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W N C PA R E N T. C O M

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c o n t e n t s Sports and more Katie Wadington, editor

This month’s features 6 8

Extreme fun Kids crave the excitement of more daring sports.

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No team sports, please How to deal with a kid who won’t play soccer.

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Lacrosse 101

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Hit the water

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All you need to know about the fast-growing sport. From kayaks to sailboats, WNC offers boating options.

Life of a single dad

Family Choice Awards We crown the winners for 2013’s most family-friendly businesses.

Sun: Pros and cons Sunshine has its benefits, if you’re protected.

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20

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Ready for rhubarb Scared of rhubarb? Try these recipes.

Two area fathers describe life without a spouse.

In every issue

On the cover

Artist’s Muse ...................30

Gavin and Brendan Marlow, by Kaelee Denise Photography, www.kaeleedenise.com

Kids’ Voices .....................18

Making Connections ........34 Growing Together............36 Nature Center Notes ........37

Find us online

Divorced Families ............38

.com

Librarian’s Picks...............40 Story Times .....................40 FEAST .............................44 Kids Page ........................50 Calendar .........................55

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facebook.com/ wncparent @wncparent

Last month, I had the pleasure of sharing lunch with a group of second-graders at Red Stag Grill. Chef Adam Hayes worked with the students all year, teaching them about healthy foods and eating local. The program culminated in a tour of the Grand Bohemian Hotel and a three-course meal. I loved watching the kids’ faces as the food arrived — both wrinkled noses and excitement. ASAP’s Growing Minds farm-to-school education program played a role. Learn more about the program’s summer plans on Page 42. This issue is all about summer, from Father’s Day to sports your kids can practice to outdoor activities. Lacrosse is all the rage these days. If you have an older elementary or middle school-age boy, you no doubt know someone who is playing. Our stories on Pages 10-12 give a primer on the rules and uniform. It seems lacrosse is almost too traditional for some kids. They’re more into extremes, slike skateboarding, unicycling and Digging into a more. Read about it in our story on Page 6. local food feast. But my child isn’t sporty, you say. No SPECIAL TO WNC problem. Our story on Page 8 looks at opPARENT tions for the unathletic child, or the boy or girl who just isn’t interseted in team sports. The other big focus of this issue is the Family Choice Awards results. Who won? Find out starting on Page 20. I”m off to work on the Birthday issue now. See you in July!

P.O. Box 2090, Asheville, NC 28802 www.wncparent.com PRESIDENT AND PUBLISHER Randy Hammer WNC PARENT EDITOR Katie Wadington — 232-5829 kwadington@citizen-times.com

GENERAL MANAGER Shannon Bullard — 236-8996 sbullard@gannett.com

Special thanks to features editor Bruce Steele, designer Val Elmore and web developer Jaime McKee. CALENDAR CONTENT Due by June 10. E-mail calendar@wncparent.com ADVERTISING DEADLINE Advertising deadline for the July issue is June18.

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summer sports & fitness

GOING TO

EXTREMES

Griffin Golby, right, follows behind friend Elliot Hensley as he drops in on his skateboard at the Food Lion SkatePark. DILLON DEATON/DDEATON1@ CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

From unicycles to skateboards and more, kids enjoy sports of a wilder nature

By Marla Hardee Milling, WNC Parent contributor

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xtreme sports. Just those two words can make most any parent hold his or her breath for a moment when a child expresses interest. But for moms like Katherine Hensley, of North Asheville, the goal is to encourage pushing the limits while teaching kids proper safety practices. Hensley’s 11-year-old son, Elliott, has been fanatical about skateboarding since he was about 6. “He’s addicted to the Food Lion

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SkatePark,” says Hensley. “He’s quite talented and likes to go up there every waking moment that it’s dry and sunny. He’s already dropping into the 10-foot bowl. He’s interested in competing — we’re letting him evolve.” Elliott’s interest in skateboarding is also evolving into a company that he’s launching with two classmates at Jones Elementary School. They are creating ZEG Boardz and in the process of designing their own skateboards. ZEG stands for the first initia-

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ls of the three partners — Zachary Wilson, Elliott Hensley and Griffin Golby. Hensley says she’s offering assistance in designing a logo, website and writing a business plan. “I would say they’ll be up and running within six months,” she says. “This summer they will have time to get their business started.” Elliott perfects his skills during the summer during skate camps at the Food Lion SkatePark, which is located


summer sports & fitness

Zach Wilson, Anna Eiele-Sullivan, Griffin Golby and Elliot Hensley, from left, take a break from skateboarding at the Food Lion SkatePark. DILLON DEATON/DDEATON1@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

across from the U.S. Cellular Center at the corner of Flint and Cherry streets. Camps are offered for skaters ages 6-15 of all levels. The cost is $75 per session with the camp running daily from 9 a.m.-noon. Registration is offered at Push Skate Shop at 25 Patton Ave., or by calling 225-5509. “We’ve also encouraged him to do Parkour,” says Hensley. “It’s tumbling and free running. He takes those classes at the gymnastics center downtown. It helps him learn to use his body strength and teaches him how to land properly.”

Flipping for thrills

Cory Governo, a 16-year-old North Buncombe High School student, enjoys going to downtown Asheville with friends and amazing others by doing front flips and back flips. It’s part of the skills he’s learned taking Parkour classes at Asheville Gymnastics. “It’s kind of like urban gymnastics,” says Governo. “It’s all about getting from point A to point B as fast and efficiently as possible. It’s basically like a free movement of expression. If you want to climb something, you do it. Even walking can be Parkour. There’s also a subset called free running.” Parkour can involve running, climbing, flipping, swinging, jumping, rolling, vaulting and other movements to get around obstacles. Asheville Gymnastics

describes Parkour this way: “Participants run while negotiating obstacles efficiently using only their bodies.” “If you want to be really good, you have to be physically fit,” says Governo. “In the gym we focus on getting stronger and building a strong core. I really just do it for fun. It’s a way to express myself. I like to get outside and use the world as my own jungle gym.”

Mountain unicycling

Twice a year Noah Prezant’s family heads out to mountain unicycle festivals. Riding a unicycle on mountain trails is a passion 16-year-old Noah, who also goes to North Buncombe High, developed when he was in the fourth grade. He admits there can be a steep learning curve with this sport, but encourages kids who want to do it to keep practicing. “Just persevere and you’ll get there,” he says. “After you get started, it’s kind of like riding a bike. You just know how to do it.” Prezant spends time riding and practicing new skills at Bent Creek, but he says his favorite trail is in Pisgah Forest and he also enjoys the trails at DuPont State Forest near Brevard. He prefers not to use a brake on a unicycle because he says it makes it harder if you start relying on the brakes. “I just put pressure on the back of the pedals. It slows you down and becomes second nature after a while.”

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Noah Prezant has a passion for riding his unicycle on mountain trails. And he doesn’t use the brakes. COURTESY OF NOAH PREZANT/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Not just for the boys Getting an adrenaline rush isn’t just for the guys. Girls have similar interests, and summer camp can be a good way to get an introduction into some of the more extreme activities. “We definitely offer high adventure classes for our girls,” says Meredith Saine, program director at Camp Ton-AWandah in Hendersonville. “We offer whitewater rafting, extended backpacking trips, paddle boarding, zipline ropes course and a climbing wall, which I would say is close to 50 feet.” The off-property trips require sign up before the girls get to camp, but for the activities at Camp Ton-A-Wandah, the campers sign up on a first come, first serve basis. Saine says the rock climbing and ropes course are the most popular. “We like to get our girls out of their comfort zone and introduce them to new things,” Saine says. “Those are typically the activities they love most. It’s freeing for them. It’s also a good way for them to bond with each other because some of the classes require teamwork and teaches them to work together as a group.” Saine says it’s also satisfying to watch the girls increase their skills as they return in following summers. They gain more confidence in traversing the rock wall or in other activities and find they really enjoy pushing the limits.

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THE LESS ATHLETIC CHILD Engaging kids in individual sports — or no sport at all — helps them cope when they don’t enjoy team athletics

By Pam J. Hecht, WNC Parent contributor

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or the less athletic child, the court or field can be a challenging place to play with their sportier peers. When Naomi Palmer’s 11-year-old son was younger, he loved to play soccer, getting excited about strategy and scoring goals, she says. “But as he got older, he became more aware of his limitations, not always as physically coordinated as other kids, and beat himself up about it.” “After a game where he’d made mistakes, or not scored,” he’d ask to quit, says Palmer, of West Asheville. “It wasn’t worth the stress to him.” Some kids just aren’t cut out to be sports stars. But there’s much a parent can do to help them deal with their shortcomings and find athletic teams or other activities that are right for them.

Pick the right programs

For less athletic kids, try a recreational pro-

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gram as opposed to a more competitive league, says Mike Rottjakob, executive director of Asheville Buncombe Youth Soccer Association. It should be “based on fun, not standing, with equal play time for everyone,” matching the child’s ability and goals. Make sure the coach is a good one, who makes the team a positive experience for every child, regardless of athletic skills. For kids who don’t enjoy team sports, find activities that emphasize fitness, like gymnastics, mountain biking or martial arts. Palmer’s son enjoys running and swimming, and they work to encourage these activities, she says. “Get kids involved in things that they are good at or show an interest in to build confidence and participate in physical activities as a family to show that being active doesn’t mean you have to play a team sport or be super coordinated,” says Kris

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THINKSTOCK.COM


summer sports & fitness Kaufman, Healthy Living/Youth Development Director, YMCA of Western North Carolina. Traditional sports that focus on winning points and games can affect a relatively unathletic child’s self-esteem, while tae kwon do focuses on personal development and group support, says Alana Johnson, an instructor at Asheville Academy of Taekwondo.

Don’t push it

Encourage kids to stick it out as long as they can, but “if it becomes clear that for whatever reason the sport is a bad match and things are not improving,” have them choose another active activity, says Katy Flagler, an Asheville-based psychologist who works with children and families. Also, “don’t insist on lots of playing time during games until the child is ready,” Flagler adds. Before a child joins a team, parents should talk with him/her about team commitment, Flagler says. “It is a good life lesson to stick with something even when it becomes difficult or less fun than anticipated and children are more likely to stick with an activity through rough patches if they have had discussions about it ahead of time,” Flagler says. “A child who wants to give up, but perseveres, and then starts to notice real progress, has learned a powerful lesson that will apply to just about all aspects of life.” Linnae Harris’ son Luka, 10, doesn’t admit it, she says, but she thinks it bothers him sometimes that he’s uncomfortable

about playing team sports and not more athletic. “He feels he’s not as good as others so he doesn’t want to compete,” Harris says. On the other hand, “he knows that if he really wants to improve his skills I would help him; it just doesn’t seem to be a goal for him,” she adds. “I want him to have physical activity every day,” says Harris, of Candler, but she doesn’t push team sports. “My kids understand that everyone has certain talents and challenges in life — my son may not be the best athlete but he is kind and helpful, super creative and an amazing artist,” says Harris.

Combat teasing

“Open communication with the child, coach, and program director will help,” says Kaufman. “Parents need to be in tune with their child and be present at practices and games so that they know what is happening and can follow up if needed.” If kids get to pick their teammates at recess or PE class, speak with the teacher or coach about making a change so that kids don’t endure being repeatedly picked last. To spare feelings, encourage kids to pick teams based on birth month or some other arbitrary divider,” says Flagler. “Parents can teach kids to silent selftalk, saying things to themselves like, ‘Just because he says it doesn’t make it true’ or ‘There are lots of things I’m good at, this just doesn’t happen to one of them and at least I’m trying,’” says Flagler. Kids who tease are looking for a reaction, she adds, so tell your child to say very little in re-

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sponse to teasing. “It’s good for kids to hear their parents and other adults chatting about their own childhoods — with time, some of those hurts lose their sting and may even seem funny, and it is helpful for kids to hear that adult perspective,” she says.

Offer encouragement

When Tipton Dillingham’s son, Ethan, 15, joined a soccer team for 7-year-olds, all the players knew each other and the coach was one of the fathers. “He had a hard time jumping in and the coach did little to help encourage him,” says Dillingham, of Arden. He tried flag football in middle school “with lots of encouragement” but in high school “became more self-conscious about his lack of athleticism during P.E.,” says Dillingham, who offered to do a couch to 5Kk program with him to expose him to running. “One of my neighbors did not become athletic until college — now as an adult he is an avid cycler and competes,” Dillingham says. “I don’t think Ethan’s (athletic) fate is necessarily determined by playing sports.” Stress individual goals and help kids make assessments about how they’re improving and mastering skills, Rottjakob says. Work with your child to help build skills and show the value of working hard to overcome an obstacle,” adds Kaufman. Above all, praise effort, not outcome, says Flagler, which is something kids can control.

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LACROSSE:

THE GAME AND THE EQUIPMENT

Helmet $200-$350

Mouthpiece $5-$10 Shoulder pads $30-$100

By Paul Clark, WNC Parent contributor

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acrosse is gaining popularity among young players in the Asheville area, but its rules and equipment are as unfamiliar to many parents as those for soccer once where. So that you don’t feel totally lost watching your son or daughter play, we’ve described the game and listed a few terms you’re likely to hear. Rules vary depending on the age and gender of the players. Body contact is inevitable in lacrosse, but contact is limited in younger athletes. No body checking of any kind is permitted among players 11 years old and younger. Older players are allowed to play a more aggressive game and are allowed to “check,” or bump into, opposing players to get them to drop the ball. Officials refereeing games in younger leagues tend to be stricter about enforcing penalties for head checks, unnecessary roughness, slashing, cross check, illegal body checks and unsportsmanlike conduct. Competition at the high school level can be intense — and physical.

Arm pads $30-$80

The game

The game is played with 10 players per side — a goalkeeper, three defenders, three midfielders and three attackers. Each carries a “crosse” (the stick with a basket at the end) and wears upper-body protection. Goalies must wear arm pads. Rib pads are recommended. The game starts with a face-off, or two

Gloves $50-$220 Stick, $40-$300 Ball, $2-$3

THE WELL TURNED-OUT LACROSSE PLAYER Here’s what your player will need to get onto the field, with price ranges for each item (though some items may be more). Different leagues may have additional requirements. Note: Players in the Asheville Lacrosse Club’s youth division are required to buy lacrosse stick, mouth guard, cup, helmet, gloves, arm pads, shoulder pads and cleats.

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First-year players may rent equipment from the league, depending on availability. Peak Lacrosse doesn’t rent equipment, but works with the lacrosse supply company Lax World to offer a package that includes helmet, gloves, shoulder pads, arm pads, mouthpiece, stick and ball for $170.

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Mitchell Frisch, 14, with lacrosse player equipment. JOHN COUTLAKIS/ JCOUTLAKIS@ CITIZEN-TIMES.COM


summer sports & fitness opposing players scraping for possession of the ball. Teams may substitute freely “on the fly” (as the game is being played). Players who commit personal fouls like slashing and tripping must wait out penalties, usually 30-60 seconds, in penalty boxes, forcing their team to play one person short. Here are some of the terms you might hear your child talk about after practice or during a game. The definitions are from U.S. Lacrosse’s youth rules guidebook for boy’s competitions (the girl’s game is different and has different rules). Time: Each game has four quarters, lasting (depending on the age of the players) 8 to 10 minutes each. Ties are broken in overtime periods. Faceoff: Two players from opposing sides battle for the ball, at the start of each quarter and after a goal. Advancing ball: Players have 20 seconds to advance the ball from the defensive half of the field to the offensive half, and then 10 seconds to advance the ball into the goal area. (The rule doesn’t apply for younger players.) Stick checking: A player will strike an opposing player’s stick in an attempt to dislodge the ball. It’s legal. Slashing: Striking an opponent with the stick or swinging in a vicious or reckless manner is a personal foul warranting a 1-3 minute penalty. Body checking: Players may check each other only above the waist and below the shoulders while holding the stick with both hands. (Body checking is not allowed in younger players.) Cross checking: Players are prohibited from checking players with the part of the stick they hold between their hands. Offside: A team is considered offside if it has fewer than three players on its offensive half of the field or fewer than four players on the defensive half of the field. Crease: It’s the semi-circle in front of the goal, where the goalie hangs out. He or she has to get out of it four seconds after securing the ball. Substitutions: They can be done on the fly if the entering player waits until the exiting player is all the way off the field. Tripping: A player can’t intentionally trip an opponent or place his stick below an opponent’s waist to obstruct him. Warding off: A player can’t use his free arm or any other part of his body to keep an opponent away from his stick. Releasable foul: A player in the penalty box is allowed back on the field if the other team scores before his penalty time is up.

FAST AND FUN, LACROSSE IS GROWING IN WNC By Paul Clark, WNC Parent contributor

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acrosse is a lightning-fast game that’s catching on in Asheville, and there is a growing number of options for boys and girls who want to play. Derived from American Indian stickball, the game has traveled south in recent years from the colleges, universities and prep schools in the Northeast. Following the footsteps of soccer’s development in the United States, lacrosse is gaining interest nationwide as more and more younger players get involved. Organizers say it’s the fastest-growing sport in the U.S. “It combines a lot of sports,” said Jeff Miles, the head of lacrosse at Christ School in Arden and the director of Peak Lacrosse. “It has the speed of soccer and the skillset of basketball. And it’s a full-contact sport like football and hockey. It really fits a niche for youth players that might not have a traditional football body or might not be tall enough to play basketball. It’s a sport that fits everybody.” “It accommodates all body types,” said Mike Frisch, director of the Asheville Lacrosse Club’s youth leagues. “It’s open to a lot of kids who feel they don’t fit a particular type of

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(physical) mold. And it’s fast, it’s exciting and it keeps their interest. There’s not a lot of standing around.” Peak Lacrosse (www.ncpeaklacross.com) will be a summer boys’ league, running June 1-July 20 (your son can still sign up, Miles said). Miles is expecting to teach about 50 boys, in divisions U7 (under 7), U9, U11 and U13. The emphasis is on fun and learning. There will be lots of instruction from coaches in the area, and for all but the U7 division, there will be tournaments. Next summer, Miles, one of the nation’s leading scorers when he played for Mars Hill College, hopes to add a girls program to Peak. Rachel Hillhouse already has one — Raw Lacrosse, a skills camp for girls in Asheville. Held this summer from 5-8 p.m. during the first full week of August, the camp will take place on Carolina Day’s athletic complex on Sweeten Creek Road (for details and costs, email Hillhouse at ashevillewomenslacrosse@gmail.com or rachelahillhouse@yahoo.com). Hillhouse, who started playing when she was 8 years old, is head coach of the girls team at Carolina Day and is organizing Continues on Page 12

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summer sports & fitness

LACROSSE Continued from Page 11

a women’s league for the Asheville Lacrosse Club (www.ashevillelacrosse.net). If enough girls are interested, she’ll work to form a youth league that will scrimmage other girls and play club teams from other cities. The YMCA in Asheville has a coed youth spring league for players 5 years old and above. The season just concluded for 2013, but to learn more, contact YMCA youth development director Tina Weaver at 2109622, ext. 265 or tweaver@ymcawnc.org. Enrollment was $72 for YMCA members and $92 for non-members. The Asheville Lacrosse Club, established in 1994, runs a spring league for boys from February to May. Its Empire team for high school-age players practices 4-6 p.m. Monday-Friday at Memorial Stadium, and its Junior Empire teams for players in middle school and younger practice there 4-6 p.m. Tuesdays and Thursday. Emphasis is on sportsmanship, participation, safety and fundamentals. Games are played at Christ School and Carolina Day. “Every year we’ve kind of doubled the number of kids playing,” said Frisch, a Junior Empire coach who played with Brown University in the Division I playoffs in 1987 and 1990. “Lacrosse has taken off in Charlotte and in the Triad, and it’s starting to move out here in Western North Carolina. When I grew up, it was centralized in Baltimore, Long Island, upstate New York and Canada. But the teams in the NCAA men’s tournament (recently) were from all over the country.” Registration for the Empire and Junior Empire teams is $200, which includes shorts, pinnie (a reversible jersey) and helmet decal. Players are required to buy lacrosse stick, mouth guard, cup, helmet, gloves, arm pads, shoulder pads and cleats. Depending on availability, first-year players may rent equip-

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The Asheville Empire youth lacrosse team practices recently. Lacrosse is one of the country’s fastest-growing sports. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

ment from the Asheville Lacrosse Club. Lacrosse isn’t a hard sport for kids to learn, Miles said, “as long as you’re reasonably athletic and you can commit to the skill part of it, the catching

and throwing. A lot of the boys I coached (at Christ School) didn’t play before ending up getting college scholarships. “I think what appeals to them is the combination of other sports. And it’s something different.”

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summer sports & fitness

OUT ON THE WATER

WNC’s lakes and rivers offer families chance to boat, kayak and more By Marla Hardee Milling, WNC Parent contributor

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ooking for a cool spot for summer fun? Head to an area lake or river and get out on the water. Whether you set out in a canoe, kayak, paddleboat, ski boat or other type of watercraft, you’ll find it’s a great way to make family memories. “The best water is always in the morning,” says Kellie Whittemore, of Arden. She and her husband, Lattie, have spent countless hours boating on area lakes with their two children, and now a granddaughter. “There’s nothing like waking up and hearing your child say, ‘Hit it!’ and knowing what a blast they are having.” The Whittemores have an inboard/ outboard MantaRay and primarily take it out on three area lakes. “In the early spring and fall we go to Lake Keowee because it’s warmer,” she says. “Fontana Lake has the best coves and Lake James is the closest.” The family enjoys water skiing, but Kellie says she also learned to wake board because her daughter wanted to learn. “In order to teach her, we had to learn ourselves.” They’ve also enjoyed a role in teaching other kids how to ski behind a boat including groups of Boy Scouts who worked on earning their motor boating merit badge. “One kid was having trouble getting up on the skis, so Lattie called me to come down to Lake James one evening after I got off work. I got this kid out in the lake and worked with him,” says Kellie. “I told him not to be alarmed, but when the boat took off I was going to push him up. He told Lattie to hit it and as I pushed him with everything that I had, he got up and skied. From then on he was a skier. It was a real confidence builder.” At the Marina at Fontana Village, public relations manager Colton McClung says Fontana Lake is the perfect place for families and kids to enjoy the water because they don’t have to worry about watching out for other boats. “It’s a big lake,” he says. “There’s no development on this end of the lake, and

Shane and Amanda Whittemore ski behind their family's boat. KELLIE WHITTEMORE/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

RENT A BOAT There are plenty of places in WNC where you can rent boats and other watercraft for family enjoyment, as well as take some lessons. Here are a few ideas: » Lake Lure Marina offers daily rentals from 10 a.m.-6 p.m. on motorized and nonmotorized boats. http://lakelure.com/activities/ boat-rentals/. » Lake Julian Park in South Asheville has paddle boats, canoes and fishing boats available for rent 8 a.m.-9 p.m. daily in the summer. www.buncombecounty.org/common/parks/ LakeJulian_Brochure.pdf. » Lake James State Park maintains rentals of canoes that hold two to three people and

that cuts down on a lot of the boat traffic. It’s very quiet out here.” The Marina offers a range of watercraft rentals including bass boats, jet skis, canoes and kayaks, but McClung says the pontoon boats that hold up to 10 people are the most popular. “Life jackets are provided, and it also comes with an inner tube to pull behind it,” he says. “If people have never driven a

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one-person kayaks. Rentals are available 9 a.m.-4 p.m. Memorial Day through Labor Day. Rates are $5/first hour and $3/hour for additional time. www.ncparks.gov/Visit/ parks/laja/facilities.php » Asheville Outdoor Center provides instruction in Stand-Up Paddleboarding. A 90-minute lesson costs $65. Participants learn how to balance on the board, paddling techniques and ways to read the river. www.paddlewithus.com/supasheville.html » Instructors at The Asheville Kayaking School prepare participants to get out on the water in a kayak. They offer classes for beginners to more advanced kayakers, as well as private lessons. www.ashevillekayaking.com/

boat before, we show them how to do it.” While it’s possible to walk into the Marina and rent a boat, calling ahead for reservations is advised, especially during the summer months when more people are on the water. The Marina’s website lists rental fees starting at $60 an hour. Canoes (for two) rent for $25 for four hours and single kayaks rent for $25 for two hours.

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SUNSHINE HAS ITS BENEFITS

I THINKSTOCK.COM

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By Betty Lynne Leary, WNC Parent contributor

nstant information has become a way of life. What is treacle? Google it. When was the Streamline Moderne style fashionable? Check out Wikipedia. Who wrote that song you just heard in the grocery store? There’s an app for that too. While an endless stream of information may seem like the best thing since CDs replaced vinyl, the downside is that an overwhelming amount of sometimes conflicting information can be difficult to interpret. For example, doctors and dermatologists have warned for years that overexposure to the sun is dangerous. Researchers at the American Cancer Society estimate there will be more than 82,000 new cases of skin cancer diagnosed in 2013. Other research has shown the UV radiation

may also increase the likelihood of certain cataracts and may even suppress the body’s immune system. To ward off the damaging effects of the sun, parents slather their babies, toddlers and tweens with the highest SPF sunscreen available even at a time when the Internet is abuzz with sites claiming that the chemicals in sunscreen are dangerous. Does the human body really need sunshine at all? The answer, of course, is not simple. “Clearly there are great benefits of outdoor activities especially for children,” says Dr. Gary Curran, a family physician with Pisgah Family Health in Asheville. “Outdoor play is recommended for children of all ages and a healthy target would be one to three hours per day. It reduces obesity, improves confidence, reduces depression and allows

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children to develop appropriate motor skills.” In addition to fresh air and exercise, exposure to the sun has several health benefits. It helps to synchronize the body’s circadian rhythm so that a person feels more awake during the day and sleeps better at night. People report a more positive mood with sunlight exposure which has also been shown to stabilize the mood of Alzheimer’s patients. A lack of sunlight exposure can sometimes result in depression called Seasonal Affective Disorder. “Sunlight most directly affects the skin,” Curran says. “Sunlight exposure is a recognized treatment for acne and psoriasis, and the importance of vitamin D has been widely publicized.” Vitamin D is a fat-soluble vitamin made by the skin in response to sunlight exposure. According to Curran, vitamin D facilitates the absorption of calcium and the storage of calcium in the bones which helps prevent osteoporosis, osteolamacia, and rickets. Most women are aware that they should take a calcium and vitamin D supplement to prevent osteoporosis; however, new guidelines state that vitamin D supplements are important at almost every age.

“Evidence also suggests that vitamin D is important in other ways,” Curran explains. “Higher vitamin D levels have been shown to correlate with lower colon cancer risk, decreased obesity, decreased diabetes, and lower overall cancer risk.” He cautions, however, that these studies do not distinguish vitamin D level from overall outdoor exposure. “These health benefits may stem simply from more outdoor exercise,” he notes, “so while a vitamin D supplement is recommended, it should not be considered as a replacement for outdoor exercise.” Unfortunately, it is very difficult to determine the right amount of sun exposure. The effects of ultraviolet exposure on the skin vary dramatically based on the season, latitude and skin color. A Caucasian person in summertime can exceed healthy sun exposure in 15 minutes, while the same person in winter may become vitamin D deficient even with prolonged sun exposure. Darkerskinned individuals absorb less UV light,

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which protects them from skin cancer but also increases their risk of vitamin D deficiency. “Caucasian children and adults are particularly susceptible to sunburn and skin cancer,” Curran says. “During the summer months, Caucasians have no problem making enough vitamin D; therefore they should wear SPF 15 sunscreen and protective clothing when they go outside.” He adds that in the winter, Caucasians should make an effort to get 30 minutes or more of sun exposure daily and also take a vitamin D supplement. For those with darker skin, the risk of sunburn and skin cancer may be lessened thanks to their skin tones, but there is an increased risk of vitamin D deficiency. “These people should take a vitamin D supplement year-round and consider having their vitamin D level tested occasionally,” Curran explains. With both positive and negative effects of sunlight exposure, you need to strike a balance between too much and too little. Just like Mom offers the veggies before the cookies, protect your skin but don’t hide it completely from that warm sunshine.

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JUST DAD

Two Asheville-area fathers talk about adjusting to life as a single parent By Marla Hardee Milling WNC Parent contributor

Painting nails, braiding hair and shopping for dresses. These may seem like alien activities to a lot of dads, but for those who are thrown into the life of a single parent these tasks and others become the new normal. Steve Mace, who works as network administrator at Mars Hill College, sees brand new value in his lunch hour. Since he lives close to his office, he can use his midday break to take care of new tasks that have become part of his life since separating from his wife two years ago. With three kids — Ashley, 21; Andrew, 17; and Anthony, 11 — extra planning is necessary to run a successful household. “Time is the thing I seem to have the least of,” says Mace. “Working full time, keeping the yard work done, running the household and spending time with the kids takes a lot of planning. I use my lunch breaks to come home and start laundry or unload/load the dishwasher or sew ripped clothes.” He’s also learned to bake and decorate birthday cakes for his kids, and if a birthday falls on a weekday, he bakes the cake layers before going to work in the morning and then goes home at lunch to add the icing and decorations. “They call it their ‘Dad Cake,’” he says. He’s also had to venture into areas that his spouse had previously handled.

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Ray Hemachandra and his son, Nicholas. Hemachandra moved to Asheville because of the services available to his son, who is on the autism spectrum. As a single father, he has learned to advocate for his son. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Steve Mace, in an older photo of him and his children, has learned to do housework on his lunch hour since becoming a single dad. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

“The first Christmas after my separation, I found out my daughter really wanted some new clothes. This was a little intimidating, but I bought her new dresses and blouses.”

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Learning to be efficient with his time and money has led him to some other conclusions — he now parks closest to the shopping cart return instead of spaces closer to the door; he grocery shops early on Saturday mornings when


the kids are sleeping and the store is less crowded; and he’s learned that a clothes dryer completely full of wet clothes “will never finish drying.”

Fearless advocate

Ray Hemachandra, of Arden, says the biggest thing he’s learned while caring for his 12-year-old son, Nicholas, is how to advocate fearlessly for his child. Nicholas was diagnosed with autism and OCD when he was 4. At that point, Hemachandra was married and living with his family in Bellingham, Wash. He conducted a nationwide search to find the best autism support system and instruction for Nicholas, and that led to a crosscountry move to the Asheville area in the fall of 2006. His marriage broke up in the beginning of 2012 and his ex-wife moved back to Washington State. Hemachandra decided to remain in N.C. to give his son the best possibility for a successful future. He says in the context of being a single dad, his choices all stem from one core question — what is best for Nicholas? “I make life decisions based on my child. I have to ask, ‘What’s the best school? Where’s the best place to live?’ and I’ll make my job and life work around that,” he says. As the parent of a special needs child, Hemachandra says he’s much more involved in his son’s life than he would be if he was the parent of a neurotypical boy. He works to set up social activities for his son and also tries to give him a wide diversity of experience. Hemachandra is extremely active with Nicholas and his Facebook page shows the results of a multitude of hikes, waterfall visits, dinners with friends and other activities. “His experience of the world is funneled through me,” says Hemachandra. “He’s my buddy. We go and do fun things all the time. Nicholas is just a joy. It’s an incredible blessing. ” But life as a single dad doesn’t come without worry. “The biggest challenge I have as a single dad is there’s no safety net,” he says. “I don’t have a wife or family in this area. If I get sick it’s much more complicated how to care for things. I also have to think about who will get Nicholas if I’m in an accident. And I think about what happens if I die. It’s a concern.”

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kids’ voices

Father’s Day wishes

We wondered what gifts children would like to give their dads for Father’s Day. So we checked in with Sand Hill-Venable Elementary School in Candler. Here are answers some first-graders gave us. “I think my father would like some Hershey kisses cause he loves kisses.” Melisa, 7

“My father should want wood. He builds a lot. Once he added on more deck. Our deck is wood. My dad needs wood.” Aiden, 7

“My dad will want a tie and a tuxedo and shiny black shoes for Father’s Day because my dad told me.” Mia, 7

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“My Father’s Day ... some shaving cream and a brand new car and a big hug.” George, 7

“My dad would want the most important thing of all, love, because you should always care for your dad on that day. It is important! To spread a little joy.” Alan, 7

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“I think my dad will want some tools because he likes to fix stuff. He likes to fix the car and his truck. Daddy likes to read so he might like a book.” Kaylee, 7

“The best gift for my dad would be a day off work. Me and my dad would go to the wastewater treatment plant!” Connor, 7

“My dad would want a picture for Father’s Day. It would be of our entire family.” Gabe, 7

“My Father’s Day, I would give him a big rainbow. He will be happy at me so he would say, thank you my sweetheart. I would say, you’re welcome. I love you, my sweetheart. I love you too, Daddy. I have something for you, my sweetheart. What? A red teddy bear. Wow, thank you. You’re welcome.” Zjhykira, 7

“I love my dad. I think he will want a hug and a big smoochy kiss and a new dog. His old one died. Because he loves me and I love him and we will always love each other.” Leila, 6

“My dad would want a party, because he’s always wanted a party. I would bake him a delicious coconut cake and balloons would be everywhere. There would be presents, too. There would be red bows, green bows and orange bows.” Kylie, 7

“My dad would like to go swimming because he always wanted to go swimming. We would go to the lake to swim.” Mailee, 7

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Seal of

APPROVAL E

ach spring, hundreds of readers cast ballots in our annual Family Choice Awards. We are now happy to bring you the results, in everything from your favorite birthday party venue to the most family-friendly places to eat. Where are the best dance lessons? Who is the best orthodontist? What’s WNC’s best ice cream? Read on, Pages 20-29.

Katie Wadington, editor

FOOD & DINING Most family-friendly restaurant for breakfast

1. IHOP Several area locations; www.ihop.com. 2. Cracker Barrel Several area locations; www.crackerbarrel.com. 3. Waffle House Several area locations; www.wafflehouse.com

Most family-friendly restaurant for lunch

Asheville Pizza and Brewing Co. wins the Family Choice Award for most family-friendly restaurant for dinner. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

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1. Chick-fil-A Several area locations; www.chickfila.com. 2. Blue Sky Cafe 3987 Hendersonville Road, Fletcher, 684-1247; www.iloveblueskycafe.com. 3. (tie) Apollo Flame 485 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 274-3582; 1025 Brevard Road, Asheville, 665-0080; www.apolloflamebistro.net. Asheville Pizza and Brewing Co. 77 Coxe Ave., Asheville, 255-4077; 675 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 254-1281; 1850 Hendersonville Road, 277-5775 (delivery or carry out only); www.ashevillepizza.com.

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2. Blue Sky Cafe 3987 Hendersonville Road, Fletcher, 684-1247; www.iloveblueskycafe.com. 3. Chick-fil-A Several area locations. www.chickfila.com.

Best vegetarian meals

1. Laughing Seed Cafe 40 Wall St., Asheville, 252-3445; www.laughingseed.jackofthewood.com. 2. Plant 165 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 258-7500; www.plantisfood.com 3. Early Girl Cafe 8 Wall St., Asheville, 259-9292; www.earlygirl eatery.com.

Best date night restaurant

1. 131 Main Biltmore Park Town Square, 308 Thetford St., Asheville, 651-0131; www.131-main.com. 2. (tie) Carrabba’s Italian Grill 10 Buckstone Place, Asheville, 281-2300; 332 Rockwood Road, Arden, 654-8411; www.carrabbas.com. Cúrate 11 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, 239-2946; www.curatetapasbar.com.

Best pizza

Rachel Wechgelaer serves up ice cream at The Hop Ice Cream Cafe, winner in the best ice cream category. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

Most family-friendly restaurant for dinner

1. Asheville Pizza and Brewing Co. 77 Coxe Ave., Asheville, 255-4077; 675 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 254-1281; 1850 Hendersonville Road, 277-5775 (delivery or carry out only); www.ashevillepizza.com. 2. (tie) Blue Sky Cafe 3987 Hendersonville Road, Fletcher, 684-1247; www.iloveblueskycafe.com. Papa’s & Beer 1996 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 684-4882; 17 Tunnel Road, Asheville, 255-2204; 1000 Brevard Road, Asheville, 665-9070; 1821 Asheville Highway, Hendersonville, 692-9915.

Best kids’ menu

1. Chili’s 253 Tunnel Road, Asheville, 252-4999; 420 Airport Road, Arden, 684-5067; www.chilis.com.

1. Marco’s Pizzeria 946 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 285-0709; 1854 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 277-0004; www.marcos-pizzeria.com. 2. (tie) Brixx Biltmore Park Town Square, 30 Town Square Blvd., Asheville, 654-0046; www.brixxpizza.com. Mellow Mushroom 50 Broadway St., Asheville, 236-9800; www.mellowmushroom.com.

Best bakery

1. Carolina Mountain Bakery 1950 Hendersonville Road, Suite 11, Asheville, 681-5066. 2. City Bakery 88 Charlotte St., Asheville, 254-4289; 60 Biltmore Ave., Asheville, 252-4426; 18 N. Main St., Waynesville, 452-3881; www.citybakery.net. 3. McFarlan Bake Shop 309 N. Main St., Hendersonville, 693-4256.

Best ice cream/custard shop

1. The Hop Ice Cream Cafe 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 254-2224; 721 Haywood Road, Asheville, 252-5155; www.thehopicecreamcafe.com. 2. Cold Stone Creamery 129 Bleachery Blvd., Suite S, Asheville, 296-0004; 30 Town Square Blvd., Asheville, 650-3013; www.coldstonecreamery.com. 3. Ultimate Ice Cream 1070 Tunnel Road, Asheville, 296-1234; 197 Charlotte St., Asheville, 258-1515; on Facebook.

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SERVICES Best pediatric practice

1. Blue Sky Pediatrics 5 Walden Ridge Drive, Asheville, 687-8709, www.blueskypediatrics.com 2. ABC Pediatrics 64 Peachtree Road #100, Asheville, 277-3000, www.abcasheville.com. 3. Mountain Area Pediatrics 500 Centrepark Drive, Asheville, 254-4337, www.mountainareapediatrics.com.

Best family dentist

1. Great Beginnings Pediatric Dentistry (Drs. Chambers, Baechtold, Pratt and Haldeman) 10B Yorkshire St., Asheville, 274-9220; 50 Bowman Drive, Waynesville, 454-9156; www.greatbeginningspedo.com. 2. Dr. Josh Paynich 11 Yorkshire St., Asheville, 274-4744, www.drjoshdentistry.com 3. (tie) Asheville Pediatric Dentistry (Dr. Jenny Jackson) 76 Peachtree Road, Suite 100, Asheville, 277-6788, www.ashevillepedo.com. Marks Family Dentistry 674 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 255-8447; www.northashevilledentist.com

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Best orthodontist

1. (tie) Blue Ridge Orthodontics (Dr. Luke Roberts) 2 Walden Ridge Drive, Asheville, 687-0872, www.blueridgeorthodontics.com. Haldeman Orthodontics (Dr. Ryan Haldeman) 10B Yorkshire St., Asheville, 274-8822; 50 Bowman Drive, Waynesville, 454-9156; www.drhaldeman.com. 3. Dr. Joe H. Farrar 1714 Old Village Road, Hendersonville, 693-0202; 5 Park Place, Suite 101, Brevard, 884-7122; www.joesbraces.com.

Best family eye doctor

1. Asheville Eye Associates 8 Medical Park Drive B, Asheville, 258-1586; 2001 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 684-2867; www.ashevilleeye.com. 2. Champion Eye Center 825 Merrimon Ave. #B, Asheville, 236-0099; 300 Julian Lane, Asheville, 650-2727; www.championeyecenter.com. 3. Carolina Optometric

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2145 Hendersonville Road, Arden, 681-8000; www.carolina optometric.com.

Best veterinarian

1. Asheville Veterinary Associates 50 New Leicester Highway, Asheville, 253-0451; 1275 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville, 274-0646; www.ashevillevetassociates.com. 2. Animal Hospital of North Asheville 1 Beaverdam Road, Asheville, 253-3393; www.ahna.net. 3. Fletcher Animal Hospital 5515 Hendersonville Road, Fletcher, 684-4244; www.fletcheranimalhospital.com.

Best family/child specialty photographer

1. Kaelee Denise Photography www.kaeleedenise.com. 2. Ruby Peoples Photography www.rubypeoplesphotography.com. 3. (tie) Kristi Hedberg Photography www.kristihedbergphotography.com.


EDUCATION

Olan Mills www.olanmills.com. Sunday Grant Photography www.sundaygrant.com.

Best preschool

1. Nativity Preschool 2425 Hendersonville Road, Arden, 687-8381; www. nativitypreschool.org. 2. Grace Lutheran Church Preschool 1245 Sixth Ave. West, Hendersonville; 693-4890; www.gracelutheran nc.com 3. Montessori Country Day 158 Bradley Branch Road, Arden; 654-9933; www.montessori countryday.org.

Best place for birthday parties

1. Mountain Play Lodge 3389 Sweeten Creek Road, Arden; 676-2120; www.mountainplay lodge.com. 2. Asheville's Fun Depot 7 Roberts Road, Asheville, 277-2386; www.ashevillesfundepot.com. 3. Chuck E. Cheese's 104 River Hills Road #H, Asheville, 299-3750; www.chuckecheese.com.

Best birthday party entertainer

1. The Balloon Fairy 423-2030, www.balloonfairy magic.com 2. (tie) Chuck E. Cheese's 104 River Hills Road #H, Asheville, 299-3750; www.chuckecheese.com. Par-T-Perfect 335-KIDS; www.par-t-perfect.com

Best after-school program

1. YMCA Child Care Services At various Buncombe County Schools sites and YMCA Beaverdam, 2102273; www.ymcawnc.org.

FILE PHOTO

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2. Dojoku 32 Rosscraggon Road, Asheville, 681-5023; www.dojoku.com. 3. Asheville JCC 236 Charlotte St., Asheville, 253-0701; www.jcc-asheville.org.

Best child care

1. Montessori Country Day 158 Bradley Branch Road, Arden, 654-9933, www.montessori countryday.org. 2. Asheville JCC 236 Charlotte St., Asheville, 253-0701; www.jcc-asheville.org. 3. Grace Lutheran Church Preschool 1245 Sixth Ave. West, Hendersonville; 693-4890; www.gracelutheran nc.com.

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ACTIVITIES Best parent/child program

1. The Little Gym 1000 Brevard Road, Suite 168, Asheville, 667-9588; www.tlgashevillenc.com 2. YMCA programs www.ymcawnc.org 3. Hands On! A Child’s Gallery 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville; 697-8333; www.handsonwnc.org.

Best gymnastics program

1. Hahn’s Gymnastics 18 Legend Drive, Arden; 684-8832; www.hahnsgymnastics.com. 2. The Little Gym 1000 Brevard Road, Suite 168, Asheville, 667-9588; www.tlgashevillenc.com 3. Osega Gymnastics 1800 A U.S. 70, Swannanoa, 665-0004; www.osegagym.com.

Best music program

1. Kindermusik www.kindermusik.com. Area licensed educators: Allyson MacCauley, 318-3100, allysonmarief@ hotmail.com; Debra Alexander, 206-3145, dhuff@mhc.edu. 2. Asheville Area Music Together Contact Kari Richmond at karirichmond@charter.net or 545-0990. www.AshevilleAreaMT.com or www.musictogether.com. 3. Asheville Music School 126 College St., Asheville; 252-6244; www.ashevillemusicschool.com.

Best dance program for children

1. Center Stage Dance Studio 38L Rosscraggon Road, Asheville; 6547010; www.centerstage1.com. 2. Pat's School of Dance 1256 N. Main St., Hendersonville; 692-2905; www. patsschoolofdance.com. 3. Angie’s Dance Academy 115 Glance St., Clyde, 6273267; www.angiesdance academy.com.

Best art lessons for children

1. Roots + Wings School of Art 545-4827; www.rootsandwingsarts.com 2. M’s School of Art 302 Davis St., Hendersonville, 329-1329; www.msartschool.com 3. Asheville Art Museum 2 N. Pack Square, Asheville, 253-3227; www.ashevilleart.org

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Students from the Center Stage Dance Studio rehearse for the 34th annual spring recital at Thomas Wolfe Auditorium. The studio wins the Family Choice Award for best dance program for children. BILL SANDERS/WSANDERS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

Best sports club/league

1. Asheville Buncombe Youth Soccer Association/Highland Football Club 299-7277, www.abysa.org 2. YMCA of WNC www.ymcawnc.org 3. South Buncombe Recreation and Athletic Association www.sbraa.leaguetoolbox.com.

Best place for swim lessons

1. YMCA of WNC www.ymcawnc.org

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2. YWCA of Asheville 185 S. French Broad Ave., Asheville, 254-7206; www.ywcaofasheville.org. 3. Cane Creek Pool 590 Lower Brush Creek Road, Fletcher, 628-4494; www.buncombecounty.org

Best place for horseback riding lessons

1. (tie) Biltmore Equestrian Center 225-1454; www.biltmore.com/equestrian. Willow Pond Stables 47 Lance Road, Arden, 684-0447; www.willowpondstables.net.


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DESTINATIONS Best place for teens and tweens to hang out

1. Biltmore Park Town Square South Asheville; www.biltmorepark.com 2. Asheville Mall 3 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville, 298-0012; www.asheville-mall.com 3. Asheville’s Fun Depot 7 Roberts Road, Asheville, 277-2386; www.ashevillesfundepot.com

Best museum

1. The Health Adventure 800 Brevard Road, Suite 620, Asheville, 665-2217; www.thehealthadventure.org. 2. Hands On! A Child’s Gallery 318 N. Main St., Hendersonville, 697-8333; www.handsonwnc.org. 3. (tie) Asheville Art Museum 2 N. Pack Square, Asheville, 253-3227; www.ashevilleart.org. Colburn Earth Science Museum 2 S. Pack Square, Asheville, 254-7162; www.colburnmuseum.org

Best miniature golf

1. Tropical Gardens 956 Patton Ave., Asheville, 252-2207 2. Asheville’s Fun Depot 7 Roberts Road, Asheville, 277-2386; www.ashevillesfundepot.com 3. Boyd Park Church Street, Hendersonville, 697-3084; www.cityofhendersonville.org

Most family-friendly fair, festival or special event

1. Mountain State Fair Sept. 6-15 at WNC Agricultural Center, Fletcher; www.mountainfair.org. 2. N.C. Apple Festival Aug. 30-Sept. 2, Main Street, Hendersonville; www.ncapplefestival.org. 3. Bele Chere July 26-28, Asheville; belecherefestival.com.

Best family-friendly hiking trail

1. DuPont State Forest Between Hendersonville and Brevard. For trails, visit www.dfr.state.nc.us/contacts/dsf.htm. 2. N.C. Arboretum trails 100 Frederick Law Olmstead Way, Asheville, 665-2492, www.ncarboretum.org. 3. Bent Creek For trails in Pisgah National Forest, visit www.cs.unca.edu/nfsnc.

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The Asheville Holiday Parade was named best holiday event. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM

Best rainy day activity

1. Mountain Play Lodge 3389 Sweeten Creek Road, Arden; 676-2120; www.mountainplaylodge.com 2. Movies 3. The Health Adventure 800 Brevard Road, Suite 620, Asheville; 665-2217; www.thehealthadventure.org.

Best place to take child for the morning or afternoon

1. WNC Nature Center 75 Gashes Creek Road, Asheville; 298-5600; www.wncnaturecenter.com. 2. Mountain Play Lodge 3389 Sweeten Creek Road, Arden; 676-2120; www.mountainplaylodge.com. 3. Fletcher Community Park 85 Howard Gap Road, Fletcher; www.fletcherparks.org.

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Best summer day camp

1. Camp Tekoa Hendersonville; 692-6516; www.camptekoa.org 2. YMCA of WNC For camp information, visit www.ymcawnc.org. 3. Gwynn Valley 301 Gwynn Valley Trail, Brevard, 885-2900; www.gwynnvalley.com.

Best summer overnight camp

1. Camp Tekoa In Hendersonville, 692-6516; www.camptekoa.org 2. Camp Pisgah (Girl Scouts) In Brevard; www.camppisgah.org. 3. Camp Cedar Cliff At Billy Graham Training Center in East Asheville; 450-3331; www.campcedarcliff.org

Best holiday event

1. Asheville Holiday Parade Parade is Nov. 23. www.ashevilleparade.org 2. Gingerbread houses at Grove Park Inn www.groveparkinn.com. 3. Biltmore Estate Christmas at Biltmore is Nov. 2-Jan. 1. www.biltmore.com.


Truffles at the French Broad Chocolate Lounge. FILE PHOTO

JUST FOR YOU Best place to relax without your children

1. Grove Park Inn Resort & Spa 290 Macon Ave., Asheville, 252-2711, ext. 2772, www.groveparkinn.com. 2. Barnes & Noble 3 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville, 296-7335; 33 Town Square Blvd., Asheville, 687-0681; www.bn.com. 3. Downtown Asheville

Best place to get back into shape

1. YMCA of WNC 30 Woodfin St., Asheville, 210-9622; 3 Town Square Blvd., Asheville, 651-9622; 40 N. Merrimon Ave., Suite 101, Asheville, 505-3990; 810 W. Sixth Ave., Hendersonville, 692-5774; 348 Grace Corpening Drive, Marion, 659-9622; www.ymcawnc.org 2. The Rush Fitness Complex 1818 Hendersonville Road, 274-7874; 1056 Patton Avenue, 274-7874, www.therush247.com. 3. Asheville Racquet Club 1 Crowne Plaza Drive, Asheville, 253-5874; 200 Racquet Club Road, Asheville, 274-3361; www.ashevilleracquetclub.com.

Best place for a moms’ night out

1. Biltmore Park Town Square South Asheville, www.biltmorepark.com. 2. French Broad Chocolate Lounge 10 S. Lexington Ave., Asheville, 252-4181; www.frenchbroadchocolatelounge.com. 3. (tie) Pack’s Tavern 20 S. Spruce St., Asheville, 225-6944; www.packstavern.com. Regal Biltmore Grande Theater Biltmore Park Town Square, 229 Thetford St., Asheville, 684-4380; www.regmovies.com.

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SHOPPING Most family-friendly grocery store

1. Ingles Multiple locations, www.ingles-markets.com. 2. Earth Fare 1856 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 2100100; 66 Westgate Parkway, Asheville, 253-7656, www.earthfare.com. 3. Harris Teeter Store coming to Merrimon Avenue, Asheville. www.harristeeter.com.

Best place to find organics

1. Earth Fare 65 Westgate Parkway, Asheville, 253-7656; 1856 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 2100100; www.earthfare.com. 2. Greenlife Grocery 70 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 254-5440, www.greenlifegrocery.com. 3. The Fresh Market 944 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 252-9098; www.thefreshmarket.com.

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Best consignment store

3. Gymboree Asheville Mall, 3 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville, 299-4447; www.gymboree.com

1. LuLu's Consignment Boutique 3461 Hendersonville Road, Fletcher; 6877565; www.ilovelulus.net. 2. Lollipops Ltd. 1950 Hendersonville Road, Asheville, 6547771; www.lollipopsltd.com. 3. Etc. Consignment Shoppe 1500 Patton Ave., Asheville, 251-1160; www.etcconsignmentasheville.com.

Best toy store

1. O.P. Taylor's 1 Biltmore Park Town Square, Asheville, 681-1865; 2 S. Broad St., Brevard, 8832309; www.optaylors.com. 2. Dancing Bear Toys 518 Kenilworth Road, Asheville, 255-8697; 418 N. Main St., Hendersonville, 693-4500; www.dancingbeartoys.com. 3. Toy Box 793 Merrimon Ave., Asheville, 254-8697; www.toyboxasheville.com.

Best pet store

1. PetSmart 150 Bleachery Blvd., Asheville, 298-5670; and 3 McKenna Road, Arden, 681-5343; www.petsmart.com. 2. Pet Supplies Plus 1856 Hendersonville Road, Asheville; 277-8020; www.petsuppliesplus.com. 3. Petco 825 Brevard Road, Asheville; 665-7977; www.petco.com.

Best children's clothing store

1. The Children's Place Asheville Mall, 3 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville, 296-8351; www.childrensplace.com 2. Gap Asheville Mall, 3 S. Tunnel Road, Asheville, 298-8200; www.gap.com.

Most family-friendly car dealer

1. Jim Barkley Toyota 777 Brevard Road, Asheville, 667-8888, www.jimbarkleytoyota.com. 2. Apple Tree Honda 195 Underwood Road, Fletcher, 684-4400; www.appletreeautos.com. 3. Bryan Easler Toyota 1409 Spartanburg Highway, Hendersonville, 693-7261; www.bryaneaslertoyota.com.

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Social media sets the stage

By Sharon Jayson USA TODAY

Tweens and young teens who use social media place a higher value on fame than kids who don’t use it or use it infrequently, says a new survey of media use among those ages 9-15. “Kids who claim they want to be famous use more media,” says lead author Yalda Uhls, a researcher at UCLA’s Children’s Digital Media Center. She will present findings Friday at a meeting of the Society for Research in Child Development in Seattle. Of the 334 young people surveyed online with parents’ permission, almost half say they use social networks. Of those under 13, 23 percent use a social media site; 26 percent of the younger group say they have a YouTube account. Uhls used a five-point scale asking young people how important they believe fame is to their future; she says those who use social media put a high-

er value on fame than those who don’t use social media. A third said being famous was very important, important or somewhat important. Findings show 54 percent of those who believe fame is very important for their future post photos often or “almost always”; 46 percent update their status that frequently; and 38 percent update their profile page that frequently. Carl Pickhardt, an Austin psychologist and author of Surviving Your Child’s Adolescence, says social media gives young people an opportunity to “craft their own public identity.” “Social media has revolutionized early adolescence,” he says. “They have this online refuge. There you are on the screen. All these people are saying nice things about you. They can control it. When I’m at school, I can’t control my image, but online, I can put myself out there in the way that I want.” Psychologist Laurence Steinberg of Temple University in Philadelphia, likens social networking to the telephone

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and YouTube to television. Steinberg, author of You and Your Adolescent: The Essential Guide for Ages 10-25, says they are just newer ways to communicate that shouldn’t create too much alarm. Parents have always had photo albums of kids, now they’re posting them online, he says. “Fame-seeking is not new,” Pickhardt says. But now “you can imitate what it’s like to be famous.” Kids who want to be famous need only look to teen phenom Justin Bieber, a Canadian who posted videos of his singing on YouTube, which led to being “discovered” in 2008 when he was just 13. Adults may be encouraging fameseeking, but even if parents don’t, society will, the psychologists say. “We live in a society in which selfpromotion is a constant, and in which American Idol or The Voice, and for any of these reality shows, the main goal is to be discovered,” Steinberg says.

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artist’s muse

Growing confidence in young artists By Ginger Huebner WNC Parent columnist

So much of life is what you expect to gain or find within it. I have found that in working with any student, the higher we set our expectations, the further students grow to reach beyond. They are always surprising us with their perseverance and desire to try new things. Within this process, our youngest students (ages 3-5) are growing a confidence that will provide a foundation like no other as they enter elementary school. We have found that by simply providing the right tools, space and structure of each creative lesson, the students’ work and learning skyrockets. We recently did a painting project with our preschoolers inspired by the works of Georgia O’Keeffe in which we saw great examples of this growth. It is possible to set up this successful environment and experience for your own child at your home or even at Grammy’s house. Here is the set up, which directly relates to how the students see the importance of the process they are about to embark on:

Using real art supplies: » Acrylic paint » Professional brushes » Stretched canvases Referencing an artist to draw a real-life comparison: Georgia O’Keeffe

Setting up a true studio space:

Youngsters’ confidence can grow by leaps and bounds when given the opportunity. Here, children paint using real supplies and inspired by the work of Georgia O’Keeffe. GINGER HUEBNER/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

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» Studio table (could just be a dining room table with a protective cloth) » Water cup, brushes and canvas » Paint on a palette (could be a paper plate)


Flowers from the garden make a perfect subject for young artists to paint. GINGER HUEBNER/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

» Subject like real flowers from the garden (or local grocery floral department) » Artist smock (could be an old Tshirt) The other element that is powerful, when working with multiple children, is sitting all together as a peer group. If half of the students were somewhere else playing with toys, the other half of the group wouldn’t be nearly as engaged. By sitting together, a powerful, positive energy emerges as they work, converse and share comments and encouragement with one another: growing confidence. Ginger Huebner is the director of Roots + Wings School of Art and Design, offering visual art and design education for all ages. Email her at info@rootsandwingsarts.com or visit www.rootsandwingsarts.com.

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making connections

Girls’ self-esteem under attack By Nicole McKeon WNC Parent columnist

Imagine, if you will, being a 15year-old boy or girl growing up today. Can you remember what it was like to be 15? I can. Everything, absolutely everything seems of the utmost importance. If you wake up with a zit, it’s the end of the world. If your girlfriend starts dating another guy, a crushing blow to your world. Now imagine the added pressure of Facebook, Twitter and text messaging. Imagine turning on your phone, and seeing the CEO of Abercrombie and Fitch quoted as saying he doesn’t want any fat or uncool kids shopping in his stores or wearing his clothes.

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And, imagine the confusion produced by seeing pictures of said CEO who looks like an advertisement for plastic surgery gone bad. What must that be like? I’ve given this a lot of thought. I have a teen living in my house, and so I know the daily ups and downs of teen life. I have found myself wondering if I should support any store that sells 00 size jeans. I mean, really, double zero? What are we trying to encourage here? Are we telling young women that the less of them there is, the more they are worth? What’s next, size invisible? At the same time that the clothing in the stores is getting smaller and smaller, girls are told at school that if they have “womanly curves” they better not wear clothing that shows them. This is a very confusing message. And, then we have like Mike Jeffries, CEO of Abercrombie and Fitch,

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making irresponsible comments — the quote, originally recorded in 2006, indicated that the company was an exclusionary brand and made no apologies for being one. He has since come forward with a lukewarm apology, but the damage has been done. And, the truth is, he was just being honest about something that most of the “teen targeting” corporations do with no apology. Have you read Teen Vogue or walked through any popular store in the mall lately? Airbrushed, stick thin girls, and perfectly coiffed boys plaster the walls, the clothing catering to the very thin, the very tall and the very rich. Let’s face it, they’ve made it quite clear who they want shopping in their stores, and reading their magazines. So, what’s a parent to do? It’s really a problem, because these images are being transmitted through every form


of media possible to a most vulnerable population. Teens are notoriously self-conscious, and self-critical. How then, does one combat this attack on our children? I think it can begin with teaching them to accept themselves, and love themselves for exactly who and what they are. We must demonstrate self-love, especially moms, who tend to be self-critical. We need to encourage schools to both encourage appropriate dress codes, while not discriminating against girls who may be more curvy. Boys and girls need to be taught to respect one another regardless of their body type. Healthy, strong, capable — these are the words we should encourage our children to think and feel about their bodies. These feelings need to start when our

children are very young and need to be reinforced throughout their lives. As parents, we also need to make our voices heard by refusing to shop at establishments that encourage this unhealthy view of what a “popular/beautiful� person looks like. And, take every opportunity to point out to your child when a photograph has been airbrushed, when a person looks abnormally thin, when a model looks perfect. Remind your kids, no one is perfect. In a time when appearance has become more important than truth, it is tantamount that we as parents tell our children the truth, and teach them to love without parameters. Contact McKeon at homeschoolstation@hotmail.com.

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growing together

Connecting with real friends By Chris Worthy WNC Parent columnist

Not too long after she began speaking in sentences, my daughter started telling us all about her new friend, Sally. Sally wasn’t real — at least not to anyone except my daughter — but for the next few years she was chief of the imaginary entourage that accompanied my daughter almost everywhere. That group also included the imaginary brother with the inexplicable name “Crunchy.” To say that my daughter had a wild and active imagination probably is a gross understatement. Contrast that with my son who, when told that some people have imaginary friends, said “Why would they want to do that?”

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In any event, poor Sally hung with us for a long time, though she did get left behind at Walt Disney World once. Being a resourceful gal, she somehow made her way home. I’ve been thinking about those friends recently as I’ve noticed both of my children being immersed in a virtual world that I admit, I only half grasp. I’ve decided that Facebook is a great tool for posting about lost and found pets or for neighbors alerting each other with the county’s sewer project has moved to a new street. Beyond that, I am losing patience. I see too many hurtful comments and bad attitudes disguised as status updates. Spouses take digs at each other in public, grown women embrace their inner teenager (not in a particularly good way) and adults say things they wouldn’t say in person. It’s too easy to detach from this disembodied online existence. Unfortunately, I don’t know that my

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teenagers have a frame of reference outside this world of instant updates and tell-all profiles. We’ve always kept strict rules about Internet use and we’ve drilled into our children that there is no delete button once anything is posted online. They do get that, I think, but I also think the world is changing their view of friendship. Does anyone really have 600 friends? I am not ready to pull the plug. I do enjoy keeping up with old (real) friends that have spread far and wide. I love seeing their kids grow up, even if it’s only virtually. But I also think I have a firm grasp on reality. But as they grow into adults, I wonder how many teenagers will be able to separate online from real life. Will they know which friends are real? Maybe Sally and Crunchy were more lifelike than I thought. Contact Chris at chris@worthyplace.com.


nature center notes

Otters are made for swimming By Hannah Epperson Special to WNC Parent

Can you swim with your eyes open? You’ve probably opened your eyes in the pool or even in the ocean, but chances are it didn’t feel very good. But the river otters at the WNC Nature Center swim with their eyes open all the time. They have to — how else would they find their fish dinner? Otters have a special third eyelid, called a nictitating membrane, that covers their eyes when they’re swimming underwater. The eyelid is clear, so they are still able to see where they are going — kind of like wearing swim goggles. Otters have several cool adaptations that allow them to move around as easily in the water as they would on land. For example, they can close their ears and nostrils to keep water out, and their fur is waterproof, so their skin stays warm and dry, allowing them to swim even on the coldest days. River otters

River otters can hold their breath for about eight minutes, and they have a special third eyelid that allows them to keep their eyes open under water. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

can also hold their breath for up to eight minutes. Their streamlined bodies and webbed feet let them propel themselves quickly through the water, allowing them to catch those speedy fish. River otters are very sensitive to pollution in their environment; they need very clean rivers in order to thrive and be healthy. Though they are tricky

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to find the wild, you can always visit Obi Wan and Olive, the Nature Center’s river otters, and learn more about the importance of protecting these playful critters and their wild habitat. WNC Nature Center is at 75 Gashes Creek Road, Asheville. Visit www.wncnaturecenter.com.

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divorced families

Stepfamilies require some adjusting By Trip Woodard WNC Parent columnist

Personally, I am delighted that we have gone back to calling remarried families stepfamilies. I never liked the term “blended family.” I guess I could never get around that blender image. While I don’t think of families being put into a blender, I do have flashbacks after hearing the term trying to make healthy drinks using a blender or juicer. It seems no matter what I put into my blender, the end product is always green, smells like old green tennis shoes and tastes like green castor oil. Stepfamilies are a growing phenomena in our country with unique challenges that may require family therapy. Yet, I think most stepfamily problems could be headed off with proper education and some attitude adjustments. The initial goal should be to form a mutual parenting front. Ideally, differences in parenting styles should be addressed and resolved to a level of mutual comfort before marriage. This could involve taking some parenting courses together like Love and Logic or whatever is available in the community. The next challenge will come from the children. Parents who have been single awhile tend to form a closer relationship with their children through daily activities and use of time. When a new parent moves in, children may feel threatened by their loss of time with their biological parent and may test their parent’s “loyalty” by acting out. The parent on the scene is what I call the PIC, or Parent in Charge. If the other parent, step or biological, is absent, they should do the best they can to support the PIC’s decision in responding to misbehavior. Disagreements about parenting should be taken and

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resolved out of the hearing range of the children. Over time, this re-establishes a grown up parenting hierarchy that ultimately benefits the children. Children may grieve the loss of their prior relationship with the biological parent and take out their anger on the stepparent. In this case, the biological parent needs to reassure the children of his or her continued love for them while also showing disapproval of any inappropriate acting out toward the stepparent. Next, the stepparent needs to come into this new family formation with eyes wide open. He or she must be careful of expectations. Stepmoms or stepdads who desire to become a “super dad or mom” to replace or make up for a biological parent is often a recipe for disaster. Instead, stepparents should acknowledge with the children that they are not trying to replace the other parent, but are trying to become an important support and participant in their lives. Beyond this, stepparents need to understand that the children’s relationship with them can be anywhere on a spectrum from toleration to love. If the children proclaim love for you, that is wonderful, but not usual. Sometimes the best a stepparent can expect from children is civility and common courtesy, which the biological parent should support as a minimum requirement. Be patient and understand that all families are very fluid things. As the children grow up, they may come to respect the stepparent as a great mentor and friend. All of these principles still hold if both parents getting married have children. While you might not be “The Brady Bunch,” stepfamilies can ultimately be a rich and fulfilling experience for all those involved. Trip Woodard is a licensed family and marriage therapist and a clinical member of the N.C. Association of Marriage and Family Therapists. Contact him at 606-8607.


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librarian’s picks

A fresh look at trees, farm life By Jennifer Prince Buncombe County Public Libraries

In two new picture books, readers are invited to not just look at the illustrations, but to see the illustrations. In doing so, readers are compelled to slow down, absorb the details, and gain a fresh perspective. In “Picture a Tree,” author and illustrator Barbara Reid begins with a simple, profound statement: “There is more than one way to picture a tree.” Reid presents colorful scenarios of town life. There is a park, a bus stop, a sidewalk and so on. All around are trees. Using spare language, Reid points out the potential trees have in an imagination. Trees are more than just scenery. For example, against a white winter sky, the bare dark branches of a tall, wide tree look like giant scribbles of ink. A tree in full summer leaf is home to squirrels, birds and bees. However, the apartment building in the background looks as if it might be perched in the tree as well, making the tree “a high-rise home sweet home.” Reid escorts readers throughout the four seasons, showing worlds of possibility in trees laden with snow, blossoms and leaves of green, red and yellow. The illustrations in “Picture a Tree” were made with Plasticine that was shaped and then pressed onto illustration board. Readers will enjoy poring

area story times Buncombe County Libraries Visit www.buncombecounty.org Black Mountain, 250-4756: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday; Mother Goose: 11:30 a.m. Tuesday; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursday East Asheville, 250-4738: Preschool: 11 a.m. Wednesday and Saturday Enka-Candler, 250-4758: Preschool: 10:30 a.m.

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over the colorful, detailed images of everyday life. The three-dimensional quality of the actual illustrations comes across with stunning clarity in the two-dimensional

Wednesday; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursday Fairview, 250-6484: Mother Goose, 11 a.m. Tuesday; Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday Leicester, 250-6480: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday North Asheville, 250-4752: Preschool: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Toddler: 10 a.m. Wednesday; Mother Goose, 10:30 a.m. Tuesday Oakley/South Asheville, 250-4754: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 11 a.m.

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format. It looks as if the reader could reach through the page and touch the trees, people and buildings. The contemplative nature of this book makes it a natural selection for independent readers and for one-on-one sharing. In “I Spy on the Farm,” author and illustrator Edward Gibbs takes readers on an unusual tour of the farm. The reader meets all kinds of farm animals, but thanks to Gibbs’ clever presentation, the reader has to guess about each animal’s identity. For instance, the first page shows a small, bright eye peeking out of circle. The text reads, “I spy with my little eye…” The opposite page has a hole cut in the middle. In the hole, there is a patch of yellow. The text reads, “…something yellow that begins with a D.” When the reader turns the page, a vibrant two-page spread shows, of course, a duckling. The ensuing pages reveal a lamb, pig and other farm animals in a like manner. Gibbs’ illustrations were created digitally. The backgrounds consist of easily recognizable farmyard silhouettes — a scarecrow, trees, a fence. The colors are pale. The stars of the book, the animals, are rendered in more detail. Bold, black outlining adds emphasis. The hide-andseek aspect of this book makes it a fun choice for one-on-one and group sharing. These books are available in the Buncombe County Public Libraries. To learn more, visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

Wednesday; Preschool: 10 a.m. Wednesday Pack Memorial Library, 250-4700: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Mondays; Mother Goose: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Thursdays; Reading Corner (ages 6-12): 3:30 p.m. first Wednesdays Skyland/South Buncombe, 250-6488: Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 10:30 a.m. Wednesday Swannanoa, 250-6486: Preschool: 11 a.m. Thursday; Toddler: 10 a.m. Thursday; Mother Goose: 2:30 p.m. Thursday (starting April 18)


area story times Weaverville, 250-6482: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Thursday; Preschool: 11 a.m. Tuesday West Asheville, 250-4750: Mother Goose: 11 a.m. Monday; Toddler: 11 a.m. Wednesday; Preschool: 11 a.m. Thursday

Haywood County Library Visit www.haywoodlibrary.org. Waynesville, 356-2512 or 356-2511: Movers and Shakers: 11 a.m. Thursdays; Ready 4 Learning: 11 a.m. Tuesdays; Family story time: 11 a.m. Wednesdays Canton, 648-2924: Family story time, 11 a.m. Tuesdays; Rompin’ Stompin’ story time, 10 a.m. Thursdays

Henderson County Library Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. Main, 697-4725: Bouncing Babies: 11 a.m. Thursdays; Toddler Time: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays; Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays; 4 O’Clock Club (K-5): 4 p.m. Thursdays. On June 13, there are cooking activities. Register by stopping by the Children’s Desk or call 697-4725, ext. 2312. Edneyville, 685-0110: Family: 10 a.m. Mondays Etowah, 891-6577: Family: 10 a.m. Tuesdays Fletcher, 687-1218: Toddler Time: 10 a.m. Wednesdays; Preschool: 10:30 a.m. Wednesdays Green River, 697-4969: Family: 10 a.m. Thursdays Mills River, 890-1850: Familiy: 10 a.m. Mondays

Barnes & Noble Asheville Mall, 296-7335: 11 a.m. Mondays and 2 p.m. Saturdays; Biltmore Park Town Square, Asheville, 687-0681: 11 a.m. Saturdays

Blue Ridge Books 152 S. Main St., Waynesville, 456-6000: 10:30 a.m. Mondays, ages 3 and under.

Dancing Bear Toys 518 Kenilworth Road, Asheville, 800-6598697: 3:30 p.m. Tuesdays and 11:30 a.m. Thursdays, through May.

Spellbound Children’s Bookshop 21 Battery Park Ave., Asheville, 232-2228: 10:30-11 a.m. Saturdays, ages 4-7.

The Health Adventure 800 Brevard Road, Suite 620, A sheville, 665-2217: 3:30 p.m. Monday and Friday.

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parent briefs

Growing Minds @ Market caters to kidss

ASHEVILLE — ASAP’s Growing Minds Farm to School Program recently wrapped up its school year program and is turning its focus to tailgate markets. As part of the Growing Minds program, Glen Arden Elementary secondgraders worked this year with Adam Hayes, chef at the Red Stag Grill at the Grand Bohemian Hotel in Biltmore Village. In the culmination of their partnership, Glen Arden’s students visited the hotel in a field trip last month, touring the kitchen and laundry room. The trip’s grand finale was a three-course meal, prepared by Hayes and his staff, that used local ingredients from Sunburst Trout Farm, Looking Glass Creamery and Hickory Nut Gap Farm. Now that school is out, ASAP will bring education to tailgate markets, with Growing Minds @ Market. The summer series, formerly known as Kids Corner Market, will take place Saturdays, June-August, at Asheville

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Glen Arden Elementary second-graders try the first of their three courses, a smoked Sunburst trout salad with edible flowers. Other courses included “Super Power” meatloaf, with Hickory Nut Gap Farm’s grass-fed beef and pasture pork, and Looking Glass Pack Square panna cotta. SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

City Market Downtown. This summer, the series also extends to North Asheville and West Asheville tailgate markets, thanks to support from The Com-

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munity Foundation of Western North Carolina. Growing Minds @ Market is a space at a farmers market set aside for children and families so kids can engage in fun projects focused on local food and farms. Activities include fresh local food tastings, food and farm-based art crafts, and physical activities and games. ASAP has offered the series at Asheville City Market with the help of other community organizations since 2009. “We’ve seen firsthand how the programming not only brings families to a market and helps children connect with the source of their food, but also helps a market successfully engage with the community and a wide variety of community partners,” says ASAP’s Growing Minds Director Emily Jackson. Activities slated for June at Asheville City Market include a garden story reading and activity with Spellbound Children’s Bookshop, hula hooping with Hooping Hearts, edible plant parts edu-


cation with the Girl Scouts, a collage craft with Rainbow in My Tummy, and more. For a complete schedule of activities at Asheville City Market, and to learn more about the programming, visit www.growing-minds.org. Organizations interested in participating should email jessica@asapconnections.org. To learn more about activities scheduled or to participate as a group at the West and/or North Asheville markets, contact markets directly.

See artifacts from Blackbeard’s flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge

ASHEVILLE — If you have a little pirate on your hands, you may want to take him (or her) to see some real pirate artifacts this summer. A cannonball, window glass and gold dust from the wreck of Blackbeard’s flagship, Queen Anne’s Revenge, will be on exhibit until July 13 at the Cultural Resources Western Office, 176 Riceville Road, Asheville (across from the Charles George VA Medical Center). It is the first stop on a statewide tour of “Blackbeard’s Queen Anne’s Revenge, 1718,” and is a part of the statewide kick-off of the 2013 summer dive season at the shipwreck in Beaufort.

Entry to the traveling exhibit is free. There will be artifacts shown that represent weaponry, nautical tools and personal items. The Western Office is open 10 a.m.-3:30 p.m. Monday-Friday, with special hours June 8 and July 13, as part of the N.C. Department of Cultural Resources 2nd Saturdays program, a statewide initiative to highlight free family fun this summer at historic sites and museums across the state. The artifacts are on loan from the N.C. Maritime Museum in Beaufort, the official repository for artifacts from the Queen Anne’s Revenge shipwreck. The Underwater Archaeology Branch leads research on the shipwreck. The QAR ran aground near Beaufort in 1718. This wreck was located in November 1996 by Intersal Inc., with information provided to Operations Director Mike Daniel by company President Phil Masters. For information, call 919-807-7389.

CarePartners starts postpartum workshop

ASHEVILLE — CarePartners will host a six-week postpartum workshop start-

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ing July 8 for women 6 weeks to a year postpartum. It will be taught by physical therapists and a certified yoga instructor, and runs 10:30-11:30 a.m. Mondays at CareParnters Seymour Auditorium on the main campus at 68 Sweeten Creek Road, Asheville. The goal of the class is to provide a supportive educational experience for the transition to motherhood, emphasizing wellness, injury prevention and return to self; to improve mothers’ ability to care for their baby through toddler years by caring for their bodies; and to assist as appropriate with injury referral recommendations. The classes will focus on helping women regain strength in the core; improving bladder control and reducing risk of back pain with instruction in pelvic floor strengthening; body mechanics education for baby care positions (crib and floor maneuvering); baby fun including massage, songs, motor milestones, and mombaby yoga; and having a community of moms for support. The cost is $120 and participants need to sign up ahead of time. To register, call Jessica Clark at 4181050.

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By Kate Justen

Homemade food stirs memories

WNC Parent columnist

Exploring food traditions with your family can be like a trip down memory lane. I have very vivid memories of the cookies my grandma used to make, my uncle’s sourdough pancakes, the appetizer buffet on football Sunday. We want to re-create fond memories because it gives a connection with those people, places and times in our lives. Whether you follow your Great Uncle Joe’s recipe for pecan pie or just talk about him as you create your own recipe for pecan pie, you are carrying on the tradition. Intentionally or not, you pass those traditions on to your children. People love to hear stories, but kids especially can be influenced by them. Sometimes the story behind the meal is what makes it taste good. It is the idea behind comfort food, food that makes us comfortable because of our connection to it or the memories behind it. Your eating habits create or alter the food traditions of your family. Here are two food traditions from my family: The family pizza dough recipe that has been passed down by my father-in-law has changed a little bit. When my husband started making it, he did it the exact same way. Now his dough tastes a little different, but the

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Making pizza is a family tradition in the Justen house. While the recipe may have changed a bit, the tradition continues. KATE JUSTEN/SPECIAL TO WNC PARENT

Summer vegetable roast 1 or 2 of each of the following: potatoes, carrots, parsnips, turnips, sweet potato, beets, onion and/or garlic 1-2 tablespoons olive oil Salt and pepper 1/4 cup fresh chopped thyme, oregano, rosemary and/or parsley

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1. Cut each of the vegetables into bite-sized cubes, lightly coat with olive oil, salt and pepper as desired. 2. Spread veggies on a baking sheet and place in oven at 400 degrees, bake for 40-50 minutes or until soft. 3. Remove veggies and let cool slightly. Toss with fresh herbs before serving.


Homemade chicken “nuggets” 16 ounces skinless boneless chicken breasts, cut into even bitesized pieces Salt and pepper to taste 2 teaspons olive oil 5-6 tablespoons whole wheat breadcrumbs 1 tablespoon dried Italian seasoning(parsley, oregano, basil, thyme) 2 tablespoon course ground cornmeal 2 tablespoon grated Parmesan cheese Olive oil spray

1. Preheat oven to 425°. Spray a baking sheet with olive oil spray. 2. Combine breadcrumbs, herbs, cornmeal and Parmesan cheese in a bowl. 3. Season chicken with salt and pepper, add olive oil and mix well so the olive oil evenly coats the chicken. 4. Put a few chunks of chicken at a time into the breadcrumb mixture to coat, then on the baking sheet. Lightly spray the top with olive oil spray then bake 8-10 minutes. Turnover then cook another 4-5 minutes or until cooked thoroughly.

tradition is making the pizza together as a family. As we pass it to our children it will be changed a bit more, but it is still pizza night and there is not much better than homemade pizza that the whole family participated in. I asked my mom what meal she made for us as kids that her mom made for her when she was a child. Her response — not too healthy by today’s standards — fried chicken, mashed taters, gravy and corn. She made it the exact same way except she thinks Grandma fried the chicken in lard, while Mom used a little oil and covered the pan so the heat/steam cooked the chicken. Here is how it looks today: baked chicken bites dipped in local honey, roasted vegetables, corn on the cob (hopefully from our garden). Kate Justen is the program director of FEAST — Fresh Easy Affordable Sustainable Tasty, a program of Slow Food Asheville. Contact her at feast.avl@gmail.com or visit www.slowfoodasheville.org.

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Tart, tangy rhubarb can be sweet spring treat By Candace Page, Burlington (Vt.) Free Press

You will not find a more urban Vermonter than I, raised inside the city limits of Burlington, Vt., settled for the last 30 years on a city street as closepacked as a rugby scrum. So why has rhubarb, that plant of farmyards and rural kitchens, burgeoned in the backyard of every home I’ve occupied? Why do I anticipate those green-and-red stalks of spring as if they were a birthday gift? And why has the culinary world recently jumped on the rhubarb bandwagon, converting a homely pie ingredient into a star in such haute dishes as goat cheese panna cotta, roasted pork belly with rhubarb compote and rhubarb mousse?

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“Rhubarb brings balance and brightness,” said Steve Atkins, chef-owner of Kitchen Table Bistro in Richmond, Vt., who uses rhubarb he grows himself with caramelized garlic and onions to accompany his all-day roasted pork shoulder. “People are taking more notice of what is growing around them,” offered Max MacKinnon of Pistou in Burlington. “There’s more interest in new or rediscovered ingredients … Rhubarb brings a nice acidity to brighten up a dish.” At August First, the Burlington bakery, co-owner

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/GANNETT


Phil Merrick said an ample supply walks in the door. He puts out the word he’s looking for rhubarb, and customers bring in armloads to trade for a gift card, “or they just drop it and run,” Merrick said. He turns the bounty into rhubarb crumble baked on big sheet pans. “We don’t make it real sweet,” he said. “You want that tart rhubarb flavor to come through — most recipes call for three times as much sugar as you need.”

Easy as pie

In my own case, I wish I could say my appreciation was the result of a superior palate or talent in the kitchen. No such luck. Laziness, and a preference for sweets that are balanced by tartness, explain why I love rhubarb and why I believe it belongs in the garden of every home baker. Consider: Once established, a rhubarb plant needs virtually no tending beyond a good feeding of fertilizer and plenty of water each year. No fruit is easier to prepare.

Pull a stalk, wash, chop and you’re ready to bake: yes, rhubarb pie, but also rhubarb cake, rhubarb crisp, rhubarb muffins and my very favorite treat, rhubarb maple bread pudding. Don’t feel like baking? Put some chopped rhubarb in a saucepan — a nonreactive stainless or enamel one, because of rhubarb’s acidity. Add sugar, cook briefly and you have a tart, delicious sauce for ice cream or pound cake or to add to a morning fruit smoothie. No fruit is easier to preserve. Pull some stalks, chop, put in bags and drop in the freezer. Elapsed time: 10 minutes.

‘I love rhubarb’

When it comes to practical rhubarb experience, it would be hard to beat Jessica Gaudette and her parents, Bill and Sara Kittell of Fairfield, Vt.: Any family with 125 rhubarb plants in the backyard can speak with authority. “Oh God, I love rhubarb. I’d eat it Continues on Page 48

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RHUBARB TIPS » Rhubarb leaves contain toxins and should never be eaten. » Older stalks on a plant may be woody. Choose younger ones. » When buying rhubarb, choose redder stalks for a more striking pink color in a pie or sauce. If flavor alone is what matters, either green or red stalks are fine. » “Don’t pick when the plant is wet and pull the stalks, don’t cut them. Grasp the stalk near its base and tug.

LEARN MORE The Internet offers many sources for information about cultivating and cooking with rhubarb. Among the most helpful: » www.rhubarbinfo.com, includes a guide to varieties, instructions on dividing rhubarb, a discussion of the plant’s history and links to other sites. » www.rhubarb-central.com, provides dozens of recipes for using rhubarb in baking, preserves and cooking. » www.marthastewart.com/food, offers nearly four dozen beautifully presented rhubarb recipes. Click on “seasonal produce recipes” in the left-hand column, then on “rhubarb.”

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Rhubarb

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every day,” Sara Kittell exclaimed when I called. Since 1994, rhubarb lemon pound cakes have been the star of Gaudette’s farm stand, Black Creek Preserves, at the Burlington Farmers Market. She has baked and sold 50 a week, along with a dozen of her mother’s 9inch rhubarb pies and 20 to 40 of the six-inch size. Gaudette’s rhubarb ginger jam (“one of my biggest sellers”) and rhubarb maple chutney (“with or without cashews”) round out her rhubarb repertory. She grows Victoria, a greenstemmed rhubarb variety, for its hardiness and superior flavor, but limits its use to concoctions in which some other ingredient will provide vibrant color. “It cooks up greeny-brown, not pretty, so we use it in strawberry pie where its color doesn’t matter,” she said. “We use two less

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Rhubarb maple toasted bread pudding This is delicious warm and even better in the morning for breakfast.

4 slices good white bread 3/4 cup milk 3 tablespoons butter 2 eggs 1/4 cup maple syrup 1/4 cup plus 1 tablespoon sugar pinch of salt 1 cup of chopped rhubarb whipped cream flavored with maple syrup

Remove the crusts from the bread and toast the slices. Cut or tear into small cubes and place in a bowl. Heat the milk with 2 tablespoons of the butter and pour over the bread cubes. Use the remaining butter to coat a 1-quart casserole. After the toast has soaked for 10 minutes, beat together the eggs, maple syrup, 1/4 cup sugar and salt. Stir in the rhubarb and combine with the bread mixture. Pour into the buttered casserole, sprinkle remaining sugar on top and bake for 40 minutes in a preheated 325-degree oven. Serve warm with maple-flavored whipped cream. Source: “L.L. Bean Book of New New England Cookery” by Judith and Evan Jones, Random House, 1989

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Rhubarb cosmopolitan 1 ounce garden rhubarb syrup (see below) 2 ounces Ketel One vodka 1 ounce triple sec 1 ounce fresh lime juice

Combine all ingredients in a cocktail shaker, shake and strain into a chilled martini glass. Alternatively, as a cooler, strain into an ice-filled highball and top with 2 ounces soda water and stir gently. Makes 1. For the rhubarb syrup 3 cups chopped rhubarb 1/4 cup honey 1 1/2 cup water

Combine all ingredients in a stainless saucepan and bring to a boil over medium-high heat. Reduce to a simmer and cook for about 10 minutes, until rhubarb is broken down. Strain and cool. Tartness varies a bit from batch to batch, so adjust honey amount as desired. Source: Steve Atkins, Kitchen Table Bistro, Richmond, Vt.


hardy hybrids, one medium red, one dark red for jam because they hold their color.” In the garden, “my rhubarb tip is to pull the stalks, don’t cut them. You pull from the bottom and you get the most fruit and it keeps the plant thinned out,” she said. For efficiency, Gaudette and Kittell do most of their harvesting in two or three swoops during the May-June season, picking 900 pounds of rhubarb and freezing more than two-thirds of it for later use. Friends and relatives pitch in, pulling stalks and whacking the rhubarb into pieces and measuring it into quart bags for freezing. “I actually prefer frozen rhubarb for cake,” Gaudette said. “It seems to make the cake more consistent because freezing has broken down the rhubarb fibers.” If the fruit is frozen, the batter has a chance to firm up before the rhubarb releases all the liquid. This also works for pies — there’s no need to worry that frozen rhubarb will turn a pie crust soggy. “The more fat in the crust, the better,” she said (a good rule for pie crust in any case). “You put the fruit in frozen, and it hits that 400 degree oven and it really tightens up.” Sara Kittell, the family pie maker, uses rhubarb as the base for a rainbow of summer pies. “Sometimes I’ll add a little cinnamon, but I like to keep it plain,” said Kittell. “Rhubarb is the essence of spring,” she said.

Rhubarb blackberry buttermilk cake 1 cup all-purpose flour 1/2 teaspoon baking powder 1/2 teaspoon baking soda 1/4 teaspoon salt 1/2 stick unsalted butter, softened 2/3 cup sugar 1/2 teaspoon pure vanilla extract 1 large egg 1 teaspoon lemon zest 1/2 cup well-shaken buttermilk 3/4 cup fresh blackberries 1/2 cup rhubarb, chopped 2 tablespoons turbinado (or brown) sugar

Preheat oven to 400 degrees with rack in middle. Coat a 9-inch round cake pan with cooking spray. Whisk together flour, baking powder, baking soda and salt in a small bowl. Set aside. Beat butter and two-thirds cup sugar with an electric mixer at medium-high speed until batter is smooth, about 2 minutes. Beat in the vanilla, egg and lemon zest. Mix until well

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combined. At low speed, mix in the flour mixture in 3 batches, alternating with buttermilk. Start with the flour and end with the flour. Mix until just combined. Don’t over mix. Spoon batter into cake pan, smoothing the top with a spatula. Scatter blackberries and rhubarb evenly over the top of the batter. Sprinkle with 2 tablespoons of turbinado sugar. Bake until cake is golden brown and a wooden pick inserted into center comes out clean, 20-25 minutes. Let the cake cool in pan for about 10 minutes, then turn out onto a rack and cool completely. Serve the cake upside down to show off the pretty berries and rhubarb. Cut into slices. Serves 8 Source: Adapted from Gourmet magazine by bakers at the website Two Peas and Their Pod

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calendar of events

Things to do June 3

CONNECT: INCREASING SOCIAL FLEXIBILITY THROUGH ACTIONS AND THOUGHTS: Starts week of June 3, times TBD, St. Gerard House, 620 Oakland St., Hendersonville. $180 per session. A 10-week summer session to teach how thoughts, actions and reactions affect social situations. Classes are interactive, age appropriate and fund. Curriculum incorporates social thinking lessons and characters, uses evidence-based practices, games, role play and skits. St. Gerard House provides services for children with autism spectrum diagnosis but a child and/or adolescent taking this class does not need to be diagnosed. Call 693-4223, ext. 21, for information. YWCA SWIM LESSONS: Starts June 3 at YWCA of Asheville, 185 S. French Broad Ave., Asheville. Classes for all ages and levels taught by Red Cross-certified instructors in a solar-heated pool. Call 254-7206, ext. 110, or visit www.ywcaofasheville.org.

June 6

CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 3:30-5:30 p.m. June 6, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Ages 6-12. Kids will create a mosaic sun catcher and tie-dye. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. WOODSY OWL’S CURIOSITY CLUB: 10:30 a.m.noon and 1:30-3 p.m. June 6, Cradle of Forestry, U.S. 276 in Pisgah National Forest. $4 per child, $2.50 per adult. Summer nature series for children ages 4-7. Outdoor-oriented activities help kids explore a forest-related theme. Thursdays through Aug. 1. Visit www.cradleofforestry.com or call 877-3130.

June 8

FACE PAINTING AND BALLOON ART: 1-5 p.m. June 8, Asheville’s Fun Depot, 2 Roberts Road, Asheville. Free face painting and balloon art. No purchase necessary, tips appreciated. Call before arriving to verify event, 277-2386. Visit www.ashevillesfundepot.com. GET OUTDOORS DAY: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. June 8, The Cradle of Forestry, on U.S. 276 in Pisgah National Forest. Free. Established in 2008 by the USDA Forest Service to encourage Americans, especially youth, to seek out healthy, active outdoor lifestyles, connect with nature, and embrace public lands. With skill teaching and demonstrations by the area’s outdoor recreation community. Visit www.cradleofforestry.com or call 877-3130. GREAT SMOKIES USED CURRICULM SALE: 10 a.m.-2 p.m. June 8, Covenant Christian Church, 486 Fairview Road Sylva. Free. Home-schoolers and those

Chad Pry and his son Eliot enjoy last year’s debut AVL Father’s Day Fest at Highland Brewery. The event returns on June 15. JOHN COUTLAKIS/JCOUTLAKIS@CITIZEN-TIMES.COM interested in home education will find books, resources, and curriculum as well as free information on home-schooling in NC. Open to the public. For more information, contact Crystal Akers 507-0452 or email used.curriculum.sale@gmail.com. HERITAGE DAY AT VANCE BIRTHPLACE: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. June 8, Vance Birthplace, 911 Reems Creek Road, Weaverville. The event will feature a Civil War living history encampment and will also include demonstrations of weaving and other skills and presentations from James Stokely, son of the late novelist Wilma Dykeman, and Jim McDowell, potter and historian. To find out more, call 645-6706 or email site manager Chris Morton at chris.morton@ncdcr.gov.vance birthplace.jpg. REVOLUTIONARY WAR DAYS: June 8-9, Davidson’s Fort, 140 Bud Hogan Road, Old Fort (behind Janesville Acoustics). $5 adults, $2 ages 6-10, free 5 and younger. Talk to craftspeople, watch the soldiers drill, discuss with civilians and camp followers what it was like to live in the 1700s. With military camps and weapons demonstrations, and a battle demonstration at 1 p.m. June 8. Visit www.davidsonsfort.org.

June 9

REVOLUTIONARY WAR DAYS: June 8-9, Davidson’s Fort, 140 Bud Hogan Road, Old Fort (behind Janesville Acoustics). $5 adults, $2 ages 6-10, free 5 and younger. Talk to craftspeople, watch the soldiers drill, discuss with civilians and camp followers what

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it was like to live in the 1700s. With military camps and weapons demonstrations. Visit www.davidsonsfort.org.

June 10

CELEBRATE PREGNANCY CLASS: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. June 10, at at The Health Adventure, Biltmore Square Mall, 800 Brevard Road, Asheville. $65. The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health offers a twist on a normal childbirth class, covering important labor process and support techniques, dealing with pregnancy ailments, breast-feeding and newborn care. Includes a massage voucher. Scholarships available. Call 681-2229 or visit www.parkridgebabies.com to register. KID SAFE SUMMER: 12:30-3 p.m. June 10 at Cane Creek Pool, Fletcher. $3 to swim. Event features information on summer safety, water safety and sunscreen use. Fire departments will answer questions about fire safety at home and outdoors. With crafts and activities from Buncombe County Parks, Greenways and Recreation Services. Buncombe County Sheriff’s Department Crime Prevention unit will be on site with kid friendly handouts. Call 250-4260.

June 11

CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. June 11, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D,

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calendar of events Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Ages 6-12. Kids will create handmade clay clocks and tie-dye. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. KID SAFE SUMMER: 12:30-3 p.m. June 11 at Erwin Pool, West Asheville. $3 to swim. Event features information on summer safety, water safety and sunscreen use. Fire departments will answer questions about fire safety at home and outdoors. With crafts and activities from Buncombe County Parks, Greenways and Recreation Services. Buncombe County Sheriff’s Department Crime Prevention unit will be on site with kid friendly handouts. Call 250-4260. NINJA KIDS CLUB DEMO: 6:30-7:30 p.m. June 11, The Hop, 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Free. Ninja Kids Club teaches ancient Japanese martial arts for today’s world. Take a sneak peek at the discipline as cultural experience or a fun new possibility for kids. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com. OLD THYME COUNTRY TALES AND TUNES: 10 a.m. Fletcher Library and 2 p.m. Henderson County Main Library. With Sharon Clark. For all ages. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.

Master Gardener. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. FIRST LEGO LEAGUE ROBOTICS: 3-5 p.m. June 12 at 94 Coxe Ave., Asheville. Design, build and program NXT First LEGO League robots. For ages 10-14. Classes meet second and fourth Wednesdays. Parental participation encouraged. To learn more, call 258-2038. POLICE K-9 PROGRAM: 11 a.m. June 12 at Henderson County Main Library, Hendersonville. Hendersonville police officer Jennifer Drake brings her police dogs. For ages 4 and older. (Program may be canceled in event of a police emergency.) Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. KID SAFE SUMMER: 12:30-3 p.m. June 12 at Hominy Valley Pool, Candler. $3 to swim. Event features information on summer safety, water safety and sunscreen use. Fire departments will answer questions about fire safety at home and outdoors. With crafts and activities from Buncombe County Parks, Greenways and Recreation Services. Buncombe County Sheriff’s Department Crime Prevention unit will be on site with kid friendly handouts. Call 250-4260. SONIA BROOKS THE MOOZIC LADY: 10:30 a.m. June 12, South Buncombe/Skyland Library. Calling all Toddlers! Come shake, rock and roll with the Moozic Lady! All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library.

June 12

June 13

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DIG INTO SUNFLOWER SUMMER: 4 p.m. June 12, Swannanoa Library. Start summer off right planting and growing your own sunflowers with a local

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BOOK SPEED DATING: 6:30 p.m. June 13, Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood St., Asheville. Calling all teens and tweens! Looking for a good read?

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Come share your favorite books and fall for some new ones. Pizza and prizes. Call 250-4720 to register. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 3:30-5:30 p.m. June 13, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Ages 6-12. Kids will create a clay picture frames and tie-dye. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. KID SAFE SUMMER: 12:30-3 p.m. June 13 at North Buncombe Pool, Weaverville. $3 to swim. Event features information on summer safety, water safety and sunscreen use. Fire departments will answer questions about fire safety at home and outdoors. With crafts and activities from Buncombe County Parks, Greenways and Recreation Services. Buncombe County Sheriff’s Department Crime Prevention unit will be on site with kid friendly handouts. Call 250-4260. WOODSY OWL’S CURIOSITY CLUB: 10:30 a.m.noon and 1:30-3 p.m. June 13, Cradle of Forestry, U.S. 276 in Pisgah National Forest. $4 per child, $2.50 per adult. Summer nature series for children ages 4-7. Outdoor-oriented activities help kids explore a forest-related theme. Thursdays through Aug. 1. Visit www.cradleofforestry.com or call 877-3130.

June 14

DIG INTO ROCKS AND MINERALS: 10:30 a.m. June 14, Henderson County Main Library. Presented by Mineral and Lapidary Museum, Hendersonville. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. KID SAFE SUMMER: 12:30-3 p.m. June 14 at Owen Pool, Swannanoa. $3 to swim. Event features in-


formation on summer safety, water safety and sunscreen use. Fire departments will answer questions about fire safety at home and outdoors. With crafts and activities from Buncombe County Parks, Greenways and Recreation Services. Buncombe County Sheriff’s Department Crime Prevention unit will be on site with kid friendly handouts. Call 250-4260. WNC HIGHLANDS CELTIC FESTIVAL: 4 p.m.-midnight June 14 at Asheville Outdoor Center, 521 Amboy Road. $20 in advance, $25 day of. Fourthannual festival features Celtic bands, dance, authentic foods and crafts. Visit www.celticheritageproductoins.com/wnc.htm.

June 15

AVL FATHER’S FEST 2: Noon-6 p.m. June 15, Highland Brewery, 12 Old Charlotte Highway, Asheville. $12.50 per family of four in advance, $18 at door. An interactive experience that honors the relationship between dad and his kids. With food vendors, family games, Dad’s Hamburger Grilling Challenge, blacksmith demonstrations, obstacle course, strolling characters, hammock chill area, more. Performances by Forty Fingers and a Missing Tooth, Farmer Jason, Jacob Johnson, Bruce Lang. Visit www.ashevillefathersday.com. MONTHLY MAGIC SHOW: 7 p.m. June 15, Toy Boat Community Art Space, 101 Fairview Road, Asheville. Suggested donation $10 adults, $5 children. Family friendly 90-minute show, “Magic, Mirth & Meaning,” displays talents of people with varying disabilities and those who are helping them. Show raises money for The Vanishing Wheelchair. Reserva-

HAPPY MAMA CONFERENCE, RETREAT Happy Mama Conference & Retreat is a weekend getaway aimed at stressed-out, overwhelmed, overworked, tired and under-nurtured mothers of a children with ADHD, ADD, OCD, SPD, PBD, FASD, autism, PDD, or any number of other brain-based differences. It is July 12-14 at Rock Barn Club and Spa in Conover. Registration ends June 30. Visit http://if-mamaaint-happy.com for more information.

tions encouraged. Buy tickets at www.VanishingWheelchair.org, or contact Magic Central, 175 Weaverville Highway, Suite L, Asheville, North Carolina 28804, or call 828-645-2941. TWILIGHT FIREFLY TOUR: 7:30-9:30 p.m. June 15, The Cradle of Forestry, on U.S. 276 in Pisgah National Forest. $6 adults, $3 youth. Enjoy the magical evening forest and learn about the natural history of these fascinating insects. Park and meet at the Pink Beds Picnic Area, next to the Cradle of Forestry entrance. The firefly walk will be led by a naturalist from the Cradle. The group will meet to discuss the life cycle and special features of fireflies and then take an easy, slow paced walk looking for them and exploring the surrounding forest. Bring a flashlight. Visit www.cradleofforestry.com or call 877-3130.

WNC HIGHLANDS CELTIC FESTIVAL: 8 a.m.-midnight June 15 at Asheville Outdoor Center, 521 Amboy Road. $20 in advance, $25 day of. Fourthannual festival features Celtic bands, dance, authentic foods and crafts. Visit www.celticheritageproductoins.com/wnc.htm.

June 17

DONNA WASHINGTON STORYTELLER EXTRAORDINAIRE: 10 a.m. June 17, Black Mountain Library. Part of the summer reading program. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. FAIRY TALE PUPPET SHOW: 2 p.m. June 17, Henderson County Main Library, Kaplan Auditorium. Presented by library staff, for all ages. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. MEET THERAPY DOG CHLOE: 2 p.m. June 17, Edneyville Branch Library. For all ages. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.

June 18

AUTISM PARENT SUPPORT GROUP: 6:15 p.m. June 18. Autism Society of North Carolina office, 306 Summit St, Asheville. Buncombe County Chapter of the Autism Society of NC offers a parent support group, open to all parents, caregivers and advocates. Meetings are the third Thursday of the month. Child care provided upon request. Contact chapter leader Lisa Pickering at lisarogerkaelyn@gmail.com. CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. June 18, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D,

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PARENTS’ NIGHTS OUT Need a date night? Here is a roundup of upcoming parents’ nights out. Have an event to submit? Email information to calendar@wncparent.com.

members/$25 per child nonmembers. Call 651-9622 to register.

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Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Ages 6-12. Kids will be glass Continued from Pagefusing 57 unique jewelry and tie-dyeing. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. GAGGLE OF GIGGLES YOUTH IMPROV: 6:30-7:30 p.m. June 18, The Hop, 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Free. Chris Martin’s Youth Improv Troupe makes its monthly appearance at The Hop. Interested in joining? Email Chris at cwaremartin@yahoo.com. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com. HEALTH ADVENTURE SUMMER CAMP DAY: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. June 18, The Health Adventure, 800 Brevard Road, Asheville. $10 member/$15 nonmember per participant. For rising 1st-3rd grade plus adult. Do you have a tinkerer in your family? Would you like to practice some problem-solving skills while having fun with your family? Our design challenges will test your abilities. Can your egg survive the fall? Which team can build the tallest structure? Register by calling Emily Ducat at 6652217, ext. 324, or email emily.ducat@ahss.org. Visit www.thehealthadventure.org. WORM RANCHING: 3 p.m. June 18, Etowah Branch Library. With Diane Rhodes. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.

19, Edneyville Branch Library. Presented by Mineral and Lapidary Museum, Hendersonville. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.

4-7. Outdoor-oriented activities help kids explore a forest-related theme. Thursdays through Aug. 1. Visit www.cradleofforestry.com or call 877-3130.

June 19

June 20

June 21

DIG INTO ROCKS AND MINERALS: 10:30 a.m. June

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REUTER FAMILY YMCA MORNING OUT: Includes a healthy snack, games and crafts. Ages 6 weeks-12 years. 9 a.m.-12:30 p.m. $13 for the first child, $11 each additional for members/$25 per child nonmembers. Call 651-9622 to register.

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REUTER FAMILY YMCA: Themed nights of fun and games, taking place every second and fourth Friday of the month. Includes craft, movie and snacks. Ages 6 weeks-12 years. 6:15-9:45 p.m. $13 for the first child, $11 each additional child for

CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 3:30-5:30 p.m. June 20, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Aegs 6-12. Kids will make a clay wall pocket and tie-dye. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. DIG LIKE A DOWNWARD FACING DOG: 11 a.m. June 20, Swannanoa Library. Kids yoga during preschool story time. Fun for ages 4 and older. Ticketed event. Contact the library for your free ticket. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. HEALTH ADVENTURE SUMMER CAMP DAY: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. June 20, The Health Adventure, 800 Brevard Road, Asheville. $10 member/$15 nonmember per participant. Rising fourth-graders and older plus adult. Kids and adults work together to build robots. Does not require computer programming skills; accessible to everyone. Register by calling Emily Ducat at 665-2217, ext. 324, or email emily.ducat@ahss.org. Visit www.thehealthadventure.org. MAGIC SHOW: 10 a.m. June 20, Etowah Branch Library; 1 p.m. June 20, Henderson County Main Library; 4 p.m. June 20, Fletcher Branch Library. With magician Carolina Zelnik in an all-ages show. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. SUMMER LIBRARY FEST: DIG INTO RE ADING : 10 a.m.-noon June 20, Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood St., Asheville. Kick off summer reading fun. Dig into awesome soil and seed activities with the Appalachian Sustainable Agriculture Project. Enjoy hula hoops, cave painting, make and take crafts, and more. All ages. Call 250-4720. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. WOODSY OWL’S CURIOSITY CLUB: 10:30 a.m.noon and 1:30-3 p.m. June 20, Cradle of Forestry, U.S. 276 in Pisgah National Forest. $4 per child, $2.50 per adult. Summer nature series for children ages

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REUTER FAMILY YMCA: Themed nights of fun and games, taking place every second and fourth Friday of the month. Includes craft, movie and snacks. Ages 6 weeks-12 years. 6:15-9:45 p.m. $13 for the first child, $11 each additional child for members/$25 per child nonmembers. Call 651-9622 to register. WOODFIN YMCA: Neighborhood Y at Woodfin offers Parents’ Night Out the fourth Friday of each month, 6-9 p.m. Themed nights include healthy snacks, games and crafts. $12 member/$18 nonmember, with $2 sibling discount. Ages 2-13. Register online at www.ymcawnc.org or in person at 40 N. Merrimon Ave., Suite 101, Asheville. Call 505-3990.

PARENTS’ MORNING OUT: 10 a.m.-1:30 p.m. the third Friday of the month at Asheville Downtown YMCA. For ages 6 weeks-7 years. Includes swimming, circle time, crafts, movement, music and games. Send swimmers in bathing suits and bring a towel. Snack provided. $15 members, $23 nonmembers, with sibling discount. Register by 5 p.m. the Wednesday prior. At 30 Woodfin St., Asheville. Visit www.ymcawnc.org. ROCKIN’ IN THE LIBRARY: 11 a.m. June 21, West Asheville Library. Farmer Jason rocks the library. Pick up free ticket at the library. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. TEEN AWESOME GROUP: 3-5:30 p.m. June 21, Weaverville Library. Start reading “The Perks of Being a Wallflower” by Stephen Chbosky in preparation for a book and movie discussion. Ages 11-17 welcome. For more information, call 250-6482 or email weaverville.library@buncombecounty.org

June 22

BUG DAY: 9 a.m.-5 p.m. June 22, The Cradle of Forestry, on U.S. 276 in Pisgah National Forest. Learn about insects and other arthropods to commemorate National Pollinator Week. With buggy games, crafts and more. Visit www.cradleofforestry.com or call 877-3130. FACE PAINTING AND BALLOON ART: 1-5 p.m. June 22, Asheville’s Fun Depot, 2 Roberts Road, Asheville. Free face painting and balloon art. No purchase necessary, tips appreciated. Call before arriving to verify event, 277-2386. Visit www.ashevillesfundepot.com. PINT-SIZE POLKAS: 10 a.m. June 22 at Mills River Branch Library and 1 p.m. June 22, Henderson County Main Library. Polkas you can dig, with Mike Schneider. All ages. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.


June 23

CELEBRATE PREGNANCY CLASS: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. June 23 at Park Ridge Health, 100 Hospital Drive, Hendersonville. $65. The Baby Place at Park Ridge Health offers a twist on a normal childbirth class, covering important labor process and support techniques, dealing with pregnancy ailments, breast-feeding and newborn care. Includes a massage voucher. Scholarships available. Call 681-2229 or visit www.parkridgebabies.com to register.

June 24

SUMMER VAGABONDS: 2 p.m. June 24, Henderson County Main Library. YouTheatre’s special summer program for grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. WORM RANCHING: 11 a.m. June 24 at Green River Branch Library or 3 p.m. June 24 at Mills River Branch Library. With Diane Rhodes. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.

June 25

‘ANNIE GET YOUR GUN’ AUDITIONS: 6-8 p.m. June 25-26, Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Be a part of a classic Broadway musical. Children and adults can audition for this Wild West show-within-a-show. Prepare 16 bars of music and bring your sheet music to the audition in the key in which you will be singing. Accompanist provided. All roles are available to anyone in the community. Directed by Jerry Crouch with musical direction by Lenora Thom and choreography by Tina Pisano-Foor. For more information, visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. June 25, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Ages 6-12. Kids will paint fish aquarium plates and tiedye. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. DIG INTO READING: 10:30 a.m. June 25, Fletcher Branch Library or 2 p.m. at Henderson County Main Library. With Ronald McDonald, for grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. FANCY NANCY GALA: 2 p.m. June 25, Fairview Library. Come dressed in your fancy clothes for fancy food, crafts, and fun. Ages 5 and older. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. THE MOON AND YOU: 6:30-7:30 p.m. June 25, The Hop, 640 Merrimon Ave., Asheville. Acoustic duo who blend cello and guitar to make warm, folky music perform. Part of a benefit for Mad Divas Junior Derby, which runs 5-8 p.m. Visit www.thehopicecreamcafe.com. PAJAMA PARTY STORY TIME: 7 p.m. June 25, Weaverville Library . Wear your pajamas and bring something snuggly. All ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. STORIES AT SAND HILL COMMUNITY GARDEN: 10 a.m. Tuesdays, June 25-July 23, Enka-Candler Library. Stories, songs and time to explore the garden. All ages. Reservation required. This is an off-site program; children must be accompanied by an adult. Call 250-4758. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. SUMMER VAGABONDS: 2 p.m. June 25, Etowah Branch Library. YouTheatre’s special summer program for grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. WEIRD AND WONDERFUL CARNIVOROUS

VISIT US ONLINE

For a list of groups for moms and for a full, updated family-friendly calendar, visit CITIZEN-TIMES.com/Living. To submit events, email details to calendar@wncparent.com by June 10.

PLANTS: 2 p.m. June 25, Enka-Candler Library. Learn more about these fascinating plants and make a craft to take home. Ages 5 and older. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. WORM RANCHING: 3 p.m. June 25, Fletcher Branch Library. With Diane Rhodes. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.

June 26

‘ANNIE GET YOUR GUN’ AUDITIONS: 6-8 p.m. June 25-26, Asheville Community Theatre, 35 E. Walnut St., Asheville. Be a part of a classic Broadway musical. Children and adults can audition for this Wild West show-within-a-show. Prepare 16 bars of music and bring your sheet music to the audition in the key in which you will be singing. Accompanist provided. All roles are available to anyone in the community. Directed by Jerry Crouch with musical direction by Lenora Thom and choreography by Tina Pisano-Foor. For more information, visit www.ashevilletheatre.org. DIG INTO ROCKS AND MINERALS: 10:30 a.m. June 26, Green River Branch Library. Presented by Mineral and Lapidary Museum, Hendersonville. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. FIRST LEGO LEAGUE ROBOTICS: 3-5 p.m. June 26 at 94 Coxe Ave., Asheville. Design, build and program NXT First LEGO League robots. For ages 10-14. Classes meet second and fourth Wednesdays. This is a STEM educational activity. Parental participation encouraged. To learn more, call 258-2038. POLICE K-9 PROGRAM: 10:30 a.m. June 26 at Edneyville Branch Library. Hendersonville police officer Jennifer Drake brings her police dogs. For ages 4 and older. (Program may be canceled in event of a police emergency.) Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. SNAKES ALIVE: 3 p.m. June 26, North Asheville Library. Join Ron Cromer and learn about snakes. Ages 5 and older. Pick up your free ticket at the library. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. STICKS, STONES AND FOSSILIZED BONES: 10:30 a.m. and 1:30 p.m. June 26, Pack Memorial Library, 67 Haywood St., Asheville. Join experts from the Colburn Earth Science Museum and travel back through time to the ancient days of the dinosaurs, learn all about fossils and experience a hands-on real dig. At 10:30 a.m. for grades K-2 and 1:30 p.m. for grades 3-5. Call 250-4720 to register. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. SUMMER VAGABONDS: 11 a.m. June 26, Mills River Branch Library. YouTheatre’s special summer program for grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. TAP-N-SHAKE WITH THE MOOZIC LADY: 11 a.m. June 26, East Asheville Library. For ages 6 and younger. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library.

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June 27

CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 3:30-5:30 p.m. June 27, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Aegs 6-12. Kids will paint Fourth of Julythemed pottery and tie-dye. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. DIG INTO POI: 10:30 a.m. June 27, Black Mountain Library. Stories and dance from Polynesia. Make poi. Ages 3 and older. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/ library. DIG INTO ROCKS AND MINERALS: 10:30 a.m. June 27, Etowah Branch Library. Presented by Mineral and Lapidary Museum, Hendersonville. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. DECORATE A T-SHIRT: 11 a.m. June 27, Leicester Library. Dig into Reading with a new T-shirt. Bring a white or light shirt to decorate. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. ERIC EVERETT’S ANIMAL PARTY: 3 p.m. June 27, Weaverville Library. An Earth-rockin’ musical adventure. Pick up a free ticket at the library beginning June 13. HEALTH ADVENTURE SUMMER CAMP DAY: 10 a.m.-3 p.m. June 27, The Health Adventure, 800 Brevard Road, Asheville. $10 member/$15 nonmember per participant. Rising fourth-graders and older plus adult. Kids and adults work together to build robots. Does not require computer program-

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ming skills; accessible to everyone. Register by calling Emily Ducat at 665-2217, ext. 324, or email emily.ducat@ahss.org. Visit www.thehealthadventure.org. MAGICIAN MARK DANIEL: 3 p.m. June 27, South Buncombe/Skyland Library. Storytelling, book talking, puppetry, magic tricks and fun for all ages. Visit www.buncombecounty.org/library. SUMMER VAGABONDS: 11 a.m. June 27, Edneyville Branch Library. YouTheatre’s special summer program for grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us. WOODSY OWL’S CURIOSITY CLUB: 10:30 a.m.noon and 1:30-3 p.m. June 27, Cradle of Forestry, U.S. 276 in Pisgah National Forest. $4 per child, $2.50 per adult. Summer nature series for children ages 4-7. Outdoor-oriented activities help kids explore a forest-related theme. Thursdays through Aug. 1. Visit www.cradleofforestry.com or call 877-3130.

June 28

SNAKES ALIVE!: 3 p.m. June 28, Fairview Library. Herpetologist Ron Cromer shares his vast knowledge of snakes and other reptiles. Hands on! For ages 5 and older.

July 2

CLAYING AROUND WORKSHOP: 1-3 p.m. July 2, Claying Around, 1378 Hendersonville Road, Suite D, Asheville. $32, includes materials and snacks. Ages 6-12. Kids will make glass-fused candle votives and tie-dye. Reserve a spot online at www.clayingaround.com or call 277-0042. DIG INTO ROCKS AND MINERALS: 10:30 a.m. July

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2, Fletcher Branch Library. Presented by Mineral and Lapidary Museum, Hendersonville. For grades K-5. Visit www.henderson. lib.nc.us.

Ongoing

T-BONE’S RADIO ACTIVE KIDS: Stories, music, contests, interviews and all things for families in the Asheville area. 8-10 a.m. Saturdays on www.ashevillefm.org. CONNECT: INCREASING SOCIAL FLEXIBILITY THROUGH ACTIONS AND THOUGHTS: Class at St. Gerard House, 620 Oakland St., Hendersonville, to learn how thoughts, actions and reactions affect social situations. Classes are interactive, age appropriate and fund. Curriculum incorporates social thinking lessons and characters, uses evidence-based practices, games, role play and skits. Call 693-4223, ext. 21, for information. St. Gerard House provides services for children with autism spectrum diagnosis but a child and/or adolescent taking this class does not need to be diagnosed. HAPPINESS GROUP: 6-7:30 p.m. Wednesdays, 1528 Smoky Park Highway, Candler. $20 per session. Who is the happiest person you know? If you have ever thought about increasing your own level of happiness this group is for you. This six-week group is led by a licensed psychologist and allows for dialogue and support among group members. It offers you proven methods to create lasting happiness; helpful strategies to fit your personality and lifestyle; and ways to increase your motivation and commitment to positive change. Call 761-1017 to register or visit www.drjamielopez.com HEALTH ADVENTURE PROGRAMS: At the mu-


NEW DAY CAMP LISTINGS BASKETBALL CAMP: 9 a.m.-4 p.m. July 15-18 at Waynesville Recreation Center. Kevin Cantwell, head coach at Carolina Day School and former assistant coach at Georgia Tech, will coach basketball camp. Goals include a positive and challenging learning experience; excellent instruction; teaching "quickness" in the fundamentals of dribbling, passing and shooting; understanding body development of footwork, body balance, and body control; daily contests including free throw, lay up and spot shooting; and 3-on-3 half court games along with 5-on-5 full court games. $135. Registration forms are available at Waynesville Recreation Center. For more information, call or text 770-490-6580 or email academy7@live.com. DRAMA CAMP: 9 a.m.-noon June 10-14 at Haywood Regional Arts Theatre, Waynesville. $100. Campers will work together to write, produce, and perform their own play.

seum, in Biltmore Square Mall, at 800 Brevard Road, Suite 620. Call 665-2217 or visit www.thehealthadventure.org. » Science Wonders on Wednesday: 3:30 p.m. Wednesdays. Enjoy science demonstrations of all

Students will learn important theater essentials, including stage direction, blocking, projection, self-control and character development. By writing and producing their own play, campers will also learn concepts like play script analysis and an actor’s responsibilities. For more information or to register, please contact Kristen Donelle Livengood by email: kristendonelle@gmail.com. INNOVATIVE BASKETBALL TRAINING CAMP: 9 a.m.-noon July 8-10, Waynesville Recreation Center. $125, with $50 deposit. For boys and girls ages 6-12. Limited to the first 40 applicants. Directed by Derek Thomas, a 32-year head coach. Register from 8-9 a.m. July 8 at Rec Center. For information, call 246-2129 or the Waynesville Parks and Recreation Department at 456-2030. JAM CAMP: 10 a.m.-4 p.m. July 8-12, Haywood Community College. $75, with lunch included. The Junior Appalachian Musicians

kinds. » Story time: 3:30 p.m. Monday and Friday. » Preschool Play Date: 10:30 a.m. Tuesdays and Thursdays. Interactive fun just for preschoolers. » Science Wonders on Weekends: Noon and 3 p.m. Saturdays. Experiment with science through

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(JAM) Program is designed to acquaint area young people, grades 4-8, with mountain cultural heritage through instruction in mountain music and exposure to mountain dance, songs and stories. The JAM afterschool program takes place at Canton Middle School during the school year. JAM CAMP is an extension of that program. To register, call the Haywood County Arts Council at 452-0593. The registration deadline is June 30. VOLLEYBALL CAMP: 9 a.m.-1 p.m. June 10-13 at Waynesville Recreation Center. $100. Skill-building coed camp for ages 8-14. Sessions will include fundamental skills instruction, developing strategies and playing games. The pool will also be available for all campers after the camp ends at 1 p.m. each day. For more information or to register, call 456-2030 or email recathletics@townofwaynesville.org.

hands-on activities. All ages. JEWISH ART CALENDAR: List your child's birthday in the Chabad House’s seventh-annual calendar for 2013-14. Calendars will be distributed for free in WNC. Submission deadline July 15. $18/each date. Call 505-0746 or visit www.chabadasheville.org.

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June 2013 WNC Parent