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CON TENTS


6 10 12 14 16

Evoking Arctic considerations by Cecilie Andersson Lofoten by Anna Liisa Saavaste Dymaxion world map Lofoten map

#1 complexity

54 60 68

Introduction by Magdalena Haggärde & Gisle Løkken Discursive: Stories of resistance by Anniken Førde & Trond Waage Assignment

#2 imbrication

92 100

Introduction: The connections of city and landscape by John Pløger Assignment

#3 vulnerability

122 128

Introduction by Magdalena Haggärde & Gisle Løkken Assignment

#4 fieldwork

154 160 164 170 172 218 222

Introduction by Magdalena Haggärde & Gisle Løkken Discursive: Encountering Lofoten through art by Tone Megrunn Berge Discursive: Cognitive landscapes by Hermod Torbjørnson Assignment Field trip Discursive: #layeredlandscapeslofoten Discursive: Den andre verden by Anne Katrine Dolven

#5 flexibility

250 256

Introduction by Magdalena Haggärde & Gisle Løkken Assignment

#6 reorientation

286 290 294 298

Introduction by Magdalena Haggärde & Gisle Løkken Discursive: Nothing is forever / Everything is by Marianne Lucie Skuncke Discursive: Spatial liminalities of the arctic shore by Karoline Kalstveit Assignment

summary

352 378

by Magdalena Haggärde & Gisle Løkken

foreword context

introduction

annexes

by Magdalena Haggärde & Gisle Løkken


IN TRO DUC TION layered landscapes lofoten:

understanding of complexity, otherness and change

Magdalena Haggärde & Gisle Løkken


Introduction

With this book we aim to challenge internalized concepts about planning and investigation, which today often are too predefined, limiting and simplifying. We want to open up for alternative research, and legitimize the subjective and singular approaches as highly valid and appreciated as a foundation for an informed planning process. This way of investigating and understanding is in its nature open and non-biased, hence both the landscape, and the practices taking place in the landscape, are consistently full of individual and collective stories and experiences. The approach is a preparation for planning that takes into consideration the complexity created in both time and space, which influences our societies not only as traces of historical events, but as present realities and even expectations and becomings. concept and idea

The book is based on a master studio at Bergen School of Architecture (BAS) in the winter/spring of 2017, using the studio’s curriculum and didactic approach as framework. The studio followed a distinct idea of consistent research along different lines and concepts, all to emancipate curiosity to find possible hidden knowledge, and for detecting the real forces of change in the landscape.

The studio followed a distinct idea of consistent research along different lines and concepts, all to emancipate curiosity to find possible hidden knowledge, and for detecting the real forces of change in the landscape. layered landscapes lofoten

11


Introduction This book is a framework where the students’ work forms a testing ground for the different concepts launched. It is framed around six concepts, elaborated and discussed, and has in addition several contributions from invited lecturers, participants and teachers in the studio. context lofoten

Lofoten is the history of extremes; extreme nature, extreme weather conditions, extreme natural resources and extreme survival. The islands of Lofoten float in a timeless mythical narration of battling between man and nature rooted back to the origin of human presence in these territories. The fact that Lofoten has hosted the world’s most precious fisheries of codfish for centuries in the same areas where the seabed is assumed to hide a prosperous amount of oil and gas, and now in addition experiences an extreme influx of tourists, signifies a latent and incommensurable conflict that can irreversibly change the landscape. The people living in these territories have been connected to the landscape and its resources for innumerable years. They are therefore facing not only external threats from global economies and climate changes, but also national political decisions and structural changes in the fisheries which threaten to deprive local communities of their resources. These ongoing processes have for a long time altered the way people have used and inhabited the landscape, but now more than ever it demands awareness and knowledge to build resilience – to maintain flexibility for changes – but at the same time to be in control of the changes’ impacts on the complex ecology of landscapes and societies. open minds, open landscapes, open societies

A fundamental contradiction in planning – as well as in politics and in society in general – is the dichotomy between closed and open. It might sound as a marginal issue, but in practical life, it marks a crucial difference in how society is governed and developing, the individual’s self-realization, and not least how we maintain a civilization and sustain our common ecology.


Introduction A closed society means, according to Richard Sennett; over-determined, balanced integrated, linear – while an open society means incomplete, errant, conflictual, non-linear. The closed is full of boundaries and walls (…) as the open possesses more borders and membranes. The closed society can be designed and operated top-down – belonging to the masters, as the open society is a bottom-up place; it belongs to the people. Sennett says these contrasts are of course not absolutes of blackand-white; real life is painted in greys. Yet to design the modern city well (and societies in general), Sennett emphasizes, we have to challenge unthinking assumptions now made about urban life, assumptions which favour closure. Sennett concludes that we have to embrace less re-assuring, more febrile ideas of living together, those stimulations of differences, both visual and social, which produce openness (Sennett 2013: 14).

We have to embrace less re-assuring, more febrile ideas of living together, those stimulations of differences, both visual and social, which produce openness. The concept of openness permeates the work and makes the studio an ideological testing ground for investigations and approaches in the landscape. We study the landscape through different concepts to keep an open mind to any possible understanding and knowledge – to follow, as a Deleuze and Guattarian line of flight, which challenges the usual designer’s thinking about lines – lines that are an abstract and complex enough metaphor to map the entire social field, to trace its shapes, its borders, its becomings (Petrescu 2005: 44 ). It is a perspective of survival – both historically and for the future, which makes all human encounters or interactions with nature or in society aspects of interest. It is a way of seeing society as a dynamic force or ecology that does not distinguish what is human and what is not, but as Félix Guattari does in his Three ecologies (Guattari 1989); sees ecology as an interdependent relationship between humans and their natural environment. Ecology, therefore, in the Guattarian sense is about heterogeneity, stratification and complexity, but also still about interconnections between human subjectivity, the environment, and social relations.


#1

14


#1

15


#2 Imbrication

Ornithological map / Diving seabirds Victoria Helene Haukøya Storemyr (booklet, 17 pages)

Investigations of the conditions of seabirds such as murres, puffins and cormorants, create maps based on their migratory routes, and the resting and feeding areas for the birds, where each spot and connection might be crucial for the species’ viability. These beautiful patterns of survival are of course invisible in most other maps, as they are nonexistent as physical imprint, but once traced they give important meaning and awareness to the understanding of the landscape. Ornithological map / Diving seabirds Lofoten

Laukvikøyene

Laukvikøyene Borgværet (Seabird)

Hovsflesa

(seabird)

(seabird)

GIMSØYA

Grunnfør

Borgværet

Protected areas

Ulvøyværet

(other)

(seabird)

(Seabird)

Seløya

(seabird)

(seabird)

Grunnfør

Ulvøyværet

(other)

(seabird)

Seløya

Pelagic diving seabirds

Alkekonge

Svellingflaket

Alke

Lunde

Lomvi

VESTVÅGØY

Polarlomvi

Svellingflaket

Coastal-bound diving seabirds

(N/A)

(N/A)

MOSKENESØY

STORMOLLA

STORMOLLA Teist

Sjøorre

Svartand

Siland

Gulnebblom

Fuglbergøya/Nautøya

Fuglbergøya/Nautøya

(Seabird)

(Seabird)

AUSTVÅGØYA

Gråstrupedykker

Smålom

Havelle

Laksand

Praktærfugl Topskarv

Ærfugl

AUSTVÅGØYA FLAKSTADØY

FLAKSTADØY MOSKEN

Islom

MOSKEN

Bergand

VÆRØY

VÆRØY

RØST

RØST

Protected areas

Pelagic diving seabirds

Common murre / Lomvi Common murres breed in colonies at high densities, located on In the breeding season (from April to August, and to early

the chick leaves its nesting ledge and heads for the sea, unable jumping is synchronized within each colony, and usually occurs during the night in calm weather. Chicks are capable of diving

rest of the year is spent on the open sea. The largest colony in Norway, is Røst in Lofoten. ( In 2005; 433,000 breeding pairs) self, earth caves or voids and in rock crevices. The female lays one egg in May-June, which are incubated by both parents. The kid hatch after 40-45 days and remain in the nest until it weeks. The chick can not swim to begin with, so if it should fall

months. Northern populations spend the winter farther from their colonies. (Røst, 1960; 16000 pairs) Common murres

PELAGIC DIVING SEABIRDS Consists of birds that spend much of their lives far out to sea. The species are skilled swimmers and divers who captures the food in deep water. Some species can dive to more than 100 m (dive down to 200 m have been recorded). The wings are used

underwater.

worms and crustaceans. Weight; 300–600 g. Height; 26–29 cm Conservation status (Norway)

Weight; 0,9–1,3 kg Height; 38–43 cm

Least concern

Threatened

Extinct

Conservation status (Norway)

dive. These species usually comes only to the coast to breed, often in large colonies. The species spends little time on the wings and are not particularly skillful pilots and their beaks are designed so that they

EX

EW

CR

EN

EX

Least concern

Threatened

Extinct

VU

NT

EW

CR

EN

VU

NT

LC

LC

species usually comes only to the coast to breed, often in large colonies. The species spends little time on the wings and are not particularly skillful pilots.

Protected areas

Pelagic diving seabirds

Alkekonge

Alke

Lunde

Lomvi

Polarlomvi

Coastal-bound diving seabirds

Great cormorant / Storskarv

The Great cormorant thrive along the coast and at larger lakes and estuaries where food is readily available on the reasons. It The nest is placed either in a tree or on a rock ledge. The female usually lays 3-4 eggs, which are light blue-green in color. Incubating for approximately 27 days, after which chicks are hatched. They remain in the nest for about 50 days. They are accomplished pilots who is able to do impressive maneuvers

European shag / Toppskarv

It feeds in the sea, and, unlike the great cormorant, is rare inland. The European shag is one of the deepest divers among the cormorant family. Using depth gauges, Weight; 1 496-1 716 g. Height; 68-78 cm

meters. The great cormorant can dive to considerable depths, but often feeds in shallow water. It frequently brings prey to

COASTAL-BOUND DIVING SEABIRDS consists of birds that spend most of their time in coastal areas of the sea, lakes and estuaries. The species are skilled swimmers and divers who captures the food in a submerged state, but the species do not dive as deep as pelagic diving Several species are also capable pilots. The species in this group often spend more time on land, also outside the breeding season.

cormorant draws south in the winter, but the vast majority of them winter in the country. Some however prefer a vacation in Central Europe. Weight; 1 810–2 810g Height; 80-100cm

Conservation status (Norway)

EX

Least concern

Threatened

Extinct

EW

CR

EN

VU

NT

LC

Protected areas

Pelagic diving seabirds

Alkekonge

Alke

Lunde

Lomvi

Polarlomvi

Coastal-bound diving seabirds

Teist

16

Sjøorre

Gråstrupedykker

Smålom

Havelle

Laksand

Svartand

Siland

Praktærfugl Topskarv

Islom

Gulnebblom

Ærfugl

Bergand

layered landscapes lofoten

(seabird)

Mosfjorden (other)

(other)

MOSKENESØY

Hovsflesa

GIMSØYA

(seabird)

Mosfjorden

VESTVÅGØY

Conservation status (Norway)

EX

Least concern

Threatened

Extinct

EW

CR

EN

VU

NT

LC


Protected areas areas Protected

Pelagic diving diving seabirds seabirds Pelagic

Alkekonge Alkekonge

Alke Alke

Lunde Lunde

Lomvi Lomvi

#2

Polarlomvi Polarlomvi

Coastal-bound diving diving seabirds seabirds Coastal-bound

GråstrupeGråstrupedykker dykker

Havelle Havelle

Sjøorre Sjøorre

Svartand Svartand

Siland Siland

Smålom Praktærfugl Praktærfugl Topskarv Topskarv Smålom

Gulnebblom Gulnebblom

Ærfugl Ærfugl

Laukvikøyene Laksand Laksand

Islom Islom

Bergand Bergand

Borgværet (Seabird)

Hovsflesa

(seabird)

(seabird)

GIMSØYA

Grunnfør

Ulvøyværet

(other)

(seabird)

Seløya (seabird)

Mosfjorden (other)

VESTVÅGØY

Svellingflaket (N/A)

MOSKENESØY

Ornithological map / Diving seabirds

Teist Teist

STORMOLLA

Fuglbergøya/Nautøya (Seabird)

AUSTVÅGØYA FLAKSTADØY MOSKEN

17 VÆRØY

RØST


#2 Imbrication

Diversity of nature Ingeleiv Andrea Utne Midtun (GIF, 129 frames)

Mapping both landscapes and seascapes with the same intensity concerning geology, biotopes, flora, habitats etc, creates a continuous map that gives new meanings, showing interconnections transcending the shoreline. Where most maps stop at the coastline, neglecting the sub-sea landscape and its importance to us, this map shows present, continuous, limitless connections.

18

layered landscapes lofoten


Diversity of nature

#2

21


The material used in the study trip collage is extracted from the works of Andreas Tveit, Anna Liisa Saavaste, Arne Magnar S. Nordhammer, Eva Bull, Ingeleiv Andrea Utne Midtun, Livie Avo Johansen, Pernille Kleppan Mørch and Victoria Helene Haukøya Storemyr.

20 FEB RU ARY 2017

svolvær – sildpollnes – fiskebøl – melbu – myre – nyksund


DAY 1. travelogue. AUSTNESFJORDEN. -9°C 09:00 Polar Low Pressure. Sightseeing at Støvelhaugen. Seagulls and eagles. Wildlife sounds. First sighting fishery with active tools. Doing the Lofoten fishery in this fjord appears comfortable. Spawning place for fish, presumably mainly herring due to the name Sildpollnes. A small settlement on a nearby peninsula with the complementary mid 18th century chapel. ”Monte Carlo Method.” A broad class of computational algorithms that rely on repeated random sampling to obtain numerical results. Their essential idea is using randomness to solve problems that might be deterministic in principle. They are often used in physical and mathematical problems and are most useful when it is difficult or impossible to use other approaches. Monte Carlo methods are mainly used in three distinct problem classes: optimization, numerical integration, and generating draws from a probability distribution.

0°C

-5°C

-10°C

9.00

10.00

11.00

-9,0°C

-4,2°C

-7,5°C


12.00

13.00

14.00

1,9°C

0,1°C

0,7°C

With king Sverre the first “rorbuene” was built in Kabelvåg in the 1100s. But before this time the fishermen also had need for shelter for the night. They came back from fishing for cod, turned their boats over ashore and put the sail canvas over. They made a fire, and boiled up seawater over it. First they put the roe in the boiling water, then the fish and finally the liver on top. That´s how the dish “mølje” arose, according to legend.


4.

3.

5.

2.

15.00

16.00

17.00

18.00

-1,3°C

-4,5°C

1.

-0,7°C

-1,3°C

1. 2. 3. 4. 5.

flattbrød - flatbread made of wheat, water and salt torskelever - cod liver rogn - roe potato skrei - cod

The fish in the water it is our bread.


#4

30


#4

31


#5 Flexibility

Adaptive houses Victoria Helene Haukøya Storemyr (booklet, 11 pages)

The post-war type house of 80m² living space, with a 48m² footprint, built en masse in Northern Norway, is investigated through new needs and different uses: the development towards larger living spaces, the humble need for a weather protected entrance, a growing family, modernisation, changed living conditions and accessibility – telling individual stories about flexibility through adaptation, transformation and customisation of a similar and standardised starting point.

Development in living area During the last half of the 20th century, the average size is in Norwegian households decreased sharply, from 3.3 people per household in 1960 to 2.3 people in 2000. The reason for this development has primarily been extensive social and cultural changes during the period, including prolonged life expectancy and higher divorce rates. In parallel with this, a general welfare increase has lead to even larger houses. The living area in the average Norwegian house has grown from 89m2 in 1967 to 114.2m2 in 1997. The living area pr. person has increased from 29m2 per person in 1967 to 51m2 in 2000. This is an increase of 75 percent in 40 years.

5.

2.

6.

4.

1.

3. 4. 100

5.

%

1600

1700

1900

one area for all functions

introducing corridor and simple room divisions

Specialization in room functions, bath / WC + childrens room

2000

80 60 40 20

Adaptive houses

Victoria HH Storemyr, 2017

0

-40

year

2

3

Complex room division, w/ bathroom, living room, kitchen, laundry room, TV room etc.

livingarea per person

-20

/ Change in home sizes through time.

persons per household 1960

1970

1980

1990

history / plan and wellfare development

2000

4

5

1. In the post-war Norway, the Housing Bank has been our most important housing policy instrument. At the start of 1946, a housing with a living space of 80m2 was considered the ideal family residence.

They inherited their house from his mother, who was a fisherman's wife The house doesn’t have a lot of space, but consists of a kitchen, bathroom and living area on the first floor, and two bedrooms on the upper floor.

extending / rehabilitation

6000mm

8000mm

The family expands their home into the garden during summer season, both for playing area, dinners at the lawn and household chores. The outdoors is used as a playground for both adults and kids all year round.

The characteristics of post-war revival houses •

48m2 /80m2

They might need to expand when the children get older. For now it works just fine as long as the two can share a bedroom.

• • • • •

Rectangular and limited building volume. Gable roof. Partial symmetry in the facade. Simple moldings. Absence of decorative elements. Often bright colors englishred, stavernyellow or medium green, usually with white window frames.

the need or wish for more space • • • • •

bigger familiy modernisation of bathroom modernisation of kitchen larger living areas shelter for weather

Family of 2 + 2 6

7

8

9

2.

4.

After years of living on the shadow side of the mountain with the draft coming right past the house, when they saw the next door neighbour adding an extension, they decided to add the exact same small extension using their savings.

After a busy life in the larger city of Oslo, a calmer life was suitable. The small house was bought in its original standard. In the establishment of a atelier on the upper floor connection to the main bedroom the roof was lifted with a small extension in front, perfect for a reading area in front of the window.

It offers a shelter to the windy entrance area, a home office on the first floor and a patio out from the bedroom where you have the first glimpse of sun mid february.

Family of 2 + 1

After years of having the bicycle in the living room a shelter was built, consisting of a small hallway and a workshop, for simple woodworking where you could also store outdoor equipment.

Family of 2

12

13

Family of 1

14

15

5.

16

17

6.

When their oldest son turned ten he no longer wanted to share his bedroom with his younger brother. After a trial solution by adding a bookshelf as a divider, he still wasn’t pleased. The two bedrooms on the upper floor were given to the two boys. A large master bedroom was established in an extension in front of the house with a direct entry to a large patio where you could enjoy the morning coffee on nice days.

After a lifetime of a comfortable life in the small house. With kids growing up, and moving out. Family parties with grandchildren and children filling the house. At some point the lady in the house was no longer able to walk the steep stairs to the upper floors. For the first year the solution was to have a bed in the living room with a curtain to divide it from the rest of the room. But when the need for a walker occurred, the whole plan needed adapting if they were not to move. A spacious bathroom was added as an extension as well as a small bedroom. The rest of the floor plan was opened up on the ground floor.

Later, after years of having a small hallway filled with all sort of equipment, both from the boys, but also from the large collection of raincoats for the whole family, a larger hallway with a storage room connected to it was added at the back of the building.

1.

2.

3.

4.

5.

6.

In the upper floor a workspace for the man's model-making hobby was established.

Family of 2 + 2

32

11

3.

When they bought their house in 1986, it consisted of the original building core and an extension in the front facilitation, a sheltered entry and a modern larger bathroom. After a couple of years they wanted a bigger living room with space for both a large tv area and a more formal dining area for parties.

18

10

Family of 2 19

20

layered landscapes lofoten

21

22

23


#5

extending / rehabilitation

the need or wish for more space • • • • •

bigger familiy modernisation of bathroom modernisation of kitchen larger living areas shelter for weather

Adaptive houses

extending / rehabilitation

the need or wish for more space • • • • •

bigger familiy modernisation of bathroom modernisation of kitchen larger living areas shelter for weather

8

8

33

9


#6 Reorientation

Conglomerate Livie Avo Johansen, Victoria Helene Haukøya Storemyr (booklet, 48 pages)

A study of semiotics and typologies of Lofoten; fish racks, oil tanks, huts, bridges and pile wharfs – their materiality, functionality, location and conditions, leads to the creation of a catalogue of materials, colours, traditional building typologies and vernacular architecture. Combining the knowledge and understanding with basic human needs and well-known BAS entities; a place to wash, a place to sleep, a place to eat, a place to meet – liberates numerous possibilities of new combinations in a playful testing, re-use and transformation of traditional references to modern needs and in new settings. CONGLOMERATE noun /kənˈɡlɒm(ə)rət/ 1.

Typology studies

or items that are grouped together. ”the Earth is a specialized conglomerate of organisms” 2. GEOLOGY, a coarse-grained sedimentary rock composed of rounded fragments embedded in a matrix of cementing material such as silica. clay”

CONGLOMERATE

adjective /kənˈɡlɒm(ə)rət/ 1. relating to a conglomerate, especially a large corporation.

Victoria + Livie

Victoria + Livie

FISKEHESJE [FISH RACKS]

verb /kənˈɡlɒməreɪt/ 1. gather together into a compact mass. ”atoms which conglomerate at the centre” synonymer: coalesce, unite, join together, combine, merge, fuse, consolidate, amalgamate, integrate, mingle, meld, blend, intermingle, knit (together), link up, converge, come together; literarycommingle ”the debris then conglomerated into planets”

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

OLJETANK [OILTANK]

synonymer: aggregate, agglomerate, amassed, gathered, clustered, combined ”a conglomerate mass”

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

FISKEHESJE [FISH RACKS]

OLJETANK [OIL TANK]

RORBU [FISHERMANS HUT]

PÅLEBRYGGE [PILE WHARF]

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

RORBU

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

re-use of form

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

program

material library Kvalnes

Kvalnes

Napp

Henningsvær BRYGGE

Streets 4 GJØREMÅL Eating place

RORBU [FISHERMANS HUT]

a place to wash a place to sleep a place to eat a place to meet

PÅLEBRYGGE [PILE WHARF]

Sleeping

Bird watching

PUBLIC

Almenning

COMMON

Showers

PRIVATE

Kitchen

Wiewpoint

Ramberg

Nyksund

Sauna Toilets

Unstad

FISHDRYING RACKS OILTANK

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

ICE SHANTY (From Wikipedia, the free encyclopedia)

FELTSTASJONEN PÅ HERNYKEN, RØST

Utgangspunktet for feltstasjonen på Hernyken var en primitiv hytte på 7 m2 med jordgulv.

More durable ice houses are generally left on a lake for the

Many northern communities have developed bodies of laws about the operation of ice shanties - frequently including dates by which they must be removed, even if the ice can still hold them.[3]

Først i 2009 ble den skiftet ut med et moderne, full-isolert stasjonsbygg som er nøye tilrettelagt for virksomheten.

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

A PLACE TO SLEEP

placement.

New functions

A PLACE TO MEET

verb 1. protect or shield from something harmful, especially bad weather. ”the hut sheltered him from the cold wind” synonymer: protect, keep safe, shield, cover, screen, shade,

Contents [hide] 1 Folklore 2 References 3 Further reading 4 External links

Instituttet disponerer også hytta «Alkebåde» på Vedøy, en slutten av 1950-tallet. Hytta ble benyttet av den sveitsiske professoren Beat Tschanz og hans studenter til adferdsforskning på sjøfugl gjennom 25 år.

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

2. a shielded or safe condition; protection. ”he hung back in the shelter of a rock” synonymer: protection, shield, cover, a roof, screen, shade; safety, security, defence, refuge, sanctuary, asylum, safe keeping, safeguarding ”the plants provide shelter for animals”

problems, such as thaws and re-freezing causing houses to be immoveably frozen onto the lake.[2] Lighter, cheaper versions can collapse into a package to be moved from lake to lake during the season.

Den ble laget på 1930-tallet av en gammel båt som var dratt på land og vendt opp-ned. Da Svein Myrberget fra Statens Viltundersøkelser på Ås startet lundeforskningen på Hernyken i 1964 oppførte han et tilbygg på 10 m2. Denne hytta gjorde nytten som soverom, kjøkken, stue og arbeidsrom for personellet gjennom 45 år.

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

SHELTER /ˈʃɛltə noun 1. a place giving temporary protection from bad weather or danger. ”huts like this are used as a shelter during the winter”

is a portable shed placed on a frozen lake to provide shelter tarp draped over a frame of two-by-fours, or as expensive as a small cabin with heat, bunks, electricity and cooking facilities.

save, safeguard, wrap, cover for, preserve, conserve, defend, cushion, secure, guard, hedge; inoculate, insulate ”the hut sheltered him from the cold wind” protected, screened, shielded, covered, calm; shady, shaded, cool; cosy, snug, warm ”a sheltered stretch of water lying between the coast and the peninsula”

Folklore[edit] In northern climates, ice shanties are the center of a large, often humorous, folklore. Fishermen often decorate their ice shanties in humorous ways (toilets are a popular joke addition), while others studiously work on ways to make their ice involves the inherent danger of erecting a structure atop a frozen pond.

A PLACE TO EAT A PLACE TO WASH

http://www.seapop.no/no/lokaliteter/rost.html Feltstasjonen på Hernyken ca. 1970. Ice Huts by Richard Johnson Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

5.

a place to eat.

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

(small)

3.

4.

(x-small)

1.

5. 3. 4. 6.

B

A

B

A

2.

COOKING STATION

0,0m

3m

6m

0,0m

plan / 1-50

3m

6m

section B

A place to eat

0,0m

3m

6m

sSection A

9m

0,0m

3m

6m

0,0m

3m

6m

plan (x-small)

0,0m

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

6m

12m

18m

12m

0,0m

3m

6m

section B (x-small)

(x-small)

wiew from loft (x-small)

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

(large)

9m

section A

A place to eat

(small)

1. providing structure 2. floor construction 3. exterior walls 4. adding recycled roof 5. adding recycled windows 6. adding furniture and oven

(construction prinsiples)

A place to eat (small)

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

PROVIDING SHELTER

(x-large)

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

5.

a place to sleep.

B 3.

6.

6. 6.

4.

4.

1. 4. 4.

7. 8.

2.

A 0,0m

3m

0,0m

6m

3m

6m

9m

A place to sleep (small)

12m A

section A

plan (large)

0m

A place to eat

0,0m

3m

6m

9m

0,0m

3m

6m

0,0m

9m

3m

6m

9m

12m

(large)

plan (x-large)

Fredvang (x-large)

section B (x-small)

section A

A place to eat

3m

(x-large)

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

1. structure 2. floor construction 3. roof construction 4. exterior walls 5. adding recycled roof 6. adding recycled window 7. adding recycled door 8. adding somewhere to sleep

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

a place to wash. A. existing oiltank.

opening up.

B.

+

+ providing stucture.

0m

plan

3m

0m

section A.

A place to sleep.

WATCH TOWER AND SAUNA

( anchoring )

3m

0m

section B.

+ adding interior walls and glass.

adding furniture and oven.

=

3m

A place to sleep (small) 3m

0m

on the shoreline (construction principles)

a place to wash.

0,0m

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

3,5m

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

a place to meet.

A COMMON GROUND

0m

2m

4m

6m

0m

A place to meet (medium)

3,5m

plan 1. floor, changing room

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

0,0m

0,0m

3,5m

3,5m

plan roof, watching platform

plan 2. floor, sauna

0,0m

inside the sauna

3,5m

Henningsvær

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

thank you

0m

2m

4m

6m

A place to meet (medium) ( section + composition )

meeting place, where tourists and locals meet.

34

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

layered landscapes lofoten

placed on the shoreline, giving easier access to the sea.

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

all placed together in kvalnes.

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

4m

6m

( elements + dimensions )

kvalnes

section

Presentation, layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

2m

A place to meet (medium)

( isometric )

0,0m

8m

9m


#6

2m

4m

ace to meet (medium)

6m

0m

2m

4m

A place to meet (medium)

( isometric )

( isometric )

6m

0m

2m

4m

6m

A place to meet (medium) ( elements + dimensions )

0m

8m

9m2m

4m

6m

A place to meet (medium

( elements + dimensio

Conglomerate

Presentation, ing 2017 layered landscape Lofoten, spring 2017

Presentation, Presentation, layered layered landscape landscape Lofoten, Lofoten, spring spring 2017 2017

35


#6 Reorientation

Kaleidoscope Anna Liisa Saavaste (card game, 40 cards)

Collecting stories, narratives and histories of places – the cognitive experience behind the numbers, statistics and plans – creates a storytelling game floating in time and space. It has the form of a casual archive of the landscape and its history, and shows subjective fragments of Lofoten that can be endlessly combined into new and other stories – as memories, but also as becomings and new beginnings.

36

layered landscapes lofoten


Kaleidoscope

#6

37


38

38


39

39


Layered Landscapes Lofoten: understanding of complexity, otherness and change Based on the master studio Layered Landscapes Lofoten at Bergen School of Architecture, 2017. Teachers: Tone Megrunn Berge, Magdalena Haggärde and Gisle Løkken.

Published by: Actar Publishers New York, Barcelona, 2018 www.actar.com Concept: Magdalena Haggärde Gisle Løkken Editors: Magdalena Haggärde Gisle Løkken Anna Liisa Saavaste

ISBN: 9781948765060 Library of Congress Control Number: 2018942825 A CIP catalogue record for this book is available from the Library of Congress, Washington D.C., USA. This publication is produced and financed by 70°N arkitektur, and has received support from Bergen School of Architecture, The Cultural Business Development Foundation SpareBank 1 Nord-Norge and Tromsø municipality.

Graphic design: Anna Liisa Saavaste Cover design: Magdalena Haggärde Copy editor: Marianne Cruickshank Frantzen Printing and binding: Comgrafic, Barcelona Distribution: Actar D, Inc. New York, Barcelona New York 440 Park Avenue South, 17th Floor New York, NY 10016, USA T +1 212 966 2207 salesnewyork@actar-d.com Barcelona Roca i Batlle 2-4 08023 Barcelona T +34 933 282 183 eurosales@actar-d.com Publication date: November 2018

All rights reserved. © edition: 2018 Actar Publishers © texts: authors noted in each of them © student work: Bergen School of Architecture This work is subject to copyright. All rights are reserved, on all or part of the material, specifically translation rights, reprinting, re-use of illustrations, recitation, broadcasting, reproduction on microfilm or other media, and storage in databases. For use of any kind, permission of the copyright owner must be obtained. The authors and Actar Publishers are especially grateful to image providers. Every reasonable attempt has been made to identify owners of copyright. Should unintentional mistakes or omissions have occurred, we sincerely apologize and ask for notice. Such mistakes will be corrected in the next edition of this publication.


Profile for Actar Publishers

Layered Landscapes Lofoten  

Understanding of Complexity, Otherness and Change; by Magdalena Haggärde, Gisle Løkken. This book discusses approaches towards landscapes un...

Layered Landscapes Lofoten  

Understanding of Complexity, Otherness and Change; by Magdalena Haggärde, Gisle Løkken. This book discusses approaches towards landscapes un...

Profile for actar
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