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barcelona modern architecture guide Manuel Gausa, Marta Cervell贸, Maurici Pla, Ricardo Devesa


One of the areas where Barcelona stands out is in terms of its architecture. It is one of the main attractions of the city, and it really helps promote our image around the world. This is because our architecture clearly shows the changes that have happened in the city. It is in architecture where the social, economic, scientific, technological and cultural factors of each epoch are seen in a very tangible and lasting way for future generations. That is why, when we are in front of a building, we can often glimpse into the sort of society that built it rather than just seeing a stone structure. This book called Barcelona Modern Architecture Guide, 1860-2013 is a comprehensive collection of architectural work built in Barcelona from the midnineteenth century to the present. It allows us to restate that behind the magnificence of the Modernisme movement was the splendour of an emerging bourgeoisie and the strength of force of some crucial events for the city like the International Exhibitions or the 1992 Olympics and these reshaped and modernized large areas of the city with great success, by planning changes for the future, such as in the case of the 22@ district. Observing the legacy left to us by several generations of architects over the years helps us to reflect on the legacy that we will leave behind. All this shouldn’t make us lose our critical spirit, which is necessary to help us move forward and improve the contributions we make to the environment, and this should not just be for ourselves, but rather something that can last for many years to come. By publishing a new revised and expanded edition of this book, that we are now presenting, we will contribute to preserving the historical memory of the city’s heritage. A heritage that makes us proud to be Barcelonians. Xavier Trias Mayor of Barcelona


A map, a guIDE (REVISED) Manuel Gausa, Ricardo Devesa

This updated and revised guide to Barcelona features an extensive selection of architecture dating from 1860 to 2013. This period begins with the architectural manifestations of modernisme and noucentisme for which the city is known worldwide. The book also offers the more innovative proposals from the Modern Movement, such as the German Pavilion of 1929, rationalist works conceived during the 1940s and 1950s, the major housing and facilities projects built from the 1970s and up to the 1992 Olympic Games, and the signs of continual urban redefinition during the years of the 1990s. It also contains the most exemplary proposals for infrastructure renovation that the city underwent around the turn of the millennium, as well as the urban acupuncture applied to consolidated neighbourhoods, to built areas and public spaces, green belts and city parks alike. Equally, a special chapter is devoted to the Universal Forum of Cultures of 2004, and what that event meant for the connection of the southern end of Avinguda Diagonal with the neighbourhood of La Mina, the Besòs river, the sea front and Sant Adrià. Furthermore, it highlights the design projects that have shaped and structured the two major urban transformations undertaken in the city around the 22@ district and with the consolidation of the Gran Via towards the west with the Plaça Europa, the expansion of the Fira towards L’Hospitalet de Llobregat and Zona Franca. Lastly, it covers the transformation of scale with which Barcelona is looking towards the future, from the urban to the more regional, landscape and even geographic angle: a new approach where nature is gradually incorporated within a scheme that is more interconnected with built structures.


Each entry provides a catalogue including the building’s designers, the project start and works completion dates, the address, a short description, the modes of transport for accessing the site and any subsequent interventions undertaken, mentioning the respective authors and the date. Furthermore, in each of the sections structuring the guide, a set of introductory texts are presented that situate the catalogue of works included historically and conceptually. In short, this map of the modern architecture of Barcelona is a document that, in addition to being a conventional guide, also offers a reflection of how the city of Barcelona has changed, grown and tackled the urban planning, social and cultural challenges that it has faced from the end of the 19th century up to the start of the 21st.


a guide, a map Manuel Gausa Marta Cervelló Maurici Pla

1

In recent years the number of publications intended as architectural guides or catalogues have proliferated in Spain. At first glance this phenomenon might be attributed to a more utilitarian vocation within recent culture, which has traded the former ideological grappling with History for a more dispassionate and wide-ranging vision: reconnoitering the ground and making inventories are de facto responses to a more programmatic and instrumental sensibility, in apparent accordance with the temporizing tone typical of postmodern culture. Ignasi de Solà-Morales has already drawn attention to some of these issues in his foreword to the publication devoted to the register compiled by DOCOMOMO Ibérico in 1996. While sharing many of the views expressed there, and opting at the same time for the purposiveness of a more heterodox, unprejudiced and –why not?– more contradictory vision, we would like to defend here the possibility of understanding the project of a guide to architecture not just as a mere documentary effort –of seemingly neutral intent– but also as the result of a considered viewpoint: a “projectural” intervention within reality. In the final analysis, the implicit question would be to clarify what we understand by a “guide to architecture”: a patrimonial inventory, a tourist itinerary, an erudite compilation... The guide we are presenting here should be thought of as a map: a new orientative drawing for exploring and reformulating a specific physical and cultural landscape, in this instance, that shaped by an architectural production located within the geographical limits of what has come to be called “Barcelona”. A map which would help give an outline to, and also a possible propositional reading of, what the history of the city’s architecture and urbanism has been during the last 150 years, sketched out from the paths


traced by the disciplinary memory of the country itself, but also from all those others arising from the exploration of hidden, maybe forgotten, marginal, or even hitherto unmapped trajectories. It’s in that sense that we might refer to the idea of a “map” as a design traced on a landscape for the purpose of exploring, knowing and intervening in it, rooted in a desire for the analysis and selection of its latent materials, and with the intention of manipulating, structuring and reformulating these in a state of permanent provisionality. It follows that we have critically revised the “official” historiographic reading –a reading which is culturally largely accepted and disseminated with too great a frequency, perhaps– and have persisted in tackling the recent history of our architecture as a “shared experience” of an unequivocally local kind, which would subsume within a single narrative discourse, barely interrupted since the beginning of the century, the ideal of a “national architecture” favored by Catalan Modernisme, the dream of noucentista el seny i l’ordre [prudence and order] in the 1920s, the “avant-garde realism” of the GATCPAC in the 30s, the “sterile” tabula rasa of the postCivil War period of the 40s, the reclamation of the “indigenous cultural debate” around the Grup R, and the rejection of the “acritical” evolutive architectures of the 50s, the political and social demands of the 60s or the “Barcelona School”’s recycling of domestic tradition and taste, typical of the revisionism of the 70s. Obligatory references to which we would add –thereby providing one more link in the chain– a good part of the public architecture promoted by the new administrations during the 1980s and much of the 90s. Attention to values of the vernacular, of constructional probity, the use of available technologies, contextualism, contention and/or formal elegance would define, within that elemental schema, principles repeated time and time again in order to assure the continuity of a supposedly indigenous and differentiated discourse. The uneven results obtained while encouraging a culturally advanced image of a good part of recent production, elaborated from these parameters, has nevertheless guaranteed the mannerist exhaustion of a potential Catalan


architecture, based on the continuity of the profession, evocation of the past, tried and tested work methods, pragmatism and the absence of risk. The emergence of new revitalizing policies, the spectacular development of the media and the arrival of constant stimuli from outside, the return of an epic aspiration towards the global rather than a taste for the episodic, but above all the stimulating input of a number of individual architectural trajectories, would, over and above “shared” ways of doing things –growing out of subjective plastic intensity or the severity of abstract conceptualism– invite the increasing exploration of plural, hybrid territories open to multiple influence and intended, in as far as this is possible, to go beyond an overly endogenous cultural landscape, in the same way that the city has, in recent years, gone beyond its “eternal” natural barriers.

2

In that respect the guide we are presenting here is at one with the earlier –and currently out-of-print– Guide to the Contemporary Architecture of Barcelona and Its Territorial Area (1928-1990), published by the authors in the review Quaderns, though extending its chronological limits to 1860 and 2001. As in that guide, the percentage of works from the 1980s and 90s is deliberately high, and corresponds to the desire for contemporaneity which forms the basis of the book. This preferential attention to recent work has been rounded off, however, by a close rereading of the production of the past, the purpose of which is to present, in that potential new tracing, an extended, heterogeneous and multifarious period within our architecture, albeit committed, in one way or another, to treating each period with a certain aspiration towards reassessment, implicit in the quintessentially “modern” idea of renewal and progress. Unlike the former publication, however, the organization of the works selected is not now based on strictly geographical criteria, nor on the usual chronological listing, but on the idea of a joint “chronologico-geographical” structure capable of engendering a strategical and alternative grouping of


the works considered, with the goal of relating these to particular sequences or thematic areas defined by certain “moments” in the history of Barcelona and/or with certain urban “landscapes” linked to them: – “Moments”, explicitly defined around the ambitions of a number of grand collective projects and/or urbanistic visions of the city which, while they refer to particular eras –emblematic dates, recognizable landmarks or specific documents– would also spread their energies, as in a Gaussian curve, over more or less extended periods. – “Landscapes”, constituted around those city settings where the stimuli mentioned above tended, to a greater or lesser degree, to concretize a particular urban physiognomy. This does not mean, however, using watertight compartments or constrictive pigeonholes, but working from overlapping structures, layers of information which endlessly expand and interweave their particular boundaries. Rather than “classifying” a series of elements, we would prefer to propose various coordinates capable of constructing that potential map of modern architecture and town planning in Barcelona, understanding the cultural and physical development of the city not from the simple arithmetical sum of isolated entities, but from its consideration as a complex, combinatory system affected by multiple interventions, impulses and agencies. This map seeks, therefore, to valorize the works selected, not just for their strict architectural interest but for their ability to transcend such a first reading, to be cognizant of their projectural value –be it aesthetic, semantic, functional or whatever– as particular responses to a given program, so as to be able to link the project to a larger scale, that of the specific urban development of the city. A primarily objectual approach to the works considered is not our main concern, then, but rather their inherent capacity to generate relationships, intersections, synergies and combinatory dynamics between each other, capable of engendering a certain “mental schema” of the periods and landscapes of the city under consideration.


3

From a methodological point of view, and in what concerns those periods prior to the 1980s, the task of selection has had to restrict its sphere of action to the traditional limits of Barcelona City. We have tried, however, to compensate for that accepted limitation by a detailed work of research and documentation which, although indiscriminate and non-prejudicial, would allow for a necessary subjective and critical valorization of the material under study, in such a way that the presented works are finally organized in four hierarchical categories. We have also tried to accommodate the official readings sanctioned by History, along with the consideration of other trajectories that are also significant within the architectural panorama of our country. And lastly, we have called on a certain heterodox taste for the rediscovery of marginalized works –we present a large number of projects hitherto absent from the literature–, drawing attention to certain elements or aspects of our production which are little recognized or valued by disciplinary culture: the exuberant production of Beaux-Arts academicism, the nexus between prerationalism and Noucentisme, the specific redefinition of so-called rationalist architecture, the lines of continuity between noucentista aesthetics, tertiary Americanist classicism and certain of the immediate post-war architectures, concern for the “stigmatized” period of the 40s, a revalorization of the explicit and functional optimism of a certain professionalist production of the 50s and 60s, the developmentalist epic and the architecture of leisure, the cosmopolitan and internationalist ideology specific to certain impulses during periods of economic growth: the beginning of the industrial city, the interwar period, the boom of the 50s and 60s, etc. Lastly, we might point to the collective nature of this publication: a project conceived and elaborated from the sum total of individual interpretative effort, both in relation to the conception, selection, structuring and presentation of the specific contents, and in the particular photographic vision which illustrates the works and landscapes covered, as well as in the final visual and graphic formalization of the resulting map.


Barcelona: a physical description

The physical space over which the urban structure of Barcelona extends has been characterized by the position of its natural limits. To the east and west, the channels of the Besòs and the Llobregat, ancient rivers which for centuries would define the natural access routes into the city; to the south, the sea and the coastal strip, the “sea line”; and to the north, the sierra of Collserola, the “mountain line”, constituted a natural barrier to the development of the upper reaches of the city. Within the line of the sea, the mountain and the two lateral river courses there unfolds the plain, an extended area punctuated by a series of excrescences: the hummocks scattered at the foot of Collserola, and the two hills next to the sea: Montjuïc, an outcrop isolated in the littoral, and the ancient Mons Taber, a crest swallowed up by the fabric of the earliest urban structure. This plain opens out as a large, slightly angled, central flatland, furrowed by a number of streams which funnel together, and whose centermost area would finally form a network of parallel lines, destined over the years to give rise to a perpendicular reading of the city: a logic based on the sea/mountain axis, manifested in the subsequent layout of many of the main civic roadways. This logic would find itself continually interrupted by the natural barriers of the coast and the sierra, and therefore necessarily combined with a transverse movement of expansion, a horizontal parameter oriented towards the great river basins, and determining some of the more significant routes of territorial communication, in accordance with various vertical and horizontal movements of structuration and dilatation respectively, over an extended endogenous period, limited to a seemingly invariable geographical framework. Given this, the urban area of the city has ended up being characterized by a complex, albeit structured, fabric capable of being depicted in a synthetic way as the presence of a series of concentric rings: encircling sectors which have their hypothetical radii in the av. del Paral·lel and the av. Meridiana. A first nucleus, the ancient city built around the primitive Roman settlement, is defined by the old historic town with its dense and fragmented medieval warp and weft, but also by the traces of subsequent interventions aimed in their day at superceding the historic fabric. This old nucleus is swamped by Cerdà’s famous grid plan, the industrial city’s Eixample [Expansion], extending over practically the whole of the Barcelona plain and converted –somewhat reductively– into the image and emblem of a fabric with numerous points of


a. Original hydrographic network of the Barcelonès. Pau Vila, Barcelona i el seu pla, Ed. Generalitat de Catalunya, Barcelona, 1981. b. Alignments of the chief littoral and interior mountain ranges.

a

b


tension at its edges. Surrounding the Eixample, and occupying the topographic protuberances situated east-west at the foot of the sierra of Collserola, is a wide fringe made up of formerly outlying municipalities, situated at a more or less equal distance from the historic city, whose siting was governed by the military requirements of the day. Extending either side of these surrounding sectors are the areas of ground located in the final reaches of the Llobregat and the Besòs, more industrialized and rural in the first case, denser and more dislocated in the second. Lastly, in the northern part of this structure there rises the mountainous area of Collserola, an obligatory topographical reference for the city, and currently the object of new activity related to the building of tunnels linking up the territory situated behind the mountain: the Vallès region, a space undergoing rapid expansion that has become an alternative area for the city’s growth. The piercing of the sierra of Collserola and the building of major communications routes in the area of the Vallès, Llobregat and the littoral has unleashed a new process of growth, restricted till now to the Barcelona plain. Successive ring roads, laid out in concentric circles, have defined a structure at the macro-urban level in which the tunnels act as important elements of internal and medium-range intercommunication, at the same time as preserving the topography of the pre-littoral sierra, an historical problem for the growth of Barcelona. A new reality begins to emerge beyond the old geographical limits, aided and abetted by recent works related to civil construction: implementations along the littoral, at the foot of Collserola and in the Vallès capable of bringing different permeable and pregnant situations together as a single whole. Barcelona has ceased, therefore, to be that city bounded by two rivers. Traditional geographical concepts have given way to territorial ones, just as old compositional tools have done in relation to strategic ones: today the limited and predictable urban dynamic of former times contemplates a new metropolitan reality, at once more mobile, forceful, vital and uncertain. a. Situation of Barcelona within the geographical entity of Catalonia, and flatland structures. 1. Massifs, 2. Montjuïc, 3. Quaternary plain, 4. Delta plain, 5. Degree of erosion. b. The old town and the ring of urban settlements around it. Lluís Casassas & Pau Vila, Barcelona i la seva rodalia al llarg del temps , Ed. Aedos, Barcelona, 1974. c. The Barcelona plain: morphological and structural analysis of the main rings. 1. Urban fabric, growing radially around topographic outcrops 2. Ancient settlements 3. Cerdà Plan. The Eixample 4. New development areas (1960s-1970s).


a

c

b

1

3

2

4


how this guide works

The guide is structured in 22 chapters, organized according to a mutual combination of historical, geographical and cultural criteria. These chapters are numbered A through V. Each chapter is defined by an historical event and by the date, be it precise or more general, when this occurred. It is also defined by an initial and a final date that determines the range of works included in it. Each chapter begins with a brief historical description of its content, after which comes the group of entries on the buildings. These are organized in three hierarchies, according to the number of pages allotted to each work: two, one, or half a page. The way these are ordered relates to a combination of geographical, chronological and author factors, etc., without any of these predominating absolutely. At the end of each chapter there is a list of other works of equal interest, this forming a fourth hierarchy. Mention is made in each entry of the authors of the work, the dates of initial planning and final construction, the address, a brief explanatory description, the means of public transport for getting there, and any later interventions the work underwent, listing the respective authors and the date. Amplifications, alterations, restorations and reconstructions are highlighted by a coding system. Where relevant, visiting hours are also mentioned. A bibliographical index organized in four main groups appear at the end of the volume: General works, Guides, Monographs and Electronic Resources. A general index of works and an author index has also been included, listing the entries in which each author appears.


key

AMP: Amplification of surface area COL: Collaborator CON: Contractor DIR: Direction of works FGC: Ferrocarrils de la Generalitat de Catalunya / local train INT: Interiors LAN: Landscape n/n: no street number OR: Original project or original construction REC: Reconstruction RENFE: Red Nacional de los Ferrocarriles Espa単oles / mainline train REM: Remodeling REST: Restoration SC: Sculptures


E

D B

H

G F

C

A

1860 1862

1870 1873

1880

1890

1900

1910 1907

1920

1915

1925

1917 period area of influence

1913

1930 19

1924 1931

1922

1929


K J

I

1940 36

L

1950 1951 1953

N

M

O

Q

P

R S

V

1960 1965 1961

1970

1980

1975

1990

1985

1992

2000

2010

2001

1989 1996 1998

T U

2013

2004 2007

Chronological diagram of the periods under consideration. Sequences, run-ons and “stretchings�.


A

new buildings in and on the edge of the old town

1860 1900


1860 The Cerdà Plan The Eixample project and the integration of the historical city The approval, in 1860, of the “Plan for the Reform and Expansion of Barcelona” synthesizes a period of the city’s life marked by the consequences of the Industrial Revolution and characterized by a desire for expansion, economic, cultural and social, but above all physical. The result of long negotiations with the central government aimed at obtaining authorization for the growth of the city and the resulting demolition of the walls, the Eixample Plan, or Expansion Plan, was to permit the colonization of the broad flatland which extended between the old walled city and the urban settlements spread around its edges, separated by an obligatory distance of two kilometers in accordance with military regulations. Despite not winning the consultative competition convoked by the City Council (the scheme chosen was by the municipal architect Rovira i Trias), the design finally drawn up and approved was the one presented by Ildefons Cerdà in 1859, commissioned by the central government and known as the “Cerdà Plan”. Later converted into an emblematic image of Barcelona urbanism, the Plan is characterized by its isotropic ordering of the territory by means of an extensive orthogonal grid appropriate to the geographical reality of the plain, intended to guarantee efficient redistribution of old agrarian land and also to be capable of prefiguring the progressive growth of what was to become a big city. More than a willful compositional layout, this was a precise and rigorous system of growth, albeit open-ended in time terms, which permitted the hypothetical tabula rasa of the agricultural flatland to be occupied and preexisting physical realities to be absorbed: the historic city, adjoining settlements, geographical variations, etc. Thus, although traditionally interpreted as a paradigm of homogeneity, from its inception the Cerdà Plan presented elements of distortion, not only in the variable distribution of foreseeable constructional programs (later disfigured by further exploitation of the city blocks), or in the adoption of chamfered edges for the street corners, but above all in the road layout itself, with the appearance of differentiated major traffic arteries disposed according to strategic routes (Diagonal, Gran Via, Paral·lel, Meridiana) designed to connect the city at a greater scale, and through incorporation of the old extramural roads (pg. de de Gràcia, av. de Sarrià, av. de Roma, c. de Ribes, c. de Pere IV). The Cerdà Plan also proposed an intervention in the historic city, with the opening of routes A, B and C and the construction of the first orbital roads, in place of the old city walls, coinciding in time with the execution of various redefinition projects within the historic city, which had shortly before witnessed the planning of the Via Transversal (1824-1854, c. de Ferran, pl. de Sant Jaume, c. de la Princesa), the pl. de Sant Josep (1840) and the pl. Reial and its delimiting passages (1848-59). The construction of amenities strategically located in the new perimetral borders (the University, the new Customs House, the Sant Antoni and El Born markets) was complemented by generic buildings of a social or cultural kind and by the remodeling of some important apartment buildings, all of them illustrative of the transitional period between acceptance of the Plan and its progressive implementation.


Plan of the outskirts of the city of Barcelona and project for its Reform and Enlargement. Ildefons CerdĂ , 1859. Real Academia de Bellas Artes de San Fernando.


A1

university of barcelona building

Gran Via de les Corts Catalanes, 585 C. de la Diputació, 230 BCN1 <M> L1, L2 Universitat - L3 FGC RENFE Catalunya OPENING TIMEs Mon-Sun 8.00-22.00

1862-1873 Elies Rogent

Planned to be sited within the walled enclosure, the author’s first designs for the University of Barcelona date from 1853. Between 1859 and 1862 the first steps taken towards urbanizing the Eixample led him to site the new University on two of the blocks nearest the Old Town, following Cerdà’s own criterion, according to which large monuments could be freely adapted to the regular order of the grid. The University, a large mass 130-meters-long and 83 wide, is configured in three rigorously symmetrical bodies, thereby emphasizing the unity of the two original city blocks. Both it and the Seminary, which adjusts its program to a single city block, constitute neo-Romantic programmatic responses to the dominant classicist academicism.


A2

el born market

Daniel Molina, Antoni Rovira i Trias (first project) Josep Fontserè, Josep M. Cornet i Mas (definitive project and construction) rem / a mp Pere Espinosa, 1977-1979 re s t / rec J. Pascual, E. Soria, R. de Cáceres (Competition 1998). Remodeling as

1874-1876 Plaça Comercial, 12 BCN1 < M > L4 Jaume I L1 RENFE Arc de Trionf

a library. Under construction.

This project is one of the most important local examples of the application of the new iron technology. Drawing on an original scheme by Rovira i Trias, Fontserè, the architect in charge of construction, brings together in El Born, the old central fish market, a wish to combine a rigorously hierarchical constructional order with the use of artisanally produced elements (as seen in the use of ceramic materials for the enclosures and the roof). A precise structure based on metal trusses and cast pillars (due to the engineer Cornet i Mas) disposes the whole in the form of two main naves and four subsidiary ones, achieving a rectangle that is perfectly adjusted to the perimeter of the site.


Antoni Rovira i Trias, Josep M. Cornet i Mas rem / re s t Pere Joan Ravetllat, Carme Ribas, 2001-

sant antoni market

A3

1876-1882 C. del Comte d’Urgell - C. de Tamarit C. del Comte Borrell - C. de Manso BCN1 < M > L1 Urgell, L2 Sant Antoni

In this instance the work exploits to the full the geometric possibilities of the Eixample city block, the academicist theories of the author being applied to a large metal construction. The volumetrics and spa­­ tial organi��zation of the market are based on total occupation of the block at street level and the diagonal projection of two large naves at a second level, at the intersection of which towers the body of the dome.

1836-1840 / 1860 (market) Josep Mas i Vila, Francesc Daniel i Molina (square) rem / re s t / a mp Estudi Clotet Paricio, 2000-2001

boqueria market & sant josep square

Consequent to disentailment of the site of the ancient convent of the Discalced Car­me­ lites of Sant Josep, the City Council decided to construct a porticoed square in which to concentrate the traditional itinerant stalls in the old Pla de la Boqueria. Although its construction was well advanced, the square, with its Ionic columns and upper gallery, was never completed. Attributed to Daniel Molina, author of the Plaça Reial, it was probably the work of the municipal architect Mas i Vila. The posterior realization of the metal structure and roof of the market made use, concealing it thereby, of this prior construction. The handling of the glass and metal rose window on the Rambla-side entrance is noteworthy.

A4

La Rambla, 105 BCN1 < M > L3 Liceu fgc RENFE Catalunya OPENING TIMEs Mon.sun. 6.00-21.00


B 16

expiatory temple sagrada família

crypt, apse, nativity facade & local church schools

Antoni Gaudí or Francesc de Paula del Villar, 1882 d ir D. Sugrañes i Gras , 1927-1935 re s t / a mp F. Quintana, Ll. Bonet i Garí, I. Puig i Boada, F. de P. Cardoner, J. M. Subirachs, 1935-2000

An unfinished Gaudí opus, the architect began intervening in the project in 1884, substantially modifying the original conception of the crypt designed by F. de P. del Villar. Following this, he decided to embark on an ambitiously programmed design. His general conception is an adaptation of neo-Gothic premises –a basilical ground plan with five naves, transept and a spacious apse–, although with certain innovations such as the perimetral ambulatory and the huge main entrances, which have tremendous figurative impact. A wide range of Biblical myths, characters and concepts, represented hermetically, are incorporated in the planimetric organization. At the foot of the tall towers the author constructed a number of small buildings intended as local church schools, the buckled roofs of which much interested Le Corbusier, who drew them during his stay in Barcelona.

1882-1926 Pl. de la Sagrada Família C. de la Marina, 253 BCN2 <M> L2 L5 Sagrada Família OPENING TIMES October-March 9.00-18.00, April-September 9.00-20.00


C

modernist architecture in the central eixample

1880 1925


1892 Les Festes Modernistes The initial construction of the Eixample The progressive urbanization of the Eixample went hand in hand with a rapid redividing of the land, owing to the geometric and quantitative facilities required by the Cerdà Plan. This redivision was soon to generate a genuinely Barcelonan version of the apartment building, born simultaneously in many of the major European cities. The apartment building vouchsafed a variety of meanings: owning it, obtaining a rent from it, living in it; and, given its urban image, that of being used as an ideological and aesthetic vehicle. Often quite simple in design, the typical example has a sumptuous and high-ceilinged ground floor, sometimes with an entrance for carriages and almost always with a potential for commercial use. The elegant first floor was designed to house the proprietor of the building, who tended to give his surname to it. More sober in treatment, the other stories (between four and six) were given over to rented apartments, the domestic staff being lodged on the top floor. The modernista aesthetic develops around this typology and its needs, with much ornamental ostentation and great iconographical variety in the more economically advantaged cases, or greater restraint in those edifices resolved by “master builders”, transmitters of a building tradition of excellence. Despite its kinship with similar movements emerging in the rest of Europe at the end of the 19th century (Arts and Crafts, Art Nouveau, Jugendstil), Catalan architecture has its own characteristics, in its combining of a certain desire for cultural cosmopolitanism with the re-encountering of various specific values that contributed to the consolidation of an increasingly widespread national consciousness. The organization in 1892 of the first of the festes modernistes [modernista festivals] in Sitges (pioneered by the painter and writer Santiago Rusiñol) stands as an emblem for the beginning of a cultural tendency which in the case of architecture had already been indicated a few years before by Lluís Domènech i Montaner in his essay “In Search of a National Architecture” (1878). Iconographic eclecticism (neo-medievalism, highly evocative mystical symbolism, organic expressionism) and technological research (mainly on large iron structures) coexisted in modernista ideology with an unprejudiced formal and procedural freedom, emphatically open to the incorporation of motifs and elements arising from a flowering of artisanal crafts (mosaic, glass, furniture, enamelwork, marquetry, sgraffiti) in accordance with local procedural tradition. More or less in harmony with this set of ideas, the characteristic architecture of the Eixample emerges during the first decades of the century in a lengthy process which would end up favoring homogeneity and a building density greater than that envisaged in the original plan, by encouraging the resolution of the enclosed city block, in antithesis to one of Cerdà’s prime objectives: the open block disposed in differing variations and combinations.


Plan of the combined project for the sewer system. Pere Garcia, 1891.

General plan of Barcelona and of the surrounding villages, 1890.


C1

1881-1886

montaner i simon editorial office. tàpies foundation

Lluís Domènech i Montaner rem / a mp Roser Amadó, Lluís Domènech i Girbau, s c Antoni Tàpies , 1987-1990 2 nd ref Iñaki Ábalos, Renata Sentkiewicz 2010

Slightly predating the park’s Café-Restaurant, the Montaner i Simon editorial office building allowed Do­­mè­nech i Montaner to combine his theoretical re­sear­­ches with the possibility of their practical and programmatic realization. Roofed over by a glass sky­light, the huge workshop sits happily in the new Eixample layout. The use of iron technology is combined with the rehabilitation of the facade through the elaborate artisanal handling of its patterned brickwork, blended with wrought ironwork and large glass facings, thus initiating the modernista rejection of antiquated academic notions.


C. d’Aragó, 255 BCN2 <M> L3 Passeig de Gràcia OPENING TIMES Tue.-sun. 10.00-19.00


N

the public purchase of land and new civic amenities

1980 1992


1976 The General Metropolitan Plan From urban “planning” to urban “reconstruction” The political change produced in the country in the mid-1970s and the resulting commitment of the new administration to a normalized state of public affairs was to encourage the long-awaited affirmation of an ideal: the “reconstruction and harmonization of the city’s public space”, Barcelona’s principal planning objective. The enormous number of claims and conflicts accumulated over the years could now be tackled from within a new legal framework, the General Metropolitan Plan (GMP), approved in 1976 at the height of political transition –but born earlier of the resistance movement, and embracing many local neighborhood demands–, immediately renounced all faith in the idea of the document as an “open-ended process”, in order, in the meantime, to defend the Plan as an instrumental design intended to facilitate the future public administration’s leadership in that “reconstruction of the city”, with which the substitution of the idea by the project was, in a way, set in motion. With the GMP approved in 1976, the municipal team (presided over by the then Head of Planning Joan-Antoni Solans, the distinguished drafter of the Plan itself) would try to promote a policy of short-term cost-effectiveness through the aquisition of urban land, taking advantage of the unrepeatable opportunity of buying up, for the city, the last remaining large estates and disused industrial installations, a demand that had often been made over the years by various civic bodies. This mainly regenerative ambition, this reconstructionist vision of a finalized, completed city (ideals deriving from the dogmas in vogue at the end of the 70s, and fixated on the salvaging of the traditional city and on the value of the “historic center” as a symbolic representation of this), would henceforth become the main challenge for the new administration which, in its unwonted status as Maecenas and within the urbanistic field, would back a still sacralized “city architecture” whose emblem was the recovery of memory, with attention to context as its main argument and control of form as its chief procedure. In the Barcelona mindset of that new administration, emerging from the first municipal elections of 1979, and with Oriol Bohigas as the new Head of Planning, the redeeming of a conflictive, taut space was to be entrusted, pragmatically so, to minor operations of suture, short-term projects capable of “metastatically” improving adjacent fabrics and rendering them more compatible with each other. More often than not located in anomalous places –distributed heterogeneously, full of morphological irregularities and often with already constructed perimeters–, the majority of the facilities built during this period respond to typologically orthodox models (schools, housing, medical centers, open spaces): paradigmatic models of urban “adjustment”, in accordance with a civic notion of the discipline desirous of giving back to the city fragments of an impossible, albeit still coveted, continuity, and which in the last analysis would encounter its finest instrument in public space.


Inventory of amenities existing in the municipality of Barcelona. 1994

General Metropolitan Plan for Urban Development of the Municipal Metropolitan Entity of Barcelona. Zonal System. 1976.


N1

1981-1983

plaça dels països catalans

Pl. dels Països Catalans BCN2 BCN8 <M> L3 L5 r e n f e Sants-Estació

Albert Viaplana (project) Viaplana/Piñón Arqs. c o l Enric Miralles

An implementation symbolic of an austere “contextualism”. The interven­ tion, undertaken in a truncated space, an intersection of wide communication routes, and surrounded by chaotic and unconnected buildings, proposes the establishment of a new type of “urban gateway”, conditioned in part by the minimum excess weight allowance available on top of the decks of the underground railway station. The smooth, neutral treatment of the paving, conceived as a metaphor for the sky above the plaza, and the invention of artificial elements deriving indirectly from the ma­ny urban artefacts present in the area, express the conceptual complicity with the contemporary landscape which subtends the basic project.


N2

1981-1985

espanya industrial park

Pg. de Sant Antoni, n/n BCN8 <M> L3 L5 r e n f e Sants-Estació

Luis Peña Ganchegui, Francesc Rius s c Andrés Nagel (dragon)

N3

Situated in the grounds of an exfactory, of which the Casa de Mig and a group of plane trees are all that remain, the new park configures a landscaped area whose boundaries are defined by a series of architectural elements that attempt to resist the heterogeneity of the surroundings. The recreational program proposed, with water playing the dominant role, attempts to stimulate the visitor’s imagination and to create the right atmosphere for large-scale events of a festive, popular kind.

joan miró park ( escorxador park )

This centrally located park consists of an open space integrated into an axis of urban amenities structured by the Calle Tarragona. Res­pond­ing to the varying characteristics of the surrounding streets, the whole entity is organized into a number of sectors in which the paving, vegetation and ground level relative to the external perim­eter continual­ly define the different planned areas.

C. d’Aragó - C. de Tarragona C. de la Diputació - C. de Vilamarí BCN2 BCN8 <M> L3 Tarragona L1 L3 f g c r e n f e Espanya OPENING TIMES From 10.00 a.m. until dusk

1980-1982 Andreu Arriola, Beth Galí, Antoni Solanas, Màrius Quintana s c Joan Miró


1982-1986 Elías Torres, José Antonio Martínez Lapeña s c Francisco López

vil·la cecília gardens

The interventions in the old Vil·la Cecília gardens seek to incorporate these within the Quinta Amèlia Park by means of the extending of their surface area and the urbanization of the street which both links and separates the two green zones. In antithesis to the classical layout of the original garden, the new extension establishes a labyrinthine structure based on the asymmetry, discontinuity, simulation and individualization of the elements that go to form it.

N4

C. de Santa Amèlia - C. d’Eduardo Conde C. del Trinquet BCN9 <M> L3 t r a m Maria Cristina f g c Sarrià - Reina Elisenda OPENING TIMES From 8.00 a.m. until dusk


N5

1981

remodeling of the plaça reial

Pl. Reial BCN1 <M> L3 Liceu

Federico Correa, Alfons Milà

The Plaça Reial, constructed between 1848 and 1859 by Francesc Daniel Molina and inspired by French unitary urbanizations of the Empire pe­riod, underwent a significant –and emblematic– remodeling in 1984. This remodeling closed off traffic access and eliminated the 19 th -century-style parterres that characterized the enclave. The Three Graces fountain, Gaudí lamp standards, palm trees and benches are isolated elements scattered around the continuous paving where bar terraces are installed.

N6

1981-1986

moll de la fusta. passeig de colom

The project proposes converting a sector of the old seafront into a new road system that sat­isfies the needs of both local traf­fic and the trajectory of the Ron­da del Litoral, plus prevent­ing the formation of a road bar­rier between the city and the sea. The general layout from the trans­v erse section onwards is of a size to provide pedestrians with a large open space for stroll­ing and passing the time.

Pg. de Colom - Moll de Bosch i Alsina BCN1 <M> L3 Drassanes - L4 Barceloneta

Manuel de Solà-Morales i Rubió e s c M. Blay, F. López, R. Krier


Beth Galí, Màrius Quintana

fossar de la pedrera

N7

C. de la Mare de Déu de Port, n/n BCN4

fossar de les moreres

N8

1983-1986

A monumental commemorative space that occupies a quarry used at the end of the Civil War as a com­m on grave. On the extended lawn covering this common grave there is a pergola which marks the path from the entrance space to a pool, where the mausoleum of President Companys is located.

Carme Fiol

col

Jaume Artigues

Pebetero: project: Albert Viaplana Albert i David Viaplana, 2001 r e f Víctor Argentí (facades), 1995-2001

1988-1989 C. de Santa Maria, n/n BCN1 <M> L4 Jaume I

Here, on the historic site of the ce­metery where the victims of the siege of the city by the Bourbons in 1714 were buried, the topogra­ phic manipulation of the surface of the square reworks the main ortho­gonals of the lateral facade of San­ta Maria del Mar and that of the tiny c. de Malcuinat to form a polygonal concavity facing a wall on which a dedication is inscribed. The project seeks, through this in­ter­v ention, to provide for the everyday public use of the space and at the same time to emphasize its symbolic meaning as a memorial site.


N9

1981-1985

the squares of gràcia

Pl. del Sol - Pl. de la Virreina Pl. Trilla - Pl. Raspall BCN2 <M> L3 Fontana - f g c Gràcia

Jaume Bach, Gabriel Mora

The interventions realized in the squares of Gràcia tackle the rehabilitation of some of the different public spaces that have historically configured the structure of the neighborhood. The urbanization of these areas is planned as an axial composition generated by their particular geometry. The resolution of the paving –of uninterrupted slabs–, the use of lines of trees for marking boundaries, and the design of the street furniture constitute a coherent and varied repertoire of resources governed by a wish to render modernity stylistically compatible with tradition, domestic space and colective space.


1981-1987 Av. de la Mare de Déu del Coll, 77 BCN3 <M> L3 Vallcarca - L5 El Coll/Teixonera OPENING TIMES From 10.00 a.m. until dusk

la creueta del coll park

The project makes good use of the confines of an old quarry to create a vast semicircular plaza mainly intended for leisure activities, with its visual itineraries enhanced by three large sculptures: in the entrance driveway (Ells­worth Kelly), on the water (Eduardo Chilli­ da), and at the summit (Roy Lichtenstein). The shady part of the hill is proposed as a zone for replanting trees, with the paths cross­ing it regularly giving way to picnic and play areas.

N 10

Oriol Bohigas, Josep M. Martorell, David Mackay e s c J.A. Fernández Ordóñez


N 11

1984

plaça de sóller

Pl. de Sóller - C. de l’Escultor Ordóñez BCN7 <M> L5 Virrei Amat - L4 Llucmajor

Andreu Arriola, Josep Lluís Delgado, Josep M. Julià, Carme Ribas

N 12

The plaza as a whole, rectangular in form, has its zero datum at the higher level, creat­ing an implied flat platform that is divided into two sub-areas. The lesser of these is treated as a hard and smooth flat deck, while the more important one is laid out as a park. A pool is situated at the point where they meet, the terracing of which conducts water to the lower level. It connects there with a large porticoed space below the hard deck, from which the upper level is reached via a double system of steps. The whole is thus conceived as a pla­za/ construction occupying one of the neighborhood’s reclaimed city blocks.

plaça de la palmera de sant martí

C. d’Andrade - C. del Maresme C. del Concili de Trento BCN6 <M> L2 St.Martí - L4 La Pau tram S a n t M a r t í d e P r o v e n ç a l s

Two concentric sheets of concrete bisect the site, dividing it into two contrasting sectors, one treated as a large open pla­za for games and mass gatherings, the other uniformly covered by a plantation of pines. The big palm tree that typified the site prior to the intervention remains stuck between the two sectors, in the space defined by the overlapping of the walls.

1985 Pedro Barragán, Bernardo de Sola s c Richard Serra


sc

Sergi Aguilar, Antoni Roselló

1. Paloma Bardají, Carles Teixidor c o l J. Estorach (architect) , J. Miró, J. Sant, J. L. Sierra (engineers) Q. Lara (surveyor) sc

1986 (1) 1986-1989 (2) 1. Via Júlia (between Pl. de Llucmajor & Via Favència) BCN7 <M> L4 Llucmajor - L3 Roquetes 2. Av. Rio de Janeiro - Via Júlia BCN7 (between Pg. Valldaura & Av. Meridiana) <M> L1 Fabra i Puig - L4 Llucmajor

public spaces in the avinguda rio de janeiro & in the via júlia

Agustí Roqué

The layout of the Ronda del Mig in this stretch of the av. Rio de Janeiro is used to structure the connection between the different neighborhoods and also to organize spaces for pedestrians to walk and socialize in. The sidewalks, of unchanging section, are separated in such a way that the central reservation is understood as a linear sculptural element, punctuated by vertical landmarks where the axes of the streets that meet in the avenue impinge. The Via Júlia is in turn made up of two straight sections of different width linked by a gentle curve. By placing a series of landmarks along the roadway and submitting the preexisting protuberances to precise geometries, both projects propose the urban reconstruction of a setting destructured by unbridled speculation.

N 13

2. Bernardo de Sola, Josep M. Julià c o l P. Barragán (architect) , F. Ruiz (surveyor)


N 14

1985-1987

pla莽a de general moragues

C. de la Sagrera - C. de Felip II BCN6 <M> L1 Navas - L2 Bac de Roda L9 L10 La Sagrera

Olga Tarras贸 s c Ellsworth Kelly

The plaza, triangular in outline and surrounded by streets, is divided into three surface areas distinct in texture, color and angle of incline, which configure a new triangle superimposed on the original one. Two large sculptures sited on the central surface dominate the perspectives from the vertices of the new space, and as a consequence of topographic manipulation emphasize its isolation from its surroundings.


1986-1987 C. de Felip II - C. Bac de Roda BCN6 <M> L1 Navas - L2 Bac de Roda

felip ii bridge bac de roda

L9 L10 La Sagrera

In a landscape characterized by its very lack of definition, the project supplements the interconnective function of the bridge with that of forming a new identifying sign of the city. The structure, consisting of twin steel arches which bifurcate as they des­cend towards the ground, and of four series of cables which are suspended from these, define and separate the pavement of the wide lateral sidewalks and support the access stairs to the future station and large park situated either side of the railroad tracks.

N 15

Santiago Calatrava c o l P. Barragán, B. de Sola, O. Tarrasó


N 16

clot park

Daniel Freixes, Vicente Miranda c o l E. González, V. Argentí, Ch. Sanz, D. Andreu, M. Ruisánchez

1982-1986 C. dels Escultors Claperós C. de Rossend Nobas - C. del Municipi BCN6 <M> L1 L2 r e n f e Clot tram C a n J a u ma n d r e u

Situated on a plot once occupied by now-obsolete railroad installations, the park, a large “landscaped plaza”, has two distinct areas: the “plaza”, a depressed paved space intended for sporting and public use related to the new buildings, and the “garden”, product of an artificial topography. The design of distinguishing elements such as the four floodlight towers or the raised footbrid­ ges, and the conservation of part of the old buildings as reutilized ruins, are the main compositional devices of the design.


1982-1987 Albert Viaplana (project) Viaplana/Piñón Arqs. c o l Enric Miralles

besòs park

In a degraded, peripheric setting, the project is proposed as the phase prior to a subsequent, hypothetical park. Three linear plant masses opening the space towards the south help it find a structure and also facilitate the organization of the different areas by the placing of emphatic artificial elements. Two Y-shaped pathways bisect the site on the bias.

N 17

Rda. de Sant Raimon de Penyafort - C. de Cristóbal de Moura BCN5 <M> L4 Besòs Mar tram Parc del B esòs


O

major infrastructures for the olympics

1985 1992


1992 The Olympic Games Barcelona ringed The celebration in 1992 of an international event of such media importance as the Olympic Games (already petitioned for by the City Council in 1983, and awarded to Barcelona on 18 October 1986) presented an unbeatable opportunity to catalyze the investment and energy needed for bringing urban interventions of enormous structural importance to a conclusion. The Games had a twin goal, one that was widely taken on board: to provide for the sporting activities, organized strategically in four Olympic areas; and to construct the enormous infrastructures, planned long before, which, using the pretext of a much-needed urban mobility, were at last to become reality. While it had helped promote a series of interventions of great international prestige (fomented in grand part by the specialized magazines), the intense municipal activity of previous years had also been characterized by a methodology more given to detail than to a totalizing ambition. Despite the conceptual fragility glimpsed in this program of “urban embellishment”, the magnitude of the Olympic operation suddenly gave rise, at least for the attentive viewer, to isolated phenomena that were hitherto unusual in the city; phenomena in which the episodic, the figurative and the contextual gave way to a globalizing vision. The construction of the vast orbital road system –and especially the design for a remodeled Ronda de Dalt– would constitute one of the most revitalizing phenomena in recent Barcelona urbanism: the physical materialization of a new kind of “place”, a vast road network (no longer a street or an avenue) with no echoes, with no references other than immediately technical ones, and yet experienced as a supremely architectural event. An enormous perimetral entity (along with the Ronda Litoral) whose derived elements were to form a concatenation of intertwined landscapes, functionally and typologically alien schemes –flyover systems, articulations, approaches, fringe green belts, huge decks with service facilities, and immense entrance corridors– which would constitute “ex novo” architectural forms on a new city scale. Scenarios and phenomena that would, in all events, give rise to a new interpretation of the city, a definitively “metropolitan” interpretation in which traditional natural barriers would suddenly find themselves circumvented by a new territorial scale (that broadens to encompass the regions close to the city) in which highways, tunnels and ring roads emerging as the internally-connected arteries of a vast arc of concentric rings.


The new system of fast roads in Barcelona and the siting of the four Olympic areas.


o 33

remodeling of the municipal swimming pool

1991-1992

Antoni de Moragas i Spa

o 34

Av. de Miramar BCN4 <M> L2 L4 Paral·lel Funicular de Montjuïc

font de la guatlla civic center

1993-1995

Antoni de Moragas i Spa, Irene Sánchez

o 35

C. del Rabí Rubèn, 22-26 BCN4 <M> L1 L3 r e n f e Espanya

remodeling of the frontón colón

1990-1992

Anna Soler, Sílvia Farriol

o 36

La Rambla, 18 BCN1 <M> L3 Drassanes

apartment block in the olympic village Carlos Ferrater c o l Josep M. Montaner Beth Figueras (gardens) C. de Ramon Turró, 69-109 BCN1 BCN5 L4 Bogatell

<M>

1989-1992


abraham ecumenical center

o 37

1990-1992

Josep Benedito, Agustí Mateos

<M>

olympic port sailing school

o 38

1989-1992

C. de Jaume Vicens Vives, 2 C. del Bisbe Climent BCN5 L4 t r a m Ciutadella/Vila Olímpica

Oriol Bohigas, Josep M. Martorell, David Mackay, Albert Puigdomènech Ramon de Clascà, engineer Port Olímpic - Moll de Gregal BCN5 L4 t r a m Ciutadella/Vila Olímpica

<M>

shelters on the avinguda d’icària

o 39

1990-1992

Enric Miralles <M>

tram

Av. d'Icària BCN1 BCN5 Ciutadella/Vila Olímpica

carles I park

o 40

1989-1992

L4

Josep Zazurca Av. d'Icària - C. de Moscou BCN1 BCN5 <M> L4 t r a m Ciutadella/Vila Olímpica


R

consolidation of the major metropolitan arteries (1): diagonal south and gran via east

2004


2004 The Forum of Cultures and the connection Diagonal South/Sant Adrià/Besós. Urban management, marketing and iconic architecture The first Universal Forum of Cultures was organised in 2004 and revolved around three main themes: sustainable development, world peace and cultural diversity. This new major event was a trigger for Barcelona to drive forward with an operation to clean up, reorganise and boost an area of the city that was complex, loss-making, partially obsolete and unresolved: that encompassing the mouth of the River Besòs, the point where Avinguda Diagonal reaches the sea, the Ronda de Litoral (coastal ring road) as it passes through and the seafront, plus the relationship with the town of Sant Adrià and the treatment of the existing wastewater treatment plant. The Forum site arose, in this sense, as an opportunity to find solutions to a broad range of accumulated problems and needs present in a sector still in a “latent state”; there was an attempt then, to emulate the good results obtained with the urban planning project for the Olympic Games of 1992. The first operation involved the introduction of a wide esplanade that, together with other parks nearby, provided a boundary for the site while covering over the wastewater treatment plant. Secondly, that enormous public area needed to harmonise the meeting of the public space with the seafront, the coastal ring road and Passeig del Taulat as well as help define the perimeter of the new marina, “Port Fórum”, and all its associated facilities. A new and representative landmark appeared in the construction of a giant photovoltaic solar plant hovering above the ground, which was also designed to act as an immense pergola situated right by the new bathing areas and the open-air auditoria, created via a system of artificial sand dunes. The ambitious urban development operation sparked by the Forum would provide solutions to a large part of the urban puzzle and the numerous commitments that the city still had pending at the previously mentioned crossroads. However, owing largely to the urgency of the official requirements, some cultural facilities and important support structures (business centre, conventions centre, etc.), were resolved with iconic and autonomous objects isolated from city spaces. Had these been given a treatment more focused on integration, they could have (once the Forum event concluded) offered themselves as new innovated and innovating scenarios for the city. The Forum of Cultures was to form part, in any event, of a decided urban marketing plan designed to sell the Barcelona brand. The event was to be a great showcase that would let the world view a city that wanted to appear as a leading centre of avant-garde design, but also a window display of a city devoted to mass tourism, leisure consumption and the hypothetical potential of the tertiary sector. In any case, the great Forum operation was also a missed opportunity to integrate the neighbourhoods surrounding the site into a new, imaginative urban fabric, and it wasted the chance to resolve important spatial, social and landscape problems and propose more open and participative debates with the city’s inhabitants in general and with research and creation in particular. A large number of the criticisms raised then focused on denouncing the speculative use of the land and the death of the balance between public and private investment, or the abandoning of horizontal urban planning for another based on vertical constructions. Advantage was not taken to commit to encouraging more empathetic, sustainable and interactive urban development, capable of promoting a potentially more innovative and stimulating “new urban model” for the 21st century.


Fórum of Cultures square plant. Elias Torres and José Antoni Martínez-Lapeña


R1

1997-2002

diagonal mar park

Passeig de Garcia FĂ ria 81, 08019â&#x20AC;&#x192; BCN5 < M >â&#x20AC;&#x192; L4 Selva de Mar t r a m El Maresme

Miralles Tagliabue EMBT Enric Miralles, Benedetta Tagliabue

Diagonal Mar Park is a large park that in its expanse connects Avinguda Diagonal and the beach. The Park is ordered in line with a series of paths, rather similar to the branches of a tree, ramifying out in all directions. The main walkway, a kind of boulevard, directly connects the Diagonal with the nearby beach, crossing the coastal ring road via a pedestrian bridge to be completed shortly. In turn, this walkway joins the rest of the paths crossing the park which are gradually transformed into a series of areas for recreation: skating, train, bikes, etc. A place for walking. The main promenade follows the edge of a large lake and it is perhaps this, together with the treecovered area, that gives the park its character...


R2

barcelona international convention centre – ccib

2000-2004 Plaça de Willy Brandt 11-14, 08019 BCN5 < M > L4 El Maresme - t r a m Forum

Mateoarquitectura Josep Lluís Mateo

The CCIB sits at the meeting point of two juxtaposed urban realities, city and nature. It’s a place where historical layouts (the end of Avinguda Diagonal) coexist with new urban developments that follow denser models. Furthermore, there is the added presence of major metropolitan infrastructures along with the coastal ring road fast route. In the face of such realities, the overall area responds via functional bands to a complex programme: a strip of buildings that complement the CCIB (hotel, offices), another that is the great hall or covered area, and finally a strip of services attached to the centre. Three bands that relate with the site: sea, sky and mountain. For this reason, the exterior of the southern block resembles wild nature; the roof of the great hall resembles an artif icial landscape; and the front on to the road is a fragmented set of static spaces with horizontal and vertical flows. The structure of the whole ensemble acts as a spatial geometric pattern.


hotel ac and offices for the zona franca consortium (czf )

R3

Mateoarquitectura Josep Lluís Mateo

princess hotel

R4

2000-2004 Passeig Taulat 278, 08019  BCN5 <M> L4 El Maresme - t r a m Forum

The Hotel is a solid structure, a sculpted volume with small windows. The cut in the centre of its height and the modelling of its mass are reinforced by the textures of its f inishes. The solution for the CZF offices, in contrast, is a volume hanging from a top structure, a lighthouse that, together with the climbing lights – the work of artist Silvia Hornig – shows the consistency of the building. The solid circulation core unif ies the dif ferent pieces adhered to it, through the appearance of the concrete.

2000-2004 Av. Diagonal 1, 08019  BCN5 < M > L4 El Maresme - t r a m Forum

Óscar Tusquets Blanca

At the point where Barcelona’s longest and most representative avenue kicks off, lies this plot with a pointed edge, like the bow of a great ship. This site demanded a building with a clear identity. The urban development plan imposed a 25-storey tower. However, the buildable surface permitted did not allow for the entire plot to be occupied to full height. This was fortunate because it would have led to a very stockylooking tower, like nearly all those in the city. For this reason was proposed to divide the great tower into two very slim-line towers, similar but different, connected only by a bridge with walls and floors of glass. The gap opened between the towers breaks up the façade oriented northwards of the Diagonal, interrupts the long face on the shady side and projects a strip of sunlight over the avenue.


S

urban recycling and functional complexity

1998 2010


V

change(s) on scale(s): from the urban city to the multi-city-geo-urban

1998 2013


1998-2013 Metropolis > Metapolis: Articulate the territory, regenerate the city Former geographical notions have given ground to the new territorial scale of things, as have former compositional factors to the existence of a much more complex, elusive and vital reality. The idea of urban space as an essentially figurative reference, as a sum of qualities relating to formal definitions, has given way to the actuality of a more aleatory and untamed new space, articulated at other scales, no longer founded on the traditional continuity of building but on the vigor and neutrality of the vast networks intended to structure it, and on the different autonomous events destined to guarantee its evolution. Communications and transport infrastructures reveal themselves to be, in effect, the most obvious tracings of this complex territorial system; neutral arbiters of the future organization of the terrain, arterial networks destined to produce a welter of syncopated developments, among which spaces of omission, operating “in negative”, are generated. The description of this complex and mutable new space should not, for all that, be confused with the idea of a single development: that of the periurban city, with mobility and displacement as its seductive referents. The contemporary “metapolis” is not a place or a form anymore, yet neither is it a unique evolutive state, a single movement, but rather the accumulation of many simultaneous experiences. A progressively diversified system produced by different, discontinuous, stratified and non-fixed realities that continually pervert and transform the elemental –and circumstantial– schema it would tend to remit itself to, according to a process of dissolution and “gasification” of a once solid body. Akin to an inkstain on the territory, the crystalline form of the primitive city tends to dissolve. A map of this new “metapolitan” Barcelona, which extends its sphere of influence far beyond the classical metropolitan area in a radius of 70 km from the city center (from Vilanova to Blanes, from Vilafranca to Massanet), would imply a selective drawing, an interpretation of the territory: of a city according with a mesh of infrastructures (no longer just buildings) with an isotropic and equilibriating mission for this territory. An ideal grid –proposed by the Territorial Directive Plan for Catalonia itself– that would fuse with the whole interregional communications system. And yet a mesh ordained, in turn, by the actual geographical system of the central coastline: a succession of mountainous masses and land corridors parallel to the sea, which would include the coastal corridor and plateau, the Serralada Litoral, the prolongations of the Vallès and the Penedès flatlands, the Serralada Prelitoral, etc; a banded structure with occupied areas along the land corridors and with huge outcrops, all of which favors a particular seriation of “colonization-landscape” and “solid-void”. This new Barcelona would thus no longer be a single place, a centrifugal or radial movement around a center, but a serial structure of moving switch rails that interlock in a “city of cities”, a “place of places”.


Previous page: Barcelona Land Grid. Gausa-Raveau Actarquitectura, Metรกpolis, 1998. Right: Hiper-conectividad Barcelona. Gausa-Raveau Actarquitectura, 2007.


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architects index

ÁBALOS VÁZQUEZ, Iñaki (b.1956) Q7 ACEBILLO, Josep-Anton (b.1946) O1

ADROER i IGLESIAS, Jordi (1925-1973) L11

AGUILAR, Sergi (b.1946) Sculptor N13

AIXAS i ESPAR, Pere (b.1947) M58 - N44

AIXELÀ i TARRATS, Josep M. (1907-1991) I28

ALEMANY i BARRIS, Josep (b.1940) J25 - K1 - M26

ALONSO i CALLEJA, Lluís (b.1955)

B14 - P49 - T6 - T7

AMADÓ i CERCÓS, Roser (b.1944)

A13 - C1 - N31 O24 - P17

AMARGÓS i SAMARANCH, Josep (1848-1918) B5 - B18 - G1

ANDRÉS i PUIGDOLLER, B11

ANDREU i CASTELLVÍ, Dolors (b.1960)

ARDÈVOL i FERNÁNDEZ, Joan (b.1947) Surveyor M58

BALCELLS i BUIGAS, Eduard M. (1877-1965)

K20

D27

ARGENTÍ i SALVADÓ, Víctor (b.1947)

BALCELLS i GORINA, Santiago (b.1913)

D1 - N8 - N16

M17

ARRIOLA i MADORELL, Andreu (b.1956)

BALDRICH i TIBAU, Manuel (1911-1966)

B11 - N3 - N11 - N41 U9 - U10

D2 - D3 - K3 - K27 K30

ARTIGUES i VIDAL, Jaume (b.1954)

BALLESTEROS FIGUERAS, Juan Antonio (b.1930)

N8

J18

ARTIGUES i CODÓ, Ramon (b.1936)

BAQUERO RIAZUELO, Iñaki (b.1965)

N22 - N33 - P14

AULENTI, Gae (b.1927) G6

AVELLANEDA i DÍAZ-GRANDE, Jaume (b.1949) J1 - N30

AZÚA GRUART, Félix de (1916-1985) E13 - G5

BACH, Eugeni (b.1974) Q36 BACH, Jaume (b.1943) Q36 BACH i NÚÑEZ, Jaume (b.1943)

N16

ANGLADA i ROSSELLÓ, Josep (b.1927)

BACHS i BERTRAN, Isabel (b.1956)

J28 - M30 - M31 - M44

P21

ARANDA QUILES, Rafael (b.1961)

BADIA, Jordi (b.1961)

ARDERIU i SALVADÓ, Jaume (b.1951) P8

B14 - P49 - T6 - T7

ARENAS, Manuel (b.1955)

C12 - D5 - M21 - N9 N21 - N28 - O23 - P10

Q9 - T8

BALAGUER i BARBADILLO, Sergi (b.1953)

S19

BAENA ASENCIO, David (b.1961) Q11 - R12 - U5

R17

BARBA i CORSINI, Francisco Juan (b.1916) C23 - I17 - L4 - L6 - l29

BARBERO REBOLLEDO, Manuel (b.1924) K12 - K14

BARDAJÍ ÁLVAREZ, Paloma (1957-1997) N13

BARNADAS, Toni S15

BARRAGÁN RAMOS, Pedro (b.1943) N12 - N13 - N15 - O1

BARTUMEUS, Sara S16

BARTUMEUS i JENÉ, Josep M. (b.1942) M49

BASIANA, Xavier (b.1953) K9 - K20

BASSEGODA i AMIGÓ, Bonaventura (1862-1940) C8


BASSEGODA i AMIGÓ, Joaquim (1854-1938) C8

BASSEGODA i MATEU, Pere (1817-1908)

BERENGUÉ, Mercé (b. 1962) S4 - T3

BERGNE, Miquel de Engineer

C27

B11

BASSÓ i BIRULÉS, Francesc (b.1921)

BERGNES DE LAS CASAS i SOTERAS, Antoni (b.1945)

J17 - K16

K19

BASSÓ i VIDAL, Carles (b.1947)

BLANCH i SEGARRA, Albert (b.1964)

B4 - C10 - S18

Q21

BATLLE i DURANY, Enric (b.1956)

BLAY, Miquel (1866-1936) Sculptor

N38 - O2 - O4 - P6 Q4 - S5 - S22

BATLLE PAGÉS, Teresa (b. 1961) Q28 - S6

BATLLE i SALVAÑÁ, Montserrat (b.1958) P40

BATLLEVELL i ARÚS, Juli (1864-1928) c38

BAYÓ i FONT, Jaume (1873-1961) Contractor C22 - D33

BAYONA MAS, Marta Q19

BELGIOJOSO, Ludovico Barbiano di (b.1909) M1

BENAVENT DE BARBERÀ i ABELLÓ, Pere (1899-1975) H9 - H11 H14 I19 - K28

BENEDITO i ROVIRA, Josep (b.1948) B12 - O37 - P11 - S10

BERCEDÓ, Ivan S24

N6

BOFILL i LEVÍ, Ricardo (b.1939) L13 - L14 - M6 - M29 O11 - P1 - P18 - Q5 Q41

BOHIGAS, Josep (b. 1967) R17 BOHIGAS i GUARDIOLA, Oriol (b.1925)

BONET i CASTELLANA, Antoni (1913-1989) K3 - K22 --K26 M10 - M45

BONET i CORREA, Santiago (b.1936) M48

BONET i FERRER, Vicenç (b.1928) D17 - M12 - M40

BONET i GARÍ, Lluís (1893-1993) B16 - I6 - I23

BORI i GENSANA, Josep (b.1938) D3

BORRELL i SENSAT, Agustí (1910-1971) I27 - l35

BOSCH i AGUSTÍ, Joan (b.1936) K3

BOSCH i GENOVER, Jordi (b.1949) N43 - N45

BRUGGEN, Coosje van Sculptor (b.1942) O28

BRULLET i MONMANY, Miquel (1904-1988) I24

BRULLET i TENAS, Manuel (b.1941) N27 - O27 - Q3

BUÏGAS i MONRAVÀ, Gaietà (1851-1919) B13

BUÏGAS i SANS, Carles (1898-1979) Engineer G8

BUSQUETS i GRAU, Joan (b.1946) Q5

BUSQUETS i SINDREU, Xavier (1917-1990) J22 - L8 - l32 - M16 M53

BUXADÉ i RIBOT, Carles (b.1942) B13 - O8 - O10

A6 - C7 - J7 - J8 - J11 J25 - K1 - K5 - L18 - L24 l37 - M2 - M9 - M11 M32 - M38 - M50 - N10 N18 - O15 - O38 - P28 P29 - P39 - Q7 - R2 - S9 T2

BOSCH i PLANAS, Andreu (b.1943) BOTEY i GÓMEZ, Josep M. (b.1943)

N32 - P34 - P44

D3

CALATRAVA i VALLS, Santiago (b.1951)

BONA i PUIG, Eusebi (1890-1972)

BOU i BOSCH, Vicenç (b.1964)

N15 - O13

E22 - F3 - I1 - I9 I25 - M54

BRIÁNEZ, A. Engineer

BONELL i COSTA, Esteve (b.1942) M27 - M59 - N26 P30 - P38

BONET i ARMENGOL, Jordi (b.1925) l38

BONET i BERTRAN, Josep (b.1941) B4 - M25 - N35

D3

P22 B11

BROSSA, Joan (1919-1998) Sculptor N26

BRU i BISTUER, Eduard (b.1950)

N19 - O28 - Q8 Q31 Q32 - Q46

BRUFAU i NIUBÓ, Robert (b.1946) C17 - D4 - P41

CÁCERES ZURITA, Rafael de (b.1944)

CALLIS, Joan Q20

CALVET i PEYRONILL, Arnau D15 - E17

CALZADA ECHEVARRÍA, Andrés (1892-1938) G4

CANOSA i MAGRET, Josep Lluís (b.1940) D3 - P42

CÀNOVES i RICHART, Jacint (b.1924) M41


CANTALLOPS i VALERI, Lluís (b.1934)

CASES i LAMOLLA, Manuel (1900-1974)

CLOTET i JUAN, Rosa M. (b.1954)

M13 - P11

I4

N34

CAPDEVILA, Oriol (b. 1955)

CATÀ i CATÀ, Enric (1878-1937)

COBB, Henry N. (b.1926)

Q7 - S2 - S9 - T2

E13 - E25 - G6

P44

CAPELLA i samper, Juli (b.1960)

CAVALLER i SOTERAS, Francesc (b.1932)

CODERCH GIMÉNEZ, Gustavo (b.1948)

P45 - Q33 - S3

K19

J1

CARDENAL GONZÁLEZ, Juan Carlos (b.1929)

CENDOYA OSCOZ, Pedro (1894-1975)

CODERCH DE SENTMENAT, José Antonio (1913-1984) I11 - J1 - J19 - J24 K23 - L12 - L17 - L20 L21 - l27 - M18 - M34 M52 - M54

J18

G6

CÁRDENAS, Ignacio de (1898-1979)

CERVELLÓ, Marta

E21

CARDONER i BLANCH, Francesc de Paula (1929-1997)

Q10

CHALAMANCH I AMAT, Marc (b.1971) Q30

B16

CHILLIDA, Eduardo (b.1924) Sculptor

CARMONA i SANZ, Claudi (b.1926)

N10

L10 - l39 - l40 M43 - P5

CARTAÑÁ i GUBERN, Josep M. (b.1951) O30 - P2 - P3

CARVAJAL FERRER, Javier (b.1926) K16

CASAJOANA i SALVÍ, Pere (b.1941) D2 - N34

CASAMOR i MALDONADO, Antoni (b.1961) Q11 - R12 - U5

CASANOVAS RODRÍGUEZ, José Miguel (b.1946) G9

CASAS EZQUERRO, Marta S15

CASAS I GALOFRÉ, Xavier R13

CASAS i PÉREZ, Raimon (b.1942) M49

CHIPPERFIELD, David (b. 1953) S13 - T1

CHURRUCA DOTRES, Ricardo de (1900-1963) E24 - H16 - H21 - H22

CINNAMOND i PLANÀS, Norman (b.1941) D3 - M55- S15

CIRICI i ALOMAR, Cristian (b.1941) B4 - C3 - G13 - K7 M25 - P48 - S18

CIRICI i AMELL, Elisabet (b.1963) O1

Clascà, J. Ramon de Engineer of roads, canals and ports O1 - O15

CLOS, Oriol O43

CLOTET i BALLÚS, Lluís (b.1941) A4 - B3 - M22 - M23 - M36 - P23 - Q16 - Q40 - R14

CORREA RUIZ, Federico (b.1924) C14 - M19 - M20 M39 - M46 - M56 N5 - O8 - O10

COSP i VILLARÓ, Guillem (b.1915) J12 - J13

CRESPO i LLOBET, Josep M. (b.1956) P8

CUSPINERA i FONT, Lluís (b.1942) D3

CODINA i MATALÍ, Joaquim

DANÉS i TEJEDOR, Albert (b.1942)

C45

M47

CODINACHS i RIERA, Marcià (b.1955)

DANIEL i MOLINA, Francesc

O6

A2 - A4 - A11

COLL, Jaime

DARDER i MARSÀ, Antoni (1885-1956)

Q29 - R16 - U3

COLL i PUJOL, Rafael (b.1943) P5

COMAS i THOS, Manuel

E13

DELGADO i ESPALLARGAS, Josep Lluís (b.1955) N11

C43

DÍAZ i GÓMEZ, Carles (b.1946)

COMERÓN, Luis (b.1960)

E1 - P23

CONDE i FONT, Santiago (1957-1994)

A5

P41

DILMÉ i ROMAGÓS, Lluís (b.1960)

N50

DOMÈNECH, Lola

CONILL i MONTOBBIO, Bonaventura (1876-1946)

DOMÈNECH i ESTAPÀ, Josep (1858-1917)

D15

CORADA, Franco S12

COREA AIELLO, Mario Luis (b.1939) H17

CORNET i MAS, Josep M. (1839-1916) Engineer A2 - A3

U4

A6 - A15 - B7 - B20 C29 - D20 - D23 - M37

DOMÈNECH i GIRBAU, Lluís (b.1940) A13 - C1 - N31 O24 - P17

DOMÈNECH i MANSANA, Josep (1885-1973) F16


DOMÈNECH i MONTANER, Lluís (1850-1923) A16 - B4 - C1 - C3 - C6 - C16 - C29 - C34 - D1 E1

DOMÈNECH i ROURA, Pere (1881-1962) D1 - E13 - G6 - G15

DOMINGO, Mamen R11

DONATO i FOLCH, Josep Emili (b.1934) L23 - M8 - N20 N48 - N49

DURAN i REYNALS, Raimon (1897-1966)

E10 - F2 - G10 - H7 H15 - H20 - I3 - I5 I10 - I21 - I26 - L2

ECHAIDE ITARTE, Rafael (b.1923) K13

EGEA VIÑAS, Ginés Q16 ESCRIGAS, Narcís H25

ESPINET i MESTRE, Miquel (b.1948) C7 - N36 - O31

ESPINOSA i GIMÉNEZ, Pere Lluís (b.1944) A2

ESTEVA i CASAL, Joan C17

ESTORACH i TOSET, Xavier (b.1951) N13

FABRÉ i CARRERAS, Francesc Xavier (b.1959) A5

FALGUERA i SIVILLA, Antoni de (1876-1945) C10

FALGUERAS i FONT, Joan (b.1958) O18

FALQUÉS i URPÍ, Pere (1857-1916)

A17 - B1 - B10 C10 - C21

FARGAS i FALP, Josep M. (b.1926)

B11 - M14 - M15 - M51

FARRANDO i SICÍLIA, Jordi (b.1956) N29 - N39 - O42

FIGUERAS i AMNELIA, Jordi (b.1923) K9

FORESTIER, Jean-Claude-Nicolas (1861-1930)

FIGUERAS COSTA, Virginia

FORGAS COLL, Joan

B1 - G11

S12

U8

FIGUERAS i RIBAS, Enric

FOSTER, Norman (b.1935)

D21

O3

FIGUERES, Elisabet

FRAMIS, Jordi

P42

S19

G14 - O35

FIOL i COSTA, Carme (b.1956)

FARRÉ, Ernest

B11 - N8 - N41 - U9 U10

FRANCÈS i MARQUETA, Manuel (b.1930)

FARRIOL i GIL, Sílvia (b.1947)

R11

FAYOS i MOLET, Ricard (b.1947) N47

FLORENSA i FERRER, Adolf (1889-1969) E5 - E7 - E25 - G5

FELIU i VIA, Josep M. (b.1928)

FLORES, Ricardo (b. 1965)

J30

U6

FERNÁNDEZ i JANOT, Telm (1855-1926)

FOLCH, Ramon

B10 - C33

FERNÁNDEZ DE LA REGUERA i MARCH, Alfred (b.1941) M48

FERNÁNDEZ i EDUARDO, Francesc (b.1954) N23 - O12 - O19 - R19

FERRATER i BOFILL, Antoni M. (b.1958)

H26

FERRATER, Borja (b. 1978) Q37

FERRATER, Lucía (b. 1971) Q37

FERRATER i LAMBARRI, Carlos (b.1944)

D3 - M60 - O30 - O36 P2 - P3 - P42 - Q26 Q37 - S8 - S14

FERRÉS i PUIG, Eduard (1880-1928)

C48 - C49 - E11 - E16

M41

FREIXA i JANÀRIZ, Jaume (b.1942) M31

FREIXES i MELERO, Daniel (b.1946) N16 - P22

FUENTE, Carlos Engineer (b.1951)

U8

O42

FOCHS i ÁLVAREZ, Carles (b.1944)

GALÍ i CAMPRUBÍ, Elisabeth (b.1950)

J1

N3 - N7 - O14 - R10

FOCHS i ÁLVAREZ, Pere (b.1950)

GALÍ IZARD, Teresa Ingeniera

B10

FOLGUERA i GRASSI, Francesc (1891-1960) E11 - F11 - G12

FONT i CARRERAS, August (1846-1924) B14

FONTELA BUSSALLEU, Antonio (b.1945) G9

FONTSERÈ i MESTRE, Josep (1829-1897) A2 - A13 - B1 - B2 B3 - B5

FORCADELL i VALLS, Joan Josep (b.1938) O30

Q8

GALIANA, Ricard Q17

GALLARDO-BRAVO ORTEGA, Francisco (b.1950) H17

GALLEGO OLMOS, Moisés (b.1947) N23 - O12 - O19

GALLISSÀ i SOQUÉ, Antoni M. (1861-1903) A9 - C11

GARCÉS i BRUSÉS, Jordi (b.1945)

M37 - N24 - O21 O29 - P4 - P25 P36 - P38 - S17


general BIBLIOGRAphy

GUIdES AAVV, Barcelona modernista [Document cartogràfic]: una guía indispensable / an essential guide, BIGCO, Barcelona, 2012 AAVV, L'Agenda Cerdà: construint la Barcelona metropolitana / The Cerdà agenda: constructing metropolitan Barcelona , Ajuntament de Barcelona / Lunwerg, Barcelona, 2010 AAVV, Ruta del modernisme, Ajuntament de Barcelona / Institut Municipal del Paisatge Urbà i la Qualitat de vida, Barcelona, 2005 ASENSIO, Paco & KLICZOWSKI, Hugo (Eds) - BONET, Llorenç (text) - CASAS, Roger (fotos), Guía de arquitectura de Barcelona, Rivas-Vaciamadrid / Kliczkowski, Madrid, 2004 BARJAU, Santiago (ed), Guía de la Barcelona modernista/ Barcelona’s Modernist Guide, Sendai, Barcelona, 1991 BASSEGODA NONELL, Juan - GARRUT, José María, Guia de Gaudí, Ed. Literarias y Científicas, Barcelona, 1970 CACERES, Rafael de (dir.), Espacios urbanos/Espaces urbains: Barcelona 1981-1987, Ajuntament de Barcelona, Regidoria de Publicacions, Barcelona, 1988 CASAS, Núria - MATEO, Lourdes, Passejant per Barce­lona: art i espais urbans, Pòrtic, Barcelona, 1997 CIRICI PELLICER, Alexandre, Barcelona pam a pam, Comanegra, Barcelona, 2012 FERRÉ, Albert - PUIG-PEY, Ana (coord.), Barcelona:

plànol-guía d’arquitectura/ Plano-guía de arquitectura/ Plan-guide d’architecture/ Architectural map, Demarcació de Barcelona del Col·legi d’Arquitectes de Catalunya / Serbal, Barcelona, 1995 FLORES, Carlos - GÜELL, Xavier, Arquitectura de España: guía/ Architecture of Spain: A Guide; 1929/1996, Fundación Caja de Arquitectos / Actar, Barcelona, 1996 GARCÍA ESPUCHE, Albert (ed.), El “Quadrat d’Or”: 150 casas en el centro de la Barcelona modernista: Guía Olimpíada Cultural, Ajuntament de Barcelona, Barcelona, 1990 GAUSA, Manuel - CERVELLÓ, Marta, Barcelona: guia d’arquitectura contemporània, Barcelona i la seva àrea territorial, 19281990, Quaderns d’Arquitectura i Urbanisme, n. 188-189 (generjuny 1991), Barcelona, 1991 GONZÁLEZ, Antoni - LACUESTA, Raquel, Barcelona guía de arquitectura: 1929-2000, G. Gili, Barcelona / Mèxic, 1999 GUERRA, Leo, Barcellona: discontinuità senza crisi, Testo & Immagine, Torino, 2001 HERNÁNDEZ-CROS, J. Emili, MORA, Gabriel, POUPLANA, Xavier - MORETÓ, Bel (coord.), Guía de arquitectura de Barcelona, Plaza & Janés, Barcelona, 1985 HERNÁNDEZ-CROS, Josep Emili MORA, Gabriel - POUPLANA, Xavier, Plano guía de arquitectura de Barcelona: edificios de los siglos III al XX, Colegio Oficial de Arquitectos de Cata­lu­ña y Baleares, Barcelona, 1972


HERNÁNDEZ-CROS, Josep Emili, MORA, Gabriel, POUPLANA, Xavier, MORETÓ, Bel - REYES QUIJADA, Arquitectura de Barcelona, Demarcació de Barcelona del Col·legi d’Arquitectes de Catalunya, Barcelona, 1990 HUERTAS i CLAVERIA, Josep Maria (text) - ENCINAS, Pepe (photos), 50 vegades Barcelona: guia de visita de la ciutat, Ajuntament de Barcelona, Regidoria d’Edicions i Publicacions, Barcelona, 1995 LACUESTA, Raquel - GONZÁ­LEZ, Antoni, Guía de arquitectura modernista en Cata­luña, G. Gili, Barcelona, 1997 MARREIROS, Sabina - FORSTER, Jürgen, Barcelona: Architecture & Design, TeNeues, Kempen, 2003 MIRALLES, Roger - SIERRA, Pau, Barcelona: arquitectura contemporània: 1979-2012 / contemporary architecture: 1979-2010 / arquitectura contemporánea: 1979-2012, Polígrafa / Ajuntament de Barcelona, Barcelona, 2012 MIRALLES, Roger, Barcelona : arquitectura modernista i noucentista: 1888-1929 / noucentista and art nouveau architecture / arquitectura modernista y noucentista, Polígrafa / Ajuntament de Barcelona, Barcelona, 2008 MUGA, Patricia de - GARCIA HINTZE, Laura, Barcelona : arquitectura moderna : 1929-1979, Polígrafa / Ajuntament de Barcelona, Barcelona, 2006 PIZZA, Antonio, Guía de la arquitectura moderna en Barcelona: 1928-1936, Ediciones del Serbal, Barcelona, 1996

PIZZA, Antonio, Guía de la arquitectura del siglo XX: España, Electa España, Madrid, 1997 PLANES, Lurdes (ed), Guía dels parcs de l’Àrea metropolitana de Barcelona: 1995, Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona / Mancomunitat de Municipis de l’Àrea Metropolitana de Barcelona, Direcció de Serveis de l’Espai Públic, Servei de Promoció i Conservació, Bellaterra, 1995 POCH, Marta, BCN arquitectura: 473 obres des de la Barcino romana al 22@ / BCN architecture, Col·legi d'Arquitectes de Catalunya / Triangle Postals, Barcelona, 2011

TOLOSA, Eduard - ROMANÍ, Daniel, Barcelona: escultura guia/Sculpture Guide, Actar, Barcelona, 1996 VENTEO, Daniel, Barcelona del segle XVIII fins a l'actualitat: guia històrica, Marge Books, Barcelona, 2011 VIDAL-RIBAS, Olympia, Cool Barcelona: a non-standard guide, Polígrafa, Barcelona, 2010 VILLORO, Joan - RIUDOR, Lluís, Guia dels espais verds de Barcelona: aproximació històrica, Col·legi Oficial d’Arquitectes de Catalunya, Delegació de Barcelona / Caixa de Pensions “La Caixa”, Barcelona, 1984

RICHARDSON, Phyllis, Barcelona, Thames & Hudson, London, 2003

GENERAL works

ROVIRA-BELETA-CUYAS, Enrique FOLCH, Ana, Guia de la Barcelona accessible, Viena, Barcelona, 2006

ABALLANET, Albert, CASTI­ÑEI­RA, Isabel, MONTEYS, Xavier, PARICIO, Antoni, Residencia urbana en Barcelona, 1945-1970: El área de la Bonanova (Sarrià-Sant Gervasi), ETSAV /Edicions UPC, Sant Cugat del Vallès/ Barcelona, 2000

RUBIO, Albert, Barcelona: arquitectura antiga, segles I-XIX / old architecture, 1st-19th century / arquitectura antigua, siglos I-XIX, Polígrafa / Ajuntament de Barcelona, 2009 SALVADOR, Reyes - LLOPIS, Carmen (eds), Barcelona, guía de diseño, Aram, Barcelona, 1992 SOLÀ-MORALES, Ignasi de, CAPITEL, Antón, RUIZ CABRERO, Gabriel, PÉREZ ESCOLANO, Víctor (et alt.), Guía de arquitectura: España: 1920-2000, Tanais, Sevilla /Madrid, 1998 SOLDEVILA, Carlos, Guía de Barcelona, Destino, Barcelona, 1951 STRUM, Suzanne - FERRARI, Diego (fotos), Barcelona: a Guide to Recent Architecture, Ellipsis, London, 2001

ACEBILLO, Josep Antoni, A New Urban Metabolism: Barcelona/Lugano, Accademia di architettura - USI / AB Publishers, Mendrisio / Barcelona, 2012 ACEBILLO, Josep Antoni, La complexitat de les noves intervencions urbanes, Diputació de Barcelona, Barcelona, 1993 ACEBILLO, Josep Antoni FOLCH, Ramon (eds.), Atles ambiental de l’àrea de Barcelona: balanç de recursos i problemes, Ariel / Agència BR, Barcelona, 2000 ACEBILLO, Josep Antoni MORALES, Alfred, Infraestructures


Published by ACTAR With the collaboration of Ajuntament de Barcelona

English translation Debbie Smirthwaite

Authors Manuel Gausa, Marta Cervelló, Maurici Pla (for the first edition, 1860-2002) Manuel Gausa, Ricardo Devesa (for the revision and update until 2013) Researchers Nacho López Alonso, Laura García Hinze (1860-2002 edition) Andrés Flajszer (Revision and update) Collaborators Susanna Cros, Leandre Linares, Cristina Lladó, Anna Tetas (1860-2002 edition) Anna Tetas, Veronica Carniello (Revision and update)

Graphic Design Ramon Prat, Rosa Lladó (1860-2002 edition) Ramon Prat, Núria Saban (Revision and update) Digital manipulation of the images and tecnical production Oriol Rigat, Carme Galán, Wanda Spangenberg (1860-2002 edition) Leandre Linares (Revision and update) Special Thanks Albert Ferré, Lluís Permanyer, Josep Emili Hernández-Cros, and all the published architects to give over the documentation of their works.

Ajuntament de Barcelona Council of Editions and Publications Jaume Ciurana i Llevadot Jordi Martí i Galbis Marc Puig i Guàrdia Miquel Guiot i Rocamora Jordi Joly i Lena Vicente Guallart i Furió Àngel Miret i Serra Marta Clari i Padrós Josep Lluís Alay i Rodríguez José Pérez Freijo Pilar Roca i Viola Albert Ortas i Serrano Director of Communication and Citizen's Attention Marc Puig Director of Image and Publishing Services José Pérez Freijo

© of the edition, ACTAR © of the texts, their authors © of the photographs, their authors isbn: 84-89698-32-5 (1860-2002 edition) ISBN: 978-84-96954-18-2 DL: B.6718-2013 Printed and bound in the European Union

Distribution ACTAR-D Barcelona Roca i Batlle 2-4 08023 Barcelona Tel + 34 93 418 77 59 Fax + 34 93 418 67 07 salesbarcelona@actar.com www.actar-d.com www.actar.com

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Direction of Image and Publishing Services Passeig de la Zona Franca, 66 08038 Barcelona Tel +34 93 402 31 31 www.bcn.cat/publicacions


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Barcelona: Modern Architecture Guide