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contents This month’s features 6

First birthdays

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Parties on a dime

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13

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Tips for making your baby’s first party a fun one.

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Suggestions on saving money on your celebration.

The Birthday Guide

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Always hungry

Where to party, what to eat, whom to hire and where to find supplies.

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Fun on wheels

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Second-shift dads

Birthday biz Looking for Scooby-Doo plates? Blue’s Clues napkins?

Learn to swim Plenty of pools around WNC offer swim lessons.

Keeping up with kids who are never full. WNC is a bike-friendly place for families. Fathers are increasingly taking jobs that let them spend mornings at home.

In every issue

On the cover

Librarian’s Picks...............30

Cassidy Lewis, by Kaelee Denise Photography, www.kaeleedenise.com

Kids’ Voices .....................24 Story Times .....................30 Growing Together............38 Divorced Families ............34

Find us online

Calendar .........................51

.com

Kids page ........................54

facebook.com/ wncparent @wncparent

It’s birthday month

Katie Wadington, WNC Parent

Just as school ends, serious planning starts at my house. Birthday party planning. Both of my kids have July birthdays — a mere eight days apart. This year, it looks like their parties may be the same weekend. Usually the planning involves picking between an at-home party or pool party. My son often opts for the pool, my daughter a sleepover. I used to make both kids’ cakes, until the themes they wanted eclipsed my talents. But to keep costs down, one of them gets a store-bought cake, and the other a homemade one. (The funny part there is that I bake cakes and cookies and pies all the time, and all my kids want is a bakery or ice cream cake.) It can be a bit stressful, with two parties in two weeks (or this year, one). But then, it’s done. To help you with your birthday party planning, we have the annual Birthday Guide. Starting on Page 9, you’ll find listings of places to have your party, where to buy a cake or other treat, where to find supplies, and some of the area’s entertainers. One of the most fun things parents do is celebrate their child’s first birthday. Learn how to throw a party (and ease your stress over it) in our story on Page 6. Summertime means getting outside with your family. So we’ve taken a look at kid-friendly bike paths in WNC, on Page 20. With so many pools and swimming holes around, swim lessons are important. The story on Page 16 glances at area options. Believe it or not, the next issue we’ll be working on is back to school. But don’t think about that — just get out and enjoy the summer.

P.O. Box 2090, Asheville, NC 28802 www.wncparent.com PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER Randy Hammer WNC PARENT EDITOR Katie Wadington — 232-5829 kwadington@citizen-times.com

ADVERTISING Katy Graziano — 236-8994 kgraziano@gannett.com

Special thanks to features editor Bruce Steele, designer Val Elmore and web developer Jaime McKee. CALENDAR CONTENT Due by July 10. E-mail calendar@wncparent.com ADVERTISING DEADLINE Advertising deadline for the August issue is July 16.

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YOU ONLY TURN ONCE

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Planning your baby’s first birthday party

By Susanna Barbee, WNC Parent contributor

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arents dream of their child’s first birthday party, but when the big day arrives, there are many decisions to make regarding how to celebrate this monumental and special life event.

Themes

The theme is often the first decision to be made. Once it is selected, the colors, decorations, invitations, location and other choices become less daunting. When considering a theme for her child’s party, Leah Mehaffey, Waynesville mom to 18-month-old Huck, said, “I tried to find a lot of inspiration online but really came up short. So, honestly, I just sat down and started thinking of simple things I could do on my own.” Writers at Punchbowl.com, a party planning website, encourage parents to incorporate their baby’s interests and favorite items into the theme. Even though a 1-year-old cannot articulate what he or she likes best, many still have a favorite toy or food that could be used when developing the theme. “I thought about dinosaurs but realized that my soon to be 1-year-old didn’t know anything about them or give

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two hoots anyways,” said Mehaffey. “That got me thinking about what sorts of things Huck was into. What did he love most? What were his favorite toys? That’s when we realized that playing with blocks was one of his favorite activities. He carried a block everywhere and loved knocking down towers we would build for him. So, blocks it was!”

Birthdays near a holiday can also help parents with theme selection. Halloween or fall themes would be appropriate for an October birthday. December birthdays could use Christmas, Hanukkah or Kwanzaa themes. Patriotic themes could be used for birthdays near Memorial Day or July 4th. Even St. Patrick’s Day or New Year’s offer a

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Leah Mehaffey designed her son’s first birthday party around a blocks theme, since Huck was into blocks. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT


anywhere that had what I was looking for, so I designed the invites on my computer and had them printed at Staples. It was much cheaper than a website in the end, even using color on both sides,” said Mehaffey.

variety of themes. Pinterest, Google, parenting blogs and merely talking with other parents are also great ways to pick a theme for your baby’s big day.

Location, location, location

The party’s location depends on several factors, including space, number of guests, weather, planned activities and proximity to one’s home. Spring and summer birthdays lend themselves well to cookouts and pool parties, while fall and winter birthdays are a bit more challenging. Indoor spaces can be more expensive and must be reserved further in advance. There are many options, however, for fall and winter parties, including museums, indoor bounce houses, church fellowship halls, community centers, school gyms, indoor pools, recreation centers or merely the home of the birthday child or a family member. Plenty of establishments offer birthday rooms and packages. Sarah Howell, Asheville mom to Haddie, who turns 1 on July 31, is still in the planning stages. With Haddie having a summer birthday, Howell has chosen an outdoor location for her little one’s party. “We have decided to have her birthday party at my husband’s parents’ house,” Howell said. “They have a big yard for the pools and sprinklers and a big deck for all of the decorations and people. They also have a lot of room for parking, so that’s a plus.” As with the theme, neighboring holidays can also help with location selection. Pumpkin patches, hayrides and corn mazes would be fun for an October birthday, while a Christmas tree farm would be a unique location for a December birthday.

Sweet treats

Veteran parents love looking back at pictures of their little ones smashing that first cake or cupcake, and new parents can’t wait to watch their growing tots do the same. Before those photographs can be made, however, the perfect cake must be chosen. “Many parents buy a cake for the guests, then a separate small cake or smash cake for the birthday child,” said Brooke Cannon, pastry chef, at City Bakery in Waynesville. A smash cake is a 4-inch cake, petite in size, solely made

To gift or not to gift?

Huck digs into his smash cake, made especially for him to destroy and eat. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

for the birthday girl or boy to smash, throw, eat and freely make a mess with. Cannon, who has a bachelor’s degree in fine arts, will attempt any artistic representation a parent requests while at the same time keeping the cake nutritious. “I often get questions about amount of sugar or food coloring, but we do not use shortening, and we use all natural ingredients, so our cakes and cupcakes are as healthy as a cake can be,” she said. Mehaffey went with a smash cake. “I had the local bakery make his smash cake in the shape of a block with an ‘H’ on it, in the dark green and tan colors we were using,” said Mehaffey, who chose City Bakery for Huck’s party. “The large cake spelled out Happy First Birthday in blocks out of icing.” Howell is using City Bakery in Asheville for Haddie’s party but plans to make Haddie’s individual cake herself.

What to wear, what to say

Many parents can’t resist dressing their little birthday gal or guy in a onesie or outfit that signifies the big day. “We have decided on gray and yellow polka dots as our colors,” said Howell. “I found Haddie’s birthday outfit on Etsy. It is a onesie with a ‘1’ sewn into it in yellow polka dots with a matching yellow headband and tutu. Cuteness!” Invitations can be bought, made or ordered. Check photo and greeting card websites like Shutterfly, Tiny Prints and similar companies for free shipping and other deals on invitations. “I couldn’t find an invitation or a site

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For Huck’s birthday, Mehaffey asked that guests bring canned food items instead of presents. “Forgoing presents in lieu of doing something for others is a major theme in our lives,” she said. “We decided that each year until Huck is able to decide for himself, we will pick a local or global organization or cause to have folks contribute to in his honor. When he’s old enough, he can begin choosing the projects himself. Because our sweet, silly, goofy, smart, loving, stubborn baby turned 1, many people were able to have something to eat.” Presents can also be reserved for close family members. “We did decide that our parents, my brother’s family, my sister-in-law, and we would give Huck small gifts,” Mehaffey said. Another idea is for guests to bring books instead of gifts. This helps build the child’s home library. Some families forgo a large party altogether and instead go on a trip as a family, though this option is more popular for older children.

Take time to enjoy

Though planning a child’s first birthday party takes a lot of work and thought, it should not become a stressful event. Some general tips are to not overspend and plan around baby’s naptimes. “Drinks will spill, accidents will happen and kids will cry, but you shouldn’t sweat the small stuff,” said Kori Ellis, parenting writer and blogger. Relax and enjoy yourself with your baby and your guests. Birthday parties are meant to be fun, and sometimes we get too caught up in all the details.” “I’m so incredibly sad but happy at the same time,” said Howell. “I am just so shocked that I am actually planning her first birthday. I am excited to see it all come together and watch her face light up.” Susanna Barbee is an Asheville area mom and freelance writer. More from her can be found on her blog at zealousmom.com.

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CELEBRATE WITHOUT

SPLURGING By Marla Hardee Milling WNC Parent contributor

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elebrating your child’s birthday in style doesn’t have to mean busting your bank account. Sure, there are plenty of places that offer pricey packages promising fun for your guests and birthday boy or girl. But chances are, they’ll have just as much fun even if you pick out a simple venue that doesn’t come with a big price tag attached. Weaverville artist Robin Plemmons says Lake Louise offers up a successful party combo — plenty of space to run around, picnic tables, playground and a laid back, family atmosphere. She selected it as the site for one of her daughter’s birthday celebrations. “We loved having Ruby’s party there, “ she says. “It has a great playground, and I especially love the tiny pieces of recycled tires they put down for potential shock absorption. It’s right next to Lake Louise, which has lots of shade, benches and tables that you can reserve through the Town Hall. “We kept it simple and sweet,” she continues. “We had cupcakes and balloons, and we just let the kids run around.” Susan Mundy, of South Asheville, says one of her daughter’s favorite parties took place at Michaels on South Tunnel Road. “I believe it only cost about 40 bucks for a couple of hours in their party room. I bought $3 T-shirts for the girls to decorate, and they had so much fun at a low cost,” says Mundy. “I used to live near the park behind East Asheville Library, and it was a popular spot for birthday parties,” says April Nance. “They have playground equipment, picnic tables, grassy areas and shade.” Christie Hales Jones, of Arden, put it very simply when defining a suitable low-cost, easy party venue. She says: “Your own backyard. Period.” Leah Ingram, who writes frugal living books and a blog at www.sudden-

lyfrugal.com, says it’s possible to save money even on big-ticket venues. “I would scour Groupon, Living Social, Amazon Local and any other deal sites that might offer some sort of discount you can use to an advantage,” says Ingram.

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A birthday party can be as easy as taking your child and her family or friends to the park. Weaverville mom Robin Plemmons hosted her daughter’s second birthday celebration at Lake Louise. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

SIMPLE PARTIES Other parents are in agreement — simple venues can still bring in big smiles and lots of fun. A recent discussion prompted these suggestions from area moms: » Lake Julian Park, off Long Shoals Road in Skyland, www.buncombecounty.org. » Asheville Pizza, 675 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, www.ashevillebrewing.com. » Pool at Asheville Jewish Community

Center, www.jcc-asheville.com. » The Health Adventure, in Biltmore Square Mall at 800 Brevard Road, Asheville, www.thehealthadventure.org. » Mini golf » Roller skating rink » YMCA or YWCA pool » Gymnastic centers » Local parks

“Are you a member of any club or group that would allow for a discounted birthday party? For example, when my daughters were younger they took classes at The Little Gym,” she continues. “Because of that, we saved on the birthday package there.”


BIRTHDAY GUIDE

THE

BIRTHDAY GUIDE

By Katie Wadington, WNC Parent editor

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irthday parties come in all shapes and sizes. Some parents opt for a simple at-home party with a homemade cake. Others host at home but bring in entertainers or inflatables. And some families celebrate by hauling a van full of kids to someplace fun where all the party needs are taken care of. Our annual Birthday Guide can help you plan your children’s parties, with listings of places to throw a party, people who can keep the kiddos entertained, businesses that offer supplies and organizing, and (what I think is most important), bakeries and stores around town that offer frosting-covered birthday confections. MORE ON PAGES 10-12

Bella Peterson, of Arden. KAELEE DENISE PHOTOGRAPHY/WWW.KAELEEDENISE.COM

PLANNING AND SUPPLIES Get help organizing a birthday celebration from one of the area’s party planners. Par-T-Perfect, Asheville, 335-5437, partytime@part-perfect.com, www.par-t-perfect.com. A complete children’s party service that offers a variety of inflatables, face painting, balloon twisting, costume characters, games, crafts and themed parties. Fully insured and state inspected.

If you want to look beyond WNC’s discount stores like Kmart, Target and Walmart for supplies, here are local party supply retailers: Baggie Goose, 3 Swan St., Asheville, 274-3333; baggiegoose@gmail.com; baggiegoose.com. Celebrations! Your Party & Gift Store, 265 Tunnel Road, Asheville, 255-5868; celebrationprint@bellsouth.net. Celebrations, 1829 Hendersonville Road, Asheville,

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687-7774. K&C’s Party Supplies, 598 Hendersonville Road, Asheville; 274-7773; www.partysuppliesasheville.com. Party Blvd., 21 Long Shoals Road, Asheville, 6760314, www.partyblvd.com. Rental Me This, 535 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 505-3434, www.rentalmethis.com

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BIRTHDAY GUIDE

PARTY PLACES Adventure Rock, 273 Monte Vista Road, Candler, 670-7625, www.rockofasheville.com/adventurerock. Two hours of private play time on 4,000-square-foot play structure. Party packages for 15 or 25 people. AMF Star Lanes Bowling, 491 Kenilworth Road, Asheville, 254-6161, amf.com. A two-hour party, offered Saturdays and Sundays, includes one hour of bowling, rental shoes, pizza and drinks. Minimum of eight guests. Anna's Playhouse, Mills River, 674-6653, annasplayhouse@morrisbb.net, annasplayhouse.biz. Host a tea party at a playhouse. Two-hour parties may include tea or drink of choice and treats. Dress up, learn tea party manners, play a game and do a craft. Maximum of four children. Asheville Gymnastics, 50 Coxe Ave., Asheville, 252-8746, ashevillegymnastics.com. Parties include trampoline, foam pit, games, rock climbing, plus time in the party room. Bring your own decorations and refreshments; cleanup provided. Asheville Racquet Club, 1 Resort Drive, Asheville, 253-5874, and 200 Racquet Club Road, Asheville, 274-3361, ashevilleracquetclub.com. Offering tennis parties for up to 21 kids and outdoor pool parties at both locations, and arena sports parties at the South location (for arena parties, call 712-2255 or email ashevillearenasports@gmail.com). Asheville Tourists, McCormick Field, 258-0428, theashevilletourists.com. Three party packages available, with a 10- or 20-person minimum. Packages include seat at the game, invitations, cake, food, drinks, public announcement and scoreboard recognition during game, visit from Ted E. Tourist and Mr. Moon, and a marker and baseball for autographs before the game. Asheville Treetops Adventure Park, 1 Resort Drive, Asheville, 225-2921, ashevilletreetopsadventurepark.com. Options for rafting, ziplines, mountain biking, adventure park and more. Asheville's Fun Depot, 7 Roberts Road, Asheville, 277-2386, ext. 104, ashevillesfundepot.com. Parties in a private room with assistance from a Party Pal. Packages include food, drinks, T-shirt, invitations, thank-you cards, paper products and play cards and access to activities. Parties available in a train caboose. Bricks 4 Kidz, wland@bricks4kidz.com, www.bricks4kidz.com/asheville. Parties are available at the location of your choice. Three party packages available. Parties are fast-paced; children are kept active using loads of LEGO-based games. Build-A-Bear Workshop, Asheville Mall, 3 S. Tunnel Road, 298-1852, buildabear.com. Party leader guides guests through creating a stuffed friend. Invitations and thank-you cards are provided online. Favors included. Food not allowed. Minimum of six guests. Buncombe County pools, buncombecounty.org/ governing/depts/parks/facilities/pools. All outdoor pools are available to rent for parties at $70 per hour. Cost includes one lifeguard for 25 kids or less; $10 charge for additional lifeguards. At Zeugner Center (684-5072), activity room is available for rent along with indoor pool.

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The Hop Ice Cream Cafe offers four party packages, from space rental with decorations to a sundae bar or cake, face painting and more. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

Canvas Paint & Mingle, 735C Haywood Road, Asheville, 254-4486, paintandmingle.com. Guests take home a masterpiece after a painting party with an instructor. Packages include setup, cleanup, invitations and paintings. Pick design from Canvas' portfolio or make a request. For ages 16 and younger, minimum of seven guests required. Center Stage Dance Studio, 38L Rosscraggon Road, Asheville, 654-7010, dance@centerstage1.com, centerstage1.com. Themed parties include time with instructor, use of private studio room, set up and cleanup, T-shirt for birthday child, invitations, games, dances, crafts and more. Bring your own food. Cherokee Fun Park, 1897 Tsali Blvd. (U.S. 441 N), Cherokee, 497-5877, cherokeefunparknc.com. Miniature golf, go-karts, arcade, more, with birthday packages starting at $12 per guest. Chimney Rock Park, 431 Main St., Chimney Rock, 625-9611, chimneyrockpark.com, groups@chimneyrockpark.com. Parties include admission for up to 12 kids and two adults, cupcakes, drinks, paper goods, passes for a return visit, an animal demonstration and scavenger hunt. Climbing tower option. Chuck E. Cheese's, 104 River Hills Road, Asheville, 299-3750, chuckecheese.com. Package includes pizza, soft drinks, tokens for each guest, decorated table, cake, visit from Chuck E. Cheese and more. Space reserved for two hours. Free invitations online. Online bookings are available. Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville, 277-0042, clayingaround.com. Offers several party options, including basic 90-minute party, with fee per child plus the cost of pottery. Glass fusing party, silver clay party and "Fancy Nancy" options available. All parties include a special birthday plate for the guests to sign. Add-ons include face painting, craft projects, snow cones, cupcakes. Bring your own food, beverages and decorations. ClimbMax, 43 Wall St., Asheville, 252-9996, climbmaxnc.com. Climbing parties, bouldering or roped climbing, discount rates for groups of six or more. Pizza available. Great for most ages. Earth Fare, 1856 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 210-0100. Host a party in the store's community room. Purchase healthy meals for all.

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Eye Scream Parlour, 2064 U.S. 70, Swannanoa, 298-2772, facebook.com/eyescreamparlour. Parties for up to two hours include 10 kid scoops of ice cream and tokens for arcade games. Food available for purchase, or bring outside food and beverages. Fired Up! Creative Lounge, 26 Wall St., Asheville, 253-8181, and 321B N. Main St., Hendersonville, 698-9960; fireduplounge.com. Reserved parties available for groups of six or more. Per person studio fee plus the cost of pottery each guest chooses to paint. Bring your own food and drink, balloons, presents, etc. Hahn's Gymnastics, 18 Legend Drive, Arden, 684-8832, hahnsgymnastics.com. Birthday parties include one hour of gym time and 30 minutes in party room. Activities include parachute, games, obstacle course and more. Two instructors guide party guests. For up to 15 children. Hands On! A Child's Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville, 697-8333, handsonwnc.org. Includes party room for two hours, set up with table, chairs and tablecloth; one hour of museum play time; invitations; gift for birthday child; museum admission for up to 12 children. Bring your own food and drinks, paper goods and provide one adult for every five children. Parties held on Saturdays; check for availability on weekday parties. Hickory Nut Gap Farm, 57 Sugar Hollow Road, Fairview, 628-1027, hickorynutgapfarm.com. Farm provides picnic tables under an open-air party shed by the creek for two hours. Bring your own table cloths, balloons, party favors. Participate in the season’s farm activities such as visiting with the animals or going through the corn maze. Party Shed rental, $75. September and October Party Shed rental, $75 plus group rate admission fee for guests (party hosts do not have to pay admission). Hollywild Animal Park, 2325 Hampton Road, Welford, S.C., 864-472-2038, hollywild.com. Party in outdoor screened pavilion or party loft inside Zoovenir Shop. Includes cake and ice cream, paper products, drinks, popcorn, bags of animal food for guests, party host, free pass to return to the zoo and one hour in the party room. Birthday child receives a bottle to feed a baby animal, a safari hat and T-shirt. Pony rides additional. KidSenses, 172 N. Main St., Rutherfordton, 2862120, info@kidsenses.com, kidsenses.com. Includes admission for 20 guests and parents, party room for one hour, unlimited play time in museum until closing, invitations, balloon bouquet, T-shirt for birthday child. Character parties available. Add-ons include paper goods and favors. Marble Slab Creamery, 14 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, 225-5579, marbleslab.com. Party room for rent. Ice cream and cakes available. Michaels, 111-A River Hills Road, Asheville, 2990183; 5 McKenna Road, Arden, 684-1961; michaels.com. Birthday parties for include invitations, choice of project, keepsake apron for guest of honor, crafting assistance, set up and cleanup. Minimum of five children, maximum of 10. Mobile Video Game Parties, 585-5591, sales@mobilevideogamepartiesnc.com, mobilevideogamepartiesnc.com. Luxury, limo-style theater comes to you. Twenty can play at once, with room for eight more friends in second row of stadium seating. With Wii, Xbox 360 and PS3.


BIRTHDAY GUIDE

The WNC Nature Center offers two-hour parties that include admission for up to 25 guests, use of the birthday room and kitchen facilities and self-guided tours of the center. BILL SANDERS/WSANDERS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

Mountain Play Lodge, 3389 Sweeten Creek Road, Arden, 676-2120, gabby@mountainplaylodge.com, mountainplaylodge.com. Base package includes party for 10 children, 75 minutes in play area and 45 minutes in party room, party attendant, set up and cleanup, two pizzas, juice boxes, T-shirt for birthday child, paper goods and invitations. Parties at 10 a.m., 1, 4 and 6:15 p.m. Private parties available. Ninja Kids Club, 640 Merrimon Ave., Suite 207, Asheville, 280-0624, ninjakidsclub.com. Come to the dojo or the dojo comes to you. Rent the space or have an hourlong party with Sensei Sean. N.C. Arboretum, 100 Frederick Law Olmstead Way, Asheville, 665-2492, ext. 224, mpearce@ncarboretum.org. Parties offer 15 minutes of classroom discovery time, an hourlong guided program of choice and 45 minutes for cake and gifts. Led by an environmental educator in the interactive children’s classroom as well as outside on the 434-acre campus. Parties are 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. Saturdays, and cannot be held June-August. Maximum of 24 children and 15 adults. Parking fees waived. Osega Gymnastics, 1800 A U.S. 70, Swannanoa, 665-0004, osegagym@gmail.com, osegagym.com. Party includes hour in gym, 30 minutes in party room. Up to 15 guests. Playball birthdays and parties with Coach Maxy, 575-3000. Boys and girls, ages 3-8 can run, kick, jump, throw, and score during this 90 minute sports extravaganza. Summer parties can include water balloons, and super soakers but they all incorporate obstacle course, relay races, the best Playball games, and a special sporty present for the birthday boy or girl. Goodie bags for the guests are optional. $120 for 10 children, additional children are $10 each. Ramada Biltmore West, 275 Smoky Park Highway, 667-4501, ramada.com. Ramada offers two-hour pool parties year round for up to 15 people, including an area set aside for the party adjacent to the indoor-outdoor pool. Regal Cinema Biltmore Grande Stadium 15, 292 Thetford St., Asheville, 684-4726, regmovies.com/

Theatres/Birthday-Parties#. Rent the party room before a movie. Maximum of 18 kids. Visit website to request date and get info. Smith-McDowell House Museum, 283 Victoria Road, Asheville, 253-9231, smh@wnchistory.org, wnchistory.org. Historic themes to choose from or plan your own theme. Parties include two-hour use of party room, program, activity and materials, tablesettings. Bring your own refreshments. Parties designed for ages 7 and older. Parties available only until Aug. 30. Smoky Mountain Sk8way, 19025 Great Smoky Expressway, Waynesville, 246-9124, smokymountainsk8way.com. Parties include skate rental, admission, tables, paper goods, balloons, drink. Southeastern Physical Therapy, 23 Turtle Creek Drive, Asheville, 274-2188, southeastpt.com. Exclusive use of the indoor heated pool for parties. Stephens-Lee Recreation Center, 30 George Washington Carver St., Asheville, 350-2058. Variety of packages available with two-hour time limit. Must be booked two weeks in advance. Tarheel Lanes, 3275 Asheville Highway, Hendersonville, 692-5039 or 253-2695, tarheellanes@att.net, tarheellanesinc.com. Offers parties for 10 or more people. Bring your own cake and ice cream. Include shoes, can include concessions. Tarwheels Skateway, 2134 U.S. 70, Swannanoa, 298-6606, tarwheelsskate.com. Parties offered during any regular session and include invitations, admission and skates, paper goods, balloons, drink and ice cream, free pass for birthday person. Minimum 10 people. Private parties available. The Fun Factory, 1024 Georgia Road, Franklin, 349-8888, franklinfun.com. Packages include cake, drinks, set-up, host, paper goods, balloons, fun cards, more. Five package options, plus add-ons. The Health Adventure, Biltmore Square Mall, 800 Brevard Road, Asheville; thehealthadventure.org, 665-2217, ext. 322. Parties on Saturdays and Sundays (weekdays may be available) include 90 minutes in the party room, unlimited admission all guests, set

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up and cleanup, paper products, invitations, gift for the birthday child, goody bags for each guest. Several themes to choose from. Up to 20 children. The Hop Ice Cream Cafe, 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 254-2224, thehopicecreamcafe.com. Shop featuring all-natural, homemade ice creams offers four packages, from space rental with decorations to a sundae bar or cake, face painting and more. The Little Gym, 1000 Brevard Road, Suite 168, Asheville, 667-9588, tlgashevillenc.com, tlgashevillenc@thelittlegym.com. Two qualified instructors lead 90-minute parties with gymnastics, games, more. Includes invitations, setup and cleanup, paper goods, drinks, and a T-shirt for the birthday child. For up to 25 children. Facility closed to the public during parties. The Tree House, A Cafe at Play, 1020 Merrimon Ave., Suite 103, Asheville, 505-2589, info@ashevilletreehouse.com. Two-hour parties include private room, custom cake, pizza and juice boxes for each child, paper products, decorations, set up and cleanup, T-shirt for birthday child, invitations. 360 Party Bus, 236-2841, 360partybus.com. Host a party on wheels and take birthday guests to a favorite fun spot. Bus includes TVs, DVD player, satellite radio, party lights. For up to 20 people with two-hour minimum. Parent or guardian required on bus. Tomato Jam Cafe, 379 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, 253-0570, tomatojamcafe.com. Cafe space is free for catered parties, Saturdays or Sundays or after 4 p.m. weekdays. Catering is custom-priced. Tropical Gardens Mini Golf, 956 Patton Ave., Asheville, 252-2207, tropicalgardensminigolf.com. Includes time in decorated gazebo, soft drink, snow cone and future free pass for each child, one round of 18 holes of mini golf and paper goods. Xcel Sportsplex, 37 Maxwell Drive, Hendersonville, 684-7898, xcelsportsplex.com. Party packages for 12 people include an hour of play time, at least 45 minutes in party room, snack, T-shirt for birthday child, set up and cleanup, and more. Choice of basketball, volleyball, dodgeball or soccer. Inflatable available. Waynesville Recreation Center, 550 Vance St., 456-2030, waynesvilleparksandrec.com. Call for information on pool parties. Wine and Design, 640 Merrimon Ave., Suite 208, Asheville, 255-2442, asheville@wineanddesignus.com, wineanddesignus.com/asheville.html. Pick a painting for guests to create, bring your own food and drinks. Parties available in private room or main studio. WNC Nature Center, 75 Gashes Creek Road, Asheville, 298-5600, ext. 305, wncnaturecenter.com. Two-hour parties include admission for up to 25 guests, and use of the birthday room and kitchen facilities. Self-guided tour of Nature Center during and/or after party. Wolverine Paintball Park, 487 Brookside Camp Road, Hendersonville, 697-4263, wolverinepb@msn.com, wolvpb.com. Party pack includes six players, paintballs, free air refills. Additional players $9 each. Pizza and drinks available. YWCA of Asheville, 185 S. French Broad Ave., 254-7206, ext. 209, ywcaofasheville.org. Pool parties include an hour in pool and an hour in multipurpose room. Saturdays only.

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BIRTHDAY GUIDE

CAKE AND MORE Anita Cup of Tea, anitacupoftea.com; 545-1236; anitactaylor@bellsouth.net. For children 4 and older. Packages include baked goods and brewed fruit tea, lemonade or apple cider. Games, dress-up time and more vary by theme. The Bake Shoppe, 146 Weaverville Highway, Asheville; 645-2038; bakeshoppeasheville.com. Offers a large selection of custom birthday cakes. Bi-Lo, several WNC locations; bi-lo.com. Personalized birthday cakes, cupcakes, cookies and other treats. Black Mountain Bakery, 102 Church St., Black Mountain; 669-1626; blackmountainbakery.com. Variety of flavors and sizes, made from scratch and to order. Blue Ridge Bakery, 400 S. Broad St., Brevard, 883-8444; blueridgebakery@yahoo.com; blueridgebakery. com. Custom cakes of all shapes and sizes. Cakes by Jane, 9 Old Burnsville Hill Road, Suite 4, Asheville; 285-9292; cakesbyjane.com. Southern cream cheese pound cakes in a variety of flavors. Calico Corner Gifts & Goodies, 298-5609; calicocornergiftsandgoodies.com. Personalized cakes made to order. Daytime delivery available. Callie’s Confections, 490-1329; calliesconfections.com. Made-to-order cakes for birthdays and more. Carolina Mountain Bakery, 1950 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 681-5066. Custom cakes with any theme incorporated into cake design. CinTom’s Frozen Custard, 3080 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville, 274-5853. Homemade custard in several flavors. City Bakery, 88 Charlotte St., Asheville, 254-4289; 60

ENTERTAINERS Anita Cup of Tea, 545-1236, anitactaylor@bellsouth.net, anitacupoftea.com. Themed tea parties. For children 4 and older, as well as adults. Packages include baked goods, finger sandwiches, drinks. Asheville Face and Body Painting, 778-1360, amy@ashevillefaceandbodyart.com; ashevillefaceandbodyart.com; facebook.com/ashevillefaceandbodypainting. Offers face painting at parties to body painting for events. Asheville Face Painting, 606-0598, info@ashevillefacepainting.com, AshevilleFacePainting.com. Artist Michelle Bevans specializes in artistic, unique face painting. Asheville Hoops, ashevillehoops.com. Hula hoop group brings hoops and leads children age-appropriate hoop games. The Balloon Fairy, 423-2030, balloonfairymagic.com. Marcie, The Balloon Fairy, creates balloon art and performs interactive magic for events. Bella Rouge Design, in Rutherfordton, 458-7938, bellarougedesign.com. Face painting parties. Twohour minimum. Bill Grimsley, Magic Productions Inc., 777-9143, magicprod1@bellsouth.net, billgrimsley.com. A profes-

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Biltmore Ave., Asheville, 252-4426; 18 N. Main St., Waynesville, 452-3881; citybakery@bellsouth.net; citybakery.net. Cakes made from scratch in a selection of sizes with a variety of cake flavors, fillings and frostings. Traditional layer cakes to poundcakes. Cold Stone Creamery, 129 Bleachery Blvd., Asheville, 296-0004; 30 Town Square Blvd., Asheville; coldstonecreamery.com. A variety of ice cream cakes with children’s themes. Dairy Queen, several WNC locations; dairyqueen. com. Ice cream cakes and other treats. Great American Cookies, Asheville Mall, 3 Tunnel Road, 298-2849, greatamericancookies.com. Specializes in customized cookie cakes, cupcakes and cookies. Ingles, various locations, ingles-markets.com. Cakes in a variety of themes and 12-inch cookies made to order in store and online. Kilwin’s, 26 Battery Park Ave., Asheville, 252-2639; 116 W. State St., Black Mountain, 669-6119; 506 N. Main St., Hendersonville, 698-9794. Treats include ice cream, novelty chocolates, fudge, caramel corn, caramel apples and more. Marble Slab Creamery, 14 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, 225-5579; and 421 N. Main St., Hendersonville, 6970480; marbleslab.com. Ice cream cakes in several sizes and varieties. McFarlan Bake Shop, 309 N. Main St., Hendersonville; 693-4256. Cakes and more, made to order. Sam’s Club, 645 Patton Ave., Asheville, 251-5243; 300 Highlands Square Drive, Hendersonville, 698-6889; samsclub.com. Cakes in a variety of sizes made to order. Short Street Cakes, 225 Haywood Road, Asheville; 505-4822; shortstreetcakes.com. Specializes in naturally handcrafted down-home Southern desserts. Gluten-free and vegan options available. The Hop Ice Cream Cafe, 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 254-2224; and 721 Haywood Road, Ashe-

ville, 252-5115; thehopicecreamcafe.com. Homemade ice creams, ice cream cakes and vegan treats. The Sisters McMullen, 840 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 252-9330; cakes@thesistersmcmullen.com; thesistersmcmullen.com. Pastries and cakes in several sizes and flavors, including gluten-free and vegan choices. Take the Cake, 712-3157; info@takethecakeasheville.com; takethecakeasheville.com. Cakes, cupcakes, tarts and French-inspired pastries using local and organic ingredients available by special order. TCBY, 5 Westgate Parkway, Asheville, 225-5111; 1800 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 274-1100; 105 Weaver Blvd., Weaverville, 645-0234; tcby.com. Yogurt cakes and pies. Tiffany’s Baking Co., 989-9466; info@tiffanysbakingco.com; tiffanysbakingco.com. From-scratch cakes with custom themes. True Confections, Grove Arcade, 1 Page Ave., Suite 147, Asheville; 350-9480; trueconfections.net. From scratch, all-natural birthday cakes. Ultimate Ice Cream, 1070 Tunnel Road, Asheville, 296-1234; 197 Charlotte St., Asheville, 258-1515; ultimateicecreamasheville.com. Homemade ice cream available in pints and quarts. Nondairy soy cream, gelato, sorbet and ice cream pies also available. Walmart Supercenter, multiple locations around WNC. Birthday cakes made to order. West End Bakery & Café, 757 Haywood Road, Asheville; 252-9378; westendbakery.com. Cakes in variety of flavors using organic flour, sugar and fresh local ingredients. Gluten-free, sugar-free and vegan cakes available. World’s Best Carrot Cake, 175 Weaverville Highway, Asheville; 658-2738; worldsbestcarrotcake.com. Five kinds of all-natural carrot cake made by hand in small batches. Organic, vegan and gluten-free options.

sional entertainer for more than 25 years, Bill Grimsley provides magic and humor for a variety of events. Caricatures by Helen Nagan, 298-8546; hnart@bellsouth.net. Fun color caricatures in less than five minutes for birthdays, family reunions and groups. Carolina Caricatures, 298-1350, brianvasilik.blogspot. com. Brian Vasilik has drawn caricatures at Bele Chere and Grove Park Inn, parties and other events. Elijah Mountain Gem Mine, 2120 Brevard Road, Hendersonville, 693-3123, elijahmountain.com. Hunt for gems at this mine that has rubies, emeralds and more. Birthday party pricing available. Funtastic Faces Face Painting, Lesley Barkett, 280-7926, lesley@funtasticfaces.net, funtasticfaces.net. Specializes in elaborate face painting. Good Times Inflatables, 775-3232, goodtimesinflatables.com. Provides inflatable games and rides. HighTouch HighTech, 684-3192, info@sciencemadefun.net, sciencemadefun.net. Provides hands-on science programs for kids at party venue. Parties include a 75-minute science adventure, all supplies and materials for 15 children, take-home experiments for each child and more. Ages 4 and older. Kindermusik with Yvette, singandtwirl@gmail.com, kindermusikwithyvette.com. Music and movement activities, including singing and playing instruments. Yvette's birthday events specialize in

baby's first birthday. Mark DeVerges, 678-0116, mark@balloonillusions.com, markdeverges.com. From balloon twisting and large-scale balloon creations to roving magic and full magic shows. Miles of Smiles, 777-3584. Balloon twisting entertainment for parties. Professor Whizzpop, 506-3198, magictom@themagictomshow.com, ashevillemagic.com. Shows of magical comedy and balloon twisting. Putt Party, www.puttparty.com. Portable mini-golf games course that can be delivered and set-up at any destination in the Asheville area for $150. Includes nine mini-golf games for three hours. Rental Me This, 535 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 505-3434, rentalmethis.com. Full-service company with party and outdoor recreation rentals, event planning. Twister Theater of Asheville, 337-5174, MrTwister.AVL@gmail.com, twistertheater.com. Comic balloon twisting, balloon decorations, and magic shows for stage or walk-around events. WNC Party People, 484-8585, wncpartypeople.com. Rents bounce houses and other inflatables. Rentals are for 24 hours. Zowie Entertainment, 808-1757, ashevilleparty.com. Offers themed parties including animals, movie making, karaoke, games and other options.

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Jennifer Sherwood and Adam Schlain own Hardtofindpartysupplies.com. They have a 4,000-square-foot warehouse filled with vintage party supplies. JACK GRUBER/USAT

DOING THEIR PART FOR YOUR

PERFECT PARTY

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ummed that you can’t find your favorite childhood TV show on a paper plate? Cry no more. There’s still hope. Jennifer Sherwood has a law degree and Adam Schlain has a finance degree, but the couple’s real expertise lies in rare party supplies. “Plates, cups, napkins, blowouts, banners, little mini tamborines, everything a kid needs for a birthday party,” Sherwood says. It’s called HardToFindPartySupplies.com, based in Newport News, Va. As the name suggests, Sherwood and Schlain will give you a fighting chance to find a rare item that’s no longer stocked at Target or Walmart. “If a little girl wants Snow White, her mom wants to give her Snow White. But

By Natalie DiBlasio, USA TODAY

just try to find that in a store; you can’t,” Sherwood says. “Anything that is more than a year old just cannot be found anywhere.” Soccer moms, collectors and fans of everything from “He-Man” to “Power Rangers,” Disney princesses to “Finding Nemo,” have plenty to choose from. Sherwood and Schlain have stockpiled hundreds of thousands of paper plates and other obscure party items in the past 2 1/2 years. “Other people, they go out there and invest in the stock market,” Sherwood says. “We invest in paper plates.” Because of an eye for rarity and the ability to buy in bulk, they can sell some items with a huge mark-up. “For one product, we paid 5 to 10 cents an item for pieces and can sell it

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for 15 or 20 dollars,” Schlain says. “We have gems, items that are extremely valuable, and the profit margin is really big on them.” Business is booming, all run online through the company website and eBay. “Six months into the business, we were doing $6,000 in sales every month,” Sherwood says. “Thirty months into the business, we are doing $40,000 in sales every month, and it just keeps growing.” HardToFindPartySupplies’ eight employees ship more than 100 packages around the world every day. “We started off with $20,000 worth of inventory in one bedroom,” Sherwood recalls. “Then it took over the next bedroom, Continues on Page 14

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PERFECT

Hardtofind party supplies.com sells vintage party supplies that are no longer produced, like “Lone Ranger,” old Disney cartoons and more. JACK

Continued from Page 13

and the next bedroom, and the next bedroom. Floor to ceiling, 80 percent of our house was filled with party supplies.” Now, the business operates out of a 4,000-square-foot office warehouse that Sherwood and Schlain can navigate with ease, recalling exactly where the earliest edition of the Winnie the Pooh plates are. Where do they get it? “All over the place,” Sherwood and Schlain said in unison. And they said no more. The couple won’t share secrets that could give competitors and advantage. “Where we get it? That’s probably what we are most protective of,” Schlain says. “We don’t want to encourage people to compete with us.” Schlain says he travels all over the country hoping to score big and rare. The latest jackpot was “Little Bear,” a product they expect will do very well. “We have to go back to our childhood and think, ‘What really evokes our emotions?’ “Sherwood says. “If you have a child and you read

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GRUBER/USAT

them ‘Little Bear’ and they fall in love, now they are 2 years old, and where are you going to find Little Bear party supplies?” Other hot product lines include “How to Train Your Dragon,” “Teenage Mutant Ninja Turtles,” Disney’s “Little Einsteins,” “Blue’s Clues,” Harry Potter, Indiana Jones and Godzilla, many of which manufacturers don’t make any more. “Six months — that’s the average

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amount of time a popular theme is on the shelves at major stores; after that, you just can’t find them anywhere else,” Sherwood says. Hearing Sherwood talk about one variety of Snow White plates is like listening to a mother describe her youngster. This business is her child, she says. “We are building an empire,” Sherwood says. “This is our baby. This is our family’s future.”


PLENTY OF OPTIONS FOR LESSONS AROUND WNC

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By Paul Clark, WNC Parent contributor

t’s never too late to learn to swim, even halfway through summer. Several organizations and entities have open enrollment or are just beginning their second round of lessons for kids of all ages. That said, earlier is better, at least age-wise, instructors said. “The younger you introduce them to water, the easier (swimming) is for them and the more fun they have,” said Kitty Schmidt, of Schmidt Swimming. “Most little kids have no fear of the water, so it’s important that parents get them in the water as early as possible,” said Teri Gentile, aquatics director for Buncombe County. “The first step in their learning to swim is learning to be comfortable with having their

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faces in the water.”

Buncombe County’s second set of summer swim lessons for children is July 15-25, with 45-minute classes held Monday-Thursday. The cost is $30 per person for the eight-lesson sessions. Register and pay starting noon July 8 at one of the county’s five outdoor pools. The city of Asheville offers lessons for free for kids at the three city pools. Register at 11 a.m. July 9 at the pool of your choice. Classes are Monday-Thursday, running July 16-26. The Asheville Jewish Community Continues on Page 16

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You don’t have to belong to the YMCA to take part in swimming lessons, seen here at the Reuter Family Y in South Asheville. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

SWIM Continued from Page 15

Center (www.jcc-asheville.org) offers four private one-on-one lessons for $105 or four semi-private lessons for $60 at its 25-meter outdoor pool. Register at the JCC at 236 Charlotte St. Schmidt teaches youth lessons at Mars Hill College’s pool. In Schmidt’s novice level, children 6 years and older learn to tread water and how to use proper arm and leg motions. Classes meet Monday and Wednesday mornings, Monday and Wednesday evenings or Tuesday and Thursday evenings. Schmidt teaches all

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year, ending the summer season around the time kids go back to school. She assigns children to levels by testing to see how well they float front and back and how comfortable they are in the deep end, among other criteria. For details, visit www.swimasheville.com. Preteens who can swim learn the four competitive strokes: freestyle, backstroke, breaststroke and butterfly. Schmidt has taught hundreds of kids, including children 18 months old. The YMCAs in Asheville, Hendersonville and Marion (www.ymcawnc.org) offer several levels of lessons for preschoolers, from those who have never been in

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the water to those who can already swim but want to learn better breathing techniques and how to dive. School-age children can start as beginners or as swimmers who want to learn strokes and work on endurance. Advanced youth swim classes work on the skills necessary for competitive swimming. Preschoolers are taught water safety and familiarity, while older kids focus on stroke development, efficiencies and dynamics in the water. Everyone learns how to float on their backs (a vital emergency skill) and how to swim underwater. “Children who start out in the water when they’re young don’t struggle like older kids that start out later,”


BUNCOMBE COUNTY POOLS WWW.BUNCOMBECOUNTY.ORG » Cane Creek (628-4494) » Erwin (251-4992) » Hominy Valley (667-9937) » North Buncombe (645-1080) » Owen (686-1629) » Zeugner Center (684-5072) (indoor pool)

ASHEVILLE CITY POOLS » Recreation Park (298-0880) » Malvern Hills (253-1164) » Walton Street (253-1143)

said Tina Weaver, youth development and aquatics director. “But it’s never too late to learn. We have students taking private lessons that are 50 years old.” You don’t have to be a member to take lessons at the YMCA or the YWCA of Asheville. The YWCA (www.ywcaofasheville.org) has an extensive program for kids year-round, aquatics director Tonna Davis said. Its second summer session starts July 1, but with open enrollment, parents can sign their children up at any time. Kids take lessons one day a week through August. The YWCA also teaches swimming to toddlers and adults. Beginners who are 14 or 15 generally take lessons with adults, Davis said. Teachers at the YWCA are trained to spot confidence or anxiety in the water and assign beginners to appropriate levels accordingly, Davis said. Parents can prep their children for lessons by explaining that having water on their faces and in their ears is normal, she said. Classes for preschoolers at the YWCA involve songs and games and toys. Older kids get to play on the slide and jump off the diving board. “We focus on making every experience here a positive experience,” Davis said. “The four P’s — practice, persistence, praise and patience — that’s our mantra.”

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Summer snack attack

Healthy snacks fill — and shut — them up By Paul Clark

WNC Parent contributor

It’s the whine that makes parents long for the beginning of school — “Mom, I’m hungry and there’s nothing to eat!” Often the kids are bored, and a little nudge toward an activity or friend will suffice. But often kids are hungry because they’re bored with the snacks at home. Just be careful what you offer, nutritionists advise. “We’re finding a predisposition toward obesity occurs when a child is snacking on refined sugars all the time,” said Phil Mohr, a nutritionist with the

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WIC program at Buncombe County Health and Human Services. “So, getting them started early with good eating is a way to address the problem.” “If you’re eating a bunch of junky, processed food, you kind of feel like sitting around and doing nothing,” said Amy Burle, a Candler mother of three. “But if you’re eating what’s good for you, you feel like going out and doing things.” The best way to ensure good nutrition is to serve well-rounded, substantial meals that leave kids satisfied until the next meal, said Christine Banman, a registered dietitian. “That increases the likelihood they’ll eat their vegetables

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THINKSTOCK.COM

and explore new options.” But kids get hungry at the most inconvenient times. And as any parent knows, keeping them in snacks is expensive. “Things like packaged trail mix and


even something as innocent as instant oatmeal are expensive,” said Banman, a registered dietitian at Mountain Kidney & Hypertension Associates in Asheville and parent of a teenager. “Those protein bars and Greek yogurts can cost $1 each.” Here’s what Burle does, at mealtime and in between. She serves breakfast and lunch at regular times that her 11and 8-year-old girls and 2-year-old son can depend on. “In summertime, it’s easy to get busy with things and lose track of time, so if I have lunch at a set time, they’re not looking for snacks,” she said. She also keeps apples and oranges on hand when the girls come in from playing and want something in between meals. When she buys a watermelon, she cuts it up so she can dish up something succulent to snack on. “A lot of times when they’re hungry, they’re really thirsty,” Burle said. “And fruit is full of water, so it’s quenching their thirst.” Children don’t need drinks like juice, milk and Gatorade to stay hydrated, Banman said. Nothing beats water, and you can’t beat the price. Whole fruit is as quenching as juice, and because it has fiber, it sticks around

HEALTHY, LOW-COST SNACK IDEAS from the Buncombe County Health Department » Ants on a log – Peanut butter and raisins on celery or apple slices. » Broccoli trees – Lightly steamed and cooled fresh broccoli served with a low-fat dip like ranch or hummus. » Crunchy banana roll – A banana rolled in peanut butter, crusted with crushed cereal and frozen for an hour. » Trail mix – Mixed nuts, raisins, dried fruit and toasted coconut shreds. » Nutella on graham crackers – No explanation necessary. » Turkey pinwheels – Turkey and cheese rolled in a tortilla and cut cross-wise.

longer. Frozen fruit can be cheaper than fresh (frozen peach slices will quell the heat with fewer calories than ice cream). Mohr said fruit tends to have more calories than vegetables, so make sure you offer plenty of the latter. Ten of Cynthia Taylor’s 11 children are

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home with her in Alexander, so snacking can be expensive. She makes healthy choices like grapes and cubed cheese available. The kids love yogurt and granola, and her youngest is crazy about cucumbers. Controlling snacking is harder with older children who have jobs and their own money, she said. But everyone loves veggies and whole wheat pretzels dipped in low-fat sour cream mixed with a little ranch dressing. Taylor keeps a little junk food around, for special occasions. But she makes sure it’s in the downstairs pantry. “Out of sight, out of mind is my theory,” she said. For her teen, Banman stocks bagels and cream cheese and buys big containers of Greek yogurt and raw oatmeal. “I try to make homemade sweets rather than buy cookies, which are expensive,” she said. She stirs up cookie dough and freezes it. She and her son make a lot of homemade pizzas. “I am the queen of thrifty shopping,” Banman said. “It’s worth it to me to put leg work in than to spend the money. I’m in control of what goes into our meals and snacks. It’s more healthy and less expensive.”

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GO FOR A

SPIN TIPS FOR TAKING THE FAMILY ON A BIKING ADVENTURE

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By Pam J. Hecht, WNC Parent contributor

Biking together can pave the way for families to bond, get outdoor exercise and have fun. If your neighborhood isn’t the best place to bike or if the scenery outside your front door is getting stale,

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there are plenty of other places in the area to roll. Tacey Mack, of West Asheville, and her family bike together whenever and wherever they safely can, she says.


“We make it fun for the kids,” says Mack, whose daughter Isabel, 13, likes the “rooty, bumpy trails” and daughter Ava, 8, likes the “hilly rides where you jump a little — we call them whoopy woos.” When Ava struggles up a hill, her dad helps push her up, says Mack, and often, the family will stop for a picnic. Have a destination in mind, which makes the trip more of an “adventure,” says Joe Sanders, president of Blue Ridge Bicycle Club. “Ride to Lake Powhatan and maybe go fishing on the dock.” The Macks also participate in community bike rides (such as those hosted by Asheville on Bikes, a local biking advocacy organiza-

tion, and Asheville Cyclocross, which hosts “fun, no-pressure kid bike races”), she says. “Group rides are great to get kids started biking — there are lots of families with kids and rest breaks.” “Biking is a way to keep kids active so they stay that way,” Mack adds. “It’s also a great way to have family time and fun together.”

WHERE TO RIDE

Grab your road or mountain bike (or rent one, along with a bike rack, from an area bike shop,) and try one of these paths or trails below: » French Broad River Greenway, a 2.8-mile bicycle/pedestrian asphalt trail that winds along the French Broad River and connects Carrier Park to Hominy Creek and French Broad River parks in West Asheville, with on-road and off-road sections. (Bike rentals are available at the nearby Asheville Outdoor Center for kids

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10 and up, 521 Amboy Road, Asheville, 232-1970, www.paddlewithus.com.) » Carrier Park, at the center of the French Broad River Greenway, includes a paved trail for biking along the river, with a playground, wetland interpretive and education trail, and a velodrome (an enclosed asphalt track for bike racing, open to bikers during park hours, but not during races). Visit www.ashevillenc.gov/Departments/ ParksRecreation.aspx. » Bent Creek Experimental Forest in Pisgah National Forest of N.C. 191, at Hard Times parking area. Check the information kiosk to find the gravel trail that splits at the creek and head right to Lake Powhatan (the left trail leads to the Arboretum), says Julia Kirschman, Bent Creek technology transfer specialist. From the Arboretum, park in the first parking area on the left past the entrance and take the Continues on Page 22

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woodchip trail that runs along the creek, where kids can stop and play with salamanders and rocks — “it’s one of the best, especially for young kids,” says Claudia Nix, co-owner of Liberty Bikes in Asheville. Visit www.srs.fs.usda.gov/bentcreek » Black Mountain Greenways for road or mountain bikes. Three paved trails meet at Recreation Park in Black Mountain: Community Garden Trail (parents can ride or sit and watch their kids ride around the slightly hilly loop), River Loop Trail and the Oaks Trail Blue Ridge Road, or the Flat Creek trail, with parking available behind Black Mountain Primary School, Black Mountain, tinyurl.com/blackmountaintrailmap, blackmountainrec.com » Fletcher Community Park, a nearly half-mile paved path includes scenic trails and gardens, a playground and a creek. At 85 Howard Gap Road, www.fletcherparks.org » Charles D. Owen Park, a flat, well-packed, natural surface trail around two ponds with a fishing pier, bird watching, at 875 Warren Wilson Road, Swannanoa. Visit

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www.buncombecounty.org/connect. » Oklawaha Greenway Trail, a two-mile paved trail for mountain or road bikes, through the nature trail at Jackson Park (which also includes a mountain bike park) to Patton Park, Hendersonville, http://bit.ly/13vNd8c. » Jackson Park, paved bicycle trail, with playground and scenic walking trails, 801 Glover St., Hendersonville, hendersoncountyrecreation.org » Buncombe County Sports Park, a nearly mile-long, flat trail bordering the soccer fields, “a good place to ditch the training wheels and teach your kids to ride,” says Lucy Crown, Park and Greenways Planner, Buncombe County Parks, Greenways and Recreation Services, who also bikes often with her two young sons. At 58 Apac Circle, Enka, www.buncombecounty.org/connect » Reed Creek and Glenn’s Creek Greenways from Weaver Park through the Botanical Gardens of Asheville, “is a great place for family rides in North Asheville,” says Christen McNamara,


outdoor program coordinator for Asheville Parks, Recreation & Cultural Arts. (The path crosses Merrimon Avenue.) Visit http://bit.ly/14QYWhi. » For an out-of-town, family-friendly biking adventure about two hours from Asheville, try the Virginia Creeper Trail, an easy, mostly downhill or flat 34-mile scenic ride, bike rentals/shuttle service available, Damascus, Va., www.vacreepertrail.com

FAMILY BIKING TIPS

Here are a few family biking suggestions to get you going: » Consider starting with a trailer bike, which attaches to an adult bike, and later, a scooter bike (or any small bike without pedals), which teaches balance to help prepare younger kids for regular bike riding, says Mack. When a child is ready for two wheels, start with a small, lightweight bike that the child can easily control. “Don’t buy a bike for a child

BIKING EVENTS For the latest information on family bike riding events, go to » blueridge bicycleclub.org » ashevilleon bikes.com » asheville cyclocross.com

to grow into because it’ll be too heavy,” says Nix. A strider bike is a two-wheeler bike designed especially for the youngest riders. Some stores have bike buy-back programs for trading up when kids grow out of their bikes. » While mountain/hybrid or children’s bikes with wider tires can handle rougher, woodsy trails or those with gravel or mulch, street/road bikes are fine for riding on greenways, sidewalks and other flatter surfaces. » For the safest rides, stick to

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places with little or no car traffic. » Remember helmets (state law requires bicyclists younger than 16 to wear one on public roads, public paths and public rights-of-way, but it’s a good idea for everyone to wear them at all times), water and sunscreen, to look both ways when crossing streets (or trail intersections), driveways or parking lots and to stay on the right hand side of the trail, says McNamara.

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kids’ voices

My favorite thing to do We asked students at Nativity Kindergarten in Arden, “If you could spend your time doing only one activity, what would that activity be and why?” Here’s what they told us. “I would do a maze because I like mazes.” Aaron, 6

“Playing on my pogo stick because it’s fun.” Jack, 5

“Playing Legos because those are my favorite toys.” Noah, 5

“Making crafts wtih Mrs. Ann because we do different activities.” Audrey, 6

“It would be reading a book. It’s because reading books is fun.” Joshua, 6

“A horse competition because I like animals.” Nora, 5

“Riding my bike because it’s fun.” Ben, 7

“Swimming, because it is fun and I really like to do it.” Mackenzie, 6

“Playing on my scooter because I really like playing on it.” Ryan, 5

“Playing outside because I like to.” Claire, 5

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“Playing in the swimming pool because I like to.” Victoria, 5


DADDY DAY CARE Night-shift fathers spend their days bonding with kids By Shari Rudavsky Indianapolis Star

When Carlos Wood made a career change eight years ago, he wasn’t just looking to do something different from teaching children with learning disabilities. He also wanted a new schedule — one that let him spend more time with his four children. Wood, 40, became a firefighter. He now works 24 hours on and 48 hours off with the Indianapolis Fire Department. He usually works two shifts a week. On the other days, he’s the parent who runs forgotten lunches to school or helps with school projects. His three younger children — now 9, 6 and 5 — stayed home with Dad before they started school, often heading to the Children’s Museum, the zoo or a local library or park. “That was one of the appealing things,” said Wood, who recently moved with his wife, Michelle, and family to Fishers, Ind. “I was able to stay at home, and I realized a lot more people stayed at home than I thought. But I was able to spend time with the family, do things around the house.” Wood belongs to a cadre of fathers who opt to work evenings or nights to give them time to raise their children during the day. For some, it’s a conscious decision. Others, like Brian Maksl, enter fatherhood while already working nights and find that it works well for them. The Danville, Ind., father met his wife at the distribution center where they Continues on Page 26

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DADDY Continued from Page 25

worked. When she was pregnant with their now 3-year-old, Maksl was promoted to a shift that required him to work 3 p.m. to 11:30 p.m. Tuesday through Saturday. His wife works Sundays to Thursdays, 7 a.m.-3:30 p.m., and spends evenings with their preschooler and her two children, ages 5 and 7, from a previous marriage. Because their shifts overlap, the children spend a few hours a day with a sitter. But evening work allows the Maksls to minimize the time the children are being watched by someone other than a parent. “I think I know my kids better than a lot of other fathers do,” Maksl said.

Perks of split-shift parenting

Regardless of why a father works an off-peak schedule, there are advantages to doing so, said Maureen Perry-Jenkins, a professor of psychology at the University of Massachusetts. She has studied a group of low-income and working-class families who have recently had their

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Slater Hogan and Erin Polley with their year-old son, Jack. It’s not just stay-at-home dads who get to spend the daylight hours with their children. It’s also fathers like Hogan, who’s a disc jockey and has a music producing business. INDIANAPOLIS STAR

first child. About a third of those in her sample split shifts to avoid using child care.

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Not only can this arrangement save on costs, it can also lead to a stronger bond between father and child — one


that lasts, Perry-Jenkins said. “Fathers are much more involved with their kids when they do shift work because they’re the primary parent. What we’re finding is if they’re involved early on, they stay involved,” she said. “It’s really patterns that get set up early that are important.” Single father Keith Angell would agree. After his son was born 11 years ago, the professional chef was the go-to daytime parent. He drove from the family home in Zionsville to his night and weekend job in Greenwood. Days, however, belonged to him and Jacob. He’d wake Jacob up each morning and the two would have breakfast together. They dined out for breakfast at least one day a week. If Jacob ever needed something from home during school, Angell would take it to him. Angell attended every school meeting. “I was one of a few dads around. It made me feel great,” says Angell, 42. Two years ago, Angell and his wife divorced, and he became a single father. Baby sitters and his parents helped out with evening child care, but Angell noticed Jacob’s grades slipping, and he feared he was not involved enough. Now, Angell works days and week-

ends at a grill closer to home, a job that allows him to spend school nights with his son. And if anything, that bond has only grown stronger.

Making a conscious choice

Steve Lew, an intensive care unit nurse at Community East Hospital, worked days at another job before retraining to enter the medical field. His decision to change careers from construction rested in part on the poor economy. But it also had to do with the long days that often required him to leave his house before his children woke up and return after they went to sleep. When he entered nursing in January 2012, he looked for jobs that would allow him to work nights. Now, Lew, 36, pulls 12-hour shifts Friday, Sunday and Monday nights. His wife, Erica, works Wednesday, Thursday and Friday days. On Sundays, the family attends church together. And each night, they sit down for dinner. “It can be tiring, but it beats the alternative,” the Center Grove resident said. “I would rather work a night shift where I can still have dinner with my family.” Missing dinners and bedtimes may be

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easier in general for dads than for moms, Perry-Jenkins’ research suggests. Many of the mothers she spoke with said they felt they needed to be there for those times in the day. That means fathers in some fields are more likely to pick up lucrative evening shifts. Slater Hogan and Erin Polley have the best of both worlds. Hogan, whose career as a disc jockey and music promoter predated the arrival of the couple’s son last year, splits the time with his wife. In the morning, Polley leaves for work. Hogan, 43, watches their son, Jack. Because much of Hogan’s work is with West Coast colleagues, he makes his calls when Polley gets home in the afternoon. Because of his schedule, Hogan has been on hand to witness many of Jack’s firsts — his first smile, his first words. The downside for Hogan and Polley and many other couples who work opposite shifts? How little time they spend together. Some days will go by when the Lews seem to pass one another on the way in and out of their home. “We kind of high-five,” Steve said. “She comes home and I go to work.”

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kids’ fitness

Is your daughter’s knee at risk? By Brian Lawler

WNC Parent columnist

Girls are four to six times more likely to sustain serious knee injuries as compared to boys who participate in the same sport. The highest injury rates occur in jumping and cutting sports like basketball, soccer and volleyball. One of the more serious knee injuries that can occur are anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) tears; the ACL is the primary stabilizing ligament in the knee. Such injuries can greatly impact an athlete’s mental health and involve an expensive surgery, a long painful rehab, at least one lost season of sports participation, and a ten-fold increased incidence of knee osteoarthritis later in life. Fortunately, a large number of these injuries can be prevented through a

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sound training program. Girls tend to be weaker in their hip musculature, have greater muscle imbalances, and move with poorer mechanics in comparison to boys. If your daughter participates in sports, it is imperative that she participate in a year-round strength training program, and it is even more important for her to strength train. Girls also tend to overuse their quadriceps muscles when landing from a jump or cutting. Such recruitment patterns result in increased shearing forces at the knee. Fortunately athletes can be taught how to use their buttocks and hamstring muscles to counteract these forces. After age 11, girls do not increase in hamstring strength unless they actively work at it. Participating in sports is not enough. In fact, muscle imbalances will generally worsen as a girl continues to train and compete; this is one reason for the increased incidence of injuries in college. It is also takes a longer amount of time for girls to recruit their hamstring

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muscles relative to boys. There are exercises that can increase hamstring strength and the rate at which hamstrings contract. Finally, girls tend to land from a jump, cut or run with an inward collapse of her knees. Such movement mechanics will tend to worsen after puberty due to widening of the hips and increased body weight. These faulty movement mechanics can be corrected though specific strengthening exercises and practicing proper movement. In addition to helping to prevent injury, correction of faulty movements will improve a girl’s performance on the field or on the court and lead to greater enjoyment of her sport. Brian Lawler is a sports physical therapist and sports trainer at Asheville Physical Therapy. He offers a basketball skills and speed camp for young athletes with pro basketball player Desmond Penigar on July 15-19 at Warren Wilson College. Visit www.trainingwiththepros.com or www.ashevillephysicaltherapy.com.


Bullying by siblings can be damaging too, study says

By Michelle Healy USA TODAY

Bullying and aggressive behavior by a sibling can be as damaging as bullying by another peer, finds a new study that links it to increased depression, anxiety and anger among victimized kids and teens. And that association holds true for the types of aggressive behavior studied, mild and severe, from physical and psychological to property victimization, researchers say. Although peer bullying has increasingly become a recognized problem and the focus of preventive efforts, sibling bullying has historically been viewed as “benign and normal and even beneficial” for a child’s social development and ability “to learn to handle aggression in other relationships,” according to the

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study, in the July issue of the journal Pediatrics. The study “shows that sibling aggression is linked to worse mental health (for

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the victim), and in some cases it’s similar to what you find for peer aggression,” says lead author Corinna Jenkins Tucker, an associate professor of family studies at the University of New Hampshire in Durham. Tucker and colleagues analyzed data from The National Survey of Children’s Exposure to Violence, focusing on nearly 3,600 kids 17 and younger with at least one sibling living in the household. Kids were interviewed by phone about victimization in the past year. Just as parental violence and marital violence occurs in families, “sibling violence happens, as well,” says Nicole Campione-Barr, director of the Family Relationships and Adolescent Development Lab at the University of Missouri. “This is something we really need to be aware of.” She was not involved in the new study.

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librarian’s picks

2 fun summer reads for teens Jennifer Prince Buncombe County Public Library

Summer is the perfect time to pursue fun reading. These new novels for teens have fun in spades. Jaclyn Moriarty’s new novel, “A Corner of White,” is the first in a proposed series. In this novel, the strange and familiar are so entwined that the novel is at once enchanting and heart-rendingly realistic. In addition, it is funny and a tad romantic. Fourteen-year old Madeleine and her mother have left behind their jet-setting lifestyle for reasons mysterious and live now in a shabby apartment in Cambridge, England. When Madeleine finds a piece of paper wedged in a parking meter, she reads the note and leaves a note in return. A correspondence begins. Madeleine’s correspondent is not, as she believes, a neighbor, but 14-year-old Kingdom of Cello resident, Elliot. Elliot has a slew of problems, too, the most troublesome being his inability to find a locator spell to track his missing dad, who according to the town gossips, ran off with the high school physics teacher. Madeleine’s and Elliot’s stories unwind separately, though the narratives intersect occasionally via their letters. As Madeleine and Elliot get to know each other, they discover that their respective worlds are full of secrets and surprises. Why is Madeleine’s mom behaving strangely? What really happened to Elliot’s dad? Is there more to the Princess

area story times Buncombe County Libraries Visit www.buncombecounty.org Black Mountain, 250-4756: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday; Mother Goose: 11:30 a.m. Tuesday; Toddler: 10:30

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Sisters’ frivolous Royal Tour than meets the eye? Imagery about light and color is pervasive and integral to the story: from Madeleine’s kaleidoscopic wardrobe, to the ongoing thread of discussion about Isaac Newton and his theories on color and light, to Cello’s large population of unpredictable, occasionally violent Colors. a.m. Thursday East Asheville, 250-4738: Preschool: 11 a.m. Wednesday and Saturday Enka-Candler, 250-4758: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursday Fairview, 250-6484: Mother Goose, 11 a.m. Tuesday; Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday

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Rosemary Clement-Moore’s new novel “Spirit and Dust” is another one full of fancy, but of a different sort. Seventeen-year-old Daisy Goodnight is a psychic phenom. During the day, Daisy is a college student who works part time, unofficially, for the FBI. When federal agents whisk her away to help out with another murder case, she thinks it is going to be routine investigation. Daisy is wrong — dead wrong. Crime boss Maguire kidnaps Daisy to extort her powers to find his kidnapped teenage daughter and track down the magical Black Jackal, an ancient Egyptian artifact. A secret brotherhood wants the jackal, too. Maguire and the brotherhood have separate agendas and have no qualms about taking down whomever or whatever gets in their way. Daisy takes off with the handsome young criminal-with-a-conscience, Carson, to find the Black Jackal before anyone else does. What follows is a dynamite combo of action, suspense, mystery, romance and the paranormal. Daisy and Carson race across state lines, searching for clues in cemeteries, libraries and museums. They wrestle mummies, flee from the ghost of the Pompeii volcano and encounter helpful spirit remnants of dead relatives. As Daisy and Carson get closer to the jackal, they discover that it has the potential to unleash unlimited spirit power. In the wrong hands — well, there’s the rub. These books will be available soon in Buncombe County Public Libraries. To learn more, visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

Leicester, 250-6480: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday North Asheville, 250-4752: Preschool: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Toddler: 10 a.m. Wednesday; Mother Goose, 10:30 a.m. Tuesday Oakley/South Asheville, 250-4754: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Preschool: 10


area story times a.m. Wednesday Pack Memorial Library, 250-4700: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Mondays; Mother Goose: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursdays; Reading Corner (ages 6-12): 3:30 p.m. first Wednesdays Skyland/South Buncombe, 2506488: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Swannanoa, 250-6486: Preschool: 11 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 10 a.m. Thursday; Mother Goose: 2:30 p.m. Thursday (starting April 18) Weaverville, 250-6482: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Thursday; Preschool: 11 a.m. Tuesday West Asheville, 250-4750: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Monday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Preschool: 11 a.m. Thursday

Haywood County Library

Visit www.haywoodlibrary.org. Waynesville, 356-2512 or 356-2511: Movers and Shakers: 11 a.m. Thursdays; Ready 4 Learning: 11 a.m. Tuesdays; Family story time: 11 a.m. Wednesdays Canton, 648-2924: Family story time, 11 a.m. Tuesdays; Rompin’ Stompin’ story time, 10 a.m. Thursdays

Henderson County Library

Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. There are no story times in July.

Barnes & Noble

Asheville Mall, 296-7335: 11 a.m. Mondays and 2 p.m. Saturdays; Biltmore Park Town Square, Asheville, 687-0681: 11 a.m. Saturdays

Blue Ridge Books

152 S. Main St., Waynesville, 4566000: 10:30 a.m. Mondays, ages 3 and under.

Dancing Bear Toys

518 Kenilworth Road, Asheville, 800-659-8697: 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 11:30 a.m. Thursdays, through May.

Spellbound Children’s Bookshop

21 Battery Park Ave., Asheville, 232-2228: 10:30-11 a.m. Saturdays, ages 4-7.

The Health Adventure

800 Brevard Road, Suite 620, A sheville, 665-2217: 3:30 p.m. Monday and Friday.

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divorced families

Getting rid of entitlement By Trip Woodard WNC Parent columnist

My parents grew up and survived the Great Depression. Hence, my generation (the one that walked 10 miles to school in blinding snow uphill both ways) grew up in the shadow of the Great Depression. Both of these were shared as national experiences for these generations. Today’s kids have grown or are growing up under relative affluence (loosely translated, that means a relative pays for their affluence). There are also way too many children in our own immediate area who live in poverty and worry about basic things like

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food, but this is not seen as a national experience or portrayed as much through media. So, what I want to address is a question I encounter more and more from the families I serve. How do we teach the growing mass of youth the value of money to prepare them for the future? How do we derail them from the delusion of entitlement? How do we teach them that just because they turned 18 or 21, they still have to be respectful of the “golden rule”? (For those of you who don’t know this, the golden rule is “whoever has the gold makes the rules.”) This is not easy, I must say. As a single parent, I once solicited advice on these topics by doing a straw poll on close to a hundred colleagues (therapist types), friends, relatives, ministers and neighbors via email when my son entered his adolescent phase. Here are

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some of the suggestions I received and what I also learned from my own experience. First, quit buying them so much stuff. Model saving money and using it strategically. Help them to set up a bank account and work on long-range goals (like college or a car, not the latest game system). Next, junk the allowance system when they hit adolescence. Chores should be eliminated from the vocabulary and something like “doing your fair part for the family” used instead. Replace the allowance with a block grant system. Add up all the money you spend on their entertainment, personal vanity items, clothes, cellphone bill and gas (if they have a car). Give them this amount as a lump sum every month and let them spend it as they will … but, when it is gone, it is gone. You may sug-


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gest they set up a potential budget with you before doing this. Don’t spend money on elaborate vacations. Do simple vacations so you can occasionally fund their ability to do service trips through your religious or social affiliations. Try to give them experiences with REAL poverty to give them a bigger life perspective. My son is going with our church to the Dominican Republic this summer to work with Haitians. No fancy accommodations and real work. I expect it to be an eye opener.

Poverty always is for me. Determine your position on paying for college, buying a car, buying the next one when they wreck the first one, paying for car insurance, paying for the increased insurance rates after they wreck their first car, paying for gas, paying for any extracurricular events when they enter college and paying for any legal citations (yes, they speed — didn’t you?). Talk this over with your spouse (if you have one) or ex-partner in advance to develop a solid position. There are no right or wrong answers to any of this, what is most important is that you are clear on your expectations before sharing this with your child. Should you decide to set a prime example for your children about the value of money by embracing a life of poverty for yourself, feel free to give all your assets to the Trip Woodard Costa Rica Retirement Fund. All donations to this important fund are totally non-tax deductible. Trip Woodard is a licensed family and marriage therapist and a clinical member of the N.C. Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. Contact him at 606-8607.

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Home life trumps pop culture By Bill George WNC Parent guest columnist

How we establish our home life both determines and says a great deal about how we parent our children. The kind of homes we create for our children will do much to determine several outcomes. For example, we know that there is a direct correlation between the environment of the home, and things like character development, compassion, work ethic, aesthetic awareness, and even the academic success of our children. And of course our children’s spiritual development is hugely impacted by home life. As our children grow and mature, home life changes and, as Bobby Dylan wrote, “the times, they are a changin’,”

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too. I find the origin of the word “culture” is interesting in this regard. It had its origin in the 15th century and was related to cultivating. The idea here was that of tending and guarding the crops. So how are we cultivating families and our children? Consider now “pop” culture. It offers many enjoyable opportunities for all of us. But it also threatens to rob us and our children of the ideas and habits that matter most. How can parents navigate in this tricky culture? In his classic book “The Closing of the American Mind” (1987), Allen Bloom described pop culture as follows: “What each generation is can be best discovered in its relation to the permanent concerns of mankind. This in turn can best be discovered in each generation’s tastes, amusements and especially angers (this is above all true in an age that prides itself on calm self-awareness). Particularly revealing are the various impostors whose business it is to

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appeal to the young. These culture peddlers have the strongest of motives for finding out the appetites of the young — so they are useful guides into the labyrinths of the spirit of the times.” (p. 19) Bloom is on to something here, and I don’t want you to miss it. He juxtaposes “impostors… (who) …appeal to the young,” with the “permanent” things. All too often, we as parents are harping on our kids about the evils of pop culture. But what is behind these manifestations all around us? Today’s generation, like yesterday’s, increasingly lives for the moment because it has no grand idea or belief to capture its imagination. Today’s generation lives without margin, without quietness and downtime. Today’s generation seems oblivious to the serious consequences of poor life decisions. They seem to live for themselves — for right now. This generation will sell long-term possibilities for short-term gratification (look again at the Bloom quote). Think for


yourself how home life sets the standard for addressing (or not) the unhealthy and immoral invasiveness of pop culture. The best defense is a good offense. I have also found that this generation is disconnected from a sense of historical context, heritage, community, family pride and a grander cosmic purpose. They don’t have anything to die for, yet they spend countless hours playing games where people die in droves. This generation has embraced pop culture, yet they are, for the most part, culturally illiterate. Do they have a sense of thankfulness for what others have given their lives to secure for us? So what is my point? Pop culture is vying to replace what parenting and home life traditionally formed by way of knowledge, culture and heritage. Which is winning in the fabric of our home life? Without a healthy home life, children are not developing the moral, spiritual and intellectual compass they need to become responsible adults. As Hungarian novelist Stephen Vizinczey, stated, “we now have a whole culture based on the assumption that people know nothing and so anything can be said to them.” Oh how important it is that we take the lead in building home life.

Today’s generation ... increasingly lives for the moment because it has no grand idea or belief to capture its imagination. Today’s generation lives without margin, without quietness and downtime. Instead of doing battle over the outward manifestations of pop culture — instead of parenting out of fear — we ought to be infusing, exposing and living out the “permanent things” in our home lives. The children most susceptible to the ravages of pop culture are those whose parents are either neglecting to expose them to the great truths, rich history, high culture and the sense of context, or they are parenting out of fear, trying to demonize and prevent all pop culture from invading the home. In my observations over 30 years in education, parental permissiveness and parental fear are a formula that threatens the

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future of parenting. But wait a minute, you say to yourself, I’m a person of character, a person of faith, I go to church, etc. Good! We must understand the times we live in. We must not make these great ideas an add-on, a compartment, but an integral part of our every endeavor. A faith-driven life is an intentional life. We must celebrate truth, beauty, noble people and noble ideas in our homes. Our dinner tables should be a forum of fun discussion, analysis, arguing (the good kind), and social engagement. This is the underside of home life that is rarely talked about. If parents can move their families in the right direction with respect to faith, heritage, and culture, the quality of learning will be better. Children will display thankfulness, rather than complaining. The choices they make will not be to ape the culture, but to aspire to your standards and expectations. And they will dream big because you have placed before them the Big Ideas that have built our civilization. William George and his wife Lynn have been married for 32 years and are the parents of six grown children. He is the head of school at Asheville Christian Academy.

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growing together

Teen years have benefits By Chris Worthy

WNC Parent columnist

The payoff is changing around here. There is nothing like the pure neurochemical response to a new baby. I don’t have words to describe it. It’s as stunning as the first realization that your body can produce food. The payoff is primal at that stage, I think, as hormones and milk-drunk babies work together to make all seem right with the world. Just when it can’t get better, it does. Baby smiles, then laughs and then words form. We pour in and we get back tenfold. Blink and they are teenagers. Are you dreading it? Don’t worry. The

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payoff is different and wonderful. My daughter and I are working our way through “Downton Abbey” together. The boys aren’t interested, but I have a discerning TV companion who doesn’t balk at Masterpiece Classic and who never met a documentary she didn’t like. Netflix is losing money on us as we find obscure stories about psychology and crime and how to make sushi. She also runs errands for me. I am an introvert who is content never to leave the house, so handing her a grocery list feels like I’ve hit the parenting jackpot. The boy would seize up in fits of testosterone at the sight of the Dowager Countess, but he is a sucker for science and is gaining an appreciation for science fiction. It makes my geek heart happy to hear him compare “Star Trek” captains. My son, the guitar player, also fully appreciates playing the classic rock

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station a little too loud, something his mother may or may not do on occasion. Thanks to years of being home-schooled by a music lover, he is almost equally content when I am playing Holst’s “The Planets” (also too loud, probably) or when we’re sitting in the audience waiting for the conductor to take the podium. Probably also a result of home-school field trips, the boy has a passion for museums. He reads every sign, pores over every painting as if each were waiting to be discovered — which they are, by the way. I have an instant ally as I argue for adding a day to vacation so we can take a side trip to the Museum of Something Most People Don’t Care About. Perhaps the biggest payoff of all is having two teens who enjoy their time together. Gone — mostly — are the days of someone touching someone else’s


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stuff or invading a sibling’s space. The biggest argument these days is about the level of bossiness the younger will tolerate from the older or maybe about who gets the remote control. They happily hop in the car and head off for frozen yogurt or gather in the family room to watch “Napoleon Dynamite” for the 14th

time. The sleepless nights, potty training, fevers and testing of limits are so, so hard, but I’m still amazed that the investment comes back over and over, in all new ways. Contact Worthy at chris@worthyplace.net.

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For an easy summer dinner, put

fish steaks on the grill By Karen Fernau, The Arizona Republic

Swordfish steaks take on a spicy zest with pineapple juice, brown sugar, garlic, lemon, cinnamon and chili powder. GANNETT

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Grillers, like fishermen, like to tell the story about the one that got away. The fish whose flesh stuck to the grate or the fillet that crumbled into the coals. “I hear it all the time. Someone tries to grill fish and it turns out a mess, so they never try again,” chef Eric Naddy said. With the right choice of fish and proper technique, there’s nothing intimidating about grilling fish, said Naddy, who teaches fish-cooking classes at Sweet Basil Gourmetware and Cooking School in Scottsdale, Ariz., and owns Tall Order Catering in Chandler, Ariz. First, choose steaks over fillets for grilling. Fillets are cut parallel to the bone, making them delicate and flaky. Fish steaks are cross-cut, making them sturdier, firmer and better-suited for grilling. Tuna, salmon, mahi-mahi, marlin, swordfish and halibut are a few of the top choices for fish steaks. They vary in thickness, so select steaks that are at least 1-inch thick for slow, even cooking. Fishmongers typically remove the bones, but it’s

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always a good idea to run a finger lightly but firmly across the flesh, feeling for bones. Use tweezers to pull them out. Steaks from the ocean can be grilled almost bare — just a touch of olive oil, salt and pepper — or jazzed up with a marinade, sauce, crust or rub. Marinating beef steaks tenderizes tough cuts, but marinades simply enhance the flavor of fish. Marinate no longer than 30 minutes. “Steaks can really stand up to bold flavors, so pair a favorite fish with a sesame crust or pineapple glaze,” Naddy said. Serve with a flavorful vegetable side for a light, healthy summer meal. Another must when grilling steaks is to avoid overcooking, which makes the flesh dry and crumbly. Fish are done when the flesh becomes opaque but is still moist. “When the fish is fresh and the steaks grilled to medium-well,” Naddy said, “a steak from the ocean is hard to beat.”

Sesame-crusted ahi tuna with ginger dressing and bok choy For the ginger dressing: 1 garlic clove, minced 1 teaspoon sugar 2 tablespoons soy sauce 1/4 cup peanut oil (can substitute olive oil) 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, minced 1/4 cup rice vinegar 1 tablespoon toasted sesame seeds 1 teaspoon Dijon mustard 1/2 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper

Combine ingredients in a non-reactive bowl; whisk until well blended. Chill or serve at room temperature.

For the tuna and bok choy: 4 sushi-grade ahi tuna steaks 1 tablespoon salt 1 teaspoon freshly ground black pepper 2 tablespoons sesame oil 1/4 cup sesame seeds 4 baby bok choy, halved lengthwise

PHOTOS BY JOHN SAMORA/GANNETT

1 tablespoon olive oil

Sprinkle tuna on all sides with about half the salt and all the pepper. Drizzle all sides with sesame oil. Pour sesame seeds into a shallow dish. Press tuna firmly into the seeds, coating all sides. Fill a large bowl with ice and cold water. Bring a medium stockpot two-thirds full of water to a boil; add remaining salt. Blanche bok choy 1 minute.

With slotted spoon, transfer bok choy to the ice-water bath. When it is completely chilled, drain and set aside. Preheat a grill to mediumhigh. Just before grilling, oil the grate where you will place the fish. Grill tuna about 3 minutes per side. Remove from the heat; let rest for 2 to 3 minutes. Heat olive oil in a large saute pan over medium-high. Place drained bok choy cutside-down in pan. Cook 1-2 minutes, or until cut side is golden brown. Remove from heat. Divide bok choy among four plates. Rest each fish portion against the bok choy on each plate. Drizzle with ginger dressing. Serve warm or chilled. Makes 4 servings. Source: Arizona chef Eric Naddy

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Pineapple-citrus glazed swordfish with garlic snap peas For the swordfish and sauce: 1/2 cup pineapple juice 1 lemon, zested and juiced 4 swordfish steaks, about 6 ounces each, 1 to 1 and one-half inches thick 2 tablespoons brown sugar 1 teaspoon chili powder 2 garlic cloves, finely minced 1 teaspoon sea salt 1 teaspoon ground cinnamon 2 tablespoons unsalted butter Salt and pepper, to taste

In a nonreactive dish large enough to hold the fish in a single layer, combine the pineapple juice and lemon juice. Add swordfish, cover and refrigerate at least 15 minutes, but no longer than 30 minutes. Preheat grill to medium-high. In a small bowl, combine lemon zest, brown sugar, chili powder, garlic, sea salt and cinnamon. Reserve 1 teaspoon of the mixture. Remove fish from marinade. Reserve marinade and add the reserved teaspoon of spice mixture. Rub the rest of the spice mixture generously on all sides of the fish. Oil the grill grate where you will place

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the fish. Grill fish 2-3 minutes per side. It should have a firm feeling but not flake. Remove from heat and let rest for 3 to 4 minutes. Meanwhile, in a saute pan over medium-high heat, simmer the reserved marinade until reduced by half. Reduce heat to low and swirl in butter until melted and combined. Season with salt and pepper to taste.

For the garlic snap peas: 2 teaspoons sesame oil 3 cups sugar snap peas 2 garlic cloves, chopped 1 teaspoon fresh ginger, minced 2 teaspoons lemon juice Salt and pepper, to taste

Heat sesame oil in a large skillet over medium. Add peas; cook and stir for 2 to 4 minutes. Add garlic, ginger, lemon juice, salt and pepper and cook for 30 seconds. Remove from heat and serve immediately with the swordfish, with the sauce spooned on top of the fillets. Makes 4 servings. Source: Arizona chef Eric Naddy

HOW TO BUY FISH Buying fresh fish steaks can be tricky. Here are a few buying tips: » Fresh fish smells briny, but not “fishy.” » Pass on slimy steaks. The flesh should be firm to the touch. » Much of today’s frozen fish is just a tad off of fresh. Stock your freezer with varieties and defrost just before grilling. If in doubt, ask the fishmonger which is the freshest. » Grill as soon as possible, within 24 hours of buying.

How to grill fish Follow these grilling tips for moist, flavorful fish steaks: » To prevent fish from sticking, clean the grill well. Oil liberally and allow it to heat up. Hot grates make for instant sear, preventing both the flesh and skin from sticking. Medium-high typically is the best temperature. » Lay the fish across the grill bars, not alongside them. The less metal in contact with the meat, the less the chance for sticking. » Let the fish grill for a few minutes before trying to move it to try to keep the fish from sticking. » Be gentle with fish. Use tongs and a spatula to turn it. First, try turning it gently with tongs, but if the fish sticks slightly, slide a thin spatula underneath the steak to turn. » Finally, when handling the fish, proceed slowly and gently.

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Wild rice-crusted halibut with rainbow chard For the rainbow chard: 3 bunches (3 pounds total) rainbow chard 2 tablespoons olive oil 2 medium sweet onions, finely chopped 6 garlic cloves, finely chopped 12 cups vegetable stock (homemade or reduced-sodium store-bought) 1/3 cup apple-cider vinegar 1 tablespoon sugar 1 teaspoon salt 3/4 teaspoon pepper 1/4 cup shredded Parmesan cheese, for garnish

Wash chard well. Remove and dice stems and veins; chop leaves. Heat oil in a large stockpot over medium. Add onions and saute for 8 minutes. Add garlic and saute 1 minute. Stir in stock, vinegar, sugar, salt and pepper. Cook 30 minutes. Add chard and cook to desired degree of tenderness. Garnish with Parmesan when served. For the rice-crusted halibut: 6 halibut steaks Salt and pepper

1/2 cup rice flour 2 eggs 3 tablespoons half-and-half 2 cups wild rice, cooked 6 tablespoons olive oil

Season halibut with salt and pepper, then dredge in rice flour and set aside. In a medium bowl, mix eggs, half-and-half, salt and pepper. In a wide bowl, mix cooked wild rice with salt and pepper to taste. Dip halibut in egg mixture, then coat with rice, pressing rice onto halibut. Preheat oven to 400 degrees. Line a baking sheet with parchment. Heat 2 tablespoons oil in a medium skillet over medium-high. Place two pieces halibut in pan, sear 2 minutes per side, then move to the prepared baking sheet. Repeat with remaining halibut and oil. When all halibut is on the baking sheet, roast until internal temperature registers 145 degrees. Meanwhile, prepare the beurre rouge sauce.

For the tarragon beurre rouge: 1 small shallot, minced 1 garlic clove, minced 1/2 cup red wine 1/2 cup (8 tablespoons or 1 stick) butter,

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JOHN SAMORA/ THE REPUBLIC

sliced into pats 1 tablespoon fresh tarragon, chopped 1 tablespoon parsley, finely chopped

In a small saute pan, combine shallot, garlic and red wine. Over medium-high heat, reduce the liquid to almost dry. Remove from heat and swirl in butter until the sauce is uniform and mixed. Strain through a fine mesh strainer into a bowl and add the herbs. Serve the fish on a bed of rainbow chard, drizzled with tarragon beurre rouge sauce. Makes 6 servings. Source: Arizona chef Eric Naddy

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Gourmet snack cakes upgrade lost childhood favorites By Karen Fernau The Arizona Republic

When it looked as if the maker of Twinkies, Ding Dongs and Ho Hos was going kaput last year, consumers rushed to stores to stockpile the lunchbox snacks of childhood. Shelves were wiped clean in hours. Investors swooped in to save, hopefully for good, Hostess Brands’ spongy cake snacks. The crisis was averted and hysteria passed. Through it all, our devotion remained unchanged. Bakers like Tracy Dempsey took notice. The premier pastry chef has created a line of whimsical desserts patterned after the greats, but baked with top-of-the-line ingredients. Nostalgia never tasted so good. Her updated Ho Hos are a chocolate sponge cake wrapped around chocolate

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MORE RECIPES ON PAGE 46 hazelnut mousse and encased with a chocolate glaze. She fills replicas of Ding Dongs with red velvet cake. The cocoa in her Oreo lookalikes is European-style dark, and the cream in the middle is made with butter and pure vanilla. “These are the desserts that evoke good childhood memories, the treats that made us happy as kids. When you bake them with better ingredients, you get the comfort of old and the excitement of new,” says Dempsey, owner of Tracy Dempsey Originals, a wholesale bakery in Tempe, Ariz. Blame it on the poor economy, political gridlock or electronic overload, but Americans seem to be gobbling these

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whimsical, classic treats with abandon. At Noca and Crudo restaurants in Phoenix, Dempsey’s Ho Hos and replicas of Twinkies filled with mascarpone sell out nightly. Restaurants, like bakers, are tapping into diners’ desire for retro desserts. “They hit the sweet memory spot but taste better because the ingredients are better,” says Noca owner Eliot Wexler. “They remind us of a more innocent time, a treat with nice memories attached. Everyone has their favorite.” For Dempsey, who sells her retro desserts to Phoenix area restaurants and online at www.tracydempseyoriginals.com, the challenge was creating a balance between old and new. Her theory: The nostalgia is driven more by fondness of memory than actual taste. “You want them to look the same,” she says, “but taste much, much better.”


Red velvet cream-filled cakes Inspired by Hostess Brand Ding Dongs

For the cake: 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour, sifted 3 tablespoons unsweetened cocoa powder 1 teaspoon baking soda 1 cup buttermilk, shaken 1 teaspoon white wine vinegar 1/4 cup water 8 ounces butter, softened 1 1/2 cups granulated sugar 1 teaspoon kosher salt 3 eggs 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 1 tablespoon plus 1 teaspoon red food coloring For the filling: 1 1/2 cups powdered sugar, sifted 4 ounces (1 stick) unsalted butter, softened 1 teaspoon vanilla extract 2 tablespoons heavy cream or 1 tablespoon whole milk, as needed For the dip: 1 pound semisweet chocolate 2 tablespoons vegetable oil

For the cake: Preheat oven to 350 degrees. Prepare a 15-inch-by-10-inch sheet

JOHN SAMORA/GANNETT

pan by oiling and lining with parchment paper cut to fit in the pan. Set aside. In a medium bowl, whisk together flour, cocoa and baking soda; set aside. In a separate bowl, combine buttermilk, vinegar and water; set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter, sugar and salt until light and fluffy. Add eggs, vanilla and food coloring, mixing to thoroughly incorporate. Alternating, add the flour mixture and the buttermilk mixture, stirring only until no lumps are visible. Do not overmix. Transfer batter to prepared cake pan. Bake until cake is firm to the touch and a toothpick inserted into

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the center comes out clean. Cool completely before continuing. It is best to chill the cake overnight. For the filling: In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the powdered sugar, butter, vanilla and cream or milk until creamy. Once the cake has chilled, invert it onto a parchment-lined cutting board. Cut the cake in half widthwise. Spread the filling on one half, then place the other cake half on top of the filled half. Return filled cake to the refrigerator and allow to chill for an hour before cutting and dipping. Once the cake has chilled, cut it into shapes with a favorite cutter or any shape you like. Chill again until ready to dip. To dip cakes: Melt chocolate and oil in the microwave in short bursts of 20 seconds, stirring after each time until chocolate is melted completely and smooth. Dip each cake in chocolate, shake off excess, and transfer to a parchment-lined sheet pan. Allow to set in the refrigerator before serving. Refrigerate any leftovers. Makes about 2-3 dozen cakes, depending on the size. Source: Tracy Dempsey Originals, tracydempseyoriginals.com.

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Homemade lemon sponge cakes Inspired by Hostess brand Twinkie snack cakes

lemon zest in a medium saucepan and bring to a boil. With the mixer running, For the cakes: drizzle the hot milk mixture into the 1 1/2 cups all-purpose flour eggs and sugar. Remove the bowl from 1 1/2 teaspoons baking powder the mixer. With a spatula, fold the 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt sifted dry ingredients into the wet 3 large eggs ingredients until just incorporated. Stir 1 1/3 cups granulated sugar in the vanilla and vegetable oil. Pour 3/4 cup whole milk batter into the prepared pan. Bake 3 tablespoons unsalted butter 1 teaspoon lemon zest, freshly zested until cake springs back when touched, 1/2 teaspoon vanilla extract 15-25 minutes. Cool the cake complete1 tablespoon vegetable oil ly before inverting onto a sheet pan. For the filling: Chill cake before cutting. 1/4 cup heavy cream For the filling: Combine all filling 1/2 cup mascarpone cheese, softened ingredients in the bowl of an electric 1 drop pure lemon oil mixer fitted with the paddle attach2 tablespoons granulated sugar ment. Beat until creamy. Transfer to a For the glaze: pastry bag. Refrigerate until needed. 1 cup powdered sugar Juice of 1 lemon For the glaze: Combine powdered Zest of half a lemon sugar, lemon juice and zest in a mediWater, as needed um bowl. Add water as needed to create a glaze. It may require additionFor the cake: Preheat oven to 350 al water as it sits. degrees. Prepare a 9-inch-by-13-inch cake To cut and fill cakes: Use a serratpan by oiling and lining with parchment ed knife to cut 4- by 2-inch cake finpaper cut to fit the bottom of the pan. gers, or use an oval-shaped cookie Lightly flour the pan, then tap out the excess and set pan aside. (As an alternative, cutter. Use a dowel to hollow out each cake finger from end to end. Fit the you could use one of the Twinkie pans filling bag with a small open tip and available on the market. If so, oil and flour pipe filling into each cake. Dip tops of the cavities.) the cakes in the lemon glaze. Place on In a medium bowl, sift together flour, a cooling rack to allow excess glaze to baking powder and salt. Set aside. drip off. Refrigerate until ready to In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted serve. Makes 8-12 cakes, depending on with the whisk attachment, combine the eggs and sugar and start beating until light size. Source: Tracy Dempsey Originals, and fluffy. Lower the speed and continue to tracydempseyoriginals.com. beat. Meanwhile, combine milk, butter and

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Vanilla cream-filled chocolate sandwich cookies Inspired by Nabisco Oreo Cookies

2 tablespoons water 1 teaspoon vanilla extract For the cookies: 2 1/2 cups all-purpose flour For the filling: 1 1/2 cups powdered 1 1/2 cups unsweetened sugar, sifted cocoa powder 4 ounces (1 stick) 1 teaspoon baking soda unsalted butter, softened 1/2 teaspoon kosher salt 1 teaspoon vanilla 5 ounces (1 stick plus 2 extract tablespoons) unsalted 2 tablespoons heavy butter, softened cream or 1 tablespoon 1 1/3 cups brown sugar whole milk, as needed 2 eggs

For the cookies: In a medium bowl, whisk together the flour, cocoa, baking soda and salt. Set aside. In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream the butter and brown sugar until light and fluffy. Add eggs. Add water and vanilla, stirring until well mixed. Add dry ingredients, mixing until combined and a dough forms. Transfer dough to a work surface, shape into a disk and wrap in plastic wrap. Chill for 20 minutes. Preheat oven to 300 degrees. Roll dough on lightly floured surface to about one-fourth-inch thick. Cut with favorite cutter. Transfer cookies to parchment-lined sheet pans. Bake until dry on the surface, 7-10 minutes. Remove from oven and allow to cool. For the filling: In the bowl of an electric mixer fitted with the paddle attachment, cream together the powdered sugar, butter, vanilla and cream or milk until creamy. To assemble: Once cookies are completely cool, use a pastry bag fitted with a plain tip to fill pipe filling onto half the cookies. Top each with a plain cookie to make sandwiches. Cookies will keep for up to five days if stored in an airtight container. Makes about 3 dozen. Source: Tracy Dempsey Originals, www.tracydempseyoriginals.com.

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calendar of events

Things to do

July 2

ALL ABOUT ME: 10:30 a.m.-noon July 2, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. Using crafts, music and movement, participants will learn about what makes them unique. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 3-6. Must be potty trained to attend. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. July 2, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Ages 6-12. Kids will make glass-fused candle votives and tie-dye. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: July 2, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for students in fourth-seventh grades. Session from 10 a.m.-noon reads “Harry Potter and the Sorcerer’s Stone.” Session from 1-3 p.m. reads “The Extraordinary Education of Nicholas Benedict.” Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DIG INTO ROCKS AND MINERALS: 10:30 a.m. July 2, Fletcher Branch Library. Presented by Mineral and Lapidary Museum, Hendersonville. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. FAIRY TALE TEA PARTY: 1:30-3:30 p.m. July 2, in Cedar Mounain. Ladies, young and young at heart, get dressed up in your favorite party clothes, hats and gloves optional. With Mountain Marionettes. Children $30, adults $19. To reserve a spot, call Susan at 862-8122. Go to www.mountainmarionettes.com for more information.

July 3

CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: 10 a.m.-noon July 3, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for students in fourthseventh grades. Book is “One Crazy Summer” by Rita Williams-Garcia. Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DIG INTO MUSIC: 10:30 a.m. July 3, Leicester Li-

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calendar of events

No groups please. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library.

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July 5

brary. Free. Special story time with the Moozic Lady. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. FIRST LEGO LEAGUE ROBOTICS: 3-5 p.m. July 3 at 94 Coxe Ave., Asheville. Design, build and program NXT First LEGO League robots. For ages 10-14. Classes meet second and fourth Wednesdays (with extra class on July 3). This is a STEM educational activity. Parental participation encouraged. To learn more, call 258-2038. MICROWONDERS: 2-4 p.m. July 3, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 7-12. Examine the world at the microscopic level using traditional and digital microscopes. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. PARADE OF PUPPETS: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 pm. July 3, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 7-10. Learn the history of puppet making, create your own puppets, and perform a puppet show. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. SCIENCE OF SOUND: 10:30 a.m.-noon July 3. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 3-6. Learn about sound. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. WILD OAKS SCHOOL-AGE LIBRARY CLUB: 3:30 p.m. July 3, South Asheville/Oakley Library. On Wednesdays in July for ages 6-12. Space is limited.

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APPALACHIAN STORYTELLING & SONGS: 12:30 and 2 p.m. July 5-6 at Chimney Rock Park’s Outdoor Classroom on the Meadows. Performances by John Fowler with stories and songs collected by generations of Carolina old-timers and storytellers. Free with park admission. Visit www.chimneyrockpark.com or learn more at www.hairytoeproductions.com. EXPLOSION-PALOOZA: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 5, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 8-12. You’ve seen the fireworks on July 4th, now spend some time with other explosions safely conducted in an explosion-palooza. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

July 6

APPALACHIAN STORYTELLING & SONGS: 12:30 and 2 p.m. July 5-6 at Chimney Rock Park’s Outdoor Classroom on the Meadows. Performances by John Fowler with stories and songs collected by generations of Carolina old-timers and storytellers. Free with park admission. Visit www.chimneyrockpark.com or learn more at www.hairytoeproductions.com. HALOTHERAPY STORY TIME: 10-10:30 a.m. July 6, The Salt Spa of Asheville, 473 Hendersonville Road, Asheville. $8. Storytelling during halotherapy for children in a unique salt room with tons of Himala-

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yan salt on the walls and floor. Halotherapy can support respiratory health and offer relief for allergies, asthma, cystic fibrosis and more. Adult must accompany children. Call 505-1838 or visit www.saltasiawellbeing.com.

July 7

OVERCOMING ANGER: 7-8:30 p.m. July 7, Rainbow Mountain Children’s School, 574 Haywood Road, Asheville. Discover a better way to deal with anger. Learn how to respond to difficult people and challenging circumstances with a patient, relaxed and “cool” mind. Everyone welcome. Drop-in classes. Includes guided meditation, talk and discussion. $8, $5/students/seniors. Visit www.meditationinasheville.org or call 668-2241.

July 8

ANIMALS THAT LIVE UNDERGROUND: 2 p.m. July 8, Henderson County Main Library. Presented by Henderson County 4-H. For ages 5 and older. CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 3:30-5:30 p.m. July 8, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Aegs 6-12. Kids will be hand-building wind chimes with clay. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. POSTPARTUM CLASSES: 10:30-11:30 a.m. Mondays starting July 8, CarePartners, Seymour Auditorium, 68 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville. $120. Series of six classes for women who are six weeks to one year postpartum. Classes are designed to provide a supportive educational experience for a woman’s


transition to motherhood by emphasizing wellness, injury prevention and return to self. The classes will also help improve a mothers’ ability to care for her baby through the toddler years by caring for her body. It will be taught by physical therapists and a certified yoga instructor. Call 418-1050 to register.

For updates weekly, visit CITIZEN-TIMES.com/Living. To submit events, email details to calendar@wncparent.com. August calendar items are due July 10.

July 9

ANIMALS THAT LIVE UNDERGROUND: 11 a.m. July 9, Fletcher Branch Library. Presented by Henderson County 4-H. For ages 5 and older. CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: July 9, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for students in fourth-seventh grades. Session from 10 a.m.-noon reads “Harry Potter and the Chamber of Secrets.” Session from 1-3 p.m. reads “Midnight Magic.” Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DINOSAUR DIG: 10:30 a.m. (grades K-2) and 2 p.m. (grades 3-5) July 9, Henderson County Main Library. With Hands On! A Child’s Gallery. Free. Registration required. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register. PARTY LIKE A WOOKIE: 2 p.m. July 9, Fairview Library. Crafts and other “Star Wars” fun. Ages 5 and older. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. RUG HOOKING WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. Tuesdays, July 9-30, Henderson County Public Library. Conducted

by the Tar Heel Ruggers Guild. For grades 4-12 only. Registration required. Free. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register. TERRIFIC TEST TUBE SCIENCE: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 9, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 5-8. How many different experiments can you do in a test tube? Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

July 10

ANIMALS THAT LIVE UNDERGROUND: 11 a.m. July 10, Green River Branch Library. Presented by Henderson County 4-H. For ages 5 and older. CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: 10 a.m.-noon July 10, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for students in fourthseventh grades. Book for this session is “The Mysterious Benedict Society.” Students should read book

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before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DINOSAUR DIG: 10:30 a.m. (grades K-2) and 2 p.m. (grades 3-5) July 10, Edneyville Branch Library. With Hands On! A Child’s Gallery. Free. Registration required. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register. EAT YOUR VEGETABLES: 3:30 p.m. July 10, South Asheville/Oakley Library. Make a shoebox garden with Kimberly Kirstein of Adelbert Farms. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. FAIRIES AND FAIRY HOUS ES: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 10, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 6-10. Create fairies with beads, wire and flowers and create a fairy house. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. FIRST LEGO LEAGUE ROBOTICS: 3-5 p.m. July 10 at 94 Coxe Ave., Asheville. Design, build and program NXT First LEGO League robots. For ages 10-14. Classes meet second and fourth Wednesdays. This is a STEM educational activity. Parental participation encouraged. To learn more, call 258-2038. LEGO LEARN, THEN BUILD: 2-4 p.m. July 10, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 8-12. Learn about the skill of building castles, then use your knowledge to build a Lego castle. Can it stand up to the catapults? Call 6978333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. MEET THERAPY DOG CHLOE: 2 p.m. July 10, Mills

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calendar of events

TEEN RETRO REVAMP: 4-5:30 p.m. July 12, Weaverville Library. For ages 12-18. Bring any boring item from your room or closet and revamp into a stylish work of art! Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

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July 13

River Branch Library. For all ages. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. PROFESSOR WHIZZPOP MAGIC SHOW: 3 p.m. July 10, North Asheville Library. Ages 4 and older. Pick up a free ticket at the library. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. WILD OAKS SCHOOL-AGE LIBRARY CLUB: 3:30 p.m. July 10, South Asheville/Oakley Library. On Wednesdays in July for ages 6-12. Space is limited. No groups please. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library.

MOUNTAIN MARIONETTES: At the Hop, 11 a.m.noon July 13, East Asheville Library. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. SCIENCE PLAY - AIR: 10:30 a.m.-noon July 13, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Little ones learn about the science of air. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. ‘THE SECRET GARDEN’: 11 a.m. July 13 at Mills River Branch Library and 2 p.m. July 13 at Henderson County Main Library. Bright Star Children’s Theatre production for pre-K through fifth-graders. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information.

July 11

ANIMALS THAT LIVE UNDERGROUND: 11 a.m. July 11, Etowah Branch Library. Presented by Henderson County 4-H. For ages 5 and older. BIZARRE BEASTS: 2-4 p.m. July 11, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. What is bizarre about a spider? How do they create silk? Learn the answers to these questions and more. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: July 11, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Read Alouds Club from 10 a.m.-noon for grades K-3. Session from 1-3 p.m. reads “Inkheart,” geared toward grades 4-7. Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DIG INTO NATURE: 11 a.m. July 11, Leicester Library, and 2 p.m. July 11 at Black Mountain Library. Live animals, music and stories for all ages with Doug Elliott. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. DIG INTO ROCKS AND MINERALS: 10:30 a.m. July 11, Mills River Branch Library. Presented by Mineral and Lapidary Museum, Hendersonville. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. THE FAMILY KITCHEN: 6-7:30 p.m. July 11, The Morgan Center, 2820 Lynn Road, Tryon. Free series designed to equip families with practical knowledge on nutrition. This session is “What’s in Your Kids’ Lunchbox?” about how to pack a nutritious lunch for school or outings. Children 12 months and older who attend will participate in educational activities. Register to attend at Changing Lives MOMS Group on Facebook or via email at changinglivesmomsgroup@hotmail.com. FLI-RITE LEARNING: 2:30 p.m. July 11, South Buncombe/Skyland Library. Dig into the past and join the Wordsmith of Wonder, Wendal Wandell, to explore Ancient Egypt. For all ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. HISTORY IN THE DIRT: 11 a.m. July 11, Swannanoa Library. Ages 8 and older. Join Warren Wilson College archeology crew leader and anthropologist David Moore as he teaches us about digging in the dirt to find treasures of history--whether dinosaur bones or arrowheads, there are pieces of the past, sometimes in our own backyards! This is a ticketed

July 14

Kids ages 10-14 with an interest in Legos and robotics can join learn to design, build and program NXT First LEGO League robots with a group that meets at least twice a month. The first meeting this month is July 3. BILL SANDERS/WSANDERS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM event. Contact the library for your free ticket. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. MAKE YOUR OWN CLAY TILE: 3 p.m. July 11, Weaverville Library. With Jim the potter, for ages 7-15. Bring a cookie sheet to take your tile home and bake it. Limited space. Pick up a free ticket at the library beginning June 27. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. NANO SCIENCE: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 11, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 7-12. Explore the science of the very small with memory metals, mysterious gels and more. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. SUSANA AND TIMMY ABELL PROGRAM: 2 p.m. July 11, Henderson County Main Library. Storytelling, poetry, puppetry and music for all ages. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information.

July 12

STICKS, STONES AND FOSSILIZED BONES: 11 a.m. July 12, West Asheville Library. For ages 5-11. Space is limited. Pick up a free ticket at the library. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

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OVERCOMING ANGER: 7-8:30 p.m. July 7, Rainbow Mountain Children’s School, 574 Haywood Road, Asheville. Discover a better way to deal with anger. Learn how to respond to difficult people and challenging circumstances with a patient, relaxed and “cool” mind. Everyone welcome. Drop-in classes. Includes guided meditation, talk and discussion. $8, $5/students/seniors. Visit www.meditationinasheville.org or call 668-2241. ROYAL BOOK CLUB: 4 p.m. July 14, Spellbound Children's Bookshop, 21 Battery Park Ave., Asheville. Club for ages 18 and older discusses “Life As We Knew It” by Susan Beth Pfeffer. No RSVP necessary. Visit www.spellboundbookshop.com

July 15

ONE STRING PORK-N-BEAN GUITAR WORKSHOP: 2 p.m. July 15 at Green River Branch Library. With local musician Jeff Robbins. For grades K-5. Registration required. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register.

July 16

CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: July 16, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for grades 4-7. Session from 10 a.m.-noon reads “Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban.” Session from 1-3 p.m. reads “The Lightning Thief.” Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. HOPPIN’ AND GROOVIN’: 5:30 p.m. July 16, Swannanoa Library. All ages. Hoopin’ Hearts with Caitlin visits Groovin’ on Grovemont to bring exercise and summer fun with hula hoops to this summer concert event. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. OLD THYME COUNTRY TALES AND TUNES: 7 p.m. July 16, West Asheville Library. With story lady Sharon Clarke. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library.

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calendar of events Continued from Page 55 ONE STRING PORK-N-BEAN GUITAR WORKSHOP: 2 p.m. July 16 at Fletcher Branch Library. With local musician Jeff Robbins. For grades K-5. Registration required. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register. RUG HOOKING WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. Tuesdays, July 9-30, Henderson County Public Library. Conducted by the Tar Heel Ruggers Guild. For grades 4-12 only. Registration required. Free. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register. SONGS AND STORIES: 3 p.m. July 16, Enka-Candler Library. With Sharon Clarke. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. WIGGLE WITH THE WORMS: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 16, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Call to sign up. Ages 6-10, younger with accompanying adult. Get hands-on with these fascinating creatures of the dirt. Hold worms, hunt for worm eggs and create worm crafts. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

July 17

CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: 10 am.-noon July 17, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take

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NEW DAY CAMP LISTINGS FIVE FARMS CAMP: Opens sessions weekly starting July 15. Campers visit five farms over five days. Kids learn about sustainable farming practices, see and work with goats, rabbits, chickens, honey bees, veggies, fruits, fiber animals, bison, dairy animals. Buy directly from the farms. Then campers cool off in some of WNC’s best swimming holes, waterfall pools and creeks. Visit www.facebook.com/five.farms , email fivefarmscamp@gmail.com, call 242-0667. NATURE OF SPEED: Morning conditioning clinic, 8:30 a.m.-noon or 2 p.m. July 22-26. Sports performance training, 1-3 p.m. (ages 12-18) and 3:30-5:30 p.m. (ages 7-12) July 8-12, 15-19, 22-26, plus Aug. 5-9, 12-16, 19-23. At Blackeye Asheville, 44 Business

place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for grades 4-7. This session’s book is “The Penderwicks.” Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DRUMMING WITH THE MOOZIC LADY: 3 p.m. July 17, North Asheville Library. Space limited. Pick up a free ticket at the library. Ages 4 and older. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

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Park Circle, Arden. Call 684-1338 or visit www.blackeyeasheville.com. SUMMER VOICE MUSIC CAMP: 8:45 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 29-Aug. 2, First Baptist Church of Waynesville. Voices in the Laurel offers camp open to singers in all area counties who will be entering grades 1-9 in the fall. They will be divided into age groups to participate in a variety of musical experiences. Campers will learn to sing with proper vocal technique and in two and three part harmony. Groups will rotate through classes in piano, drums, guitar and violin. Some choral numbers will include choreography. $85, includes music, snacks, professional instructors, a tee shirt. Register online soon at www.voicesinthelaurel.org, or call 335-2849.

FARMER JASON ROCKS THE LIBRARY: 2:30 p.m. July 17, South Buncombe/Skyland Library. It’s Farmer Jason, rocking in the forest and the farm: going green fun for the whole family. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. LEGO LEARN, THEN BUILD: 2-4 p.m. July 17, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 8-12. Learn about the skill of building simple


machines and contraptions, then use your knowledge to be an engineer and build. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. ONE STRING PORK-N-BEAN GUITAR WORKSHOP: 2 p.m. July 17 at Henderson County Main Library. With local musician Jeff Robbins. For grades K-5. Registration required. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register. SCIENCE PLAY - WILD WATER: 10:30 a.m.-noon. July 17, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 3-6. Explore water and all of its unique properties. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. WILD OAKS SCHOOL-AGE LIBRARY CLUB: 3:30 p.m. July 17, South Asheville/Oakley Library. On Wednesdays in July for ages 6-12. Space is limited. No groups please. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library.

July 18

AUTISM PARENT SUPPORT GROUP: 6:15 p.m. July 18. Autism Society of North Carolina office, 306 Summit St, Asheville. Buncombe County Chapter of the Autism Society of NC offers a parent support group, open to all parents, caregivers and advocates. Meetings are the third Thursday of the month. Child care provided upon request. Contact chapter leader Lisa Pickering at lisarogerkaelyn@gmail.com. CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: July 18, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sun-

screen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Read Alouds Club from 10 a.m.-noon for grades K-3. Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Session from 1-3 p.m. is Flowers Club, with nonfiction and poetry. No need to read anything prior. Bring a favorite book about flowers. Geared toward grades 3-7. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DIG INTO DINOSAURS: 11 a.m. July 18, Leicester Library. With the Colburn Earth Science Museum, using real fossils. Space is limited. You must have a free ticket to come to this event. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. DIG INTO THE OCEAN: 10:30 a.m. July 18, Black Mountain Library. Fun facts, stories, song and salt water craft. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. FAMILY FUN NIGHT: 6:30 p.m. July 18, Pack Memorial Library. Join award-winning team of Susana and Timmy Abell for wonderful evening of storytelling, poetry, puppetry and song. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. FIRE AND ICE: 10:30 a.m. July 18, Fairview Library. Fire truck, fire safety and ice cream. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. MICRO WONDERS: 2-4 p.m. July 18, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 7-12. Examine the world at the microscopic level using traditional and digital microscopes. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. ONE STRING PORK-N-BEAN GUITAR WORKSHOP: 2 p.m. July 17 at Etowah Branch Library. With local musician Jeff Robbins. For grades K-5. Registration

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required. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register. SUSANA AND TIMMY ABELL CONCERT: 6:30 p.m. July 18, Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood St., Asheville. Award-winning original music for children and adults alike. Visit www.timmyabell.com. MOUNTAIN STORY MAGIC: 3 p.m. July 18, Weaverville Library. Pick up a free ticket at the library beginning July 5. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library.

July 19

AFRICAN DRUMMING CLASS: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 19, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 6-10. Join instructor Maria Freeman, to learn drum rhythms and explore African masks and instruments. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. AUTHOR TALK: 3 p.m. July 19, Spellbound Children's Bookshop, 21 Battery Park Ave., Asheville. Author Brad Herzog talks about his new book “Francis and Eddie” and the true story that inspired it. All ages. Visit www.spellboundbookshop.com.

July 20

HALOTHERAPY STORY TIME: 10-10:30 a.m. July 6, The Salt Spa of Asheville, 473 Hendersonville Road, Asheville. $8. Storytelling during halotherapy for children in a unique salt room with tons of Himalayan salt on the walls and floor. Halotherapy can

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calendar of events Continued from Page 57 support respiratory health and offer relief for allergies, asthma, cystic fibrosis and more. Adult must accompany children. Call 505-1838 or visit www.saltasiawellbeing.com.

July 22

PUPPET CAMP: 1-4 p.m. July 22-26, Cedar Mountain. Have you ever wanted to be a puppeteer? Mountain Marionettes hosts puppet camp. Build a marionette and give your puppet its own personality. $200, includes all materials and a snack. To reserve your spot call Susan at 862-8122. Go to www.mountainmarionettes.com for more information.

July 23

COMEDY CAMP: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 23-July 26, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $36 nonmembers / $30 members. Must register to attend. Weeklong camp for ages 7-12. Learn about the health benefits of good, clean humor. Work on presentation, timing, puns and homophones and practice these concepts by acting. Comedy presentation at 12:30 p.m. on the last day. Cost to attend the performance is $5 per person. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: 10 am.-noon July 23, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for grades 4-7. This session’s book is “Harry Potter and the Goblet of Fire.” Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. THE DIRT ON DIRT: 2 p.m. July 23, Fairview Library. Program the Colburn Earth Science Museum. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. PAJAMA PARTY STORY TIME: 7 p.m. July 23, Weaverville Library. Wear your pajamas and bring something snuggly. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. POLICE K-9 PROGRAM: 10:30 a.m. July 23 at Fletcher Branch Library. Hendersonville police officer Jennifer Drake brings her police dogs. For ages 4 and older. (Program may be canceled in event of a police emergency.) Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. RUG HOOKING WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. Tuesdays, July 9-30, Henderson County Public Library. Conducted by the Tar Heel Ruggers Guild. For grades 4-12 only. Registration required. Free. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information and to register. SCIENCE PLAY - SEED PARTY: 2-3:30 p.m. July 23, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 3-6. Learn about plants through seed play. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

July 24

CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: 10 am.-noon July

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PARENTS’ NIGHTS OUT Need a date night? Here is a roundup of upcoming parents’ nights out. Have an event to submit? Email information to calendar@wncparent.com.

JULY 5

REUTER FAMILY YMCA MORNING OUT: Includes a healthy snack, games and crafts. Ages 6 weeks-12 years. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $13 for the first child, $11 each additional for members/$25 per child nonmembers. Call 651-9622 to register.

JULY 6

ASHEVILLE DOWNTOWN YMCA: For ages 2-13. Themed nights include swimming, healthy snacks, games and crafts. 6-10 p.m. the first Saturday of each month at the Downtown YMCA, 30 Woodfin St., Asheville. $15 members/$23 nonmembers, with $2 sibling discount. Register online at www.ymcawnc.org. Call 210-9622 or email cemrick@ymcawnc.org for more information.

JULY 12

FIRED UP! CREATIVE LOUNGE: Kids paint pottery, have pizza and play games, 6-9 p.m. the second Friday of the month. At 26 Wall St., Asheville, and 321 N. Main St., Hen-

24, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for grades 4-7. This session’s book is “The Mysterious Benedict Society, Book 2.” Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. ENVIROSCAPE: 11 a.m.-noon July 24, East Asheville Library. Learning about our watershed, for ages 6 and older. Limited to 30 participants. Call the library at 250-4738 to sign up. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. ENVIROSCAPE: 3 p.m. July 24, North Asheville Library. Learning about our watershed, for ages 6 and older. Space is limited. Pick up your free ticket at the library. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. FIRST LEGO LEAGUE ROBOTICS: 3-5 p.m. July 24 at 94 Coxe Ave., Asheville. Design, build and program NXT First LEGO League robots. For ages 10-14. Classes meet second and fourth Wednesdays. This is a STEM educational activity. Parental participation encouraged. To learn more, call 258-2038. LEGO LEARN, THEN BUILD: 2-4 p.m. July 24, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 8-12. Learn about the skill of building arcade games, then use your knowledge to be an engineer and build. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

dersonville. Ages 5-12. $25. Registration required. Call Asheville shop at 253-8181 and Hendersonville shop at 698-9960. REUTER FAMILY YMCA: Themed nights of fun and games, taking place every second and fourth Friday of the month. Includes craft, movie and snacks. Ages 6 weeks-12 years. 6:15-9:45 p.m. $13 for the first child, $11 each additional child for members/$25 per child nonmembers. Call 651-9622 to register.

JULY 26

REUTER FAMILY YMCA: Themed nights of fun and games, taking place every second and fourth Friday of the month. Includes craft, movie and snacks. Ages 6 weeks-12 years. 6:15-9:45 p.m. $13 for the first child, $11 each additional child for members/$25 per child nonmembers. Call 651-9622 to register.

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REUTER FAMILY YMCA MORNING OUT: Includes a healthy snack, games and crafts. Ages 6 weeks-12 years. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $13 for the first child, $11 each additional for members/$25 per child nonmembers. Call 651-9622 to register.

POLICE K-9 PROGRAM: 10:30 a.m. July 24 at Mills River Branch Library. Hendersonville police officer Jennifer Drake brings her police dogs. For ages 4 and older. (Program may be canceled in event of a police emergency.) Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. WILD OAKS SCHOOL-AGE LIBRARY CLUB: 3:30 p.m. July 24, South Asheville/Oakley Library. On Wednesdays in July for ages 6-12. Space is limited. No groups please. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library. YOGA FOR KIDS: 10:30 a.m. July 24, Black Mountain Library. With Valerie Holbert. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

July 25

BALLOON MAGIC: 11 a.m. July 25, Leicester Library. With the Balloon Fairy. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: July 25, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Read Alouds Club from 10 a.m.-noon for grades K-3. Session from 1-3 p.m. reads “The Hobbit,” geared toward grades 4-7. Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com.

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calendar of events Continued from Page 59 JUNIOR PUPPET CAMP: 10:30 a.m.-noon July 25 in Cedar Mountain. Children build a charming marionette puppet. For ages 3-7. $14. To reserve a spot, call Susan at 862-8122. Visit www.mountainmarionettes.com for more information. SCREEN PRINT CRAFT: 3-4:30 p.m. July 25, Weaverville Library. Bring your own light-colored T-shirt to print on. Pick up your free ticket at the library beginning July 11. Limit one print per person. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library.

July 26

MOUNTAIN STORY MAGIC: 11 a.m. July 26, West Asheville Library. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

July 27

NESTING PARTY: 2-4 p.m. July 27, 51 N. Lexington Ave. Asheville. Free class in cloth diapering, baby wearing, swaddling, and much much more. RSVP to 258-1901. Visit www.nestorganics.com.

July 29

MEET THERAPY DOG CHLOE: 2 p.m. July 29, Fletcher Branch Library. For all ages. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.

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July 30

CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: 10 am.-noon July 30, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for grades 4-7. This session’s book is “Harry Potter and the Order of the Phoenix.” Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DINOSAUR DISCOVERY: 1 p.m. July 30, East Asheville Library. With N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences, for ages 5-10. Limited to 30 participants. Call the library at 250-4738 to sign up. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library. DIG INTO DINOSAURS: 3 p.m. July 30, Enka-Candler Library. Join the NC Museum of Science and discover more about dinosaurs. Ages 6 and older. Space is limited, reservation required. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. GROOVIN’ ON GROVEMONT — KIDS EDITION: 5 p.m. July 30, Swannanoa Library. All ages. Join Big Bang Boom for a rock ’n’ rolling good time under the tent in Grovemont Park. One of the most sought-after kids groups in all of NC, Big Bang Boom will have you dancing on the edge of your camp chair. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. RUG HOOKING WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. Tuesdays, July 9-30, Henderson County Public Library. Conducted by the Tar Heel Ruggers Guild. For grades 4-12 only. Registration required. Free. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for

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information and to register. TERRIFIC TEST TUBE SCIENCE: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. July 30, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 5-8. How many different experiments can you do in a test tube? Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

July 31

CREATIVE SUMMER BOOK CLUB: 10 am.-noon July 31, Pack Place, 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville. Read and discuss books and have fun. Kids should come in play clothes and ready for fun in the sun (think sunscreen, hats and water bottles). Meet at Pack Place main entrance; book club meetings will take place in Pack Place and outside. $15 per club, cash or check. Books appropriate for grades 4-7. This session’s book is “The Mysterious Benedict Society, Book 3.” Students should read book before attending, or expect spoilers. Visit www.creativesummerbookclub.com. DIG THAT ROCK MUSIC: 1 p.m. July 31 at Henderson County Main Library and 3:30 p.m. July 31 at Mills River Branch Library. With Big, Bang, Boom! Free. For all ages. Call 697-4725, ext. 2312, for information. DINOSAUR DISCOVERY: 3 p.m. July 31, North Asheville Library. With N.C. Museum of Natural Sciences, for ages 5 and older. Limited space. Pick up a free ticket at the library. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. DON’T TRY THIS AT HOME: 2-4 p.m. July 31, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Henderson-


ville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 6-10. Walk on eggs, explode soap and burn money. These are a few of the activities you shouldn’t do at home, but you can at Hands On! Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. LEGO LEARN, THEN BUILD: 2-4 p.m. July 31, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Must register to attend. Ages 8-12. Learn about the skill of building machines that can walk on the moon, then use your knowledge to be an engineer and build. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org. MEET THERAPY DOG CHLOE: 2 p.m. July 31, Green River Branch Library. For all ages. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. OLD THYME COUNTRY TALES AND TUNES: 3:30 p.m. July 31, South Asheville/Oakley Library. With story lady Sharon Clarke. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. WILD OAKS SCHOOL-AGE LIBRARY CLUB: 3:30 p.m. July 31, South Asheville/Oakley Library. On Wednesdays in July for ages 6-12. Space is limited. No groups. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. WONDERFUL WORMS: 10:30 a.m. July 31, Pack Memorial Library. The Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project brings an up close and personal look at real worms. Meet and study these wonderful wigglers and learn how they can work for you. For school-age kids and older. Space is limited. Please call 250-4720 to register.

Aug. 1

BUBBLE-MANIA: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Aug. 1, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hen-

dersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Call to sign up. Ages 6-10 years; younger with an accompanying adult. Discover the world of bubbles through hands-on play. Learn to make your own bubble solution and take it home. Call 697-8333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

Aug. 2

LET’S GO FLY: 10:30 a.m.-12:30 p.m. Aug. 2, Hands On! A Child’s Gallery, 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville. $16 nonmembers, $10 members. Call to sign up. Ages 7-12. Taught by Henderson County science teacher, Tony Campbell. Learn about aerodynamics by creating and flying paper airplanes. Call 6978333 or visit www.handsonwnc.org.

Aug. 10

WEE TRADE: 9 a.m.-6 p.m. Aug. 10, Davis Event Center at WNC Ag Center, Fletcher. Sale is expected to have more than 1,600 consignors offering all things for children. Also included is She Trade, offering ladies maternity clothing, shoes, handbags and accessories. Visit www.wee-trade.net. Email info@wee-trade.net if you have further questions.

Aug. 11

WEE TRADE: Noon-6 p.m. Aug. 11, Davis Event Center at WNC Ag Center, Fletcher. Sale is expected to have more than 1,600 consignors offering all things for children. Also included is She Trade, offering ladies maternity clothing, shoes, handbags and accessories. Visit www.wee-trade.net. Email info@wee-trade.net if you have further questions.

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Ongoing

KIDS YOGA: 3:30-4:30 p.m. Thursdays, Black Mountain Yoga, 120 Broadway St., Black Mountain. For ages 4-9. $9 each or $7 for each additional sibling. Drop kids off for an hour of mindful, creative play and movement with a different theme each week. For more information or registration visit www.blackmountainyoga.com. MUSIC TOGETHER: 3:30 p.m. Fridays, Nest Organics, 51 N. Lexington Ave., Asheville. Visit a class for free ages 8 months to 5 years. Call 258-1901 or visit www.nestorganics.com. MUSIC WORKSHOP: Singer/songwriter Sonia Brooks hosts free music workshop for children, 11 a.m.-noon Saturdays at Grateful Steps Bookstore, 159 S. Lexington Ave. Walk-ins welcome. Donations accepted. Call Sonia at 380-0275 with questions. CHABAD HEBREW SCHOOL OF THE ARTS: Early bird enrollment open for Chabad Hebrew School of the Arts, a combination Sunday School and Hebrew School Program, for 2013-14. General registration through Aug. 15. Early registration and sibling discounts available through July 15. For ages 3-13. Sundays 10 a.m.-noon. SeptemberMay. At the Chabad House, 660 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Call 505-0746 or visit www.chabadasheville.org. JEWISH ART CALENDAR: List your child’s birthday in the Chabad House’s seventh-annual Jewish Art Calendar for 2013-14. Calendars will be distributed for free throughout WNC. Submission deadline July 15. $18/each date. Call 505-0746 or visit www.chabadasheville.org.

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