__MAIN_TEXT__

Page 1

ATLAS

of emerging practices being an architect in the 21st century

GIANPIERO VENTURINI

A project by I T I N E R AN T O F F I CE Within the cultural agenda of N E W G E N E R AT I O N S


A project by

Within the cultural agenda of

ATLAS of emerging practices: being an architect in the 21st century Edited and curated by Gianpiero Venturini Concept design & layout María Buey González Domenico de Cicco Editorial assistants Giulia Fogli, Anja Van Der Watt Copyediting Daniel Lacasta Fitzsimmons Proofreading Anjelica Ong Printing DecaQuattro Servicios Gráficos S.L.L. This publication is an original idea of Itinerant Office and part of the cultural agenda of the New Generations Association. ‘ATLAS of Emerging practices: being an architect in the 21st century’ was made possible thanks to the generous support of: Funder35, an initiative supported by 18 Foundations (17 banking foundations and Fondazione CON IL SUD), adhering to Acri, which includes Fondazione Cariplo; the Creative Industries Fund NL;

NATO FUN D IO EZ

35 ER

SE L

the Embassy of the Kingdom of the Netherlands in Italy.

W

W

5. W. F UNDER3

IT

All rights reserved. No part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system, or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior permission of Itinerant Office. Every effort has been made to gain permissions from copyright holders and/ or photographers, where known, for the images reproduced in this book, and care has been taken to caption and credit those images correctly. Any omissions are unintentional and we will be happy to include appropriate credit in future editions if further information is brought to the publisher’s attention. First published in 2019 by New Generations Cultural Association Via Fratelli Rosselli 15 25086 - Rezzato (BS) www.newgenerationsweb.com Printed in Spain ISBN 9 788894 152715


Index

8

– 11

Prologue

12 – 47

An introduction to New Generations

48 – 85

Organisation

86 – 111

Business

112 – 159

Media

160 – 239

Projects

240 – 263

New conditions to rethink the architectural profession

264 – 271

Credits and biographies


Towards the ATLAS Reducing boundaries The ATLAS Themes and questions The online survey The selection of the participants One last note

··· ··· ··· ··· ··· ··· ···

18 21 23 27 29 34 46

Practice configuration: partners, employees, roles, and interests Reasons behind starting the practice Practice definition

···

56

··· ···

64 71

··· ··· ··· ···

71 76 79 80

Private, public, unsolicited Countries Invested resources

··· ··· ···

92 102 110

Going public, finding clients, developing projects Join forces, collaborate The potential of communication media: a series of interviews

··· ··· ···

118 121 124

··· ··· ··· ··· ···

128 134 139 145 150

Index of projects

···

162

Emerging architecture ATLAS of tools Organisation, business, media What’s next

··· ··· ··· ···

248 253 257 261

ATLAS of practices Image credits Itinerant Office New Generations

··· ··· ··· ···

266 268 270 271

Office Atelier, laboratory, workshop, and studio Collective, platform, and network Other definitions

deltastudio – Practice organisation Parasite 2.0 – Digital technology ndvr – Participatory platforms ABACO – Research, design, communicate POOL IS COOL – Building campaigns


New Generations Festival. BENT: workshop installation. Genoa, 2015.


· AN INTRODUCTION TO NEW GENERATIONS ·

See diagram “Most frequent keywords and themes” on pages 32–33

Themes and questions The results of this investigation were collected in two phases: initially, the aim was to define and isolate a set of common themes; and then, an investigation into some of these issues through an online questionnaire that involved the participation of 95 selected groups from 22 countries in EUROPE 32. 5 > The European Union (EU) consists of 28 member states (EUROPE 28): Austria, Belgium, Bulgaria, Croatia, the Republic of Cyprus, the Czech Republic, Denmark, Estonia, Finland, France, Germany, Greece, Hungary, Ireland, Italy, Latvia, Lithuania, Luxembourg, Malta, the Netherlands, Poland, Portugal, Romania, Slovakia, Slovenia, Spain, Sweden, and the UK. EUROPE 32 refers to a category that includes Norway, Serbia, Turkey, and Switzerland. 120 studios from 26 countries were invited to take part in the online survey. The 95 practices that participated in the questionnaire span 22 countries. Participants from Croatia, Slovenia, Estonia, and Turkey were invited but did not join the project. In six other countries, it was not possible to select any who were able to be part of the research. In addition to the four mentioned above, the other six countries not represented in this research are the Czech Republic, Latvia, Lithuania, Serbia, Slovakia, and Malta, altogether representing a total of 22,850 professionals —about 3% of the total number of architects in EUROPE 32.

5

The first of the two phases was developed as an analysis of the activities carried out by New Generations since 2012. Among these, particular attention was given to the approximately 80 video interviews performed over a six year period by New Generations —each of them transcribed and analysed— highlighting the most

· 27


Most frequent keywords and themes ................................

55 51

................................ ................................

46 40

................................ ................................

37 35

................................ ................................

34

................................

33 32

................................ ................................

26

................................ ................................ ................................

25

................................ ................................

23 22

................................ ................................

18

................................

17

................................ ................................ ................................ ................................

16

................................

15

................................ ................................ ................................ ................................

14

13 12

11

10

9

8

7

32 ·

................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................ ................................

collaboration public space process research multidisciplinarity approach city ideas community collective platform participation network office technology values digital sharing environment workshop crowdfunding crisis context strategies scale methodology construction communication commission mapping flexibility design bottom-up new economies transformation open infrastructure data temporary model layer landscape program private sector energy small-scale planning materiality information concretisation climate regeneration re-activation exchange urban planning trust interaction installation innovation event urban refugees solutions real estate publishing production

Between 2013 and 2018, New Generations involved a selection of approximately 80 architectural practices in a series of video interviews. These were transcribed and analysed, highlighting the most significant keywords mentioned by the interviewees. From the analysis of these keywords, it was possible to identify four main areas of investigation: organisation, business, media, and projects. After defining these four main topics, which correspond to the central chapters of this publication, an online survey was prepared and completed by various young emerging architects from all over Europe. Their responses and insights are further explored in this publication.

< Repetitions of terms From the transcription of the interviews conducted by New Generations from 2013 to 2018, more than 500 keywords have been identified. Terms that are repeated more frequently have a more general nature such as “collaboration” or “public space”. Words repeated fewer times correspond to more specific concepts.

<

107

Intersection of themes

O = Organisation B = Business M = Media P = Projects

O

B O+B

O+M

O+B+M

O+P+B B+P

O+B+M+P

B+M

P+B+M O+P

M

M+P P


Geography of terms The diagram collects a selection of keywords, arranged according to the four themes: organisation, business, media, and projects.

organisation

business

media

projects

office

horizontal

commission

new economies

informal

coalition freelancing

network software

code

data

solutions

sharing

information

robots

innovation

research

recycle

format

mapping

bottom-up

video

critic tools discussion

artificial intelligence

interaction visualisation

regeneration

methodology

re-activation

model

anticipation

concretisation

sustainability urban planning

imagination

temporary

media

re-use

approach

think tank

pedagogy

machine learning

scale

process

participation

user

photography

environment

experiment

technology

digital publishing

context

climate

social innovation

open source

social network

landscape

learning by doing

transformation

digital fabrication

crowdfunding

urban development

collaboration

multidisciplinarity

marketing

communication

community

values

identity

small-scale

infrastructure

blockchain

evolution

refugees

program

co-creation

hub

event

public space

prototype

strategies

exchange

developer

construction

cooperative

database

layer

co-management

e

client

investment

crisis

optimisation

arena

platform

online

unsolicited

BIM

sin

private sector

stakeholders

compromising

decentralised

time

negotiation

open

coordination management

real estate

workshop

flexibility

task

collective

materiality production ephemeral

vernacular housing

installation

¡ 33

planning

cts

studio

bu

oje

laboratory

pr

on

or

an

ti isa

ss

g

The keywords placed near the outside of the diagram belong to specific themes. Moving towards the centre, we find words that fall under two or more themes (e.g. projects + business, projects + media, organisation + media + business, etc.). The words that fall under all four themes are right in the centre; they are the most generic and the most frequently used by the participants.


The different ways of organising oneâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s work correspond to different approaches to an architectural project. This section introduces some of the aspects that characterise the configuration of the practices such as the number of partners and employees, the division of roles, the external collaborators, the reasons


for starting an independent career, and so on. The chapter ends with a collection of terms that define the architectural practice: “office”, “atelier”, “workshop”, “studio”, “collective”, “team”, etc. These terms are further analysed and are possible hints to different organisational and working approaches in the various practices.


Practice definition This diagram collects a selection of definitions submitted by the different participants who answered the following question: “Define in up to 50 words the term that best represents the organisation of your practice”.

Office

Studio 2001 [LU]

We are a “classical” architectural design office, developing building projects and interior design for private customers and public administrations.

05 AM arquitectura [ES] We are a small office that do small projects, which means projects of a comprehensible scale, with personalized treatment and, if possible, love.

ENORME Studio [ES] Office, “oficina” in spanish, is the place in which you develop work. Although we develop projects in many places and with clients around the world, we consider our little office in Madrid as the space in which ideas and production start.

EXTUDIO [ES] To be an architect means to develop an intellectual work and intellectual works usually take place in offices.

gosplan [IT] In order to do what we want to do —to create beautiful buildings which benefit the environment and surrounding community— we need to make sure that our practice is economically viable, efficient, organised etc. ‘Design Office’ seems to capture this aspiration.

IF_DO [UK] Our office consists of two founding partners, one employee and a team of independent architects.

LOW architecten [BE]

Just an ordinary office where we sit down daily to discuss, to draw, to build models, etc. —to develop ideas and implement them into form.

Schneider Türtscher [CH] We have an office space that we come to every day (when not travelling). We develop our ideas together with our collaborators or other firms. We use laptops and telephones and we have meetings. This is what we understand as an office.

Something Fantastic [DE] As a young practice that wants to take part actively in the city-making process and architectural building, we need a solid professional structure that help us to deal with daily issues of this reality. The term ‘office’ refers to this ambition while letting our production define our common imaginations.

CENTRAL office for architecture and urbanism [BE] We are a part-time office that relies on a loose network of collaborators, but the core workgroup is fixed and functions as a traditional office.

This term reflects our determination to develop projects throughout investigation, focusing on both the technical and creative aspects.

BarrioBalmaseda [ES] “Studio”, from the Latin word, “Studium”, to mean study, application. Our projects develop a narrative to provide a bespoke service, specific to place and context. We study the world as it exists, drawing inspiration and ideas from urban, historical, and social analysis to create a backdrop to everyday life.

MUTT [UK] Studio —a place where work happens— as in an art studio or a studio in an architecture school. Studio is derived from Latin studere - meaning to study.

Norell/Rodhe [SE] There is a dialogue for each project with all the members of the practice — experimentation, research, hard models and renders. It reminds us of the way studios in architecture school used to tackle a creative project.

Petras Architecture [GR]

Virkkala de Vocht architects [FI] It is an architectural office based in the historic Athenian downtown, Plaka, inside a typical ground floor portico. We chose to open our office next to traditional handcraft stores (bookbinder, jewellery, tailor), giving importance to handcraft detailing.

SOUTH architecture [GR]

··

The responsibilities engaged in building contracts demand an office structure.

Laboratory Remembering the time we talked about opening the office, there were three of us, located between Milan, Reggio Emilia, and Florence. Our options were to go further away from each other or gathering together. In the end, our love for Italy pushed us to stay here and build our projects.

OPPS architettura [IT]


Other definitions

Collective

Team

We like to collaborate with each other and with other practices —not only architectural ones— in fact, we get our inspiration mostly from non architectural projects.

architecture uncomfortable workshop [HU]

Taller de Casquería [ES]

Workshop Our practice works a lot with physical models that are everywhere present in the space, so that the traditional office is contaminated by a rigorous production of objects.

AREA Architecture Research Athens [GR]

A collective represents a flexible way to organise and manage a group of professionals. This give us the possibility to change team, place, and format according to the projects that we have.

Colectivo Warehouse [PT] We are a loose collective of thinkers, makers, theorists, planners, pedants, and muddlers, who range in between the fields of urban planning, built and temporary architectures, art production, cultural history, theatre, and art. We come from different parts of Germany, Italy, and Bulgaria and are based in Berlin, Kiel, and Sofia. The work of every single member of the group enriches the evolving network and significantly defines its working and communication methods.

Guerilla Architects [DE/BG]

Atelier

A2BC [IT] The place and type of work we do is kind of, still, in the traditional sense of the word, a reflection of our intentions and moral beliefs that we have and try to realise.

Atelier Starzak Strebicki [PL] It summarises the perfect amount of technique and art in the work space.

fala [PT]

Creative culture We see our office as our biggest project. We want to build a culture that always produces high quality creative solutions.

XML [NL]

Office, laboratory, network, collective Our office can’t be defined by one term. Depending on the stage of the project our organisation shifts between terms. This means that our office has a core of 30 people, but we also have a team of 20 different people/offices who/where we collaborate with, according to the needs of the project.

Marc Koehler Architects [NL]

Cordée Network Nowadays it’s not possible nor fun to work alone. But it’s important also to manage a flexible economical and human structure. ‘Network’ works in both senses.

Eeestudio [ES]

A cordée is a light moving unit of a small number of persons working all together towards a common goal. It incorporates a broader range of human relations than a traditional ‘office’ —friendship, partnership, mutual help, cooperation and shared knowledge.

Peaks [FR] The network offered the opportunity to develop an innovative organisation that works as a platform to exchange knowledge and ideas.

NEAR architecture [GR/IT]

Platform The project gathers different profiles and a very flexible number of collaborators.

Aman Iwan [FR]

··

A place where the design is influenced by the physical presence of matter and cultural implications of each project.

OOIIO Architecture [ES]

Narrators CENTRALA conducts research into historical designs, reconstructs outstanding, though often forgotten, architectural ideas, and designs its own interventions, recreating modes of architecture’s functions in complex narratives: urban policies, cultures of memory, and affirmation of social spaces.

CENTRALA [PL]

··

Taller de Casquería’s work focuses on the intersection between architecture and contemporary society. Its research-based experiments and installations aim to find tools to be applied to space, city, and society.

I try to organize the office as well as possible, giving to each one of us a specific task complementing their colleague’s one. Everyone is important to keep the machine working.

··


22 000 €, 22 000 €,

24 000 €, 24 000 €,

25 000 €, 25 000 €, 25 000 €, 25 000 €, 25 000 €, 25 000 €, 25 000 €, 25 000 €, 26 000 €,

28 000 €,

29 000 €,

Up to €100,000; public commissions Most public commissions range from €0 to €100,000. This category can be further divided into two, where only a small number of public commissions exceed €50,000, with most public commissions remaining under €50,000. These include artistic installations, public participation projects, or small- to medium-scale interventions in the public space.

30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30.000 €,30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 30 000 €, 31 500 €, 31 500 €,

34 000 €,

35 000 €, 35 000 €, 35 000 €, 35 000 €, 35 000 €,

37 500 €,

40 000 €, 40 000 €, 40 000 €, 40 000 €, 40 000 €, 40 000 €, 40 000 €, 40 000 €, 40 000 €, 40 000 €, 45 000 €, 45 000 €, 45 000 €, 45 000 €, 45 000 €, 45 000 €,

50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 €, 50 000 € , 52 000 € 50 000 €,

48 000 €, 48 000 €,

60 000 €, 60 000 €, 60 000 €, 60 000 €, 60 000 €, 60 000 €, 62 000 €,

From €50,000 to €150,000; private commissions

70 000 €, 70 000 €, 70 000 €, 70 000 €, 70 000 €, 70 000 €, 70 000 €, 70 000 €, 70 000 €, 70 000 €, 75 000 €, 80 000 €, 80 000 €, 80 000 €, 80 000 €, 80 000 €, 81 000 €,

From the data, most private projects have an average budget of around €150,000, mostly corresponding to homes and other small- to medium-scale projects such as apartments, renovations, holiday houses, etc. Only a few private commissions have higher budgets of up to €1,000,000.

85 000 €, 85 000 €, 85 000 €,

90 000 €, 90 000 €, 90 000 €,

99 000 €,

100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €,100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 100 000 €, 110 000 €, 110 000 €, 110 000 €, 110 000 €, 110 000 €, 120 000 €, 120 000 €, 120 000 €, 130 000 €, 130 000 €,

125 000 €,

140 000 €,

150 000 €, 150 000 €, 150 000 €, 150 000 €, 150 000 €, 150 000 €, 150 000 €, 150 000 €, 150 000 €, 150 000 €, 160 000 €,


180 000 €, 180 000 €, 180 000 €,180 000 €, 180 000 €, 180 000 €, 180 000 €,

200 000 €, 200 000 €, 200 000 €, 200 000 €, 200 000 €, 200 000 €, 200 000 €, 200 000 €, 215 000 €, 220 000 €, 230.000 €,

250 000 €, 250 000 €, 250 000 €, 250 000 €, 250 000 €, 250 000 €, 250 000 €, 250 000 €, 250 000 €,

260 000 €, 270 000 €,

300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 300 000 €, 317 489 €,

350 000 €, 350 000 €, 350 000 €, 350 000 €, 350 000 € 400 000 €, 400 000 €, 400 000 €, 400 000 €, 420 000 €, 430 000 €, 400 000 €, 400 000 €, 450 000 €, 450 000 €, 450 000 €,

456 852 €,

500 000 €, 500 000 €, 500 000 €, 500 000 €, 500 000 €, 500 000 €, 565 000 €, 565 000 €,

600 000 €, 600 000 €, 600 000 €, 600 000 €, 600 000 €, 600 000 €, 600 000 €, 600 000 €, 650 000 €, 650000 €, 650 000 €, 700 000 €, 700 000 €, 700 000 €, 750 000 €, 800 000 €, 800 000 €, 800 000 €, 900 000 €, 900 000 €, 960 000 €,

978 000 €,

More than € 1,000,000; competitions This category is mostly comprised of unrealised projects such as architectural competitions. These architectural competitions offer very high potential budgets and are usually medium- to large-scale buildings, interventions in the public space, urban infrastructure, etc. However, only a handful of the 95 studies have had the opportunity to execute this type of project at this stage of their career.

990 000 €,

1 000 000 €, 1 000 000 €, 1 000 000 € 1 000 000 €,1 000 000 €, 1 200 000 €, 1 200 000 €, 1 200 000 €, 1 200 000 €, 1 400 000 €, 1 400 000 €,

1 300 000 €,

684 000 €,

1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 500 000 €, 1 700 000 €, 1 800 000 €, 2 000 000 €, 2 000 000 €, 2 000 000 €, 2 000 000 €, 2 000 000 €, 2 000 000 €, 2 000 000 €, 2 000 000 €, 2 500 000 €, 2 900 000 €, 2 900 000 €,

3 000 000 €, 3 000 000 €, 3 000 000 €, 3 000 000 €, 3 000 000 €, 3 000 000 €,

3 500 000 €, 3 500 000 €, 3 500 000 €, 3 500 000 €,

3 600 000 €,

4 000 000 €, 4 000 000 €,

5 000 000 €, 5 000 000 €, 5 000 000 €, 6 000 000 €, 8 000 000 €,

5 500 000 €,

6 500 000 €,

5 900 000 €,

7 000 000 €, 7 200 000 €,

8 750 000 €,

9 000 000 €, 9 000 000 €, 9 000 000 €,

9 300 000 €,

9 800 000 €,

12 000 000 €, 12 000 000 €,

10 000 000 €,

15 000 000 €, 15 000 000 €,

16 500 000 €, 40 000 000 €,

75 000 000 €,

90 500 000 €,

13 000 000 €,

18 000 000 €,

45 000 000 €, 108 300 000 €


Gianpiero Venturini > Do you use each communication channel differently depending on the content you want to share? Saverio Massaro >

Exactly, it depends on the content. Facebook is more useful if you want to share some text, whereas Instagram is better for images. These two elements â&#x20AC;&#x201D;images and wordsâ&#x20AC;&#x201D; define very easily the way we use one or other social media channel. I think we should also mention tools like WhatsApp or Facebook Messenger. They are replacing emails.

There is not much hierarchy among the many types of apps that allow you to send direct messages. Every app is almost as good as the other, and in general, this creates confusion. We talk without distinction with everyone, from family to clients and friends. 130 ¡

Dario Pompei >

An important element linked to the use of these channels lies in the relationship with the client, who is always able to reach


· MEDIA ·

you through WhatsApp, Instagram or Facebook Messenger. These channels, for better or for worse, reduce the distance between the architect and the client. Although sometimes the client may invade your personal space if they feel entitled to contact you at any time. Gianpiero Venturini > And then there are all the tools for the internal workflow. What are the advantages of using tools like Drive, Skype, Dropbox, and so on? Dario Pompei >

Drive is useful in various different ways. Although it has a limited capacity, it’s a tool that makes communication much more agile, without the need to attach documents to emails. We try to organise all the folders with drawings and images in a way that we can share all the material with magazines or clients via a simple link. We also use it as our database to organise our work, as well as for the management of tenders and competitions. It has become an indispensable tool to share, comment, and work simultaneously.

· 131


Media and communication In the media and communication section, apps, platforms, and web pages reported in the online survey have been divided into two broad categories. First, digital tools that allow for the communication and dissemination of projects, which often attracts external collaboration and clients. Second, digital tools that facilitate the organisation, management, and communication among the core team or with clients.

Communication, dissemination, and research HeloAsso

Facebook Twitter

*

website 1

Tumblr

YouTube

Vimeo

*

2

Instagram

Baunetz

Pinterest

Mailchimp

LinkedIn

AngelList

Google Hangouts Toogl OneNote

Google Calendar

Slack

Asana Trello

*

4

*

*

iMessage Moxtra

Skype

Threema

Google Drive

Dropbox

FaceTime

3

WhatsApp TeamViewer

5

WeTransfer

OneDrive

Jitsi

Outlook

*

1

In the category “communication and dissemination”, Instagram and Facebook are the two most mentioned channels. In just a couple of years, Instagram has almost overshadowed Facebook, which seems to have lost the interest of the participants. Furthermore, Instagram and Facebook have almost completely replaced websites, which were reported as important for the communication of the activities of the practice by only 10 participants.

* *

2

3

Youtube and Vimeo were mentioned a significant number of times, with a preference for the second one in the architectural field. Amongst the tools used for communication, Skype was reported 44 times. Founded in 2003, Skype was one of the first applications providing video chat and voice call services between computers, tablets, and mobile devices, and so far it has not been affected much by the presence of other similar software, such as FaceTime or Google Hangout.

*

4

Organisation, management, and communication

Within the category “organisation, management, and communication”, we mostly find two kinds of tools: those used to organise internal workflow, such as Dropbox, WeTransfer, or Google Drive; and those used to communicate with clients, partners, or external collaborators, such as Skype, Google Hangout, or FaceTime.

*

5

Dropbox and Google Drive were reported 19 and 29 times respectively. Both applications offer similar services, with Google Drive appearing more frequently because it offers additional all-in-one features such as the possibility of working simultaneously with other remote users.


Most used digital tools and their application The two diagrams are related to one another. The first one represents the long list of digital tools, software, and applications reported by the 95 participants. The second diagram illustrates their use. With regard to the different tools from the first category “communication, dissemination, and research”, participants report different functions. First, traditional communication activities such as increasing publicity for the company, dissemination of projects, or displaying job vacancies. Second, critiquing

or writing, researching, and discovering architectural news. Third, building online campaigns and involving communities suggest in contrast a very pro-active and experimental way of using tools such as Facebook or Instagram. In the second category, “organisation, management, and communication”, participants report that their main use of these tools is for collaborating and networking (64), followed by developing projects (29), and organising the practice (28).

Communication, dissemination, and research

involving communities - stakeholders (7) building online campaigns (5) crowdfunding - fundrising (1)

dissemination of projects

discovering architectural news

(39)

increasing publicity of company

finding clients (4)

critic - writing (4)

(28)

(34)

research — learning (24)

displaying job vacancies (6)

organising practice — workflow (28)

collaboration — networking (64)

developing projects (29)

Social media/digital tools timeline

Facebook Vimeo OpenStreetMaps

Twitter Google Calendar Toggl

Trello iMessage

Instagram Pinterest AngelList FaceTime

Google Drive Outlook Moxtra Threema OneNote

2018

2017

2016

2015

2014

2013

Slack Telegram

2012

2011

2009

2008

Dropbox Asana

2010

WhatsApp WeTransfer HelloAsso

Tumblr OneDrive

2007

2006

2005

2003

2002

Linkedin

Youtube TeamViewer

2004

Skype Jitsi

Mailchimp

2001

<

Organisation, management, and communication


Amsterdam [NL]

Space&Matter


>

Sweets hotel Amsterdam, the Netherlands 2010 - ongoing

>

Schoonschip Amsterdam, the Netherlands 2011 - ongoing

¡ 201


220 ·


Rome [IT]

orizzontale

8 ½ Yap MAXXI 2014 Museo MAXXI, Roma, Italia 2014

· 221

>


New Generations is a project conceived by Itinerant Office in 2013 that investigates the changes in the architectural profession since the economic crisis. This publication analyses the careers of a selection of young emerging architects in Europe, with the aim of providing useful tools and insight for architecture students, new graduates, and emerging practices in the early stages of their careers. ATLAS involved 95 emerging practices from 22 European countries in an online survey. Their responses were collected and further analysed in this publication. Following an introduction on the New Generations project and its evolution over the years, the publication develops in four main sections: organisation, business, media, and projects. The “Organisation” section analyses different organisational structures, with diagrams and data highlighting the huge variety of configurations that reflect the array of different approaches used by the various firms. The section “Business” highlights various types of commissions —public, private, and unsolicited— ranging in budgets, scale, and program. “Media” introduces the potential of digital tools, not only for the online communication of the office’s activities, but also for the development of projects such as encouraging participation through social media, or managing the organisational aspects of the studio. The section “Projects” collects a selection of executed interventions by some of the participants of the ATLAS. The final chapter of ATLAS emphasises the need to rethink the architectural profession. Organisation, Business, Media, and Projects become central and inextricable themes to build a new generation of architects aware of their role in today’s society.

9

788894

152715

Profile for Actar Publishers

Atlas of Emerging Practices  

Atlas of emerging practices, being an architect in the 21st century, is a publication that provides an overview of the state of the architec...

Atlas of Emerging Practices  

Atlas of emerging practices, being an architect in the 21st century, is a publication that provides an overview of the state of the architec...

Profile for actar
Advertisement