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ACS ATHENS MISSION STATEMENT:

ACS Athens is a student-centered international school, embracing American educational philosophy, principles and values. Through excellence in teaching and diverse educational experiences, ACS Athens challenges all students to realize their unique potential: academically, intellectually, socially and ethically -- to thrive as responsible global citizens.

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TABLE OF CONTENTS ACS Athens Mission Statement:

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Table of Contents

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Introduction

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General information

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Student placement

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Achievement levels

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ACS Athens grade policy

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ACS Athens ASSESSMENT policy

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Pursuit of excellence

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Requirements for graduation

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Ninth and Tenth grade program

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The Advanced Placement Program (AP)

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About the International Baccalaureate Diploma program (grades 11 & 12)

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On what basis is the IB Diploma given?

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When do students begin formal study for the IB Diploma?

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Must all courses be studied? Choice of IB Diploma courses

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Assessment of student work in the IB Diploma

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School and IBO fees for the IB Diploma

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How does one get more information about the IB Program at ACS?

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College applications and grades for AP and IB courses

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IB predicted Scores

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IB – Division of Language and Literature

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IB – Division of Humanities and the Arts

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B – Division of Math, Science and Technology

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IB YEAR 2 criteria

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IB /AP/Scholar Diploma core & support courses

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IB/AP/SCHOLAR DIPLOMA CORE & SUPPORT: Courses in Detail

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ACS Athens Division of Language and Literature: course offerings

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Department: English (ESL SUPPORT)

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ENGLISH as a Second Language: Courses in Detail

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Department: English

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ENGLISH: Courses in Detail

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Department: Greek / Language A

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GREEK / LANGUAGE A: Courses in Detail

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Department: Greek / Language B

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GREEK / LANGUAGE B: Courses in Detail

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Department: Modern Languages / Spanish

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MODERN LANGUAGES / SPANISH: Courses in Detail

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Department: Modern Languages /Arabic

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MODERN LANGUAGES / ARABIC: Courses in Detail

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Department: Modern Languages / Chinese Language A

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MODERN LANGUAGES/ CHINESE LANGUAGE A: Courses in Detail

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Department: Modern Languages/ Chinese Language b

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MODERN LANGUAGES / CHINESE: Courses in Detail

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Department: Modern Languages / German

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MODERN LANGUAGES / GERMAN: Courses in Detail

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ACS Athens Division of Math, Science and Technology: course offerings

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Department: Mathematics

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MATHEMATICS: Courses in Detail

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Department: Science

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SCIENCE: Courses in Detail

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Department: Technology

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TECHNOLOGY: Courses in Detail

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ACS Athens Division of Humanities and the Arts: course offerings

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Department: Social Studies

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SOCIAL STUDIES: Courses in Detail

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Department: Visual and Performing Arts

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VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS: Courses in Detail

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Department: Physical Education

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PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Courses in Detail

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Academic Guidance Program

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ACADEMIC GUIDANCE: Courses in Detail

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Optimal Learning Program

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Optimal Learning Program- classroom

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Optimal Learning Program -consultation

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Optimal Learning Program Support Plan for Instruction, Assessment and Accessibility (SPIAA)

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Differentiated instruction at ACS Athens

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Optimal Learning Mentor Program

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Acceptance criteria to the Mentor Program

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INTRODUCTION Dear Students and Parents: The faculty and administration of the Academy are pleased to provide the Course Catalog for the 20182019 school year. We believe the Academy’s diverse offerings are unparalleled in Greece at the secondary school level. As an international school embracing American principles of education, our program strives to maximize the growth of the whole person and to provide equal opportunities for a diverse student body. Our focus is also to encourage multicultural awareness and understanding, as well as to honor the rich culture of our host country. The range of courses offered at the Academy allows students with varied interests and talents to excel and to continue to grow academically. Courses are offered in all of the traditional academic areas, as well as in the fine arts, computer technology, physical education and health. The Optimal Learning, EFL and ESL Programs provide more individualized assistance for students who require it for mastery. Taken as a whole, the Academy program offers an exemplary college preparatory experience for all students. Beginning with the challenging 9th and 10th grade courses, the Academy experience provides students the opportunity to receive both an American and an International Baccalaureate Diploma at the end of grade 12. IB Diploma candidates may also work towards earning the equivalency of a Greek high school diploma (apolytirion). ACS Athens is offering an additional graduation option which provides students with an authentic learning experience unavailable anywhere else. Our ACS Athens Scholar Diploma combines a unique sequence of cross-disciplinary courses, honors courses, IB courses, and/or AP courses as well as the opportunity to conduct serious and rigorous research through a Senior Research Experience. Students, who successfully complete 14 credits including 10 honors, AP, and / or IB courses, as well as the research component, may earn this diploma. See Student/Parent Handbook under ACS Athens Scholar Diploma for more details. The Program of Studies is written to assist students and parents in making informed choices for course selections. Courses will run providing the student enrollment is sufficient- generally a minimum enrollment of 10. A printed course description is no guarantee that a given course will be scheduled. If a course is cancelled because of low enrollment, or for other reasons, the student will be contacted by the counseling department to make adjustments to his/her program. Please review the following course descriptions and visual representations of Academy offerings. It is of critical importance that you maintain contact with your child’s counselor to ensure that students’ schedules will satisfy all Academy graduation requirements and also match their special strengths and interests. Co-curricular opportunities -- cultural, academic, service and athletic as well as programs offered by the ACS Athens Institute for Creativity (IIC), that allow students the opportunity to pursue college level study for credit --- provide possibilities for students to extend learning beyond the classroom. The Student/Parent Handbook and the publications of the IIC contain descriptions of such activities. The entire Academy staff looks forward to greeting you in September 2018. The Academy Administration, Faculty and Staff 6


GENERAL INFORMATION STUDENT PLACEMENT During registration students are given a list of courses to be offered for the following school year. Each course in the program of studies states the prerequisites that must be met in order for a student to be eligible to enroll. Students who do not meet the prerequisites for course enrollment in the final step based on June grades may be offered reconsideration if requested. The reconsideration request must be initiated by the parent or student after June grades are posted and before June 30. Typically, grades earned determine whether the prerequisite has been met. Those students who do not meet the course prerequisites with June grades will have the opportunity to initiate a course reconsideration process. Students are expected to show, by the end of the summer, evidence of the content knowledge and academic skill needed for their requested courses. Different subject areas may require different forms of assessment of performance.

ACHIEVEMENT LEVELS Honors Courses are planned for the student who brings extraordinary background and superior motivation to the subject. Honors credit is available in selected English, Social Studies, Mathematics, Science, Foreign Language, and Visual and Performing Arts courses. To earn honors credit, students will typically complete advanced work and be evaluated at higher standards of assessment than in a regular course. To enter an honors-level course, students must meet stated prerequisites. Where a separate honors section is not available, students may elect (having met the prerequisite) to earn honors credit in a regular course, by the end of the first quarter of the academic year. Most International Baccalaureate courses are designated as honors level courses. Standard Courses are classes offered to the student who brings standard background and motivation to the subject.

ACS ATHENS GRADE POLICY The Academy uses letter grades: A, B, C, D and F. Teachers may give a plus or minus with the letter grade (except in the case of an F). The + or – will appear on the transcript. Students who attend a class less than two weeks will not be awarded a withdrawal grade on their transcript. Students who attend a class for more than two weeks will be awarded a withdrawal grade indicating either a withdraw/pass (W/P) or a withdraw/fail (W/F). Additionally, the student’s transcript will reflect the withdrawal date, courses in progress, and "NC" to indicate no credit given. Students who attend more than 50% of a course will be awarded a quarter grade and a cumulative semester or year’s grade (depending on the course duration). The report card will list this class along with the grade. This will become part of their transcript. For complete details on our grading policy please refer to the Student/Parent Handbook.

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ACS ATHENS ASSESSMENT POLICY ACS Athens students are challenged to become architects of their own learning who reach their unique potential – academically, intellectually, socially and ethically – to thrive as responsible global citizens. The school’s approach to assessment is designed to support these elements of the school’s vision and mission. ACS Athens faculty and administration believe that assessment is formative and summative and seeks to: 1. discover and enhance students’ knowledge, attitudes towards learning, understandings and abilities; 2. inform, improve and facilitate teaching and learning; 3. inspire students to reach their full potential. At ACS Athens, we assess: 1. to provide purposeful, meaningful and useful feedback to students about strengths, weaknesses and observed potential in the process of learning; 2. to evaluate final student performance against clearly stated standards of quality; 3. to guide instruction, and as a spur to further learning; 4. to inform students, parents and the professional staff of individual and group/school achievement and progress; 5. to measure the success of programmatic/curricular initiatives and to guide the development of new programs; 6. to ensure that learning is aligned with standards. ACS Athens faculty and administration are committed to implementing assessment practices that exhibit the following characteristics: ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ ✓ 8

holistic authentic flexible meaningful a product of/allows for student choice encouraging of self-reflection and peer review differentiated to account for learning differences contextual ethical reliable and fair aligned with clearly articulated curriculum standards engage students in intellectual activities of analysis, synthesis and evaluation in addition to recall of knowledge encourage creativity draw upon individual and collaborative student effort; independent and guided learning experiences; and classroom, on-line and fieldwork study (i2flex) promote problem-solving, project-based, inquiry-fueled learning take a wide variety of forms in a wide variety of media and performance modes encourage reflection and revision inspiring


ACS Athens faculty and administration are committed to developing an assessment program that values the most accurate demonstration of student performance over the averaging of grades in a reporting period. The faculty are currently engaged in documenting assessment practices, and creating a bank of departmental assessment rubrics, as part of our work (grades JK-12) to create a portfolio of teaching strategies and practices that promote students’ learning in all aspects of the Learner Profile/ACS Portrait of a Graduate, and which represent research-based best practices in constructivist, inquirybased teaching and learning.

PURSUIT OF EXCELLENCE While the Academy strives to offer a program of academic excellence, of equal import is the development of respectful, ethical, and self-reliant behaviors. When students join the Academy, they are making a commitment to improving themselves, the school, and the community. The Academy also believes that academic success demonstrates little when achieved at the cost of academic integrity. We are committed, therefore, to the maintenance of ethical standards and behaviors from all the members of our community. The expectation in the Academy is that work on all papers, projects, homework, exams, is original. No matter what pressures are faced from the family, the demands of college admissions or peers, students are responsible for consistently maintaining originality of work, for documenting all sources, for organizing and preparing well, and for completing assignments on time. Learning support is provided to students through Counseling, Academic Advisory, Junior and Senior Advisory, the Writing and Math Studios, The Optimal Learning Program and ESL Programs.

REQUIREMENTS FOR GRADUATION The American Community Schools of Athens will require twenty-six Carnegie Units to be earned over a minimum of eight semesters for the Academy Diploma. These will include the following: 1. Four English credits. Classes are taken each semester in grades 9-12.

2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7.

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The following courses or their equivalents must be taken. English 9: Literature or Language and Literature (Regular or Honors) English 10: Literature or Language and Literature (Regular or Honors) English 11: Humanities or a year of IB English Literature or IB English Language and Literature year 1. English 12: Humanities, or a year of IB English Literature or IB English Language and Literature year 2. Three Years of Greek and/or Modern Language, two years must be in the same language. (It is recommended that students take four years.) Three years of Mathematics including Geometry with Algebraic Topics (It is recommended that students take four years.). Three years of Science. (It is recommended that students take four years.) One semester of Health, preferably in grade 10. Two semesters of Computer Technology. Four Social Studies credits. Classes are taken in grades 9-12, including: European History: grade 9 requirement (Regular or Honors) American Studies: grade 10 requirement (Regular or Honors)


Plus two full years of Social Studies classes in grades 11-12. 8. Two semesters of Visual and Performing Arts. Students may elect courses from the Visual Arts and Performing Arts. 9. Three semesters of Physical Education. All 9th graders must take Physical Education. A third semester must be taken for graduation, preferably in Grade 10. 10. The remainder of the credits is to be earned through the various elective courses offered in grades 11-12. * Course Selection: Students must elect eight courses per semester, including Academic Advisory in grades 9 and 10 and then Junior and Senior Advisory. Students in grade 11 who are not enrolled in the IB Diploma Program or five IB certificates or AP courses must enroll in eight classes including Junior Advisory. The same students in grade 12 not enrolled in the IB Diploma program or five IB certificate or AP courses must enroll in eight classes including Senior Advisory and Study Hall. Exception to this in extraordinary circumstances must meet with the principal’s approval.

NINTH AND TENTH GRADE PROGRAM The grade 9 and 10 program is designed to ensure a smooth transition from middle school to high school study; grounding students in the academic and social skills necessary for a successful high school experience. The program in grades 9 and 10 is designed to prepare students to enter the appropriate program of study (including the IB DP) in grade 11. The student’s intellectual and social development is the focus of the Academy Program. An interdisciplinary inquiry-based approach gives the curriculum its core. A central focus of the grade 9 and 10 program is participation in community and service activities, which are a part of every student’s freshman and sophomore year experience. The grade 9 and 10 curriculum consists of eight subject groups. Those subjects are required of students during both grades 9 and 10. They are: 1. English – Taught as Language A (native speaker) level, co- taught with social studies. 2. Greek A or B/ Modern Language - All modern languages are taught at Language B (nonnative speaker) level. Native Greek speakers may study Greek as a second Language A. 3. Mathematics – core courses include: Algebra 1, Geometry with Algebraic Topics, and/or Algebra 2 & Trigonometry, Mathematical Methods, and AP Calculus. 4. Sciences – biology, chemistry and physics 5. Technology – Introduction to Computer Science I and II. STEAM. 6. Social Studies– European and American history are the 9th and 10th grade social studies offerings, co- taught with English. 7. Visual and Performing Arts – art/design, music and drama, STEAM (Grade 10 only) 8. Physical Education and Health – wellness and hygiene; individual and team sports; and lifelong fitness activities. The student’s educational accomplishments are documented in a Personal Learning Portfolio, which records the skills acquired and results obtained in each academic subject. The portfolio is compiled throughout the two years and completed at end of grade 10. The student’s extended research skills are assessed through an exercise known as the Personal Project, which is completed in Grade 10. Both the Personal Learning Portfolio and the Personal Project are addressed in the grade 9 and 10 Academic Advisory classes.

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THE ADVANCED PLACEMENT PROGRAM (AP) The Advanced Placement (AP) program has been run by The College Board, a non-profit organization, since 1955. It offers a wide variety of rigorous, analytical and challenging college preparatory courses. Depending on performance, candidates can earn worldwide university credit. The design, delivery and assessment in these courses offer a unique learning experience as it enables students to gain deep understanding of the subject, to develop advanced skills in writing and problem solving and to become actively involved in the teaching process. The AP program consists of 38 courses from which a student can choose, provided the courses are offered at our school. ACS Athens will offer the following AP courses in the academic year 20182019: • • •

AP Calculus AP Environmental Science AP Spanish

Courses run for one year, at the end of which students take external, standardized tests provided by The College Board and administered by the licensed school. The duration of the AP courses, compared to those of the IB, allows the students to design their own unique program that best fits their student profile and academic plans. In many instances, such programs have been proven to be more effective and timely for a great number of students. Students receive a certificate for each AP course they complete. For each AP exam the student takes, AP courses can help students acquire skills and habits necessary for success in college. The rigor and advanced level of these courses make the AP program widely accepted by universities and colleges around the world. All AP courses are honors level and are designated on the transcript as such.

ABOUT THE INTERNATIONAL BACCALAUREATE DIPLOMA PROGRAM (GRADES 11 & 12) Each IB diploma candidate studies from six subject groups. Three subjects are studied at the Higher Level and three at the Standard Level. Students must take a course from each of the first 5 subject groups and have the option to choose either a course from the 6th group or from any of the other groups. The six subject groups are: 1. Group 1: Studies in Language and Literature (Language A) 2. Group 2: Language Acquisition (Language B or Ab initio, second language) 3. Group 3: Study of Individuals and Societies 4. Group 4: Experimental Sciences and Computer Science 5. Group 5: Mathematics 6. Group 6: Visual Arts, Theatre (or another course from group 1,2, 3, or 4) Three further requirements which contribute to the unique nature of the Diploma are: 1. A Theory of Knowledge class, which unites the various areas of studies and deals with the ways humans perceive the world. This course provides an opportunity for serious reflection about all of an individual’s studies. Students are required to write a 1600 word essay during their senior year. 2. A 4,000 word Extended Essay (EE) based on original research and chosen by the candidate from one of the six subject groups.

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3. The Creativity, Activity and Service (CAS) requirement met through student engagement in various co-curricular activities which involve artistic expression, creative projects, physical activity, and community service. Theory of Knowledge can be taken as an IB course by any grade 11 student.

ON WHAT BASIS IS THE IB DIPLOMA GIVEN? In May of each year, students, after having completed their two year program, sit for externally assessed examinations which, are graded on a 1-7 scale: 7 being the highest mark awarded. Students also complete a number of internally and externally assessed or moderated projects, papers, presentations and/or performances in each course. These assessments constitute a percentage of the final IB score in each course. Students will sit for mock exams in IB courses during the final exam periods in grade 11 and the midterm exam period in grade 12. The IB Diploma is awarded by the IBO if: a. CAS requirements have been met. b. The candidate’s total points are 24 or more. c. There is no “N” (non-submission of work) awarded for Theory on Knowledge, the Extended Essay or for a contributing subject. d. There is no grade E awarded for Theory of Knowledge and/or the Extended Essay. e. There is no grade 1 awarded in a subject/level. f. There are no more than two grade 2s awarded (HL or SL). g. There are no more than three grade 3s or below awarded (HL or SL). h. The candidate has gained 12 points or more on HL subjects (for candidates who register for four HL subjects, the three highest grades count). i. The candidate has gained 9 points or more on SL subjects (candidates who register for two SL subjects must gain at least 5 points at SL). j. The candidate has not received a penalty for academic misconduct from the Final Award Committee.

WHEN DO STUDENTS BEGIN FORMAL STUDY FOR THE IB DIPLOMA? Students enter the program in the 11th grade and continue their studies in the 12th grade. Those who desire to be considered for the IB Diploma program must go through our admissions procedures which include both an application and an interview. Frequently, candidates to the IB Diploma program will have participated in honors classes in the 9th and 10th grades, but enrollment in honors classes is not a requirement for participating in the IB program. Interested candidates should apply formally to enroll in the IB Diploma program. Students are guided through the application process in Grade 10 advisory class during 3rd quarter, when counselors review with them the criteria for admission into the IB Diploma program. A committee comprised of counselors, teachers, and administrators will holistically evaluate student performance, academic goals, effort, and commitment to success in order to grant admission to the IB Diploma program. Any interested, successful and hard-working student who intends to pursue a college or university education can receive an IB Diploma. Students must maintain a good academic record to continue in the IB Diploma Program. The IB-Diploma status of students who fail to meet the SIB prerequisite in any courses, the year 1 Extended Essay requirements, or the August- retake exams (see the IB year 2 criteria), will be re-evaluated by a committee comprised of counselors, teachers, and administrators. Student performance, academic goals, and student effort and commitment to 12


success will be evaluated holistically in order to assess whether the student will be given a chance to continue to the Year II of the IB Diploma. Note that there is an additional fee for this program as well as a registration fee to take the May examinations at the end of the second year. Contact the IB office for more details.

MUST ALL COURSES BE STUDIED? CHOICE OF IB DIPLOMA COURSES Students who do not wish to pursue the International Baccalaureate diploma may choose to take individual IB Diploma courses and receive certificates for successful completion of exams. The students are referred to as IB Diploma Course students. US colleges and universities may award advanced placement to their candidates offering based on IB scores in the higher level IB Diploma courses.

ASSESSMENT OF STUDENT WORK IN THE IB DIPLOMA Delivery of IB courses must meet the IBO (International Baccalaureate Organization) course specific requirements as they are stated in each IBO subject guide. Student work is designed and assessed using the IBO assessment criteria. IB Diploma or Diploma Course students, in addition to their inclass IB assessments, must sit for formal mock exams in June of year 1 (grade 11) and in January of year 2 (semester 1 grade 12). Mock exams follow the IB examination protocol and schedule. Mock examination papers are graded by ACS Athens faculty and IB scores are converted to the ACS Athens grade scale. Year 1 assessment of IBO student work (internal assessment, tests, projects, essays, mock exams) using the IBO scale (1-7) is included in the end of year student report card under the SIB (June-IB score up to date) column. The SIB score constitutes the academic performance prerequisite for all year 2 IB classes.

SCHOOL AND IBO FEES FOR THE IB DIPLOMA IB schools offering the IB Diploma program face both fixed and variable costs payable to IBO. The variable costs involve course exam registrations and any optional services requested by the students in relation their examinations. All ACS Athens IB Diploma students pay a flat fee for the two years of the IB program. The IB Diploma Course students pay only a prorated fee based on the number of courses they take. The ACS Athens IB Diploma program fee is paid in the beginning of each year. The exam registration fee (approximately 1100 euro for the IB Diploma students) is paid during the IBO registration in November of year 2.

HOW DOES ONE GET MORE INFORMATION ABOUT THE IB PROGRAM AT ACS? Parents and students can attend the announced informational sessions, visit our school's website to find all relevant information on our website, ACS Athens IB and/or should call to make an appointment with the Director of AP and IB programs.

COLLEGE APPLICATIONS AND GRADES FOR AP AND IB COURSES Both AP and IB examinations take place in May at the end of the senior year. Scores are released in June from the College Board for the AP tests, and in early July from the IB examinations. A frequently asked question by both parents and students is, “How do colleges offer admissions to students prior 13


to the release of the examination results?� U.S. colleges base admissions on a number of criteria (grades, difficulty of program, SAT scores, co-curricular activities, essays, teacher recommendations, and IB/AP Predictions). UK universities admit students based on predicted IB scores, which teachers submit in the fall of the senior year. All teachers use key IB assessments of the first and second year to determine predicted IB grades in each subject. It should be noted that the predicted grade may deviate from the ACS Athens grade, which is more holistic and includes assessments other than those set by the IBO. These additional assessments make up the ACS Athens student profile. For example, it is likely that a student with an ACS Athens grade of A in a course be given an IB prediction of 6 instead of a 7 or a 4 instead of 5 for an AP course. We list below the individual course criteria used by teachers to form their IB score predictions in order to assist parents and students in academic planning.

IB PREDICTED SCORES Both the year 1 Score on the IB Scale, SIB, and the fall IB course predicted grades are based on assessment and evaluation of student work specific to the IB course requirements. The criteria used to predict IB scores are listed below per Division and per IB subject group.

IB – DIVISION OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE Group 1

Group 2

English Literature, English Language and Literature, Greek Language and Literature, Chinese Language and Literature

Spanish B, Arabic B, Chinese B, Spanish AB, Mandarin AB

Year 1

Year 2

Year 1

Individual Oral Presentation

Oral and written Individual Oral assignments of semester 1 of Presentation the senior year

Oral and written assignments of semester 1 of the senior year

IB Writing Assignments

September Mock exam

Practice past papers assessments

September Mock exam

Exams and IB assessments

Assessed student work, paper 1 and paper 2, using the IB criteria and descriptors

Exams and IB assessments

Assessed student work using the IB criteria and descriptors

Summer assignment for the senior year

Practice past papers assessments

Daily class work and oral comprehension

Practice past papers assessments

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Year 2


IB – DIVISION OF HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS Group 3

Group 6

Business Management, Economics, Environmental Systems and Societies, History, Psychology

Visual Arts

Year 1

Theatre

Year 2

Year 1

Year 2

Year 1

Year 2

Exams: January, and June mocks

September Mock exam

Progress of studio work

Comparati ve study; first draft

Exams: June mocks

Completion of the Research Investigation assessment

Assessed Internal Assessment work and progress

Practice past papers assessments

Assessment of past examination papers

Internal Assessment completed in summer and in semester 1 of Year 2

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Evaluation of studio work completed by the fall of Year 2


B – DIVISION OF MATH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY Group 4

Group 5

Biology, Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Systems and Societies, Physics

Math Studies, Mathematics SL, Mathematics HL

Year 1

Year 2

Year 1

Year 2

Exams: January, and June mocks

September Mock exam

Exams: January, and June mocks

September Mock exam

Assessed Internal Assessment work and progress

Practice past papers assessments

Practice Internal Assessment

Practice past papers assessments

Assessment of past examination papers

Internal Assessment completed in summer and in semester 1 of Year 2

Assessment of past examination papers

Internal Assessment completed in summer and in semester 1 of Year 2

IB YEAR 2 CRITERIA Academic success for our students is one of our main goals. As such, we have established specific criteria for continuation to the second year of the IB courses which are stated in the Program of Studies under each course. Students must meet all prerequisites as outlined in the Program of Studies in order to continue into Year 2 of the IB Diploma Program or any IB Diploma Course. Students who fail to meet their June SIB (mock exam + year 1 internal assessment scores) prerequisite, but wish to continue in the second year of the IB Program, will have the opportunity to retake the exam late August, prior to the start of the academic year, as a second chance to meet the entry requirements for the second year courses. Please note that performance in the retake Mock exams in August will not change the year 1 student course grade. Furthermore, students who fail to meet the prerequisites in the August- retake Mock exams will not be given another chance to take the exam, and will be required to make the appropriate changes in their schedule with their counselors. Their IB Diploma status will be re-evaluated by a committee comprised of counselors, teachers, and administrators which will assess holistically student performance, academic goals, effort and commitment to success in order to allow the student to continue to the Year II of the IB Diploma. In addition to the course prerequisites, IB diploma candidates must show evidence of satisfactory progress on their Extended Essay requirement in order to maintain their IB Diploma status in year 2.

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IB /AP/SCHOLAR DIPLOMA CORE & SUPPORT COURSES Grade 9 --

Grade 10 --

Grade 11

Grade 12

7640y-H

7642s

9312s

9000

IB Theory of Knowledge (Junior Course)

IB CORE Seminars (IB Diploma Juniors)

IB Theory of Knowledge (Senior Seminar) Senior Research Experience

9311s

Study Hall

IB/AP/SCHOLAR DIPLOMA CORE & SUPPORT: Courses in Detail 7640y-H

IB Theory of Knowledge Honors (Junior Course)

Required for all IB Diploma candidates This course is designed to allow the student provide students with the opportunity to engage with issues such as the nature and acquisition of knowledge, the relationship between language and thinking, logic and ways of knowing in Science, Mathematics, History, Art and Social Science. Students will also explore the means by which moral, ethical, aesthetic and political judgments are made, with special consideration for differences in perspective such as awareness of cultural, religious or individual differences. Students are encouraged to reflect upon their entire academic career and make connections between the areas of knowledge and ways of knowing that they have studied, as well as being expected to demonstrate understanding of the interaction between shared and personal knowledge. They will also analyze and reflect on their CAS experiences as a means of gaining experiential knowledge in the context of the real world. This course is required for all full diploma IB students. Students will complete their Formal TOK Presentation in May, which will account for 33% of their total IB TOK grade. 7642s

IB Theory of Knowledge (Senior Seminar) Required for all IB Diploma candidates In the Senior Seminar, students will build on their Theory of Knowledge studies from the previous year and focus on completing the required essay with the guidance of their instructor by the end of Semester One. Students will become confident with the TOK essay format, criteria and requirements in preparation for the final TOK assessment, a 1600-word essay in response to one of the six prescribed titles published by the IB in September. The TOK Essay accounts for 67% of their total IB TOK grade. In completing the essay, students will also further develop their Thinking and Communication Skills in accordance with the IB Approaches to Learning, as well as their Self-Management skills.

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9312s

IB CORE Seminars (Diploma Juniors) The IB junior advisory is a semester class for IB Diploma students. It aims in strengthening essential knowledge and key Approaches to Learning skills into three areas of learning: Research & Organizational Skills, Study Habits and Personal Development. In addition, IB Diploma students are introduced to two of the IB Core requirements, CAS and Extended Essay. Underpinning the aims and running throughout the course are the skills and qualities that enable students to become well-rounded individuals and lifelong learners. Students are expected to develop a strengthened focus on securing independent study, research and organizational skills, which can be used and applied throughout their two-year IB curriculum. In addition, students will develop stress reduction techniques which will prove useful during exams and periods of multiple major deadlines.

Various #s

Self-Taught IB Language A Literature

The Self-Taught Language A course is intended for native or near-native speakers of languages other than English and Greek offered at ACS Athens. The program is designed to provide international students with the opportunity to study the literature of their native culture. The Self Taught IB Language A course is offered only at SL, and it follows the Language A Literature SL course outline quite closely. Students choosing this option should be able to study independently. In addition, they must feel confident in their ability to analyze literature in the target language. The IB office provides all the necessary guidance regarding course requirements, choice of books and assessments. It also monitors student work and schedules assessments. Self Taught Language A students will write the June Mock Exam, and their work will be assessed either by an internal or external moderator. This course will appear as Pass/Fail class on each IB Diploma candidate’s ACS Athens transcript. Students will receive a standard credit for a passing grade. 9311s

Study Hall All Seniors, during the second semester of their senior year, will be enrolled in Study Hall. Study hall will give students the time and opportunity to study, work on projects or take advantage of the writing and math studios. Students not participating in study hall must choose an elective course.

9000

Senior Research Experience This project offers seniors the opportunity to develop and demonstrate their research skills as they explore (under the direction of the Librarian and a faculty mentor) an intellectual passion or civic, social, moral or ethical issue in depth to produce a challenging studentdriven, mentor guided culminating project. It is required for those students opting for the ACS Athens Honors Diploma. In the process of completing their senior project, students will demonstrate their mastery of the research skills of knowledge acquisition; information/media literacy; validation, credibility and reliability of sources; sorting and selecting appropriate and relevant sources and information; attribution and citation of sources; writing skills and appropriate use of media/technology; as well as developing and following through on a research plan of action and demonstrating their discoveries in a compelling, interesting and intelligent manner. They will demonstrate that they can conduct an investigation that is solidly grounded in one

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or more academic disciplines. Though the senior project must contain a written component, the final demonstration project (presented to a panel of judges in May of Senior Year) does not have to be a formal essay. It may be a formal essay, or it may be a multi-media production, a film, an exhibition, an invention, a lecture, a community project, an engineering solution, etc. A final reflective essay, in which the student reflects on the process of completing the project and on what he/she has learned as a result of his/her work (about the subject/issue studied and about his/her own learning/thinking process and the evolution of his/her ideas, beliefs and understanding). Students will not receive graduation credit for the Senior Honors Project, but their grade will be recorded on their official transcript and college and university admissions officers will be apprised of the fact that students have engaged in a year-long research endeavor equal in scope and rigor to the IB Extended Essay.

ACS ATHENS DIVISION OF LANGUAGE AND LITERATURE: COURSE OFFERINGS The “y” following a course number indicates a year-long course; “s” indicates a semester course; an “H” signifies an honors course or honors credit. Students must meet prerequisites for honorslevel study.

DEPARTMENT: ENGLISH (ESL SUPPORT) Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

1563y ESL 3

1564y ESL 4

1565y ESL 5

1565y ESL 5

1564y ESL 4

1565y ESL 5

1565y ESL 5

ENGLISH as a Second Language: Courses in Detail 1563y

ESL 3 This is a course which focuses on developing language skills for intermediate level students of English. Vocabulary building and fundamental grammar concepts involving the application of all tenses in both speaking and writing are to be consolidated in combination with fiction and non - fiction reading comprehension, as well as personal and narrative writing. Listening comprehension will be incorporated throughout and applied to develop note-taking skills. Students will develop their skills in literary analysis and practice proper use of research sources. Focus is placed on the writing process in multiple-paragraph compositions that demonstrate organization of ideas, use of a thesis statement, and supportive evidence. Oral skills will be developed through presentations and a speaking component including monologue, dialogue and debate.

19


This course does not earn a credit towards fulfilling English requirements for graduation; however, the student’s grade in the course will be recorded on the transcript and the student will be awarded one elective credit. (This corresponds to the B2 level of CEFR) Prerequisite: Successful completion of the EFL Program and /or appropriate score on the ACS Athens Placement Test. 1564y

ESL 4 This is a course for students approaching a higher level of upper intermediate to advanced English proficiency. Students in this class will apply advanced grammar structures and academic vocabulary to increasingly demanding reading, writing and speaking activities. Students will also develop their skills in literary analysis and practice proper use of research sources. Focus is placed on essay writing, interpretive reading and summarizing. This course will introduce IELTS preparation for students who require this credential. This course does not earn a credit towards fulfilling English requirements for graduation; however, the student’s grade in the course will be recorded on the transcript and the student will be awarded one elective credit. (This corresponds to the B2 towards C1 level of CEFR) Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESL 3 or appropriate score on the ACS Athens Placement Test for students new to the program.

1565y

ESL 5 This is a flexible course for students with an advanced level of English proficiency who require further development of their academic language usage or who wish to take the IELTS exam. Students will develop higher academic vocabulary, grammar, reading, writing, and oratory skills. Students will sharpen skills transferable to core subjects. They will engage in literary analysis and proper use of research sources. Focus is placed on fine-tuning the writing process and creating compositions that demonstrate use of a thesis statement, organization of ideas, and supportive evidence. Upon completing the course, students who require the IELTS will qualify to sit for the examination. This course does not earn a credit towards fulfilling English requirements for graduation; however, the student’s grade in the course will be recorded on the transcript and the student will be awarded one elective credit. (This corresponds to the C1 towards C2 level of CEFR) Prerequisite: Successful completion of ESL 4 or appropriate score on the ACS Athens Placement Test for students new to the program.

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DEPARTMENT: ENGLISH Grade 9 1015y, 1018y-H

Europe and the World: Literature & History 9 (taken in conjunction with 2016y, 2019y-H)

Grade 10 1025y, 1028y-H

American Studies: Literature & History 10 (taken in conjunction with 2009y, 2011y-H)

1035s

Speech

1032s

Writing Seminar

Grade 11

Grade 12

1092y-H

1088y-H

1084y-H

1093y-H

IB English A Literature Year 1

IB English A Language and Literature Year 1

1047y, 1048y-H Humanities: English

1035s

Speech

1032s

Writing Seminar

IB English A Literature Year 2/SL

IB English A Literature Year 2/HL

1082y-H

IB English A Language and Literature Year 2 /SL

1083y-H

IB English A Language and Literature Year 2/HL

1047y, 1048y-H

Humanities: English

1035s

Speech

1032s

Writing Seminar

ENGLISH: Courses in Detail 1015y 1018y-H

Europe and the World: Literature & History 9 Europe and the World: Literature & History 9 Honors

Europe and the World: Literature & History 9 is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course based on the essential question: How is “The Journey” a metaphor for life? Students will examine this question and theme through the prisms of history, literature and art. The course develops skills in critical thinking, reading, writing, and speaking. Course reading will include a variety of genres including drama, novels, short stories, historical essays, poetry, historical documents, and extracts from primary and secondary sources. Works of literature studied include: George Orwell’s Animal Farm, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country, excerpts from Homer’s The Odyssey and a selection of World War I Poetry. These works will be studied in the context of the following historical themes and time periods: New Imperialism, the Scramble for Africa, the French and Russian Revolutions, Nation Building in Europe, and the First World War. 21


Students will develop skills in close reading of a text, participate in individual and group presentations and create portfolios and multimedia projects. Written tasks will include journal writing, informal responses, formal essays and literary commentaries. A unique feature of this course is the culminating collaborative student project entitled “A Journey to Peace,” as well as a cross-disciplinary research paper and an introduction to formal field study. This course is offered at the Honor and Standard levels. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 An ACS Athens Scholar Diploma core course 1025y 1028y-H

American Studies: Literature & History 10 American Studies: Literature & History 10 Honors

This course is offered at the Honor and Standard levels. See prerequisites below. American Studies: Literature & History 10 is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course that challenges students to excel in writing, speaking, and listening. The course features key American historical texts and literature. Each unit of study is integrated based on themes and a series of essential questions posed to students. Interdisciplinary questions include: How does society define us and how do we define society? What are the limits of liberty and freedom? What makes us responsible citizens? What is happiness? How do American values change over time? At both the honors and standard level students will be assessed in skills required for success in the new SAT reasoning test. At the honors level students will additionally be required to read a wider variety of texts at a more advanced level, with assessments based on skills required for success in IB and AP courses. Unique features of this interdisciplinary American Studies course include the “Readers Theater,” “Transcendentalism Project,” the “Consuming Happiness Project,” the “Truman Trial,” and the “Human Rights and Social Consciousness Presentation.” Major literature texts studied include: Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, and poetry across genres. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 An ACS Athens Scholar Diploma core course 22


1035s

Speech Speech is an elective class for students in grades 10, 11 and 12;. This course is geared towards developing confidence and competence in the fundamentals of voice and diction needed for effective oral expression. The course will help students develop public speaking skills as well as prepare them for college and work interviews, and work in drama and theater arts. Through a variety of activities (such as impromptu and informative speeches, oratory, group discussion, debate, oral interpretation of literature, duet acting, college interviews, news broadcasts and non-verbal communication), students gain poise and self-confidence in front of an audience. Special attention is given to quality of both content and delivery, as well as to listening skills. Students will use the skills and knowledge they gain in the course to prepare a TED-talk style presentation as their culminating assignment. Students will be encouraged to prepare one piece of tournament quality for possible entry in the annual Panhellenic Forensics Competition. The course is open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12. Successful completion of the course will earn students .5 elective credit. There is no prerequisite for Speech.

1032s

Writing Seminar In this semester course students will develop their writing skills in a variety of genres. Writing Seminar is an elective class for students in grades 10, 11 and 12. Students will read and analyze several model essays by professional writers before beginning the process of drafting and revising their own personal essays. This class is excellent preparation for the essay writing required in the college application process. Students will also study examples of literary genres such as poetry and fiction or non-fiction narratives in preparation for writing their own creative pieces. The course is open to students in grades 10, 11 and 12. Successful completion of the course will earn students .5 elective credit. There is no prerequisite for Writing Seminar.

1047y, 1048y-H

Humanities: English

This team-taught, two-year interdisciplinary program focuses on particular historical periods, such as Classical Greece, Byzantium, the Renaissance, and Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Europe. Each period is studied through the great works that it produced and the people who produced them. Literature, art, music, history and philosophy are studied with concern for the great themes that surface repeatedly. Students will read from a variety of literary genres and will undertake detailed study of selected works of literature. The program is open to students in grades 11 or 12, who may choose to take one or both years of the two-year cycle. Year One of Humanities (to be offered 2019-2020) focuses on the question “What Makes Us Human?� This question is explored with particular focus on Ancient Greece, The Age of Reason, the Neo-Classical and Romantic periods, and the 20th Century. Among the 23


course readings are: E.H. Gombrich, The Story of Art; Kenneth Clark, Civilisation; Joshua Taylor Learning to Look; Euripides, The Bacchae; Kitto, The Greeks; Voltaire, Candide ; Joseph Conrad; Heart of Darkness ; and Kafka, Metamorphosis. The art historical component includes representative works from Ancient Greek, Neo-Classical, Romantic, and 20th century artistic movements. Year Two of Humanities (to be offered 2018-2019) focuses on the relationship between humans and their gods as an important factor in the shaping of civilizations. This relationship is explored through a study of the art, literature, and history of Byzantium, Islam, Medieval Western Europe and the European Renaissance. Among the course readings are: Kenneth Clark, Civilisation; E. H. Gombrich, The Story of Art; Steven Runciman, The Fall of Constantinople; Boccaccio, The Decameron; Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales; Joshua Taylor, Learning to Look; Petrarch, Selected sonnets; Machiavelli, The Prince; Sir Thomas More, Utopia; and William Shakespeare, Macbeth. The art historical component includes representative works of Byzantine, Islamic, Medieval European, and Italian Renaissance art and architecture. A unique feature of the course is the opportunity for extensive field study. There are several required field study trips within Greece, and one optional trip each year to either Italy or France that is highly recommended for Humanities students. Students may choose to take the Humanities course for either English credit or Social Studies credit. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 An ACS Athens Scholar Diploma core course 1092y-H

IB English A Literature Year 1

This is the first year of a two-year program preparing 11th & 12th graders to take the International Baccalaureate examination at either the Standard or the Higher Level. In this year of the course candidates for either examination will follow the same curriculum, engaging in critical reading, discussion, and written analysis of a prescribed syllabus of works of acknowledged literary merit. In the first year the students will cover the following parts of the IB course: Part One: Works in Translation and Part Four: Options, which include selected prose and poetry. Works studied include: Marquez’s One Hundred Years of Solitude, Satrapi’s Persepolis, Sophocles’ Oedipus Rex, Dostoevsky’s Crime and Punishment, and Shakespeare’s Hamlet. Students will develop commentary skills, both oral and written, in analyzing and commenting on poetry and prose. They will also develop essay writing skills. IB evaluation will be based on essays, written and oral commentaries, and oral presentations. Students taking this course will be required to purchase and read one or more assigned texts during the summer before their junior year. They are expected to purchase all texts to facilitate their preparation for the examination at the end of the two-year course.

24


Assessment is aligned with the IBO assessment criteria. IB Predictions are based on student performance on IB assignments and mock exams. Prerequisite: B+ in American Studies: Literature & History 10 Honors/B in Standard Level. Note: If a student fails the June mock exam and is not a full IB student, s/he cannot enter year two of the class. S/he can enter the first year of another class for ACS Athens credit. 1088y-H 1093y-H

IB English A Literature Year 2 - Standard Level IB English A Literature Year 2 - Higher Level

This is the second year of the two-year International Baccalaureate Program for students wishing to take the IB English A Literature examination at the Standard or Higher Level. The course will continue to build on skills of literary analysis and written and oral commentary in preparation for the externally assessed examination which students are expected to take at the end of the course. The curriculum focuses on Prose: The Novel and Short Story; Drama: William Shakespeare, Hamlet; and detailed study of poetry and non-fiction prose. Works studied in the course include: Chinua Achebe, Things Fall Apart; Toni Morrison, Song of Solomon; Joseph Conrad, Heart of Darkness; Virginia Woolf, To the Lighthouse (Higher Level); Selected poems by Robert Frost; and Selected passages from Thoreau's Walden (Higher Level). The internal assessment component of the two-year program will be completed through the formal oral commentary, and the formal written assignment will be finalized. Students taking this course are required to purchase and read several assigned texts during the summer before their senior year. They are expected to purchase all texts to facilitate their preparation for the examination at the end of the two-year course. Assessment is aligned with the IBO assessment criteria. IB Predictions are based on student performance on IB assignments and mock exams. Prerequisite for IB English A Literature Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for IB English A Literature Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 1084y-H

IB English A Language and Literature Year 1

This is the first year of a two-year program that prepares eleventh graders to take the International Baccalaureate Language and Literature examination at either the Standard or the Higher Level. IB English Language and Literature, Year One, is designed for native and non-native speakers of English. This course focuses on the detailed study of literature, the development of language in cultural contexts and how meaning is determined through the media. This study is approached through prescribed literary texts and a wide range of nonliterary texts. Evaluation will be based on literary essays, written and oral comparative commentaries, the development of close reading skills, and formal oral examinations. Works studied in the course include: Sophocles, Oedipus: Lorraine Hansberry, A Raisin in the Sun; Maya Angelou, I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings; and Barbara Kingsolver, Homeland and Other Stories.

25


Students taking this course will be required to purchase and read one or more assigned texts during the summer before their junior year. They are expected to purchase all texts to facilitate their preparation for the examination at the end of the two-year course. Assessment is aligned with the IBO assessment criteria. IB Predictions are based on student performance on IB assignments and mock exams. Prerequisite: B- in American Studies: Literature & History 10/ B+ in SL Note: If a student fails the June mock exam and is not a full IB student, s/he cannot enter year two of the class. S/he can enter the first year of another class for ACS Athens credit. 1082y-H 1083y-H

IB English A Language and Literature Year 2 – Standard Level IB English A Language and Literature Year 2 – Higher Level

This is the second year of the two-year International Baccalaureate Program that prepares twelfth graders to take the IB English Language and Literature examination at either the Standard or Higher Level. The IB English Language and Literature, Year Two, course will continue to build on skills of detailed literary analysis as well as written and oral commentary in preparation for the externally assessed examinations which students are expected to take at the end of the course. The course balances two units of study over one year: a Language and Mass Communication unit and a Literature Critical Study unit. Internal evaluation will be based on literary essays, written and oral commentaries, oral presentations, a recorded formal oral exam, and a mid-year IB mock exam. Works studied in the course include: Ethan Frome by Edith Wharton; The Glass Menagerie by Tennessee Williams; and Harlem Renaissance poetry by Langston Hughes. Students taking this course will be required to purchase and read one or more assigned texts during the summer before their junior year. They are expected to purchase all texts to facilitate their preparation for the examination at the end of the two-year course. Assessment is aligned with the IBO assessment criteria. IB Predictions are based on student performance on IB assignments and mock exams. Prerequisite for IB English A Language and Literature Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for IB English A Literature and Literature Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

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DEPARTMENT: GREEK / LANGUAGE A

Grade 9

6146y, 6148y-H

Greek 9 Language and Literature

Grade 10

6147y, 6149y-H

Greek 10 Language and Literature

Grade 11

6153y-H

Greek IB A Language and Literature Year 1

6155y-H

Grade 12

Greek IB A Language and Literature Year 2 SL

6156y-H

Greek IB A Language and Literature Year 2 HL

GREEK / LANGUAGE A: Courses in Detail 6146y, 6148y-H

Greek 9 Language and Literature

This course is offered to native or near-native speakers of the Greek language. This is a language and literature course that promotes an appreciation of the wealth of the language and facilitates the clear expression of ideas. Writing, reading, listening, speaking and viewing are developed in order for the students to be adequately prepared for the continuation of the Language A Program. Students are introduced to a variety of texts (literature, poetry, articles, history), through which they develop their ability to engage in close analysis, make relevant connections to the present and understand the various functions and register of the language. Emphasis is also placed on the use of advanced grammatical structure and refined vocabulary in both written and oral speech. Short answers, essays, book reviews, oral presentations are the major assignments students are familiarized with. Works studied in this course include: Ilias Venezis, Eoliki Gi; George Seferis, Selected poems. Students taking this course for Honors credit might be required to complete some supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. General Prerequisite: Successful completion of Greek Language Arts 8 (or Β΄ Gymnasiou of the Greek School) and / or placement test. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6147y, 6149y-H

Greek 10 Language and Literature

This is a continuation of the Greek Language Arts program. It is a course for native or nearnative speakers dealing mainly with selected works of literature and preparing students for the Greek IB A Language and Literature two-year Honors program. The various functions of the language will be also studied through selected texts of different genres. Emphasis is placed on the literary analysis of the works studied, which encourages students to appreciate the different perspectives of people and the stylistic and aesthetic qualities of the texts. Commentaries, essays, creative writing and book reviews are the major 27


assignments students are familiarized with. Works studied in this course include: Nikos Kazantzakis, Kapetan Michalis (Freedom or Death); Sophocles, Antigone; and Aristophanes, Ornithes (Birds). Students taking this course for Honors credit might be required to complete some supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. General Prerequisite: Successful completion of Greek 9 Language and Literature (or Γ΄ Gymnasiou of the Greek School), and/or placement test. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6153y-H

Greek IB A Language and Literature Year 1

This is the first of a two-year Honors program for eleventh graders who are native or nearnative speakers to prepare students for the IB Greek Language and Literature exam. Language and Literature is a Group 1 course taught in two years. The focus of this course is directed towards developing and understanding the constructed nature of meanings generated by language and the function of context in this process. The course comprises four parts; two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. The program followed is prescribed by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The model for Language A. Language and Literature is the same at Standard Level and Higher Level, but there are significant quantitative and qualitative differences between the levels. The aims of the Language A. Language and Literature course are: to introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and genres; to develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections; and to develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication. Furthermore, the program encourages students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received. Through the study of texts, it encourages an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning, teaching the students to appreciate the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts. It also promotes in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature; develops in students an understanding of how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in text; and encourages students to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose. The assessment is aligned with the IBO assessment criteria. Predictions are based on Paper 1 and Paper 2 tests and mocks, oral presentations and written tasks. Works studied in this course include: Albert Camus, The Stranger; Konstantinos Theotokis, Katadikos; and Plato, Apology. Prerequisite: a B- Greek 10 Language and Literature Honors/ B+ in SL, or placement test. for those new to the program.

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6155y-H 6156y-H

Greek IB A Language and Literature Standard Level Year 2 Greek IB A Language and Literature Higher Level Year 2

This is the second of a two year Honors program for twelfth graders who are native or nearnative speakers to prepare students for the Greek IB A Language and Literature exam. Language and Literature is a Group 1 course taught in two years. The focus of this course is directed towards developing and understanding the constructed nature of meanings generated by language and the function of context in this process. The course comprises four parts, two relate to the study of language and two to the study of literature. The program followed is prescribed by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The model for Language A. Language and Literature is the same at Standard Level and at Higher Level, but there are significant quantitative and qualitative differences between the levels. The aims of the Language A. Language and Literature course are: to introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and genres; to develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections; and to develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication. Furthermore, the program encourages students to recognize the importance of the contexts in which texts are written and received. Through the study of texts, it encourages an appreciation of the different perspectives of people from other cultures, and how these perspectives construct meaning, teaching the students to appreciate the formal, stylistic and aesthetic qualities of texts. It also promotes in students an enjoyment of, and lifelong interest in, language and literature; develops in students an understanding of how language, culture and context determine the ways in which meaning is constructed in the text; and encourages students to think critically about the different interactions between text, audience and purpose. The assessment is aligned with the IBO assessment criteria. Predictions are based on Paper 1 and Paper 2 tests and mocks, oral presentations and written tasks. Works studied in this course include: Dimitris Chatzis, To telos tis mikris mas polis; Konstantinos Kavafis, Selected poems; and Alexandros Papadiamantis, H Fonissa (only Higher Level). Full IB candidates who take examinations in both English A and Greek A may earn an IB bilingual diploma. Prerequisite for Greek IB A Language and Literature Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for Greek IB A Language and Literature Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

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DEPARTMENT: GREEK / LANGUAGE B

Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

6145y, 6144y-H

6048y, 6047y-H

6049y, 6050y-H

6152y, 6052y-H

6048y, 6047y-H

6049y, 6050y-H

6152y, 6052y-H

6053y, 6057y-H

Greek 4 Greek 5

Greek 5 Greek 6

Greek 6 Greek 7

Greek 7 Greek 8

6040iy, 6041iy 2

Greek i Flex

GREEK / LANGUAGE B: Courses in Detail 6145y, 6144y-H

Greek 4

This course is offered to non-native speakers of Greek as well as to students of Greek background who have a limited knowledge of Greek. The five skills: reading, writing, listening, speaking and viewing are expanded to a more advanced level. More complicated grammatical structures are introduced. The objective of the course is to enable students to develop skills of reading and writing through selected texts including literature, and speaking and listening through short oral narrations and dialogues. Students will use the writing process to develop their ideas in writing. They will focus on the organization of their ideas, and on improving their use of language. In developing reading skills, they will understand the reading process and will work with the interpretation of a variety of texts. Use of listening and speaking strategies for different purposes is part of this course. Selected literary texts will be studied. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Greek 3, and/or placement test, for those new to the program. The students must have a spoken Greek background. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6048y, 6047y-H

Greek 5

This is a language, literature and culture course for advanced students that are near-native or non- native speakers. Continuing the study of the Greek language (vocabulary, grammar and syntax, paragraph and essay writing), through a variety of texts, students will work on units which will help them enrich their vocabulary, practice what they have already learned, progress in both grammar and syntax and develop those skills necessary for written and oral communication. The focus is on all the language skills (writing, reading, speaking and listening). Concerning writing, students will be able to use the prewriting process of brainstorming ideas, drafting and revising. They will learn to understand the focus of the topic and to develop and organize their ideas, using a wide variety of vocabulary. In reading, they will be able to appreciate the text by understanding its meaning and by comparing and contrasting various issues of concern to the present day. Presentation of projects and class discussions will enhance their speaking skills and develop a solid vocabulary for listening 30


comprehension. Selected literary texts will be studied. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Greek 4, or placement test, for those new to the program Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6049y, 6050y-H

Greek 6

This course is offered to students who have achieved Greek proficiency but need support in strengthening their language skills. The objective of the course is to enable students to further develop writing, reading, listening, speaking and viewing skills and to introduce them to selected texts from Greek Literature. Reading comprehension, projects and oral presentations on specific historical periods the literary texts refer to, as well as grammar and language exercises according to the students’ needs, are the major assignments given. Selected literary texts will be studied. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Greek 5, and/or placement test. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6152y, 6052y-H

Greek 7

This course is offered to students with a well-developed Greek background or advanced language skills in Greek who wish to continue Greek in eleventh and twelfth grade but do not wish to take an IB Greek course. It is the first year of a rotating program in which students become acquainted with history and various literature texts that pertain to the particular historical period studied, and develop a sense of how language is used in its various functions. Emphasis is on strengthening the students’ knowledge of the Greek language and culture through systematic practice of the writing and speaking skills. Students are taught to use the prewriting process of brainstorming ideas, drafting and revising. They are taught to understand the focus of the topic and to develop and organize their ideas, using a wide variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Through reading, students will learn how to appreciate the text by understanding the meaning of it, and by comparing and contrasting various issues of concern to the present day. Selected literary texts will be studied. Students develop writing, reading, listening, and speaking skills at a level required to participate in Exams for the Certification of Ellinomatheia (B1, B2, C1, C2). The syllabus, however, is not exam-oriented and students must prepare for these exams independently. 31


Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Greek 6, or placement test, for those new to the program. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6053y, 6057y-H

Greek 8

This course is offered to students with a well-developed Greek background or advanced language skills in Greek who wish to continue Greek in twelfth grade but do not wish to take an IB Greek course. It is the second year of a rotating program in which students become acquainted with history and various literature texts that pertain to the particular historical period studied, and develop a sense of how language is used in its various functions. Emphasis is on strengthening the students’ knowledge of the Greek language and culture through systematic practice of the writing and speaking skills. Students are taught to use the prewriting process of brainstorming ideas, drafting and revising. They are taught to understand the focus of the topic and to develop and organize their ideas, using a wide variety of vocabulary and grammatical structures. Through reading, students will learn how to appreciate the text by understanding the meaning of it, and by comparing and contrasting various issues of concern to the present day. Selected literary texts will be studied. Students develop writing, reading, listening, and speaking skills at a level required to participate in Exams for the Certification of Ellinomatheia (B1, B2, C1, C2). The syllabus, however, is not exam-oriented and students must prepare for these exams independently. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Greek 7, or placement test for those new to the program. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6040iy, 6041iy

Greek i2Flex

Greek i2Flex is a blended learning program offered separately from the regular school day schedule and designed for native or near-native speakers of Greek. The course is open only to juniors and seniors who are enrolled in another Modern Language class during the regular school day, but who also wish to have instruction in Greek language, grammar and literature. At the end of the academic year, students enrolled in Greek i2Flex will present a research project based on an aspect of Greek history and culture. This project takes the place 32


of a semester exam in the course. Students receive a total of 30 hours of instruction, which includes guided independent on-line learning and face-to-face sessions.

DEPARTMENT: MODERN LANGUAGES / SPANISH Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

6020y

6020y

6023y

6122y-H

6022y

6022y

6022y

6124y

6124y

6124y

6124y

6130y

6130y

6130y

6130y

6131y

6131y

6131y

6132y-H

6132y-H

6134y-H

6136y-H Spanish AP 6139y-H IB Spanish

6135y-H

Spanish 1 Spanish 2 Spanish 3 Spanish 4

IB Spanish Ab initio 1

Spanish 1 Spanish 2

Spanish 2

Spanish 3

Spanish 3

Spanish 4

Spanish 4

Spanish 5

Spanish 5

6132y-H

Spanish 5 Honors

Spanish 5 Honors

Language B Year 1

IB Spanish Ab initio 2 Spanish 3 Spanish 4 Spanish 5

Spanish 5 Honors

Spanish IB Language B Year 2 SL Spanish IB Language B Year 2 HL

MODERN LANGUAGES / SPANISH: Courses in Detail 6020y

Spanish 1 This is an introductory Spanish course designed for students that have had no prior experience with Spanish. Students will demonstrate skills in reading, writing, listening and speaking Spanish throughout the year as defined by the core and language syllabi. Students will reach a good foundation in the present tense using vocabulary from all aspects of everyday living situations. Basic skills, dialogues and drills are emphasized. In addition, students will research and complete projects on the culture and history of the Spanishspeaking people.

6023y

IB Spanish Ab Initio 1 This is the first year of the two-year IB Spanish Ab Initio Standard Level program. It is designed for students who have no previous experience with the language. This is a skill-building course. Students are expected to demonstrate the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in everyday situations. This course is open to Grade 11 students only.

6122y-H

IB Spanish Ab Initio 2

This is the second year of the two-year Spanish Ab Initio Standard Level course. It is designed for students that have satisfactorily completed the first year of the Ab Initio Standard Level course. After finishing this course the students will sit for the IB formal examination offered in May. This is a skill-building course. Students are expected to demonstrate the 33


communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in everyday situations. This course is open to those who have completed IB Spanish Ab initio 1. Prerequisite for IB Spanish Ab Initio 2 Standard Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 6022y

Spanish 2 This course is a continuation of Spanish 1. It is open to students in grades 9-11 who have either completed Spanish 1 in the high school or are arriving from the Middle School having taken Spanish 1 in eighth grade. Students will be expected to demonstrate a more sophisticated mastery of the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in everyday situations, as defined by the core syllabus and the language syllabuses. Basic skills in dialogues and vocabulary are emphasized. In addition, students will complete projects and write reports on the culture and history of Spanish-speaking peoples. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 1, or Middle School Spanish 1, or a placement test for those new to the program.

6124y

Spanish 3 This course is a continuation of Spanish 2. The course is designed for students who wish to develop their reading comprehension, writing skills and oral proficiency. Book reports, essays, projects and performances are used as means of improving the students’ ability to communicate fluently in Spanish. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 2 or the Middle School Program.

6130y

Spanish 4 This course is a continuation of Spanish 3. The course is based on analyses of short texts, articles, world events, music and newspapers, as well as further development of grammar and vocabulary. There is an emphasis on fluency in oral language skills. There is an intense grammar review and individual and group oral presentations. Following this course, students are able to place into Spanish 5 or Spanish 5 Honors. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 3 or the Middle School Program.

6131y

Spanish 5 This course is a continuation of Spanish 4 and is designed for students not yet ready (grade level) for the IB or AP program and is therefore considered a pre-IB course. There will be a continued emphasis on fluency in oral language, advanced grammar structure, syntax, vocabulary and cultural and historical readings. More focus will be given also to oral proficiency through individual and group presentations. Following this course, students are able to place into Spanish AP/IB Language B Year 1. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Spanish 4 or placement test.

6132y-H

Spanish 5 Honors

This course is a continuation of Spanish 4 and is designed for students not yet ready (grade

level) for the IB or AP program but who have strong skills in writing and grammar. This 34


course’s main components are language structure, literature, and composition skills. There is also a complete review of grammar, mechanics, and usage and a continued emphasis on fluency in oral language. In the literature component, students will be introduced to short stories and other common literary genres. Following this course students are able to place into. Spanish AP/IB Language B Year 1 Prerequisite: A grade of B + (87%), or better, in Spanish 4. 6136y-H 6139y-H

Spanish AP IB Spanish Language B Year 1

This is an intensive course that fulfills requirements for Spanish IB B Year 1 and also prepares students for the AP Spanish exam and the SAT II Spanish exam. The course is intended for students who will either take the AP or SAT II exam in Spanish upon completion of Spanish AP/IB Language B Year 1 or go on to Spanish IB Language B Year 2 in their senior year and take the Spanish IB Language B exam in May of that year. The IB language B program is designed to be studied over two years by students who have had at least four years of previous experience with the language. This is a skill-building course. Students are expected to demonstrate the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in complex grammatical structures. Prerequisite: B+ in Spanish 5 or a B- in Spanish 5 Honors. 6134y-H 6135y-H

IB Language B Year 2 Standard Level IB Language B Year 2 Higher Level

This is the second year of the Spanish IB Language B program. It is designed for students who have satisfactorily completed the first year of the Spanish IB Language B program and are preparing to take the IB exam in May at either the Standard Level or the Higher Level. This is a skill-building course. Students are expected to demonstrate the communicative skills of listening, speaking, reading and writing in complex grammatical structures. Students also develop a critical approach to the literature, art, and civilization of Spain and the Latin American countries Prerequisite for IB Spanish B Year 2 Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for IB Spanish B Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

35


DEPARTMENT: MODERN LANGUAGES /ARABIC Grade 9

Grade 10

6070y, 6074y-H Arabic 4

6076y, 6077y-H Arabic 5

Grade 11 6075y-H IB Arabic SL Year 1

Grade 12 6071y-H IB Arabic SL Year 2

MODERN LANGUAGES / ARABIC: Courses in Detail 6070y, 6074y-H

Arabic 4

The course is for students at an advanced level who wish to further develop their skills in the Arabic language and to learn more about Arabic literature and culture. Units will emphasize an appreciation of various pieces of creative writing through the study of Arabic literature, both ancient and modern. Students will also study Arabic culture and civilization from a historical perspective. Assessments will focus on reading, spelling, translation and essay writing. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6076y, 6077y-H

Arabic 5

This course is a continuation of Arabic 4 and is designed for students not yet ready (grade level) for the IB program. There will be a continued emphasis on advanced grammar structure, syntax, vocabulary and cultural and historical readings. More focus will be given also to oral proficiency through individual and group presentations. Following this course, students are able to place into Arabic IB Standard Level Year 1. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6075y-H

Arabic IB Standard Level Year 1

This is the first year of the two-year IB Arabic Standard Level program. The focus is on reading and analyzing Arabic literature, ancient and modern, as prescribed by the IB curriculum. Students will refine their skills in reading, speaking and writing the language. Assessment in reading comprehension and analysis, oral expression, and essay writing is aligned with IBO criteria. Prerequisite: B + in Arabic 5/ B- in Arabic 5 Honors.

36


6071y-H

Arabic

IB Standard Level Year 2

This is the second year of the IB Arabic Standard Level program. Students will continue to refine their skills in reading, discussing, analyzing and writing about selected works of Arabic literature. Upon successful completion of this class, students will sit for the IB exam at the end of the school year. Assessment in reading comprehension and analysis, oral expression, and essay writing is aligned with IBO criteria. Prerequisite for IB Arabic Year 2 Standard Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

DEPARTMENT: MODERN LANGUAGES / CHINESE LANGUAGE A Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

6176y, 6177y-H

6178y, 6179y-H

6180y-H

6181y-H

Chinese 9 Language and Literature

Chinese 10 Language and Literature

Chinese IB A Language and Literature Year 1

Chinese IB A Language and Literature Year 2

MODERN LANGUAGES/ CHINESE LANGUAGE A: Courses in Detail 6176y, 6177y-H

Chinese 9 Language and Literature

This course is offered to native or near-native speakers of the Chinese language. It is a literature and language course that promotes an appreciation of the richness of the Chinese language. Writing, reading, listening and speaking skills are developed in order to prepare students to continue in the Language A Program. Students are introduced to a variety of texts, including novels, poetry, articles and history. Through the study of these texts students will enrich their vocabularies and their understanding of grammatical structure, as well as develop skills in literary analysis. The major assignments in the course are based on literary analysis, essay writing and oral presentations. Literature studied in the course is selected from works of the following authors: Ba Jin, Yu Hua, and Zhu Ziqing. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. General Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chinese Language Arts 8, teacher recommendation and / or placement test. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1

37


6178y, 6179y-H

Chinese 10 Language and Literature

This course is a continuation of the Chinese Language Arts program and is open to native or near-native speakers. Through the study of selected texts from a variety of genres, the course prepares students for the Chinese IB A Language and Literature two-year IB program. Emphasis is placed on literary analysis of the works studied, which encourages students to appreciate different perspectives and the stylistic and aesthetic qualities of the texts. The major assignments will be commentaries, creative writing and oral presentations. Literature studied in this course includes works of the following authors: Lao She, Bai Xianyong, Lu Xun, and San Mao. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. General Prerequisite: Successful completion of Chinese 9 Language and Literature, and/or placement test. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6180y–H

Chinese IB A Language and Literature Year 1

This is the first of a two-year Honors program for eleventh graders who are native or nearnative speakers. It is designed to prepare students for the IB Chinese Language and Literature exam. Language and Literature is a Group 1 course, and the program followed is prescribed by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The model for Language A. Language and Literature is the same at Standard Level and Higher Level, but there are significant quantitative and qualitative differences between the levels. The aims of the Language A. Language and Literature course are: to introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and genres; to develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections; and to develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication. Through the study of texts, students are encouraged to broaden their horizons, to develop a greater appreciation for different perspectives of people from other cultures, and to think creatively and critically. It also encourages students’ interest in and desire for learning. The assessment is aligned with the IBO assessment criteria. Predictions are based on Paper 1 and Paper 2 tests and mocks, oral presentations and written tasks. Works studied in this course include: Albert Camus, The Stranger; Bai Xianyong, Taipei People; and Lu Xun, The True Story of Ah Q. Prerequisite: B+ in Chinese 10 Language and Literature / B- in Chinese Language and Literature Honors, or a placement test for those new to the program.

6181y–H

Chinese IB A Language and Literature Year 2

This is the second of a two-year Honors program for twelfth graders who are native or nearnative speakers. It is designed to prepare students for the IB Chinese Language and Literature exam. Language and Literature is a Group 1 course, and the program followed is prescribed 38


by the International Baccalaureate Organization. The model for Language A. Language and Literature is the same at Standard Level and Higher Level, but there are significant quantitative and qualitative differences between the levels. The aims of the Language A. Language and Literature course are: to introduce students to a range of texts from different periods, styles and genres; to develop in students the ability to engage in close, detailed analysis of individual texts and make relevant connections; and to develop the students’ powers of expression, both in oral and written communication. Through the study of texts, students are encouraged to broaden their horizons, to develop a greater appreciation for different perspectives of people from other cultures, and to think creatively and critically. It also encourages students’ interest in and desire for learning. Assessment is aligned with the IBO assessment criteria. IB Predictions are based on student performance on IB assignments and mock exams. Works studied in this course include: Cao Xueqin, Dream of the Red Chamber; Lao She, Tea House. Prerequisite for Chinese IB A Language and Literature Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for Chinese IB A Language and Literature Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

DEPARTMENT: MODERN LANGUAGES/ CHINESE LANGUAGE B Grade 9

6163y, 6164y-H Chinese 4

Grade 10

6171y, 6172y-H Chinese 5

Grade 11

Grade 12

MODERN LANGUAGES / CHINESE: Courses in Detail 6163y, 6164y-H

Chinese 4

The curriculum of Chinese 4 is designed to help students strengthen their skills in reading comprehension, essay writing, and speaking. The course will focus on reading, analysis and discussion based on texts, articles, world events, music and newspapers. There also will be intensive review of grammatical patterns and essay writing skills. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1

39


6171y, 6172y-H

Chinese 5

This course is a continuation of Chinese 4. There will be a continued emphasis on advanced grammar structure, syntax, vocabulary and cultural and historical readings. More focus will be given also to oral proficiency through individual and group presentations. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. If students who have completed Chinese 5 wish to pursue further studies in Chinese, not including IB Chinese, an after school i2Flex program in Chinese may be offered through the Institute at an extra cost. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1

DEPARTMENT: MODERN LANGUAGES / GERMAN Grade 9

Grade 10

6033y German 3

6031y, 6034y-H German 4

6031y, 6034y-H German 4

6035y, 6037y-H German 5

Grade 11

Grade 12

6035y, 6037y-H German 5

MODERN LANGUAGES / GERMAN: Courses in Detail 6033y

German 3 This course is a reinforcement of the Middle School German 2 class. Based on a variety of already known communicative areas, students of this class will expand their vocabulary and deal with new grammatical structures in order to enhance their active language skills of speaking and writing. Within an interactive class atmosphere and a creative learning environment the students will become acquainted with new communicative domains and will have many possibilities to express themselves through individual creative projects of their choice. E-learning concepts and methods of the ACS i2Flex educational program are integrated into the learning process. This class is an intermediate II class. It is open to ninth grade students who have successfully completed the ACS Middle School German 2 class. It is also open to students who have two or three years of experience in learning German.

40


6031y, 6034y-H

German 4

A major focus of the course is to introduce students to different text styles. Students will be encouraged to strengthen their reading comprehension and to practice reading strategies and different techniques of approaching texts. As a part of their language-learning process, students will become acquainted with new communicative domains. Students will be guided further to experience and practice interactive discussions in class, sharing ideas and exchanging different opinions. E-learning concepts and methods of the ACS i2Flex educational program are also integrated into the learning process. This is an advanced class. It is open to ninth and tenth grade students. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 6035y, 6037y-H

German 5

This course is a continuation of German 4 and is designed for students intending to take a proficiency exam in the German language. There will be a continued emphasis on advanced grammar structure, syntax, vocabulary and cultural and historical readings. More focus will be given also to oral proficiency through individual and group presentations. E-learning concepts and methods of the ACS i2Flex educational program are integrated into the learning process. This is an advanced II class. It is open to tenth and eleventh grade students. This course also offers the opportunity for students to take the AP exam and the SAT II exam in German. If students who have completed German 5 wish to pursue further studies in German, not including IB German, an after school i2Flex program in German may be offered through the Institute at an extra cost. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1

41


ACS ATHENS DIVISION OF MATH, SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY: COURSE OFFERINGS DEPARTMENT: MATHEMATICS Grade 9 3026y

Algebra 1

3032y, 3034y-H

Geometry with Algebraic Topics

Grade 10 3032y, 3034y-H

Geometry with Algebraic Topics

3037y

Algebra 2 & Trigonometry

3049y-H

Grade 11 3037y

Algebra 2 & Trigonometry 3015y Statistics and Business Mathematics

Grade 12 3037y

Algebra 2 & Trigonometry

3015y

Statistics and Business Mathematics

3074y

3077y

3050y- H

3051y-H

3052y-H

3098y-H

3098y-H

3098y-H

3091y-H

3092y-H

Algebra 2 & Trigonometry (Honors) Mathematical Methods

IB Math Studies 1 IB Math SL1

AP Calculus

AP Calculus

IB Math HL 1

IB Math Studies 2 IB Math SL 2 AP Calculus IB Math HL 2

3050y -H

3050y -H

3053y

3053y

Mathematical Methods Heart of Mathematics

Mathematical Methods Heart of Mathematics

MATHEMATICS: Courses in Detail 3026y

Algebra 1 This course is a formal introduction to Algebra. Topics include: uses of variables; solving linear equations; slopes, graphing lines and inequalities; exponents; quadratic equations and square roots; polynomials; linear systems; factoring; and functions; sequences and series, trigonometric ratios, areas and volumes. Problem solving is stressed throughout. Assessment: Exams/tests/quizzes/ homework/projects. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Pre-Algebra or equivalent.

3032y

Geometry with Algebraic Topics This course is a study of topics in Geometry with Algebra. Topics include: angles, parallel lines, triangles, quadrilaterals, polygons, circles and 3D geometry, areas and volume. Algebraic topics include: coordinate geometry, linear equations and inequalities, right angle and non-right angle trigonometry, factoring expressions and quadratics, solving quadratic equations, laws of exponents and radicals, rational expressions and rational equations Assessment: Exams/tests/quizzes/ homework/projects. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I or equivalent.

42


3034y-H

Geometry with Algebraic Topics Honors

This course is a study of topics in Geometry with Algebra. Geometry topics include: angles, triangles, polygons, circles, surface area and volume. Algebraic topics include: algebraic expressions, linear equations, linear 2 by 2 systems and linear functions, exponential expressions and equations, right-angle trigonometry and vectors. Topics are similar to Geometry with Algebraic Topics, however, the course involves more challenging problemsolving. Assessment: Exams/tests/quizzes/ homework. Prerequisite: Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra I with a minimum grade of B-.

3037y

Algebra 2 & Trigonometry This course is a study of topics in Advanced Algebra and an introduction to the study of trigonometric functions. Topics include: functions and relations, polynomials, exponents, quadratics, logarithms, probability and statistics, systems of equations, unit circle, trigonometric functions and their graphs. Emphasis is placed on applications and the use of the graphic calculator. A graphic display calculator is required. Please check with the school before buying a graphing calculator. Assessment: Exams/tests/quizzes/ homework/projects. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Geometry with Algebraic Topics or Honors Geometry with Algebraic Topics.

3049y-H

Algebra 2 & Trigonometry Honors

This course is a fast-paced and rigorous study of advanced algebraic topics, including: functions relations, function transformations, complex numbers, polynomials, the factor remainder theorem, quadratics and the properties of the discriminant, logarithms, the sine and cosine rules, trigonometric identities, functions and equations, sequences and series, probability and advanced algebraic topics. It is designed for students planning to study mathematics and /or science in college. It is a Pre IB Higher level math course. A graphic display calculator is required. Please check with the school before buying a graphing calculator. Assessment: Exams/tests/quizzes/ homework/projects. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B- in Geometry with Algebraic Topics Honors.

43


3015y

Statistics & Business Math

Course offered in alternate years; not offered in 2018-19. This year long course is designed to meet the needs of college-bound students in 11th and 12th grade whose direction is towards non math/ science fields. The skills needed to cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society are developed and emphasis is placed on the application of mathematics to real-life situations. Topics include: Sequences and Series, Sets, Logic and Probability, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, Descriptive and Inferential Statistics. A substantial piece of research, in the form of a project, is required and will be completed in this course. Assessment: exams/tests/quizzes/ homework/projects/, oral presentations Prerequisite: Open only to juniors or seniors. Successful completion of Algebra 1.

3050y-H

Mathematical Methods

This year long course is designed to meet the needs of college-bound students in 11th and 12th grade whose direction is towards non math/ science fields. The skills needed to cope with the mathematical demands of a technological society are developed and emphasis is placed on the application of mathematics to real-life situations. Topics include: Sequences and Series, Sets, Logic and Probability, Functions, Geometry and Trigonometry, Descriptive and Inferential Statistics. A substantial piece of research, in the form of a project, is required and will be completed in this course. Assessment: exams/tests/quizzes/ homework/projects/, oral presentations Prerequisite: Successful completion of Algebra & Trigonometry Honors or B- in Algebra & Trigonometry Regular.

3053y

Heart of Mathematics

Course offered in alternate years. The course will be offered in 2018-19. This is a course for 11th and 12th grade students. A common answer given by professional mathematicians when describing their subject is that Mathematics is beautiful and that it is everywhere! But this is hardly the view taken by students. This course is designed to illustrate through projects, research and group work that Mathematics is indeed beautiful and Mathematics can be found everywhere. The topics covered in this course include fractals and chaos, recursion, Feigenbaum’s number, the golden section, Fibonacci numbers, elementary topology, prime numbers, types of infinity, the fourth dimension and the theory of special relativity, probability and large data. Assessment: exams/tests/quizzes/ homework/projects/ oral presentations Prerequisite: Successful completion of two years of mathematics

44


3074y

Mathematical Studies IB Standard Level 1 This is the first part of a two-year sequence designed for students planning to sit for the IB Mathematical Studies Examination. Topics include: Sequences and Series, Financial Mathematics, Linear Equations and Graphs, Coordinate and 3D Geometry, Linear, Quadratic and Exponential Functions, Sets and Venn Diagrams, Probability, Descriptive and Inferential Statistics. A Graphic Display calculator is required. Please check with the school before buying a graphing calculator. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams, projects in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B+ in Geometry and Algebraic Topics Regular, B- in Geometry and Algebraic Topic Honors, or B- in Mathematical Methods. The last time this course will be offered will be the 2018-2019 academic school year.

3077y

Mathematical Studies IB Standard Level 2 This is the second part of a two-year sequence preparing the student for the IB Mathematical Studies examination. Topics in the second year include: Logic, Probability, Normal Distribution, and an Introduction to Differential calculus. Revision and extension of topics from the first year of this course are included. Please see course 3074y for list of topics. Students complete their individual project (Internal Assessment) in late fall and early spring as part of the IBO internal assessment. During the fall semester a prediction will be sent to Universities indicating the teacher’s best estimate of how a student will do in the May IB exams. The prediction will be based on (i) the final grade of the first year, (ii) the grade of the final exam in the first year and (iii) the mock exam early in the fall semester. In year 2 students in SL classes will be released from class once a week in order to attend to work in their HL courses. A Graphic Display calculator is required. Please check with the school before buying a graphing calculator Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams, projects in accordance with IBO assessment practices Prerequisite for IB Mathematical Studies Year 2: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

3051y-H

Mathematics IB Standard Level 1

This is the first part of a two-year sequence designed for students planning to sit for the IB Standard Level Examination. Topics in this first year include Algebra (Logarithms, Sequences and Series, and the Binomial Theorem), Functions (domain & range, function composition and transformations), Trigonometry (identities, the unit circle, solution of triangles, Law of sines and cosines, trigonometric equations and functions, i.e. sine, cosine and tangent), and Calculus (Differentiation). A Graphic Display calculator is required. Please check with the school before buying a graphing calculator. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams, projects in accordance with IBO assessment practices.

45


Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B- in Algebra II & Trigonometry Honors or B+ in Algebra II & Trigonometry, or B- in Mathematical Methods.

3052y-H

Mathematics IB Standard Level 2

This is the second year of a two-year sequence leading to the IB Mathematics Standard Level Examination. Topics in this second year include: Calculus (Differentiation, Integration and their applications: optimization & kinematics), Vectors (2D and 3D Vectors, Vector Equation of a Line) Probability (Discrete random variables, Binomial and Normal Distribution), Statistics (single variable and bivariate statistics, and regression analysis). Students complete the mathematical exploration, in late fall and early spring as part of the IBO internal assessment. During the fall semester a prediction will be sent to Universities indicating the teacher’s best estimate of how a student will do in the IB Examination in May. The prediction will be based on (i) the final grade of the first year, (ii) the grade of the final exam in the first year and (iii) the mock exam early in the fall semester. In year 2 students in SL classes will be released from class once a week in order to attend to work in their HL courses. A Graphic Display calculator is required. Please check with the school before buying a graphing calculator Prerequisite for IB Mathematics Year 2 Standard Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 3098y-H

AP Calculus AB Honors

This rigorous course introduces the basic concepts of Calculus. It is designed for seniors who are not IB diploma candidates and are US College bound. Students in this course will sit for the Advanced Placement Examination (AP Syllabus). Topics covered in this course include a study of Limits and Continuity, Differentiation and Integration, Applications of Derivatives and Integrals, Differential equations and Mathematical Modeling. Assessment: Exams/tests/quizzes/homework. Prerequisite: A grade of B- in Algebra 2 Trigonometry Honors or Mathematical Methods.

3091y-H

Mathematics IB Higher Level 1

This is the first part of a two-year sequence designed for students planning to sit for the IB Higher Level Examination. Emphasis is placed on development of analytical skills. Topics covered in the first year include Algebra, Functions, Trigonometry and Calculus. This is a demanding, fast-paced course designed for those with proven mathematical ability and interest. There is a very substantial amount of homework which the student is well advised to do. A Graphic Display calculator is required. Please check with the school before buying a graphing calculator. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams/homework in accordance with IBO practices Prerequisite: A minimum grade of B- in Algebra 2 & Trigonometry Honors or Mathematical Methods. 46


3092y-H

Mathematics IB Higher Level 2

This is the second year of the 2-year course leading to the IB exam at Higher Level. Topics covered include Vector Geometry (lines and planes in 3 dimensions), Complex numbers (including De Moivre’s theorem and the Euler notation), Probability and Statistics, and the optional topic which is Calculus. Students complete the mathematical exploration, in late fall and early spring as part of the IBO internal assessment. During the fall semester a prediction will be sent to Universities indicating the teacher’s best estimate of how a student will do in the May IB exams. The prediction will be based on (i) the final grade of the first year, (ii) the grade of the final exam in the first year and (iii) the mock exam early in the fall semester. A Graphic Display calculator is required. Please check with the school before buying a graphing calculator. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams/homework, mathematical exploration, in accordance with IBO practices Prerequisite for IB Mathematics Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

DEPARTMENT: SCIENCE Grade 9 5025y, 5028y-H Biology 9

Grade 10 5030y, 5035y-H Chemistry 10

Grade 11 5021y-H

Biology IB 1

5011s, 5012s-H

5083y-H

5041s, 5042s-H

5090y-H

Physics 1

Physics 2

Chemistry IB1

Physics IB 1

5703y-H

AP Environmental Science

5701y

Environmental Science

5704y-H

IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL 1

5013y

Earth and Beyond

5046y-H

IB Computer Science 1

Grade 12 5072y-H

Biology IB 2 SL

5022y-H

Biology IB 2 HL

5089y-H

Chemistry IB 2 SL

5800y-H

Chemistry IB 2 HL

5092y-H

Physics IB 2 SL

5091y-H

Physics IB 2 HL

5706y-H

IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL2

5703y-H

AP Environmental Science

5701y

Environmental Science

5013y

Earth and Beyond

5048y-H

IB Computer Science SL 2

5049y-H

IB Computer Science HL 2

47


SCIENCE: Courses in Detail 5025y 5028y-H

Biology 9 Biology 9 Honors

The Biology 9 course is designed to fulfill one year of the science requirement for graduation. It is part of the ninth grade core requirements, and is also taken by transfer students who have not taken biology. Topics in the course include: biochemistry, cell biology, DNA, genetics, ecology, evolution, and human physiology. Assessments include: unit exams, laboratory reports, research projects, and homework. Assessment: Tests/exam/quizzes, lab reports, homework, projects. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 5030y 5035y-H

Chemistry 10 Chemistry 10 Honors

The Chemistry 10 course is designed for 10th grade students and aims to develop an understanding of the properties, composition, structure and transformations of matter along with energy transfer and chemical reactions. Topics in the course include Properties of matter and Phase Changes. Structure of Matter: Atoms, Elements and Compounds, Relative Atomic mass, Isotopes, Periodic Table and Periodic Trends. Bonding and Compound Formation: Naming inorganic compounds, Chemical Formulae and Equations, Molecular and Formula Mass. Quantities and Equations: Conservation of Mass, The Mole and Avogadro's number. Chemical Reactions: Reaction Types, Balancing chemical equations, Stoichiometry, Solutions, Acids and Bases, Reaction Rates, Oxidation Reduction and Electrochemistry. Introduction to Organic Chemistry. The practical aspect of the course focuses on measurements, simple experimental techniques, following the scientific method when designing an investigation, data collection and basic statistical analysis. Assessment: Tests/exam/quizzes, lab reports, homework, projects. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 5011s 5012s-H

Physics 1 Physics 1 Honors

This is a semester course. Course topics include: Measurements, Basic Laboratory Techniques, Transverse and Longitudinal Waves, Wave Effects, Sound, Light, Kinetic Theory, 48


Temperature, Thermal Expansion, Thermal Transfer, Electric Charge, Electric Current, Potential Difference, Resistance. Assessment: Tests, exam, quizzes, lab reports, projects, homework assignments, participation in class, extra assignments and test/exam questions for Honors students. Prerequisite: None. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 5041s 5042s-H

Physics 2 Physics 2 Honors

This is a semester course. Course topics include: Speed, Velocity, Acceleration, Motion Graphs, Free Fall, Newton’s Laws, Friction, Weight and Gravity, Moving in Circles, Turning Effects, Stretching and Compressing, Pressure, Work and Energy, Energy Transformation, Kinetic and Potential Energy, Efficiency and Power, Energy Resources. Assessment: Tests, exam, quizzes, lab reports, projects, homework assignments, participation in class, extra assignments and test/exam questions for Honors students. Prerequisite: Completion of Physics 1 with a grade of B- or above Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Teacher recommendation based on Q3 performance: minimum grade of B-Honors placement is finalized after Q3 Progress Report 5013y

Earth and Beyond Earth Science is designed for 11th and 12th grade students looking to fulfill one year of the science requirement for graduation that are not pursuing an IB diploma. Topics in the course include: geology/mineralogy, plate tectonics, oceanography, meteorology, and astronomy. Assessments include: unit exams, quizzes, research projects, laboratory investigations, and homework. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Grade 10 Science or equivalent.

5701y

Environmental Science This course for 11th and 12th graders aims to develop an understanding of the structure and functioning of natural systems. It will encompass the social, ethical and economic impacts of human activities focusing on current environmental problems and their underlying scientific principles. The student will understand the cause- effect relationship of human activities on the environment and all other living species. The concept of interdependence will be stressed throughout. Topics include: Atmosphere, Hydrosphere, Lithosphere, Biosphere, Pollution, The Greenhouse Effect and Global Warming, Ozone Layer and Biodiversity/Resource Loss. Activities include reading, written assignments, reviews (e.g., of

49


articles, news items, documentaries), scientific investigations outdoors as well as the laboratory and field trips. Assessment: includes research projects, presentations, posters, written assignments, labs, tests and semester exams. Prerequisite: Successful completion of Grade 10 Chemistry and Physics 1. 5021y-H

Biology IB 1

This is the first year of the two-year IB Biology course sequence and is designed for 11th grade students, who will take the externally assessed IB Biology Exam at the end of the second year. This course is designed for students who wish to study Biological or Natural Sciences, Biomedicine, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Psychology, Veterinary, Nursing, and Medicine. Topics of the Core Syllabus include: Cell Biology, Molecular Biology, Genetics, Ecology, Evolution & Biodiversity and Human Physiology. The course involves an individual investigation, which is internally assessed and forms part of the final IB grade. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisites: a grade of B- or better in 10th grade Science

5022y-H 5072y-H

Biology IB 2 Higher Level Biology IB 2 Standard Level

This is a college-level introductory Biology course and a continuation of Biology IB 1. It is a demanding and rigorous course designed for students who will take the IB Biology exam in May, and is appropriate for students with an interest in studying Biological or Natural Sciences, Biomedicine, Biochemistry, Bioengineering, Psychology, Veterinary, Nursing, and Medicine. Topics of the Additional Higher Level Syllabus include: Nucleic Acids, Metabolism, Cell respiration and Photosynthesis, Plant Biology, Genetics & Evolution, and Animal physiology. The optional topic on Human Physiology is also covered this year. Practical work for internal assessment is completed during this year. During the fall semester a prediction will be sent to Universities indicating the teacher’s best estimate of how a student will do in the May IB exams. The prediction will be based on (i) the final grade of the first year, (ii) the grade of the final exam in the first year (iii) the mock exam early in the fall semester, and (iv) the progress in the internal assessment. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisite for IB Biology Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. Prerequisite for IB Biology Year 2 Standard Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 5083y –H

Chemistry IB 1

This is the first year of the two-year IB Chemistry sequence and is designed for 11th grade students, who will take the IB Chemistry exam at the end of the second year. Topics include 50


quantitative chemistry, atomic structure, stoichiometry, thermochemistry, measurement and data processing, electronic structure of the atom, periodicity, bonding, kinetics and equilibrium, acids and bases. Chemistry and all other Group 4 subjects begin new syllabi in September 2014. The course includes practical lab work culminating in a single work as part of the IBO’s Internal Assessment requirements that all students are required to complete. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisites: Chemistry at grade 10 with a grade of B- or better and successful completion of Physics 1 and Algebra 2 and Trigonometry. 5800y –H 5089y-H

Chemistry IB 2 Higher Level Chemistry IB 2 Standard Level

This is a college-level introductory Chemistry course and a continuation of Chemistry IB 1. It is designed for students who will take the IB Chemistry Higher Level exam in May, and is appropriate for students with an interest in studying Natural or Biomedical/Biochemical Sciences, Medicine or various disciplines of Engineering including Chemical, Biomedical, Materials Science etc. Topics include acids and bases, oxidation reduction, measurement and data processing and analysis, and organic chemistry, along with one topic out of four options available: Materials, Biochemistry, Energy, and Medicinal Chemistry. Practical lab work continues in the second year of this course as well. During the fall semester a prediction will be sent to Universities indicating the teacher’s best estimate of how a student will do in the May IB exams. The prediction will be based on (i) the final grade of the first year, (ii) the grade of the final exam in the first year and (iii) the mock exam early in the fall semester. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisite for IB Chemistry Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. Prerequisite for IB Chemistry Year 2 Standard Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 5703y-H

AP Environmental Science

This is offered as a one-year course for seniors at and is designed for students who will take the AP Environmental Science Exam in May. This course is appropriate for students with an interest in natural sciences, and especially in techniques and knowledge of environmental issues and problems. Topics covered in the course are: Basic Earth Science Topics: Plate Tectonics, Atmospheric Circulation, Soil Qualities, Ecosystems: Energy Flow and Matter Cycles, Evolution and Diversity, Biogeography: Climate and Biomes, Aquatic and Community Ecology, Population Dynamics, Human Population: Growth, Demography, Carrying Capacity, Sustainable Cities: Urban Land Use and Management, World Food Resources, Water Resources, Nonrenewable Mineral and Energy Resources, Energy Efficiency and Renewable Energy. Assessment: Tests/quizzes/exams/homework and lab work. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry 10 and Physics 1 with a minimum grade of B-. 51


5704y-H

IB Environmental Systems and Societies-Standard Level 1

This is the first year of a two year, Standard Level course leading to an externally-assessed IB examination at the end of the two year cycle. This trans-disciplinary course satisfies the IB requirements for both Group 3 (individuals and societies) and Group 4 (experimental sciences). This course is appropriate for students with an interest in natural sciences, and especially in techniques and knowledge of environmental issues and problems, as well as their impact to societies. Students coming from either a scientific or a non-scientific knowledge background can choose this course. Topics covered in the first year are: Foundations of environmental systems and societies, Ecosystems & Ecology, Biodiversity & Conservation, Water & Aquatic food production systems and societies. The course involves an individual investigation, which is internally assessed and forms part of the final IB grade. Assessment: Tests/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Chemistry 10 and Physics 1 with grade of B- or above. 5706y-H

IB Environmental Systems and Societies-Standard Level 2

This is a college-level introductory Environmental Science course and a continuation of Environmental Systems and Societies IB 1. It is designed for students who will take the IB Environmental Systems and Societies Standard Level exam in May, and is appropriate for students with an interest in natural sciences, and especially in techniques and knowledge of environmental issues and problems, as well as their impact to societies. Topics covered in second year of the course are: Soil systems & Terrestrial food production systems and societies, Atmospheric systems and societies, Climate change & Energy Production, Human Systems & Resource Use. During the fall semester a prediction will be sent to Universities indicating the teacher’s best estimate of how a student will do in the May IB exams. The prediction will be based on (i) the final grade of the first year, (ii) the grade of the final exam in the first year (iii) the mock exam early in the fall semester, and (iv) the progress in the internal assessment. Assessment: Tests/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisite for IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL 2: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 5090y –H

Physics IB 1

This is a course that is suitable for those who want to follow a course in the Sciences, Math, Medicine or Engineering at University. The course follows the curriculum of the IBO in Physics and includes mechanics, thermal physics, waves, electricity and magnetism, circular motion and gravitation, atomic, nuclear, quantum and particle physics, energy production, electromagnetic induction. The course involves laboratory work, which is internally assessed and forms part of the final IB grade. The course includes practical lab work as part of the IBO’s Internal Assessment requirements that all students are required to complete 52


Assessment: Tests/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisites: Algebra, Geometry and Algebra 2 and Trigonometry and Physics 1 and 2 at grade 10 with a grade of B- or higher. 5091y-H 5092y-H

Physics IB 2 Higher Level Physics IB 2 Standard Level

This is the continuation of Physics IB 1 at Higher Level. It prepares student for the IB exam in May. This is very rigorous course that covers the topics of Physics IB 1 in greater depth. Laboratory work continues and the optional topics of the IB are studied. Assessment: Tests/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisite for IB Physics Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. Prerequisite for IB Physics Year 2 Standard Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 5046y-H

Computer Science IB 1

This is the first year of a two year, rigorous and demanding course leading to an IB examination at the end of the two year cycle. This is Group 4 subject. It is a course designed for those who wish to study computer science, electrical engineering, electronic engineering, business information systems, mathematics or sciences at university. The course does not presume any background knowledge of computer science but any such knowledge is a definite advantage. The syllabus includes system fundamentals, computer organization, networks, computational thinking, problem solving and programming, abstract data structures, resource management and control. An optional topic is chosen from the following: databases, modeling and simulation, web science and object oriented programming. As with all Group 4 subjects there is also an internal assessment component, worth 30 hours, in which students develop practical skills in the development of a product including the relevant documentation. Assessment: Tests/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisite: B- in Computer Science 2. 5048y-H 5049y-H

Computer Science IB 2 Standard Level Computer Science IB 2 Higher Level

This is the second year of the 2-year course leading to the IB exam at Higher Level. During the course the student will study networks, control systems, develop computational solutions and complete an internal assessment project. This will involve the ability to: identify a problem or unanswered question, design, prototype, test a proposed solution

53


using object-oriented programming (OOP) and liaise with clients to evaluate the success of the proposed solution and make recommendations for future developments. Students will also research various aspects of Computer Science, including technical concepts and additional subject content in greater depth based on a pre-seen case study of an organization or scenario. Prerequisite for IB Computer Science Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. Prerequisite for IB Computer Science Year 2 Standard Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

DEPARTMENT: TECHNOLOGY Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

4010s

4010s

4010s

4010s

4011s

4011s

4011s

4011s

4003s

4003s

4046y-H

4048y-H

4004s

4004s

Introduction to Computer Science 1 Introduction to Computer Science 2 STEAM 1 STEAM 2

Introduction to Computer Science 1

Introduction to Computer Science 2 STEAM 1

Introduction to Computer Science 1 Introduction to Computer Science 2

IB Computer Science 1

STEAM 2

Introduction to Computer Science 1 Introduction to Computer Science 2

IB Computer Science SL 2

4049y-H

IB Computer Science HL 2

TECHNOLOGY: Courses in Detail 4010s

Introduction to Computer Science 1 This semester course introduces students to the foundations of computer science and information technology. The individual lessons in this course were developed to reinforce the unifying themes and support the use of the computational practices that we expect students to employ. The goal of the course is to develop in students the computational practices of algorithm development, problem solving and programming within the context of problems that are relevant to the lives of today’s students. Students will also be introduced to topics such as interface design/html, limits of computers, and societal and ethical issues. Assessment: Projects, Tests/ Quizzes, class Participation. Prerequisites: None

54


4011s

Introduction to Computer Science 2 This semester course builds on students’ experiences with the foundations of computer science and information technology in Introduction to Computer Science I. Students will continue to expand their understanding of computational thinking and relevant terminology focusing on gaining comfort with the fundamentals of programming. As they gain comfort in programming techniques, students will be invited to place their learning into action in applied projects. Assessment: Projects, Tests/ Quizzes, class Participation. Prerequisites: Introduction to Computer Science 1 (or equivalent experience with advanced instructor approval)

4003s

STEAM 1 Science, Technology, Engineering Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) course is an inquiry/project-based course for 9th and 10th grade students. This is a pilot course. It fosters data literacy through the various STEAM areas, and encourages analytical thinking, critical thinking, problem solving, and team working. Course topics include artificial intelligence, citizen science, robotics, engineering design, computational knowledge, data acquisition, research, design thinking, and collaboration skills through STEAM inquiries. Topics include: Big Data, Artificial Intelligence, Risks and Ethics, Citizen Science, Robotics, Programming, and Internet of Things. Assessment: Projects. Prerequisites: None

4004s

STEAM 2 Science, Technology, Engineering Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) course is an inquiry/project-based course for 9th and 10th grade students. This is a pilot course and will consist of 2 independent semesters. It fosters data literacy through the various STEAM areas, and encourages analytical thinking, critical thinking, problem solving, and team working. Course topics include artificial intelligence, citizen science, robotics, engineering design, computational knowledge, data acquisition, research, design thinking, and collaboration skills through STEAM inquiries. Topics include: Engineering Design, Aerospace engineering, Computational Knowledge, Equation Solving, Data Analysis, and Data Visualization Software. Assessment: Projects. Prerequisites: None

4046y-H

Computer Science IB 1

This is the first year of a two year, rigorous and demanding course leading to an IB examination at the end of the two year cycle. This is Group 4 subject. It is a course designed for those who wish to study computer science, electrical engineering, electronic engineering, 55


business information systems, mathematics or sciences at university. The course does not presume any background knowledge of computer science but any such knowledge is a definite advantage. The syllabus includes system fundamentals, computer organization, networks, computational thinking, problem solving and programming, abstract data structures, resource management and control. An optional topic is chosen from the following: databases, modeling and simulation, web science and object oriented programming. As with all Group 4 subjects there is also an internal assessment component, worth 30 hours, in which students develop practical skills in the development of a product including the relevant documentation. Assessment: Tests/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisites: B- in Computer Science 2. 4048y-H 4049y-H

Computer Science IB 2 Standard Level Computer Science IB 2 Higher Level

This is the second year of the 2-year course leading to the IB exam at Higher Level. During the course the student will study networks, control systems, develop computational solutions and complete an internal assessment project. This will involve the ability to: identify a problem or unanswered question, design, prototype and test a proposed solution using object-oriented programming (OOP) and liaise with clients to evaluate the success of the proposed solution and make recommendations for future developments. Students will also research various aspects of the Computer Science, including technical concepts and additional subject content in greater depth based on a pre-seen case study of an organization or scenario. Prerequisite for IB Computer Science Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. Prerequisite for IB Computer Science Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

56


ACS ATHENS DIVISION OF HUMANITIES AND THE ARTS: COURSE OFFERINGS DEPARTMENT: SOCIAL STUDIES Grade 9

Grade 10

2016y, 2019y-H

2009y, 2011y-H

Europe and the World: History & Literature 9 (taken in conjunction with 1018y-H, 1015y)

American Studies: History & Literature 10 (taken in conjunction with 1028y-H, 1025y)

Grade 11

Grade 12

2047y , 2048y-H Humanities 2050y Business Management 2052y-H Business Management IB 1 2700y-H Economics IB 1 2080y-H History IB 1 2064y-H Psychology IB 1 2702y-H IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL 1 2013y, 2014y-H Topics in Modern History 2061y, 2062y-H Social Science: Psychology & Sociology

2047y , 2048y-H, Humanities 2050y Business Management 2051y-H Business Management IB 2 HL 2053y-H Business Management IB 2 SL 2071y-H Economics IB2 SL 2078y-H Economics IB2 HL 2087y-H History IB 2 SL 2088y-H History IB 2 HL 2067y-H Psychology IB 2 SL 2068y-H Psychology IB 2 HL 2706y-H IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL 2 2013y, 2014y-H Topics in Modern History 2061y, 2062y-H Social Science: Psychology & Sociology

SOCIAL STUDIES: Courses in Detail 2016y, 2019y-H

Europe and the World: History and Literature 9 Europe and the World: History and Literature 9 Honors

Europe and the World: Literature & History 9 is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course based on the essential question: How is “The Journey” a metaphor for life? Students will examine this question and theme through the prisms of history, literature and art. The course develops skills in critical thinking, reading, writing, and speaking. Course reading will include a variety of genres including drama, novels, short stories, historical essays, poetry, historical documents, and extracts from primary and secondary sources. Works of literature studied include: George Orwell’s Animal Farm, Shakespeare’s The Tempest, Paton’s Cry, the Beloved Country, excerpts from Homer’s The Odyssey and a selection of World War I Poetry. These works will be studied in the context of the following historical themes and time 57


periods: New Imperialism, the Scramble for Africa, the French and Russian Revolutions, Nation Building in Europe, and the First World War. Students will develop skills in close reading of a text, participate in individual and group presentations and create portfolios and multimedia projects. Written tasks will include journal writing, informal responses, formal essays and literary commentaries. A unique feature of this course is the culminating collaborative student project entitled “A Journey to Peace,” as well as a cross-disciplinary research paper and an introduction to formal field study. This course is offered at the Honor and Standard levels. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 2009y 2011y-H

American Studies: History and Literature 10 American Studies: History and Literature 10 Honors

This course is offered at the Honor and Standard levels. See prerequisites below. American Studies: Literature & History 10 is an interdisciplinary, team-taught course that challenges students to excel in writing, speaking, and listening. The course features key American historical texts and literature. Each unit of study is integrated based on themes and a series of essential questions posed to students. Interdisciplinary questions include: How does society define us and how do we define society? What are the limits of liberty and freedom? What makes us responsible citizens? What is happiness? How do American values change over time? At both the honors and standard level students will be assessed in skills required for success in the new SAT reasoning test. At the honors level students will additionally be required to read a wider variety of texts at a more advanced level, with assessments based on skills required for success in IB and AP courses. Unique features of this interdisciplinary American Studies course include the “Readers Theater,” “Transcendentalism Project,” the “Consuming Happiness Project,” the “Truman Trial,” and the “Human Rights and Social Consciousness Presentation.” Major literature texts studied include: Arthur Miller’s The Crucible, F. Scott Fitzgerald’s The Great Gatsby, Harper Lee’s To Kill a Mockingbird, Margaret Atwood’s The Handmaid’s Tale, and poetry across genres. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 ACS Athens Scholar Diploma Core Course 58


2047y 2048y-H

Humanities: Social Studies Humanities: Social Studies Honors

This team-taught, two-year interdisciplinary program focuses on particular historical periods, such as Classical Greece, Byzantium, the Renaissance, and Nineteenth and Twentieth Century Europe. Each period is studied through the great works that it produced and the people who produced them. Literature, art, music, history and philosophy are studied with concern for the great themes that surface repeatedly. Students will read from a variety of literary genres and will undertake detailed study of selected works of literature. The program is open to students in grades 11 or 12, who may choose to take one or both years of the two-year cycle. Year One of Humanities (to be offered 2019-2020) focuses on the question “What Makes Us Human?� This question is explored with particular focus on Ancient Greece, The Age of Reason, the Neo-Classical and Romantic periods, and the 20th Century. Among the course readings are: E.H. Gombrich, The Story of Art; Kenneth Clark, Civilisation; Joshua Taylor Learning to Look; Euripides, The Bacchae; Kitto, The Greeks; Voltaire, Candide; Joseph Conrad; Heart of Darkness ; Walden; and Kafka, Metamorphosis. The art historical component includes representative works from Ancient Greek, Neo-Classical, Romantic, and 20th century artistic movements. Year Two of Humanities (to be offered 2018-2019) focuses on the relationship between humans and their gods as an important factor in the shaping of civilizations. This relationship is explored through a study of the art, literature, and history of Byzantium, Islam, Medieval Western Europe and the European Renaissance. Among the course readings are: Kenneth Clark, Civilisation; E. H. Gombrich, The Story of Art; Steven Runciman, The Fall of Constantinople; Boccaccio, The Decameron; Geoffrey Chaucer, The Canterbury Tales; Joshua Taylor, Learning to Look; Petrarch, Selected sonnets; Machiavelli, The Prince; Sir Thomas More, Utopia; and William Shakespeare, Macbeth. The art historical component includes representative works of Byzantine, Islamic, Medieval European, and Italian Renaissance art and architecture. A unique feature of the course is the opportunity for extensive field study. There are several required field study trips within Greece, and one optional trip each year to either Italy or France that is highly recommended for Humanities students. Students may choose to take the Humanities course for either English credit or Social Studies credit. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1 An ACS Athens Scholar Diploma core course 2700y-H

Economics IB 1

Economics is a dynamic social science, dealing with issues of scarcity, and the methods and processes by which choices are made to allocate resources. The IB Diploma Program 59


Economics course has four main components. In the first year, the topics will include an introduction to the basic approach of the study of scarcity, microeconomics (variables affecting individuals, firms and markets) and macroeconomics (variables affecting countries, governments and societies). The ethical dimensions involved in the application of economic theories and policies permeate the economics course as students are required to consider and reflect on end goals and values for all stakeholders. The course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues, and raises students’ awareness at all levels. The course also develops values that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve economic issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world. While the Economics course requires no specific prior learning, this is a college level course in which students must demonstrate the ability to understand and explain abstract concepts, the ability to reason logically and quantitatively, as well as the ability to write in a structured and succinct manner. Students wishing to sit for the examination must follow the two-year course of study and complete the Internal Assessment project. All assessments follow IBO guidelines, including a quantitative component for HL students. Prerequisite: B- or better in English, Social Studies and Math. 2071y-H 2078y-H

Economics IB 2 SL Economics IB 2 HL

Economics is a dynamic social science, dealing with issues of scarcity, and the methods and processes by which choices are made to allocate resources. The IB Diploma Program Economics course has four main components. In the second year, the course continues beyond national borders to cover international trade (interactions on a global level, discussions of trade and currency), and economic development (variables correlating economic activity to human well-being and global sustainability). The ethical dimensions involved in the application of economic theories and policies permeate the economics course as students are required to consider and reflect on end goals and values for all stakeholders. The course encourages students to develop international perspectives, fosters a concern for global issues, and raises students’ awareness at all levels. The course also develops values that will enable students to achieve a degree of personal commitment in trying to resolve economic issues, appreciating our shared responsibility as citizens of an increasingly interdependent world. While the Economics course requires no specific prior learning, this is a college level course in which students must demonstrate the ability to understand and explain abstract concepts, the ability to reason logically and quantitatively, as well as the ability to write in a structured and succinct manner. Students wishing to sit for the examination must follow the two-year course of study and complete the Internal Assessment project. *All assessments follow IBO guidelines, including a quantitative component for HL students. Prerequisite for IB Economics Year 2 Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for IB Economics Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 2080y-H

IB History Year 1

IB History is a two-year course in 20th Century World History. Students will begin by exploring Topic 4 from the prescribed topics of the IB History Syllabus, which deals with the 60


struggles for rights and freedoms in the mid-20th century. Under this topic, students are required to investigate two case studies from different regions of the world. In the first year, students will cover Case Study 1: Apartheid South Africa from 1948 to 1964 as a Case Study. Students will investigate Topics 10 and 12 from the IB Syllabus. These are, respectively: Authoritarian States (focusing on Hitler and Stalin), and the Cold War. Additionally, students interested in pursuing History at the Higher Level in Year 2 will study aspects of the History of the Americas, with in-depth study of Political Developments in Latin America and the Caribbean (1945-1980), the Cold War in the Americas (1945-1981), and Civil Rights and Social Movements post-1945. Historical study will include the selection and interpretation of data, critical evaluation of sources, persuasive writing, expository writing, and debate. *Assessment is aligned with the IBO course assessment requirements. Unique features of this course include an historical investigation of the student’s choice which carries over the two years. Prerequisites: B- in American Studies Honors/B+ in American Studies Regular 2087y-H 2088y-H

IB History Year 2 SL IB History Year 2 HL

IB History is a two-year course in 20th Century World History. The second year is a continuation of Topics 4, 10, and 12 from the IB History Syllabus: Rights and Protest, Authoritarian States, and the Cold War, respectively. Under Rights and Protest, students in the second year will cover a second Case Study: The Civil Rights Movement in the United States, 1954-1965. Students will examine Castro’s Cuba as an Authoritarian State, and will continue their study of the Cold War by examining superpower tensions and rivalries with a focus on leaders, countries, and crises from more than one region in the world. In addition to the above, HL students will complete an independent study of one topic of their choice from the Paper 3 IB syllabus focusing on the Americas. Students at both the Standard and Higher levels are required to complete an independently initiated research project that is internally assessed, the Historical Investigation. Special attention will be given to preparation for the final IB examination in May, which consists of a document-based paper and two essay papers at the Standard Level, with an additional three essays at the Higher Level. *Assessment is aligned with the IBO course assessment requirements. Prerequisite for IB History Year 2 Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Prerequisite for IB History Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 2064y-H

Psychology IB 1

Psychology is a two-year course. IB year 1 students (SL & HL) will examine human behavior from the cognitive and socio-cultural perspective, covering 2 of the 3 requirements for PAPER 1. Students also will complete the Human Relationships Unit from the OPTION 1 of 61


PAPER 2 within the context of interpersonal relationships as well as altruism & social responsibility. The Research Methodology unit will prepare students for the pilot study of the IB Internal Assessment requirement which is a replication of a simple experiment conducted under the instructor’s guidance. Quantitative and Qualitative Research Methodology will be studied in the context of preparation for PAPER 3 and to help hone critical thinking skills when evaluating research studies (PAPER 1 and 2). *Assessment is aligned with the IBO course assessment requirements. Prerequisite: A grade of B- or better in 10th Grade English and Social Studies.

2067y-H 2068y-H

Psychology IB 2 SL Psychology IB 2 HL

In Year 2, students (SL & HL) will complete the third component of PAPER 1 examining the neurobiological aspects of behavior. In addition, HL students will explore PAPER 2 – OPTION 2, focused on the psychology of health-related behaviors such as Stress Management, Eating Disorders and Substance Abuse. PAPER 3 (HL only) will continue to examine and apply Qualitative and Quantitative research methods. The IB Internal Assessment will be finalized and presented in a 1800-2200 word report, including an Introduction, Exploration of the methodology, Analysis of the results, and Evaluation of the process as a whole. *Assessment is aligned with the IBO course assessment requirements. Prerequisite for IB Psychology Year 2 Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for IB Psychology Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

2702y-H

IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL 1

This is the first year of a two year, Standard Level course leading to an IB examination at the end of the two year cycle. It is a trans-disciplinary course that satisfies the IB requirements for both Group 3 (individuals and societies) and Group 4 (experimental sciences). This course is appropriate for students with an interest in natural sciences, and especially in techniques and knowledge of environmental issues and problems, as well as their impact to societies. Students coming from either a scientific or a non-scientific knowledge background can follow this course. Topics covered in the first year of the course are: Foundations of environmental systems and societies, Ecosystems and Ecology, Biodiversity and Conservation, Human Systems and resource Use, Water, food production, systems and society. The course includes practical lab work as part of the IBO's Internal Assessment requirements that all students are required to complete. *Assessment: Tests/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisites: None

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2706y-H

IB Environmental Systems and Societies SL 2

This is a college-level introductory Environmental Science course and a continuation of Environmental Systems and Societies IB 1. It is designed for students who will take the IB Environmental Systems and Societies Standard Level exam in May, and is appropriate for students with an interest in natural sciences, and especially in techniques and knowledge of environmental issues and problems, as well as their impact to societies. Topics included are: Soil Systems and Society, Atmospheric Systems and Society, Climate Change and Energy. Practical work for internal assessment is completed during this year. During the fall semester a prediction will be sent to Universities indicating the teacher's best estimate of how a student will do in the May IB exams. The prediction will be based on (i) the final grade of the first year, (ii) the grade of the final exam in the first year and (iii) the mock exam early in the fall semester. *Assessment: Tests/exams/homework and lab work in accordance with IBO assessment practices. Prerequisite for IB Environmental Systems and Societies Year 2: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 2050y 2052y-H

Business Management IB Business Management Year 1

Business management is a rigorous, challenging and dynamic discipline. Business management explores business functions, management processes and decision-making in contemporary contexts of strategic uncertainty. It examines how business decisions are influenced by factors internal and external to an organization, and how these decisions impact stakeholders. Furthermore, business management investigates how individuals and groups interact within an organization, how they may be successfully managed and how they can ethically optimize the use of resources in a world with increasing scarcity and concern for sustainability. The course allows students to develop their understanding of interdisciplinary concepts from a business management perspective, through the exploration of six topics underpinning the subject: change, culture, ethics, globalization, innovation and strategy. Students learn to analyze, discuss and evaluate business activities at local, national and international levels. The course encourages the appreciation of ethical concerns and issues of corporate social responsibility, at both local and global levels. Moreover, the course encourages critical thinking and making ethically sound and well-informed decisions. It fosters an appreciation for the pace, nature and significance of change, in addition to strategic thinking and the undertaking of long term planning. *All assessments will follow IBO guidelines. Students wishing to sit for the IB examination must follow the two-year course of study. All students will complete a year-long research project. Prerequisite for Business Management: B (83 %) in their most recent social studies course. Prerequisite for IB Business Management Year 1: B- or better in 10th grade English, Social Studies and Math.

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2053y-H 2051y-H

IB Business Management Year 2 SL IB Business Management Year 2 HL

In Year Two, the course follows and expands upon the material covered in Year One and covers the remaining units of study of the IB Business Management syllabus. Student learning focuses on in-depth study of the concepts introduced in Year One, on student preparation for submission of their Internal Assessment as well as the final examinations in May. Three weeks of semester 2 will be devoted to the Pre-seen case study for the May final exams. Higher Level extensions of all five topics studied during the first year will be covered for students choosing this option. Prerequisite for IB Business Management Year 2 Standard Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 and above. Prerequisite for IB Business Management Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. 2013y Topics in Modern History 2014y-H Topics in Modern History Honors Course offered in alternate years. Course will be offered in 2018-2019. This 11th and 12th grade college preparatory elective course examines the major forces, events, and political leaders of the twentieth century. The emphasis of the course will be on identifying, examining and attempting to understand the underlying philosophical, ideological, historical, economic and social underpinnings which have shaped this century. This course aims to prepare students to be informed and active citizens in the contemporary world. Current issues to be examined include global trends, prospects and threats, conflict, development, disarmament, economics, globalization, human rights, health and other world challenges before the United Nations. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 9th and 10th grade Social Studies. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1

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2061y Social Science: Psychology and Sociology 2062y-H Social Science: Psychology and Sociology Honors Course offered in alternate years. Course will not be offered in 2018-2019. This year-long college preparatory elective course for 11th and 12th grade students begins with a general study of the methods of inquiry used by social scientists. Students will be exposed to the concepts, principles and theories that compromise introductory courses in Psychology and Sociology. The first semester focuses on psychology and the second on sociology. The psychology course is designed to give students a basic understanding of human behavior. General areas of study for psychology, include human growth and development, learning and cognitive process, personality theories, conflicts and adjustment, as well as social behavior. Sociology deals with the basic principles of human group life. The focus is on social structures and functions, social patterns and processes. Topics include socialization, deviance and crime, groups and organizations, social institutions and global challenges, including social movements and social change. By the end of the course students will understand how theoretical psychological and sociological perspectives provide insights into individual and group behaviors. Students taking this course for Honors credit will be required to complete supplemental assignments and will be assessed with an Honors-level rubric. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 9th and 10th grade Social Studies. Placement in the Honors section of this course requires: -Completion of all assigned honors summer work -Teacher recommendation based on Q1 performance and grade (minimum B- and above) -Honors placement is finalized after Q1

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DEPARTMENT: VISUAL AND PERFORMING ARTS Grade 9

Grade 10

Grade 11

Grade 12

MUSIC 7531s

MUSIC 7531s

MUSIC 7531s

MUSIC

VISUAL ARTS 7106s

VISUAL ARTS 7003s

VISUAL ARTS 7106s

VISUAL ARTS

7104s

7004s

7104s

7128s

7106s

7128s

7129s

7104s

7129s

7210s

7128s

7210s

7129s

7160y-H

7210s

7162y-H

Music Ensemble

Graphic Art

Design Drawing & Painting 1 Drawing & Painting 2 Digital Photography

Music Ensemble

STEAM 1

STEAM 2 Graphic Art

Design Drawing & Painting 1 Drawing & Painting 2

Digital Photography

PERFORMING ARTS 7240s Drama 2

Graphic Art Design

Drawing & Painting 1 Drawing & Painting 2 Digital Photography

IB Visual Arts 1 Visual Arts 1

PERFORMING ARTS 7110s

Drama 1

7241s

Music Ensemble

Media Studio

PERFORMING ARTS 7110s

7111s

From Script to Screen

Media Studio

7240s

From Script to Screen

7241s

Drama 1

7741y-H

Drama 2

7746y-H

7111s 7240s 7241s

Drama 1 Drama 2 IB Theater 1

Theater 1

7531s Music Ensemble 7106s Graphic Art 7104s Design 7128s Drawing & Painting 1 7129s Drawing & Painting 2 7210s Digital Photography 7163y-H IB Visual Arts 2 SL 7164y-H IB Visual Arts 2 HL 7165y-H Visual Arts 2

PERFORMING ARTS

7110s Media Studio 7111s From Script to Screen 7240s Drama 1 7241s Drama 2 7743y-H IB Theater 2 SL 7744y-H IB Theater 2 HL 7747y-H Theater 2

VISUAL & PERFORMING ARTS: Courses in Detail MUSIC 7531s

Music Ensemble This elective course for students in grades 9-12 gives students the opportunity to develop proficiency with their voice or on an instrument with which they have previous playing experience. Instruments may be from the string, wind, brass or percussion families of the concert band or symphony orchestra. Musicianship is developed through study of technical exercises and performance repertoire (music), theory and history. Students enrolled in the course are required to participate in all concert performances. This class can be taken repeatedly.

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Prerequisites: Basic note-reading proficiency is required and students must be able to read music. Successful completion of Intermediate Instrumental Music or at least two years singing or playing experience on primary instrument to be studied is required for admittance.

VISUAL ARTS 7003s

STEAM 1 This is a pilot course. Science, Technology, Engineering Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) course is an inquiry-based, project-based course for 9th and 10th grade students. This is pilot course and will consist of 2 semesters. It fosters data literacy through the various STEAM areas, and encourages analytical thinking, critical thinking, problem solving, and team working. Course topics include artificial intelligence, citizen science, robotics, engineering design, computational knowledge, data acquisition, research, design thinking, and collaboration skills through STEAM inquiries. Topics include Big data, Artificial Intelligence, Risks and Ethics, Citizen Science, Robotics, Programming, Internet of Things. Assessment: Projects. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology 9 and previous math course. Student application.

7004s

STEAM 2 This is a pilot course. Science, Technology, Engineering Arts and Mathematics (STEAM) course is an inquiry-based, project-based course for 9th and 10th grade students. This is pilot course and will consist of 2 semesters. It fosters data literacy through the various STEAM areas, and encourages analytical thinking, critical thinking, problem solving, and team working. Course topics include artificial intelligence, citizen science, robotics, engineering design, computational knowledge, data acquisition, research, design thinking, and collaboration skills through STEAM inquiries. Topics include Engineering Design, Aerospace engineering, Computational Knowledge, Equation Solving, Data Analysis, Data Visualization Software. Assessment: Projects. Prerequisites: Successful completion of Biology 9, previous math course and STEAM 1 if taken .Student application.

7106s

Graphic Art Students in grade 9-12 will learn the fundamentals of good graphic design and develop technical skills by combining illustration, photography and text to create their own work. They will explore in depth various font designs and letter composition, and consider possible font combinations. Acquiring an aesthetic appreciation for the way writing looks and making critical decisions about the appropriate font and image for the presentation of a concept or product allow students to apply their skill and knowledge in solving real-world design problems. The students will work on product packaging, logos, posters, magazine covers and page layouts. Students will create a portfolio of graphic designs through the production of original work. The computer will be used as a tool once the required design concepts have been mastered. Prerequisite: None

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7104s

Design Design is the structure of art. It is the well planned aspects of any kind of art. Students in grades 9-12 will work on a variety of original 2D projects and become familiar with the ways that the Elements of Art can be successfully arranged according to the Principles of Design. Students will experiment with the expressive qualities of line, shape and texture using a range of concepts and materials. They will organize and manipulate shapes, forms and color to create illusions of space and movement. They will engage in authentic creative process, from brainstorming to construction of the final projects. They will finally appreciate the organizational principles in Art. Prerequisite: None

7128s

Drawing and Painting 1 Students in grades 9-12 learn and practice the perceptual skills in order to draw anything from observation. They experiment with a variety of materials, like soft pencils, ink, charcoals and pastels to reach a better understanding of the expressive qualities of each media. During this course students will work on still lifes, portraits and figures, as well as explore other artist’s works. They will perceive the idea of composition, light and shadow, positive-negative space and the rules of perspective. The fundamentals of color theory are introduced and applied as students experiment with stylistic approaches to subject matter through the use of watercolor and acrylic paints. Drawing and Painting 1 and 2 can be taken in any order, for either one semester or a full year. The level of difficulty of both classes is similar, while the focus is different. Students in both classes deal with the same fundamental issues in different projects. Prerequisite: None

7129s

Drawing and Painting 2 Students in grades 9-12 learn and practice the perceptual skills in order to draw anything from observation. They experiment with a variety of materials, like soft pencils, ink, charcoals and pastels to reach a better understanding of the expressive qualities of each media. During this course students will work on still lifes, portraits and figures, as well as explore other artist’s works. They will perceive the idea of composition, light and shadow, positive-negative space and the rules of perspective. The fundamentals of color theory are introduced and applied as students experiment with stylistic approaches to subject matter through the use of watercolor and acrylic paints. Drawing and Painting 1 and 2 can be taken in any order, for either one semester or a full year. The level of difficulty of both classes is similar, while the focus is different. Students in both classes deal with the same fundamental issues in different projects. Prerequisite: None

7210s

Digital Photography Students in grades 9-12 are offered the opportunity to take creative control of the content and appearance of their digital photos in order to produce new artworks. They will have a basic knowledge of photo editing software and they will explore the formal qualities of an image. They will research the relationship of photography to other visual arts and they will discuss its connections with journalism, advertisement, history, and science.

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Required materials: Student-owned DSLRs / or compact cameras, card reader and flash USB drives or portable external disks to transfer and backup files. 7160y-H

Visual Arts IB 1

IB Visual Arts is a two-year program that requires a great deal of motivation, commitment, self-discipline, hard work, and time. The first year of the course combines studio practice with the study of art history, theory, criticism, and aesthetics. Students in grade 11 critically analyze, interpret, and synthesize readings about art history and about making and appreciating art. They develop knowledge and understanding of the formal aspects and working methods of art and design through structured studio problems and practice. Students are required to engage in independent research and to keep working journals of their process. Students entering this class should have strong drawing skills and a good understanding of the Elements of Art and Principles of Design. They should be competent critical, analytical thinkers with the ability to communicate clearly in writing and through images. *Assessment is aligned with the IBO course assessment requirements. Prerequisites: A grade of B in one year of high school Art, and Grade 10 English and Social Studies. 7163y-H 7164y-H

Visual Arts IB 2 SL Visual Arts IB 2 HL

IB Visual Arts is a two-year program that requires a great deal of motivation, commitment, self-discipline, hard work, and time. In the second year of the course, students in grade 12 are guided to develop a significant collection of original studio work in a chosen area of concentration. Independent research in cross cultural and historical studies is required and must have a close relationship with the studio work. Coursework culminates in a formal exhibition of the student’s studio work, as well as formal written work presented in the Process Portfolio and Comparative Study. *Assessment is aligned with the IBO course assessment requirements. Prerequisite for IB Visual Arts Year 2 Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for IB Visual Arts Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses. 7162Y-H

Visual Arts 1

This year-long course offers 11th grade students the opportunity to experiment and explore different techniques and media. They will develop knowledge and understanding of the formal aspects and working methods of art and design through structured studio problems and practice as well as with independent work. They will be expected to keep their process on workbook, engage in independent research as well as create their own portfolio. This course combines practice with art criticism and appreciation of art. Prerequisite: One semester of Art course and Instructor recommendation

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7165Y-H

Visual Arts 2

This year-long course offers 12th grade students the opportunity to gain an Honors credit by developing their own structured portfolio. Independent research on art history and international contemporary artists is required together with a lot of commitment and self discipline. Prerequisite: Successful completion of IB Visual Arts 1 or Visual Arts 1

PERFORMING ARTS 7110s

Media Studio Using a project-based curriculum, students combine creative and technical skills to generate effective products to multiple audiences using a variety of media and formats. Students learn the skills necessary to design and communicate information using sound and video in The Suheil Sabbagh Media Studio of ACS Athens. Students work individually and in teams to produce authentic projects like podcasts, broadcasts, advertisements, infomercials, music videos, newscasts, etc. The course culminates in a digital portfolio of projects which reflect the skills and knowledge learned. Students are assessed on their skill in operation equipment, quality of projects, ability to work on a production team, and ability to meet production deadlines. Credit may be applied toward meeting the minimum Visual and Performing Arts graduation requirement. This course is open to students in grades 10-12, by application only.

7111s

From Script to Screen – Film Writing /Production Students get hands-on experience in creating a short film from conception to screening. Students will learn writing, speaking and performance skills; explore group dynamics, interviewing, and problem-solving strategies; and write proposals, story treatments and scripts; create storyboards; and participate in all aspects of the actual filmmaking process. Students will complete the course by creating (in a working team) one complete short film. Course focus will rotate between documentary and fictional/narrative films in alternating years. This course is open to grades 10-12, by application only.

7240s

Drama 1 Students in this mixed-level (9-12) semester elective course will develop a range of social, interpersonal and expressive skills through daily preparation and presentation of group improvisations and scenes. This is a practical class that develops a set of life-transferable skills: confidence, communication, focus, concentration of attention, coordination, imagination, team work, space, time and body awareness, creativity and expression, to mention but a few. Students will learn how to reflect upon their experience and the creative process and how to constructively evaluate their own work as well as that of others. Drama 1 and 2 can be taken in any order for either one semester or a full year.

70


Prerequisite: None 7241s

Drama 2 Students in this mixed-level (9-12) semester elective course will explore the role of the actor through practical tasks and exercises and through daily preparation and presentation of scenes and improvisations. They will study the fundamentals of acting, namely voice, body language, facial expression, characterization, developing at the same time social and interpersonal skills like confidence, cooperation and effective communication. Students will learn how to reflect upon their experience and the creative process and how to constructively evaluate their own work as well that of others. Drama 1 and 2 can be taken in any order for either one semester or a full year. Prerequisite: None

7741y-H 7746y-H

Theater IB 1 Theater 1

This year-long course offers 11th grade students the opportunity to gain an Honors credit by exploring the art of theatre in theory and practice. Students will explore at least two world theater traditions one of which will be Greek theater and two production roles, one of which will be Western-style acting. They will also take part in a full scale theater production staged in the ACS Theater in May as actors, designers or technicians. They will read texts by Aristotle, Stanislavski, and Brecht amongst others, and they will need to keep a daily journal of reflections. Participation in theater trips and after school rehearsals for the final performance is an essential part of experiential learning in the course. IB students will have additional research and written tasks. *Assessment is aligned with the IBO course assessment requirements. Prerequisites for honors: One semester of Drama and course instructor recommendation Prerequisites for IB: One semester of Drama and a grade of B- in English or Social Studies 7743y-H 7744y-H 7747y-H

Theater IB 2 SL Theater IB 2 HL Theater 2

This year-long course offers 12th grade students the opportunity to gain an Honors credit by exploring the art of theatre in theory and practice. Theater 2 is addressed to students who want to be actively engaged in theater-making. They will take part in creating from scratch a full scale theater production staged in the ACS Theater in December and they will pursue independent work by taking part in a short performance of their choice (Independent Project). They will also develop a director’s portfolio and keep a daily journal of reflections. Theory will address contemporary trends of theater and course texts will include P. Brook, J. Grotowski, J. Littlewood amongst others. Participation in theater trips and after school rehearsals is an essential part of the course. IB students will have additional research and written tasks: A Research Presentation, a Collaborative Theater Project Portfolio, a Director’s notebook and a Solo Theater Piece (HL only). 71


Components Used for IB Prediction: IB predictions are based on the Research Presentation, completed in October of the second year and the Collaborative Theater Project, completed in February. *Assessment is aligned with the IBO course assessment requirements. Prerequisite for honors: Grade of C or better in Theater 1. Prerequisite for IB Theater Year 2 Standard Level: A June- IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 4 or above. Prerequisite for IB Theater Year 2 Higher Level: A June-IB Score Up to Date (SIB on report card) of 5 and above. Please review the criteria of Year 2 IB courses.

DEPARTMENT: PHYSICAL EDUCATION Grade 9 9025s

Grade 10 9025s

PE10

PE 9

9060s

Grade 11 9027s

Fitness, Strength and Conditioning

Grade 12 9027s

Fitness, Strength and Conditioning

Health

PHYSICAL EDUCATION: Courses in Detail 9025s

Physical Education

Physical Education (9th and 10th grade) instruction is required for all 9th graders and for one semester of 10th grade. Through regular fitness activities, individual and team games, direct instruction, group discussions and team-building activities, students will meet the following program objectives:

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Assessment and development of basic physiological variables such as muscular strength and endurance, cardiovascular endurance, body composition and flexibility;

Development of the student’s interest in maintaining the best possible physical, mental, social and emotional well-being (in conjunction with the Counseling department);

Development of basic physical skills through various motor activities;

Development of initiative, self-responsibility, self-control, sportsmanship values and cooperation in group activities and individual games;

Development of knowledge of basic rules and skills required to play a range of individual and team games and sports at a satisfying level of achievement;

Physical Education activities include: Basketball, Wall Climbing, Track and Field, Ultimate Frisbee, European Handball, Badminton, Fitness, Field Hockey, Water Polo, Softball, Table Tennis, Volleyball, Tennis, Weight training, Resistance training, Swimming


9027s

Fitness, Strength and Conditioning

This class is offered to 11th and 12th graders and is directed by three essential goals for each student: 1) attaining a level of personal fitness; 2) using technology to design and implement a personal fitness program based on scientific principles; and, 3) developing proficiency in selected motor skill activities for personal satisfaction and continued activity commitment. This course is designed to give students the opportunity to learn fitness concepts and conditioning techniques used for obtaining optimal physical fitness. Students will benefit from comprehensive weight training and cardio-respiratory endurance activities. Students will learn the basic fundamentals of strength training, aerobic training, and overall fitness training and conditioning. Prerequisite: Successful completion of 2 semesters of PE in grades 9-10. 9060s

Health This is a semester course, required of all tenth graders, and is a graduation requirement. The course instills in students the skills and knowledge necessary to enhance the health and wellness of self and others across the lifespan. Drawing on knowledge and health issues from the biological, environmental, psychological, social, emotional, physical and mental sciences, students are given the opportunity to apply essential skills to reduce health risks and promote lifelong wellness. Topics of study include: “Emotional & Mental Health;” “Nutrition & Physical Activity,” “Abstinence, Personal & Sexual Health;” “HIV, STD & Pregnancy Prevention;” “Tobacco, Alcohol & Other Drug Prevention;” and “Violence & Injury Prevention.” The course is highly interactive and participation in class discussions is a must. Assessments: Tests/quizzes/exams/homework/journal entries/ presentations/binder checks Prerequisites: None.

ACADEMIC GUIDANCE PROGRAM

Grade 9 9900s

Academic Advisory 9

Grade 10 9901s

Academic Advisory 10

Grade 11 9313s

Junior Advisory Semester 2 only

Grade 12 9314s

Senior Advisory Semester 1 only

ACADEMIC GUIDANCE: Courses in Detail 9900s

Academic Advisory 9 The Academic Advisory 9 class is designed to help students make a smooth transition to high school and further develop skills, strategies and attitudes needed to achieve their personal and academic goals. Students use educational computer software programs to explore their college and career interests Focusing on social and emotional development the course addresses responsible decision making processes, interpersonal and self-management skills, ethical choices and ways of being, and an appreciation for civic responsibility. Class seminars are held with administrators, counselors and teachers reviewing information on course selection, four-year plans, and co-curricular activities available for students including participation in athletics, clubs, student government and service activities.

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9901s

Academic Advisory 10 The Academic Advisory-10 course is a continuation of the 9th grade Advisory course. During the Academic/College and Career Exploration Unit, students complete the ACT Career Discover Program, research university options, review course selection options for AP/IB/ACS Authentic programs of study and finalize their 4-year plans. The Wellness Unit on Social/Emotional Health and Well-being encourages students to explore healthy life choices, develop coping skills in response to stress, manage peer pressure and enhance their interpersonal skills. The focus of the Responsible Living unit is on social awareness and ethical and responsible decision making. Students answer the question, “How do I impact the world and how does the world impact me?� This course culminates in a 10th Grade Personal Project in which students investigate a contemporary issue in the areas of health and social education, the environment, global affairs, technology and innovation and civic responsibility. Students eventually produce a 2,000 word research paper based on a creative project that is displayed in a school exhibition at the end of the semester.

9313s

Junior Advisory (Semester 2 only) All 11th graders are enrolled in Junior Advisory, which focuses on College Preparation, International Baccalaureate Support, and Creativity, Action, Service During this time juniors commence the college application process including conducting searches for and choosing potential universities, writing essays/personal statement drafts, registering and preparing for the SAT and completing their Digital Portfolios. Students also meet CAS obligations; conduct Extended Essay research, complete Internal Assessment assignments and complete group projects and individual course obligations. The course earns students an elective credit .25 towards graduation and is graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

9314s

Senior Advisory (Semester 1 only) All 12th graders enroll in Senior Advisory. Led by the ACS College Counselors, the course is designed to take all students through the college selection and application process – researching colleges and areas of future study and their connections to various careers, identifying reach and safety schools, writing college essays, completing applications, practicing for interviews, honing decision-making skills, comparing/contrasting higher education approaches in different countries, learning about financial aid options, managing stress, learning time management. The course earns students an elective credit .25 towards graduation, and is graded as Satisfactory/Unsatisfactory.

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OPTIMAL LEARNING PROGRAM 8061s 8060 8063 8064 8067

Optimal Learning Program (OLP) Optimal Learning Program Support Plan Optimal Learning Program Grade 9 (OLP) Optimal Learning Program Grade 10 (OLP) Optimal Learning Consultation Program (OLP)

The Optimal Learning Program offers students with learning differences an equal opportunity to excel in the classroom. By providing the necessary accommodations students are empowered to reach their academic potential. Entering this program begins with a student referral by a classroom teacher, counselor or parent. The Child Study Team (CST), which consists of the school principal, the K-12 school psychologist, the counselor(s), the Optimal Learning specialist and/or the Optimal Learning coordinator, work together to determine which program will most effectively meet the student’s needs and provide opportunities for him/her to perform optimally. The student may at this stage be referred for psycho-educational testing directly or may, initially, be informally assessed by an Optimal Learning Program specialist, in order to determine reading, writing and math levels. These subtest results may indicate a potential need for the students to enroll in the Optimal Learning Program only after a full battery of psycho-educational assessments has been completed. The full battery of psycho-educational assessments, which is administered by the ACS Athens diagnostic center or by consulting psychologists who collaborate with ACS Athens, must be completed to determine the type of support the student requires depending on the learning difference at hand.. Based on findings and a subsequent report, standards are set according to the individual needs of the referred student. In accordance to the psychologist’s recommendations, an Individual Learning Plan (ILP) is drafted for the student. The ILP is a formal, comprehensive document that outlines each student’s profile and indicates the student’s learning difference, preferred learning style, strengths as well as areas of difficulties. It also states the accommodations that students are eligible to receive and lists the goals that the Optimal Learning Program specialist, student and parent have set for the student within each academic year. Effective strategies are then developed by the Optimal Learning Program specialist and are subsequently shared with all teachers working with the particular student so as to be implemented within the classroom. The Optimal Learning Program specialist provides ongoing support and guidance to the classroom teachers in order to assist them in properly supporting student abilities. Collaboration is established among the entire team and valuable tactics are adopted in order to enable students to maintain success within the classroom. The Optimal Learning Program also uses an inclusion type model as a support service for students who need monitoring to help them succeed in the regular content classes. The Optimal Learning Program specialist and / or Optimal Learning Program aide enter the content classes with the student to provide on the spot assistance. The Optimal Learning Program specialist communicates and meets regularly with members of the faculty which help to regulate the monitoring of the student. The Optimal Learning Program provides three levels of support: (1) OLP Classroom, (2) OLP Consultation, and (3) OLP Support Plan for Instruction, Assessment and Accessibility (SPIAA). Whether a student is enrolled in Optimal Learning Program Classroom, Optimal Learning consultation or Optimal Learning Program Support Plan for Instruction, Assessment and Accessibility (SPIAA) is determined by the Child Study Team. Please read below for further information on each of the three aforementioned services. 75


OPTIMAL LEARNING PROGRAM- CLASSROOM The Optimal Learning Program Classroom is a support service for students who require the attainment of academic skills so as to better perform in the educational setting. Small group classroom instruction and cooperative learning activities are incorporated within the student’s curriculum in order to complement various learning abilities. 1. This class takes place during a specific block of time and meets regularly (3 times a week). 2. During OLP class, students work on areas of identified weakness by utilizing their strengths and learning strategies, which are modeled, practiced and eventually generalized throughout all mainstream classroom settings. 3. Students receive an ILP (as described in detail above) and are provided accommodations that cater to their learning needs. 4. The OLP specialist is in close collaboration with teachers in order to implement techniques. 5. Formal communication with parents takes place in the beginning of the year, where the ILP is introduced and discussed, during Parent-Teacher conferences, at the end of the year, where the level of progress the student has made on the goals that were set in at the commencement of the academic year is reviewed, and via phone calls or emails as often as necessary. * Whether a student is enrolled in Optimal Learning Program Classroom, Optimal Learning consultation or Optimal Learning Program Support Plan for Instruction, Assessment and Accessibility (SPIAA) is determined by the Child Study Team.

OPTIMAL LEARNING PROGRAM -CONSULTATION The Optimal Learning Program Consultation is a support service for students who need monitoring and/or classroom as well as testing accommodations to help them succeed in the regular class. Classroom instruction is not provided in this particular area. 1. The Optimal Learning Program specialist meets with the student on a pull-out basis during a scheduled convenient time for both. This consultation may be up to 20 minutes long and may take place once a week. The student is responsible for contacting the Optimal Learning Program specialist just as much as the Optimal Learning Program specialist is responsible for contacting the student. 2. Optimal Learning Program consultation students get an ILP as described above and are entitled to accommodations, which are specific to each student’s needs. Accommodations are stated within the ILP as guidelines for teachers to follow so that individual student needs are met. 3. The Optimal Learning Program specialist communicates regularly with members of the faculty which help to regulate the monitoring of a consultation student. 4. Formal communication with parents takes place in the beginning of the year, where the ILP is introduced and discussed, during Parent-Teacher conferences, at the end of the year where the level of progress the student has made on the goals that were set in at the commencement of the academic year is reviewed, and via phone calls or emails as often as necessary. 76


* Whether a student is enrolled in Optimal Learning Program Classroom, Optimal Learning consultation or Optimal Learning Program Support Plan for Instruction, Assessment and Accessibility (SPIAA) is determined by the Child Study Team.

OPTIMAL LEARNING PROGRAM SUPPORT PLAN FOR INSTRUCTION, ASSESSMENT AND ACCESSIBILITY (SPIAA) The Optimal Learning Program Support Plan for Instruction, Assessment and Accessibility (SPIAA) is a support service for students who need accommodations to help them succeed in the classroom. This service does not involve classroom instruction, person-to-person consultation or monitoring. It is a minimal support service for students in the OLP who have progressed as independent learners. 1. The Optimal Learning Program specialist meets with the student once in the beginning of the academic year to review his/her support plan. The student is then responsible for contacting the Optimal Learning Program specialist if and when assistance is needed. It is the responsibility of the student to contact the Optimal Learning Program specialist. 2. Optimal Learning Program SPIAA students are entitled to accommodations, which are specific to each student’s needs. Accommodations are specific guidelines for teachers to follow so that individual student needs are met. These guidelines are presented in the student’s Support Plan for Instruction and Accessibility (SPIAA). Classroom teachers are responsible for implementing/providing these accommodations. For example, if a student’s accommodation requires a quiet space and/or additional time for test-taking, the accommodation will be provided by the Optimal Learning Program. 3. The Optimal Learning Program specialist communicates regularly with members of the faculty which helps to regulate the monitoring of a SPIAA student. *Whether a student is enrolled in Optimal Learning Program Classroom, Optimal Learning consultation or Optimal Learning Program Support Plan for Instruction, Assessment and Accessibility (SPIAA) is determined by the Child Study Team.

DIFFERENTIATED INSTRUCTION AT ACS ATHENS OLP realizes the importance of addressing each student's needs in the classroom, so as to optimize his/her learning experience; this is accomplished with Differentiated Instruction as described in the following excerpt. Differentiated Instruction is like Environmentally Sensitive Land Development "The development begins with an assessment of the current landscape. The underlying bedrock differs from place to place like students’ academic levels. There are existing structures or roads (students’ prior knowledge), different soil types (cultural origins) and several elevations and drainage patterns (preferred pathways of absorbing and using knowledge). A timeline (the school year) and resource restrictions (curriculum and testing) must be balanced. A successful development uses the assets from current landscape as the basis for new construction. "Adventure of the American Mind Northern Virginia Partnership.

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OPTIMAL LEARNING MENTOR PROGRAM The Mentor Program has been developed to challenge students who have exceptional abilities in a variety of areas. The expansion of the Optimal Learning Program to incorporate the high end of the learning spectrum will enable students to achieve their utmost potential. This program identifies students with exceptional strengths and creates a learning environment in which students can fully develop these talents and interests. The mentors guide and coach students into generating original and quality work. Students develop ideas or projects that are creative and innovative based on their interests, encouraging and cultivating the students’ curiosity. The mentor is responsible for designing a “curriculum” that challenges the students and promotes learning.

ACCEPTANCE CRITERIA TO THE MENTOR PROGRAM Application form to be submitted by the end of October The application form to the mentor program consists of three short questions and a letter. The questions are very specific and the letter gives students the opportunity to express their uniqueness and the reasons that they believe makes them good candidates for the program. ●

Above average intellectual functioning (IQ of 130 and above)

One of the requirements to being accepted to the mentor program involves taking an Intelligence test. The aim of the Intelligent Quotient (IQ) test is to measure the intelligence of a child, which is one indication of a child’s potential. It tests and analyses the performance of the student on a series of analytical, mathematical, and spatial activities, and the success with those activities will be represented as an IQ score. Or… ●

Score in the 95th percentile or above on a standardized test

Standardized tests evaluate how students perform in relation to other students and are one of the tools that can be used to determine entrance for the mentor program. These tests help in the identification process of students that are performing above and beyond their grade level. * The Emotional Intelligence Quotient (EQ) will also be considered in determining the best fit for the student. ●

Three Letters of Recommendations from ACS Athens faculty

A letter of recommendation can provide detailed information about a student. These letters should outline many of the characteristics we will be looking for in applicants to the mentor program. Some of these characteristics may include: communication skills, leadership, intellectual ability, critical thinking skills, and ability to get along with peers, adaptability and motivation. ●

Interview with the Division Chairs

The final stage of the application process for the mentor program is to interview with one or more of the division chairs of ACS Athens. The interview provides the utmost opportunity for the applicant to express why they should be a part of the program and allows for determining the best fit.

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Academy Program of Studies 2018 - 2019  
Academy Program of Studies 2018 - 2019