter, finger-picker extraordinaire; performer of contemporary folk, roots & bluegrass, and gospel-tinged music. 8:30pm. Free

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29 saturday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Joel Palmer Crazy Wisdom Bookstore and Tea Room Known for his folk, blues and swing style, Joel is also a trained vocalist who can belt out a song or croon a tune while creating the sound of a small combo with his guitar. 8:30pm. Free

Country & Bluegrass

The Ragbirds - Blind Pig

A2’s favorite Americana band led by the insatiable Erin “E-Bird” is sure to serve up a rollickin’ good time. 9pm. $12 adv./ $14 door

Jazz, Blues & R&B

Lady Sunshine and the X Band - Guy Hollerin’s

Lady Sunshine’s sultry, soulful vocals leads the X Band into the realms of the funkiest blues. 8pm. $5

30 sunday Acoustic, Folk & Ethnic

Ingrid Michaelson Power Center

Staten Island, New York songstress Ingrid Michaelson started out singing mellow, moody, often very funny folkpop confections. Now Ingrid comes to A2 with an acoustic quartet, putting her voice and songs front and center, in a show that marks the maturing of one of today’s generation’s favorite artists. 7pm. $27-$42


music

BeauSoleil with Michael Doucet mixes it up with a thick gumbo of cajun, zydeco, bluegrass and more

perspective: blues

Photo by: Keneeth Cooke

The blues channel by Jerry Mack  

You won’t find blues music on your TV, unless there is a PBS fundraiser or other specialty music show being aired, though television programming can give you the blues. Fortunately the nature of the music is that you can get rid of your blues by listening or dancing to it and absorbing its healing powers. Television programming cannot do that for you because it requires passive participation, while the blues invokes active participation  –  it moves you. Ruthie Foster wakes up You can tune into The Ark for at audiences with raw power least three big time shows that require and the hope of redemption your active participation. Singer/guitarist Ruthie Foster returns on the 4th with a soul stirring Photo by: John Carrico show that gets back to the basics of what the Big Three on the 8th. Root Doctor from Lansing music is about — authentic emotional expression and absorption of that energy by the audience. has  the R&B, soul and blues grooves that will set you in Her spirited delivery is a powerful vehicle that fuses soul, motion on the 15th. Harper & Midwest Kind returns blues, folk and gospel into a message that leaves little on the 22nd with great original music honed from his love doubt that peace and redemption are at hand. Her latest of American R&B mixed with aboriginal rhythms. Harpeffort, Let It Burn, is a heart-felt release of her joyful er’s use of the didgeridoo from his native Australia during expression at its best. Get ready for a feast of Louisiana performances is always intriguing. Ann Arbor’s first lady Cajun music when BeauSoleil with Michael Doucet of funk and soul Lady Sunshine & the X Band will returns on the 24th. Cajun fiddler, Doucet,   has led this soothe and groove you with soul, funk, and blues originals troupe for over 30 years revealing the Pelican state’s rich and standards on the 29th. You won’t need reality TV to enjoy the return of Happy history as it is transformed into irresistible dance beats. Cajun, zydeco, country, blues, bluegrass, Tex-Mex, and Hour every Friday starting at 6pm at the Live Club at 102 Afro-Caribbean are all served up, precise and listener S. First Ave. Fubar starts the season rolling with R&B, friendly. Their latest, Alligator Purse, will open your  ears pop, and rock standards and originals on the 7th. Perennial favorite Drivin’ Sideways delivers soulful country, to their bounty of musical styles. The Local Blues And Local Brews at Guy Hol- honky tonk, and rock ballads on the 14th and 28th. The lerin’s in the Holiday Inn Near UM’s Campus has a line- Terraplanes drive home the blues, R&B, and roots rock up of award winning musicians that are the real deal in on the 21st.   Conor O’Neill’s Irish Pub on Main St. not only local entertainment. Bobby Murray Band performing on the 1st brings an   impressive repertoire of jump has traditional music, but features some mighty fine blues blues standards from his long term role as guitarist and acts such as Michael May & the Messarounds, the musical director for Etta James in the 1990’s. Party down Blues Owls, and The Terraplanes on Thursdays and with some funky urban blues from Motor City  Josh & Saturdays. You can check out their updated schedule at www.conoroneills.com/annarbor.       ecurrent.com / september 2012   23


film

6 thursday Fever (Goraczka)

Free. 7pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397.

could launch great discussions about expectations and school pressure.

14 friday I Was Born, But

$7-$15. 7pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www.michtheater.org.

Explore the effects of a rapidly modernizing Japan and the class-consciousness it creates in a typical Japanese family.

15 saturday The Breakfast Club

Parable of the past

Set in a time when Europe was on the brink of being swallowed by fascism, Pan's Labyrinth takes a gothic, surreal turn into a juxtaposed story of a little girl's journey into a magical world where she's viewed as the second coming of a princess. In reality, her step-father-to-be exterminates anti-Franco regime rebels at his day job; in the realm of the underworld, she's met with three challenges to prove herself. As she struggles for identity — in both worlds — the violence escalates and her dual purpose is revealed. The Michigan Theater screens this dark fairy tale on Tuesday, September 4. $10. 7pm. 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8463. www.michtheater.org —SR

1 wednesday Revenge of the Electric Car

Rushmore

Free. 7pm. Luther House, 1520 Hill St.

Presents the recent resurgence of electric cars as seen through the eyes of four pioneers of the EV revolution. Director Chris Paine (Who Killed the Electric Car?) has had unprecedented access to electric car R & D programs at GM, Nissan, and Tesla Motors. He also follows an electric car converter who refuses to wait for international car makers to fill the demand.

3 monday Casablanca

$7.50-$10. 7pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397.

8 saturday

www.michtheater.org. Enjoy a screening of one of America’s favorite wartime love stories.

$7. Midnight. State Theater, 223 S. State St. 734-761-8667. www.michtheater.org/state/.

Follow the eccentric fifteen year old Max Fischer as he handles being a poor tenth grader with big dreams. After falling in love with a teacher and getting kicked out of school, Fischer tries to redeem himself. 

12 wednesday Race to Nowhere

Free. 7pm. Luther House, 1520 Hill St.

Antidote to Waiting for Superman.  Is our culture placing too much pressure on young people to be uber-successful, pushing them to the edge of exhaustion or worse? The film forces us to examine our own preconceptions about parenting and education.  A worthwhile watch for both parents and older kids and

 $7. Midnight. State Theater, 223 S. State St. 734-761-8667. www.michtheater.org/state/.

Follow Claire, Andrew. John, Brian and Allison as they’re trapped in an all-day Saturday detention in this quintessential 80s film. 

19 wednesday Education Under Fire

Free. 7pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www.michtheater.org.

This documentary focuses on the Islamic republic of Iran’s policy that denies Baha’i community members the chance to attend higher educational institutions. A discussion will follow the screening. 

20 thursday Europa, Europa

Free. 7:30pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www.michtheater.org.

This film is based on the 1989 biography of Solomon Perel, a German Jew who fled the Holocaust by passing as an elite member of the Aryan race.

23 sunday Note by Note: The Making of Steinway L1037 $7-10. 2pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www. mictheater.org.

Follow the creation of a Steinway concert grand from lumber to the concert hall. Sales benefit the Steinway Campaign at Eastern Michigan University. 

26 wednesday Koch Brothers Exposed

Free. 7pm. Luther House, 1520 Hill St.

An expose on the billionaire brothers Charles and David Koch, who helped finance the conservative political advocacy group Americans for Prosperity. Among other donations, they give large sums of money to universities, but only if the paid parties sign contracts that require the hiring of teachers who will push the Koch point of view:  dismantling Social Security and Medicare, gutting unions, eliminating all forms of “government interference “ - otherwise known as regulations and laws pertaining to corporations.

27 thursday Secret Garden

Free. 7:30pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www. michtheater.org.

Frances Hodgson Burnett’s classic tale of three young children who bring life back to an old and gloomy estate in England comes to life in Polish filmmaker Agnieszka Holland’s screen version.

29 saturday The Three Corpse Circus Independent Horror Film Classic

$7-$10. 7:30pm and 9:30pm. | Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www.michtheater.org.

The Three Corpse Circus will be presenting a variety of shorts from around the world. These shorts will highlight genres involved in horror, such as psychological, supernatural, comedy, thriller and more. 

30 sunday Bunnicula

$12-$15. 1:30pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www. michtheater.org.

The Monroe family adopts a rabbit they find on the street that has sharp fangs and prowls about its cage at night. Vegetables begin to lose their color; coincidence or could the new pet be a vampire?

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theater

Photos by Jorg Baumann

So Shakespeare, you think you can dance?

Comedy

1 saturday

Nate Fridson

$10-$12. 8pm and 10:30pm. Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase, 314 E. Liberty.734-996-9080. www.aacomedy.com/.

Nate Fridson, hailing from Detroit, is a rising star in the worlds of writing and comedy. He was a semi-finalist in the New York Comedy Contest and has participated in numerous festivals and contests, such as the Laughing Skull Comedy festival.

7 friday Jon Fisch

$10-$12. 8pm and 10:30pm. Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase, 314 E. Liberty.734-996-9080. www.aacomedy.com/.

Jon Fisch has been featured in Maxim Magazine as well as Comedy Central’s “Fresh Faces of Comedy”. His routine, which focuses on city living, has gotten him attention from numerous television stations, movies and festivals. Catch him on the 7th or 8th.

14 friday Geoff Tate

$10-$12. 8pm and 10:30pm. Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase, 314 E. Liberty.734-996-9080. www.aacomedy.com/.

This rising star from the midwest has been seen on Comedy Central’s “Live at Gotham” as well as numerous festivals around the nation. Shows on the 14th and 15th.

20 thursday Ahmed Ahmed

$9-$14. 8pm-10:30pm. Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase, 314 E. Liberty.734-996-9080. www.aacomedy.com/.

Ahmed has been in movies such as “Iron Man” and “You Don’t Mess With The Zohan”, as well as shows like “The Tonight Show with Jay Leno” and “Roseanne”. His comedy routine has gotten him attention

The world renowned Kidd Pivot dance company brings their multimedia theatrical spectacular to Ann Arbor with a performance of The Tempest Replica. The production is based on motifs from Shakespeare's play The Tempest and integrates original music, high tech visual design and text to create a multi-sensory experience. Kidd Pivot is revered for blending classical dance elements with adventurous contemporary improvisation, which brings an added complexity to the process of telling the story. $16-38. Friday & Saturday, 8pm. Power Center, 121 Fletcher St. 734-764-2538. www.ums.org—JG

from multiple publications and he has performed all around the nation. Catch him on the 20th, 21st or 22nd.

27 thursday Ricarlo Flanagan

$8. 8pm. Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase, 314 E. Liberty St. 734-996-9080. |www.aacomedy.com.

Ricarlo Flanagan, as seen on HBO’s “Just For Laugh’s Montreal” will be showcasing his comedy routine for one night only.

28 friday Tony Deyo

 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www.michtheater.org. 

Mark Haddon’s best-selling novel has been transformed into a play. Watch as Christopher works on solving the mystery of who killed Wellington the dog. Presented by UMS. 

27 thursday The Fantasticks

7pm. $26. Encore Theater, 3126 Broad St., Dexter. 734-268-6200. www. TheEncoreTheatre.org.

The Fantasticks ran for more than 42 years off-Broadway, making it the longest running musical in theater history. The opening song, “Try to Remember,” has been a huge hit for

a number of artists over the years, and a movie version of the musical had a very successful run in 1995.

29 saturday Spokenword Billboard Awards

$20-$25. 7pm. Village Theater, 50400 Cherry Hill Rd. 734-394-5300. www.canton-mi.org/villagetheater/ Join vocalists, steppers, musi-

cians, mimes and spoken word artists from around the world for an evening of the area’s finest talent.

$10-$12. 8pm-10:30pm. Ann Arbor Comedy Showcase, 314 E. Liberty.734-996-9080. www.aacomedy.com/.

This rising young talent has been featured in HBO’s U.S. Comedy Arts Festival. Catch him on the 28th or 29th.  

Theater

14 friday My Fair Lady

$17-$20.7:30pm. Village Theater, 50400 Cherry Hill Rd.  734-394-5300. www.canton-mi.org/villagetheater/.

The classic tale of linguistics professor Henry Higgins as he attempts to transform Eliza Doolittle into a proper lady. A Lerner and Loewe classic.

21 friday Threefold Productions presents “The Pillowman” $15-$18. 8pm. Mix of Ypsilanti, 130 W. Michigan Ave. 734-961-8704.

Ypsilanti’s newest theater group will be performing “The Pillowman”, a play about an author and his younger brother and their possible involvement in a string of murders. 

23 sunday National Theater Live: The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time $22. 7pm. Michigan Theater,

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art

artbeat George Nelson:  Inventor of Modern Design by Louis Meldman

As readers and fans well know, less than an hour from downtown Ann Arbor, even without breaking the speed limit, is Cranbrook. At the Cranbrook Art Museum, through Sunday, October 14, is George Nelson: Architect, Writer, Designer, Teacher. It is the most comprehensive retrospective of his work ever staged – 120 iconic pieces. If you don’t really know who George Nelson was, this is compulsory. And a guiltless pleasure.  CAM’s show was put together by Vitra, the legendary German reproducer of Mid-Century Modern decorative art, and this is the final stop for the exhibition before returning to Germany. Nelson died in 1986, having spent his last three years as a professor of Design Research at the University of Michigan.  Walking through the exhibit, I kept thinking, “I didn’t know he did that.” And that. More than art, George Nelson invented the bulwarks of modern design including the concepts “Living Room,” “Office Cubicle,” and “Modular Storage.” Everybody knows him for his Bubble Lamps and Ball Clocks, but he did everything, including advertising posters, like the one with Marilyn Monroe displayed here for “The Misfits” (1961). George Nelson studied architecture and art history at Yale in the Roaring Twenties. In Europe he made friends with Mies van der Rohe, Le Courbusier and Walter Gropius, head of the Bauhaus. He was drinking buddies with Buckminster Fuller and he drove a Jaguar XK-120. After

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At left, George Nelson posing for a Herman Miller advert Traveling Men, ca. 1954. Above, Ball Clock, 1948, still looks futuristic, even today Photos courtesy of Vitra Design Museum Archive

the war he was made Director of Design by Herman Miller, the far-sighted furniture maker that put Zeeland, Michigan on the map. There he hired Charles and Ray Eames and other Cranbrook artists like Harrey Bertoia to create American modernism. It was what warweary America wanted: something completely different, a break with the past. It was called modernist at the time but even today it looks futurist to me, more an inspiration for The Jetsons than for Mad Men. Whatever you call Nelson’s work, it has a timeless, pleasing, subtly droll aesthetic that is easy to live with. My wife and I have a hanging Bubble Lamp H-727 that I just hit my head on. And a Ball Coat Rack that I can barely see because of the jackets and hats. They’re Vitra reproductions, of course, but I can’t tell the difference. The show has a sumptuous, eponymous hardbound catalogue with photographs and histories and essays. A steal at $98.00. Or you can do what I did. Walk ten paces to the lovely museum library and review the catalogue to your heart’s content. There are also well-chosen books by and about Nelson, including his brilliant “How to See” and “A Guide to Reading Our Man-Made Environment.” This is a great season for a walk around the grounds, too. Ask at the desk for a laminated, self-guided tour map. $8 for non-members. 39221 Woodward Ave., Bloomfield Hills. 248-645-3319. www.cranbrookart.edu.


art

You’ve Been Framed

Free. 6pm-9pm. Detroit Institute of Arts, 5200 Woodward Ave., Detroit. 313-833-7900. www.dia.org.

Make your very own frame with papers, gel pens and markers on a corrugated board. 

9 saturday New Art Prints from the AADL Collectio

Ann Arbor Downtown Library, 343 S. Fifth Ave. 734-327-4555. www. aadl.org. The collection makes

Step Through Vessel

A history of clay

Running at the Clay Gallery on Main from September 1st through the 29th is Craig Hinshaw Ceramics: Two Decades, Two Themes. Acclaimed ceramicist, Hinshaw garnered his MFA at Cranbrook and is active in art education and art criticism. The current show goes back twenty years and features both his “Black and White” and “Animals” motifs. The Black and Whites include both wheel thrown and hand build pieces, glazed in satiny black with white glaze. They are functional or can be enjoyed for their decorative value. The Animals pieces are hand built and fired with stoneware glazes in a gas kiln Hinshaw has in his backyard. They interpret and reconstruct contemporary environmental dilemmas like factory farming and pollution. Hinshaw is the author of more than 50 articles on art education and ceramics. He wrote the critically acclaimed book, Clay Connections, an account of his innovative elementary art lessons and projects. There will be an artist’s talk at the gallery on Sunday, the 9th at 3pm. And don’t miss the opening reception on Friday the 7th. The Clay has some of the best opening parties in town. Clay Gallery, 335 S. Main St. 734-662-7927. www.claygallery.org —LM

available original works of art and fine reproductions of paintings, photography, prints and drawings. Artists represented in the circulating collection are global and multicultural in scope. Selections range from the iconic to the eclectic but are always, good examples of the artists’ works.

13 thursday The Spirit of Place: Photographs by Angela and Jim George

Free. 5pm. Kerrytown Concert House, 415 N. 4th Ave.734-769-2999. www.kerrytownconcerthouse. com.Pictures from excursions

through the United States, Canada, Mexico, Central America, Europe and North America, reflecting inner personal journeys.

PES

Free. 5:10pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www.michtheater.org

PES has worked with slowmotion animation to highlight household and other common items.

16 sunday

and dancing will begin at 9pm.

New Exhibits

2 sunday African Art Guided Tour

Free. 2pm. University of Michigan Museum of Art, 525 S. State St. 734-764-0395. www.umma.umich.edu.

View thirty works of art and how they relate to the overall history and theme of African art.

7 friday Craig Hinshaw Ceramics: Two Decades, Two Themes Free. 7pm-9pm. Clay Gallery, 335 S. Main St. 734-662-7927. www.claygallery.org. 

Work in black and white and animals from the past twenty years.

YOUNG

Free. 2pm. University of Michigan Museum of Art, 525 S. State St. 734-764-0395. www.umma.umich.edu.

The Seoul-based art collaborative YOUNG-HAE CHANG HEAVY INDUSTRIES blends digital text with music. This guided tour will focus on their new pieces.  

20 thursday Sally Mann

Free. 5:10pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St.734-668-8397. www.michtheater.org.

Mann’s photographs showcase life in the “deep, dark South.” A camera was used that mimics photos of the nineteenth century.

23 sunday

“The Death of General Wolfe” Guided Tour

 

Free. 2pm. University of Michigan Museum of Art, 525 S. State St. 734-764-0395. www.umma.umich.edu.

Benjamin West’s painting “The Death of General Wolfe” depicts the Battle of Quebec, also known as the French and Indian War.

27 thursday Jennifer Karady & Paul Rieckhoff

 

Free. 5:10pm. Michigan Theater, 603 E. Liberty St. 734-668-8397. www.michtheater.org.

Jennifer Karady has been working with veterans to created staged narratives of their difficult experiences while fighting. The photos symbolize the veterans switching back into civilian roles. Paul Rieckhoff is the founder and executive director of Iraq and Afghanistan Veterans of America (IAVA). 

ongoing

10th Annual Teen Graffiti Art Exhibit

Downtown Library Multi-purpose Room, 343 S. 5th Ave. 734-327-4555. www.aadl.org.

In this annual event held during Ann Arbor’s summer Art Fairs, teens gather in the staff parking lot of the Downtown AADL to try their hand at the art of graffiti.

Creature

The Gallery Project, 215 S. Fourth Ave. 734-997-7012. www.thegalleryproject.com

The latest thought-provoking themed exhibition from the Gallery Project, featuring work in multiple media from cutting edge artists.

ecurrent.com / september 2012   27


everything else 1 saturday Ann Arbor Roller Derby

5:30pm. Admission is a suggested donation of $10. Buhr Park, 2751 Packard Rd. www.a2derbydimes.org

It’s a battle of Tree Town vs. Motor City as Ann Arbor Derby Dimes’ Brawlstars and Detroit Derby Girls’ Motown Wreckers lay it all on the track. Who will prevail?

7 friday

8 saturday Exotic Plant Sale

Saturday & Sunday, 10:30am-4pm. Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd. 734-647-7600. www.lsa.umich.edu

Featuring a large selection of cactus, succulents, and bromeliads, including air plants and orchids, in sizes ranging from seedlings to mature plants. Also find growing supplies, books, and art prints.

Law, Policy and the War on Al Qaida: An emerging consensus?

Honey Harvest Demonstration

Come for this special lecture by General Michael Hayden, a retired United States Air Force four-star general and former Director of the National Security Agency and Director of the Central Intelligence Agency. As Director of the CIA, General Hayden was responsible for overseeing the collection of information concerning the plans, intentions and capabilities of America’s adversaries; producing timely analysis for decision makers; and conducting covert operations to thwart terrorists and other enemies of the US.

A free demonstration by local beekeepers Richard Mendel and Colette Szabo. This is a hands-on learning experience for the whole family. Participate in uncapping the comb and cranking the extractor. Be the first to taste the fruits of your labor. Seating limited; RSVP requested.

1-2:30pm. Alumni Center, 200 Fletcher. www.fordschool.umich.edu

10am-12pm. Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd. 734-647-7600. www.lsa.umich.edu

9 sunday MESA/Trotter’s 18th Annual Taste of Culture

2-6pm. William Monroe Trotter Multicultural Center, 1443 Washtenaw. 734-763-9044. www.mesa.umich.edu

Taste of Culture is a Welcome Week event intended

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to introduce the campus and larger Ann Arbor community to MESA/Trotter’s staff, locations, and program offerings. This free event features a wide range of international cuisine catered by local restaurants, musical performances, and family-friendly activities! Rain or shine, open to the public.

15 saturday Teamwork and Timbers: It’s Barn Raisin’ Time!

1-5pm. Pittsfield Branch Library, 2359 Oak Valley Dr. 734-327-4200. www.aadl.org

Reconstruct a quarter-scale replica barn! Held in partnership with the Michigan Barn Preservation Network, this event is a one-of-a-kind opportunity to experience a traditional community barn raising. This event is for youth (grade 3 and up), teens and adults.

16 sunday 6th Annual Vision Builders 5K Run / Walk / Kids Race / Dog Walk 8am. Hudson Mills Metropark, 8801 North Territorial Rd., Dexter. www.visionbuilders5k.org

Bring the whole family (including your dog) for race participation and food, fun, and activities! All proceeds go towards the development of Kutumb Village, a multi-faceted

campus providing education, housing, medical care, nutrition and women’s empowerment programs–a sustainable community resource for residents of the Nadesar slums in Varanasi, India.

18 tuesday Great Lakes Estuaries: Keys to the Health of the Great Lakes

7:30pm. Matthaei Botanical Gardens, 1800 N. Dixboro Rd. 734-647-7600. www.lsa.umich.edu

The Great Lakes river estuaries are an important and little-understood part of the puzzle of the health of the Great Lakes. Michigan DNR Fisheries Research Scientist Paul Seelbach explains the latest studies and provides insight into what the future holds.

Understanding Race Project September Community Conversations 6-9pm. The University of Michigan Museum of Natural History, 1109 Geddes Ave. 734-764-0478. www.UnderstandingRaceProject.org

In anticipation of the FebruaryMay 2013 display of the traveling exhibit RACE: Are we so different?, the U-M Museum of Natural History is offering a continuing series of monthly community conversations to provide an opportunity for


everything else Science Center will discuss research that takes place on the Great Lakes, including deep-water science, invasive species, coastal ecosystems, restoration ecology, and environmental health.

10th Annual Kerrytown Bookfest

Ann Arbor Farmers’ Market / September 9

Celebrate the written word and Ann Arbor’s rich history of book culture during the 10th Annual Kerrytown Bookfest. Each year this family-friendly festival draws local businesses and organizations together with the area’s most talented authors, illustrators, storytellers, publishers, and of course, book lovers! This year’s fest will include Tigermania! a discussion with five authors who have written about Michigan baseball, moderated by famed baseball historian, Peter Morris. There will also be a panel exploring the possibilities that digital media presents to book artists, authors and designers. The day will feature creative activities for kids too, all within the beautiful setting of Ann Arbor’s Farmers’ Market in historic Kerrytown. See a full list of activities and speakers online. 12pm. 315 Detroit St. 734-669-0451. www.kerrytownbookfest.org—AG learning, sharing, discussion, and planning for larger scale dialogues, community action projects, and/or educational events. The September discussion includes a presentation by J.R. Reynolds from the Calhoun County.

19 wednesday US Geological Survey Great Lakes Science Center

7-8:30pm. Downtown Library, 343 South Fifth Ave. 734-327-4200. www.aadl.org

Scientists from the U.S. Geological Survey Great Lakes

20 thursday 2012 Earthfest: Party for the Planet 10am-2pm. Diag, University of Michigan Central Campus. www.sustainability.umich.edu

Find out about all things related to sustainability at the University of Michigan. Browse dozen’s of booths with information on how to get involved in sustainability on campus and beyond. There will be free food, live entertainment and games with prizes.

23 sunday Ann Arbor’s 7th Annual P.E.A.C.E. Day

bands, break dancers, beat boxers, hip-hop artists, singer/ songwriters & more. There will also be arts & crafts, free pizza and fun activities.

29 saturday Second Annual Run for the Arb

9am. $25 registration fee includes t-shirt. U-M Nichols Arboretum, 1610 Washington Hts. www.mbgna.umich.edu

All are invited to this 5K family run through the Nichols Arboretum trails. Run for the Arb is a fundraiser to benefit the University of Michigan Matthaei Botanical Gardens & Nichols Arboretum. All proceeds support the Arb & Gardens. Space is limited for this event so register early! Matthaei-Nichols members receive a $5 discount on registration. Volunteer opportunities available. Register online.

12-4pm. Diag, University of Michigan Central Campus. 856-677-3223

Come and share in the experience of Ann Arbor’s 7th Annual P.E.A.C.E. (Promoting Ethnic And Cultural Equality) DAY at the University of Michigan. This year several thousand in attendance are expected for this fun-filled day full of a wide group of performers including poets, speakers, painters,

For more events

www.ecurrent.com

ecurrent.com / september 2012   29


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