Page 1

Proceedings of the 7th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation Faculty of Management University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk Poland 12-13 September 2013

Edited by

Przemysław Lech A conference managed by ACPI, UK www.academic-conferences.org


Proceedings of the   7th European Conference on   IS Management and Evaluation  ECIME 2013   

Faculty of Management  University of Gdańsk  Sopot  Poland      12‐13 September 2013      Edited by   Prof Przemysław Lech   Faculty of Management  University of Gdańsk  Poland         


Copyright The Authors, 2013. All Rights Reserved.  No reproduction, copy or transmission may be made without written permission from the individual authors.  Papers  have  been  double‐blind  peer  reviewed  before  final  submission  to  the  conference.  Initially, paper  ab‐ stracts were read and selected by the conference panel for submission as possible papers for the conference.  Many thanks to the reviewers who helped ensure the quality of the full papers.  These Conference Proceedings have been submitted to Thomson ISI for indexing. Please note that the process  of indexing can take up to a year to complete.  Further  copies  of  this  book  and  previous  year’s  proceedings  can  be  purchased  from  http://academic‐ bookshop.com  E‐Book ISBN: 978‐1‐909507‐57‐9  E‐Book ISSN: 2048‐8920  Book version ISBN: 978‐1‐909507‐55‐5  Book Version ISSN: 2048‐8912  CD Version ISBN: 978‐1‐909507‐58‐6  CD Version ISSN: 2048‐979X    The Electronic version of the Proceedings is available to download at ISSUU.com. You will need to sign up to  become an ISSUU user (no cost involved) and follow the link to http://issuu.com    Published by Academic Conferences and Publishing International Limited  Reading  UK  44‐118‐972‐4148  www.academic‐publishing.org 


Contents Paper Title 

Author(s)

Page No. 

Preface

iii

Committee

iv

Biographies  

vi

Knowledge Management in the Process of  Enterprise System's Configuration 

Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko 

1

Understanding and Supporting Cloud Computing  Adoption in Irish Small and Medium Sized  Enterprises (SMEs)  

Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard  Conway 

10

New Delivery Model for Non‐Profit Organisations:  Shared Computing Services 

Barbara Crump and Raja Peter

18

Enhancing IT Capability Maturity – Development  of a Conceptual SME Framework to Maximise the  Value Gained From IT 

Eileen Doherty, Marian Carcary, Una Downey  and Stephen Mc Laughlin 

25

Organisational Politics: The Impact on Trust,  Information and Knowledge Management and  Organisational Performance 

Nina Evans, Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi 

33

Opportunities and Risks of the Use of Social Media  in Healthcare Organizations 

Ginevra Gravili

41

Social Media Marketing: An Evaluation Study in  the Wellness Industry 

Kerstin Grundén and Stefan Lagrosen 

51

Building the Persuasiveness Into Information  Systems 

Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas 

58

Communications Management in Scrum Projects 

Vered Holzmann, Ilanit Panizel

67

The Development of an Introductory Theoretical  Green IS Framework for Strong Environmental  Sustainability in Organisations 

Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe

75

Functional Consultants’ Role in Enterprise Systems  Implementations 

Przemysław Lech

84

A Systematic Literature Review on Business Cases:  Structuring the Study Field and Defining Future  Research Dimensions 

Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De  Haes 

93

Integrating Green Information Systems into the  Curriculum Using a Carbon Footprinting Case 

Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle 

104

Electronic Health Record Requirements for Private  Medical Practices in Namibia: A Pilot Study 

Julius Oyeleke and Meke Shivute 

114

Selected Factors Influencing Customers' Behaviour  Michal Pilík in e‐Commerce on B2C Markets in the Czech  Republic   Information Asset Management: Who is  Responsible and Accountable? 

James Price and Nina Evans

i

121

129


Paper Title 

Author(s)

Page

An Integrated Model for Evaluating ICT Impact in  the Education Domain 

Mirja Pulkkinen

137

Swedish and Indian Teams: Consensus Culture  Meets Hierarchy Culture in Offshoring 

Minna Salminen‐Karlsson

147

Project Communication Management in Industrial  Enterprises 

Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína  Koltnerová  

155

Information Security in Enterprises – Ontology  Perspective 

Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Sum‐ mers 

164

Organisational Value of Social Technologies: An  Australian Study 

Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski 

174

An Evaluation of Potential Benefits of Mobile BI 

Olgerta Tona and Sven Carlsson 

185

Analysis of IT Projects in the Models of Enterprise  Value Building. A Summary of Research between  2010–2012 

Bartosz Wachnik 

192

PHD Papers 

203

No.

Giuseppe Ercolani “Cloud Computing SaaS Assessment” (CCSaaSA):  Measuring and Evaluating Cloud Services end‐User    Perceptions 

205

Business Process Maturity as a Case of Managerial  Cybernetics and Effective Information  Management 

Jaroslav Kalina, Zdeněk Smutný and Václav  Řezníček 

215

Sustaining IT Investment Value – Using IT Artifacts  as a Knowledge Generative Tools   

Nathan Lakew

222

Strategic Agility and the Role of Information  Systems in Supply Chain: Telecommunication  Industry Study 

Nicholas Blessing Mavengere

229

A Search for Patterns of Productivity Gains of  Information Workers 

Natallia Pashkevich and Darek Haftor 

239

Masters Research Paper 

247

Evaluating the Value of Enterprise Resource  Planning in Home Care Services 

Juha Soikkeli, Mirja Pulkkinen and Toni  Ruohonen 

249

Work In Progress Paper 

259

‘Backshoring’ Home: Developments in Home‐ Based Teleworking (HbTW) in the European  Labour Market  

Daiga Kamerade, Pascale Peters, Helen Richard‐ son, Minna Salminen and Sudi Sharifi 

261

ii


Preface   The 7th European Conference on Information Management and Evaluation (ECIME) is hosted this year by The  Faculty of Management, University of Gdańsk, Sopot, Poland. The Conference Co‐Chairs are Prof Przemysław  Lech  and  Prof  Bernard  Kubiak,  and  the  Programme  Co‐Chairs  are  Prof  Stanislaw  Wrycza  and  Prof  Jerzy  Auksztol, all from the University of Gdańsk, Poland  ECIME provides an opportunity for individuals researching and working in the broad field of information man‐ agement, including information technology evaluation to come together to exchange ideas and discuss current  research  in  the  field.  We  hope  that  this  year’s  conference  will  provide  you  with  plenty  of  opportunities  to  share your expertise with colleagues from around the world.  The opening keynote address will be delivered by Wojciech Piotrowicz, University of Oxford, UK on the topic  "Evaluation of the Information Systems research in the Visegrád Group of countries". The second day keynote  will  be  given  by  Benjamin  Dewilde,  President  of  Westernacher  Consulting,  Germany  on  the  topic  of  Infor‐ mation  Architecture  and  Application  Strategy,  what  can  we  learn  from  Elizabeth  Newton,  Caesar,  Genghis  Khan, the St Denis Basilica and other seemingly unrelated stories on how to make this successful in practice?  ECIME 2013 received an initial submission of 84 abstracts. After the double‐blind peer review process 23 aca‐ demic papers, 5 PhD papers, 1 Masters paper and 1 work in progress paper have been accepted for these Con‐ ference  Proceedings.  These  papers  represent  research  from  around  the  world,  including  Australia,  Belgium,  Czech Republic, Finland, France, India, Ireland, Israel, Italy, Namibia, New Zealand, Poland, Republic of Korea,  Serbia, Slovak Republic, South Africa, South Korea, Spain, Sweden, UK, USA  We wish you a most interesting conference.    Prof Stanislaw Wrycza and Prof Jerzy Auksztol  Programme Chairs    Prof Przemysław Lech and Prof Bernard F. Kubiak  Conference Chairs    September 2013   

iii


Conference Committee  Conference Executive Dr Przemysław Lech, University of Gdańsk, Gdańsk, Poland  Dr Wojciech Piotrowicz, Saïd Business School, University of Oxford, UK  Dr Piotr Soja, Cracov University of Economics, Poland    Mini Track Chairs  Ian Owens, Cranfield University, UK  Dr Ciara Heavin, University College Cork, Ireland  Grant R. Howard, University of South Africa (UNISA), South Africa  Dr Karen Neville, Business Information Systems, University College Cork, Ireland    Conference Committee The conference programme committee consists of key people in the information systems community. The fol‐ lowing people have confirmed their participation:  Prof. Abdel‐Badeeh Salem (Faculty of Computer and Information Sciences, Ain Shams University, Cairo, Egypt);  Ademola Adesina  (University  of  Western  Cape, South Africa);  Adetola Adewojo  (National  Open  University  of  Nigeria, Nigeria); Abidemi Aina (Lagos State University, Nigeria) Maria Alaranta(Copenhagen Business School,  Denmark); Prof Maria Ceu Alves (University of Beira Interior, Portugal); Dr Hussein Al‐Yaseen (Amman Univer‐ sity, Jordan);Prof Karen Anderson (Mid Sweden University, Sweden); Dr Joan Ballantine (University of Ulster,  UK);  Dr  Mustafa  Balsam  (University  Malaysia  Pahang  (UMP),  Malaysia);  Dr  Frank  Bannister  (Trinity  College  Dublin, Ireland); Dr Ofer Barkai (SCE ‐ Sami Shamoon College of Engineering, Israel); Dr David Barnes (West‐ minster  Business  School,  University  of  Westminster,  London,  UK);  Peter  Bednar  (Department  of  ISCA,  Ports‐ mouth  University,  UK);  Dr  Egon  Berghout  (University  of  Groningen,  The  Netherlands);  Dr  Milena  Bobeva  (Bournemouth University, Poole, UK); Ann Brown (CASS Business School, London, UK); Dr Giovanni Camponovo  (University  of  Applied  Sciences  of  Southern  Switzerland,  Switzerland);  Dr  Marian  Carcary  (NUIM,  Ire‐ land);Professor Sven Carlsson (School of Economics and Management, Lund University, Sweden); Dr Noel Car‐ roll  (Dublin  City  University,Ireland);  Dr  Walter  Castelnovo  (Università  dell’Insubria,  Como,  Italy);  Prof  Anna  Cavallo (University of Rome, "Sapienza", Italy); Dr Sunil Choenni (University of Twente and Ministry of Justice,  The Netherlands); Dr Peter Clutterbuck (University of Queensland, Australia); Dr Reet Cronk (Harding Univer‐ sity,  Arkansas,  USA);  Jacek  Cypryjanski  (University  of  Szczecin,  Poland);  Prof  Renata  Dameri  (University  of  Genoa, Italy); Paul Davies (University of Glamorgan, UK); Dr Miguel de Castro Neto ( ISEGI, Universidade Nova  de  Lisboa  ,  Portugal);  Guillermo  de  Haro  (Instituto  de Empresa,  Madrid  ,  Spain); Francois  Deltour(GET‐ENST‐ Bretagne Engineering School, France); Denis Dennehy (Business Information Systems Dept, University College  Cork., Ireland); Dr Jan Devos(Ghent University, Belgium,); Professor Dr Eduardo Diniz (Escola de Administracao  de Empresas de Sao Paulo, Fundacao Getulio Vargas, Brazil); Dr Maria do Rosário Martins (Universidade Cape  Verde,  Portugal);  Romano  Dyerson  (Royal  Holloway  University,  London,  UK);  Dr  Alea  Fairchild  (Vesalius  Col‐ lege/Vrije Univ Brussels, Belgium); Dr Elena Ferrari (University of Insubria, Como, Italy); Jorge Ferreira (e‐Geo  Geography and Regional Planning Research Centre / New University of Lisbon, Portugal); Dr Graham Fletcher  (Cranfield  University  /  Defence  Academy  of  the  UK,  UK);  Elisabeth  Frisk(Chalmers  University  of  Technology,  Göteborg,  Sweden);  Dr  Andreas  Gadatsch  (Bonn‐Rhein‐Sieg  University  of  Applied  Sciences  ,  Germany);  Dr  Sayed Mahdi Golestan Hashemi (Iranian Research Center for Creatology , TRIZ & Innovation Science, Iran); Pro‐ fessor Ken Grant (Ryerson University, Toronto, Canada); Professor Ginevra Gravili (Facolta Di Economia, lecce,  Italy);  Dr  Paul  Griffiths  (The  Birchman  Group,  Santiago,  Chile);  Loshma  Gunisetti  (Sri  Vasavi  Engineering  Col‐ lege,  India);  Dr  Petri  Hallikainen  (University  of  Sydney,  Business  School,  ,  Australia);  Ciara  Heavin  (University  College Cork, Ireland); Dr Jonas Hedman (Copenhagen Business School, Denmark); Dr Matthew Hinton (Open  University  Business  School,  UK);  Dr.  Vered  Holzmann(Tel‐Aviv  University  /  Holon  Institute  of  Technology,  Is‐ rael); Grant Royd Howard (University of South Africa (UNISA), South Africa); Björn Johansson (Lund University,  Sweden); Dr Paul Jones (University of Plymouth, UK); Prof Ghassan kbar (Riyadh Techno Valley, King Saud Uni‐ versity, Saudi Arabia); Professor Ranjan Kini (Indiana University Northwest, Gary, USA); Lutz Kirchner (BOC In‐ formation Technologies Consulting GmbH Voßstr. 22, Germany); Prof Jesuk Ko (Gwangju University, Korea); Dr  Juha Kontio (Turku University of Applied Sciences, Finland); Dr Jussi Koskinen (University of Jyvaskyla, Finland);  Prof.  Luigi  Lavazza  (Università  degli  Studi  dell'Insubria,  Italy);  Dr  Przemysław  Lech  (University  of  Gdańsk,  Po‐ land); Dr Harald Lothaller (University of Music and Performing Arts Graz, Austria); Prof Sam Lubbe (University 

iv


of South Africa, South Africa); Paolo Magrassi (Polytechnique of Milan, Italy); PonnusamyManohar (University  of  Papua  New  Guinea,  Papua  New  Guinea);  Prof  Nenad  Markovic  (Belgrade  Business  School,  Serbia);  Steve  Martin  (University  of  East  London,  UK);  Prof  Nico  Martins  (University  of  South  Africa,  South  Africa);  Milos  Maryska  (University  of  Economics,  Prague,  Czech  Republic);  John  McAvoy  (University  College  Cork,  Ireland);  Prof  Nor  Laila  Md  Noor  (Universiti  Teknologi  MARA,  Malaysia);  Dr  Annette  Mills  (University  of  Canterbury,  Christchurch, New Zealand); Dr Maria Mitre (Universidad de Oviedo, Spain); Dr Mahmoud Moradi (University  of  Guilan,  Rasht,  Iran);  Dr  Gunilla  Myreteg(Uppsala  University,  Sweden);  Dr  Tadgh  Nagle  (University  College  Cork, Ireland); Prof Mário Negas (Aberta University, Portugal); Karen Neville (University College Cork, Ireland);  Emil Numminen (Blekinge Institute of Technology, Sweden); Dr Brian O'Flaherty (University College Cork, Ire‐ land);  Dr  Tiago  Oliveira  (Universidade  Nova  de  Lisboa,  Portugal);  Dr  Paidi  O'Raghallaigh  (University  College  Cork, Ireland); Prof Patricia Ordóñez de Pablos (The University of Oviedo, Spain); Dr Roslina Othman (Interna‐ tional Islamic University Malaysia, Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia); Ian Owens (Cranfield University, Shrivenham, UK);  Sevgi Özkan (Middle East Tehcnical University, Ankara, Turkey); Dr Shaun Pather (Cape Peninsula University of  Technology, , South Africa); Kalevi Pessi (IT University, Gothenburg, Sweden); Dr. Danilo Piaggesi (Fondazione  Rosselli  Americas,  USA);  Elias  Pimenidis  (University  of  East  London,  UK);  Zijad  Pita  (RMIT  University,  Mel‐ bourne,  Australia);  Dr  Cosmin  Popa  (The  University  of  Agricultural  Sciences  and  Veterinary  Medicine,  Roma‐ nia);  Nayem  Rahman  (Intel  Corporation,  Aloha,  ,  USA);  Hugo  Rehesaar  (NSW,  Sydney,  Australia);  Prof.  João  Manuel Ribeiro da Silva Tavares(Faculdade de Engenharia da Universidade do Porto, Portugal); Dr Dimitris Ri‐ gas (De Montfort University, UK); Professor Narcyz Roztocki (State University of New York at New Paltz, USA);  Professor  Hannu  Salmela  (Turku  School  of  Economics  and  Business  Administration,  Finland);  David  Sammon(University College Cork, Ireland); Elsje Scott (University of Cape Town, Rondebosch, South Africa); Dr  Elena Serova (St. Petersburg State University of Economics and Finance., Russia); Dr Yilun Shang (University of  Texas at San Antonio, USA); Dr. Hossein Sharif (University of Portsmouth, UK); Gilbert Silvius (Utrecht Univer‐ sity of Professional Education, The Netherlands); Dr Riccardo Spinelli (Universita Di Genova, Italy); Dr. Darijus  Strasunskas(Norwegian  University  of  Science  and  Technology,  Trondheim,  Norway);Professor  Reima  Suomi  (University of Turku , Finland); Lars Svensson (University West, Trollhättan, Sweden); Jarmo Tähkäpää (Turku  School of Economics and Business Administration, Finland); Torben Tambo (Aarhus University, Denmark); Dr  Llewellyn Tang (University of Nottingham Ningbo , China); Dr Claudine Toffolon (Université du Mans ‐ IUT de  Laval, France); Dr Geert‐Jan Van Bussel (HvA University of Applied Sciences Amsterdam, The Netherlands); Dr  Minhong Wang (The University of Hong Kong, Hong Kong); Dr Anna Wingkvist (School of Computer Science,  Physics  and  Mathematics,  Linnaeus  University,  Sweden);  Dr  Les  Worrall  (University  of  Coventry,  UK);  Prof  Stanislaw  Wrycza  (University  of  Gdansk,  Poland);  Tuan  Yu  (Kent  Business  School,  University  of  Kent,  Canter‐ bury, UK); Dr Atieh Zarabzadeh (UCD, Ireland); Dr Ryszard Zygala (Wroclaw University of Economics, Poland);  Alexandru Tugui (Alexandru Ioan Cuza University, Iasi, Romania) 

v


Biographies Conference Co‐Chairs  Prof  Przemysław  Lech,  PhD  is  a  Professor  at  the  University  of  Gdańsk  and  Consulting  Department Managing Partner in the IT consulting enterprise—LST. His areas of interest  include  knowledge  management,  MIS  evaluation,  IT  business  impact,  MIS  project  management and implementation methodologies. He has worked as a senior consultant  and  project  manager  in  several  IT  projects,  including  IT  strategy  formulation  and  ERP  systems implementations. He is the author of more than thirty papers and two books on  Management Information Systems.  Dr  Bernard  F.  Kubiak  is  Full  Professor  of  Information  Systems  and  Information  Technologies  at  The  Department  of  Information Systems  (Faculty  of Management)  at  the  Gdańsk  University.  His researches and didactics focuses on informatization strategy of organization, systems  analysis,  knowledge  and  information  management,  ecommerce,  organizational  performance  and  electronic  business  strategies.  He  has  published  books  and  articles  in  many  national  and  foreign  journals  and  publishing  houses.  He  has  gained  extensive  experience as system analyst and as application specialist in formulating and realization  of informatization strategy in organizations. 

Programme Co‐Chairs  Stanisław  Wrycza  is  professor  and  head  of  Department  of  Business  Informatics  at  University  of  Gdansk,  Poland. His numerous publications – books, articles, papers ‐ regard business informatics,  information systems development, UML, SysML, e‐business, e‐learning. He is the editorial  board  member  of  Information  Systems  Journal,  Information  Systems  Management,  Journal of Database Management, Information Systems and E‐business Management. He  has  been  involved  in  organization  of  numerous  international  conferences,  serving  as  organizing  chair  of  the  following  regular  conferences:  European  Conference  on  Information Systems ECIS 2002, Business Informatics Research BIR 2008, SIGSAND/PLAIS  EuroSymposium  2011  on  Systems  Analysis  and  Design,  Conference  on  Advanced  Information  Systems  Engineering  CAiSE’12,  all    held  in  Gdansk.  He  was  Vice  President  of  Information  Systems  Academic  Heads  International (2008‐2010.  Dr  Jerzy  Auksztol  is  Professor  at  the  Information  Systems  Department,  University  of  Gdańsk,  Poland.  His  main  areas  of  interest  are:  information  technology  (IT)  and  information  systems  (IS)  sourcing  arrangements,  statistics  of  IT/IS  services,  enterprise  architecture mana gement, interoperation of management information systems. He is  the  author  and  co‐author  of  more  then  thirty  research  papers  as  well  as  four  books  dealing with the filed of information technology and management information systems. 

Keynote Speakers  Benjamin Dewilde is Managing Partner and CEO of the Westernacher Consulting group.  He  provides  advice  to  senior  management  at  Westernacher  clients  as  well  as  strategy  setting,  business  process  analysis,  system  design  and  implementation  expertise  to  the  projects under his management.  He has a track record of guiding top class global players  through  complex  business  reengineering  and  information  technology  challenges,  providing pivotal advice and vision to top level decision makers and implementers alike.  His  key  role  in  projects  is  ensuring  optimal  business  results  through  correct  strategy  setting,  business  process  design  and  highest  quality  implementation  of  the  appropriate  information  technology. Benjamin has over 18 years of consulting experience in topics ranging from finance, controlling,  investment  and  project  management,  forecasting,  logistics  and  business  intelligence  in  industries  like:  life  sciences, fast moving consumer goods, financial services, utilities, telecom, consumer electronics and retail. His  clients  include  well  known  multinational  companies  like  Gillette,  Colgate‐Palmolive,  Sandoz,  National  Grid,  Deutsche Telekom, Deutsche Post, RTL, Deutsche Bank, TJX and Federal Mogul.   

vi


Dr Wojciech Piotrowicz (PhD Brunel, MA Gdaosk, PGDipLATHE Oxon) is a member of the Faculty of Management, University of Oxford at SaŃ—d Business School and the Wolfson College. His research is related to supply chain management, information systems, IT/BP outsourcing, performance measurement and evaluation, with focus on emerging markets. Wojciech is recipient of Outstanding and Highly Commended paper awards from Emerald Literati Network for Excellence.

Mini Track Chairs Dr Ciara Heavin is a College Lecturer in Business Information Systems at University College Cork, Ireland. She also holds a BSc and MSc in Information Systems from UCC. Her main research interests include the development of the ICT industry, primarily focusing on Ireland’s software industry and knowledge management in software SMEs.

Grant Royd Howard is an Information Systems lecturer in the School of Computing, College of Science, Engineering and Technology (CSET), at the University of South Africa (UNISA). He is a PhD student at the North-West University (NWU) in Mafikeng, South Africa. He obtained his Master of Science (MSc) degree inInformation Systems at UNISA. He has authored and presented papers published at peer-reviewed conferences, both local and international, and has published in an accredited journal. His research focus is Information Systems in the domain of organizational, environmental sustainability. Before being a lecturer he worked in the financial industry in South Africa as a Business Analyst. Dr Karen Neville is a researcher and lecturer in Business Information Syst ems (BIS) at University College Cork (UCC), Ireland. Her current research interests focus on the areas of ISS and Compliance, Social Learning and Biometrics. Karen has published in international conferences and journals.

Ian Owens is a lecturer and researcher at Cranfield University. His research interests include information systems evaluation, information systems development methodologies, sense making and mindfulness, enterprise architecture, and service oriented architecture. He has published a number of papers on these topics in international journals and conferences. Ian is currently UK representative on the NATO RTO IST 118 panel that is researching the use of service-oriented architecture over disadvantaged grids.

Biographies of Presenting Authors Dr Jerzy Auksztol is Professor at the Information Systems Department, University of Gdaosk, Poland. His main areas of interest are: information technology (IT) and information systems (IS) sourcing arrangements, statistics of IT/IS services, enterprise architecture management, interoperation of management information systems. Marian Carcary is a post-doctoral researcher working on an IT Capability Maturity Framework research project at the Innovation Value Institute, National University of Ireland, Maynooth. Marian previously worked as a member of Faculty in the University of Limerick and Limerick Institute of Technology. She has an MSc by research and a PhD in IT evaluation. Sven Carlsson is Professor of Informatics at Lund University School of Economics and Management. His current research interests include: Business Intelligence, KM, and enterprise 2.0. He has published more than 125 peer-reviewed journal articles, book chapters, and conference papers. His work has appeared in journals like JMIS, Decision Sciences, and Information Systems Journal.

vii


Barbara Crump’s research involves evaluation of digital divide initiatives and research projects investigating the culture of the computing tertiary and work environments. She has collaborated with research colleagues from Japan, Malaysia and the UK. She is a Senior Lecturer in the information systems group in the School of Management, Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand. Dr Eileen Doherty is a Research Fellow at the Innovation Value Institute, National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Ireland. Having completed a PhD in 2012 into ‘The adoption of Broadband Technology by Irish SMEs’, her research interests include technology / innovation adoption and how the organization can gain maximum value from its IT capability. Giuseppe Ercolani is a PhD candidate in Information Systems at University of Murcia (Spain). With more than 25 years' experience as a business and information systems consultant and trainer, he works as Technical Project Manager at the University of Tuscia (Viterbo, Italy). He owns several IT certifications released from I.B.M., 3Com, Siebel, JdEdwards, Microsoft, Citrix and Planet3 Wireless. Nina Evans holds qualifications in Chemical Engineering, Education, Computer Science, Master of IT, MBA and PhD. She is Associate Head of the School of Information Technology and Mathematical Science at the University of South Australia. She teaches and conducts research in Knowledge Management, ICT Leadership, Business-IT fusion, Stakeholder Engagement, Women in ICT, CSR and Information Asset Management. Ginevra Gravili was born in Lecce in 1969. Since 2002, she has been professor of Organization Theory at the University of Economics. Salento, Lecce, Italy. She has written numerous books and articles on SMEs, knowledge sharing, social recruitment, HRM of public administration, ICT. Kerstin Grundén is senior lecturer in informatics at the West University of Sweden. She has also a background as a sociologist. She was participating in the research project Innoveta funded by Vinnova for the study of customer centres implementation within municipalities in Sweden 2009 – 2011. Her main field of research is eGovernment and e-Learning. Dr. Darek Haftor is the PostNord Professor of Information Logistics, at Linnaeus University, Sweden. His previous work exposed him initially for various aspects of operations development. Darek’s current research focuses two frontiers: Information Economy and Digital Business Models, the Normative foundations, inherent in any design and developmental effort of an organized effort. Marja Harjumaa, M.Sc., works as a research scientist at the VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland. She is experienced in conducting user-oriented research in different domains. Her main interests are knowledge intensive services for health and environment, focusing especially on technologies for health behaviour change. Dr Vered Holzmann, MBA, is an experienced practicing project manager with a distinguished track record in managing computer software development teams, implementation of quality assurance programs and management of fast track construction projects. She is a faculty member of Holon Institute of Technology - H.I.T. and lectures at Tel-Aviv University. Grant Royd Howard is an Information Systems lecturer in the School of Computing at the University of South Africa (UNISA). He has authored papers published at peer-reviewed conferences, both local and international, and has a publication in an accredited journal. His research focus is information systems in the domain of organizational, environmental sustainability. Jaroslav Kalina graduated from applied informatics. Currently, he is PhD student at the Faculty of Informatics and Statistics, University of Economics, Prague. He deals mainly with modelling. Nathan Lakew’s research interest is studying ‘ISD methods’ applied to develop and/or update systems in organizations, their effect in the overall worksystem. He is also interested in studying IT investment approaches from the perspective of value creation in IS. He is a PhD student at Mid Sweden University, Sweden and a member of ValIT research group.

viii


Przemysław Lech, PhD is a Professor at the University of Gdańsk and Consulting Department Managing Partner  in the IT consulting enterprise—LST. His areas of interest include knowledge management, MIS evaluation, IT  business  impact,  MIS  project  management  and  implementation  methodologies.  He  has  worked  as  a  senior  consultant and project manager in several IT projects, including IT strategy formulation and ERP systems im‐ plementations.   Kim  Maes,  PhD  candidate  at  University  of  Antwerp  (IWT  grant)  and  researcher  IS  Management  at  Antwerp  Management  School  and  affiliated  with  ITAG  Research  Institute,  performs  research  on  business  case,  value  management,  IT  governance  and  alignment.  He  published  in  International  Journal  of  IT/Business  Alignment  and Governance and presented at HICSS, MCIS, PREBEM and BENAIS bazaar.  Nicholas Blessing Mavengere is a researcher at the University of Tampere, Finland. His research interests in‐ clude supply chain management, business strategy, strategic agility, ICT for development, the role of IT in busi‐ ness.  Currently, he  is  working  on  his  PhD  thesis  on  investigating  supply  chain  enhancement  from a strategic  agility perspective and role of information technology.  Carolyn McGibbon, Research Associate at the Centre for IT and National Development in Africa (CITANDA) at  the University of Cape Town is doing her PhD in Green IS in the Higher Education sector. She holds a Master in  Business  Administration  and  a  Bachelor  of  Science  degree  as  well  as  a  Higher  Diploma  in  Higher  Education  (cum laude). She has co‐authored a book chapter and four peer‐reviewed conference papers.  Seid Ahmed is an MBA candidate in the Faculty of Commerce and Business Administration at the JNTU Univer‐ sity, Hyderabad India, Prior to entering the MBA program, he received a BCA from the Osmania University. His  current research interests include competence of business managers and ARE professionals.  Salla Muuraiskangas (M.H.Sc.) works as a research scientist at VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland since  2008. She is experienced in user testing. Her research interests cover developing technologies for wellness and  health behaviour change and evaluating user experience.   Julius Oyekunle Oyeleke received his honours Degree in Business computing at the Polytechnic of Namibia in  2012. He is currently pursuing his Masters in Business Administration degree and his research interests are on  the electronic health record systems and how they are to provide a comprehensive view of patient information  in the Namibian private sector.    Natallia Pashkevich is a PhD candidate at SUSB, Sweden. She has previously carried out research in the field of  Labour Economics. Her research interests target a theoretical gap within the “nano‐level” of the Productivity  Paradox  discourse  that  is  concerned  with  challenges  to  identify  productivity  increase  in  operations  that  are  conducted with the support of IT.   Michal Pilík Marketing is his professional orientation. He collaborates on EU projects. He is the researcher of  the scientific project Czech Science Foundation P403/11/P175: The factors influencing customer’s online be‐ haviour  in  e‐commerce  environment on  B2C  and  B2B  markets  in  the  CR.  He  is  the  author  of  many  scientific  papers.  James Price is the founder and Managing Director of Experience Matters, a firm that takes a position of global  leadership in the business aspects of Information Management.  He is the leader of a project conducting re‐ search on three continents into the barriers to the effective management of information assets.   Dr Mirja Pulkkinen is a Senior Researcher at the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems,  University  of  Jyväskylä.  She  joined  the  Faculty  in  2001  to  work  with  research  projects,  and  is  currently  also  teaching master’s level courses in Enterprise Architecture, which was the topic area of her doctorate thesis,  and Business Process Management.  Vaclav Reznicek graduated from information management at the Faculty of Informatics and Statistics, Univer‐ sity of Economics, Prague. Currently, he is internal PhD student at the Department of Systems Analysis, Faculty  of Informatics and Statistics, University of Economics, Prague. His doctoral thesis deals with the issue of human  knowledge. 

ix


Dr. Helen Richardson is a Professor of Gender and Organisation and joined Sheffield Business School at Shef‐ field Hallam University, UK in 2012.  She is engaged in Critical Research in Information Systems including issues  of gender and the ICT labour market and the global location of service work.   Toni Ruohonen holds bachelor’s degree in Information Technology (Satakunta University of Applied Sciences)  and PhD degree in Computer Science (University of Jyväskylä, Finland). He is currently working at the Univer‐ sity of Jyväskylä, IT Department and Agora Center as a postdoctoral researcher.  His research interests include  health operations management, process analysis and simulation and service design.    Minna  Salminen‐Karlsson  researches  the  area  gender‐technology‐organization‐education,  with  particular  fo‐ cus on ICT technologies. Her research includes gender studies of engineering education, other technical educa‐ tion  as  well  as  gendered  conditions,  such  as  situated  learning  and  career  building,  in  high‐tech  work  places,  both in private computer companies and in technical and scientific disciplines in the academy.   Jana Samáková Ph.D. works at the Slovak University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Technol‐ ogy  in  Trnava,  Institute  of  Industrial  Engineering,  Management  and  Quality.  At  the  Institute  she  is  assistant  professor in project management with a focus on project communication management and business manage‐ ment.  Stephen L. Schiavone, Enterprise IT Architect and Director of IT Engineering for a large international pharma‐ ceutical company based in Scottsdale, Arizona, USA. Obtained BSc in Cognitive Sciences, University of Surrey,  UK  and  recently  completed  MSc  in  Information  Technology,  University  of  Liverpool,  UK.  Thirty  years  experi‐ ence working for large international enterprises across five industry verticals.  Meke Shivute is a lecturer in information systems at the University of Cape Town. Her research interests lie  primarily in ICT use for Health care to enhance health service delivery, with a focus on People, Business proc‐ esses and the use of Information Technology and how it renders economic and social benefits in the health  care sector.    Mohini Singh is Professor of Information Systems at RMIT University in Australia. She has published well over  100 scholarly papers in the areas of e‐business, e‐government, ERP systems and new technology and innova‐ tion management. Her current research focus is on social media in organisations, cloud computing and broad‐ band for business.   Zdenek Smutny graduated from applied informatics and media studies. Currently, he is internal PhD student at  the Faculty of Informatics and Statistics, University of Economics in Prague where he deals with the problems  of social informatics.  Juha Soikkeli is a Master’s student at the Department of Computer Science and Information Systems, Univer‐ sity of Jyväskylä.  His research interests are Business Process Reengineering, ERP Performance Measurement  and Process Mining.  Olgerta Tona is a PhD Student at Lund University School of Economics and Management, department of In‐ formatics.  Her  PhD  project  is  related  to  Mobile  Business  Intelligence  area.  Additionally,  she  has  published  some articles—book chapters, journal article and conference papers‐‐ on Business Intelligence topic.  Jean‐Paul Van Belle, professor at the University of Cape Town and director of CITANDA (Centre for IT and Na‐ tional Development in Africa), has authored or co‐authored about 20 books/chapters, 20 journal articles and  more  than  80  peer‐reviewed  published  conference  papers.  His  key  research  area  is  the  social  and  organisa‐ tional adoption of emerging information technologies in a developing world context. The key technologies re‐ searched include e‐commerce, M‐commerce, e/M‐government but also green IS/IT, open source software and  cloud computing.  Bartosz Wachnik specializes in MIS implementation. He is a member of senior management in Alna Business  Solutions  in  Poland,  a  branch  of  Lithuanian  company,  which  is  one  of  the  largest  IT  companies  in  the  Baltic  area. He has published more than 20 articles in professional and academic journals. He has co‐operated with  University of Technology in Warsaw where he completed his PhD. 

x


Knowledge Management in the Process of Enterprise System's  Configuration  Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko  Management Department, Information Systems Faculty, University of Gdansk, Sopot,  Poland  jerzy.auksztol@ug.edu.pl  m.chomuszko@gmail.com Abstract:  Reliable  and  easy  reachable  information  has  become  a  valuable  asset  of  a  modern  enterprise.  The  ability  to  manage it, by collecting, organizing, selection and use in order to achieve certain business objectives is an advantage that  can directly translate into a better competitive  position in the  market. Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) systems have  contributed significantly to the improvement of information management processes.  While the implementation of such a  system is both technological and organizational challenge, its further operation requires dedicated management methods  so that it would not lose a strategic place in the enterprise. Changes made to the ERP system respond to directions of the  organization  development,  by  which  that  change  management  processes  become  a  key  asset  of  the  organization.    This  article aims to systematize the issues related to the management of the ERP system configuration change based on a most  common representative from the firm SAP, namely SAP–ERP.  Keywords: enterprise system, enterprise resource planning system, configuration process, SAP‐ERP, knowledge  management 

1. Introduction The development of information technology and its use in business today has not only achieved a high level,  but also can be met in a large number of companies. Currently, it is impossible to participate in the economy  without the organization of management support systems. The progress, which can be observed in this area, is  related to the continuous change that is an integral part of the development. According to the Webster’s Third  New International Dictionary the term change means: “to make over to a radically different form, composition,  state, or disposition” (Webster’s 1993, p. 373). A general definition of the change also applies to business. This  "radical  different  form"  is  the  result  of  the  interpretation  of  incoming  information  that  is  reported  by  the  participants  of  the  organization  as  well  as  the  demand  for  innovation  and an  organizational change.  This,  in  turn, is defined by Griffin, as any substantial modification of any part of the organization and can affect almost  every  aspect  of  the  organization:  the  span  of  management,  overall  project  organization  and  the  very  employees (Griffin 2012). Changes in the organization will naturally bring changes in the IT system, by which a  company  manages  execution  of  its  business  processes.  Skillful  management  of  information  resources  and  knowledge allowing to play at any time or to analyze the sequence of events involved in the changes of the  system  becomes  the  crucial  issue.  The  main  objectives  of  configuration  changes  management  are  (Guide  to  software configuration management 1995, p.3):  ƒ

“software components can be identified,

ƒ

software is built from a consistent set of components,

ƒ

software components are available and accessible,

ƒ

software components never get lost (e.g. after media failure or operator error),

ƒ

every change to the software is approved and documented,

ƒ

changes do not get lost (e.g. through simultaneous updates),

ƒ

it is always possible to go back to a previous version,

ƒ

a history of changes is kept, so that is always possible to discover who did what and when”.

It goes without saying that the tools that help people achieve these goals are necessary. IT companies began  to  offer  software  that  could  manage  configuration  changes  and  record  all  the  related  knowledge,  and  information systems, such as ERP were already equipped with such solutions. Department of Defense of the  United States was one of the first to introduce in 1950 the configuration management (Masewicz 2008). This  gave rise to the creation of new solutions (models, tools, applications) to manage configuration changes. The  most important of these are: 

1


Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko  ƒ

ISO 9000 (Quality Management System), 

ƒ

ITIL (Information Technology Infrastructure Library), 

ƒ

CMMI (Capability Maturity Model Integration), 

ƒ

Prince2 (Projects In a Controlled Environment), 

ƒ

COBIT (Control Objectives for Information and related Technology), 

ƒ

ILS (Integrated Logistics Support). 

In addition, there are dedicated solutions and industry standards. Each of these models has been designed for  the  specific  functions  and  areas,  but  all  benefited  from  the  basic  assumptions  of  the  configuration  change  management.  As  defined  by  The  Institute  of  Electrical  and  Electronics  Engineers  configuration  management  (IEEE Standard… 1990, p. 20): “is a discipline applying technical and administrative direction and surveillance to:  ƒ

identify and document the functional and physical characteristics of a configuration item, 

ƒ

control changes to those characteristics,  

ƒ

record and report change processing and implementation status,  

ƒ

verify compliance with specified requirements.” 

All configuration changes are implemented based on the knowledge brought by the implementation teams, as  well  as  information  released  in  the  course  of  the  system  operation  caused  by  changes  in  the  business  organization and any other changes (e.g. legal). The whole process covers three areas and it is not possible to  separate them. These are the area of expertise, configuration change, and organizational change. Knowledge  of the life cycles of expertise in the context of the identified and implemented changes, allows to provide the  link between the areas of:  ƒ

change management, 

ƒ

knowledge management, 

ƒ

configuration management. 

As a consequence a complete picture of knowledge management of configuration changes is given. Figure 1  shows three situations: envisaged change, the created change, an opportunity arising from the change in the  organization  relates  to  business  processes.  Capability  to  predict  changes  as  well  as  the  evaluation  of  opportunities arising from them can be achieved based on the possessed knowledge and the ability to share it  in  the  organization.  Knowledge  of  the  expertise  life  cycle  allows  linking  and  presenting  the  relationship  between the two cycles. Chan and Rosemann (2001) propose the following life cycle stages of expertise:  ƒ

identifying,  

ƒ

creating,  

ƒ

transferring,  

ƒ

storing,  

ƒ

re‐using,  

ƒ

unlearning.

Before any change appears, it is necessary to identify the knowledge of the new or existing situation. Creation  and the transfer (recording) and storage are next stages. Using knowledge is the moment when the change is  formalized.  The  last  stage  is  the  outdating,  which  is  often  referred  to  as  unlearning.  There  are  two  kinds  of  knowledge in the economic organization: tacit and explicit as described by Hansen et al. (1999) and previously  Nonaka  &  Takeochi  (1995,  p.8).  Tacit  knowledge  is  based  on  personal  experience  and  cannot  be  easily  separated from the person that possesses it, while explicit knowledge is easy to codify, store and transfer via  mechanical  media,  such  as  books,  databases  or  computer  software.  However,  when  the  areas  of  expertise,  organizational change and information systems configuration are combined only explicit knowledge (codified)  is used. Tacit knowledge may be involved in the process of knowledge management configuration only after it  is codified, that is, after changing it to explicit knowledge.    Figure 1 shows the relationships between the three areas listed above (knowledge, change and configuration  of the ERP system). 

2


Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko 

Source: own elaboration  Figure 1: The relationship between change, configuration knowledge and the ERP system  Figure 1 shows the process of knowledge identification as a result of the changes. These changes may occur  both within the organization and outside of it. The whole process is a closed cycle, because the changes are  not possible without the use of knowledge, and change always stimulates the development of knowledge. All  changes made in an enterprise, which derive from the ERP system modifications, are registered by this system.  Appropriate  mechanisms  supporting  the  management  of  change  and  to  record  it  ensure  stability  and  development of the IT system in a planned and safe way. 

2. Configuration knowledge management in the life cycle of an IT system  An IT system just like any other product has its life cycle. It was described in many publications. The present  one describes the life cycle of the two types of systems: dedicated and duplicable. Life cycles of different IT  systems differ depending on their nature. For dedicated systems (prepared for a particular company) its life  cycle  begins  with  planning  and  specifying  requirements,  while  in  the  case  of  duplicable  systems  with  the  purchase decision. Table 1 presents the phases of life‐cycle of any ERP system for both of these types.  Table 1: Presentation of ERP system’s life phases  Phase – dedicated  system  Requirements,  specification,  planning 

Phase – duplicable  system  Adoption decision 

Designing

Acquisition

Implementation integration 

Implementation

Phase characteristics  Managing people specifies requirements to be met by the ERP  system. Business problems as well as the improvement strategy  are determined by providing the benefits of implementing the  system.  In this phase, the selection and purchase of the product that  most closely matches the requirements and needs of the  enterprise are made. In addition, there also occurs a selection  of a consulting firm to handle the subsequent phases of the  cycle. In case of duplicable systems it is designed in accordance  with the customer requirements.  This step allows for parameterization and adaptation of the  system to the specific circumstances of the organization. A  consulting company, in collaboration with the business team,  carries out implementation. At this stage tests and user  trainings are carried out as well. In the case of the dedicated  system, the software author does implementation. 

3


Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko  Phase – dedicated  system  Operational mode 

Phase – duplicable  system  Use and  Maintenance 

Evolution

Retirement

Retirement

Phase characteristics  Post‐implementation operation of the system still requires the  user to monitor the functionality of the system (in terms of  expected benefits). Maintenance is based on the management  of failures and correcting discrepancies.  At this stage, the system acquires additional values, which  result from its accompanying the execution of business  processes. This includes not only the development of system  functionality, but also improved handling or working with  external applications. This phase runs parallel to the  exploitation phase.  When new technologies emerge or the system is recognized to  be inadequate to business processes in the organization, the  system is withdrawn and replaced by a new one. 

Source: Chomuszko et al. (2012)    Parameters for each stage of the ERP life cycle are defined. Some of them are covered by the standard settings  (valid for each system implementation), and some of the settings are specific to the company or industry to  which it belongs. According to the ERP system life cycle as presented in Table 1, Table 2 shows its configuration  steps.  Table 2: configuration steps for the implementation of the ERP duplicable system  ERP system life cycle stages  Implementation 

Stage setup  Define initial settings mostly based on  standard assumptions, but also taking into  account the specific characteristics of the  company 

Use and Maintenance 

Completion of configuration. At this stage,  the parameters for a specific company are  configured.  Extending the configuration with the  changes resulting from various causes that  were formed while working with the  system. Changes of this stage are shown in  the Table 3 

Evolution

Activities Founding of the company, account  plan, distribution channels, areas of  cost accounting, wage system,  dictionary of measures and units  used in the business organization.  Configuring the missing parameters  that were skipped during the  system implementation.  Building extensions and  improvements in the functionality  of the system. 

Source: own elaboration    During the operation and growth of the ERP system there may be many different causes making it necessary to  introduce changes. They have been described in the Table 3 (Chomuszko et al. 2012).  Table 3: Classification of system modifications in the evolution phase  Name  Legal change  Business change  Software errors  Ergonomics  improvement change  Technological  modification  Securing the system  Others 

Interpretation The need for modifications resulting from changes in the law.  Observations reported by users, based on the need for support of business  processes not included in the existing system functionality  Amendments resulting from program execution errors  Modification of the system based on the creativity of programmers or suggestions  raised by members to facilitate the operation of the program.  Changes to improve system operation such as changing the format of the database  use of modern technology.  Validation ‐ Modifications to ensure performance of procedures in accordance with  the assumptions.  Incidental changes not described above 

Source: Chomuszko et al. (2012)    ERP  parameterization  before  running  it  in  a  company  is  not  the  end  of  the  work  on  its  configuration.  As  mentioned in the introduction, the ERP system grows with the organization as well as business and it has to 

4


Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko  record all the changes on current basis, so it could really help the management. That is why it is very important  that the system is configurable depending on the individual needs of the customer and characteristics of the  industry in which it operates, as well as ‐ in the case of requirements growth ‐ its extension and integration  with  other  IT  systems,  Internet  based  or  mobile  applications  were  made  possible.  A  flexible  system,  which  evolves together with the company, a quick response to changes is possible (Romanowicz 2013). 

3. Solutions to management of change and configuration of ERP systems  For  the  purposes  of  this  study  a  small  survey  was  conducted.  Questions  related  to  configuration  change  management tools in the systems in use were sent to 20 businesses involved in the sale and distribution of ERP  software.  Five  companies  answered  the  questions.  The  two  agreed  that  such  tools  are  not  present  in  their  systems because they do not make the configuration available freely to its users and specialized consultants  carry  out  any  changes.  The  three  companies  declared  that  their  systems  are  equipped  with  mechanisms  to  manage  the  change. At  the same  time  in all  three  cases,  respondents identified  those  mechanisms  with  the  flexibility  of  the  system  and  access  to  the  configuration.  No  system  was  equipped  with  any  tools  to  record  process parameterization or the system expansion. “Symfonia Forte”, which is the most popular ERP system in  the Polish market, attaches documents to each latest version, with the description of all modifications made to  the previous one. However, these changes are for the standard, global solutions and a particular company is  not  interested  in  collecting  this  type  of  documentation.  The  information  that  would  be  relevant  for  the  company in the management of configuration change process should include at least the following:  ƒ

date of commencement of work on the change in the system, 

ƒ

description of the change, 

ƒ

the person who made the change, 

ƒ

was the change tested and what was the outcome of the tests, 

ƒ

date of the changes implementation. 

This type  of  information  create  valuable  knowledge  about  the  system  configuration  of  the  company.  This  knowledge can be used in cases of subsequent configurations in companies with similar activities, or for the  training of key users and consultants of ERP systems 

4. Management of information flows about the changes in SAP‐ERP configuration  SAP‐ERP  system  is  designed  for  large  and  wealthy  companies.  The  implementation  of  such  a  system  in  any  business  is  always  a  large,  complex  and  time‐consuming  project.  Therefore,  the  software  designer  had  to  provide it with the solutions that not only control and manage configuration changes but also raise the safety  of the system. The basic premise of this approach is the principle that no configuration setting can be applied  to the production system (target) without prior testing it in a test environment (Auksztol J. et al. 2012). Figure  2 shows how this idea of implementing such a configuration changes can be designed. 

Source: own elaboration  Figure 2: Model of configuration change management in SAP‐ERP 

5


Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko  The above diagram shows not only the implementation of the system configuration in SAP‐ERP, but it is a way  of documenting of the changes that have been made in the system, thus not only supporting the security of  operation  but  also  creating  the  valuable  knowledge  base  about  the  system  configuration.  The  concept  proposed  by  the  developers  of  SAP‐ERP  system  involves  running  three  environments:  configuration,  testing,  and  the  so‐called,  target  environment  that  is  called  production.  Table  4  presents  the  tasks  of  each  environment.  Table 4: Tasks of configuration changes environment  Configuration environment  Parameterization of the system  within the standard solutions 

Testing environment  Testing of the basic  parameterization validity. 

Implementation of functional  extensions 

Testing the correctness of the  designed extensions and their  configurations  Maintaining the security of the  target environment  Collecting information about  the changes made in the system 

Configuration of the system  expansion areas  Collecting information about  the changes made in the system 

Target environment  Working in real environment with the  company documentation, which is in  accordance with the requirements of  the business.  Collecting information on the  configuration changes that were  implemented from a test environment. 

Source: own elaboration    The  possibility  to  combine  these  groups  into  a  specific  sequence,  the  so‐called  transport  of  configuration  orders path (transport road) is an important element of the concept defined in such a way. It is based on the  fact  that  the  configuration  requests  are  transferred  in  accordance  with  the  defined  path.  If  the  path  of  the  system  configuration  will  be  built  from  four  environments,  such  as  configuration, testing  1,  testing  2,  target  environment, in a given order, it will not be possible to send orders from the transport configuration to the  production  (target)  environment  skipping  the  two  testing  environments.  A  user  can  enter  a  configuration  without testing it, but it will be easy to find out, because every configuration order has a log, which in addition  to the person who implemented the change, records the date of the change and its subjects. The names of  tables where changes were made can be found. Testing systems make it possible to find documents related to  the test of the correctness of a given configuration. These documents can be identified by the dates of their  introduction in the first place. The period in which they should appear in a test environment is the timespan  between the introduction of the order into the TEST system, and introducing it into the PROD (target) system.  If  documents  in  the  TEST  system  in  the  specified  date  range  are  missing  it  proves  the  lack  of  control  of  the  configuration  changes.  Ability  to  track  and  recreate  this  type  of  information  is  extremely  valuable  for  the  construction  process  of  the  ERP  system.  It  primarily  provides  its  controlled  development,  and  secures  the  production (target) environment.    The  system  configuration  place  is  called:  Customizing  Implementation  Guide.  There  are  about  30  areas  of  configuration, such as: Financial Accounting, Controlling, Materials Management, Production, General Logistics  or  other,  which  are  less  often  implemented,  like:  Time  Management,  Quality  Management,  Environment,  Health and Safety and many, many others. Each area contains many sub‐directories where the configurations  of specific functionalities are located. There are over thousand such locations in the financial accounting area  alone. It is obvious that with such a wide range of configuration options the lack of mechanisms that manage  the change as well as configuration knowledge is unacceptable. Any change in the system within Customizing  Implementation  Guide  is  automatically  stored  in  the  Transport  Management  System  documentation  in  the  form of the so‐called transportation orders. It is possible to save all the defined settings in one transport order,  but  such  an  action  contradicts  the  idea  of  configuration  knowledge  management  (described  in  Chapter  1).  Each transport order should include actions associated with defining specific parameters. As shown in Table 2,  the first steps related to the system configuration apply to standard basic settings. These are among others:  Create Company Code, Fiscal Year Variant Maintain, Define Posting Period Variant, Define Document Number  Ranges, Enable Fiscal Year Default, etc. The next stage of the configuration is to define the parameters, which  are specific to a particular enterprise, and the next one, following the table. 3, is the system extensions.    Creation of the configuration changes records starts at the attempt to save the parameters that were entered  into the system. Before they are stored, the user describes the changes that he introduced. This is done in the 

6


Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko  Prompt for Customizing request window, which will be open before saving changes. In this window, the user  enters  a  short  description  of  the  Request,  and  the  system  automatically  completes  the  data  concerning  the  order creation date (the date and the given time to the second) and the data of the user who amended the  configuration. Moreover, the table name is displayed in a forthcoming order configuration where new data are  defined,  and  the  system  automatically  gives  a  unique  number  that  identifies  clearly  this  order.  Order  configuration  is  saved  in  the  Transport  Organizer,  where  you  can  also  see  the  specific  data  that  have  been  entered. The next stage is called: release of the transport order, so it is moving it on the transport path from  the  configuration  environment  to  the  testing  environment.  In  order  to  load  that  transport  order  with  the  configuration change, the Transport Management System must be run. This is where transport orders queue is  managed. With the help of a proper button, the configuration defined in the DEV system (developer) shall be  transferred to the TEST. Figure 3 shows the log of this operation.  Figure 3: Overview of transport logs 

Source: SAP GUI 7.20    The icon Log Display appears with each record with the information about the details of a configuration order,  and it can be used to view detailed records of the executed configuration transfer process. From this point, it is  possible to test the change in the test environment. This is an important step, because the test result provides  the basis to transfer the designed configuration to the target system. In case any errors are found during the  testing  phase  the  configuration  order  will  not  be  sent  forward.  Having  corrected  errors  and  verified  the  settings  the  configuration  is  again  transferred  to  the  testing  system  as  per  earlier  described  procedure.  Positive test result allows moving the setting to the target system configuration. Table 5 gathers all stages of  information registration concerning the implemented changes in the configuration of SAP‐ERP.  Table 5: Stages of management of knowledge about system configuration SAP‐ERP  Item 

1

2

Configuration change registration  phase  Recording  configuration order 

Releasing configuration order 

Description

Configuration data entering 

Introduction of configuration change in  the environment configuration (system  DEV) 

Brief description of the task, data on the  user introducing the change, order creation  date, the name of the table where the data  were introduced and the data themselves.  Instance (principal) source, date of release  of the transport order (instance in SAP‐ERP  system is a term referring to: the binaries  of specific SAP‐ERP version, database  management system and data located in  this database. It can be installed more than  ones on a single host). 

Transfer of configuration change to the  transport path 

7


Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko  Item 

3

Configuration change registration  phase  Entering the order  to the test system 

Description

Configuration data entering 

The introduction of configuration  changes to the test environment  (system TEST) 

Entering date, the owner of the order, the  mandant’s target and the details of the  order (mandant is a special term used by  SAP‐ERP system which refers to the  package of data connected with its  configuration settings, which unify all  elements of one business group.  Documents in the test system, which are  introduced in the context of configuration  control.  Entering date, the owner of the order, the  mandant’s target, the details of the order  (data). 

4

Testing

Checking for correctness of the defined  configuration 

5

Entering the order  in the target  system 

Introduction of the configuration  change to the target environment  (PROD system) 

Source: own elaboration    In  the  SAP  ERP  system  that  was  implemented  in  a  capital  group  with  the  following  modules:  financial,  controlling,  fixed  assets,  real  estate,  distribution  and  sales,  2338  transport  orders  were  registered  in  the  Transport Management System, of which about one thousand applied to basic settings (before the system was  activated).  After  over  four  years  of  the  system  usage  it  is  possible  to  recreate  the  documentation  and  the  knowledge about the configuration that was implemented in this company in this ERP system. 

5. Conclusions SAP‐ERP  has  been  used  in  companies  for  over  30  years.  Globalization  of  the  market  made  that  it  is  readily  implemented  in  countries  not  only  in  Europe  but  also  around  the  world.  Due  to  their  functionalities  ERP  systems are very expanded solutions, but those that become international systems evolve to very large and  complex IT products.  Supporting them requires considerable amount of knowledge and is often shared among  several  specialists,  the  so‐called  modular  administrators.  However,  before  the  system  is  ready  for  use,  it  is  necessary  to  configure  it.  The  work  that  is  conducted  in  this  area  prepares  functionalities  to  ensure  that  it  most  closely  matches  the  business  concept  of  the  company.  The  developers  of  the  SAP‐ERP,  which  is  representative of this class of software, designed a solution that is not only appreciated by the users of the  system, but also by the environment engaged in the development and implementation of SAP. Configuration  change  management  that  has  been  presented  in  this  article  is  a  proposal  that  aims  to  be  an  inspiration  to  other ERP systems. This is a really noteworthy proposal because it accumulates in a unique way, not only the  facts about the implemented changes, but also builds the knowledge base about the whole setup, which was  developed on the system. It is also important that next to the function of collecting and organizing data, it also  has  a  protective  function  against  incorrectly  defined  system  configuration,  which  is  meaningful  in  all  these  applications. The benefits of concept pointed out in document Change Request Management (2013), i.e. “(i)  increased maintenance and project efficiency, (ii) minimized costs for project management and IT, (iii) reduced  risk of project failure and correction, (iv) shorter correction, Implementation, and going‐live phase, (v) efficient  maintenance  of  customer  implementations  and  developments,  (vi)  transparency  and  documentation  of  the  change  process  from  approval  of  a  request  for  change  to  the  transportation  of  changes  into  follow‐on  systems” can be confirmed in many enterprises, which use SAP‐ERP. The solution designed in SAP‐ERP meets  all the aforementioned European Space Agency assumptions. In addition, it is easy to use by automation tasks.  In the context of increasingly dynamic changes, agile implementation methodologies should directs research  towards the developments of standards for ERP systems based on such as those used in the SAP‐ERP.   

Acknowledgements We would like to express our appreciation to Sławomir Patelczyk for his useful remarks and valuable review. 

References Auksztol J., Balwierz P., Chomuszko M. (2012) SAP. Zrozumieć system ERP / SAP. Understanding ERP System, Wydawnictwo  Naukowe PWN, Warszawa.  Chan, R., Rosemann, M. (2001) “Managing knowledge in enterprise systems”, Journal of Systems and Information  Technology, Vol. 5, No. 2, pp. 37‐54.  Change Request Management (2013), [online], SAP Help Portal, http://help.sap.com/  

8


Jerzy Auksztol and Magdalena Chomuszko  Chomuszko M., Lech P., Auksztol J. (2012) “Knowledge creation and merging in the exploitation phase of the enterprise  resource planning systems – case study research”, Studies & Proceedings of Polish Association for Knowledge  Management, No. 60, pp. 30‐42.  Griffin R.W. (2012) Podstawy zarządzania organizacjami / Introduction do organisation management, Wydawnictwo  Naukowe PWN, Warszawa.  Guide to software configuration management (1995), European Space Agency for Software Standardisation and Control  (BSSC), Paris 1995.  Hansen M.T., Nohria N., Tierney T. (1999) “What’s your strategy for managing knowledge?”, Harvard Business Review, Vol.  77, No. 2, pp. 106‐16.  IEEE Standard Glosary of Software Engineering Terminology (1990) The Institute of Electrical and Electronics Engineers,  New York.  Masewicz M.  (2008) “Mechanizmy wspomagające zarządzanie zmianami konfiguracyjnymi serwera bazy danych Oracle11g  i jego otoczenia / Rules for Configuration Change Management in the Oracle 11g Database Server and for its  Environment”, Paper read at XIVth Conference PLOUG, Szczyrk.   Nonaka I., Takeuchi H., (1995) The Konwledge – Creating company, Oxford University Press, New York.  Romanowicz W. (2013) Zmiana popłaca / Change Matters, Personel PLUS, No. 2, pp. 77‐78.   Webster’s Third New International Dictionary (1993), Koenemann, Cologne. 

 

9


Understanding and Supporting Cloud Computing Adoption in Irish  Small and Medium Sized Enterprises (SMEs)   Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard Conway  National University of Ireland, Maynooth, Ireland  Marian.carcary@nuim.ie   Eileen.doherty@nuim.ie  Gerard.conway@nuim.ie     Abstract: Cloud Computing adoption has experienced a considerable rate of growth since its emergence in 2006. In 2011, it  had become the top technology priority for organizations worldwide and according to some leading industry reports the  cloud  computing  market  is  estimated  to  reach  $241  billion  by  2020.  Reasons  for  adoption  are  multi‐fold,  including  for  example  the  expected  realisation  of  benefits  pertaining  to  cost  reduction,  improved  scalability,  improved  resource  utilization, worker mobility and collaboration, and business continuity, among others. Research into the cloud computing  adoption phenomenon has to date primarily focused on its impact on the larger, multinational enterprises. However, one  key area of the market where cloud computing is expected to hold considerable promise is that of the Small and Medium  Sized  Enterprise  (SME).  SMEs  are  recognized  as  being  inherently  different  from  their  larger  enterprise  counterparts,  not  least from a resource constraint perspective and for this reason, cloud computing is reported to offer significant benefits  for SMEs through, for example, facilitating a reduction of the financial burden associated with new technology adoption.  This  paper  reports  findings  from  a  recent  study  of  Cloud  Computing  adoption  among  Irish  SMEs.  Despite  its  suggested  importance, this study found that almost half of the respondents had not migrated any services or processes to the cloud  environment. Further, with respect to those who had transitioned to the cloud, the data suggests that many of these SMEs  did not rigorously assess their readiness for adopting cloud computing technology or did not adopt in‐depth approaches for  managing  the  cloud  lifecycle.  These  findings  have  important  implications  for  the  development/improvement  of  national  strategies  or  policies  to  support  the  successful  adoption  of  Cloud  Computing  technology  among  the  SME  market.  This  paper puts forward recommendations to support the SME cloud adoption journey.    Keywords: cloud computing, SMEs, cloud adoption readiness, cloud non‐adoption reasons 

1. Introduction Cloud  Computing  affords  organisations  the  opportunity  to  access  on‐demand  IT  services  using  Internet  technologies  on  a  free  or  pay‐per‐use  basis,  thereby  enabling  them  to  improve  their  strategic  and  technological agility, and responsiveness in the global business environment (Son et al, 2011). McAfee (2011)  regards Cloud Computing as “a sea change—a deep and permanent shift in how computing power is generated  and consumed. It’s as inevitable and irreversible as the shift from steam to electric power in manufacturing”.  Cloud  Computing  has  evolved  to  become  the  top  technology  priority  for  organisations  worldwide  (Gartner,  2011). The estimated figure for cloud services worldwide in 2013 is $44.2bn (ENISA, 2009). Cloud Computing is  defined by the US National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) as:   “A  model  for  enabling  ubiquitous,  convenient,  on‐demand  network  access  to  a  shared  pool  of  configurable  computing  resources  (e.g.  networks,  servers,  storage,  applications,  and  services)  that can be rapidly provisioned and released with minimal management effort or service provider  interaction” (Mell and Grance, 2011, p.2).  Because  Cloud  Computing  is  a  relatively  new  IT  and  business  phenomenon,  there  remains  many  untapped  areas  of  research  in  this  field  (Son  et  al,  2011).  Of  the  studies  reviewed  in  developing  this  paper,  prior  academic research has focused on issues including the emergence of and developments in Cloud Computing,  Cloud deployment and delivery models, benefits and challenges in migrating to the Cloud, readiness for cloud  adoption,  among  others.  However,  the  majority  discuss  Cloud  Computing  topics  with  no  references  to  company  size,  and  for  some  it  can  be  inferred  that  they  are  oriented  more  towards  larger  organisations.  However, it is recognised that SMEs (defined by the European Commission as any enterprise with less than 250  employees) are inherently different from large enterprises (Street and Meister, 2004).     Given,  Cloud  Computing’s  ability  to  support  increased  capacity  or  extended  firms  capabilities,  without  incurring extra costs which would have historically necessitated investment in infrastructure, software or staff  training, it can be inferred that this technological platform may hold several opportunities for SMEs (Aljabre,  2012). However this emerging trend needs to be further researched from the SME perspective. SMEs are an  important and integral component of every country; they form a cornerstone of the EU economy, representing 

10


Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard Conway  99% of all enterprises. In the Republic of Ireland SMEs represent 98% of all companies employing less than 50  people, and constitute approximately 60% of the overall workforce (Central Statistics Office, 2008). Given the  pivotal  role  SMEs  play  in  the  European  economy,  ensuring  that  they  have  a  firm  understanding  of  issues  associated with cloud computing adoption is critical.     This  paper  presents  results  of  an  exploratory  study  on  the  cloud  computing  phenomenon  in  the  Irish  SME  context.  The  structure  of  this  paper  is  as  follows:  Section  two  outlines  the  methodological  approach  taken.  Section  three  outlines  survey  findings.  For  those  SMEs  who  have  adopted  Cloud  Computing,  the  paper  examines  the  steps  those  organizations  have  taken  in  preparing  for  migration  to  the  cloud  environment  (section  3.2).  For  those  SMEs  who  have  not  taken  steps  towards  adopting  Cloud,  the  paper  examines  the  reasons behind this non‐adoption (section 3.3). Understanding the implications of these findings results in the  development  of  a  set  of  recommendations  or  policy  steps  that  should  be  addressed  at  a  national  level  to  promote  and  support  the  SME  cloud  adoption  journey  (section  4).  Section  five  draws  a  conclusion  to  the  paper. 

2. Methodology   The following are the research questions addressed in this paper:  ƒ

What degree of preparation do SMEs undertake prior to adopting Cloud Computing? 

ƒ

What factors/reasons deter SMEs from adopting Cloud Computing? 

This study employed a quantitative research approach. The merits of the questionnaire are linked to its ability  to provide quantified data for decision‐making, it provides a transparent set of research methods, it supports  the presentation of complex data in a succinct format; and it provides the opportunity to apply a comparable  methodology across longitudinal studies. This quantitative study was conceptualized from a theoretical base in  order  to  ensure  that  the  instrument  employed  in  this  process  had  prior  validity,  reliability  and  was  appropriately designed to address and answer the research questions.      In  developing questionnaire constructs,  a detailed  review  of  existing  literature  which focuses on  reasons  for  technology  adoption/non  adoption,  as  well  as  readiness  for  new  technology  adoption  was  undertaken.  This  literature helped to frame the questionnaire’s constructs ‐ these constructs were then tested with a sample of  20  SME  owner/managers  and  senior  academic  researchers,  and  refined  to  ensure  relevance  and  comprehension in the SME environment. The questionnaire gathered responses using a 5‐point Likert scale. A  numerical score was associated with each response and this reflected the degree of attitudinal favourableness,  with ‘strongly disagree’ associated with number ‘1’ on the scale and ‘strongly agree’ associated with number  ‘5’. The survey also consisted of a combination of open‐ended and closed questions.     A  purposive  stratified  sampling  technique  was  employed  in  developing  the  sampling  frame  (Saunders  et  al,  2007) – using this sampling strategy units are chosen because they have specific characteristics that enable a  core  theme  to  be  understood  in  greater  detail.  Purposive  sampling  ensures  that  key  research  themes  are  addressed and that diversity in each category is explored (Silverman, 2005). The sampling frame was stratified  according to the following criteria:  ƒ

Firms must have less than 250 employees  

ƒ

Firms must be located in Ireland. 

Within each SME, the owner or manager was chosen as the point of contact, as he/she was regarded as in the  best  position  to  answer  questions  pertinent  to  the  research  problem.  The  study’s  sample  consisted  of  1500  SMEs. The researchers aimed for a response rate of 7 percent in order to achieve 100 usable responses, which  is  deemed  a  suitable  minimal  level  in  a  large  population  (Harrigan  et  al,  2008).    The  data  collection  process  generated 95 usable responses, achieving a 6 percent response rate.      

3. Findings   3.1 Profile of respondents  The survey provided 95 usable responses. Each respondent organization was located in Ireland and employed  less than 250 individuals. 70 percent (n=66) were micro‐sized firms; 26 percent (n=25) were small firms, while  4 percent (n=4) were of medium size (see Figure 1). In terms of industry sectors (Figure 2), the largest sector, 

11


Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard Conway  represented  by  almost  half  of  all  respondents  (48  percent,  n=46),  were  those  firms  from  the  Knowledge  Intensive  Business  Services  (KIBS)  sector.  39  percent  (n=37)  were  from  the  service  sector,  while  only  13  percent (n=12) were from manufacturing.  

Figure 1: Respondent profile by firm size 

Figure 2: Respondent profile by sector 

3.2 Adoption of cloud computing among SMEs – how prepared are they?  45  percent  (n=43)  of  the  survey  respondents  had  adopted  Cloud  Computing;  the  most  popular  business  service/process  they  had  migrated  to  the  cloud  were  email  (40  percent,  n=38),  followed  by  sales  and  marketing  (15  percent,  n=14),  CRM  (11  percent,  n=10),  R&D  (10  percent,  n=9),  finance  (8  percent,  n=8),  software applications development (6 percent, n=6) and purchasing/ procurement (2 percent, n=2).     This section carefully considers the degree to which these respondent firms carefully prepared and established  strategies  to  support  the  transition  to  the  Cloud  environment  and  the  ongoing  management  of  the  cloud  lifecycle.  Understanding  this  degree  of  preparation  is  important  as  previous  studies  on  technology  adoption  have  found  that  “small  firms  with  higher  organizational  readiness  ...  will  be  more  likely  to  adopt  and  more  likely  to  enjoy  higher  benefits  than  firms  with  low  levels  of  readiness”  (Iacovou  et  al,  1995).  Only  40  of  the  SMEs provided insight into the steps they took when migrating to the cloud.      Respondents were presented with a series of statements outlining possible steps to support cloud migration,  and were asked to rate the extent to which these statements applied to their firms cloud adoption journey on  a  5‐point  Likert  scale  (Figure  3).  The  findings  indicate  that  three  key  areas  received  the  greatest  degree  of  attention from SMEs in terms of preparing for Cloud Computing. These include:  ƒ

Establishing the strategic intent and objectives of Cloud Computing adoption 

ƒ

Establishing a process for identifying those services suitable for migration to the Cloud  

ƒ

Involving stakeholders in assessing service readiness for the cloud 

Findings indicate  that  the  majority  of  cloud  adopter  SMEs  in  this  study  (53  percent;  n=21)  considered  the  importance  of  establishing the  strategic  intent  and  objectives  of  transitioning  to  cloud‐based technology. As  outlined in previous technology adoption studies, a key consideration in technology adoption is the alignment  between the objectives of an organization’s IT strategy and business strategy (Henderson and Venkatraman,  1992).  Many  previous  studies  have  found  that  such  alignment  with  an  organization’s  strategic  objectives  is  important  in  maximising  returns  from  ICT  investments,  in  assisting  in  competitive  advantage  realization  through ICT and in providing direction and flexibility to deal with new opportunities (Avison et al, 2004). From  a Cloud Computing adoption perspective, Conway and Curry (2012) emphasize the importance of determining  the organization’s IT objectives, including the role of Cloud Computing within the IT strategy; understanding,  managing  and  controlling  the  impacts  on  the  business;  aligning  these  objectives  with  business  needs;  and  strategically planning the transition to the cloud environment.    48 percent of firms (n=19) established a process for selecting those services that were potentially suitable for  cloud  migration.  In  line  with  the  literature,  one  of  the  central  tenets  of  Loebbecke  et  al’s  (2012)  Cloud  Readiness Model is the need for organizations to make informed, strategic decisions regarding which of their  IT  services  are  appropriate  to  migrate  to  the  cloud  environment,  as  poor  selection  decisions  may  prove  operationally costly and may potentially negatively impact on business strategy.   

12


Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard Conway 

Figure 3: SMEs preparation for cloud adoption  43 percent of the survey respondents (n=17) indicated that management, employees and other stakeholders  were involved in assessing service readiness for the cloud. As outlined in the literature, the key differentiators  of  technology  deployment’s  long‐term  success  rest  within  the  organizations  internal  context,  in  the  form  of  managers  and  employees  knowledge  and  skills.  Previous  studies  by  Caldeira  and  Ward  (2003)  highlight  that  top management attitudes and perspectives towards IT adoption explain differences in the levels of success  achieved.  Further,  ensuring  employees  are  aware  of  new  technology  adoption  and  are  involved  in  the  adoption process yields higher success rates (Nguyen, 2009). From a cloud computing adoption perspective,  the  criticality  of  stakeholder  involvement  and  influence  is  also  emphasized  by  Conway  and  Curry  (2012),  as  failure to actively involve interested parties, particularly those from the user community, results in resistance  to cloud migration.    Further  preparatory  steps  for  Cloud Computing  adoption,  as  identified  in  the  technology adoption  literature  (e.g.  Conway  and  Curry,  2012;  Loebbecke  et  al,  2012),  were  followed  less  frequently  by  the  survey  respondents.   ƒ

28 percent (n=11) established a process to regularly review the organizations cloud service requirements, 

ƒ

25 percent (n=10) established an operational strategy to manage service transition to the cloud,  

ƒ

23 percent (n=9) developed criteria for assessing service cloud‐readiness,  

ƒ

20 percent  (n=8)  conducted  assessments  using  the  defined  criteria,  to  determine  which  pre‐identified  services were cloud‐ready, 

ƒ

18 percent (n=7) indicated that they considered/designed the current and future state of services to be  migrated to the cloud.  

ƒ

15 percent  (n=6)  established  a  threshold  to  separate  cloud  ready  services  from  those  not  yet  ready  for  cloud migration,  

ƒ

15 percent (n=6) established a strategic plan for roll‐out of the selected services to the cloud, 

ƒ

15 percent  (n=6)  documented  a  strategy  for  selecting  the  Cloud  Service  Provider(s)  and  managing  relationship(s) with them.  

3.3 Non‐adoption of cloud computing among SMEs  48  percent  (n=  46)  of  the  respondent  SMEs  had  not  migrated  any  services  or  processes  to  the  cloud  environment.  These  cloud  ‘non‐adopters’  were  primarily  (54  percent,  n=25)  those  firms  from  the  services  sector. This is a particularly interesting finding given the fact that Cloud Computing is reported in the literature 

13


Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard Conway  to offer SMEs considerable benefits in terms of cost reduction (Aljabre, 2012; Armbrust et al, 2010; Geczy et al,  2012),  improved  resource  utilization  (Neves  et  al,  2011),  and  improved  mobility  and  collaborative  opportunities (Aljabre, 2012; Kynetix, 2009; Neves et al, 2011), among others. Survey respondents reasons for  not adopting cloud computing are reported in this section (insights provided by 40 SMEs). Respondents were  presented with a series of statements outlining possible reasons for not adopting Cloud Computing, and were  asked to rate the extent to which these statements applied to their firms on a 5‐point Likert scale (Figure 4).  

Figure 4: Reasons for not adopting cloud computing  40  percent  of  the  respondents  reported  a  lack  of  time  as  a  key  deterrent  to  the  adoption  process,  while  a  further 32 percent suggested they did not have the necessary IT skills to support migration. These findings are  supported by Thong (1999) who states that the skills, time and staff required for effective technology adoption  are not predominant issues in large organizations but represent considerable difficulties in smaller businesses.     Concerns  regarding  the  security  of  the  cloud  environment  (40  percent);  data  ownership  and  protection  (35  percent); and compliance (35 percent) were further obstacles to cloud migration identified by the SME survey  respondents. These  largely mirrored  concerns  as  found in  other  studies.  A  recent  study,  conducted  by Frost  2  and  Sullivan  for  (ISC) in  2011  reported  that  Cloud  Computing  was  one  of  the  key  areas  that  represented  potential  risks  from  an  organizational  perspective.  Security  concerns  present  the  greatest  barrier  to  cloud  adoption  (Armbrust  et  al,  2010;  Iyer  and  Henderson,  2010;  Luoma  and  Nyberg,  2011),  due  to  the  need  for  organizations  to  entrust  external  Cloud  Service  Providers  with  their  business  critical  data.  Such  concerns  include  physical  and  personnel  security  in  accessing  machines  and  customer  data,  identity  management  in  accessing  information  and  computing  resources,  application  security  pertaining  to  applications  that  are  available as a service via the cloud, and data confidentiality. Privacy, from the perspective of users needing to  upload  and  store  critical  data  in  publically  accessible  data  centers,  as  well  as  legalities  surrounding  data  protection,  confidentiality,  copyright  and  audits  are  fundamental  concerns  (Yang  and  Tate,  2009).  Rules  pertaining to countries, country jurisdictions and industries impact on the free flow of data across boundaries  (Iyer  and  Henderson,  2010).  Hence,  ensuring  compliance  with  local,  regional  and  global  statutory  and  legal  requirements  represents  a  potential  barrier  to  cloud  adoption  (SIM  Advanced  Practices  Council,  2011).  The  physical location of the servers which store an organizations data is important under many nations’ laws, due  to different national legislations regarding privacy and data management. For example, within the EU, there  are strict limitations on the flow of information beyond the user’s jurisdiction (Iyer and Henderson, 2010; SIM  Advanced Practices Council, 2011).     27  percent  of  the  survey  respondents  felt  that  they  had  insufficient  financial  resources  to  support  Cloud  migration; to the authors this perceived barrier or reason for not adopting Cloud Computing highlights a lack  of understanding of the cloud environment and how it can alleviate some SME financial concerns. While lack of  financial  resources  typically  limits  SMEs  ability  to  receive  strategic  benefits  from  new  technology;  a  key  characteristic  of  cloud  computing  is  its  ability  to  reduce  the  financial  burden  placed on  SME’s  in  technology  adoption (Aljabre, 2012; Armbrust et al, 2010). For example, Cloud computing provides potential for significant  cost  reductions  in,  for  example,  capital  acquisition,  IT  infrastructure  operations  and  maintenance  costs  (Aljabre, 2012; Armbrust et al, 2010; Geczy et al, 2012; Iyer and Henderson, 2010; Luoma and Nyberg, 2011;  Yang  and  Tate,  2009).  Firms  can  switch  from  a  CAPEX  to  an  OPEX  cost  structure  (Kynetix,  2009),  and  take 

14


Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard Conway  advantage of the pay‐per‐use model (Armbrust et al, 2010).  The authors’ perception that this is an inherent  misunderstanding of Cloud Computing characteristics is further supported by the finding that 35 percent of the  survey respondents were unaware of any Cloud Computing benefits. As specified by one respondent, “I don’t  know how to set it up, or much about it”. A further 27 percent believed Cloud Computing was unsuitable for  their business/product offerings, while 42 percent of respondents didn’t migrate services or processes to the  cloud  environment  largely  because  they  perceived  that  Cloud  Computing  was  not  widely  employed  in  their  specific industry sector.     22  percent  of  the  survey  respondents  suggested  their  broadband  speed  was  inadequate.  Cloud  Computing  relies  on  the  quality  and  availability  of  the  Internet  connection  and  the  cloud  service  itself  (Kynetix,  2009),  giving rise to business continuity concerns due to Internet downtime, connection unreliability or CSP outages  (Armbrust  et  al,  2010).    Further,  latency  or  the  delay  incurred  in  transferring  data  packets  is  of  concern  especially  for  time‐critical  applications  such  as  those  used  in  financial  markets  and  international  trading  (Kynetix, 2009). Latency of the Internet is unpredictable and such performance unpredictability and resulting  data transfer bottlenecks impact on the realization of cloud computing power (Armbrust et al, 2010; Yang and  Tate, 2009). In relation to availability of a good quality Internet or broadband infrastructure, the Republic of  Ireland’s telecommunications market was late to open up to competition and only initiated broadband rollout  in 2002 (Doherty, 2012). This slow start may have contributed to the fact that by 2006 the country had one of  the lowest rates of broadband penetration in Europe (Point Topic, 2011). More recently, the Irish government  have adopted an aggressive interventionist approach to broadband rollout (Doherty, 2012) and combined with  the fact that Ireland has one of the youngest demographics in Europe, it has seen strong broadband growth in  the last few years (Point Topic, 2011). However, much still remains to be done as highlighted in a recent OECD  (2010) report where Ireland was ranked 22nd out of 33 countries in terms of fixed line broadband penetration  rates and received the lowest ranking in Europe in terms of its average broadband speed (OECD, 2010).  

4. What are the Implications of these survey findings? – recommendations for  improvement  Analysis of the findings on SMEs preparation for cloud adoption, as well as the reasons for SMEs not adopting  Cloud, result in some interesting implications. Examination of the depth of preparation SMEs undertook prior  to migrating to the Cloud environment suggests there is a substantial gap between what is published in the  literature  regarding  steps  to support cloud computing adoption  and  what  is  implemented  in practice  by  the  SME community. Specifically, only between 43 percent and 53 percent of the survey respondents determined  the strategic intent and objectives of Cloud adoption; established a process for determining the services most  suitable for the cloud environment; and involved key stakeholders throughout the process of assessing service  readiness for the cloud. The depth of effort in for example the process applied to determine suitability for the  cloud  is  somewhat  questionable,  as  only 23  percent  developed  criteria  for  assessing  cloud  service  readiness  and only  20 percent  used  those  criteria  to  assess  actual cloud  readiness.  Other  important preparation  steps  were  poorly  followed.  For  example,  only  15  percent  established  a  strategic  plan  for  roll‐out  of  the  selected  services  to  the  cloud,  and  documented  a  strategy  for  selecting  the  Cloud  Service  Provider(s)  and  managing  relationship(s)  with  them.  The  low  levels  of  preparation  correspond  to  some  findings  in  the  literature.  For  example,  Iacovou  et  al  (1995),  state  that  many  small  organisations  lack  a  required  level  of  organizational  readiness for adopting high‐impact systems. However, the survey findings also suggest that approximately half  of the SMEs in this study who adopted cloud computing did not engage in any preparation for migration to the  cloud.     Recommendations: There is a need for a more concerted national effort led by Government and State Bodies  to support SMEs who plan to engage in Cloud Computing Adoption. This requires the development of simple  SME  specific  models/frameworks  which  emphasise  and  increase  awareness  of  the  preparatory  steps  SMEs  should undertake to ensure efficient migration to the cloud environment.    Further,  the  reasons  for  cloud  non  adoption  are  quite  varied.  All  of  the  following  findings  point  to  a  lack  of  awareness  and  education  surrounding  cloud computing.  For  example, 27 percent  of the  survey  respondents  felt  that  they  had  insufficient  financial  resources  to  support  Cloud  migration;  40  percent  reported  a  lack  of  time  as  a  key  deterrent,  while  a  further  32  percent  suggested  they  did  not  have  the  necessary  IT  skills  to  support migration; 35 percent were unaware of any Cloud Computing benefits, while others perceived it was  not suitable for their product/service offering, or was not adopted within their industry sector.   

15


Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard Conway  Recommendation:  A  more  concerted  awareness/education  campaign  targeting  Irish  SMEs,  on  the  inherent  characteristics  and  benefits  associated  with  cloud  computing  needs  to  be  rolled  out  nationally.  While  much  literature on the Cloud already exists, much of this presents a specific vendor perspective. What is required is  an independent analysis of the impact of cloud computing in the SME context; this is critical to enabling SMEs  to  make  informed  decisions  regarding  the  suitability  of  Cloud  technology  for  their  businesses.  Such  an  awareness programme would help alleviate common misconceptions, and could for example specify the level  of time investment required for common service/process transitions; could outline how lack of in‐house skills  may be addressed by the outsourcing of more complex services/processes to a cloud provider; and could offer  cost  benefit  analysis  findings  in  relation  to  savings  made  in  comparison  with  any  financial  outlay  associated  with  cloud  transitioning.  A  possible  strategy  to  support  such  education  and  awareness  would  be  the  establishment of an expertise centre whose purpose would be to provide SMEs with independent advice on  management of the cloud lifecycle.    A  particularly  interesting  finding  from  the  SME  context  was  the  perception  of  some  SMEs  (22  percent)  that  their  broadband  speed  was  inadequate.  Absence  of  a  stable,  high  quality  Internet  connection  is  a  key  deterrent. As previously outlined, in a recent OECD (2010) report, Ireland ranked 22nd out of 33 countries in  terms  of  fixed  line  broadband  penetration  rates  and  received  the  lowest  ranking  in  Europe  in  terms  of  its  average broadband speed. Despite strong broadband growth being experienced in recent years, Ireland’s poor  ranking is particularly concerning given the current economic climate and the fact that Ireland is a peripheral  economy, both in the European Union (EU) and in global market terms (Doherty, 2012).     Recommendation:  Continued  and  aggressive  broadband  rollout  by  Government,  with  enhanced  and  fit  for  purpose broadband speeds available on a national basis, is critical to ensuring that Irish SMEs are no longer  disadvantaged  and  are  in  a  position  to  harness  the  power  of  available  information  and  communication  technologies. At present, broadband is not available throughout Ireland on a stable “like‐for like” basis; hence  SMEs need to be made aware of current plans and time lines for high speed (e.g. fibre optic) broadband rollout  and  available  alternatives  (e.g.  satellite).  The  issue  of  providers  specifying  a  minimum  broadband  speed,  as  opposed to the current “up to” broadband speed is critical. Effective strategies to enable Government to hold  service  providers  accountable  for  issues  such  as  this  and  to  show  more  support  for  smaller  businesses  is  required.  

5. Conclusions This  study  was  one  of  the  first  empirical  studies  to  examine  cloud  computing  adoption  preparation  and  reasons for non adoption among SMEs in Ireland.  Given the study’s exploratory nature and the limited sample  of respondents, the authors are far from reaching generalisable conclusions. Nonetheless, the insights gained  from  the  Irish  SME  cloud  survey  respondents  provide  some  interesting  findings  in  terms  of  how  the  study’s  SMEs  have  engaged  in  the  cloud  adoption  process  and  indeed  the  reasons  behind  some  SMEs  not  adopting  cloud computing.  As cloud  technology  is  asserted  to  hold  significant  benefit  potential  for  SMEs,  the  authors  believe that further efforts can be taken on a national scale to support greater understanding and adoption of  cloud. Implementation of the key recommendations outlined in section four would be of considerable benefit  to the SME market in overcoming any misconceptions of the cloud environment, in making informed decisions  regarding cloud adoption, and in managing the adoption process and deriving the benefits that are inherent  within cloud technology.  

References   Aljabre, A. (2012). Cloud computing for increased business value. International Journal of Business and Social Science, 3(1),  234‐239.  Armbrust, M., Fox, A., Griffith, R., Joseph, A.D., Katz, R., Konwinski, A., Lee, G., Patterson, D., Rabkin, A., Stoica, I. and  Zaharia, M. (2010). A view of cloud computing. Communications of the ACM, 53, 50‐58.  Avison, D., Jones, J., Powell, P. and Wilson, D. (2004). Using and validating the strategic alignment model. Journal of  Strategic Information Systems, 13, 223‐246.  Caldeira, M.M. and Ward, J.M. (2003). Using resource‐based theory to interpret the successful adoption and use of  information systems and technology in manufacturing small and medium‐sized enterprises. European Journal of  Information Systems, 12, 127‐141.  th Central Statistics Office (2008). Small business in Ireland report. Retrieved from: http://cso.ie. (Accessed February 24   2012).    Conway. G. and Curry, E. (2012). Managing cloud computing – a lifecycle approach. Proceedings of the 2nd International  Conference on Cloud Computing and Services Science. April 18‐21st, Porto, Portugal.  

16


Marian Carcary, Eileen Doherty and Gerard Conway  Doherty, E. (2012). Broadband adoption and diffusion: A study of Irish SMEs, PhD Thesis, University of Ulster, Coleraine.  ENISA (2009). Cloud computing: benefits, risks and recommendations for information security. Retrieved from:  http://www.enisa.europa.eu/act/rm/files/deliverables/cloud‐computing ‐risk‐assessment. (Accessed 26th January  2012).  Gartner (2011). Gartner Executive Programs Worldwide Survey of More Than 2,000 CIOs Identifies Cloud Computing as Top  Technology Priority for CIOs in 2011. Retrieved from: http://www.gartner.com/it/page.jsp?id=1526414. (Accessed  th 18  December 2012).  Geczy, P., Izumi, N. and Hasida, K. (2012). Cloudsourcing: managing cloud adoption. Global Journal of Business Research,  6(2), 57‐70.  Harrigan, J.A., Rosenthal, R., and Scherer, K. (2008). New Handbook of Methods in Non‐Verbal Behaviour Research. Oxford  University Press.   Henderson, J.C. and Venkatraman, N. (1992). Strategic alignment: A model for organizational transformation through  technology. In Kochan, T.A. and Useem, M. (Eds), Transforming Organizations, Oxford University Press, Oxford.  Iacovou, C.L., Benbasat, I. and Dexter, A.S. (1995). Electronic Data Interchange and small organizations: adoption and  impact of technology. MIS Quarterly, December, 465‐485.  Iyer, B. and Henderson, J.C. (2010). Preparing for the future: understanding the seven capabilities of cloud computing. MIS  Quarterly Executive, 9(2), 117‐131.  Kynetix Technology Group (2009). Cloud computing – a strategy guide for board level executives. Retrieved from: Microsoft  th Downloads. (Accessed 12  June 2012).  Leimeister, S., Riedl, C., Bohm, M., and Krcmar, H. (2010). The business perspective of cloud computing: actors, roles and  th th th value networks. Proceedings of the 18  European Conference on Information Systems. 7 ‐9  June, Pretoria, South  Africa.  Loebbecke, C., Thomas, B., and Ulrich, T. (2012). Assessing cloud readiness at Continental AG. MIS Quarterly Executive,  11(1), 11‐23.  Luoma, E. and Nyberg, T. (2011). Four scenarios for adoption of cloud computing in China. Proceedings of the European  Conference on Information Systems. Retrieved from: http://aisel.aisnet.org/ecis2011/123 (Accessed 14th July 2012).  McAfee, A. (2011). What every CEO needs to know about the Cloud. Harvard Business Review. November, pp124‐132.  Mell, P. and Grance, T. (2011). The NIST definition of cloud computing, recommendations of the National Institute of  Standards and Technology, Special Publication 800‐145. Retrieved from:  http://csrc.nist.gov/publications/nistpubs/800‐145/SP800‐145.pdf (Accessed 12th June 2012).    Neves, F.T., Marta, F.C., Correia, A.M, Neto, M. (2011). The adoption of cloud computing by SMEs: identifying and coping  with external factors. Proceedings of the 11th Conference of the Portuguese Association of Information Systems. 19th‐ 21st October, Lisbon, Portugal. Retrieved from:  http://run.unl.pt/bitstream/10362/6166/1/Neves_Marta_Correia_Neto_2011.pdf. (Accessed 3rd February 2012).  Nguyen, T.H. (2009). Information Technology adoption in SMEs: an integrated framework. International Journal of  Entrepreneurial Behavior and Research, 15(2), 162‐186.  OECD (2010), OECD Broadband Portal. Retrieved from:  th http://www.oecd.org/document/54/0,3746,en_2649_33703_38690102_1_1_1_1,00.html. Accessed 30  May 2011).    Point Topic (2011). South Korea Broadband Overview, Operator Source. Retrieved from: http://point‐ topic.com/content/operatorSource/profiles2/south‐korea‐broadband‐overview.htm (Accessed 25th July 2011).    Saunders, M., Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A. (2007). Research methods for business students. Prentice Hall, Harlow.   Silverman, D. (2005). Doing qualitative research. Sage Publications, London.  SIM Advanced Practices Council (2011). Wisdom of clouds: learning from users. Retrieved from: https://simnet.site‐ ym.com/store/default.asp (Accessed 14th July 2012).  Son, I., Lee, D., Lee, J., and Chang, Y. (2011). Understanding the impact of IT service innovation on firm performance: the  case of cloud computing. Proceedings of the PACIS 2011. Retrieved from: http://aisel.aisnet.org/pacis2011/180.  (Accessed 14th July 2012).  Street, C. and Meister, D.B (2004). Small business growth and internal transparency: the role of Information Systems. MIS  Quarterly, 28(3), 473‐506.  Thong, J. (1999). An integrated model of information systems adoption in small business. Journal of Management  Information Systems, 15(4), 187‐214.  Yang, H. and Tate, M. (2009). Where are we at with cloud computing?: a descriptive literature review. Proceedings of the  20th Australasian Conference on Information Systems, 2nd‐4th December, Melbourne. 

17


New Delivery Model for Non‐Profit Organisations: Shared  Computing Services  Barbara Crump and Raja Peter  Massey University, Wellington, New Zealand  b.j.crump@massey.ac.nz   r.m.peter@massey.ac.nz    Abstract: The current economic climate of funding stringency has intensified the need for non‐profit organisations (NPOs)  to find new delivery models of their services as a way of creating greater efficiencies and reducing costs. Consideration of  improvement  to  their  back‐office  operations  is  one  way  of  addressing  overheads  associated  with  delivery  functions  of  NPOs so that they can continue to focus on their core business activities. The overheads for back‐office functions are much  larger for smaller NPOs (by about 10‐15 percent) than the larger ones and interest in sharing services could appeal to that  sector. One approach to reduce overhead costs is for two or more NPOs to collaborate in sharing office space and office  equipment  and,  in  some  instances,  outsourcing  some  functions,  for  example,  human  resources  and  information  technology. Currently, in New Zealand, there is very little engagement by NPOs in sharing services, particularly back office  computing services. It was against this background that meetings with representatives of eight NPOs in Wellington, New  Zealand,  identified  the  challenges  they  were  facing.    These  included  funding,  client  management,  compliance  with  reporting  (financial  and  non‐financial),  financial  management  and  control,  governance,  marketing  and  promotion  and  retention  and  management  of staff  and volunteers.  Wellington  City  Council,  as  a  significant  funding  agent  of  some  local  NPOs, commissioned an online survey with the aim of understanding the interest and readiness of NPOs in adopting shared  computing  services.  The  survey was  developed collaboratively  with  the  council,  a  computing  charitable  trust  and  a  local  university. The objectives of the survey were: to provide a snapshot of computing usage within the organisations, identify  significant issues challenging the sector and understand their perceptions of shared computing services. The perceptions of  the Wellington region NPO representatives (147 valid surveys) regarding shared services are reported in this paper. Results  reveal the factors that drive the uptake of shared services within the non‐profit sector, the benefits, barriers and priorities  of sharing computing services and respondents’ views on their willingness to pay for a shared services arrangement. NPOs  were  positive  regarding  potential  benefits  of  a  shared  services  arrangement  but  recognised  potential  barriers  of  privacy  and  security,  a  need  for  contractual  relationships,  shared  vision  and  compliance  and  standardisation.  Priorities  for  a  proposed  shared  services  model  were  identified  as  finance  and  management  of  data  and  knowledge.  The  majority  of  respondents indicated they were willing to pay up to five percent of their budget for a shared services arrangement. These  results provide a basis for further study as to the type of shared services model that organisations would find acceptable  and render efficiencies and cost savings.    Keywords: shared services, non‐profit, computing 

1. Introduction and background  The challenge of having to do more with less has intensified in recent years with the economic downturn. In  the  private  and  public  sectors  many  organisations  have  turned  to  shared  services  in  an  effort  to  achieve  efficiencies  and  a  reduction  in  costs  through  the  consolidation  of  business  operations  and  administrative  processes.  For  the  nonprofit  sector  the  changed  environment  has  meant  fewer  grants  and  diminishing  resources forcing agencies and organisations to consider cost‐reduction measures, one of which is moving to  sharing services.     Definitions  of  shared  services  arrangements  vary,  depending  on  the  type  and  manner  of  sharing.  These  arrangements  are  typically  centralised  and  are  distinct  from  outsourcing  where  services  and  operations  are  provided  by  an  independent  organisation.  Shared  services  models  range  from  low‐cost  solutions  such  as  collaboration amongst co‐located NPOs (for example, sharing office space and administrative staff) to greater  complexity where organisations collaborate in the provision of back office support and increase their buying  and  purchasing  power.  Information  communications  technology  (ICT)  plays  a  major  role  in  contributing  to  economies of scale in many of these areas.     Adoption of shared services has spread within the public and private sectors since the 1990s (Ramphal, 2013)  and  are  evident  in  large  and  more  complex  organisations  such  as  those  with  multiple  business  units  and  revenue  over  $2  billion  (Schulman,  Harmer,  Dunleavy  and  Lusk,  1999).  For  example,  the  New  Zealand  government has mandated a medium‐term strategy for “how central government will more collectively lead  the  use,  development  and  purchasing  of  government  ICT  over  the  next  three  years”  (New  Zealand 

18


Barbara Crump and Raja Peter  Government, 2012). The government’s focus extends beyond shared services for ICT purchasing and includes  alignment and standardisation of agency business applications, integrating workflow across government and  improving access to government services and data. Other areas where ICT shared services can be an enabler is  in  the  financial  area  (accounts  payable  and  accounts  receivable)  and  human  resource  services  (payroll,  reporting and accountability).     Literature relevant to implementation of shared services in the nonprofit sector is scanty compared with that  relating  to  the  private  and  public  sectors  and  is  mostly  based  on  United  States  NPOs  where  the  term  ‘management  services  organisations’  or  ‘management  support  organisations’  (MSOs)  is  used  (Walsh,  McGregor‐Lowndes  and  Newton,  2008).  In  Australia  empirical  research  on  shared  services  by  NPOs  is  also  meagre although some states report initiatives such as pilot projects that include Queensland’s multi‐tenant  service centre project with a focus on co‐locating separate service providers in an appropriately located centre  (Lennie,  2008).  Another  example  is  the  IT  services  provision  to  the  UnitingCare  NPO  group  in  Australia,  an  initiative established by the Uniting Church Queensland Synod (Walsh, et al, 2008). The services respond to a  wide range of needs from desktop support, network and datacentre infrastructure to application support and  project  management  services  (Naimo,  2011).  In  New  Zealand  local  government  shared  services  include  a  diversity  of  collaborative  projects,  for  example,  call  centre  services,  library  management  systems,  business  solutions  and  IT  services  (Drew,  2011  and  Shaw,  2010).  However,  compared  with  private  and  public  sector  organisations, little is reported on shared services implementation by NPOs in New Zealand.     This  paper  contributes  to  the  shared  services  literature,  responding  to  Newton’s  (2008)  comment  that  the  literature  lags  behind  the  practice  of  forming  shared  services  arrangements.  We  report  on  the  results  of  an  online survey of NPO representatives in Wellington, New Zealand with the aim of understanding respondents’  perceptions  of  shared  computing  services.  The  survey  results  also  provided  a  snapshot  of  computing  usage  within  NPOs  and  identified  significant  issues  challenging  the  sector.  In  the  next  section  we  briefly  discuss  characteristics  of  NPOs  and  the  different  shared  services  models.  Next  is  a  discussion  on  factors  relevant  to  shared services adoption followed by a description of the study’s initiation, method and sample. Results are  then presented followed by a summary and reflections.  

2. Models and characteristics   The adoption of a shared services model is dependent, in part, on the characteristics of the NPO. Organisations  that are complementary, have synergies, a similar philosophy, share a common vision, goals and focus and are  not competing with each other are more likely to be successful in adoption of shared services (Lennie, 2008).  The range of shared services models is broad, each with benefits and limitations. Walsh et al (2008), after an  investigation of the literature, review five models in the non‐profit sector, each of which has different features.  For  example,  the  Classical  Business  Model  which  the  authors  note  is  not  particularly  common,  is  where  a  separate  shared  services  provider  brings  together  the  business  functions  previously  performed  by  separate  business units within the organisation. The Dedicated Shared Services Centres involves a separate organisation  or entity that is sub‐contracted to perform specific functions. Walsh et al warn that there could be taxation  implications with this approach. The Peak Body Support Model is useful within a particular sector or industry  and in return for a membership or subscription fee provides a range of services for members. Sharing common  premises,  resources  and  facilities  is  the  main  feature  of  the  Co‐location  Model.  Walsh  et  al  provide  several  Australian examples where this model has been implemented and believe there is potential for extending it to  shared services. Finally, the Amalgamation or Merger Model is where administrative functions are streamlined  and  consolidated  by  organisations  in  a  similar  field  of  service  amalgamation,  thus  forming  a  single  larger  organisation.      A background paper on shared services for non‐government organisations by the Council of Social Services of  New South Wales (NCOSS 2008) suggests additional models that include Outsourcing to a Specialist Provider  and  Group  Buying  Schemes  (among  others)  (see  http://ncoss.org.au/content/view/1498/111).  There  is  consensus  that  one  size  does  not  fit  all  and  for  NPOs  that  deal  with  a  “whole  other  realm  of  issues”  in  comparison to private and government sector counterparts Naimo (2011), identifying the type of model that  may be suitable requires time and negotiation. The different models, at times the bewildering possibilities of  what to share, as well as the need for trust and negotiation within a collaborative arrangement are among the  factors needing consideration in a decision to adopt shared services.    

19


Barbara Crump and Raja Peter   

3. Factors for consideration in shared services adoption  The main rationale for initiating a shared services arrangement is identified by Becker, Niehaves and Krause  (2009)  as  “cost  pressure”,  the  financial  imperative  of  having  to  do  more  with  less.  Their  model  of  causal  relationships, derived from their case study of two German local bodies where shared services projects were  implemented,  includes  two  “necessary  conditions”,  namely  key  actors  who  champion  the  initiative  and  second,  the  existence  of  prior  cooperation.  Vangen  and  Huxham,  (2003,  p.  8)  note  “Trust  is  an  essential  ingredient  for  successful  collaboration”  and  Becker  et  al  (2009)  believe  that  collaboration  and  cooperation  between  administrations,  accompanied  by  collaborative  communication  and  decision‐making  contribute  to  “trustful cooperation during shared service delivery” (p. 118). The assumption that “trust levels start small and  gradually increase” (McKnight, Cummings and Chervany, 1998, p. 473) is challenged by McKnight, et al, citing  researchers of survey and experimental studies who found high trust levels of their subjects at initial and early  stages.  Hence,  it  is  possible  that  NPOs  interested  in  implementing  a  shared  services  model  could  achieve  a  shared  arrangement  with  organisations  with  whom  they  have  previously  had  little  contact  but  have  a  good  reputation. However, McKnight et al propose that initial trust is more likely when “the trusted party has built a  widely known good reputation” (p. 486).    An NPO that has already established trustful relationships, within the geographical area of NPOs interested in  collaborating  in  a  shared  services  arrangement  is  likely  to  be  suitable  as  one  of  the  “key  actors”.  Seddon  (2008), a leading critic of management fads, notes that “command‐and‐control consultancies” where decision‐ making  is  taken  out  of  the  organisations’  hands  does  not  work.  His  recommendations  that  focus  on  local  government  (but  are  equally  applicable  to  NPOs)  is  to  find  a  “better  way”.  That  is,  to  “’check’  in  situ  for  services  that  might  be  shared,  to  improve  them  where  they  are  and  then,  on  the  basis  of  the  knowledge  gained, to determine whether and how to go about sharing them.” (p. 186). NPOs considering shared services  implementation  would  do  well  to  heed  Seddon’s  criticisms,  particularly  as  they  relate  to  what  is  being  measured and included in evaluations of shared services.     Holistic  evaluation  of  a  shared  services  project  is  critical  for  assessing  effectiveness  and  efficiencies.  Seddon  (2008)  provides  a  strong  critique  of  centralising  shared  administration.  He  notes  that  much  administration  work  is  part  of  a  service  flow  and  centralising  the  work  “creates  waste  (handovers,  rework,  duplication),  lengthens the time it takes to deliver a service and consequently generates failure demand” (p. 57). Seddon  criticises Varney’s 2006 report in which UK local authorities shared‐service centres are cited as “exemplars” in  their shared service arrangements. When Seddon visited the authorities he found no “proper evaluation of the  change to the quality of services … and no information about the cost effectiveness of the initiative” (p. 149).  He  doubted  that  if  those  involved  had  no  evidence  then  Varney  would  be  unlikely  to  have  had  information  about  the  cost‐effectiveness  of  the  initiative.  Dollery  et  al’s  (2009)  examination  of  shared  services  in  local  government  both  internationally  and  in  Australia  concluded  with  a  “modest  conclusion  [that]  thoughtful  selection and application of shared services arrangements would almost certainly induce cost savings [but] it  could not by itself solve the acute problems of financial sustainability confronting a majority of Australian local  councils” (p. 218). Triplett and Scheumann (2000) stress the criticality of having a “thorough understanding of  costs and the ability to impact those costs” (p. 42) for the success of any shared service centre.  

4. Initiation, method and sample   The  decision  to  investigate  the  perceptions  of  NPO  representatives  was  made  after  meetings  with  representatives of eight Wellington NPOs who identified the following challenges they were facing in meeting  the pressures of a tight‐funding environment:  ƒ

funding  

ƒ

client management  

ƒ

compliance with reporting (financial and non‐financial)  

ƒ

financial management and control  

ƒ

governance  

ƒ

marketing and promotion  

ƒ

retention and management of staff and volunteers.  

20


Barbara Crump and Raja Peter  Wellington  City  Council,  as  a  significant  funding  agent  of  some  local  NPOs,  commissioned  Wellington  ICT  (charitable trust) to develop and administer an online survey, in collaboration with Massey University. The aim  was to understand the interest and readiness of NPOs in adopting shared computing services. The objectives  were to:  ƒ

identify major  concerns  currently  affecting  organisations  and  possible  contributions/role  of  ICT  in  resolving these 

ƒ

gain NPO employees’ perceptions of shared ICT services 

ƒ

identify potential components/priorities in the shared services model  

The survey  was  tested  by  trustees  of  Wellington  ICT  and  feedback  incorporated  into  changes  in  survey  questions. The final version was then uploaded to Survey Monkey and remained open for four weeks. Multi‐ item  scales  were  used,  as  single‐item  measures  are  deficient  both  with  respect  to  validity  and  reliability.  Respondents  were  asked  to  rate  the  extent  to  which  they  agreed  with  different  statements  on  a  five  point  Likert scale from 1= Strongly Disagree to 5 = Strongly Agree as the anchor points. Responses to Part B of the  survey relating to the perceptions of shared services by the Wellington region respondents (147 valid surveys)  are  reported  in  this  paper.  Respondents  indicated  their  organisation  size  by  selecting  one  of  four  organisational  categories,  namely,  Large  NPO  with  several  paid  staff  plus  volunteers  (LNP),  Small  NPO  with  paid  staff  and  volunteers  (SNPFS),  Small  NPO  with  less  than  two  paid  staff  and  volunteers  (SNP<2PS)  and  Entirely Voluntary Organisation (Vol).     The  Statistical  Package  for  Social  Sciences  (SPSS)  was  used  for  data  analysis  that  included  the  means  and  Analysis  of  Variance  ANOVA  tests.  One  way  Anova  is  the  appropriate  analytical  technique  to  use  when  comparing the means of three or more groups. The statistic associated with ANOVA is the F‐statistic or the F‐ value, which also has a corresponding p‐value. From a statistical point of view, if the p‐value is less than .10,  then the results are “statistically significant’. The p‐value also indicates the degree of confidence with which  you can say that the observed phenomenon is true. For example if p = .05, then we can be 95 % confident that  the observed phenomenon is true; if p = .10, then we can be 90 % confident that the observed phenomenon is  true; if p = .01, then we can be 99 % confident that the observed phenomenon is true. A statistical significance  of p<.10 is used in this analysis and when p‐value is <.10, the differences between the means of the groups are  statistically different. This implies that there are genuine differences between the groups.  

5. Discussion of results  This section presents respondents’ perceptions of the potential for a NPO shared services arrangement.  

5.1 Drivers of shared services  There  was  agreement  by  all  organisations  on  current  concerns  that  drive  a  potential  shared  services  arrangement within the sector (see Table 1). The highest total mean (3.81) was for the item that indicated that  organisations wished to “focus resources on actual service delivery ….” The two statistically significant (p = .06  and  p  =  .04  respectively)  items:  refer  to  pressure  from  government  funding  agencies  and  a  preference  by  funders for larger organisations which are seen to be more cost effective.  Table 1: Factors that drive shared services within the sector  Drivers of Shared Services  There is pressure from government funding agencies to achieve  economies of scale within NGO programs  Funders are preferring larger organisations which are seen to be more  cost effective  There is increasing contract and compliance costs relative to funding  More skilled employees are needed to meet increasing compliance, ICT,  contract, and other demands  Recruiting and retaining workers in the sector is becoming more  challenging  Clients have changing needs and we want to provide more coordinated  and consistent range of services  We want to focus resources on actual service delivery rather than back‐ office or administrative systems 

21

LNP SNPFPS  SNP<2PS  Vol  Total  3.79  3.83  3.48  3.40  3.64  3.15 

3.63

3.61

3.16

3.38

3.75 3.64 

3.72 3.63 

3.48 3.43 

3.44 3.23 

3.61 3.48 

3.06

3.29

3.52

3.23

3.26

3.70

3.77

3.65

3.33

3.61

3.56

3.88

4.00

3.81

3.81


Barbara Crump and Raja Peter   

5.2 Potential benefits  As  can  be  seen  in  Table  2,  all  organisations  agreed  that  there  were  potential  benefits  of  a  shared  services  arrangement. No items were statistically significant.  Table 2: Potential benefits of shared services  Potential Benefits  Shared services results in savings as cost is shared  among users  Shared services provides expert  service/concentration of specialist skills  Shared services facilitates better knowledge sharing  and collaboration  We are assured of consistent and reliable service  levels at all time  Shared services allows standardisation of systems  and processes without losing your identity as an  organisation  There is a low system maintenance  Shared services streamlines accountability and  reporting requirements  For small NFPs shared services reduces risks  Shared services encourages and can eventually lead  to accreditation and compliance 

LNP 3.58 

SNPFPS 3.77 

SNP<2PS 3.52 

Vol 3.63 

Total 3.65 

3.58

3.81

3.61

3.70

3.69

3.58

3.75

3.48

3.72

3.66

3.13

3.31

3.00

3.38

3.24

3.48

3.62

3.52

3.58

3.56

3.18 3.36 

3.50 3.46 

3.48 3.52 

3.53 3.33 

3.44 3.41 

3.42 3.45 

3.31 3.38 

3.52 3.26 

3.47 3.42 

3.42 3.39 

5.3 Barriers Table 3 identifies the items that organisations regard as barriers to shared computing services. Two items of  these  items:  privacy,  control  and  confidentiality  and  need  for  contractual  relationships  are  statistically  significant.  Table 3: Barriers to shared computing services  Barriers  Privacy, control and confidentiality  Security  Need for contractual relationships  Compatibility with other organisations and need  for a shared vision  New systems of communication, management,  administration and networking  Need for compliance and standardisation  Initial costs and investments 

LNP 3.85  3.88  3.61  3.91 

SNPFPS 4.19  4.13  3.75  3.94 

SNP<2PS 3.52  3.59  3.17  3.70 

Vol 3.79  3.79  3.74  3.79 

Total 3.89  3.89  3.63  3.85 

3.78

3.79

3.39

3.93

3.77

3.61 3.82 

3.75 3.63 

3.57 3.96 

3.72 3.98 

3.68 3.82 

5.4 Priorities Organisations  agreed  they  would  want  to  share  most  services  (see  Table  4).  However  all  organisations  indicated  they  would  not  wish  to  share  customer  relationship  management.  The  LNP  did  not  want  to  share  reporting and accountability. The two items: Human resource/employer‐employee relationship management  and finance were statistically significant (p < .10).    Table 4: Shared services priorities  Shared Services Priorities  Human resource/Employer‐Employee  relationship management  Finance (accounting/budgeting)  Customer relationship management  Project and resource management  Reporting and accountability  Fundraising  Data and knowledge management   

LNP 3.09 

SNPFPS 3.36 

SNP<2PS 3.17 

Vol 2.76 

Total 3.10 

3.00 2.84  3.13  2.21  3.06  3.27   

3.50 2.96  3.36  3.61  3.53  3.50   

3.39 2.87  3.22  3.30  3.52  3.22   

3.56 2.88  3.33  3.22  3.58  3.45   

3.39 2.90  3.27  3.36  3.44  3.39   

22


Barbara Crump and Raja Peter 

5.5 Willingness to pay  Table 5 reveals that majority of the organisations indicated that they believed shared services would be useful  and  that  they  would  be  willing  to  pay  up  to  5%  of  their  budgets.  The  voluntary  organisations  tended  to  disagree (49%) but 77% were willing to pay.   Table 5: Usefulness and willingness to pay for a shared service arrangement  Organisation  Category    Large NPO  Small NPO with a  few paid staff  Small NPO < 2 paid  staff  Voluntary  organisation  Total 

Would Shared Service be Useful?  Yes  58% (19)  63% (30) 

No 42% (14)  37% (18) 

Willing to pay up to 5%  budget  Yes  80% (16)  78% (29) 

Willing to pay up to 10%  budget  Yes  20% (4)  22% (8) 

65% (15) 

35% (8) 

72% (13) 

28% (5) 

49% (21) 

51 (22) 

77% (27) 

23% (8) 

58% (85) 

42% (62) 

77% (85) 

23% (25) 

6. Conclusion 6.1 Summary of results  All  organisations  agreed  that  there  were  potential  benefits  of  shared  services  to  provide  expert  service  and  concentration  of  specialist  skills  as  well  as  savings  and  facilitation  of  better  knowledge  sharing  and  collaboration. Organisations were unanimous that there were barriers to a shared services arrangement and  these were identified as: privacy, control and confidentiality; need for contractual relationships; the need for a  shared vision, compliance and standardisation; new systems and security.     Strongest  agreement  by  all  organisations  was  for  prioritising  finance  (accounting/budgeting)  and  data  and  knowledge management. None of the organisations indicated customer relationship management as a priority  and  the  large  organisations  disagreed  that  reporting  and  accountability  was  a  priority  for  shared  services.  Finally, the results show that organisations believe they would benefit from a shared services arrangement but  the majority would not be prepared to pay more than five percent of their budget. 

6.2 Limitations A limitation of this study related to the number of shared services questions within the survey. The survey had  two parts, the first related to the funder’s interest in ascertaining ICT usage of NPOs and the second included  questions  relating  to  shared  services.  As  we  were  mindful  of  keeping  the  survey  to  an  acceptable  length  so  that  the  time  respondents  invested  in  completing  the  survey  was  not  too  long,  we  limited  the  number  of  questions. This meant that while we gained a broad overview of the perceptions of NPOs which showed their  interest  in  the  new  delivery  mode,  the  results  raised  further  questions.  This  raised  a  further  limitation  associated  with  the  nature  of  surveys  in  that  they  do  not  reveal  the  deeper  insights  which  a  qualitative  approach  can  do.  Therefore  we  recommend  a  follow‐up  study  that  uses  in‐depth  interviews,  prefaced  by  a  presentation of the different models of shared services arrangements to elicit further information. 

6.3 Reflections There is increasing pressure from local government funding agencies to achieve economies of scale within NPO  programmes. In Wellington’s case the city council was sufficiently interested to fund this exploratory survey as  they perceived that shared services offers a solution to these organisations. However barriers to adopt shared  services  remain.  We  therefore  need  to  explore  ways  in  which  these  barriers  can  be  overcome.  The  council  could  take  the  lead  and  work  with  these  NPOs,  possibly  through  the  auspices  of  Wellington  ICT,  a  NPO  the  council  has  supported  in  earlier  digital  divide  projects.  The  organisation  already  runs  the  computing  hubs  in  the council’s housing estates, has run a successful WebRider programme where NPOs have been assisted with  Web site development and has had working arrangements with ICT companies in the private sector. Through  collaboration  and  cooperation  with  many  other  NPOs,  Wellington  ICT  has  built,  and  enjoys  ‘trustful’  relationships, an important attribute in a shared services arrangement. A further benefit is that Wellington ICT  is a local NPO, is therefore “in situ” (Seddon, 2008) and familiar with the sector. A major advantage of being 

23


Barbara Crump and Raja Peter    “in situ” is that the specific values and origins of NPOs interested in a shared services approach can be carefully  focused  upon,  without  which  any  shared  service  arrangement  is  likely  to  be  carried  out  poorly  (Arsenault,  2008). Wellington ICT, as one of the “key actors” could assist with decision‐making, another favourable aspect  that Seddon (2008) believes helps when it remains within organisations’ hands.    Before launching a shared services initiative any NPO considering collaborating in a shared arrangement needs  to have a clear idea of the functionalities they believe would build economies of scale and thereby reduce cost  and/or  improve  the  quality  of  some  functions.  There  is  a  wide  range  of  areas  where  shared  services  arrangements may apply and different models of how such an arrangement works. Through cooperation and  collaboration  identification  of  areas  for  potential  efficient  can  be  made  and  appropriate  model  agreed.  McLaughlin  (1998)  and  Arsenault  (1998)  identify  cooperation  and  collaboration  among  NPOs  as  not  only  a  “good  value”  but  one  that  will  be  a  necessity  in  the  future.  Any  implementation  should  include  evaluation,  formative as well as summative, following Seddon’s (2008) argument that such evaluations should be holistic;  that is, the entire work‐flow, rather than a particular task, should be measured to assess whether efficiencies,  effectiveness  and  savings  have  been  achieved.  Finally,  the  results  of  this  study  were  presented  at  a  public  meeting  in  the  council  offices  late  2012  and  generated  considerable  interest  by  those  present.  Attendees  recommended  following  up  the  study  with  focus  groups  and  interviews  to  explore  different  shared  services  models but so far little progress has been made. With careful consideration and planning shared services could  reduce costs but the functionalities, workflow and trustful relationships need attention.  

Acknowledgements We  wish  to  thank  the  Director  and  Trustees  of  Wellington  ICT  for  partnering  with  us  in  the  development,  administration  and  analysis  of  the  survey.  The  first  author  is  an  Associate  Trustee  of  Wellington  ICT.  This  relationship has no impact on the independence of this study. 

References   Arsenault, J. (1998) Forging Nonprofit Alliances, Jossey‐Bass, San Francisco.  Becker, J., Niehaves, B. and Krause, A. (2009) “Shared Service Center vs. Shared Service Network: A Multiple Case Study  Analysis of Factors Impacting on Shared Service Configurations”, [online],  http://link.springer.com/chapter/10.1007/978‐3‐642‐03516‐6_10#page‐1  McKnight, D.H., Cummings, L.L. and Chervany, N.I. (1998) ”Initial Trust Formation in New Organizational Relationships”,  Academy of Management Review, Vol 23, No. 3, pp. 473‐490.  Dollery, B., Akimov, A. and Byrnes, J. (2009) “Shared Services in Australian Local Government: Rationale, Alternative  Models and Empirical Evidence”, The Australian Journal of Public Administration, Vol 68, No. 2, pp 208‐219.  Drew, C. (June, 2011) Shared Services for Local Government, Local Government New Zealand, Wellington.  Lennie, J. (2007) “Challenges and Strategies for the Sustainability and Viability of Non‐Profit Multi‐Tenant Service Centres:  A Literature Review”, [online], http://legacy.communitydoor.org.au/documents/strengthening/collaboration/mtsc‐ literature‐review.pdf.  McLaughlin, T.A. (1998) Nonprofit Mergers and Alliances, Wiley Nonprofit Series, New York.  Naimo, G. (2011) “The Not For Profit Sector and Shared Services”, [online]  http://www.slideshare.net/iqpcaustralia/qa‐ withe‐greg‐naimo‐the‐not‐for‐profit‐sector‐and‐shared‐services.  NCOSS (2008) “Shared Services in the NGO Sector Background Paper”, [online],  http://ncoss.org.au/content/view/1498/111   Newton, C. (2008) “Shared Services in the NGO Sector: Lessons we can learn from other sectors”, [online],  http://ncoss.org.au/content/view/1498/111  New Zealand Government (2012) “Directions and Priorities for Government ICT”, [online], http://ict.govt.nz.  Ramphal. R. (2013) A Literature Review on Shared Services, African Journal of Business Management, Vol 7, No. 1, pp. 1‐7.  Schulman, D.S., Harmer, M.J. Dunleavy J.R. and Lusk, J.S. (1999) Shared Services: Adding Value to the Business Units, John  Wiley and Sons Inc. New York.  Seddon, J. (2008) Systems Thinking in the Public Sector: The Failure of the Reform Regime... and a Manifesto for a Better  Way, Triarchy Press, Axminster.  Shaw, J. (2010) “Shared Services in New Zealand Local Government 2010”, Paper read at ALGIM Annual Conference,  Wairakei, New Zealand, November.  Triplett, A. And Scheumann, J. (2000) Managing Shared Services with ABM, Strategic Finance,p. 40‐45.  Vangen, S. and Huxham, C. (2003) “Nurturing collaborative relations: Building trust in interorganizational collaboration”,  Journal of Applied Behavioral Science, Vol 39, No. 1, pp . 5‐31  Walsh, P., McGregor‐Lowndes, M. and Newton, C.J. (2008) “Shared Services: Lessons from the Public and Private Sectors  for the Nonprofit Sector”, The Australian Journal of Public Administration, Vol 67, No. 2, pp 200‐212. 

24


Enhancing IT Capability Maturity – Development of a Conceptual  SME Framework to Maximise the Value Gained From IT  Eileen Doherty, Marian Carcary, Una Downey and Stephen Mc Laughlin  Innovation Value Institute, National University of Ireland Maynooth (NUIM), Ireland  Eileen.doherty@nuim.ie  Marian.carcary@nuim.ie  Una.downey@nuim.ie  Stephen.mclaughlin@nuim.ie    Abstract: The Small and Medium sized Enterprise (SME); defined by the European Commission (2005) as any firm with less  than 250 employees, is acknowledged as a fundamental component in the success and growth of any economy. Given the  very  difficult  global  economic  conditions  we  are faced  with,  it  is  essential  that  this  sector  is  supported  and  continues  to  thrive. In tandem with these difficult economic conditions, monumental technological advances are happening almost on a  daily  basis.  These  advances  impact  and  change  how  businesses  need  to  operate  and  SMEs  must  keep  abreast  of  these  advances  and  better  understand  how  to  remain  competitive  in  such  a  difficult  and  fast  moving  environment.  Given  the  resource constraints such as time and access to finance that are inherent in the small firm, maintaining this competitive  edge  proves  increasingly  difficult.  This  paper  seeks  to  examine  the  key  business  challenges  faced  by  SMEs  around  their  Information Technology (IT) or Information and Communications Technologies (ICTs) in this current climate.  It also seeks  to determine the IT capabilities that firms are most interested in seeing improvements in. This is done through employing a  quantitative research approach to the data collection (questionnaire) and analysis processes. Through analysis of this data,  an  SME  IT  Capability  framework  (SME  IT‐CMF)  is  conceptualised  to  facilitate  maximum  value  to  be  gained  from  IT.  This  paper will make a number of practical recommendations. Firstly, these recommendations are of value to the knowledge  base, secondly to SMEs themselves, in helping them understand how they can improve their competency in a number of  key IT areas or critical capabilities (CCs). From a government perspective it will identify the key areas that require support  for the SME in an effort at maintaining and promoting economic growth. This research primarily relates to SMEs within the  Knowledge Intensive Business Services (KIBS) Sector and those organizations which are medium sized having in excess of  50 employees.      Keywords: SME, technology adoption, value from IT, IT‐CMF, KIBS 

1. Introduction / literature review  ICTs…are facilitating the globalization of many services…[and] is having a fundamental impact on  the way economies work and on the global allocation of resources, contributing to productivity  growth by expanding markets, increasing business efficiency and reinforcing competitive pressure  (OECD, 2008, p.5).  The  current  economic  climate  has  never  been  so  competitive;  the  increasing  rate  of  technological  advancement, access, and ease of use has seen many ‘well known’ organizations struggling, and indeed failing  to  stay  competitive  and  viable.  Consequently,  many  need  to  review  their  current  market  position,  product  and/or  service  offering,  and  their  competitive  landscape  (Mc  Laughlin,  2012).    Companies  are  faced  with  significant business challenges and are increasingly focused on survival and on remaining competitive in this  very  volatile  economy  (PWC,  2013;  Rosenberg,  2012).  They  are  challenged  in  building  and  maintaining  customer loyalty and relationships (PWC, 2013; Cisco, 2013), are challenged in effective budget management  (Cisco, 2013) and in ensuring that they have the right talent required to succeed (PWC, 2013).  It is purported  that what made firms successful in the past may no longer hold true for the future. ″For those organizations  that  are  determined  to  succeed  in  this  hypercompetitive  and  dynamic  market,  the  need  to  better  sense  and  respond to market forces becomes a survival imperative“ (Mc Laughlin, 2012, p.4).  With the many significant  advancements  in  IT,  taking  into  account  Moores  Law  (Curley,  2004),  an  effective  IT  capability  enables  organizations  to  overcome  the  many  diverse  business  challenges,  traditional  barriers  to  market  are  eased  creating opportunities for ″newer, smarter, more agile organizations to gain a dominant position against well  known and established organizations“ (Mc Laughlin, 2012, p.1).  A significant amount of research has focused  on  how  IT  can  address  the  many  business  challenges  facing  organizations.  These  include  addressing  issues  pertaining  to  relationships  with  trading  partners  (Tan  et  al,  2010),  enabling  cost  savings  (Harrigan,  2008),  improvement  in  levels  of  productivity,  efficiency  (Harrigan,  2008),  improved  access  to  extensive  market  information and business knowledge (Tan et al, 2010; Xu et al, 2007), enhanced capacity to target clients on a  local, regional or global level (Tan et al, 2010; Kotelnikov, 2007; Alam et al., 2005) and improved competitive 

25


Eileen Doherty et al.  advantage  (Mora‐monge  et  al,  2010;  Harrigan,  2008).  IT  also  facilitates  improved  SME  co‐operation  and  competition with larger firms in a wide range of markets (OECD, 2008). Findings also suggest that the value or  benefits  derived  from  IT  may  vary  depending  on  the  particular  sector  and  size  of  the  organization  (Micus,  2008). So how can the organization harness maximum business value from its IT or address the many diverse  business issues it is confronted with? It is purported that for IT to move up the value ladder, it must achieve a  specific level of performance within the organization (Curley and Delaney, 2010). Figure 1 depicts this notion  and illustrates how firms at a lower level of sophistication focus on issues surrounding their IT infrastructure. It  further illustrates that as their level of sophistication improves this IT focus incorporates the operational issues  of the firm.  

Source, Cooney, 2009  Figure 1: IT value proposition   At the highest level of sophistication organizations are concerned with issues pertaining to IT strategy such as  how  best  to  align  or  partner  with  business  and  in  delivering  maximum  value  from  the  IT  capability  of  the  organization.  There  are  a  number  of  frameworks  that  support  improvements  in  the  IT  performance  of  the  organization and enhance the value gained from IT (Cooney, 2009). There are two distinct lens through which  these  frameworks  can  be  viewed  in  order  to  determine  which  approach  is  most  appropriate  to  a  specific  organization. These can be termed “Process centric“ or ″Capability centric“ frameworks.    ″Process‐centric  frameworks  are  focused  on  developing  an  ability  to  produce  a  desired,  repeatable  output  to  a  predetermined  quality  and  quantity.  Capability‐centric  frameworks  are  designed  to  understand  what  organizational  abilities  can,  and  should  be  developed  to  support  and build a unique and sustainable competitive advantage. Process‐centric frameworks are very  much  focused  on  systemizing  internal  activities,  whereas  capability‐centric  frameworks  effectively respond to (as yet undefined) external challenges″ (Mc Laughlin, 2012, pp.3‐4).  This research will build upon a capability centric framework namely the IT‐Capability Maturity Framework (IT‐ CMF), (IVI, 2013).  The framework:  ƒ

Maps IT organizations onto a capability maturity curve based on empirically derived industry best practice  across 33 different capabilities of IT management. 

ƒ

Provides practices,  outcomes  and  metrics  to  improve  capability  maturity  and  therefore  consistency  of  output. 

ƒ

Enables organizations to assess and benchmark performance over time. 

26


Eileen Doherty et al.  ƒ

Enables creation of roadmaps with actionable metrics to improve maturity with best practice guidelines. 

ƒ

Provides capability accelerators and building blocks for improvement (IVI, 2013). 

The IT‐CMF purports that IT is used as an innovation resource, helping improve the probability, predictability  and  profitability  of  IT‐enabled  innovations.  The  framework  is  developed  based  on  five  levels  of  IT  maturity  across  33  critical  capabilities  and  four  interrelated  macro‐capabilities  within  the  organization  (see  Figure  2),  which can be employed to maximise information technology for business value. Using the IT‐CMF “CIOs can  help drive four types of improvement shifts for IT capability:   ƒ

Move the business model of the IT capability from a cost centre to a value centre. 

ƒ

Move the IT Budget from a runaway scenario to a sustainable economic model. 

ƒ

Move the value focus from purely measuring total cost of ownership to demonstrating optimized value. 

ƒ

Move the  perception  of  IT  from  that  of  a  supplier  to  that  of  a  core  competency”.  (Curley  and  Delaney,  2010, p.4) 

Figure 2: The IT capability maturity framework  However, while the value of the IT‐CMF is clear for the organization, it has been developed with the large firm  in mind and similar to a lot of ICT related research pertaining to the organization (Loebbecke et al, 2012; Iyer  and Henderson, 2010; Gronroos, 2004), the focus is on the larger organization with scant attention paid to the  SME (Doherty, 2012; Spurge and Roberts, 2005).  SMEs  have  historically  been  the  hidden  engine  of  many  national  economies,  but  they  have  not  necessarily operated on the ′bleeding edge‘ of technology (BCG, 2010, p.24).   SMEs are recognised as being inherently different (Street and Meister, 2004) and cannot be seen through the  same  lens  as  the  larger  organization  (Ballantine  et  al,  1998).    They  form  a  cornerstone  of  the  EU  economy  representing 99 percent of all enterprises (European Commission, 2012). Given this instrumental role played  by SMEs in contributing to socio‐economic development (Tan et al, 2010) and recognition of the value that IT  can bring to any organization in ensuring it can compete in today’s challenging business climate (Mc Laughlin,  2012b),  development  of  an  IT  framework  to  help  support  this  value  generation  is  warranted.    Previous  research has highlighted this gap in that previous attempts to develop guidelines to govern IT in SMEs, such as  the Cobit Quick Start (IT Governance Institute, 2007) have proved disappointing (Devos et al, 2012). In essence,  this paper endeavours to highlight the key IT Business challenges currently facing SMEs. It will also identify the  key  areas  or  Critical  Capabilities  which  will  best  address  these  challenges.  This  will  form  the  basis  for  the  development of the SME IT‐CMF.   

 

27


Eileen Doherty et al. 

2. Methodology 2.1 Research approach  A  quantitative  research  approach  was  adopted  through  the  employment  of  an  online  survey  instrument  (questionnaire).  The  unit  of  analysis  in  this  research  is  the  Small  to  Medium  sized  Enterprise  (SME).    The  sample frame was developed through the use of a stratified random sampling technique and was ultimately  driven  by  the  nature  of  the  research  questions  (Saunders  et  al,  2007).  This  technique  helped  gain  representation from all sectors (Harrigan et al, 2008). The sampling frame was stratified according to one main  criterion in that firms must be considered an SME (having less than 250 employees). The research adopted an  equal  sectoral  focus  based  on  previous  research  (Grosso,  2006)  which  found  the  adoption  of  Internet  technologies to have a positive impact on SME business activities. The study’s sample consisted of 1500 SMEs.  The  researchers  aimed  for  a  response  rate  of  7  percent  in  order  to  achieve  100  usable  responses  which  is  deemed a suitable minimal level in a large population (Harrigan, 2008). Resultantly, the data collection process  generated 134 usable responses achieving a response rate of 9 percent.      

2.2 Instrument development   The  survey  questionnaire  was  designed  and  developed  following  an  extensive  review  of  the  pertinent  literature in this area. In essence, the questionnaire served to inform the following key research questions:    RQ1.  Identify the key IT business challenges facing SMEs  RQ2.  Determine the key IT related areas (Critical Capabilities) for SMEs 

2.3 Operationalization of constructs  Considerable influence was drawn from other frameworks which focus on maximising the value gained from IT  for  the  larger  firm,  namely  the  IT  Capability  Maturity  Framework  (IT‐CMF)  (IVI,  2013).    Further,  key  IT  challenges  were  identified  from  the  literature  (Cisco,  2013,  PWC,  2012.  Rosenberg,  2012,  Protiviti,  2011)  in  order to ensure the SME framework effectively captured and identified the real issues faced by SMEs in the  current  climate.  However,  whilst  considerable  value  was  derived  from  this  review  of  the  literature,  as  aforementioned, the majority of this research focused on the large firm and as such there was a need to refine  the  constructs  to  enhance  their  relevance  and  comprehension  in  the  SME  environment.  This  was  achieved  through employing a pre‐test phase in the research process, where a sample of 20 SME owner/ managers and  a number of senior academic and industry experts helped streamline the final questionnaire. As a result of this  pre‐test process, constructs and the language used were refined to enhance relevance and comprehension in  the  SME  environment.  In  terms  of  the  constructs  themselves,  the  survey  instrument  consisted  of  a  combination  of  open‐ended,  closed  questions  and  5  point  Likert  scales.  The  small  number  of  open  ended  questions  invited  free  comments  where  it  was  not  always  possible  to  predict  the  range  of  responses  to  a  particular question (Frary, 1996). Use of closed questions served to generate and gather information quickly by  the researcher (Boynton and Greenhalgh, 2004). Five point Likert scales were used in the survey instrument  where  an  expression  of  either  a  favourable  or  an  unfavourable  expression  was  required  in  response  to  a  particular  statement  (Blumberg  et  al.,  2008).  The  five  point  scale  was  adopted  as  it  is  purported  that  respondents  have  a  preference  for  numbers  that  can  be  divided  by  ‘five’,  it  facilitates  greater  information  gathering and increased accuracy (Saris and Gallhofer, 2007) with ‘strongly disagree’ associated with number  ‘1’  on  the  scale  and  ‘strongly  agree’  associated  with  number  ‘5’.    Many  SMEs  tend  to  be  controlled  by  the  owner managers in a highly personalised with a greater diversity of owner objectives.  As such the motivation  of the owner manager is increasingly recognised as a key factor in small firm performance (Fillis and Wagner,  2008), they were selected as the main point of contact in this research and were recognised as being in the  best  position  to  comprehensively  answer  questions  relating  to  most  business  issues  (Carson  and  Gilmore,  2000).      

2.4 Quantitative data analysis   The  data  analysis  techniques  employed  in  this  study  were  driven  by  the  nature  of  the  research  questions.  Given  the  exploratory  nature  of  these  questions,  both  univariate  and  bivariate  data  analyses  techniques  through  descriptive  statistics  (Onwuegbuzie  and  Leech,  2005)  proved  to  be  meaningful  and  illuminative.  Analyses  were  conducted  using  the  program  SPSS  for  Windows™  (Version  19).  This  analysis  provides  the 

28


Eileen Doherty et al.  researcher with a deeper insight into the area under investigation and provides a direction for further research  (Cameron and Price, 2009). The key findings are now presented in the Findings and Discussion section below. 

3. Findings and discussion   This section presents the key findings in respect of the earlier outlined research questions (section 2).  

3.1 Profile of SME respondents  The survey provided 134 usable responses. Each respondent organization employs less than 250 people.  More  specifically, in terms of the size of the respondent firms, 29 percent (n=39) are micro firms (1‐9 employees), 28  percent (n=37) are small (10‐49 employees) and 43 percent (n=58) are of medium size with 50‐249 employees  (see Figure 3). 

Figure 3: Respondents by firm (size n+134) In  terms  of  industry  sectors,  the  respondents  are  broken  down  as  follows  (see  figure  4):  the  largest  sector,  represented  by  more  than  half  of  all  respondents  (52  percent,  n=69),  are  those  firms  from  the  Knowledge  Intensive Business Services (KIBS) sector. Included in this category are those industries that rely heavily on the  use  of  professional  knowledge,  for  example,  computing/  IT,  accounting  and  tax  consulting,  marketing,  advertising and legal activities (Muller and Doloreux, 2007). This is followed by a significant number of firms  (27  percent,  n=36)  from  the  service  sector,  which  include  those  firms  from  retail  /  wholesale,  and  the  hospitality  sector.  Finally,  the  minority  of  respondent  firms  are  from  the  manufacturing  sector  (22  percent,  n=29).   

Figure 4: Respondents by sector (n=134)  In  summary,  these  findings  illustrate  that  in  line  with  previous  research  (Micus,  2008)  this  research  is  of  particular  importance  to  SMEs  from  the  KIBS  sector  and  to  those  ′larger‘  SMEs  who  have  in  excess  of  50  employees, as their needs for such a framework may be more pronounced.  

3.2 RQ1

Identify the IT business challenges facing SMEs 

This section presents and examines the key IT business challenges that were identified by respondents. A list of  19  IT  business  challenges  (informed  by  the  literature)  was  presented.  SMEs,  in  general,  display  moderate  agreement  to  the  existence  of  business  challenges  relating  to  IT  (mean=3.06),  the  top  10  challenges  as 

 

29


Eileen Doherty et al.  identified by respondents are outlined below (figure 5). Figure 5 shows the considerable range of agreement  to  the  IT  business  challenges  faced  by  SMEs.  What  is  apparent  from  the  findings  is  the  prominence  of  perceived  IT  business  challenges,  (in  fact  50  percent)  that  relate  to  internal  day‐to‐day  management  and  operational  issues  facing  the  SME.  The  key  challenge  highlighted  is  in  improving  business  processes  (mean  3.39), this is followed by the perception by SMEs that they experience challenges in improving information and  / or knowledge management (mean = 3.26) and in the selection, resourcing and management of IT projects  (mean=2.92),  in  managing  the  ‘tension’  between  encouraging  IT  innovation  and  day‐to‐day  operations  (mean=2.89) and in improving alignment and the relationship between business and IT units (2.84). Further,  SMEs  perceive  additional  challenges  related  to  the  management  of  their  IT  infrastructure.  This  is  evident  through firms indicating that improving IT risk management, data protection and compliance (mean=3.07) are  considered  key  IT  business  challenges  for  them.    Additionally,  they  are  also  concerned  with  the  delivery  of  their IT services and solutions to meet business needs (mean=3.22). These findings show that the primary IT  challenges facing respondent SMEs pertain to operational issues such as dealing with the day‐to‐day running  of their IT within the organization. In addition, findings show that SMEs are challenged in the management of  their IT infrastructure and ensuring that the hardware and software solutions that are in place work as they are  supposed to and indeed support the needs of the IT and business units. In addition, there is also a perception  among SMEs that they are challenged in their IT supporting the strategy of the firm. This is apparent through  the indication by respondents that they perceive themselves to be challenged in improving IT planning to meet  business  needs  (mean=3.14)  and  in  them  improving  IT  business  planning  (mean=2.94).  These  findings  show  how firms appreciate the importance of IT business strategy to their organization but feel they are challenged  in implementing such a strategy. However, whilst this strategy is important to them it is not foremost in the  minds of firms in managing their overall IT capability. Budgeting for their IT is also a concern for SMEs as they  express  a  perceived  challenge  in  their  IT  cost  and  budget  management  processes  (mean=2.98).  However,  it  th must  be  noted  that  this  ranks  6   on  the  top  10  Key  IT  business  challenges  facing  SMEs  and  whilst  it  is  recognised as a key concern it is not foremost in the mind of respondent SMEs. This is not to say that SMEs are  less concerned about budget management ‐  they may, in fact, feel that they have this capability more under  control than, for example, improving business processes. Overall these findings show that firms perceive they  are  most  challenged  in  their  day‐to‐day  IT  operations  and  in  maintaining  their  existing  IT  infrastructure.  Management of their IT strategy is perceived as less important to SMEs in this study. Taking into account the IT  Value Proposition model put forward by (Cooney (2009) (section 1.0), it is evident that in terms of focus on  gaining  maximum  value  from  their  IT,  organizations  need  to  move  to  the  next  level  and  focus  more  on  management  of  their  IT  strategy  in  order  to  maximise  the  business  value  or  return  they  receive  on  their  IT  investment.     

Figure 5: Key IT business challenges 

3.3 RQ2

Determine the key IT areas (critical capabilities) for SMEs  

This section presents and examines the key IT related areas or Critical Capabilities (CCs) that were identified by  respondents.  A  list  of  35  CCs  (adapted  from  the  IT  Capability  Maturity  Framework)  was  presented  to  respondents.  SMEs, in general display moderate agreement with regard to the importance of a number of key  CCs (mean=3.17), these are outlined below (Figure 6). 

30


Eileen Doherty et al. 

T Figure 6: Key IT areas?critical capabilitiesl  The area or Critical Capability (CC) deemed most important to SMEs in this study is Services Provisioning (SRP),  (mean =3.59). This is followed by Strategic Planning (SP) (mean= 3.42), Business Process Management (BPM),  (mean=3.32),  Business  Planning  (BP),  (mean=3.20),  Solutions  Delivery  (SD),  (mean=3.14),  Risk  Management  (RM),  (mean=3.11),  Funding  and  Financing  (FF)  (mean=  3.05),  User  Experience  Design  (UED),  (mean=2.98),  Sourcing (SRC) (mean=2.97), and finally Relationship Asset Management (RAM), (mean= 2.92). These Critical  capabilities identified by respondent SMEs as being most important to them may suggest that they are most  interested  in  improving  their  capabilities  in  aligning  IT  to  business  in  areas  pertaining  to  (in  order  of  importance)  their  operational,  strategic  and  infrastructural  capabilities.  This  finding  corroborates  and  compounds the earlier findings pertaining to the key IT business challenges experienced by the SME.   

3.4 Synthesis of key IT business challenges and key critical capabilities    The  key  IT  Critical  Capabilities  (CCs)  identified  by SMEs  were  then  cross  referenced  with  the  key  IT business  challenges.  Accordingly, a final list of critical capabilities was identified.  See Table 1 below:  Table 1: Description of CCs selected for inclusion in the SME IT‐CMF  SME IT‐CMF Critical  Capability  Service Provisioning  (SRP)  SP (Strategic  Planning)  BPM (Business  Process  Management)  BP (Business  Planning)  SD (Solutions  Delivery)  RM (Risk  Management)  FF (Funding and  Financing)  UED (User Experience  Design)  Sourcing (SRC)  Relationship Asset  Management (RAM) 

Current Definition  The capability to execute IT services to satisify business requirements. Services comprise  a combination of people, processes and technology and are typically defined in a Service  Level Agreement.  The capability of formulating a long term vision and translating it into an actionable  Strategic plan for the IT Organization.  The capability to identify, design, document, monitor, optimize and assist in the  execution of an organization‘s processes by specifying and implementing enabling  policies, methods, metrics, roles and technologies.  The capability to produce an approved document that describes tactical objectives and  operational services to be provided, as well as the financial and non‐financial constraints  that apply to the IT function for the coming planning period.  The capability to specify, design, implement, validate and deploy solutions (both  hardware and software) that effectively address the organization’s IT requirements and  opportunities.  The capability to assess, monitor and manage the exposure to and the potential impact  of IT‐related risks.  The capability to provide a company‐wide understanding of how, why and from where IT  is funded.  The capability to manage the design and evaluation of technology solutions in a way that  supports the needs of the organization and the end user.  The capability to evaluate, select, and integrate providers of IT services according to a  defined strategy and model.  The capability to analyse, plan, and enhance the relationship between the IT  Organization and the Business. 

4. Conclusion / recommendations  This research has shed some light on an area deficient of empirical research by undertaking a study into the  key IT business challenges facing SMEs and IT critical capabilities of most importance to them.  Through this  research, the primary IT critical capabilities of relevance to the SME have been disseminated and will form the  basis  for  the  development  of  an  SME  capability  centric  framework  (SME  IT‐CMF)  designed  to  enhance  the  business value gained from the IT investment of the SME. Findings indicate that this framework is likely to be     

31


Eileen Doherty et al.  of  most  interest  to  firms  within  the  Knowledge  Intensive  Business  Services  (KIBS)  sector  and  to  those  firms  with in excess of 50 employees. The primary IT challenges and capabilities identified by respondents pertain to  the alignment of the IT and business units in management of the day‐to‐day operations of the organization,  with less focus on the strategic aspects of IT. It remains to be seen whether this lack of strategic focus has any  impact  on  the  value  derived  from  their  IT  capability.  This  current  phase  forms  the  initial  groundwork  in  the  development of the SME IT‐CMF framework. The next phase will focus on the development of the existing IT‐ CMF  framework  to  suit  the  SME  context.  Further,  validation  of  this  framework  will  be  achieved  through  employing  an  in‐depth  qualitative  research  approach  which  will  provide  deeper  explanation  and  understanding of the many issues raised and will determine the relevance and validity of the framework for  the  SME  environment.  This  study  will  also  offer  practical  guidelines  to  SMEs  surrounding  the  IT  Critical  Capabilities that require improvement in order to maximise the value they gain from their IT. Further, from a  government perspective this research informs policy makers of the key IT challenges facing SMEs in order to  ensure adequate supports and education progammes are implemented and rolled out and to help to maximise  the return on investment or business value gained by SMEs from their IT.   

References Ballantine, J., Levy, M. And Powell, P. (1998) ‚Evaluating Information Systtems in Small and medium sized enterprises:  issues and evidence‘, European Journal of Information Systems, Vol. 7, No. 4, pp.241‐51.    nd Blumberg, B., Cooper, D.R. and Schindler, P.S. (2008), Business Research Methods, 2  European Edition, McGraw‐Hill  Higher Education, London.  Boston Consulting Group (BCG), (2010), The Big Embrace by Small and Medium Enterprises, in The Connected Kingdom –  How the Internet is Transforming the UK Economy online at http://www.connectedkingdom.co.uk/downloads/bcg‐ the‐connected‐kingdom‐oct‐10.pdf accessed on April 11th 2013.    Boynton, P.M and Greenhalgh, T. (2004), ‘Selecting, designing, and developing your questionnaire’, British Medical  Journal, Vol. 328, pp. 1312‐1315.  Cameron, S. and Price, D. (2009), Business Research Methods: A Practical Approach, Chartered Institute of Personnel and  Development, London.  Carson, D. and Gilmore, A. (2000), ‘Marketing at the interface: Not ‘what’ but ‘how?’, Journal of Marketing Theory and  Practice , Vol. 8, No.2, pp.1.  Cisco (2013) ‘Key Business Challenges’, Online at http://www.cisco.com/en/US/netsol/ns740/index.html  Accessed April 9th 2013.  Cooney, K. (2009) European e‐skills conference Brussels, 20th November. Online at  http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/sectors/ict/files/european_e‐skills_2009conference_report_en.pdf accessed April  15th 2013.  Curley, M. (2004) ‘Managing Information Technology for Business Value’, Intel Press, Oregan, Us.  Curley, M. and Delaney, M. (2010) ‘Winning with ICT, Competing on competency – an IT Capabaility Maturity Approach’,  Innovation Value Institute, Executive Briefing, December, online at  http://ivi.nuim.ie/sites/ivi.nuim.ie/files/publications/IVI%20Exec%20Briefing%20‐ %20Winning%20With%20ICT%20v0%203%20Jan%202011.pdf accessed on April 12 2013.    Devos, J., Van Landeghem, H. and Deschoolmeester, D. (2012) ‘Rethinking IT Governance for SMEs’, Industrial  Management and Data Systems, Vol. 112, No. 2, pp.206‐223.   Doherty, E. (2012), ‘Broadband adoption and diffusion – a study of Irish SMEs’, PhD Thesis, University of Ulster, Coleraine.  European Commission (2005), ‘The New SME Definition, User Guide and Model Declaration’, Enterprise and Industry  Publications, online at http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/policies/sme/files/sme_definition/sme_user_guide_en.pdf  European Commission (2012). Facts and Figures about the EU’s Small and Medium Enterprise. Available at:  nd http://ec.europa.eu/enterprise/policies/sme/facts‐figures‐analysis/ Accessed on 22  June, 2012.   Fillis, I. and Wagner, B. (2005), ‘E‐Business Development: An exploratory investigation of the small firm’, International  Small Business Journal, 23: pp. 604‐634.    Frary, Robert B. (1996), ‘Hints for designing effective questionnaires’, Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation, Vol.  5(3), pp. 1‐6.    Grosso, M. (2006), ‘Determinants of Broadband Penetration in OECD Nations’, Regulatory Development Branch, Australian  Competition and Consumer Commission.   Gronroos, C. (2004) “The relationship marketing process: communication, interaction, dialogue, value”, The Journal of  business and industrial marketing, Vol. 19, No.2, p.99.  Harrigan, P. (2008), ‘Technology innovation in marketing: e‐crm in Irish SMEs’, PhD Thesis, University of Ulster, Coleraine.  Innovation Value Institute (IVI) (2013) ‘IT‐CMF; Why the IT‐CMF meets the needs of IT and Business management’, Online  at  http://ivi.nuim.ie/it‐cmf accessed April 9th 2013.  IT Governance Institute (2007) Cobit Quickstart; 2nd Edition, IT Governance Institute, Rolling Meadows, Il. US.  Iyer, B. and Henderson, J.C. (2010). Preparing for the future: understanding the seven capabilities of cloud computing . MIS  Quarterly Executive. 9 (2), pp 117‐131. 

32


Eileen Doherty et al.  Kotelnikov, V. (2007), ‘Small and Medium Enterprises and ICT’, United Nations Development Program‐Asia Pacific  Development Information Program and Asian and Pacific Training Center for Information and Communication  Technology for Development, Bangkok.  Loebbecke, C., Thomas, B., and Ulrich, T. (2012). “Assessing cloud Readiness at Continental AG”. MIS Quarterly Executive,  11 (1), pp. 11‐23.  Mc Laughlin, S. (2012) ‘Positioning the IT‐CMF: A capability versus process perspective’, Innovation Value Institute,  Executive Briefing, October, online at  http://innovationvalueinstitute.newsweaver.co.uk/files/1/41285/73805/3061355/25cf200bee6073df7dc30b36/IVI% 20Exec%20Briefing%20‐%20Positioning%20IT‐CMF_%20v0.4%20_no%20mark‐ups_.pdf   accessed on April 11th 2013.      Mc Laughlin, S. (2012b) ‘Using IT‐CMF to build Competitive Advantage’, Innovation Value Institute, Executive Briefing,  November, online at http://ivi.nuim.ie/sites/ivi.nuim.ie/files/publications/IVI%20Exec%20Briefing%20‐ %20Competitive%20Advantage%20v0%206%20%20(2).pdf  accessed on April 11th 2013.     Micus (2008), ‘The impact of broadband on growth and productivity’, a study on behalf of the European Commission (DG  Informal Society and Media, online at http://www.micus.de/59a_bb‐final_en.html accessed 22nd April 2013.    Mora‐Monge, C.A., Azadega, A., Gonzalez, M.E. (2010), ‘Assessing the impact of web‐based electronic commerce use on  the organizational benefits of a firm: An empirical study’, Benchmarking: An International Journal, Vol. 17, No. 6, pp.  773‐790.    nd OECD (2008), Broadband and the economy, online at http://www.oecd.org/dataoecd/62/7/40781696.pdf accessed 22   April 2013.  Onwuegbuzie, A.J. and Leech, N.L. (2005), ‘On becoming a pragmatic researcher.  The importance of combining  quantitative and qualitative research methodologies’, International Journal of Social Research Methodology: Theory  and Practice, Vol. 8, pp. 375‐387.  Protiviti, (2012) ‘2012 Top 10 Business Challenges’, Online at www.protiviti.com/2012TopChallenges  th Accessed on April 9  2013.    th PWC (2012) ‘Dealing with Disruption; adapting to survive and thrive’, 16  Annual Global CEO Survey, Country Summary:  key findings in the UK, Online at http://www.pwc.com/gx/en/ceo‐survey/2013/assets/pwc‐16th‐global‐ceo‐ survey_jan‐2013.pdf Accessed April 9th 2013.    Rosenberg, J. M. (2012), ‘Five Key Issues Facing Small Business 2013’, Associated Press, Online at  http://www.nbcnews.com/business/5‐issues‐facing‐small‐businesses‐2013‐1C7660251 accessed on April 9th 2013.    th Saunders, M., Lewis, P. and Thornhill, A., (2007), Research Methods for Business Students, 4  Edition, Pearson Education,  Harlow, England.  Saris, W.E. and Gallhofer, I.N. (2007), Design, Analysis and Evaluation of Questionnaires for Survey Research, New Jersey:  John Wiley and Sons.     Spurge, V. and Roberts, C. (2005), ‘Broadband Technology; An appraisal of government policy and use by small and  medium sized enterprises’, Journal of Property, Investment and Finance, Vol. 23, No. 6, pp. 516‐524.  Street, C. T. and Meister, D. (2004), "Small Business Growth and Internal Transparency: The Role of Information Systems",  MIS Quarterly, (28: 3).  Tan, K., S. Chong, S.C., Lin, B., and Eze, U.C. (2010) ‘Internet based ICT adoption among SMEs: Demographic versus  benefits, barriers, and adoption intention’,  Journal of Enterprise Information Management, Vol. 23 No. 1, 2010 pp.  27‐55.    Xu, M., Rohatgi, R. and Duan, Y. (2007), ‘E‐business adoption in SMEs: some preliminary findings from electronic  components industry’, International Journal of E‐Business Research, Vol. 3 No. 1, pp. 74‐90. 

 

33


Organisational Politics: The Impact on Trust, Information and  Knowledge Management and Organisational Performance  Nina Evans ands Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi  University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia  Nina.Evans@unisa.edu.au  Athar.Qureshi@unisa.edu.au    Abstract: Organisational politics, both on intra– and inter–organisational level breaks down trust and becomes a barrier to  effective  collaboration,  information  sharing  and  knowledge  management.    Literature  agrees  that  organisational  politics  strongly  conflicts  with  the  interests  of  both  employees  and  the  organisation.  Employees  need  to  share,  collaborate  and  learn  in  order  to  further  their  personal  career  development,  whereas  organisations  rely  on  information  sharing  and  knowledge  absorption  to  promote  an  innovative  culture,  enhance  performance  and  achieve  competitive  advantage.  To  enable these positive outcomes, the negative effects of organisational politics have to be eliminated or at least minimised.  In this paper we investigate the impact of organisational politics on trust, information‐ and knowledge sharing. A number  of propositions are developed, suggesting that organisations adopt a trust‐based approach to curb the negative effects and  promote  a  culture  of  information  sharing  and  knowledge  absorption  towards  enhanced  innovation,  improved  organisational  performance  and  sustainable  competitive  advantage.  The  paper  includes  findings  from  a  reverse  brainstorming  session  with  information  and  knowledge  management  practitioners  and  consultants,  as  well  as  an  online  discussion  with  knowledge  management  experts.  Furthermore,  exploratory  case  studies  with  semi‐structured  interviews  are  currently  conducted  in  the  Healthcare  industry  of  Australia.  The  initial  data  collected  support  the  propositions  and  indicate the need for such a trust‐based approach in these organisations.    Keywords: organisational politics, information management, knowledge management, trust, innovation, performance 

1. Introduction Organisations have evolved from an era of production to an economy based on information and knowledge  work  where  they  increasingly  base  their  success  on  effectively  using  information  and  exploiting  corporate  knowledge. Knowledge management literature refers to a “vast treasure house of knowledge, knowhow and  best  practices”  that  lies  “unknown  and  untapped”  in  organisations.  The  ability  to  collaborate  and  share  information and knowledge productively is critical for organisations (O’Dell & Grayson 1998, p.154).  Marshall  and Brady (2001, p.176)  refer to collaboration as the “cornerstone for the creation and enhancement of the  21st century workplace”.    A  large  number  of  organisations  are  embracing  the  idea  that  they  could  become  more  productive  and  innovative by improving the management of their information assets (Evans & Price 2012). It is suggested that  knowledge  is  a  significant  source  of  added  value  that  contributes  to  competitive  advantage  if  it  can  be  “leveraged  and  shared  across  interpersonal  or  digital  networks”  (O’Dell  &  Grayson  1998,  p.154).  Knowledge  Management literature refers to the ability to leverage and share the knowledge as the ‘Absorptive Capacity’  of an organisation, which can be broken down to the ability of organisations to acquire and assimilate external  knowledge  and  to  transform  and  exploit  the  knowledge  within  the  organisation,  by  incorporating  it  into  its  day‐to‐day routines and processes (Cohen & Levinthal 1990).    Individual employees are also facing a significant shift in their personal and professional lives— a transition to  the “culture of collaboration” (Rosen 2007). This shift is  changing work styles, relationships and work habits  and individuals with the ability to collaborate and share information and knowledge with others effectively will  be  the  ones  to  succeed. Many collaboration  initiatives  fail  to  deliver  the  value  expected because  individuals  often resist collaborating and sharing information and knowledge. This could be because they do not see the  advantage for themselves, they do not have the same objectives, because they believe the cost and time will  outweigh the benefits, they might have had bad prior experiences, they do not trust collaborators, or because  their  corporate  culture  does  not  reward  the  sharing  of  ideas,  experiences,  or  perspectives.  Furthermore,  different departments or disciplines may have different viewpoints, people have hidden agendas, some people  play  the  power  game,  personality  conflicts  can  occur,  people  attack  each  other  in  person  and  some  people  dominate discussions.   

34


Nina Evans ands Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi  Although  the  social  character  of  knowledge  is  increasingly  recognised  (Jashapara  2011;  Marshall  &  Brady  2001), there is a gap in the literature that investigates the impact of organisational politics on trust, knowledge  management and therefore organisational performance. BenMoussa (2010) states that failure to account for  the  ‘hindering  effect’  of  organisational  politics  is  an  impediment  to  knowledge  management.  Another  impediment that can limit information management and knowledge sharing practices is the lack of managerial  leadership. The challenge to managers is to create an environment in which people both want to share what  they  know.  Managers  should  also  lead  by  example  when  it  comes  to  managing  information  effectively  and  engaging in knowledge management activities.    This paper examines literature pertaining to organisational politics and its impact on trust, information sharing,  knowledge  transfer  and  ‐absorption  in  organisations.  The  importance  of  collaboration  behaviour  and  knowledge  sharing  in  organisations  is  also  explored.  We  build  on  our  previous  work  where  trust  has  been  described as a cornerstone of information and knowledge sharing, ‐transfer and ‐absorption that can enhance  innovation,  organisational  performance  and  competitive  advantage  (Qureshi  &  Evans  2013a,  2013b).  Furthermore,  we  refer  to  the  barriers  to  collaboration  and  knowledge  management  efforts,  relating  to  organisational political behaviour. These barriers were identified in a reverse brainstorming session with more  than  fifty  Knowledge  Management  practitioners  (Evans  2012).  A  number  of  management  interventions  are  suggested  to  curb  the  negative  impact  of  organisational  politics  on  knowledge  management  and  therefore  organisational performance. The aim is to guide management in creating a trust‐based environment in which  collaboration, sharing and transfer of information and knowledge thrive to the benefit of the organisation. 

2. Literature review  2.1 Organisational politics  Organisational politics refers to behaviours that maximise self‐interest and conflict with the goals and interests  of  others.  (Gove  2011,  p.18)  refers  to  such  politics  as  a  “sinister  web”  and  “the  foe,  which  lurks  below  the  surface of most workplaces”. Gove adds that such ‘political games’ can destroy employee morale and waste an  organisation’s time and resources, thereby impacting negatively on productivity and performance.    Various  tactics  are  used  in  playing  the  organisational  politics  game  in  the  workplace  These  tactics  include  attacking or blaming others, using information as a political tool (‘currency’), controlling information channels,   maintaining  alliances  with  powerful  and  influential  people,  creating  obligations  (‘collecting  IOUs’)  and  using  external consultants to support their views (Jashapara 2011; Kreitner, Kinicki & Buelens 2002; McShane & Von  Glinow  2000).  Workplace  politics  often  take  subtle  forms  of  malicious  gossip,  rumours,  or  criticism  through  which  the  office  politician  controls  the  flow  of  information.    For  example,  office  politicians  may  spread  information  that  discredits  and  damages  the  reputation  of  a  colleague  whom  they  perceive  as  threats  to  success, or they   might   exploit the weaknesses of others to make them appear less competent (Gove 2011).  Ivancevich and Matteson (2002) refer to this as ‘ingratiating tactics’.    At its worst, office politics manifest as outright manipulation and sabotage for the sake of an individual’s own  upward mobility, power, or success. Instead of honest, professional relationships, office politicians often build  relationships  through  dishonesty  and  deception  (Gove  2011).  Organisational  politics  can  also  manifest  in  behaviours such as ‘workplace bullying’ described as “the repeated and persistent negative behaviour, which  involves a power imbalance and creates a hostile work environment” (Salin 2005, p.1). Work‐related bullying  may also include withholding information, exclusion and isolation.    Another  form  of  information  related  politics  is  ‘deception’,  which  is  defined  as  ‘‘a  message  knowingly  transmitted by a sender to foster a false belief or conclusion by the receiver’’. This manifests itself in spreading  of  rumours  or  making  false  allegations  (Connelly,  Zweig,  Webster  et  al  2012;  Salin  2005).  This  behaviour  is  referred  to  as ‘knowledge hiding’  (Connelly,  Zweig, Webster  et  al  2012).  Knowledge hiding  is  not  simply  the  absence of knowledge sharing; it is the intentional attempt to withhold or conceal knowledge that has been  requested by another individual.    In  terms  of  personal  characteristics,  effective  ‘politicians’  are  often  articulate,  sensitive,  socially  adept,  competent,  popular,  extroverted,  self‐confident,  aggressive,  ambitious,  devious,  highly  intelligent  and  logical  (Ivancevich & Matteson 2002). McShane and Von Glinow (2000) add that they have a strong need for personal 

35


Nina Evans ands Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi    power, an internal locus of control and strong Machiavellian values, i.e. they seldom trust co‐workers and use  power  to  manipulate  others.  Ivancevich  and  Matteson  (2002)  refer  to  them  as  ‘organisation  people’.  Employees play political games regardless of their education, intelligence, or position of authority. Intelligent,  confident people who will do anything to climb the promotional ladder often adopt such tactics. On the other  hand, those who perceive themselves as less competent may also resort to political games to compensate for  their shortcomings (Gove 2011).    Organisational  political  behaviour  is  triggered  by  uncertainty  (Kreitner,  Kinicki  &  Buelens  2002)  and  thrives  when  objectives  are  unclear,  performance  criteria  and  measures  are  ambiguous  or  vague,  goals  are  inconsistent,  rewards  are  uncertain,  resources  are  scarce,  workflows  are  interdependent  and  decision  processes are ill‐defined. Political behaviour is exacerbated by‐ and in turn also leads to lack of trust among  organisational  members.  This  is  mainly  a  result  of  inadequate  communication,  authoritarian  personalities  or  organisational participants that are highly competitive on individual and group level (Cook & Hunsaker 2001;  Kreitner, Kinicki & Buelens 2002). 

2.2 Trust Trust  is  considered  as  an  important  determinant  for  successful  interpersonal  relationships.  Literature  uses  a  number  of  terms  that  directly  or  indirectly refer  to  trust,  such  as  cooperation,  confidence  and  predictability  (Mayer,  Davis  &  Schoorman  1995),  reliability,  competence,  benevolence,  integrity  and  honesty  (Kocoglu,  Imamoglu & Ince 2011).  Sitkin, Rousseau, Burt et al (1998) are of the opinion that trust is not a behaviour (e.g.  cooperation) or a choice (e.g. taking a risk) but an “underlying psychological condition that can cause or result  from  such  actions”.  Mayer,  Davis  and  Schoorman  (1995)  defined  trust  as  “the  willingness  of  a  party  to  be  vulnerable to the actions of another party based on the expectation that the other will perform a particular  action  important  to  the  trustor,  irrespective  of  the  ability  to  monitor  or  control  that  other  party”,  i.e.  the  willingness  to  take  risk.  Rosanas  (2009)  agrees  that  organisational‐trust  is  “the  relationship  between  two  people where one takes an action making him vulnerable to the other”.    The  three  antecedents  of  trust,  as  identified  by  Mayer,  Davis  and  Schoorman  (1995),  are  widely  accepted.  These  antecedents  are  ability  (essential  skills,  competencies,  traits  and  characteristics),  benevolence  (the  degree or level to which the first person believes the second person wants to do good to the first person) and  integrity (a judgement whether or not the second person will adhere to acceptable principles).  On the other  hand, distrust is often defined as “a lack of confidence in the other, a concern that the other may act so as to  harm  one,  and  that  the  other  does  not  care  about  one’s  welfare,  intends  to  act  harmfully,  or  is  hostile”  (Jashapara 2011).    There  is  a  substantial  body of  research  showing  that  trust  predicts  risk  taking,  task  performance,  citizenship  behaviours and, more important for this paper, information and knowledge sharing, ‐transfer and ‐absorption  (Qureshi & Evans 2013a, 2013b) in organisations. 

2.3 Information and knowledge sharing, ‐transfer and ‐absorption  Firms came into being in order to enable human beings to achieve collaboratively what they could not achieve  alone.  Early  research  focused  on  organisation  level  knowledge  embedded  in  routines.  Recently  research  increasingly  stresses  the  role  of  individual‐level  knowledge  and  the  importance  of  knowledge  sharing  and  transfer between teams and organisational units. There is growing acknowledgement that employees must be  motivated to share their knowledge with others (Connelly, Zweig, Webster et al 2012). As knowledge resides  with the knower and not some hardware or software; knowledge must flow among knowers (Friesl, Sackmann  & Kremser 2011).    Cohen  and  Levinthal  (1990)  and  Zahra  and  George  (2002)  have  focused  on  the  firm’s  ‘absorptive  capacity’,  referring to the capability to search, acquire and assimilate knowledge from external sources and absorbing it  into the internal processes and routines. Absorptive capabilities have four dimension, namely acquisition (the  capability  to  identify  and  acquire  externally  produced  knowledge),  assimilation  (the  examination,  interpretation and understanding of the information), transformation (the capability to develop and refine the  routines  that  facilitate  combination  processes)  and  exploitation  (routines  that  allow  firms  to  refine,  extend,  and leverage existing knowledge by incorporating it into to its operations (Guzman & Wilson 2005). 

36


Nina Evans ands Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi  Knowledge sharing may occur through formal collaboration or informal everyday interaction and Riege (2005)  comments  that  the  challenge  lies  with  the  willingness  of  an  employee  to  ‘donate’  knowledge.  Riege  (2005)  adds that failure factors for knowledge sharing can be classified into personal (e.g. job security, loss of power,  perceived image), group (e.g. politics, lack of trust) and organisational levels (e.g. management commitment,  lack of recognition). Over the last years, research tried to shed light on the antecedents of knowledge sharing  and Friesl, Sackmann and Kremser (2011) suggest that perceived trust positively influences knowledge sharing.    Despite  the  growing  number  of  studies  in  the  area  of  knowledge  sharing  and  related  information  systems,  organisations  still  experience  various  difficulties  in  deploying  effective  information  and  knowledge  sharing  strategies  among  their  organisational  units.  These  difficulties  are  often  social  problems  relating  to  organisational culture and organisational power (Cook & Hunsaker 2001). The main problems associated with  knowledge sharing and transfer is therefore related to the complexity of the social processes that occur during  the transfer process and the low trust level that might exist among sending and receiving organisational units.  Its  realisation  depends  mainly  on  people  who  interpret,  organise,  plan,  develop  and  execute  and  use  the  knowledge (Guzman & Wilson 2005). 

2.4 The impact of organisational politics on trust and collaboration  Organisational  political  behaviour  is  an  important  impediment  to  information  and  knowledge  sharing  which  has  a  negative  impact  on  collaboration  in  organisations.  In  a  reverse  brainstorming  session  with  a  group  of  more  than  fifty  knowledge  management  practitioners  and  consultants  (Evans  2012)  various  organisational  political  behaviours  were  suggested  as  reason  for  a  lack  of  collaboration  and  knowledge  sharing  in  organisations.  Participants commented that organisations that ‘foster back‐stabbing’, ‘suspicion’, and ‘break  confidentiality’, that allow people to ‘criticise ideas’ and ‘play the blame game’, ‘respect the loudest opinions’,  where ‘saboteurs’, ‘nosey‐’ and ‘ego‐driven’ people are tolerated, will have a hard time encouraging staff to  collaborate  with  each  other  and  share  knowledge.  Table  1  summarises  the  inhibitors  to  collaboration  and  knowledge sharing that relate to organisational politics:  Table 1: Organisational political behaviour restricting collaboration and knowledge flow    Criticise ideas  Playing blame game  Rewarding lone rangers  Create competition  No guidelines  Foster back‐stabbing  Leadership imbalance  Identify who’s at fault and publicly  ridicule them  Ego‐driven people  Allow saboteurs  Too much authority  Ignore opinions  Nosey people 

Getting personal  Being offensive  Don’t listen  Criticise people  Not letting everyone talk  Only accept excellent input  Public ridicule for questioners  Respect loudest opinion  Publish bad ideas  Misinformation  Over‐competitive people (type‐A)  Culture clash  Personality clash 

What’s in it for me?  I don’t like/trust them  Distribute negative stories  Corporate Ninjas  “I’m always right”  Bad mouthing  Breaking confidentiality  Lack of courtesy  Lack of communications  Suspicion  Centralised power  Create mistrust  No goals 

An online  (Linked‐In)  discussion  was  also  conducted  with  six  knowledge  management  practitioners  (cited  as  Participant1‐Participant6) on the topic of organisational politics and its impact on knowledge management and  organisational performance. The comments that were made are in line with the literature and findings from  the reverse brainstorming session.    P1 referred to three specific dimensions that are likely to be impacted by “corrosive organisational politics”, as  mentioned by Robert E. Quinn in 1999 in his book Pressing Problems in Modern organisations (That Keep Us  Up  at  Night).  These  dimensions  are  i)  dynamic  capabilities,  ii)  collaborative  potential  and  iii)  employee  contract.  In  this  paper  we  are  especially  interested  in  the  second  aspect,  namely  collaborative  potential.  P1  added that all of these dimensions are critical to knowledge management and referred to trust as “a linchpin in  all three dimensions”. Trust is therefore also a foundational part of Knowledge Management. According to P1  trust  is  the  biggest  causality  of  organisational  politics  and  knowledge‐sharing  intentions  and  behaviour  very  much  depends  on  a  sense  of  trust.  P3  is  of  the  opinion  that  “trust  must  come  first  and  that  it  is  slow  and  difficult  to  develop  and  easy  to  lose.  He  added  that  without  trust  one  must  use  an  adversarial  approach  to 

37


Nina Evans ands Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi    interacting with others such as negotiating agreements and commented that this is unlikely to lead to synergy  and emergent knowledge”. P6 commented that culture is definitely one of the most important strategic pillars  of  KM,  while  P5  added  that  “it  is  very  difficult  to  shift  a  non‐trusting  culture  to  a  more  genuine  reciprocal  culture”.    In  the  online  discussion  P2  commented  that  organisational  politics  badly  damages  KMs  effectiveness,  “as  it  results from competitive behaviour amongst business units, which also reduces the value of KM efforts” (P2).  Non‐rational dynamics factor into how people behave in organisations, particularly regarding knowledge and  knowledge  programmes  (P1).  For  instance,  organisational  politics  could  also  stem  from  the  fact  that  people  don’t have a job for life and their personal success is not linked to their company anymore (P2). P2 added that  “if people think their jobs might be at risk they don’t share if they believed it makes them more valuable to the  organisation”. P3 agreed that “organisational politics is right next to culture in trumping KM” and added that  trust is an individual attitude. “You can’t see it or measure it, but it is a key determinant of external behaviour  that you can see and measure. So trust is one of the attitudes that must be in place for KM to flourish”.    The  role  of  management  in  curbing  the  effect  of  political  behaviour  should  not  be  underestimated.  P2  commented that “people do share knowledge informally – that is knowledge sharing. Knowledge management  is when knowledge is shared because of effective management action. That does depend on trust” (P2). 

2.5 Curbing organisational politics: Management recommendations  The  more  energy  is  spent  on  politics,  the less  energy  and  time  people  have  to  do  real  work.    Unfortunately  organisational  political  behaviour  is  part  of  every  organisation  (Riege  2005)  and  the  main  focus  should  therefore be on how to foster collaboration within the company. In order for Knowledge Management to be  successful, an open culture where each individual shares his knowledge without restrictions and fear has to be  promoted. People often do share their knowledge but they do so through informal means. The challenge of  Information and Knowledge Management is to tap into those informal knowledge flows.    Although  organisational  politics  cannot  be  eliminated,  political  manoeuvring  should  be  managed  (Kreitner,  Kinicki  &  Buelens  2002).  Managers  who  wish  to  curtail  the  incidence  and  impact  of  damaging  political  behaviours should attempt to increase employees’ perceptions of the trustworthiness of their colleagues, by  emphasising a shared identity, or by highlighting instances where trustworthiness has been demonstrated. It  would  also  be  important  to  avoid  providing  incentives  for  employees  to  ‘betray’  their  co‐workers.    Further,  managers  can  endeavour  to  change  their  organisation’s  knowledge  sharing  climate  by  demonstrating  managerial support for knowledge sharing, and by increasing employees’ opportunities for social interactions  (Connelly,  Zweig, Webster  et  al  2012).  Further  to  this,  managers  should  ensure a  sufficient  supply of  critical  resources,  establish  a  free  flow  of  information  so  the  organisation  is  less  dependent  on  a  few  people,  use  effective organisational change management practices ‐ such as communication and involvement ‐ to minimise  uncertainty  during  change.  They  should  also  restructure  team  and  organisational  norms  to  reject  political  tactics that appear to interfere with the organisation’s goals. Employees can also monitor the workplace and  actively discourage co‐workers who engage in political tactics (McShane & Von Glinow 2000).    Leadership  ultimately  determines  the  culture  of  an  organisation  and  collaboration  and  knowledge  sharing  should  therefore  be  entrenched  in  the  culture  from  top  down.  Managers  should  act  as  champions,  share  a  clear vision, be committed and lead by example. From the research the following propositions are formulated:  Proposition 1: 

Organisational politics occurs in all organisations. 

Proposition 2: 

Organisational political behaviour breaks down trust in relationships. 

Proposition 3: 

Trust is a cornerstone of knowledge sharing, ‐transfer and ‐absorption. 

Proposition 4: 

Organisational politics limits knowledge sharing, ‐transfer. 

Proposition 5:  capacity. 

Decreased knowledge  sharing  and  transfer  leads  to  decreased  absorptive 

Proposition 6:  performance. 

Decreased knowledge  absorption  leads  to  decreased  organisational 

38


Nina Evans ands Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi  Proposition 7:  Managers  need  to  curb  the  negative  impact  of  organisational  politics  by  implementing a trust‐based knowledge management approach. 

3. Conclusion Political  behaviour,  namely  the  intentional  acts  of  influence  to  enhance  or  protect  the  self‐interest  of  individuals or groups (Kreitner, Kinicki & Buelens 2002) and attempts to influence others using discretionary  behaviours  and  promote  personal  objectives  (McShane  &  Von  Glinow  2000)  exists  in  every  organisation  (Ivancevich & Matteson 2002). Political behaviours in organisations can lead to distortion and suppression of  information. Major organisational changes lead to political behaviour where people do not respond to rational  argument, but more to egotistical motives such as personal security and career advancement. As change and  learning is people‐dependent, power and politics play an important role and it can lead to managers making  decisions based on irrational grounds (Jashapara 2011).    Many political tactics reduce trust and the motivation to collaborate. When people operate in a tense political  environment  they  have  difficulty  relating  to  other  employees.  This  undermines  the  conditions  for  active  knowledge  sharing  (McShane  &  Von  Glinow  2000).  Employees  may  engage  in  knowledge  hiding  in  order  to  protect their own interests or they may hide knowledge to undermine or retaliate against another employee  (Connelly, Zweig, Webster et al 2012). The mechanisms that were identified by Guzman and Wilson (2005) as  crucial for effective knowledge management are to i) install a vision of knowledge and to ii) manage politics, in  order to minimise fear and trust barriers.    Sharing  across  the  boundaries  of  the  organisation  enhances  know‐what  and  know‐how  and  by  sharing  information  and  data,  companies  can  promote  innovation  and  collaboration.  Policies  that  restrict  access  to  information  and  knowledge  can  foster  a  culture  that  rewards  secrecy  and  internal  competition.  In  such  cultures, information hoarders thrive. A collaborative and sharing culture is promoted if people are allowed to  positively  challenge  other’s  ideas,  clear  and  simple  rules  exist,  collaboration  and  knowledge  sharing  is  not  enforced,  shared  group  objectives  are  created  and  group  achievement  rewarded.  Effective  knowledge  information  and  management  also  requires  feedback  mechanisms  in  an  environment  where  people  are  encouraged  to  listen,  openness  is  promoted,  there  is  transparency  in  communications,  decision  making  is  encouraged,  mixed  discipline  program  teams  are  used  and  people  are  free  to  act  and  be  heard.  A  general  characteristic of such a collaborative workplace is a high level of reciprocal trust (Evans & Price 2012). 

References BenMoussa, C. (2010) "Investigating Barriers to Knowledge Management Success: A Conceptual Model and a Comparative  Case Analysis", Journal of Information & Knowledge Management, vol. 9, no. 04, pp. 303‐318.  Cohen, W. M. and Levinthal, D. A. (1990) "Absorptive Capacity: A New Perspective on Learning and Innovation",  Administrative Science Quarterly, vol. 35, no. 1, pp. 128‐152.  Connelly, C. E., Zweig, D., Webster, J. and Trougakos, J. P. (2012) "Knowledge Hiding in Organizations", Journal of  Organizational Behavior, vol. 33, no. 1, pp. 64‐88.  Cook, C. W. and Hunsaker, P. L. (2001) Management and Organizational Behaviour, 3rd edn, McGraw‐Hill, New York.  Evans, N. (2012) "Destroying Collaboration and Knowledge Sharing in the Workplace: A Reverse Brainstorming Approach",  Knowledge Management Research & Practice, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 175‐187.  Evans, N. and Price, J. (2012) "Barriers to the Effective Deployment of Information Assets: An Executive Management  Perspective", Interdisciplinary Journal of Information, Knowledge, and Management, vol. 7, pp. 177‐199.  Friesl, M., Sackmann, S. A. and Kremser, S. (2011) "Knowledge Sharing in New Organizational Entities: The Impact of  Hierarchy, Organizational Context, Micro‐Politics and Suspicion", Cross Cultural Management: An International  Journal, vol. 18, no. 1, pp. 71‐86.  Gove, T. G. (2011) "Strategies for Curbing Organizational Politics", Journal of Knowledge Management, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 59‐ 74.  Guzman, G. A. and Wilson, J. (2005) "The “Soft” Dimension of Organizational Knowledge Transfer", Journal of Knowledge  Management, vol. 9, no. 2, pp. 59‐74.  Ivancevich, J. M. and Matteson, M. T. (2002) Organizational Behaviour and Management, 6th edn, McGraw‐Hill, New York.  Jashapara, A. (2011) Knowledge Management : An Integrated Approach, 2nd edn, Pearson/Financial Times/Prentice Hall,  New York.  Kocoglu, I., Imamoglu, S. Z. and Ince, H. (2011) "Inter‐Organizational Relationships in Enhancing Information Sharing: The  Role of Trust and Commitment", The Business Review, Cambridge, vol. 18, no. 2, pp. 115‐123.  Kreitner, R., Kinicki, A. and Buelens, M. (2002) Organizational Behavior, 2nd edn, McGraw‐Hill, New York.  Marshall, N. and Brady, T. (2001) "Knowledge Management and the Politics of Knowledge: Illustrations from Complex  Products and Systems", European Journal of Information Systems, vol. 10, no. 2, pp. 99‐112. 

39


Nina Evans ands Athar Mahmood Ahmed Qureshi    Mayer, R. C., Davis, J. H. and Schoorman, F. D. (1995) "An Integrative Model of Organizational Trust", The Academy of  Management Review, vol. 20, no. 3, pp. 709‐734.  McShane, S. L. and Von Glinow, M. A. (2000) Organizational Behaviour, Irwin McGraw‐Hill, New York.  O’Dell, C. and Grayson, C. J. (1998) "If Only We Knew What We Know", California management review, vol. 40, no. 3, pp.  154‐174.  Quinn, R.E., O'Neill, R.M. & St. Clair, L. (2000) Pressing Problems in Modern Organizations (That Keep Us Up at Night):  Transforming Agendas for Research and Practice. AMACOM, New York.  Qureshi, A. M. A. and Evans, N. (2013a) "Adopting a Trust‐Based Framework to Generate Social Capital: Espousing Social  Learning and Social Capital for Enhanced Innovation, Improved Performance and Competitive Advantage", 5th  European Conference on Intellectual Capital, University of the Basque Country, Bilbao, Spain, 11‐12 April 2013, pp.  548‐556.  Qureshi, A. M. A. and Evans, N. (2013b) "A Trust‐Based Framework for Enhanced Absorptive Capacity: Improving  Performance, Innovation and Competitive Advantage", International Conference on Innovation and Entrepreneurship,  Amman, Jordan, 4‐5 March 2013, pp. 172‐179.  Riege, A. (2005) "Three‐Dozen Knowledge‐Sharing Barriers Managers Must Consider", Journal of Knowledge Management,  vol. 9, no. 3, pp. 18‐35.  Rosanas, J. M. (2009) "Una Cuestio´N De Principios", IESE Insight, pp. 13‐19.  Rosen, E. (2007) The Culture of Collaboration, Red Ape Publishing, San Francisco.  Salin, D. (2005) "Workplace Bullying among Business Professionals: Prevalence, Gender Differences and the Role of  Organizational Politics", Perspectives interdisciplinaires sur le travail et la santé, vol. 7, no. 3.  Sitkin, S., Rousseau, D. M., Burt, R. and Camerer, C. (1998) "Trust in and between Organizations", The Academy of  Management Review, pp. 393‐404.  Zahra, S. A. and George, G. (2002) "Absorptive Capacity: A Review, Reconceptualization, and Extension", The Academy of  Management Review, vol. 27, no. 2, pp. 185‐203.   

40


Opportunities and Risks of the use of Social Media in Healthcare  Organizations   Ginevra Gravili  University of Salento, Economic Department, Ecotekne, Lecce, Italy  ginevra.gravili@unisalento.it    Abstract:  The  process  of  interaction  between  individuals,  through  the  use  of  social  media,  is  one  of  the  most  complex  problems  that  theorists  have  had  to  analyse  in  recent  years  (Richards,  2007;  Kolbitsch  and  Maurer,  2006;  Kaplan  and  Haenlein, 2010; ecc.). Social media tools are becoming important in healthcare, transforming it in the process. Today many  organizations, in the health sector, are facing a challenge: they must either choose to allow their operators to use this new  method of communication with patients and their families or forbid it. The rapid changes that the diffusion of social media  has had in the communication processes would undoubtedly impose a drastic change: the use of social media allows an  instant  sharing  of  ideas,  opinions,  knowledge  and  experiences,  creating  a  new  “space‐time”  dimension  that  would  be  translated in a new way (additional) to "cure" the patient (Hawn, 2009). Although there are many benefits and promises  from social media, several risks are associated with their use. The ambiguity related to legal and ethical issues (for example  the  patient’s  privacy)  of  social  media  at  the  same  time  contains  the  enthusiasm  related  to  the  potentialities  that  social  media offer. In this paper we are going to analyse the risks and benefits of social media perceived in healthcare. Through  an empirical study conducted on a sample of Italian physicians and patients we are going analyse some items (measured  with Likert’s  technique) that will allow us to define an "utility function"  to measure and compare what they perceive as  beneficial  and  what  they  perceive  as  a  limit.  This  work  can  be  useful  for  managers  of  healthcare  organizations  to  understand  that,  if  the  perception  of  the  presence  of  Health  organizations  on  social  media  by  doctors  and  patients  is  positive, the challenge is due and it must not only be organizational but, above all, cultural (Normann, 1996).    Keywords: social media, healthcare, Information technology, Facebook in health organizations 

1. Introduction Social  media  is  changing  the  nature  and  speed  of  healthcare  interaction  between  patients  and  health  organizations.  The  first  step  of  this  change  began  some  years  ago,  when  patients  gained  access  to  medical  information online as well as self‐diagnosis. Now the use of social media has allowed for a vast array of users  to  exit  from  the  condition  of  passive  recipients  of  information  to  arrive  at  the  opportunity  of  making  comments  and  working  to  change  information,  "creating  a  more  distributed  form  of  authority  in  which  the  boundaries  between  the  creator  of  the  site  and  visitors  are  blurred"  (Oberhelman,  2007).  The  processes  of  change  taking  place  require  renovating  and  redesigning  healthcare  organizations  who  now  find  themselves  having  to  decide  whether  to  change  the  traditional  organizational  systems,  characterized  by  strict  and  rigid  sequences of information, to becoming new organizations that are able to recombine the global needs with  local, developing intelligence simultaneously characterized by the ability of processing more information at the  same  time  not  without  creating  a  sequence,  a  hierarchy,  and  a  precise  order.  They  have  to  develop  new  partnerships between physicians, hospitals and patients to coordinate and deliver efficient care, expanding the  boundaries of the site of care and going outside the hospital and the clinic, setting and moving towards the  patient’s home. New technologies are certainly playing an important role and will be decisive for the transition  from a  “clinical‐centered” towards a “patient‐centric” approach. Effective, patient‐centered communication is  the key to quality care, because it allows individual patient preferences to be respected and responded to as  well as  evaluated, to have information and education, access to care; emotional support to relieve fear and  anxiety;  involvement  of  family  and  friends;  continuity  and  secure  transition  between  healthcare  settings;  physical comfort and coordination care (Pikert Institute Research, 2008). It is a means to avoid errors, improve  quality, save money and achieve better health outcomes.    In  this  scenario,  hospitals  have  to  develop  effective  communication  processes,  fostering  clinici‐patient  relationships,  implementing  and  exchanging  information;  responding  to  patients'  emotions;  managing  uncertainty; making decisions; and enabling patient self‐management. Our study pays more attention on how  social  networks  (Facebook  in  particular)  represent  a  useful  communication  instrument  so  that  the  health  organizations may be more and more orientated towards the patient. In this phase, physicians’ attitudes can  decide  to  either  favor  or  not  the  achievement  of  such  objectives,  imposing  a  major  challenge  on  hospitals  pursuing a patient‐centric model.  Today hospitals and health systems should assess their capabilities of using  social  networks  for  patient  education,  to  develop  team‐building  capabilities,  to  create  strong  relationships  with physicians. 

41


Ginevra Gravili  It's important to note, however, that to be a “social hospital”  (that is hospitals in which social networks are  used), it isn't sufficient to have a page on social media channels but it's necessary to implement a new thriving  and  self‐sustaining  online  system  that  includes  patient‐centric  information  architecture,  direct  access  to  the  hospital’s information systems, and an integrated social support layer, through the use of social media. In this  perspective many organizations are challenged: allowing an instant sharing of ideas, opinions, knowledge and  experiences, creating a new “space‐time” dimension that , that would be translated in a new way (additional)  to "cure" the patient (Hawn, 2009).     Although there are many benefits and promises from social media, several risks are associated with their use.  The ambiguity related to legal and ethical issues (for example the patient’s privacy) of social media at the same  time contains the enthusiasm related to the potentialities that social media offer. 

2. Social media and healthcare: opportunity and risks  The  medical  world  is  experiencing  a  period  of  evolution  of  particular  relevance.  A  recent  survey  of  “Pew  Research Center” has shown that the social media are second only to one's physician in health matters, and  they are often utilized as a first resource for medical information. Today “if healthcare organizations want to  regain control of their own names, they need to get in the mix and use social media to establish themselves as  transparent by authentically engaging patient. The linger they wait, the deeper the hole gets that they’re going  to have to climb out of” (Haverhale, 2010). It’s the time to rethink the healthcare organizations across all levels  promoting  a  culture  of  clear  communication  using  social  media.  In  this  way,  communication  becomes  a  strategy  which  is  used  in  all  healthcare  organizations:  physician‐patient,  physician‐physician  and  physician‐ manager relationships.     There are several benefits in the use of social media.    The use of social media as a communication tool enables healthcare organizations to interact with the patient  and the doctor of the structure, building relationships which are more transparent and faster, they facilitate  communication, and the sharing and processing of information. Sending targeted messages, communication is  realized in a cost‐effective, fast and above all clear way. In this way, the relationship management‐doctor and  patient‐physician  focuses  on  the  real  needs  of  the  users.  Patients,  for  example,  are  able  to  get  detailed  information even before knowing the doctor and the structure. On the other hand, the doctor, for example,  can know and share the decisions that the health facility is facing in terms of managerial handling and that will  have  an  implication  on  the  entire  organizational  structure.  All  this  translates  into  saving  time  for  the  healthcare  organization  (consider,  for  example,  the  long  queues  at  the  offices  of  primary  care)  and  money  (think of investments that a company must make to motivate its employees), so too in terms of competitive  advantage. The benefit you get is very high. In fact, the messages, perceived as authentic, that is, with a high  level of credibility are low cost so organizations can increase the number of messages to be sent. Thanks to the  simple registration as "fan" to the Page of the healthcare organization you will be informed on the flow of the  activities of each member, which are visible to friends on its network. This mechanism, therefore, encourages  word of mouth and the distribution of content published on the page. Patients, who recognize that in reality  there  is  a  place  where  healthcare  is  professional,  where  the  atmosphere  and  relationships  are  good,  where  they are at the center of medical care, will speak positively of the organization. Today, the healthcare company  is  not  just  the  curriculum  of  those  who  work  there,  but  also  the  surrounding  services  that  can  make  the  patient's stay more or less pleasant. The healthcare company administrator of the page has nothing else to do  rather than encouraging quality content that can entertain and trigger off discussions on the social web (buzz  marketing).  The  benefit  will  be  twofold:  first,  it  will  directly  improve  the  visibility  and  image  of  the  health  organization and the perception of the service offered, secondly, it will indirectly improve the prevention of  diseases. By implementing the communicative relationship between patients and patients or between patient  and doctor through the sharing of information, there is a dissemination of information that is extremely useful  in the prevention of particularly prevalent diseases (think of the flu virus or the more serious AIDS).     In the case in which the disease is contracted and needs to be cured, the patient will come to the meeting with  the doctors being more informed and aware of the disease that he has, and this will allow him to take more  updated  decisions.  Furthermore,  the  interaction  with  other  patients  or  physicians  will  allow  the  patient  to  have social and emotional support, that in specific diseases is a critically important element in the cure. The  exchange of information will, then, allow the medical staff to constantly monitor the patient's clinical situation, 

42


Ginevra Gravili  and to modify their decisions and conduct, if necessary. All this for the benefit of the service offered by the  healthcare system.        Another benefit that emerges from the use of social media, in the doctor‐doctor relationship, is the constant  updating to which individual physicians can access without the use of significant financial resources on the part  of  the  healthcare  system  or  of  the  doctors  themselves.  The  use  of  social  media  allows  each  doctor  to  be  in  constant contact with other doctors in the same area with which to exchange information on clinical cases, on  drug  prescription,  but  also  on  scientific  updates  on  new  laws  on  healthcare.  The  paper  that  is  going  to  be  published  is  experiencing  an  unprecedented  crisis  and  many  newspapers  have  invested  in  highly  interactive  web  sites,  able  to  offer  high  quality  medical  content.  In  fact,  doctors  need  a  network  even  without  social  media.  These  connections  are,  however,  too  often  linked  to  geographical  proximity  (Keating  et  al.,  2007)  or  previous reports (same university, etc.) (Gulati, 1998). Getting out of this trap, through the use of these new  tools, can only improve and simplify communication.    Although there are many benefits and promises from social media several risks are associated with their use.  The  use  of  social  networks  in  healthcare  may  raise  some  issues.  Perhaps  the  greatest  fears  health  organizations have about social media are the inability to control conversation. The healthcare organization,  agreeing to be on social networks, accepts the possibility of being exposed to criticism or praised without any  guarantee of the truth behind that specific information. Organizations using social media risk losing control of  their  message.  Once  a  comment  or  “tweet”  is  posted,  anyone  can  respond.  While  some  users  may  share  positive  feedback,  the  door  is  also  open  to  negative  comments,  which,  however  unfounded,  can  upset  an  organization’s reputation. However, it is true that patients can talk about hospitals, for example, even if they  are not online.     Some  risks  are  internal:  the  information that  can be  inserted  by doctors  on  patients may  unintentionally be  also of a personal nature so that unauthorized access could violate the rights of the individual. Consider, for  example, information on rare diseases: discussions of a patient case on social media could violate a patient's  privacy,  even  if  no  names  are  used  and  no  harm  is  intended.    In  accordance  with  current  legislation,  the  information  entered  on  the  social  networking  sites  are  considered  public  domain  (Kochman,  2009)  and  unauthorized access is not punishable by law. Moreover, if you consider that any user can "tag" a photo, even  indiscreet, linked to the profile of healthcare organization or of a doctor or a patient, you can easily guess why  healthcare is still very skeptical about using these tools. Lorenz (2009), among the reasons that may damage  the  image  of  an  individual  (be  it  an  individual  or  an  organization)  cites  inappropriate  photos,  comments  on  drinking  or  drug  use,  negative  judgments  on  the  property  or  the  doctor,  discriminatory  remarks,  sharing  confidential information, qualifications that are not adequate. In fact, a patient may come to wrong decisions  based  on  inaccurate  and  false  information.  But  what  chiefly  matters  it  is  not  only  the  legal  problem,  as  its  ethical‐moral aspects. The information published on the websites are viewed primarily by friends and relatives,  so their use for other purposes would be to "dig" into the lives of others. In fact, some argue that those who  do  not  want  you  to  know  something  should  not  publish  it  (Cuesta,  2006.)  This  observation,  however,  is  not  readily  applicable  to  the  present  generation,  who  have  grown  up  on‐line  and  are  unable  to  discern  what  is  public from what is private. So, some information ‐which is for them naturally public‐ becomes for those who  have  not  grown  up  in  this  virtual  dimension  reprehensible  and  inappropriate.  It  is,  therefore,  a  true  generational and cultural clash. The fact remains that, even when you are sure that the information of a profile  will be seen only by specific people, there is the risk that, because of a mere technical error or a deliberate  violation, such information may come into unwanted hands for the wrong purposes.    Seale  (2009)  then  sets  off  a  second  ethical  issue  calling  it  "bias  creeping"  Through  the  social  network  the  healthcare manager may become aware of facts relating to his doctors, although insignificant, in contrast with  its stereotypes, calling doctors to act more responsively to the values of 'healthcare business. Some physicians  also fear that interactions with patients on social media sites could expose them to malpractice lawsuits if their  comments are misinterpreted.    Finally,  there  is  the  problem  of  access  (digital  divide).  Patients  with  limited  culture  or  limited  knowledge  on  informatics or older people have a lot of comprehension difficulties in communicating with clinicians through  social networks (Schillinger et al., 2004). There is still no  doubt a large part of the population who does not  have, either access to fixed broadbands, or to mobiles.   

43


Ginevra Gravili 

3. Conceptual model analysis: Objectives and hypotheses  In real life it’s usual for patients with chronic health to build close relationships with physicians; but this has a  different  significance  when  it  happens  "in  on‐line  life"  ‐  legal,  ethical  and  practical  issues  emerge.  The  ambiguity  related  to  legal  and  ethical  issues  (for  example  patient  privacy)  of  social  media  contains  the  enthusiasm  related  to  the potentialities  that  they  offer, prompting  many  health organizations  not  to  exploit  their  potential.  Considering  that  "the  key  to  success  is  the  intelligent  use  of  the  relationship  with  the  customer"  (Normann,  2002:22)  we  have  studied  the  effectiveness  of  the  use  of  social  media  in  Healthcare  through the risks and benefits perceived by patients and doctors.    Starting  with  the  model  of  Diffusion  of  Innovation  (Rogers,  2003),  we  have  analyzed  the  decision  making  process of the adoption of Facebook, as a new instrument of communication. This process (Figure n.1) includes  five  stages  (knowledge,  persuasion,  decision,  implementation,  and  confirmation)  in  which  an  organization  passes from gaining initial knowledge of innovation, to forming an attitude toward the innovation, to taking a  decision of whether to adopt or reject, to the implementation of the new idea, and to the confirmation of this  decision” (Rogers 2003:168).    In  our  analysis  in  the  knowledge  stage,  individual  characteristics  are  permanent  features  because  we  have  defined them ex‐ante (see the composition of our sample). We have analyzed a sample in which individuals  use often use social networks – in particular Facebook‐ to communicate.     In  the  persuasion  stage,  we  have  considered  the  relative  advantages  and  disadvantages  that  the  Health  organizations  on  social  media  have  to  communicate,  compared  to  traditional  systems  (face  to  face  comminucation), defining 25 items divided in 5 categories.    In  the  decision  stage  we  have  analyzed  if  doctors  and  patients  accept  new  ways  of  communication  and  we  have  studied  the  importance  that  they  give  to  the  use  of  Facebook,  classifying  them  in  advantages/disadvantages.    This  has  enabled  us  to  understand  whether  they  are  likely  to  use  or  reject  the  innovation.      During  the  implementation  stage  we  have  determined  the  usefulness  that  Facebook  has  for  doctors  and  patients and consequently if doctors and patients believe that it is a useful and necessary communication tool  for hospitals,that is, the confirmation phase.  READAPTATION OF DIT MODEL

Pre condi ons of our study ¾ Socio‐ economic characteris c ¾ Personal Variables ¾ Norms of social systems

Object of our study HEALTH ORGANIZATIONS

EVALUATION OF

ADVANTAGES

DISADVANTAGES

KNOWLEDGE

DECISION PERSUASION Characteris c of Innova on All memebers of our sample know intrinsic characteris cs of innova ons : Rela ve Advantage, Compa bility, Complexity or Simplicity, Trialability, Observability

IMPLEMENTATION CONFIRMATION

ACCESS CONNECTION COORDINATION INFLUENCE SHARING PATIENTS

DOCTORS U>0

Up

Ud Uh

Figure 1: Conceptual model analysis 

44


Ginevra Gravili 

4. Empirical research  The  research  was  developed  directly  on  the  Internet  by  distributing  a  questionnaire  among  physicians,  randomly selected from the list of doctors published by professional organizations at a national level on the  Internet, and patients, selected among doctors' patients. The Internet is a territory of millions of social media,  such as blogs, social networking, forums, etc. with different subject s, for this reason we have selected only a  field of research: Facebook. In order to facilitate the accurate and consistent acquisition of information, two  steps were followed:  ƒ

Identify users who were active on Facebook (number of messages posted in a day and in a month)  

ƒ

the questionnaire posted on the message form. The questionnaire was initially tested on a limited number  of users, in order to understand at which point the questions were correct and the presentation form was  accepted. Then it was posted on the entire sample. 

Sample   The samples of this study consisted in 5000 members, made up of 2.500 physicians and 2.500 patients. They  were divided equally between 18‐24 years old; 24‐34 years old; 35‐54 years old; over 55 years old while there  were 65% of men and 35% of women for physicians and 68% of women and 32% of men for patients. Of these  (patients)  84%  were  married  or  engaged  and  79%  of  the  individuals  had  children.  This  characteristic  is  important because a lot of mothers and fathers looked for information on the health of their children. Their  main occupation is a full time job (75%), and 25% part time.  For physicians 74% are married or engaged and  72% of the individuals have children. Their main occupation is in a hospital structure (72%), and 28% in Health  private structures ians . The remaining part of users visit the group a few times a week.    About 80% of physicians and 85% of patients have seen the questionnaire and accepted to fill it in.     The sample was finally made up of N=1.960 physicians and N= 2.019 patients.     The data analisis    The data on opportunities and risks of the use of social media in Healthcare organizations has been obtained  by comparing the analysis of the physicians and patients’ observations. In order to facilitate the accurate and  consistent acquisition of information we have used 5 categories for a total of 25 items, measuring them with  Likert’s technique, in which there are 5 potential answers: 5= strongly agree; 4= Agree; 3=Neutral; 2=disagree;  1=  Strongly  Disagree,  to  evaluate  the  perception.  We catalogued  (Figure  n.  2),  then,  the  answers  in  a  range  between  a  and  b,  where  a  is  the  minimum  value  of  the  score  attributable  to  the  evaluation  (1  =  Strongly  Disagree)  and  b  the  maximum  value  attributable  (5  =  strongly  agree).  Relative  advantage  (definited  Opportunities)  refers  to  the  degree  to  which  the  adopter  perceives  the  innovation  to  represent  an  improvement in either efficiency or effectiveness in comparison to traditional methods.  Relaive disadvantage  (definited Risks) refers to a deterioration.      The opportunities create a perceived positive utility, while risks a negative utility. 

Figure 2: Value of opportunities and risks 

45


Ginevra Gravili  The sum of the benefits perceived by doctors and patients represent the total Utility deriving from the use of  social networks in hospitals as means of communication (Figure n. 3). 

Figure 3: Total utility  Therefore,  in  order  to  obtain  such  values,  we  have  analyzedthe  values  of  each  item  selected  and  we  have  created a score for each respondent. In order to create such utility functions that may represent perceptions  perceived  by  doctors  and  patients  for  each  single  item,  the  average  value  of  the  answers  given  by  the  individuals interviewed was calculated. By so doing,a matrix was created which simply highlighted the resulting  evaluations. Total utility (Utility by health organizations)  is positive each time the result of the algebra sum of  the  Utility  by  patients  and  by  doctors  becomes  positive,  however,  it  will  be  negative  when  the  algebra  sum  becomes negative (Table 1).    Table 1: Values of hospitals’ utility  U h =Hopitals’ Utility  +  +  +  ‐  ‐  ‐ 

Ud= Doctors’ Utility  +  +  ‐  ‐  +  ‐ 

Up= Patients’ Utility  +  ‐  +  ‐  ‐  + 

5. Research results  In the questionnaire of patients and physicians we have analyzed 25 items to which interviewees were given a  rating  from  1  to  5  (Table  2).  Each  item  falls  into  one  of  five  categories.  The  first  category  is  Influence.  It  concerns the ability of Facebook to influence the choice of users in Health decisions. The second category is  Connection.  It  includes  metrics  that  measure  the  ability  to  connect  users  with  the  same  health  problems  to  each  other.  The  third  category  is  Access.  It  examines  all  the  items  that  minimize  barriers  between  patients,  doctors  and  health  organizations.  The  fourth  category  is  Sharing.  It  analyzes  the  capability  of  Facebook  to  support psychological care. The last category is Coordination. It includes items that improve patients‐patient,  patient‐doctor, doctor‐doctor and doctor‐organization coordination. In each category we have identified the  single value of Doctor’s Utility and Patient’s utility, and the total Utility for Hospitals listing it as an opportunity,  when the Uh values, given by the arithmetic sum of Ud and Up, are positive and superior to 0,5; as a risk, when  the Uh values are negative and inferior to ‐0,5; or as an opportunity/risk, when the Uh values are between 0,5  and ‐0,5 – in this case it’s necessary to analyze the value with caution. For example, in communication, the use  of simple language can be opportunities or risks…it depends on the accuracy of information.   Table 2: Perception of the presence of Health organizations on Facebook with predefined items   CATEGORIES 

ITEMS

SUB‐ITEMS

Opp./   Risk 

Uh

PATIENTS (Average) 

Up

Influence

Information on  prevention  Information on  pathology 

O

1,2

4,4

1,4

2.1 Personal  info on  patient who  has a  pathology  2.2 Medical  info   

R

‐1,24

2,15

‐ 0,88

O

1,775

4,85

1,85

O

1,25

4,7

1,7

Information on  health  structure 

46

Up DOCTORS  (Average  )  +  4,7 

Ud

Ud

1,7

+

1,4

‐1,6

+

4,7

1,7

+

+

3,8

0,8

+


Ginevra Gravili  CATEGORIES 

ITEMS

SUB‐ITEMS

Opp./   Risk 

Uh

PATIENTS (Average) 

Up

Information on  doctors 

4.1 Personal  info  4.2  Professional  info   

R

‐1,05

1,8

‐1,2

O

1,65

4,8

1,8

+

O/R

0,175

3,05

0,05

O

1,45

4,5

7.1 Personal  info on  patient who  has  pathology  7.2 Medical  info   

R

‐1,25

O

 

Connection

 

Access

 

Sharing    

Information on  medicines  Information on  experimental  treatments  Information on  similar cases 

Video or  photos of  patients  Video or  photos  of  physicians  Support a  health‐related  causes  Improve  patient care  Comment  about your  health  experiences  Communication  = use of simple  language by  physicians to  explain a  pathology  Communication  = use of simple  language by  patients to  explain a  pathology  Reviews on line  of doctors  Reviews on line  of a health  structure  Sharing of  anxiety  Psycological  sharing  Trace or share  your health  symptoms or  behavior 

Ud

Ud

‐0,9

4,5

1,5

+

+

4,3

1,3

+

1,5

+

4,4

1,4

+

2,3

‐0,7

1,2

‐1,8

1,575

4,2

1,2

+

3,95

1,95

+

O

0,65

4,1

1,1

+

3,2

0,2

+

R

‐ 1,025

2,05

‐ 0,95

1,9

‐1,1

O/R

0,4

4,7

1,7

+

2,1

‐0,9

O

1,205

4,6

1,6

+

3,9

0,9

+

O

1,3

4,6

1,6

+

3,2

0,2

+

O/R

0,125

4,7

1,7

+

2,5

0,5

O/R

‐0,05

4,6

1,6

+

1,3

‐1,7

O

1,55

4,6

1,6

+

4,5

1,5

+

O

1,3

4,7

1,7

+

3,9

0,9

+

O

0,95

4,8

1,8

+

3,1

0,1

+

O

1,05

4,8

1,8

+

3,3

0,3

+

O

0,75

4,4

1,4

+

3,1

0,1

+

47

Up DOCTORS  (Average  )  ‐  2,1 


Ginevra Gravili  CATEGORIES 

ITEMS

SUB‐ITEMS

Opp./   Risk 

Uh

PATIENTS (Average) 

Up

Follow some  friends’  personal health  experience  Coordination  with public  health  department  Transfer of  personal health  information to  patient  Notification of  quick   information  Ask a doctor a  new question  Ask for an  appointment 

O

0,75

4,6    

1,6

O

1,2

4,3

1,3

+

O

1,5

4,8

1,8

O

1,6

4,8

O

1,2

O

1,45

Coordination

 

Up DOCTORS  (Average  )  +  2,9 

Ud

Ud

‐0,1

4,1

1,1

+

+

4,2

1,2

+

1,8

+

4,4

1,4

+

4,3

1,3

+

4,1

1,1

+

4,5

1,5

+

4,4

1,4

+

Using this information we have built two “utility functions” that compare the perceptions of the respondents.  The first and the second graph (Figure 4 and Figure 5) highlight the perceptions that doctors and patients have  of  the  25  items  tested,  divided  into  categories.  In  principle,  the  perceptions  of  physicians  and  patients  regarding the items that fall into the category "Influence", “Coordination” and Access are similar, while for the  other categories a much more positive perception from patients is evident rather than from physicians, this  being particularly evident in the category "Coordination" in which the perception is positive for patients and  negative for physicians. 

Figure 4: “Utility function” categories/patients                 Figure 5: “Utility function” categories/doctors  Of particular importance is the graph (Figure 6) that analyzes the average evaluation of patients and doctors  deriving  from  the  algebra  sum  of  the  two  partial  Utilities.  This  analysis  indicates  that  both  doctors’  and  patients’ perception of the opportunities that the use of social media can offer in Healthcare is positive.  

6. Considerations The use of social media in health contexts is growing and there is no sign of it slowing down.    The purpose of this study is to measure the perception of the use of Facebook in health organizations. The list  of opportunities and risks for healthcare organizations included in this paper is not thorough, but it represents  a good starting point.   

48


Ginevra Gravili 

Figure 6: Utility of hospitals – medium value of patients/physicians utility   Research demonstrates that the perception that doctors and patients have is positive, therefore, if hospitals  were to decide to use this new system of communication, the resulting utility would be positive (Figure 7).    Healthcare  organizations  can  better  meet  the  needs  of  patients  and  they  can  connect  people  to  experts  of  healthcare  services  and  physicians  with  colleagues.  They  can  connect  different  departments  and  can  be  transparent,  communicative,  and  fast.  With  the  use  of  social  media,  they  can  streamline  medical  procedures,by offering a better service, a patient‐centric service. But still there are unknown factors that have  emerged amongst those items which we have referred to as opportunities / risks and hazards. This data must  not deceive, but rather, make people think. In fact, the items listed as Opportunity / Risk, are those requiring  serious  consideration  by  managers  and  institutions.  Only  with  investments  and  laws  that  clearly  define  the  roles,  duties  and  responsibilities  of  Facebook  users  (patients,  physicians  and  health  organizations),can  the  possible risks  be transformed into enormous opportunities for all users.  By encouraging a correct social media  communication, healthcare organizations can implement their support to patients and their families.   

Figure 7: Utility function  In this scenario only health organizations that redefine business (Normann, 1996), on line, can be competitive.  The  DIT  model  intends  proving  that  organizations  are  ready  to  change  even  if  there  is  still  a  subtle  line 

49


Ginevra Gravili  between caution and fear (as results from our research). It is the fear of change so common in healthcare that  one hopes will be overcome.  According to the writer, it is most important for organizations to develop a policy  that  guides  social  media  use  within  them.  Medical  staff  members  should  receive  training  and  education  to  encourage responsible use of their social media sites. Organizations must also monitor the social media sites  to ensure that information posted there does not violate privacy regulations and other laws.    There  are  important  roles  for  policy  makers  in  supporting  social  media  in  healthcare.  They  have  to  ensure  investments  to  guarantee  the  security  of  the  information  presented  in  social  media,  in  order  to  teach  the  Health Organizations how to be present on social media. Only in this way can we be sure that information is  accurate, timely, relevant and useful for patients and physicians.    

References Ankolekar A, Krotzsch M, Tran T, Vrandecic D, (2007), Mashing up Web 2.0 and the Semantic Web, on www 2007. ACM;  Banff, Alberta, Canada.  Audet, A., Davis, K., and Schoenbaum, S., Adoption of patient‐centered care practices by physicians: Results from a national  survey. Arch. Intern. Med. 166:754–759, 2006.   Iwrey R., P. Ottenwess, Physician's use of social media and email communication,  Farmer AD, Bruckner Holt CE, Cook MJ, Hearing SD. Social networking sites: a novel portal for communication. Postgrad  Med J 2009 Sep;85(1007):455‐459  Gerteis, M., Edgman‐Levitan, S., Daley, J., and Delbanco, T., Through the patient’s eyes: Understanding and promoting  patient‐centered care. San Francisco: Jossey‐Bass, 2002.  Normann R. and Arvidsson N., (2006), People as Care Catalysts: From being patient to becoming healthy,  John Wiley &  Sons, Ltd.  Hawn  C., Take two aspirin and tweet me in the morning: how twitter, facebook, and other social media are reshaping  health care, Health Affairs, 28, no.2 (2009):361‐368  Shaw T., (2010), Healthy Knowledge: Semantic Technology & the Healthcare Revolution, 17 august 2010, on  http://www.econtentmag.com  Van de Belt T., Berben S., Samsom M., Engelen L.; Schoonhoven L., (2012) Use of Social Media by Western European  Hospitals: Longitudinal Study, in Journal of Medical Internet Research; 14 (3): e61 

50


Social Media Marketing: An Evaluation Study in the Wellness  Industry  Kerstin Grundén1 and Stefan Lagrosen2  1 School of Business, Economics and IT, University West, Trollhättan, Sweden  2  School of Business and Economics, Linnaeus University, Växjö, Sweden  kerstin.grunden@hv.se  stefan.lagrosen@lnu.se    Abstract:  An  evaluation  study  focusing  the  use  of  social  media  in  six  Swedish  wellness  companies  is  described  and  analysed. The study is a part of the research project “Efficient learning for quality in the wellness industry”. Social media  have become increasingly popular the last few years, and are rapidly changing the ground for marketing activities. The field  is, however, still immature and there are hitherto very few studies focusing the actual use by service organizations and the  efficiency and quality effects of social media for marketing. The research method in this evaluation study is qualitative in‐ depth  interviews  carried  out  with  employees  responsible  for  the  social  media  activities  in  the  studied  companies.  The  interviews are analysed according to the contents analysis method. The main results are that the initiation of the use of  social  media  in  the  organizations  generally  was  started  by  an  “enthusiast”  in  the  organizations.  The  enthusiast  could  be  very  good  at  initiating  the  use,  but  it  could  be  dangerous  to  rely  on  only  one  employee  in  the  long  run.  However,  most  often  the  use  spreads  to  more  employees  in  the  organizations  after  some  time.  Social  media  and  the  shift  towards  relationship marketing have affected the marketing profession substantially. According to the interviews, the work of the  respondents had become more hectic and difficult to plan due to fast technological changes and rapid feed‐back from the  customers. New skills and competencies are needed due to this change of the profession. There is also a need to develop  clear policies regarding the use of social media by the employees. Unclear policies tend to contribute to misunderstandings  and misbehaviour by some employees, such as confounding the private and professional use of social media, which could  lead  to  negative  consequences  for  the  organization.  According  to  the  results  most  of  the  studied  organizations  express  uncertainty concerning planning and evaluation of social media for marketing. They also experience lack of time for this  work. They argue that using social media for marketing is important; but the benefits are often unclear. Formulating and  monitoring the goals, management could develop social media into powerful marketing tools which also contribute to the  organization’s efficiency and quality. Developing skills and practices for this is a challenge as well as a potential.    Keywords:  social media marketing, wellness industry, evaluation study, social media policies 

1. Introduction In this article an evaluation study focusing social media marketing in the wellness industries, is described and  analysed. The study is part of the research project “Efficient learning for quality in the wellness industry” (2012  – 2013), financed by the research financier Knowledge Foundation of Sweden.     Recent  years,  there  has  been  an  upsurge  in  the  use  of  social  media  for  private  purposes,  as  well  as  for  companies  and  governments  as  a  marketing  tool.  The  technological  development  is  fast,  and  new  communication  patterns  are  constantly  developed  and  adapted.  However,  there  is  still  a  lack  of  empirical  research studies in this field. The aim of this evaluation study is to describe and analyse the use of social media  marketing  in  some  wellness  companies.  Qualitative  interviews  are  made  with  marketers  in  six  wellness  industries about their use of social media marketing.       Social media have revolutionized our social contacts and have quickly become very popular both for private  use, and as a professional communication tool used by opinion leaders and entrepreneurs, for example. Social  media enables digital contacts with large social networks that can enrich both the individual and social life, and  also be an important tool for marketing activities for a business. With the use of social media, we generally  mean  the  use  of  “web‐services  where  you  can  converse,  read  and  share  information,  establish  contacts  for  example.”    (Carlsson,  2010,  p.  10).  The  social  web  is  also  referred  to  as  Web  2.0.  Social  media  marketing  is  related to “word of mouth‐marketing”, which is the intentional marketing influencing consumer‐to‐consumer  communications  by  professional  marketing  techniques.  Word‐of‐mouth  is  originally  defined  as  “informal  communication  among  consumers  about  products  and  services”  (Liu  2010),  but  has  now  become  “on‐line  word‐of‐mouth” (Hennig‐Thurau, Gwinner, Walsh & Gremler (2004). Some researchers have even argued that  word‐of‐mouth is the most influencing aspects that affect the consumers before they make a purchase (Day 

51


Kerstin Grundén and Stefan Lagrosen  1971,  Katz  &  Lazarsfeldt  1955).  Social  media  marketing  is  also  related  to  viral  marketing, buzz,  and guerrilla  marketing (Palmer & Koenig‐Lewis 2009).    Traditional  marketing  is  based  on  one‐to‐many  communication  where  the  producer  is  the  sender  and  the  customer is the receiver (push communication). This traditional paradigm is more and more replaced by the  pull  communication  paradigm  based  on  one‐to‐one  communication  and  informal  relationship  between  the  marketer and the buyer (Ström 2010). In such relation‐based communication the roles of sender and receiver  becomes  more  unclear,  and  the  roles  can  merge.  In  traditional  marketing,  the  receiver  could  not  affect  the  message sent by the marketer, now the receiver participates in the communications he or she like, and can  thus affect the interchanged messages. In this way the marketing process becomes more unpredictable, but it  could also contribute to quality aspects that traditional marketing was not able to obtain. The communication  gives the marketers knowledge about the customers’ preferences and values, for example, and the influence  could  be  more  subtle  than  before.  The  communication  is  more  about  building  relationships  than  selling  products. Trust is an important aspect of good relationships. The ethics and values that are expressed in the  communication become important aspects of the quality of the relationship. The roles of the marketers and  the  buyers  are  thus  fundamentally  changing  (Brown  2009).  The  character  of  the  marketing  profession  is  changing, and new competencies and behavioural patterns need to be developed. Previous research has also  indicated that management often experience substantial uncertainty regarding the use of social media and use  them  in  inconsistent  ways  (e.g.  Burton  &  Soboleva,  2011;  Lagrosen  &  Josefsson,  2011).  In  addition,  privacy  issues,  such  as  the  use  of  cookies  raise  problems  for  companies  and  customers  alike  (Pierson  &  Heyman,  2011).    The  technological  development  is  fast,  and  new  ICT  devices  are  constantly  developed  and  adapted.  The  combination  of  various  social  digital  media  can  enhance  the  promotion  effect.  More  and  more  companies  established  a  “news  room”  on  their  website,  where  the  readers  can  follow  the  information  on  activities  of  various social media. Users can often subscribe to up‐dates through a RSS‐feed.  

2. Research method  In  the  evaluation  study  six  wellness  companies  were  studied  regarding  their  use  and  experience  of  social  media  marketing.  Qualitative  interviews  were  made  with the  marketers  that  were  responsible  for  the  social  media marketing at each organization. Five of the interviews were made face‐to‐face at the work‐places, but  one was made as a telephone interview. Five of the interviews were made in 2012, and the sixth was made in  January  2013.The  interviews  were  tape‐recorded  and  transcribed.  Contents  analysis  was  carried  out  on  the  data from the interviews.   Table 1: The spa‐hotels that participated in the study  Spa‐hotel  Sankt Jörgen Park Resort  Stenungsbaden Yacht Club  Ystads Saltsjöbad  Varbergs Kurort  Hotel Tylösand  Bokenäs Hav Spa 

Comments Spa‐hotel in Gothenburg with many day guests and an integrated golf  course  Spa‐hotel with a relaxed American east coast image  A seaside spa‐hotel on the south coast  A seaside spa‐hotel with a focus on traditional Swedish treatments  A seaside spa‐hotel with focus on art and music  A spa‐hotel in a serene rural coastal setting 

3. Results   3.1 The organization of social media for marketing  In most of the studied organizations, the use of social media for marketing started by a marketer who can be  characterized as an "enthusiast" and had personal interest in writing and using social media. More employees  are then usually also integrated into the writing on social media for the company. At one of the organizations,  even a restaurant manager has started to write on Facebook, and load up pictures of evening activities. It is  common that different employees write in different media such as blogs, Twitter or Facebook, depending on  their  interests  and  skills.  One  marketing  manager  stresses  that  it  is  important  that  many  voices  from  the  business are heard, and the goal is to involve even more members of staff in the use of social media activity.  “The staff is the core of the brand to an ever larger extent”, argues the respondent. Some of the organizations  also plan to recruit new employees, specifically for social media marketing.  

52


Kerstin Grundén and Stefan Lagrosen  In addition, it seems fairly common in the studied companies to use external assistance such as subcontractors  and/or  consultants.  For  instance,  one  of  the  hotels  uses,  subcontractors  specialized  in  film  and  audio.  One  company contracts a web agency working with the website. Using web tools such as newsletter modules and  modules for image processing is also common.     Several respondents stress that it is more difficult to plan marketing efforts in social media compared to the  planning  of  for  example  radio  or  television  campaigns  because  there  is  so  much  happening  in  the  field.  Working  in  this  way  can  be  difficult  for  those  marketers,  who  have  an  extremely  planning  personality,  one  respondent  points  out.  Social  media  provide  a  great  planning  tool  in  the  short  term,  while  they  are  more  difficult to use for long‐term planning.    One respondent is aware that older people often do not use Facebook much, but they are trying to reach them  through e.g. newspapers or television commercials.    One of the respondents avoids advertising in magazines, as this has "zero" effect, in his opinion.  

3.2 Use of different types of social media  Facebook  is  the  most  common  type  of  social  media  for  the  studied  companies,  but  it  is  increasingly  supplemented by other social media such as blogs and Twitter. It is common to link Facebook to the website  and also to include links to YouTube, for example.  Some companies publish "guest feeds" directly on the home  page, directly from TripAdviser and similar channels. Another "guest‐review site" that often is used is reita.se.  Contests aiming to increase the number of "fans" on a Facebook page are common, and they usually result in a  conspicuous increase. The prize may be a spa weekend, which is usually much appreciated and contributes to  further  spreading  of  the  offer  by  the  "fans".  But  customers  do not  like  "being bombarded by  offers",  says  a  respondent.    One of the companies has developed a mobile app. When you check into the mobile app you simultaneously  check into Facebook. Via the mobile app, you can see the entire day's program at the resort, ranging from free  treatments, the opportunity to play in the Golf Academy to tonight's menu in the restaurant and evening drink  in the bar. Via the mobile app offers to come back are also communicated. The use of e‐mail is very common.  One  of  the  companies  communicate  a  lot  with  email  mailings  to  the  customers,  such  as  confirmation  and  welcome email before the visit and thank you‐mail after the visit which announces that it wishes to continue  communicating in this way. 

3.3 How to write on social media?  For one of the hotels a blog on the website was the first channel in which the respondent expressed his private  opinion. However, it was a very difficult balance writing in a personal (like the style in a personal diary), but not  too personal way, according to the respondent. In addition, the text should be professional, but not contain  pure "sales aspects," the respondent explained. The respondent wrote on average every other day to update  the blog regularly. For a while they used both the blog and Facebook, but it was too demanding to consistently  write  in  different  ways  in  the  two  channels,  according  to  the  respondent.  It  became  increasingly  difficult  to  write in a personal way. The blog was thus closed for three years.    According to one of the companies they have the ambition that their Facebook page should be cheerful and  pleasant and describe fun activities going on. It is important to adjust the "tone" in the writing of various social  media such as Facebook and Twitter. It is a matter of keeping the right personal tone, and not to write in a too  “correct” manner, a respondent mentioned.     It seems that some employees have performance anxiety when they are supposed to write on social media.  “Then you have to encourage them in order to try to increase their self‐esteem”, a respondent stresses. The  main focus is on the use of Facebook. Twitter can be a little more "cocky and cool," continues the respondent,  “but it's not often you put the comments there because of lack of time”. The respondent points out that it is  important to have a real commitment to using social media to make it good: "You really must like it from your  heart." 

53


Kerstin Grundén and Stefan Lagrosen  One  difficulty  with  social  media  is  judging  how  privately  you  should  write,  one  respondent  stresses.  The  respondent emphasizes that the use of images is good on social media, because they express a lot of emotions  and information. Images are widely used in communication via Facebook. You can always compare with your  private  use  of  social  media  if  you  think  about  different  advantages  and  disadvantages  of  social  media  marketing.    The time of day when the post is published on social media could be crucial. The best time to post is when  most  customers  are  active  on  social  media,  usually  late  afternoon  or  evening,  or  possibly  early  morning,  according  to  a  respondent.  The  respondent  argues  that  it  would  look  unprofessional  to  publish  posts  in  the  middle of the night, even if it would come from the restaurant. The hard part is to be visible in this industry,  one  of  the  respondents  stresses.  There  is  no  point  in  just  following  what  everyone  else  does,  but  to  have  courage to change strategy if you notice an exhaustion effect of any activity. To monitor competitors' social  media activities is part of the job, according to the respondent who stresses that you can be both inspired and  discouraged by the competitors’ use of social media    The use of social media is mainly adapted to Swedish conditions, and the Swedish language is used by most  companies.  One  of  studied  organizations  has  a  fairly  high  proportion  of  foreign  guests,  but  does  not  use  English on social media.     A difficulty in social media marketing is to keep up with all the incoming news and all changes that are made.  Today  you  cannot  only  copy  text  from  the  blog  and  put  it  on  Bambuser  for  example  and  on  to  the  various  micro‐blogs, so that you get all keywords. Google engines notices this by now so that you will be demoted in  Google's search results. This means that the texts must be rewritten, and not just copied, when you want to  publish it on various social media.    Social media activities take time and energy, and require interest. In one of the studied companies the writer is  never  anonymous,  but  publishes  both  with  picture  and  name:  "Otherwise  you  lose  a  lot  of  this  personal  touch," the respondent explains.    The younger generation is skilled in handling fast communication using social media. It is important that those  who are networking have social skills. It is vital from a business perspective, that the language used on social  media is relevant, as it reaches many customers. Culture is crucial when it comes to how we express ourselves.    Employees that are trusted by the companies to write on social media often had reached 35 years of age. The  most  important  thing  is  that  the  person  who  expresses  himself  through  social  media,  do  have  social  competence and a refined language, according to a respondent.    One  of  the  companies  has  developed  the  concept  “the  Digital  Reception”,  where  social  media  is  integrated  with other IT‐tools such as a large reservation system. The vision is to build a "digital box", which all of the staff  is  working  with.  This  is  expected  to  facilitate  the  work  substantially.  They  try  to  imitate  a  reception  in  everything they do, and want to get the customer to check in digitally as soon as possible. A reward for this  could be a better price on the reservation, for example. A part of the concept is to try to create a conscious  segregation so that other guests who checked in the traditional way become aware of the advantages to check  in digitally instead. It should also be easy to become a member, and have enough digital data, without filling in  a  paper  document,  according  to  the  respondent.  Twitter  and  Facebook  are  more  and  more  expected  to  replace  the  traditional  telephone  communication.  The  goal  of  the  Digital  reception  is  obviously  increased  profitability, the respondent stresses.    The time required for the social media activities varies widely among the hotels, from less than one hour per  day, to a full‐time employee. One respondent uses "spare time during work" for this work, but points out that  he could put much more time on social media activities: "It could take more or less the whole of my working  day, but that time I do not have". A disadvantage of the use of Facebook is that it "sucks up working," said the  respondent. The respondent also writes on Facebook for work during holidays: "I'm never relaxed".     Social media for marketing has contributed to change the profession much the last two years, a respondent  stress. The pace of work has also increased drastically, according to the respondent: "It's full speed all day."  Work is much more "24‐7" compared to a few years ago”, emphasizes one respondent: "Now you should have 

54


Kerstin Grundén and Stefan Lagrosen  a  constant  dialogue”.  The  respondent  describes  that  on  the  one  hand,  the  work  with  social  media  is  demanding, but on the other hand it contributes to increased possibilities of direct contact with the guests. 

3.4 Feedback from the customers  Communication with customers via social media can mean that customers share their personal experiences,  but  this  is  not  perceived  as  a  problem,  according  to  one  respondent.  This  often  becomes  evident  when  the  customers are supposed to write motivations when they participate in a contest on social media. "Social media  becomes like a living scrapbook”, the respondent stresses.    One respondent describes the customers' activities on the company's social media as a "gossip square". The  respondent argues that there is a human basic need to communicate with one another. The difference is that  today we can communicate with many more people than before through social media.    One  of  the  companies  has  invited  guests  to  blog  in  a  special  digital  guestbook  “Special  Guest  Room”.  It  is  a  small tight group, and they write mostly positive comments, according to the respondent.    You generally get a lot of tips from customers through their postings on social media: "The tips are worth gold.  It can be anything from something they feel is missing from the breakfast buffet to the opening hours of the  spa", a respondent stresses. You can see both trends of dissatisfaction and trends of joy on social media, more  clearly compared with market surveys which are usually more concrete, a respondent continues.    It  seems  to  be  relatively  rare  that  the  customers  express  criticism  via  social  media.  One  of  the  respondents  thinks that it is predominantly women who write on business social media, because it is most women who visit  the  spa.  But  men  would  still  often  talk  clearly  about  what  they  think.  Maybe  somewhat  more  men  write  negative posts compared with women, a respondent suggests. 

3.5 Policies for social media  Policies for social media are quite usual in the participating organizations. It is common to recommend that the  guests should not be commented on social media, or that you should not write about the work place when you  use  social  media  for  private  use  for  example.  Neither  should  you  write  negative  aspects  about  your  work,  according to the policies of most of the companies.    One  respondent  stresses  that  you  should  write  on  social  media  in  a  way  that  is  acceptable  to  all  readers:  "When you are out on social media, even your grandmother should accept to read what you have written ...  actually it is all about common sense".    One  of  the  participating  companies  has  a  "secret  group"  on  Facebook,  used  only  by  employees.  The  communication on this page can only be seen by the employees, and is not exposed to guests.    It is also important to have an open work climate so that the employees can talk to the management,  about  problems  that  arise,  instead  of  writing  on  social  media.  This  is  also  a  generation‐related  issue  when  young  people today more widely communicate via text and media compared with the older generation. 

3.6 Monitoring and evaluation of social media  A respondent points out that it is part of the business service to communicate with guests via social media: "It  would  have  been  really  weird  if  we  had  not  communicated  through  Facebook,  so  we  must  do  it”.  It  seems  however,  not  to  be  common  in  the  studied  organizations  to  monitor  the  use  of  Facebook  and  other  social  media  and  analyse  how  much  they  contribute  to  the  turnover.  One  respondent  assumes  that  social  media  contributes to the turnover, but it is very difficult to define in measurable terms. Generally, there seems to be  some uncertainty regarding how to monitor the use of social media in a meaningful way. The lack of time for  such activities also contributes to the lack of evaluation.    A major weakness is that we know too little about the guests, one respondent stresses. Only when we know  which guests that are often visiting us, is it possible for us to reward them in a relevant way. It would be good 

55


Kerstin Grundén and Stefan Lagrosen  if  you  could  focus  most  on  these  "ambassadors",  the  guests  that  visit  the  hotel  on  several  occasions,  a  respondent claim.    It  is  more  difficult  to  plan  marketing  efforts  in  social  media  compared  to  the  planning  of  radio  or  television  campaigns because there is so much happening in the field, one of the respondents claims. It can be difficult to  work  in  this  way  for  someone  who  has  an  extremely  planning  personality,  the  respondent  continues.  Social  media provides a great tool in the short term, while it is more difficult to make long‐term planning. 

4. Discussion 4.1 The importance of “enthusiasts” for social media marketing  The use of social media for marketing in the studied organizations had often started by a marketer who can be  characterized as an "enthusiast" and who had a personal interest in writing and using social media. Gradually,  the  use  of  social  media  spread  in  the  activities.  It  can  mean  both  advantages  as  disadvantages  for  the  companies that development is initiated by an enthusiast. One advantage is that there is a commitment that is  a  driving  force  in  the  development  and  may  seem  motivating  for  the  other  operations.  Enthusiasts  build  important  expertise  in  the  development  of  social  media.  One  risk  is  being  too  dependent  on  individual  persons' skills and interest, if the person leaves their job, for example. 

4.2 Changes in the marketing profession  The  changing  marketing  strategies  (transition  from  push  to  pull  communication  and  relationship  marketing)  and  the  increasing  use  of  social  media  has  contributed  to  changing  the  nature  of  the  marketing  profession.  Today, greater demands are placed on personal commitment of those employees who write on social media,  for example. To monitor and write on social media often takes much time, and sometimes the employees also  use part of their leisure time to write for the companies, which can push the boundaries between work and  leisure. Social media marketing creates new demands for the marketers to write and communicate on social  media.  Personal  commitment  seems  to  be  important,  and  the  ability  to  write  with  “the  right  attitude  and  tone”  on  different  types  of  social  media  such  as  blogs,  Twitter  or  Facebook.  This  requires  management  to  identify staff with the appropriate skills, and to ensure that they also are able to develop their competencies in  relevant  ways.  The  technical  development  in  the  field  is  fast,  and  you  need  to  "keep  up".  It  seems  that  the  monitoring and analysis of use of social media often have to stand back for the time spent on actual usage,  according to the results.    It  is  a  challenge  for  companies  to  integrate  and  organize  the  use  of  social  media  for  marketing  with  more  traditional  marketing  activities  and  the  business  plans,  and  to  find  employees  that  have  competence  to  use  social media properly. An example of a high degree of integration and business orientation was at one of the  organizations that developed the concept of a "digital reception", where social media and other information  technology  systems  were  highly  integrated.  The  same  IT  tools  were  used  for  all  registration  needed,  for  example,  which  made  the  work  more  efficient,  and  also  understandable,  both  for  the  employees  and  the  customers. 

4.3 Planning and monitoring social media  According to the results, the marketers of social media experienced considerable uncertainty regarding how  best  to  monitor  the  use  of  social  media  for  marketing  in  a  meaningful  way.  It  seems  difficult  to  specify  contributions  to  business  sales  in  quantitative,  measurable  terms.  Probably  there  is  a  need  to  specify  both  quantitative  and  qualitative  aspects  for  the  evaluation  of  social  media.  New  evaluation  approaches  and  methods are needed in order to define "value" as well as follow‐up values (Carlsson, 2009).    Qualitative aspects such as commitment and attention of those who write on social media, both employees  and  customers,  rather  than  focusing  too  much  on  the  number  of  "likes"  for  example,  may  be  needed.  Committed customers are potential ambassadors for the company, which spread reputation through "word‐of  mouth".   

56


Kerstin Grundén and Stefan Lagrosen  A  starting  point  might  be  to  take  advantage  of  free  software  such  as  Google  Analytics  (http:  /  /  www.google.com/analytics/)  or  Clicly  (http://getclicky.com/)  containing  various  opportunities  to  produce  statistics from operational use of social media. 

5. Conclusion The initiation of social media marketing was often started by an “enthusiast” in the studied organizations. An  “enthusiast”  can  contribute  substantially  to  social  media  marketing  in  the  companies,  but  it  could  be  dangerous  to  rely  too  much  on  one  employee  in  the  long  run.  Social  media  marketing  and  the  shift  to  relationship  marketing  has  affected  the  marketing  profession  to  a  large  extent  recent  years.  The  work  had  become more hectic, and more difficult to plan in the long‐term, according to the respondents. The feed‐back  on social marketing activities comes quickly from the customers requiring fast measurements in order to meet  the requirements. The social media technology changes rapidly, which creates challenges for the competence  development of the staff.    It seems important to formulate relevant policies for the internal use of social media, according to the study.  There is otherwise a risk that the employees confuse their private use  of social media with the professional  work, if the policies are unclear, which can lead to negative consequences for the companies.    There  seems  to  be  an  uncertainty  among  the  studied  organization  how  the  following‐up  of  social  activities  could  be  done  in  the  best  way,  and  the  respondents  also  express  lack  of  time  for  follow‐up  activities.  The  respondents mean that it is important for the companies to be visible on social media, but the benefits for the  companies are often unclear. Formulating and monitoring the goals, management could develop social media  into  powerful  marketing  tools  which  also  contribute  to  the  organization’s  efficiency  and  quality.  Developing  skills and practices for this is a challenge as well as a potential. 

References Brown, R. (2009) Public Relations and the social web. How to use social media and web 2.0 in communications. Kogan  Page, LondonBurton, S. & Soboleva, A. (2011), Interactive or reactive? Marketing with Twitter. Journal of Consumer  Marketing, Vol. 28, No.7, pp. 491‐499.  Carlsson, L. (2010) Marknadsföring och kommunikation i sociala medier. Givande dialoger, starkare varumärke, ökad  försäljning. Kreafon, Gothenburg.  Day, G. S. (1971) Attitude change, media and word of mouth. Journal of Advertising Research, Vol 11, No. 6, pp.  31‐40.  Hennig‐Thurau T.,  Gwinner K. P., Walsh, G.  & Gremler D.D. (2004). Electronic word of mouth via consumer‐opinion  platforms: What motivates consumers to articulate themselves on the Internet?  Journal of Interactive Marketing, Vol  18, No 1, pp. 38‐52.  Katz, E. & Lazarsfeldt, P. F. (1955) Personal Influence; The part played by people in the flow of mass communication. Free  Press: Glencoe, IL.  Lagrosen, S. & Josefsson, P. (2011), Social media marketing as an entrepreneurial learning process. International Journal of  Technology Marketing, Vol. 6, No. 4, pp. 331‐340.  Liu, Y.  (2010) Word of mouth for movies: Its dynamics and impact on box office revenue, Journal of Marketing, Vol. 70,  July, pp. 74‐89.  Palmer, A., and Koenig‐Lewis, N. (2009) An experimental social network‐based approach to direct marketing. Int. Journal of  Digital Marketing, Vol 3, No. 4, pp.162‐176.  Pierson, J. & Heyman, R. (2011), Social media and cookies: challenges for online privacy. Info, Vol. 13, No. 6, pp. 30‐42.  Ström, Per (2010) Sociala medier. Gratis marknadsföring och opinionsbildning. Liber AB, Malmö.  Zarella, F. (2009) The social media marketing book: O’Reilli, Sebastopol, CA 

57


Building the Persuasiveness Into Information Systems  Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas  VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland, Oulu, Finland  marja.harjumaa@vtt.fi  salla.muuraiskangas@vtt.fi    Abstract:  Often  the  purpose  of  personal  health  and  wellbeing  systems  is  to  change  users’  behaviour.  Many  theoretical  frameworks have been developed to support the design and evaluation of these persuasive systems for behaviour change,  but their design remains challenging. No systematic way yet exists by which to put the information into practice and build  in persuasiveness effectively. The aim of this study is to investigate how the Persuasive Systems Design (PSD) model can be  utilised to support an identification of persuasive aspects in the early stages of iterative, user‐centred, information systems  development.  To  do  this,  the  study  integrates  the  PSD  model  into  the  development  of  two  health‐related  behaviour  change support systems. In Case 1, the purpose of using the PSD model was to identify new persuasive functionality within  a  fall  risk  assessment  and  fall  prevention  system.  In  Case  2,  the  purpose  of  using  the  PSD  model  was  to  identify  new  persuasive  functionality  and  new  service  concepts  within  an  existing  smartphone  application  for  mental  wellbeing.  The  study  reveals  that  the  PSD  model  can  be  successfully  applied  during  the  user  requirements  analysis  and  concept  design  phases  to  identify  new  potential  persuasive  functionalities.  In  both  Case  1 and 2,  this  resulted  in  having  more  variety  in  persuasive functionalities compared to those in the initial user requirements or existing application. It should be pointed  out however that the high number of persuasive functionalities does not necessarily guarantee an effective system nor the  users’ adherence to the intervention delivered through the system.    Keywords: behaviour change support systems, persuasive systems design, design process, evaluation, framework, health,  well‐being 

1. Introduction Huge  challenges  exist  in  treating  a  large  population  using  traditional  reactive  healthcare.  Therefore  a  need  exists to develop more proactive patient‐centred models. Personal health technology can be delivered at low‐ cost to large groups of people and it can be a competitive alternative to traditional care (Murray, 2012). Often  the  purpose  of  personal  health  and  wellbeing  systems  is  to  change  users’  behaviour.  Behaviour  change  support  systems  (BCSS)  provide  content  and  functionalities  that  engage  users  with  new  behaviours,  make  them  easy  to perform  and  support users  in  their  everyday  lives.  A  BCSS  can  be  defined  as  “a  sociotechnical  information system with psychological and behavioral outcomes designed to form, alter or reinforce attitudes,  behaviors or an act of complying without using coercion or deception” (Oinas‐Kukkonen, 2012). There already  exist a number of theoretical and practical approaches to the design and evaluation of persuasive systems for  behaviour  change.  Regardless  of  the  abundance  of  various  approaches,  however,  designers  and  researchers  struggle  with  limited  understanding  of how  behaviour change  support systems  should  be designed.  There  is  therefore  room  for  a  study  that  addresses  how  to  integrate  persuasive  design  approaches  into  the  development of personal health and wellbeing systems.    The  concept  of  BCSS  suggests  that  information  systems  (IS)  can  be  treated  as  the  core  of  research  into  persuasion, influence, nudge and coercion, whether they are web‐based, mobile, ubiquitous applications, or  more traditional information systems (Oinas‐Kukkonen, 2012). One of the key constructs of the BCSS concept  is  the  Persuasive  Systems  Design  (PSD)  model  (Oinas‐Kukkonen  and  Harjumaa,  2009)  which  can  be  used  to  analyse the persuasive potential of the system. It is a framework which discusses the process of designing and  evaluating persuasive systems, i.e. systems designed for changing users’ attitudes, behaviour or both.    This study describes experiences from two health‐related system design cases. The objective of both of these  systems is to deliver an intervention which seeks to make positive change in the health behaviour of the users.  Case 1 involves a fall risk assessment and fall prevention system to deliver an intervention designed to reduce  fall risk. Case 2 involves an existing smartphone application designed to increase mental well‐being by teaching  skills  that  boost  psychological  flexibility  and  mental  wellness.  Web‐based  and  mobile  technologies  provide  opportunities for persuasive interaction and open a whole new world for delivering an intervention. Barak et al  (2009) define such web‐based intervention as: “...a primarily self‐guided intervention program that is executed  by means of a prescriptive online program operated through a website and used by consumers seeking health‐  and mental health–related assistance. The intervention program itself attempts to create positive change and  or  improve/enhance  knowledge,  awareness,  and  understanding  via  the  provision  of  sound  health‐related 

58


Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas  material and use of interactive web‐based components.” It is important to plan interventions carefully in order  to ensure the information system becomes a successful intervention.    The  aim  of  this  study  is  to  investigate  how  the  Persuasive  Systems  Design  (PSD)  model  can  be  utilised  to  support the identification of persuasive aspects in the early stages of iterative, user‐centred IS development.    The PSD model and a Persuasive Technology Design Canvas, which was created especially for this study based  on  the  PSD  model,  were  used  as  theoretical  frameworks  in  both  cases.  The  PSD  model  provides  28  design  principles  for  persuasiveness  under  four  categories:  primary  task,  dialogue,  system  credibility  and  social  support.  The  model  was  selected  since  it  has  been  applied  in  the  evaluation  of  the  persuasiveness  of  information systems, but there are few reported instances where it would have been used in the design phase. 

2. Background Development  of  personal  health  and  wellbeing  systems  is  often  characterised  by  a  multidisciplinary  design  team,  customer  orientation,  and  iterative  development.  In  the  past  when  traditional  waterfall‐oriented  process was used, it led to a long development cycle. Customers and users were very often involved only in the  beginning to write the requirements and then at the end to accept the software, which did not work very well  (Cohn, 2004). In agile software development methods, such as Extreme Programming and Scrum, the process  is iterative and customers and users remain involved throughout the duration of the project. The benefits of  this kind of approach are that it helps to prioritize the functionalities and to describe the intended behaviour  of  the  product.  (Cohn,  2004)  However,  when  the  product  is  designed  for  health  behaviour  change,  also  its  persuasive aspects should be considered.    There are many approaches to the design of persuasive systems. These approaches can be roughly grouped  based  on  their  focus  on  1)  users,  2)  technology  or  3)  the  whole  design  and  evaluation  process  (i.e.  holistic  approaches).  In  a  design  process,  it  is  possible  and  even  favourable  to  use  a  combination  of  guidelines  and  principles from each approach to form a successful persuasive system.    When the focus is on the users and their behaviour change processes, there are plenty of theories addressing  this  aspect  of  human  behaviour.  These  include  the  Theory  of  Reasoned  Action  (Fishbein  and  Ajzen,  1975),  Theory  of  Planned  Behavior  (Ajzen,  1991),  Self‐efficacy  Theory  (Bandura,  1977)  and  Elaboration  Likelihood  Model (Petty and Cacioppo, 1986).     More recent approaches include the Fogg Behaviour Model (FBM) which states that the behaviour is a product  of three factors: motivation, ability and triggers (Fogg, 2009). There are also models for understanding general  health behaviour, such as the Health Belief Model (also known as the Health Action Model). According to this  model  a  person  takes  action  to  alter  their  health‐related  behaviour  for  specific  reasons:  if  they  regard  themselves  as  being  susceptible  to  a  particular  condition;  if  they  believe  it  to  have  serious  consequences;  if  they  believe  that  the  anticipated  barriers  to  (or  costs  of)  taking  the  action  are  outweighted  by  its  benefits  (Strecher and Rosenstock, 1997).     There are also approaches that distinguish different stages of behaviour change. They can be used for adapting  the system to react in the most beneficial way in relation to the present behaviour change stage the person is  in.  Examples  include  the  Transtheoretical  Model  which  describes  six  stages  of  health  behaviour  change  (Prochaska  and  Velicer,  1997).  Recently,  Li  et  al  (2010)  have  presented  a  five  stage  process  of  behaviour  change when people turn from passive into active behaviours.    When  the  focus  is  on  the  technology,  designing  the  product  and  its  features  are  at  the  core.  Most  design  principles  and  heuristics  fall  into  this  category.  Fogg  (2003)  defines  three  roles  for  persuasive  computer  technology; they serve as tools, media or social actors. The Design With Intent Method provides 101 ideation  cards with questions to induce ideas for the design, keeping the intent in mind (Lockton et al., 2010). Many  others  have  also  presented  design  principles,  guidelines  or  strategies  to  design  technology  for  behaviour  change.  Nawyn  et  al.  (2006)  list  three  types  of  strategies  for  behaviour  modification:  user  experience  strategies, activity transition strategies and proactive interface strategies.   

59


Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas    When the focus is on the whole process, the objective is to analyse the big picture and guide the entire process  from  idea  creation  to  the  final  product.  The  approach  described  by  Oinas‐Kukkonen  and  Harjumaa  (2009)  provides an overview of the stages in persuasive systems development. The stages include: 1) understanding  the issues in the background, 2) analysing the context with its intent, event and strategy and 3) defining the  software  requirements  using  design  principles.  Van  Gemert‐Pijnen  et  al.  (2011)  describe  six  principles  for  a  participatory eHealth development process. According to these principles eHealth technology development is  one  that:  1)  is  a  participatory  process,  2)  involves  continuous  evaluation  cycles,  3)  is  intertwined  with  implementation,  4)  changes  the  organization  of  health  care,  5)  should  involve  persuasive  design  techniques  and 6) needs advanced methods to assess impact. 

3. Research setting  3.1 Research method  In order to integrate the PSD model into the systems development it was necessary to select real life practice‐ based problems where this kind of design approach was needed and to use the PSD model in them. Thus, the  case research strategy was selected as the research method. The selected cases represent typical, information‐ rich cases from which it is possible to learn from the persuasive system’s development.    According to Yin (2009) case study is an empirical enquiry that investigates a contemporary phenomenon in  depth and within its real‐life context, especially when the boundaries between phenomenon and context are  not  clearly  evident.  In  case  study  there  can  be  many  variables  of  interest,  it  relies  on  multiple  sources  of  evidence,  and  it  benefits  from  the  prior  development  of  technological  propositions  to  guide  data  collection  and analysis. If the same study contains more than a single case, it is defined as a multiple‐case study. It can be  considered that single‐ and multiple‐case designs are variants within the same methodological framework and  no  broad  distinction  is  made  between  them.  The  advantage  of  multiple‐case  designs  is  that  they  are  often  considered  more  compelling  than  single‐case  designs.  It  should  be  noted  however,  that  single‐case  designs  have their place in solving research problems related to unusual or rare cases, as an example. (Yin, 2009)    The  goal  of  the  multiple‐case  study  was  to  find  out  how  the  PSD  model  can  be  utilised  to  support  the  identification of persuasive functionalities that would increase the persuasiveness of the system. Because one  of the objectives of the PSD model is to show examples of how the suggested persuasive design principles can  be  transformed  into  software  requirements  and  further  implemented  as  actual  system  features  (Oinas‐ Kukkonen and Harjumaa, 2009), the PSD model was applied during the user requirements analysis and concept  design phases. In practise this meant that a co‐creation session was organised for the people working in the  two  selected  cases.  In  a  co‐creation  session  people  work  in  collaboration  and  aim  to  explore  potential  directions and gather a wide range of perspectives in the process to be used as inspiration of the core design  team (Stickdorn and Schneider 2011).     The first co‐creation session was organised in November 2012 (Case 2) and the second in February 2013 (Case  1).  In  total  nine  people  participated  in  the  co‐creation  sessions  and  they  all  were  working  as  researchers  in  their  respective  projects.  Their  expertise  ranged  from  psychology  to  engineering.  The  material  from  the  co‐ creation sessions was subsequently analysed. It included the notes of the two researchers who facilitated the  designs of each project, and adhesive notes which contained new functionalities envisioned by the participants  during  the  co‐creation  sessions.  Individual  case  reports  were  written  after  the  analysis  and  cross‐case  conclusions were drawn and reported. 

3.2 Case 1: Fall risk assessment and fall prevention system  Case 1 is a fall risk assessment and fall prevention system for elderly care. It is called Aging in Balance system  and it is aimed at preventing falls amongst older people by assessing the fall risk probability and providing a  personalised  care  plan  to  reduce  the  likelihood  of  a  fall.  The  target  user  group  of  the  system  includes  older  people, their possible carers and health care professionals (Immonen et al., 2012).    The  system  has  several  components,  partly  grounded  on  existing  components  used  by  the  various  stakeholders  developing  the  system  together.  The  requirements  analysis  and  concept  design  of  the  whole  system included the creation of five scenarios for the use of the prospective system and their evaluation via  focus  group  interviews  with  older  people  in  Finland  and  Spain.  In  this  study,  the  design  work  analysed  is 

60


Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas  limited to a home exercise programme which will form part of the overall system (see Figure 1). Before the co‐ creation session one of the designers defined a preliminary list of the user requirements which was intended  to describe the most important functionalities of the system. 

Figure 1: The aging in balance system 

3.3 Case 2: Smartphone application for mental wellbeing  Case 2 is a smartphone application for learning skills related to psychological flexibility and wellbeing (Ahtinen  et al., 2012). It is called Oiva and is targeted at working age people who suffer from stress and declined mental  and physical well‐being. The application has been created with the cooperation of experts in psychology, user‐ centred  design  and  technology,  and  it  delivers  an  intervention  program  in  bite‐sized  daily  sessions.  The  intervention  program  is  based  on  Acceptance  and  Commitment  Therapy  (ACT),  which  aims  to  increase  psychological  flexibility:  “the  ability  to  contact  the  present  moment  more  fully  as  a  conscious  human  being,  and to change or persist in behaviour when doing so serves valued ends” (Hayes et al., 2006). The application  contains four intervention modules called “paths”. Three of the paths are aimed at teaching the user the six  core processes of ACT (see Figure 2). 

Figure 2: The main menu of Oiva  The  design  process  had  already  included  many  iterative  cycles.  The  initial  idea  of  the  application  had  been  created based on a needs assessment with a multidisciplinary team, and a model of the therapy process had  been  created  and  used  to  define  the  structure  of  the  application.  ACT‐based  content  and  exercises  were  adapted  for  the  mobile  phone  by  creating  audio  and  video  versions  of  exercises  and  abbreviating  textual 

61


Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas    content in order to support short daily usage sessions. Users were involved in several phases of the design to  ensure that the application would be easy to operate and engage them in its use across several weeks (Ahtinen  et al., 2012) 

4. Results 4.1 Integrating the PSD model into the development process  In  both  Cases,  the  human‐centred  design  process  was  implemented  according  to  a  prototyping  paradigm  where ‘quick design’ occurs after a requirements analysis. It aims to represent those functionalities that will be  visible to the user and leads to the construction of a prototype. The prototype is evaluated by the user and is  used  to  refine  requirements.  This  iterative  cycle  is  repeated  until  the  prototype  satisfies  the  requirements.  During the iterative process the designers are able to develop a better understanding what needs to be done  (Pressman, 2000).    The  PSD  model  was  integrated  into  the process  by  using  it  in  the  requirements  analysis  and  concept  design  phases. In Case 1, there were no existing prototypes of the software. In Case 2, the design process was already  much  further  advanced.  There  was  an  existing  prototype,  a  smartphone  application,  which  already  had  the  basic  functionality  implemented  and  it  was  under  validation  in  randomized  controlled  trials  to  prove  the  effectiveness of the intervention when delivered via the mobile channel. Figure 3 describes the development  processes of the two Cases (darker colours represent the completed phases). 

Figure 3: Development processes of cases 1 and 2  In this study the PSD model was integrated into the development work by organising a co‐creation session for  the people working in both of the projects. The PSD model was brought closer to practice by outlining a design  canvas  which  aimed  at  facilitating  the  ideation  work.  The  basic  building  blocks  of  the  resulting  Persuasive  Technology  Design  Canvas  are:  1)  Analysis  of  the  intention,  2)  Design  of  the  content  and  3)  Design  of  the  functionalities (see Figure 4). To analyse the intention, it is useful to ask: “who, what, when, where and why”.  To  design  the content  it  is  useful  to  ask  “what”,  i.e.  what  theories,  methods  or  assumptions  the  technology  relies  on,  what  kind  of  content  is  provided  and  what  kind  of  content  could  be  provided.  To  design  the  functionalities  it  is  useful  to  ask:  “how”,  i.e.  how  the  technology  has  been  implemented  and  how  the  technology could be implemented. The four categories under the functionalities contain the design principles  of the PSD model. The Persuasive Technology Design Canvas is not limited to any particular theoretical model  of behaviour change; it can be used across many kinds of design work.    At the start of both co‐creation sessions, the PSD model was introduced to the participants and the original  article  including  detailed  descriptions  of  the  design  principles  was  distributed  to  them.  The  Persuasive  Technology  Design  Canvas  was  drawn  on  a  large  board.  The  researchers  discussed  and  created  a  shared  understanding of the intention and content of the behaviour change support system and wrote it down on the  board.  Then  they  worked  independently  to  envision  new  functionalities  based  on  the  design  principles  and  wrote  their  ideas  on  adhesive  notes.  In  Case  2,  the  participants  identified  first  the  existing  persuasive  functionalities using the Persuasive Technology Design Canvas, and then potential future functionalities. After  the participants had gone through all categories, the adhesive notes were grouped and analysed. The result 

62


Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas  was  an  affinity  diagram  comprised  of  all  of  the  new  potential  functionalities  that  could  be  included  in  the  design of the system.  Analysis

1. Intention

Design

2. Content

3. Functionalities Primary task

Dialogue

Credibility

Social support

Figure 4: The persuasive technology design canvas  Because there was empirical material collected from a previous small‐scale field study in Case 2, this was also  used to identify new functionalities and create new concept ideas for further discussion and development. This  material was already analysed and reported but not published. After participants had identified existing and  future  persuasive  functionalities  with  the  Persuasive  Technology  Design  Canvas,  they  used  this  empirical  material to identify new functionalities and create new service concepts. 

4.2 The outcome of the integrated process  Material from the co‐creation sessions was analysed afterwards. The adhesive notes from Case 1 were written  up and the quantity of new persuasive functionalities envisioned by the participants was compared with the  quantity  of  persuasive  functionalities  in  the  initial  user  requirements  document.  Initially  there  were  15  different persuasive functionalities applying principles from three categories: 1) primary support, 2) dialogue  support  and  3)  social  support.  After  the  co‐creation  workshop  there  were  39  different  functionalities  from  applying principles from the four PSD model categories (see Table 1).    Adhesive notes from Case 2 were also written up and the quantity of new persuasive functionalities envisioned  by the participants was compared with the quantity of the existing persuasive functionalities. Participants in  the  co‐creation  session  identified  that  in  the  current  application  there  were  17  different  persuasive  functionalities  applying  principles  from  three  categories:  1)  primary  support,  2)  dialogue  support  and  3)  credibility support. After the co‐creation workshop there were 27 different functionalities applying principles  from the four PSD model categories (see Table 1). In addition, dozens of new ideas were identified based on  the  empirical  data.  These  included  not  only  new  requirements  but  also  improvement  ideas  and  service  concepts. Overlapping items were removed in both Cases.  Table 1: Quantity of the persuasive functionalities before and after the co‐creation session    Case one  Case two 

Before 15  17 

After 39  27 

Increase 160 %  60 % 

4.2.1 Case 1: Fall risk assessment and fall prevention system: persuasive functionalities  In Case 1 the basic functionality of the personalised training program had many similarities with the initial user  requirements, which had been defined earlier. It was expected that a personalised training programme with  goal‐setting,  self‐monitoring  and  feedback  features  would  motivate  older  users  to  exercise  and  thus,  the  likelihood  of  fall  would  be  reduced.  A  concrete  plan  and  schedule  of  performing  the  intended  balance  exercises should be provided for the users and they should be reminded at opportune moments to perform  the  exercises.  The  system  should  offer  instructions  for  how  to  perform  the  intended  behaviour  in  practice,  provide motivational information related to the exercises and give positive feedback when users reached their  goals.    As  a  consequence  of  using  the  PSD  model  new  functionalities  were  identified.  It  was  discovered  that  simulations  of  the  consequences  of  exercising  (or  not  exercising)  should  be  used  to  increase  exercise 

63


Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas    motivation.  The  system  should  provide  links  to  external  websites  providing  useful  and  trustworthy  information.  It  was  also  found  that  the  exercise  instructions  should  adapt  over  time  as  users  would  require  more challenging exercises.    Regarding  the  four  categories  within  the  PSD  model,  the  credibility  and  social  support  categories  were  the  least  taken  into  account  in  the  initial  user  requirements.  It  was  found  that  the  system  should  provide  information about the validity of the training program, show third party endorsements and logos in order to  increase the credibility. The end‐users should be provided an opportunity to send feedback to the developers  of the solution. The potential for including group functionalities was recognised to be important, although in  the first phase the system was targeted for individuals. End‐users could have a club, as they might in real life,  and  they  should  have  shared  goals.  The  system  should  monitor  the  group’s  progress  and  give  feedback  accordingly.  Club  members  should  have  an  opportunity  to  send  suggestions  about  useful  exercises  to  other  club members, discuss with the others, share their exercises with the others, have public recognition of their  achievements,  know  when  the  others  are  performing  their  exercises,  and  to  volunteer  to  help  others  to  achieve their goals.    New, non‐functional requirements were also identified in addition to the persuasive functionalities mentioned  above. To list a few, the system should be error free, easy to use, and the user interface should be “pleasant  and  credible  looking”  from  an  older  person’s  viewpoint.  Although  one  of  the  postulates  of  the  PSD  model  states that the system should aim at being both useful and easy to use (Oinas‐Kukkonen and Harjumaa 2009),  these aspects are general software qualities and not specific to persuasive systems only.  4.2.2 Case 2: Smartphone application for mental wellbeing: persuasive functionalities  In  Case  2,  the  existing  application  already  followed  many  persuasion  principles.  It  provided  thorough  opportunities to rehearsal, which can enable people to change their attitudes or behaviour. Exercises were in  both textual and audio format and users had self‐monitoring potential through keeping a diary and activity log  showing how many exercises were carried out. It suggested a program, “a path”, to follow, had reminders of  exercises, and reduced barriers to the user performing the exercises when compared for example to a book  with written instructions. It provided expertise by showing video presentations by a real therapist and stated  the evidence‐based theory behind the application. It motivated users by giving a virtual reward for performing  an exercise.    As  a  consequence  of  using  the  PSD  model,  new  functionalities  were  identified.  The  system  should  provide  feedback on the user’s progress with regards to their goals, skills and committed actions. It should also give  recognition via praise for performing the target behaviour. The system should adopt the role of a therapist, or  virtual coach, who is always available to help. The content should be tailored to the interests and needs of the  user, and the users should be provided with testimonials from other users who have been helped by using the  application.     Many  of  the  functionalities  related  to  creating  a  more  engaging  user  experience,  such  as  providing  a  more  attractive  look  and feel.  The system  should  also  provide opportunities to  rehearse difficult  situations  in  role  play and provide animations, pictures or mini movies to emphasize of the benefits of the exercises. Similarly to  Case 1, the credibility and social support categories of the PSD model were the least taken into account in the  existing  design.  To  increase  credibility,  the  system  should  provide  information  on  who  provides  the  application, evidence of the effectiveness of the therapy method, third party endorsements and logos as well  as the means to verify the accuracy of the content. Regarding “social functionalities” it was discovered early in  the design session that although it is possible to identify them, they might not be applicable in the context of  mental  wellbeing. As  an  example,  “competing  with  others  in  performing  exercises”  is  not useful,  but  on  the  other hand, it could be useful to provide opportunities to follow other users’ progress at some level, because  this might encourage people to perform their own exercises.    In  Case  2,  new  improvement  ideas  and  functionalities  were  identified  also  based  on  the  empirical  material  collected  from  a  previous  study.  Many  of  them  concerned  ways  to  better  integrate  the  solution  into  the  everyday lives of the users, where a typical barrier amongst the field trial users was being too busy to carry out  the exercises. Similarly to the requirements gathered using the PSD model, the need for a virtual coach and a  more engaging user experience were suggested. While the principles of the social support category were not 

64


Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas  earlier considered especially applicable, it was identified that supporting communication or sharing exercises  with friends and family could be useful. 

4.3 Observations from the process  When participants began the co‐creation session looking at the definition of intention, it was found that the  intention  part  of  the  Persuasive  Technology  Design  Canvas  was  not  self‐explanatory.  One  participant  commented that there can be different kinds of intentions, such as theory‐driven or more practical ones, and it  was  not  clear  what  was  meant  in  the  Canvas.  In  persuasive  design,  ‘intention’  refers  less  to  the  ‘design  objectives’ in general, than to a focus on the intent to change attitudes or behaviours. Fogg (1998) has stated  that persuasion requires intentionality, i.e. intent to change attitudes or behaviours.    It was observed that the PSD model was more useful in Case 1 than Case 2, which may be due to the fact that  in Case 1 the participants had less understanding and experience of the users and use context and thus, the  participants were more open to new ideas. In Case 2, the designers had already had frequent contacts with the  potential end‐users and were armed with findings from a prior field trial, and thus, their experience was more  evident when making comparisons using the PSD model.    In both Cases it was observed that some principles were overlapping, and participants found these somewhat  confusing. They also commented that there were many principles in credibility and social support categories  that  overlapped.  In  both  Cases  participants  doubted  the  efficacy  of  virtual  rewards.  They  stated  that  improvements  in  health  are  the  best  motivation  for  continuing  the  suggested  behaviours  and  the  system  should  make  these  improvements  more  obvious,  e.g.  by  providing  more  personalised  feedback  rather  than  virtual rewards or praise.    In Case 2 it was identified that the application could provide more guidance, but it was difficult to include this  in any of the four categories of the PSD model. The ability to adapt was also considered to be important for the  persuasiveness of the system, but it was difficult to find a corresponding principle from the PSD model. 

5. Discussion and conclusions  The  aim  of  this  study  was  to  investigate  how  the  Persuasive  Systems  Design  (PSD)  model  can  be  utilised  to  support the identification of persuasive aspects in the early stages of iterative, user‐centred IS development. It  was  integrated  into  the  development  process  by  using  it  in  the  requirements  analysis  and  concept  design  phases through organising a co‐creation session where a Persuasive Technology Design Canvas was used.    It  was  found  that  where  the  PSD  model  was  utilized,  participants  of  the  co‐creation  sessions  were  able  to  identify more persuasive functionalities compared to their existing preliminary user requirements or designs.  The  most  important  result  is,  however,  the  increased  awareness  of  the  features  needed  to  accomplish  a  personal  health  and  wellbeing  system  that  changes  users’  behaviour.  The  earlier  the  different  requirements  are identified and communicated to the development team the easier and cheaper it is to integrate them into  the final system.    This study has some limitations. Although the research approach was a multiple‐case study and thus, the study  was once replicated, it is not guaranteed that the use of the PSD model would lead to a larger set of persuasive  functionalities  in  every  case.  The  scope  of  the  project  and  the  characteristics  of  the  workshop  participants  might influence on the results as well as the starting point where the process outcome is compared. Also, it is  important  to  remember  that  adding  persuasive  functionalities  to  a  system  does  not  make  it  automatically  persuasive. According to Fogg (1998) actually the “persuasive nature of a computer does not reside with the  object  itself;  instead,  a  computer  being  classified  as  ‘persuasive’  depends  on  the  context  of  creation,  distribution, and adoption”. The PSD model does not suggest what kind of content is provided for the users or  what kind of value will be created as a consequence of system use, which is also important to consider in the  design.  Thus,  the  customers  and  users  should  still  be  involved  throughout  the  duration  of  the  project.  This  study  contributes  to  the  IS  field  by  demonstrating  how  persuasiveness  can  be  built  into  systems.  It  also  specified the purpose of the PSD model; it clearly helps to identify new requirements for persuasive systems. 

65


Marja Harjumaa and Salla Muuraiskangas   

Acknowledgments We want to thank our colleagues who took part in the co‐creation sessions, people who kindly provided their  comments  to  the  manuscript,  the  Finnish  Funding  Agency  for  Technology  and  Innovation  and  AAL  JP  for  financially supporting this research. 

References Ahtinen, A., Välkkynen, P., Mattila, E., Kaipainen, K., Ermes, M., Sairanen, E., Myllymäki, T. and Lappalainen, R. (2012)  “Oiva: A mobile phone intervention for psychological flexibility and wellbeing”, in Proceedings of NordiCHI 2012  Workshop on Designing for Wellness and Behavior Change. Copenhagen, Denmark, October 2012.  Ajzen, I. (1991) “The theory of planned behaviour”, Organizational Behavior and Human Decision Processes, Vol. 50, No. 2,  pp 179–211.  Bandura, A. (1977) “Self‐efficacy: toward a unifying theory of behavioral change”, Psychological Review, Vol. 84, pp 191– 215.  Barak, A., Klein, B. and Proudfoot J.G. (2009) “Defining internet‐supported therapeutic interventions”, Annals of Behavioral  Medicine, Vol. 38, No.1, pp 4–17.  Cohn, M. (2004) User Stories Applied for Agile Software Development. Addison‐Wesley, Boston.  Fishbein, M. and Ajzen, I. (1975) Belief, attitude, intention, and behavior: an introduction to theory and research. Addison‐ Wesley, Reading.  Fogg, B.J. (1998) “Persuasive Computers: Perspectives and Research Directions”, in Proceedings of CHI ’98, Los Angeles,  April 1998, pp. 225‐232.  Fogg, B.J. (2003) Persuasive Technology: Using Computers to Change what we Think and do. Morgan Kaufmann Publishers,  San Francisco.  Fogg, B.J. (2009) “A Behavior Model for Persuasive Design”, in Proceedings of Persuasive ´09, Claremont, April 2009, Article  No. 40.  Hayes, T.L., Hagler, S., Austin, D., Kaye, J. and Pavel, M. (2009) “Unobtrusive assessment of walking speed in the home  using inexpensive PIR sensors”, in Proceedings of the International Conference of IEEE Engineering in Medicine and  Biology Society, Minneapolis, September 2009, pp 7248–7251.  Immonen, M., Eklund, P.  Similä, H., Petäkoski‐Hult, T. (2012) "Ageing in balance – Working towards less falls among older  adults", presentation and video at AAL Forum, Eindhoven, September 2012.  Li, I., Dey, A. and Forlizzi, J. (2010) “A Stage‐Based Model of Personal Informatics Systems”, in Proceedings of CHI 2010,  Atlanta, April 2010, pp 557‐566.  Lockton, D., Harrison, D. and Stanton, N. (2010) “The Design with Intent Method: A design tool for influencing user  behaviour”, Applied Ergonomics, Vol. 41, No. 3, pp. 382–392.  Murray, E. (2012) “Web‐Based Interventions for Behavior Change and Self‐Management: Potential, Pitfalls, and Progress”,  MEDICINE 2.0, Vol. 1, No. 2: e3.  Nawyn, J., Intille, S. and Larson, K. (2006) “Embedding Behavior Modification Strategies into a Consumer Electronic Device:  A Case Study”, in UbiComp 2006: Ubiquitous Computing, Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 4206, pp 297‐314.  Oinas‐Kukkonen, H. and Harjumaa, M. (2009) “Persuasive Systems Design: Key Issues, Process Model, and System  Features”, Communications of the Association for Information Systems, Vol. 24, No. 1, pp 485–500.  Oinas‐Kukkonen, H. (2012) “A Foundation for the Study of Behavior Change Support Systems”, Personal and Ubiquitous  Computing, July 2012. Springer‐Verlag, London. DOI: 10.1007/s00779‐012‐0591‐5  Petty, R.E. and Cacioppo, J.T. (1986) Communication and persuasion: central and peripheral routes to attitude change.  Springer, New York.  Pressman, R.S. (2000) Software Engineering: a practitioner's perspective. McGraw‐Hill Publishing Company, New York.  Prochaska, J.O. and Velicer, W.F. (1997) “The transtheoretical model of health behavior change”, American Journal of  Health Promotion, Vol. 12, No. 1, pp 38‐48.  Stickdorn, M. and Schneider, J. 2011. This is Service Design Thinking. Amsterdam: BIS Publishers.  Strecher, V. and Rosenstock, I. (1997) “The health belief model”, Cambridge Handbook of Psychology, Health, and  Medicine, (Eds.) Baum, A., Newman, S., Weinman, J., West, R. and McManus, C. Cambridge University Press,  Cambridge.  Van Gemert‐Pijnen, J.E.W.C., Nijland, N., Van Limburg, M., Ossebaard, H.C., Kelders, S.M., Eysenbach, G. and Seydel, E.R.  (2011) “A holistic framework to improve the uptake and impact of eHealth technologies”, Journal of Medical Internet  Research, Vol. 13, No. 4: e111.  th Yin, R.K. (2009) Case Study Research – Design and Methods 4  Edition. Sage, London. 

66


Communications Management in Scrum Projects  Vered Holzmann and Ilanit Panizel   Faculty of Management of Technology, Holon institute of Technology ‐ HIT, Holon, Israel  veredhz@hit.ac.il  ilanit.panizel@gmail.com    Abstract:  The  last  decade  is  characterized,  in  many  IT  companies,  by  changing  the  system  development  life  cycle  methodology  from  the  classical  waterfall  or  prototype  methods  to  the  agile  methodology  of  development.  The  agile  methodology,  developed  in  the  beginning  of  2000's,  encourages  the  development  of  working  software  within  a  defined  framework,  while  accepting  changes  and  keeping  the  customer  involved  during  the  whole  project.  The  present  paper  examines the relationship between the project management‐customer's communication and the project success. The agile  software development methodology was introduced in February 2001, when the Agile Manifesto was conceived, based on  four  values:  (1)  Individuals  and  interactions  over  processes  and  tools;  (2)  Working  software  over  comprehensive  documentation; (3) Customer collaboration over contract negotiation; and (4) Responding to change over following a plan.  The  scrum  model  for  developing  software  applies  the  agile  values  and  methodology  while  presenting  a  framework,  terminology,  roles  and  ceremonies  to  perform  successful  projects.  The  core  roles  include  the  development  team,  the  scrum  master,  and  the  product  owner  who  represents  the  customer  and  the  users.  Effective  communication  with  the  various  stakeholders  in  a  scrum  project,  aimed  to  develop  a  new  product  or  software,  is  essential.  The  scrum  method  defines a series of sprints, of two to four weeks, in which the team performs the tasks to be completed. The current paper  presents  a  quantitative  research,  where  61  managers  and  customers  of  IT  scrum  projects,  answered  a  reliable  questionnaire.  The  study  investigated  the  perceived  success  of  agile  projects  as  measured  by  meeting  schedule,  budget  and performance requirements, as well as customer satisfaction and long term achievements such as business objectives  and  development  of  core  competencies.  Findings  reveal  that  effective  communication  is  a  dominant  factor  in  a  success  scrum project. Furthermore, the communications with the customer was characterized by the following items: face‐to‐face  conversations, telephone and email correspondences, and accepting changes following conversations with the customer.  Analysis of the virtual communication tools effectiveness shows that although the project team members are satisfied with  the use of these communication media tools, the tools are usually not evaluated on an economical basis but rather based  on a convenience of use. The study highlights the importance of communications management in IT project management  as applied these days. Professionals and project managers should be aware to the impact of effective communications on  the project success and to be able to identify the weak areas in their arena of communications.    Keywords: communications management; agile; scrum; project management; project success 

1. Introduction Information Technology (IT) companies tend to change the methodology of developing new products, from the  well‐established  and  known  waterfall  methodology,  which  was  introduced  in  the  1970's  by  Winston  Royce  (1970), to a dynamic approach that fits to the short, intensive product life cycle of the 21st century. In 2001 the  agile  software  development  approach  was  form,  based  on  the  understanding  that  the  current  software  and  information  technology  industry  is  energetic  and  changing  as  opposed  to  the  solid  known  industry  of  construction and engineering.     The  agile  approach  is  focused  on  developing,  within  a  defined  short  timeframe,  a  quality  product  that  is  aligned  with  the  changing  requirements,  while  considering  the  customer's  needs  and  preferences  and  maintaining effective and open communication with the customer. The methodology is based on four values:  (1)  Individuals  and  interactions  over  processes  and  tools;  (2)  Working  software  over  comprehensive  documentation;  (3)  Customer  collaboration  over  contract  negotiation;  and  (4)  Responding  to  change  over  following a plan.     Communications  management  is  a  core  concept  in  agile  because  it  is  required  to  communicate  with  the  customer and with the project team throughout the project in order to achieve the best product, therefore to  achieve project success. Several studies examined waterfall vs. agile project management over the years. They  report that waterfall teams invested more time in documentation while agile teams coded and documented  design.  They  also  found  that  short  duration  projects  with  small  development  teams  achieve  similar  results  although  worked  with  different  methodologies.  However,  all  these  studies  support  the  identification  of  communications and coordination as a key success factor in software development projects (Feng & Sedano,  2011; Tsun & Dac‐Buu, 2008; Andersen et al., 2006).   

67


Vered Holzmann and Ilanit Panizel  The  current  study  aims  to  explore  the  relationship  between  the  project  management‐customer's  communication and the project success. It is focused on investigating IT projects, developing software based  on  the  agile  methodology.  We  investigated  the  perceived  success  of  agile  projects  as  measured  by  meeting  schedule, budget and performance requirements, as well as customer satisfaction and long term achievements  such  as  business  objectives  and  development  of  core  competencies.  The  research  independent  variable  is  a  composed variable which represents the perceived communications.     The following part reviews the communication processes in general and its implementation in agile projects in  particular. The next part describes the study method, including the sample and the questionnaire which was  used  to  collect  data.  Then,  the  research  findings  are  presented  and  the  paper  is  concludes  with  recommendations and directions for future research. 

2. Project communications management  "Communication"  is  defined  by  the  Oxford  Dictionary  as  "the  imparting  or  exchanging  of  information  by  speaking,  writing,  or  using  some  other  medium  .  .  .  means  of  sending  or  receiving  information,  such  as  telephone  lines  or  computers.  .  ."  The  communication  is  an  interpersonal  process  that  enables  the  transmission of messages, ideas, and meanings between persons. In the 1940s the communication researcher,  Harold  Laswell,  presented  a  basic  model  which  divides  the  communication  process  into  five  major  components: the sender, the message, the channel, the receiver, and the outcome of the process. The basic  model, based on the mechanistic approach, emphasized the technical aspect of the communication process.  The  model’s  foremost  shortcoming  was  that  it  represented  a  one‐direction  transfer  of  information,  and  neglected the two‐direction, circular, characteristic of communication process. In 1949, Claude Shannon and  Warren  Weaver  presented  an  advanced  communication  model,  based  on  the  model  presented  by  Laswell  (Shannon  &  Weaver,  1963).  The  new  model  introduced  feedback  as  an  additional  important  component  of  communication,  which  enriched  the  basic  model  by  converting  it  to  two‐direction,  circular,  process  presentation. This communication model is presented in the following exhibit. 

Sender

Message Encoding

Decoding

Receiver

Channel

Feedback

Noise . . .

Figure 1: Basic communication model  The  elements  presented  in  the  model  include:  sender/receiver,  message,  channel,  encoding/decoding,  feedback, and noise (Gibson et al., 1991). The Sender refers to the individual who initiate the communication  process.  The  Receiver  typically  refers  to  the  individual  who  accept  the  message  and  acts  as  the  message’s  destination. The sender and the receiver may change their roles during the communication process. Message  typically refers to the verbal and nonverbal signals that conveyed by each communicator in the communication  process. Channel is the vehicle or the medium by which the message is transferred. Encoding is the procedure  of  encryption  of  the  message  into  common  symbols  and  signs.  Decoding  refer  to  the  procedure  of  interpretation of symbols and signs while giving them meaning. Feedback creates a two‐directional, circular,  process  in  which  the  receiver  approves  he  received  the message  and ensure  he  assign  it  the  right  meaning.  And  the  Noise  refers  to  any  barrier  that  may  interrupt  the  message  exchange  process  and  cause  to  a  communication failure.     Hartley  (2001)  elaborates  on  interpersonal  communication  where  face‐to‐face  communication  between  two  people  is  not  mediated  by  any  medium  or  channel;  it  includes  only  a  small  number  of  participants  who  are  physically  close  to  each  other,  which  enable  them  to  maintain  eye  contact  and  immediate  response.  In  this  type  of  communication  both  parties  can  express  themselves  actively  and  they  can  provide  verbal  and  nonverbal  feedback.  Interpersonal  communication  is  considered  to  be  a  "rich"  communication  channel  to  transfer the message as it facilitates understanding by receiving an immediate and multi‐layers feedback that  improves  software  team  work.  Huang,  Kahai,  &  Jestice  (2010)  investigated  decision‐making  in  virtual  teams 

68


Vered Holzmann and Ilanit Panizel  and  found  that  leadership  depends  on  media  richness,  where  richer  communication  takes  less  time  and  improves trust among the project team members. These findings are supported by another study, by Purdy,  Nye & Balakrishnan (2000) who compared four communication channels for negotiation and found that media  richness  affects  required  bargaining  time,  outcome  satisfaction  and  the  desire  for  future  negotiation  interaction.  Therefore,  interpersonal  communication  is  preferred  to  other  communication  channels  such  as  written documents, videoconferences, telephone conversations, and computer‐mediated communications (&  Daft & Langel, 1988; Downs & Adrian, 2004). 

3. Agile project communications  The main processes in any development project are concept and requirements analysis, architecture design,  detailed  design,  coding,  debugging,  testing,  installation,  and  maintenance.  The  traditional  waterfall  model  is  based on sequential progress where the beginning of one stage depends on the completion of previous stage  and  on  the  documentation  that  was  produced  during  the  former  stage.  However,  this  long‐established  approach  was  found,  at  least  in  several  cases,  insufficient  for  the  dynamic  technological  environment.  Therefore,  in  2001,  the  agile  methodology  was  developed  by  a  group  of  software  projects  professionals  (Rossberg,  2008;  Sliger & Broderick,  2008).  The  four  basic  values  of  the  software  agile  approach  are:  (1)  Individuals  and  interactions  over  processes  and  tools;  (2)  Working  software  over  comprehensive  documentation;  (3)  Customer  collaboration  over  contract  negotiation;  and  (4)  Responding  to  change  over  following a plan.    The  agile  manifesto  was  published  in  2001  to  define  the  guidelines  and  principles,  as  presented  in  the  following exhibit.   1. 2. 3. 4. 5. 6. 7. 8. 9. 10. 11. 12.

Customer satisfaction by rapid delivery of useful software  Welcome changing requirements, even late in development  Working software is delivered frequently (weeks rather than months)  Working software is the principal measure of progress  Sustainable development, able to maintain a constant pace  Close, daily cooperation between business people and developers  Face‐to‐face conversation is the best form of communication (co‐location)  Projects are built around motivated individuals, who should be trusted  Continuous attention to technical excellence and good design  Simplicity—the art of maximizing the amount of work not done—is essential  Self‐organizing teams  Regular adaptation to changing circumstances 

Figure 2: The 12 principles of the agile manifesto  These principles direct the agile project team to work with the understanding that customer satisfaction is the  highest target and the software should be delivered as working product as soon as possible. The team accepts  changes as they improve the final product and make it more suitable for the customer’s needs. Three of the  manifest  principles  deal  with  communications,  cooperation  and  collaboration,  and  are  aimed  to  support  a  creative and effective environment.     The agile approach laid the foundations for several models of software development, when the most popular  are XP (Extreme Programming) and Scrum (Leffingwell, 2007; Shore & Warden, 2008). The Scrum, which is the  focus  of  the  current  study,  is  an  iterative,  incremental  and  rapid  process  for  software  project  management.  The process starts with a vision of the software system, which is later defined by the Product Owner, who is  responsible to maximize the ROI (Return on Investment), into a Product Backlog. The Product Backlog includes  a list of requirements, ordered by priority. The work is progressed by sprints, where each sprint is an iteration  of  1  to  3  weeks.  Each  sprint  starts  with  a  sprint  planning  meeting  where  the  Product  Owner  describes  the  vision and the backlog tasks to the Team, and the Team replies with an estimation of what can be completed  within the sprint timeframe. Every day during the sprint, the Team meets for a Daily Scrum meeting, which is a  15 minutes gathering where each team member answers three questions: (1) what have you done since the  last  Daily  Scrum  meeting?  (2)  What  do  you  plan  to  do  until  the  next  Daily  Scrum  meeting?  and  (3)  What 

69


Vered Holzmann and Ilanit Panizel  impediments  interfere  in  your  work  and  limit  you  from  meeting  your  commitments?  This  meeting  is  administered by the Scrum Master who is responsible to remove all impediments and enable effective work by  the Team. The Sprint ends with a Sprint Review meeting where the Team presents what was developed. They  conduct a Retrospective meeting that is dedicated to lessons learned (Schwaber, 2004; Rossberg, 2008). The  following diagram represents the Scrum process.  

Figure 3: The Scrum Skeleton (Rossberg, 2008)  The  Scrum  Team  usually  includes  5  to  9  members  from  various  professions.  In  order  to  complete  all  the  backlog tasks within the defined schedule, i.e., during the Sprint, the Scrum Team should work efficiently and  effectively.  These  professionals  are  skilled,  experienced  and  responsible  workers.  They  collaborate  as  a  coherent  team  that  takes  responsibility  on  the  project  success  or  failure.  Therefore,  communications  in  an  agile team is a core competence.    The need to exchange information in an agile project is crucial as the closure of one task serves as inputs for  the next task and the intensive work processes require accuracy, completeness, and openness. Management  of successful agile projects includes a communications plan that details the communication processes between  the team and the customer. As the relationship with the customer is established on trust and understanding,  changes  are  welcome  throughout  the  development  process  and  the  final  product  is  delivered  to  the  customer’s satisfaction. An effective communication plan includes answers to what should be communicated,  to  whom,  when,  and  how.  It  aims  to  coordinate  expectations,  thus  makes  the  customer  a  partner  in  any  decision making process in the project (Craig, 2004). 

4. The study method  In the current research we investigated the following two hypotheses:  ƒ

There is a positive correlation between the communications with the project’s customer and the project  success. 

ƒ

There is a positive correlation between the communication richness and the project success.  

The data  was  collected  by  an  Internet  anonymous  questionnaire,  which  was  sent  to  100  professionals.  The  questionnaire  was  distributed  to  project  manages  and  other  stakeholders  involved  in  agile  software  development projects, that are executed based on the Scrum model. The sample includes 56 respondents who  are experienced software project managers, team managers, and subcontractors in Scrum projects.    The  questionnaire  was  composed  of  three  sections.  Section  A:  Communication  characteristics,  which  deals  with mediums and timing of communication between the team and the customer; Section B: Project success,  which  evaluates  the  perceived  success  of  the  project;  Section  C:  Project  characteristics,  which  provides  informative data regarding the project and the management style.     It included statements on a Likert scale of 1‐6, where 1 stands for do not agree and 6 stands for totally agree,  as  recommended  by  Chomeya  (2010),  to  which  the  respondents  were  asked  to  provide  their  perception  regarding a specific Scrum project.     

70


Vered Holzmann and Ilanit Panizel  Table 1: The research questionnaire  Do Not Agree Section A: Communication characteristics 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18

1

2

Totally Agree 3

4

5

6

The information is documented in a way that all the project stakeholders can read it. The customer is updated with all relevant project’s aspects We can talk freely with the customer about any issue Management meetings are taking place as planned The customer is present at every status meeting The customer is involved in the decision making process We communicate with the customer by face-to-face meetings We communicate with the customer by mail/phone conversations The project has a dedicated portal The customer has an access to all project information layers The customer is totally involved in the project planning The customer is totally involved in the project tracking and control The customer asks for changes after joint meetings The customer asks for changes after mail correspondence or phone conversations The customer provides ongoing feedback throughout the project Customer’s changes requests are welcome by the project team The customer approves change requests before development progress The customer approves acceptance of version before a new version is developed Do Not Agree

Totally Agree

Section B: Project Success 1 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29

2

3

4

5

6

The project meets its schedule plan The project meets its scope plan The project meets its budget plan The project team is responsive for any change request The customer is satisfied with the project’s results The project contributes to the team development The project team is satisfied with the project’s results The project contributes to the organization’s business objectives The project improves the organization’s technological capabilities The organization management is satisfied with the project’s results The final product satisfies the customer’s needs

Section C: Project Characteristics Number of team members: 1-5 / 6-10 / 11-30 / 30-50 / over 50 Project Budget: Less than $100k / $100k-$500k / $500k-$2M / $2M-$10M / over $10M Project Duration: Less than 3 months / 3-6 months / 6-12 months / 1-2 years / over 2 years Geographical dispersion of project team: local / country / global Project Technology: extend an existing product line / replicate a product / develop a new product with existing platform / develop a new product new platform / upgrade an existing product / develop new technology Development model: XP / Scrum / Spiral / Prototype / other Your position in the project: Project Manager / Project Officer Master Team member / Other

/ Product Owner

/ Scrum

71


Vered Holzmann and Ilanit Panizel  The questionnaire was validated by two professional experts and two academic researchers who evaluated the  relevance and the explicitly of each question on a scale of 1‐6, where 1 stands for irrelevant/not‐clear at all  and 6 stands for very relevant/very clear. The following table summarizes the average values for each of the  evaluators’ assessments regarding the questionnaire.   Table 2: Inter‐judge questionnaire assessment  Judge Number 1 2 3 4 Average

Average Relevance Assessment 5.59 4.62 5.34 5.42 5.24

Average Explicity Assessment 4.42 5.42 5.88 5.75 5.36

The questionnaire’s reliability was tested by Alpha Cronbach. The overall questionnaire reliability coefficient is  0.807, which is considered to be sufficient for social sciences studies (Bland & Altman, 1997).  

5. Research findings and results  The questionnaire respondents are project managers and team members as displayed in the following chart. 

Figure 4: Respondents’ distribution by position and project duation   The above data reveals that 50% (28) of the respondents represent relatively long period scrum projects of 1‐2  years, and the majority of respondents are project managers (35, 62.5%).     The research major variables are project communication and project success. The project communication was  calculated  by  weighting  4  questions  with  15%  each,  as  the  literature  indicated  that  these  are  the  most  important  issues  regarding  customer  communications  (questions  7,8,13,14),  and  14  questions  with  2.85%  each, as these are indications of indirect assessment of the communication. The project success variable was  calculated by weighting 3 questions with 20% each, as the literature indicated that these are well‐established  basic parameters to evaluate project success (questions 19,20,21), and 8 questions with 5% each, as these are  indications of indirect assessment of the project success.     The  research  hypotheses  were  tested  using  the  Pearson  correlation  coefficient  to  measure  the  linear  dependence between the research variables. The results are presented.   Table 3: Project communication and project success  

Project Communication

Pearson Correlation Sig. (2-tailed) N

**Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2‐tailed).  * Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2‐tailed).   

72

Project Success ** .564 .000 56


Vered Holzmann and Ilanit Panizel  Table 5: Face‐to‐face communication and project success   Project Success ** Pearson Correlation .603 Sig. (2-tailed) .000 N 56

Face-to-face Communication

**Correlation is significant at the 0.01 level (2‐tailed).  * Correlation is significant at the 0.05 level (2‐tailed).  Table 6: Face‐to‐face communication and project schedule, budget and scope  

Face-to-face Communication

Pearson Correlation Sig. (2-tailed) N

The project meets its schedule plan ** .517

The project meets its budget plan .233

The project meets its scope plan * .278

.000 56

.084 56

.038 56

The results reveal that there is a positive correlation between project communication and project success, and  that this relationship is gets stronger when the communication is richer, i.e., it is based on face‐to–face.  

6. Discussion and conclusions   One  of  the  four  values  in  agile  software  development  projects  concerns  a  continuous  and  effective  collaborative relationship with the customer. Sliger & Broderick (2008) explain that this relationship enables  the  project  team  to  accept  frequent  changes  and  implement  them  successfully,  which  eventually  leads  to  a  successful project. The importance of effective communication between the agile project team and the project  customer was confirmed by the results of the current study, and it is aligned with previous studies (Cockburn &  Highsmith,  2001;  Tengshe  &  Noble,  2007;  Chow  &  Cao,  2008).  Although  the  correlation  between  project  communication and project success was found to be significantly positive (0.564) and stronger when regarding  face‐to‐face  communication  (0.603),  it  should  be  noted  these  results  are  moderate.  A  possible  explanation  would  be  that  there  are  intervening  variables  that  were  not  measured  in  the  current  research.  Therefore,  future study should evaluate the impact or the relationship of additional factors such as organization and team  culture, and project and product complexity.     The  agile  approach  is  focused  on  delivering  a  working  product  that  the  customer  needs  and  evaluates  (Schwaber,  2004).  Thus,  Tengshe  &  Noble  (2007)  argue  that  customer  communication  processes  including  timing  and  channels  of  communication  should  be  defined  in  order  to  achieve  customer  satisfaction.  In  a  successful  project,  the  customer  is  a  partner  that  takes  active  part  in  creating  the  vision  and  in  making  decisions.    This  study  was  limited  by  the  small  number  of  respondents  and  their  experience  in  specific  type  of  agile  projects.  Further  research  that  will  be  based  on  massive  data  collected  from  an  array  of  agile  projects,  including scrum model and XP model, will provide sustainable infrastructure for analysis. In addition, although  measurement of communication is not an easy task, we recommend on developing more precise technique to  assess different communication factors. The question of how to implement the agile methodology in software  projects  is  present  in  many  IT  organizations,  especially  when  managers  have  to  consider  how  to  justify  extremely expensive customized software like SA, Oracle an s on. We believe that effective communication is a  key success factor in any project and especially in agile software development project and as soon as we will  be  able  to  provide  specific  guidelines  for  effective  communication,  we  will  be  able  to  guarantee  project  success.      

References Andersen, E, Birchall, D., Jessen, S. & Money, A. (2006) Exploring project success. Baltic Journal of Management, 1(2), 127‐ 147.  Bland, J.M., & Altman, D.G. (1997)  Statistics Notes: Cronbach's Alpha. BMJ 1997; V.314:572 

73


Vered Holzmann and Ilanit Panizel  Chomeya,  R. (2010) Quality of psychology test between Likert scale 5 and 6 points. Journal of Social Science, 6(3):399‐403.  Chow, T. & Cao, D. B. (2008) A survey study of critical success factors in agile software projects, Journal of Systems and  Software, 81(6), 961‐971.  Cockburn, A., & Highsmith, J. (2001) Agile software development, the people factor. Computer, 34(11), 131‐133.  Craig, L. (2004)  Agile and Iterative Development: A Manager's Guide .Addison‐Wesley Boston, MA.  Downs, C. W., & Adrian, A. D. (2004) Assessing Organizational Communication: Startegic Communication Audits, Guilford  Press, New York, NY.  Feng J., & Sedano, T. (2011) Comparing extreme programming and waterfall project results. Software Engineering  Education and Training, 24th IEEE‐CS Conference 22‐24 May 2011, 482‐486.  Gibson, L., Ivancevich, M., & Donnelly, H. (1991) Organizations: Behavior, Structure, Processes, Business Publications,  Plano, Texas.  Hartley, P. (2001) Interpersonal Communication 2nd ed., Taylor & Francis e‐Library, New York, NY.    Huang, R., Kahai, S., & Jestice, R. (2010) The contingent effects of leadership on team collaboration in virtual teams .  Computers in Human Behavior, 26(5), 1098–1110.  Leffingwell, D. (2007) Scaling Software Agility : Best Practices for Large Enterprises. Addison‐Wesley, Upper Saddle River,  NJ.   Lengel, R.H., & Daft, R.L. (1988) The selection of communication media as an executive skill Academy of Management  Executive, 2(3), 225‐232.  Oxford Dictionary (2013) Oxford University Press, Available at:  http://oxforddictionaries.com/definition/english/communication  Purdy, J.M., Nye, P., & Balakrishnan, P.V. (2000) The impact of communication media on negotiation outcomes .  International Journal of Conflict Management, 11(2), 162‐187.  Rossberg, J. (2008). Pro Visual Studio Team System Application Lifecycle Management .Apress, springer‐ verlag, New York,  NY.  Schwaber, K. (2004) Agile Project Management with Scrum. Microsoft, Redmond, WA.  Shannon, C. E., & Weaver, W. (1963) The Mathematical Theory of Communication, University of Illinois Press, Urbana, Ill.   Shore, J., & Warden, S. (2008) The Art of Agile Developemnt, O’reilly, Media Inc., Sebastopol, CA.  Sliger, M., & Broderick, S. (2008) The Software Project Manager's Bridge to Agility .Addison‐Wesley.Pearson Education  Tengshe, A., & Noble, S. (2007) Establishing the Agile PMO: Managing Variability Across Projects and Portfolios. AGILE  2007:188‐193, August 13‐17  Tsun, C., & Dac‐Buu, C. (2008) A survey study of critical success factors in agile software projects. The Journal of Systems  and Software, 8(6), 961–971.  Winston, W. R. (1970) "Managing the development of large software systems", Proceedings of IEEE WESCON 26 (August),  1–9.

74


The Development of an Introductory Theoretical Green IS  Framework for Strong Environmental Sustainability in Organisations  Grant Howard1 and Sam Lubbe2  1 School of Computing, University of South Africa (UNISA), Florida, South Africa  2 INF Department, North‐West University (NWU), Mafikeng, South Africa  Howargr@unisa.ac.za  Sam.Lubbe@nwu.ac.za     Abstract: There is overwhelming scientific consensus that human activities are degrading the Earth’s environment, which is  vital  for  human  survival  and  well‐being.  Symptoms  of  environmental  degradation  include  anthropogenic  climate  change  and global warming, loss of biodiversity, deforestation, water scarcity and pollution, air pollution, and depleted fish stocks,  all  of  which  are  exacerbated  by  a  burgeoning  global  human  population.  In  response,  environmental  sustainability  is  the  most  feasible  solution  to  environmental  degradation.  In  particular,  strong  environmental  sustainability  is  an  imperative,  and  is  contrasted  with  the  other  degrees  of  environmental  sustainability,  namely  very  weak,  weak  or  intermediate,  and  very strong or absurdly strong. Strong environmental sustainability states that the waste emission rates must not exceed  the  environment’s  waste  assimilation  rates;  the  consumption  rate  of  renewable  resources  must  not  exceed  the  environment’s regeneration rates; and the depletion rate of non‐renewables must not exceed the development rates for  renewable  substitutes.  Crucially,  the  concept  and  importance  of  strong  environmental  sustainability  has  not  been  addressed in IS literature. Particularly, organisations are responsible for much of the world’s environmental degradation,  being  the  social  structures  that  drive  the  world's  economies.  Nevertheless,  organisations  have  considerable  resources,  technology,  knowledge,  global  reach,  motivation,  power,  and  innovative  capacity  for  addressing  environmental  degradation.  Importantly,  it  is  Information  Systems  (IS)  that  have  played  a  pivotal  role  in  enabling  and  transforming  the  world’s contemporary organisations and business models. Therefore, IS present considerable opportunities to enable and  transform organisations for environmental sustainability; such IS are termed Green Information Systems (Green IS). Green  IS include Green Information Technology (Green IT), which focuses primarily on the Information Technology (IT) life cycle.  Further,  Green  IS  present  solutions  to  organisational  environmental  degradation  by  facilitating  and  producing  the  necessary changes for environmental sustainability. Significantly, the conceptualisation of the enabling and transforming  capabilities of Green IS for strong environmental sustainability has not been exposed in IS literature. However, researchers  have developed numerous Green IS and related frameworks, each with particular and significant perspectives. Notably, the  existing  frameworks  do  not  address  the  enabling  and  transforming  capabilities  of  Green  IS  for  strong  environmental  sustainability in organisations. This exposes a pressing research gap which this paper sets out to address, by developing an  introductory theoretical Green IS framework that conceptualises the enabling and transforming capabilities of Green IS for  strong  environmental  sustainability  in  organisations.  The  framework  also  provides  an  explicit  foundation  for  further  theoretical  elaboration  and  empirical  research.  This  paper  is  theoretical  and  exploratory  in  nature,  and  employs  a  systematic  literature  review  process,  based  on  a  systematic  data  processing  approach  comprised  of  three  high‐level  phases.    Keywords: environmental sustainability; green computing; green information systems (Green IS); green information  technology (Green IT); theoretical framework 

1. Introduction The  research problem  is  that  there  is  no  existing  theory or  framework  that  conceptualises  the  enabling  and  transforming capabilities of Green Information Systems (Green IS) for strong environmental sustainability; and  this is evident in an analysis of the numerous Green IS and related frameworks that exist in the Information  systems  (IS)  literature  (Howard  &  Lubbe  2012).  Therefore,  the  objective  of  this  paper  is  to  develop  an  introductory theoretical Green IS framework that conceptualises the enabling and transforming capabilities of  Green  IS  for  strong  environmental  sustainability  in  organisations.  The  framework  also  provides  an  explicit  foundation  for  further  theoretical  elaboration  and  empirical  research.  To  achieve  the  objective  this  paper  introduces the salient concepts and their proposed relationships, and explains why these salient concepts and  their  proposed  relationships  are  so  significant.  Importantly,  strong  environmental  sustainability  is  a  key  concept  and  needs  particular  focus  to  contrast  it  with  other  contemporary,  comparative  concepts  in  the  literature. Strong environmental sustainability is mandatory for long‐term human survival and well‐being.  This paper answers the following research questions:  ƒ

What is strong environmental sustainability, and why is it so important? 

ƒ

What are the high‐level IS capabilities for achieving strong environmental sustainability? 

75


Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe  ƒ

What high‐level  moderating  concepts  affect  the  high‐level  IS  capabilities  for  achieving  strong  environmental sustainability? 

Following this  introduction,  the  paper  continues  with  a  methodology  section  that  explains  the  research  philosophy  and  process.  Thereafter,  the  introductory  framework  is  developed  by  explicating  the  salient  concepts in the sections titled strong environmental sustainability, enabling and transforming capabilities of IS,  environmental strategy and management, Green Information Systems (Green IS), and introductory theoretical  Green IS framework. The paper ends with a conclusions section and a references section. 

2. Methodology This  paper  is  theoretical,  exploratory,  and  philosophically  based  on  interpretivism,  which  corresponds  to  ontology about existence being dependent on human perception and to epistemology where knowledge about  existence  is  obtained  subjectively  (Lee  2004).  Interpretivism  supports  a  qualitative  research  approach  using  textual data (Newman et al. 2003); and supports information systems research focussing on organizational and  managerial problems (Myers 1997).     In  this  regard,  the paper develops  an  introductory theoretical  Green  IS  framework  for  strong environmental  sustainability in organisations using quality and relevant literature produced by a systematic literature review  process (Webster & Watson 2002); (Levy & Ellis 2006). A systematic literature review process is necessary to  facilitate  theory  development;  enable  the  advancement  of  knowledge;  facilitate  meaning  from  the  accumulated knowledge on the research topic (Webster & Watson 2002); (Levy & Ellis 2006); uncover the key  variables,  relationships,  theories,  and  phenomena  (Randolph  2009);  determine  the  extent  that  other  researchers have addressed the research problem (Klopper & Lubbe 2011); prevent duplication and errors of  previous research; and produce a rigorous and auditable literature review (Kitchenham 2004). The systematic  literature  review  process  is  based  on  a  systematic  data  processing  approach  comprised  of  three  high‐level  phases  (Levy  &  Ellis  2006).  The  three  high‐level  phases  are  phase  1  or  the  inputs  phase,  phase  2  or  the  processing phase, and phase 3 or the outputs phase.    Phase 1, the inputs phase, involves a systematic literature search strategy with the objective of uncovering a  thorough  and  comprehensive  set  of  relevant  and  appropriate  literature.  Phase  2,  the  processing  phase,  evaluates the opinions, theories, and established facts within the retained literature; and results in a concept‐ centric literature matrix. The concept‐centric literature matrix maps the major concepts relating to the study’s  problem statement against each retained literature item (Klopper & Lubbe 2011). Phase 3, the outputs phase,  is the actual written literature review, presenting critical analyses of all the literature contained in the concept‐ centric literature matrix from phase 2. Phase 3 develops the introductory theoretical Green IS framework by  introducing the framework concepts; providing a descriptive representation of the framework; and explicating  the  relationships  among  the  concepts  (Sekaran  &  Bougie  2009).  Notably,  theoretical  frameworks  are  conceptualisations  of  particular  complex  research  phenomena,  include  salient  concepts  and  their  interrelationships (Levy & Ellis 2006), and enable understanding (Webster & Watson 2002). 

3. Framework development  3.1 Strong environmental sustainability  This discourse begins with the concept of capital; capital exists in four types, namely human capital including  peoples’  capacity  for  work;  manufactured  capital  including  material  tools;  social  or  organisational  capital  including  the  organisations  and  networks  that  enable  human  capital;  and  ecological  or  natural  or  environmental  capital  that  includes  atmosphere,  water,  land,  flora,  fauna,  and  habitats  (Ekins  et  al.  2003).  Notably,  natural  capital  performs  unique  environmental  functions,  being  the  sink  function;  the  source  function; the life‐support function including climate stability; and the amenity services function including open  natural  areas (Ekins  et  al.  2003).  The  four  types  of capital  sustain  human  existence  and  welfare  (Ekins  et  al.  2003).    In particular, it is the maintenance of the four types of capital and their substitutability that are crucial when  discussing environmental sustainability. There are four degrees of environmental sustainability based on the  assumed substitutability among the capital types, these degrees are termed very weak, weak or intermediate,  strong,  and  very  strong  or  absurdly  strong  (Goodland  &  Daly  1996).  Very  weak  views  the  different  types  of  capital as perfect substitutes and maintains the aggregate capital only; similarly, weak maintains the aggregate 

76


Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe  capital,  but  has  the  precondition  that  minimum  critical  levels  of  each  capital  type  must  be  maintained;  in  contrast,  strong  maintains  levels  of  each  capital  type  and  regards  the  capital  types  as  complements  not  substitutes; and very strong states that no capital type can be depleted in any way (Goodland & Daly 1996);  (Ekins et al. 2003).    Very weak environmental sustainability is not feasible (Goodland & Daly 1996), because converting all natural  capital  into  artifacts  or  manufactured  capital  will  adversely  affect  human  welfare  and  survival  (Goodland  1995).  Likewise,  very  strong  environmental  sustainability  is  not  feasible,  because  it  dictates  that  no  natural  capital  can  be  depleted  in  any  way,  which  also  applies  to  non‐renewable  resources,  and  only  net  growth  increments of renewable resources can be consumed (Goodland 1995); (Goodland & Daly 1996); (Ekins et al.  2003).    In  particular,  weak  environmental  sustainability  is  problematic  because  it  is  almost  impossible  to  define  minimum  critical  levels  of  each  capital  type  (Goodland  &  Daly  1996).  Nonetheless,  weak  environmental  sustainability  has  extensive  support  in  the  business  domain  (Goodland  1995),  and  accommodates  current  economic practices (Manzini et al. 2011); (Jenkin et al. 2011). Weak environmental sustainability is also termed  ecological  modernisation  and  involves  combining  the  contradictory  principles  of  infinite  GDP  or  economic  growth  and  environmental  sustainability,  due  to  the  finite  physical  environmental  limitations  (Milne  et  al.  2006). Indeed, weak environmental sustainability promotes sustained capitalism and business at the expense  of  the  environment  (Laine  2010).  Many  implementations  of  sustainable  development  are  characterised  by  weak  environmental  sustainability,  where  business‐as‐usual  or  small,  incremental  changes  are  promoted,  while environmental degradation continues (Laine 2010); (Diedrich et al. 2011).    In contrast, strong environmental sustainability illustrates the non‐substitutability of manufactured capital for  all natural capital (Ekins et al. 2003); and the necessity for strong environmental sustainability is substantiated  by  the  irrefutable  scientific  evidence  on  environmental  degradation  (Ekins  et  al.  2003).  To  elaborate,  the  fundamental principles of strong environmental sustainability indicate that the consumption rate of renewable  resources cannot exceed the environmental regeneration rates; the waste emission rates cannot exceed the  environmental  assimilation  rates  (Manzini  et  al.  2011);  and  the  depletion  rate  of  non‐renewables  cannot  exceed the development rate for renewable substitutes (Goodland & Daly 1996).     In  addition,  seven  principles  relating  to  the  unique  environmental  functions  guide  strong  environmental  sustainability, these are the protection of the life‐support functions, for instance biodiversity; the prevention  of  destabilisation  to  the  life‐support  functions,  for  instance  climate  patterns  and  the  ozone  layer;  the  harvesting  of  renewable  resources  at  rates  that  do  not  degrade  the  environment;  the  depletion  of  non‐ renewable  resources  at  rates  that  are  balanced  with  substitute  development  rates;  the  preservation  of  landscapes  for  amenity  services;  the  adherence  to  the  precautionary  approach  for  emission  limits;  and  the  termination  of  technologies  that  cause  lasting  damage  to  the  environment  and  severe  damage  to  human  health  (Ekins  et  al.  2003).  Thus,  strong  environmental  sustainability  is  the  only  degree  of  environmental  sustainability that protects people from the impacts of environmental degradation (Ekins et al. 2003). Strong  environmental  sustainability  is  mandatory  for  long‐term  human  survival  and  well‐being.  However,  strong  environmental sustainability requires fundamental business changes as contemporary business exhibits weak  environmental sustainability. 

3.2 Enabling and transforming capabilities of IS  From an operations perspective, IS have enabled massive productivity gains, efficiencies, and services (Watson  et  al.  2010);  (Tambe  &  Hitt  2012).  From  a  managerial  perspective,  IS  have  enabled  shared  understanding,  planning, implementation, evaluation (Elliot 2011), monitoring, controlling, and decision making (Chen 2012).  Further, IS have enabled information management for improved decision making and effectively responding to  uncertainty (Aral et al. 2012); (Mithas et al. 2011). IS have enabled organisational performance (Wang et al.  2012);  (Roberts  et  al.  2012),  and  organisational  strategy  (Grover  &  Kohli  2012);  (Sako  2012).  In  addition,  IS  have  enabled  competitive  advantage  (Roberts  &  Grover  2012);  (Dao  et  al.  2011),  and  innovation  (Han  et  al.  2012); (Xue et al. 2012).    Additionally, IS are viewed as one of the key factors in organisational transformation, transforming the nature  of work, and transforming organisational structures (Pitt et al. 2011); (Kuo 2010). Moreover, IS have brought 

77


Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe  about  organisational  transformation  with  business  digitisation,  disruptive  IT  innovations,  and  cross‐ organisation and systemic effects (Besson & Rowe 2012); all of which have produced fundamental changes to  business  processes  and  practices,  management  structures,  and  even  employee  attitudes  (Melville  2010).  Further, mobile commerce (M‐commerce), Internet‐based commerce (I‐commerce), and ubiquitous commerce  (U‐commerce) have profoundly changed traditional business models and strategies, and have accessed value  far exceeding traditional commerce (Grover & Kohli 2012).    Indeed, IS are unique in their ability to create, modify, transmit, and store information; and this uniqueness is  key  to  any  organisational  transformation  (Mithas  et  al.  2011).  Thus,  IS  demonstrate  both  enabling  and  transforming capabilities, which are associated with fundamental business changes; and fundamental business  changes  are  necessary  for  achieving  strong  environmental  sustainability.  In  addition,  the  information  component of IS is an important factor affecting such business changes. 

3.3 Environmental strategy and management  Organisational  greening  is  hindered  by  uncertainty,  ambiguity,  few  proven  solutions  and  guidelines,  few  instant  pay‐offs  (Kanarattanavong  &  Ruenrom  2009),  and  complexity  (Lin  &  Ho  2011).  This  necessitates  innovation based on human creativity and technology (Senge et al. 2001), including information management  and  decision  making  capabilities  (Herremans  et  al.  2009);  (Hu  &  Bidanda  2009).  Greening  necessitates  changing organisational routines, which constitute organisations and their operations (Berkhout et al. 2006).  Notably,  changing  the  organisational  system  and  its  decision  making  structures  entails  the  development,  interpretation, and dissemination of new information; and action based the new information (Hoffman 2010).  Importantly, organisational greening must still conform to the current economic rules for survival, which can  be a force against greening (Tzschentke et al. 2008).    Strategically, organisations have responded to environmental degradation with a number of relatively similar  and often overlapping approaches. Such approaches include corporate social responsibility (CSR) (Doh & Guay  2006);  corporate  citizenship  and  corporate  environmental  citizenship  (CEC)  (Özen  &  Küskü  2009);  corporate  social  performance  (CSP)  and  corporate  social  responsiveness  (Doh  &  Guay  2006);  corporate  sustainable  development (CSD) (Chow & Chen 2012); triple bottom line (Carter et al. 2009); the natural step, the ecological  footprint, sustainable emissions and resource usage (Berthon et al. 2011);  environmental social responsibility  (ESR)  (Siegel  2009);  corporate  sustainability  (CS)  (Dyllick  &  Hockerts  2002);  (Harmon  &  Demirkan  2011);  corporate  ecological  responsiveness  (Bansal  &  Roth  2000);  and  ecologically  sustainable  development  (ESD)  (Bergmiller & McCright 2009).    In  addition,  environmental  management  is  part  of  corporate  responsibility  (Walker  et  al.  2007),  and  environmental commitment is illustrated by the development of environmental policies, which form the basis  for  environmental  management  systems  (EMSs)  (Roy  et  al.  2001).  An  EMS  involves  all  the  management  activities  of  an  organisation’s  environmental  policy  (Wilmshurst  &  Frost  2001).  Further,  integral  to  strategic  environmental management is green supply chain management (GSCM) (Cai et al. 2008).    Indeed,  there  are  many  and  varied  strategic  and  managerial  responses  to  environmental  degradation.  Nevertheless, an organisation’s environmental strategy and management has an impact on its environmental  sustainability.  In  addition,  organisations  are  bound  by  current  economics,  which  mandates  economic  value;  and currently the consequence is a balancing of economic, environmental, and social objectives that produces  weak environmental sustainability. 

3.4 Green information systems (Green IS)  There  is  a  pressing  need  for  Green  IS  to  transform  work  systems  and  business  practices  (van  Osch  &  Avital  2011); (Bengtsson & Ågerfalk 2011). The difficulty of solving environmental degradation necessitates new ways  of technological thinking, where technology and the environment are emergent and evolving entities, and IS  are an integral part of the transformation to environmental sustainability (Berthon et al. 2011). Green IS offer  solutions  to  the  highly  complex  problem  of  environmental  degradation,  comprised  of  systemically  interconnected  and  interdependent  features,  by  addressing  the  socio‐technical  aspects,  and  by  supporting  bottom‐up,  localised,  and  emergent  approaches  (Dwyer  &  Hasan  2012).  Further,  Green  IS  enable  environmental  sustainability  to  be  integrated  into  daily  operations,  and  positively  impact  compliance,  costs,  reputation, new products and services, and revenues (Curry et al. 2011). Green IS involve business and IS in 

78


Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe  transforming  business  activities  and  enabling  sustainable  business  processes  (Loos  et  al.  2011).  Essentially,  Green  IS  are  enablers  of  environmental  sustainability  and  agents  of  transformation  for  environmental  sustainability (Ijab 2011); (Jenkin et al. 2011).    Notably,  Green  IS  facilitate  the  measurement  of  complex  environmental  sustainability  indicators,  to  reduce  uncertainty and risk in environmental sustainability decision making (Corbett et al. 2011); (Watson et al. 2012);  (Holmström  et  al.  2010).  However,  environmental  data  is  particularly  problematic  (Volkoff  et  al.  2011);  (Moldan et al. 2011), due to their ambiguity, complexity, heterogeneous hardware and software, distributed  data, inconsistent spatial and temporal scales, and inherent fuzziness and uncertainty (El‐Gayar & Fritz 2006).    Green IS, being IS, possess both enabling and transforming capabilities, which are necessary for fundamental  business changes and strong environmental sustainability. In addition, the environmental information quality  significantly affects any Green IS. 

3.5 Introductory theoretical Green IS framework  The preceding sections have exposed the salient high-level concepts and their interrelationships; which form the introductory theoretical Green IS framework, shown in Figure 1 below.

Figure 1: Introductory theoretical Green IS framework  Importantly, the following propositions are evident from the introductory theoretical Green IS framework:  ƒ

The enabling  capabilities  of  Green  IS  are  positively  related  to  the  internal  strong  environmental  sustainability or an organisation’s own strong environmental sustainability, and are further explained by  or mediated by fundamental business changes. 

ƒ

The enabling  capabilities  of  Green  IS  are  positively  related  to  the  external  strong  environmental  sustainability  or  the  strong  environmental  sustainability  of  other  external  organisations  and  the  general  economy, and are further explained by or mediated by fundamental business changes. 

The extant  IS  literature  shows  that  the  enabling  capabilities  of  IS  have  facilitated  major  advancement  and  progression  in  organisational  operations,  information  management,  management,  strategy,  performance,  innovation,  and  competitive  advantage.  Such  advancement  and  progression  is  evident  as  fundamental  business changes, which is a necessary manifestation of the enabling capability of IS for strong environmental  sustainability. So, the  enabling capability  of  IS  improves  the  strong environmental  sustainability  of  the  same  organisation,  and  of  other  external  organisations  and  the  general  economy  through  the  organisation’s  business interactions with the other external organisations and the general economy.  ƒ

The transforming  capabilities  of  Green  IS  are  positively  related  to  the  internal  strong  environmental  sustainability or an organisation’s own strong environmental sustainability, and are further explained by  or mediated by fundamental business changes. 

79


Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe  ƒ

The transforming  capabilities  of  Green  IS  are  positively  related  to  the  external  strong  environmental  sustainability  or  the  strong  environmental  sustainability  of  other  external  organisations  and  the  general  economy, and are further explained by or mediated by fundamental business changes. 

The IS  literature  provides  evidence  that  the  transforming  capability  of  IS  has  resulted  in  transformed  organisations,  such  as  transformed  structures,  strategies,  boundaries,  business  models,  processes,  practices,  stakeholder  relationships,  nature  of  work,  and  value  that  far  exceeds  traditional  commerce.  In  today’s  organisations,  the  transforming  capability  of  IS  produces  emergent  and  complex  fundamental  business  changes  that  often  involve  the  Internet  and  the  Web.  Such  fundamental  business  changes  are  a  necessary  manifestation of the transforming capability of IS for strong environmental sustainability. So, the transforming  capability  of  IS  improves  the  strong  environmental  sustainability  of  the  same  organisation,  and  of  other  external  organisations  and  the  general  economy  through  the  organisation’s  business  interactions with  other  external organisations and the general economy.  ƒ

The internal strong environmental sustainability is positively related to the external strong environmental  sustainability and vice versa. 

It is  proposed  that  where  an  organisation’s  strong  environmental  sustainability  has  been  improved  by  the  enabling and/or transforming capabilities of IS then the strong environmental sustainability of other external  organisations and the general economy will also be improved, and vice versa. It is expected that at least some  of any internal improved strong environmental sustainability will affect the external, and vice versa, instead of  none.  ƒ

Environmental strategy and management affect or moderate the relationships between the enabling and  transforming capabilities of Green IS and the internal and external strong environmental sustainability. 

The environmental strategy and management of each organisation influences the allocation of resources and  the direction of activities, including an organisation’s IS. Therefore, an organisation’s environmental strategy  and management affect or moderate the relationships between the enabling and transforming capabilities of  Green IS and the internal and external strong environmental sustainability.  ƒ Environmental  information  quality  affects  or  moderates  the  relationships  between  the  enabling  and  transforming capabilities of Green IS and the internal and external strong environmental sustainability.  Information  is  core  to  IS,  so  the  quality  of  the  information  influences  any  IS  and  influences  its  effect  on  an  organisation.  Given  that  environmental  information  can  be  particularly  ambiguous,  complex,  uncertain,  and  fuzzy;  the  environmental  information  quality  has  a  moderating  effect  on  the  relationships  between  the  enabling  and  transforming  capabilities  of  Green  IS  and  the  internal  and  external  strong  environmental  sustainability.  ƒ Economic value affects or moderates the relationships between the enabling and transforming capabilities  of Green IS and the internal and external strong environmental sustainability.  Corporate  organisation’s  must  produce  economic  value  or  perish,  this  is  mandatory.  Such  economic  value  occurs in the form of current or expected financial benefits. This imperative also applies to business changes  within  organisations,  and  therefore,  economic  value  affects  or  moderates  the  relationships  between  the  enabling  and  transforming  capabilities  of  Green  IS  and  the  internal  and  external  strong  environmental  sustainability. 

4. Conclusion This paper makes an original contribution to the academic body of knowledge by addressing a research gap  with the development of an introductory theoretical Green IS framework that conceptualises the enabling and  transforming capabilities of Green IS for strong environmental sustainability in organisations. In addition the  paper provides an explicit foundation for further theoretical elaboration and empirical research. Additionally,  the  research  questions  have  been  answered  by  explicating  strong  environmental  sustainability  and  its  importance;  by  exposing  the  high‐level  enabling  and  transforming  IS  capabilities  for  achieving  strong  environmental sustainability; and by explaining the high‐level moderating concepts that affect the high‐level IS  capabilities  for  achieving  strong  environmental  sustainability,  namely  environmental  strategy  and  management,  environmental  information  quality,  and  economic  value.  Notably,  the  introductory  theoretical  Green  IS  framework  functions  as  a  descriptive  framework  as  it  is  internally  consistent,  parsimonious,  and  covers the domain; as an analytical framework as its establishes a foundation for further empirical research;  and as a prescriptive or normative framework as it provides salient focal points for management concerning  the  enabling  and  transforming  capabilities  of  Green  IS  for  strong  environmental  sustainability  (Bensaou  & 

80


Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe  Venkatraman 1996). For academics, the introductory theoretical Green IS framework elucidates the significant  high‐level  concepts  and  their  interrelationships  for  subsequent  elaboration  and  operationalization  into  measurable  research  variables  and  hypotheses.  A  limitation  of  this  study  is  the  introductory  nature  of  the  framework  and  the  lack  of  empirical  organisational  data  for  verification;  however,  these  limitations  provide  valuable research opportunities. 

References Aral, S., Brynjolfsson, E. and Van Alstyne, M. (2012) "Information, Technology, and Information Worker Productivity",  Information Systems Research, Vol 23, No. 3‐Part‐2, pp 849‐867.   Bansal, P. and Roth, K. (2000) "Why Companies Go Green: A Model of Ecological Responsiveness", Academy of  Management Journal, Vol 43, No. 4, pp 717‐736.   Bengtsson, F. and Ågerfalk, P.J. (2011) "Information Technology as a Change Actant in Sustainability Innovation: Insights  from Uppsala", Journal of Strategic Information Systems, Vol 20, No. 1, pp 96‐112.   Bensaou, M. and Venkatraman, N. (1996) "Interorganizational Relationships and Information Technology: A Conceptual  Synthesis and a Research Framework", European Journal of Information Systems, Vol 5, No. 2, pp 84‐91.   Bergmiller, G. and McCright, P. (2009) "Lean Manufacturers' Transcendence to Green Manufacturing", Paper read at the  Institute of Industrial Engineers (IIE) Annual Conference, Miami, USA, pp 1144‐1148.   Berkhout, F., Hertin, J. and Gann, D.M. (2006) "Learning to Adapt: Organisational Adaptation to Climate Change Impacts",  Climatic Change, Vol 78, No. 1, pp 135‐156.   Berthon, P., DesAutels, P., Donnellan, B. and Clark Williams, C. (2011) "Green Digits: Towards an Ecology of IT Thinking" in  The Oxford Handbook of Management Information Systems: Critical Perspectives and New Directions, Oxford  University Press, USA, pp 1‐20.   Besson, P. and Rowe, F. (2012) "Strategizing Information Systems‐Enabled Organizational Transformation: A  Transdisciplinary Review and New Directions", Journal of Strategic Information Systems, Vol 21, No. 2, pp 103‐124.   Cai, S., De Souza, R., Goh, M., Li, W., Lu, Q. and Sundarakani, B. (2008) "The Adoption of Green Supply Chain Strategy: An  Institutional Perspective", Paper read at the 4th IEEE International Conference on Management of Innovation and  Technology (ICMIT), Bangkok, Thailand, pp 1044‐1049.   Carter, C.R., Maloni, M.J. and Pullman, M.E. (2009) "Food for Thought: Social Versus Environmental Sustainability Practices  and Performance Outcomes", Journal of Supply Chain Management, Vol 45, No. 4, pp 38‐54.   Chen, J.L. (2012) "The Synergistic Effects of IT‐Enabled Resources on Organizational Capabilities and Firm Performance",  Information & Management, Vol 49, No. 3–4, pp 142‐150.   Chow, W.S. and Chen, Y. (2012) "Corporate Sustainable Development: Testing a New Scale Based on the Mainland Chinese  Context", Journal of Business Ethics, Vol 105, No. 4, pp 519‐533.   Corbett, J., Webster, J., Boudreau, M.C. and Watson, R. (2011) "Defining the Role for Information Systems in Environmental  Sustainability Measurement", SIGGreen Workshop. Sprouts: Working Papers on Information Systems, Vol 11, No. 2,  pp 1‐7.   Curry, E., Hasan, S., ul Hassan, U., Herstand, M. and O'Riain, S. (2011) "An Entity‐Centric Approach to Green Information  Systems", Paper read at the 19th European Conference on Information Systems (ECIS), Helsinki, Finland, pp 1‐7.   Dao, V., Langella, I. and Carbo, J. (2011) "From Green to Sustainability: Information Technology and an Integrated  Sustainability Framework", Journal of Strategic Information Systems, Vol 20, No. 1, pp 63‐79.   Diedrich, A., Upham, P., Levidow, L. and van den Hove, S. (2011) "Framing Environmental Sustainability Challenges for  Research and Innovation in European Policy Agendas", Environmental Science & Policy, Vol 14, pp 935‐939.   Doh, J.P. and Guay, T.R. (2006) "Corporate Social Responsibility, Public Policy, and NGO Activism in Europe and the United  States: An Institutional‐Stakeholder Perspective", Journal of Management Studies, Vol 43, No. 1, pp 47‐73.   Dwyer, C. and Hasan, H. (2012) "Emergent Solutions for Global Climate Change: Lessons from Green IS Research",  International Journal of Social and Organizational Dynamics in Information Technology (IJSODIT), Vol 2, No. 2, pp 18‐ 33.   Dyllick, T. and Hockerts, K. (2002) "Beyond the Business Case for Corporate Sustainability", Business Strategy and the  Environment, Vol 11, No. 2, pp 130‐141.   Ekins, P., Simon, S., Deutsch, L., Folke, C. and De Groot, R. (2003) "A Framework for the Practical Application of the  Concepts of Critical Natural Capital and Strong Sustainability", Ecological Economics, Vol 44, pp 165‐185.   El‐Gayar, O. and Fritz, B.D. (2006) "Environmental Management Information Systems (EMIS) for Sustainable Development:  A Conceptual Overview", Communications of the Association for Information Systems, Vol 17, No. 1, pp 756‐784.   Elliot, S. (2011) "Transdisciplinary Perspectives on Environmental Sustainability: A Resource Base and Framework for IT‐ Enabled Business Transformation", MIS Quarterly, Vol 35, No. 1, pp 197‐236.   Goodland, R. (1995) "The Concept of Environmental Sustainability", Annual Review of Ecology and Systematics, Vol 26, pp  1‐24.   Goodland, R. and Daly, H. (1996) "Environmental Sustainability: Universal and Non‐Negotiable", Ecological Applications, Vol  6, No. 4, pp 1002‐1017.   Grover, V. and Kohli, R. (2012) "Cocreating IT Value: New Capabilities and Metrics for Multifirm Environments", MIS  Quarterly, Vol 36, No. 1, pp 225‐232.  

81


Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe  Han, K., Oh, W., Im, K.S., Chang, R.M., Oh, H. and Pinsonneault, A. (2012) "Value Cocreation and Wealth Spillover in Open  Innovation Alliances", MIS Quarterly, Vol 36, No. 1, pp 291‐315.   Harmon, R.R. and Demirkan, H. (2011) "The Corporate Sustainability Dimensions of Service‐Oriented Information  Technology", Paper read at the 2011 Annual SRII Global Conference (SRII), San Jose, CA, USA, pp 601‐614.   Herremans, I., Herschovis, M. and Bertels, S. (2009) "Leaders and Laggards: The Influence of Competing Logics on  Corporate Environmental Action", Journal of Business Ethics, Vol 89, No. 3, pp 449‐472.   Hoffman, A.J. (2010) "Climate Change as a Cultural and Behavioral Issue: Addressing Barriers and Implementing Solutions",  Organizational Dynamics, Vol 39, pp 295‐305.   Holmström, J., Mathiassen, L., Sandberg, J. and Wimelius, H. (2010) "Green IS: Steps Towards a Research Agenda" in  Industrial Informatics Design, use and Innovation: Perspectives and Services, eds. J. Holmström, M. Wiberg and A.  Lund, Information Science Reference (an imprint of IGI Global), United States of America, pp 187‐195.   Howard, G.R. and Lubbe, S. (2012) "Synthesis of Green IS Frameworks for Achieving Strong Environmental Sustainability in  Organisations", Paper read at the South African Institute for Computer Scientists and Information Technologists  (SAICSIT) Conference, Centurion, Tshwane, South Africa, pp 306‐315.   Hu, G. and Bidanda, B. (2009) "Modeling Sustainable Product Lifecycle Decision Support Systems", International Journal of  Production Economics, Vol 122, No. 1, pp 366‐375.   Ijab, M.T. (2011) "Studying Green Information Systems as Practice (Green IS‐as‐Practice)", SIGGreen Workshop. Sprouts:  Working Papers on Information Systems, Vol 11, No. 16, pp 1‐12.   Jenkin, T.A., Webster, J. and McShane, L. (2011) "An Agenda for 'Green' Information Technology and Systems Research",  Information and Organization, Vol 21, No. 1, pp 17‐40.   Kanarattanavong, A. and Ruenrom, G. (2009) "The Model of Corporate Environmentalism: The Effects of Perceived Market  Uncertainty upon Marketing, Environmental, and Social Performance", The Business Review, Cambridge, Vol 12, No.  2, pp 140‐147.   Kitchenham, B. (2004) "Procedures for Performing Systematic Reviews", [online], Keele University, UK, http://tests‐ zingarelli.googlecode.com/svn‐history/r336/trunk/2‐Disciplinas/MetodPesquisa/kitchenham_2004.pdf (accessed on  04 July 2011).   Klopper, R. and Lubbe, S. (2011) "Using Matrix Analysis to Achieve Traction, Coherence, Progression and Closure in  Problem‐Solution Oriented Research", Alternation, Vol 18, No. 2, pp 386‐403.   Kuo, B.N. (2010) "Organizational Green IT: It Seems the Bottom Line Rules", Paper read at the 16th Americas Conference  on Information Systems (AMCIS), Lima, Peru, pp 1‐9.   Laine, M. (2010) "Towards Sustaining the Status Quo: Business Talk of Sustainability in Finnish Corporate Disclosures 1987‐ 2005", European Accounting Review, Vol 19, No. 2, pp 247‐274.   Lee, A.S. (2004) "Thinking about Social Theory and Philosophy for Information Systems" in Social Theory and Philosophy for  Information Systems, eds. J. Mingers and L. Willcocks, John Wiley & Sons, Chichester, UK, pp 1‐26.   Levy, Y. and Ellis, T.J. (2006) "A Systems Approach to Conduct an Effective Literature Review in Support of Information  Systems Research", Informing Science Journal, Vol 9, No. 9, pp 181‐212.   Lin, C.Y. and Ho, Y.H. (2011) "Determinants of Green Practice Adoption for Logistics Companies in China", Journal of  Business Ethics, Vol 98, No. 1, pp 67‐83.   Loos, P., Nebel, W., Marx Gómez, J., Hasan, H., Watson, R.T., vom Brocke, J., Seidel, S. and Recker, J.C. (2011) "Green IT : A  Matter of Business and Information Systems Engineering?", Business and Information Systems Engineering, Vol 3, No.  4, pp 245‐252.   Manzini, F., Islas, J. and Macías, P. (2011) "Model for Evaluating the Environmental Sustainability of Energy Projects",  Technological Forecasting and Social Change, Vol 78, pp 931‐944.   Melville, N.P. (2010) "Information Systems Innovation for Environmental Sustainability", MIS Quarterly, Vol 34, No. 1, pp 1‐ 21.   Milne, M.J., Kearins, K. and Walton, S. (2006) "Creating Adventures in Wonderland: The Journey Metaphor and  Environmental Sustainability", Organization, Vol 13, No. 6, pp 801‐839.   Mithas, S., Ramasubbu, N. and Sambamurthy, V. (2011) "How Information Management Capability Influences Firm  Performance", MIS Quarterly, Vol 35, No. 1, pp 237‐256.   Moldan, B., Janousková, S. and Hák, T. (2011) "How to Understand and Measure Environmental Sustainability: Indicators  and Targets", Ecological Indicators, Vol 17, pp 4‐13.   Myers, M.D. (1997) "Qualitative Research in Information Systems", MIS Quarterly, Vol 21, No. 2, pp 241‐242.   Newman, I., Ridenour, C.S., Newman, C. and DeMarco Jr., G.M.P. (2003) "A Typology of Research Purposes and its  Relationship to Mixed Methods" in Handbook of Mixed Methods in Social and Behavioral Research, eds. A. Tashakkori  and C. Teddlie, Sage Publications, USA, pp 167‐188.   Özen, S. and Küskü, F. (2009) "Corporate Environmental Citizenship Variation in Developing Countries: An Institutional  Framework", Journal of Business Ethics, Vol 89, No. 2, pp 297‐313.   Pitt, L.F., Parent, M., Junglas, I., Chan, A. and Spyropoulou, S. (2011) "Integrating the Smartphone into a Sound  Environmental Information Systems Strategy: Principles, Practices and a Research Agenda", Journal of Strategic  Information Systems, Vol 20, No. 1, pp 27‐37.   Randolph, J.J. (2009) "A Guide to Writing the Dissertation Literature Review", Practical Assessment, Research & Evaluation,  Vol 14, No. 13, pp 1‐13.  

82


Grant Howard and Sam Lubbe  Roberts, N., Galluch, P.S., Dinger, M. and Grover, V. (2012) "Absorptive Capacity and Information Systems Research:  Review, Synthesis, and Directions for Future Research", MIS Quarterly, Vol 36, No. 2, pp 625‐648.   Roberts, N. and Grover, V. (2012) "Leveraging Information Technology Infrastructure to Facilitate a Firm's Customer Agility  and Competitive Activity: An Empirical Investigation", Journal of Management Information Systems, Vol 28, No. 4, pp  231‐269.   Roy, M., Boiral, O. and Lagace, D. (2001) "Environmental Commitment and Manufacturing Excellence: A Comparative Study  within Canadian Industry", Business Strategy and the Environment, Vol 10, No. 5, pp 257‐268.   Sako, M. (2012) "Business Models for Strategy and Innovation", Communications of the ACM, Vol 55, No. 7, pp 22‐24.   Sekaran, U. and Bougie, R. (2009) Research Methods for Business: A Skill Building Approach, 5th ed., John Wiley & Sons Ltd,  United Kingdom.   Senge, P.M., Carstedt, G. and Porter, P.L. (2001) "Next Industrial Revolution", MIT Sloan Management Review, Vol 42, No.  2, pp 24‐38.   Siegel, D.S. (2009) "Green Management Matters Only if it Yields More Green: An economic/strategic Perspective", The  Academy of Management Perspectives ARCHIVE, Vol 23, No. 3, pp 5‐16.   Tambe, P. and Hitt, L.M. (2012) "The Productivity of Information Technology Investments: New Evidence from IT Labor  Data", Information Systems Research, Vol 23, No. 3‐Part‐1, pp 599‐617.   Tzschentke, N., Kirk, D. and Lynch, P. (2008) "Ahead of their Time? Barriers to Action in Green Tourism Firms", Service  Industries Journal, Vol 28, No. 2, pp 167‐178.   van Osch, W. and Avital, M. (2011) "The Green Vistas of Sustainable Innovation in the IT Domain" in Governance and  Sustainability in Information Systems. Managing the Transfer and Diffusion of IT. IFIP Advances in Information and  Communication Technology, eds. M. Nüttgens, A. Gadatsch, K. Kautz, I. Schirmer and N. Blinn, Springer, Boston, pp  300‐305.   Volkoff, O., Bertels, S. and Papania, D. (2011) "The Strategic Role of Information Systems in Supporting Sustainability",  Paper read at the 17th Americas Conference on Information Systems (AMCIS), Detroit, Michigan, USA, pp 1‐7.   Walker, D., Pitt, M. and Thakur, U.J. (2007) "Environmental Management Systems: Information Management and  Corporate Responsibility", Journal of Facilities Management, Vol 5, No. 1, pp 49‐61.   Wang, N., Liang, H., Zhong, W., Xue, Y. and Xiao, J. (2012) "Resource Structuring Or Capability Building? an Empirical Study  of the Business Value of Information Technology", Journal of Management Information Systems, Vol 29, No. 2, pp  325‐367.   Watson, R.T., Boudreau, M.C. and Chen, A.J. (2010) "Information Systems and Environmentally Sustainable Development:  Energy Informatics and New Directions for the IS Community", MIS Quarterly, Vol 34, No. 1, pp 23‐38.   Watson, R.T., Corbett, J., Boudreau, M.C. and Webster, J. (2012) "An Information Strategy for Environmental  Sustainability", Communications of the ACM, Vol 55, No. 7, pp 28‐30.   Webster, J. and Watson, R.T. (2002) "Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review", MIS  Quarterly, Vol 26, No. 2, pp xiii‐xxiii.   Wilmshurst, T.D. and Frost, G.R. (2001) "The Role of Accounting and the Accountant in the Environmental Management  System", Business Strategy and the Environment, Vol 10, No. 3, pp 135‐147.   Xue, L., Ray, G. and Sambamurthy, V. (2012) "Efficiency Or Innovation: How do Industry Environments Moderate the  Effects of Firms' IT Asset Portfolios?", MIS Quarterly, Vol 36, No. 2, pp 509‐528.  

83


Functional Consultants’ Role in Enterprise Systems Implementations  Przemysław Lech  University of Gdańsk, Faculty of Management, Poland  Przemyslaw.Lech@lst.com.pl    Abstract:  Although  Enterprise  Systems  (ES)  implementations  (and  formerly  Enterprise  Resource  Planning  systems)  literature is extremely wide, most of it takes the perspective of the implementing organization and its employees: project  managers, key‐users and users. The fact that one of the possible ways of conducting such a complicated, time and money  consuming project is to use functional consultants is largely omitted and therefore the role of these consultants in the ES  implementation projects is not yet well discovered. This paper explores the role of functional consultants by analysing the  detailed lists of activities, performed by them in five projects, led by five different consulting enterprises. The analysis of  project  documentation,  followed  by  coding  resulted  in  a  consistent  task  list  in  each  of  the  project  phases  as  well  as  its  assignment to one of the project participants: consultants or implementing company. Generalization of this list allowed for  the formulation of the conclusions on the consultants’ role in the analysed projects.    Keywords: enterprise systems, ERP, implementation, project, consultants 

1. Introduction Enterprise  Systems  (ES)  were  formerly  identified  with  Enterprise  Resource  Planning  (ERP)  applications  (Davenport,  1998;  Sedera  and  Gable,  2010).  Rosemann  (1999)  defines  an  ERP  system  as  ‘a  customizable,  standard  application  software  which  includes  integrated  business  solutions  for  the  core  processes  (e.g.,  production  planning  and  control,  warehouse  management)  and  the  main  administrative  functions  (e.g.,  accounting,  human  resource  management)  of  an  enterprise.’  These  systems  have  evolved  into  application  suites,  including ERP,  CRM, Business  Intelligence, Workflow,  Content Management and other  functionalities,  which are required to support information and workflow in organizations. Generalizing the above definition,  one can state that an Enterprise System is a standard, customizable application suite that includes integrated  business  solutions  for  the  major  business  processes  of  an  enterprise,  with  the  ERP  system  remaining  the  central  component  of  this  suite.  Enterprise  Systems  are  the  backbone  of  most  global  manufacturing  and  service  enterprises  (Muscatello  and  Chen,  2008)  and  they  continue  to  draw  attention  of  the  researchers.  Though ES is a popular piece of business software, its implementation failure rate is constantly high (Aloini et  al., 2007; Wu et al., 2007; Poba‐Nzao et al., 2008). This fact has yielded much research on Enterprise Systems’  implementation summarized in ERP literature reviews like the one by Esteves and Bohorquez,  2007. Majority  of  this  research,  however,  takes  only  the  perspective  of  the  organisation  that  adopts  the  new  Enterprise  System,  while  the  classic  project  setup  involves  three  stakeholders:  the  adopting  organisation,  the  system  vendor and the consultants that perform the implementation (Haines and Goodhue 2003, Koch and Mitlöhner  2010,  Lech  2011,  Simon  et  al.  2010,  Vilpola  2008,  Wang  and  Chen  2006).  The  purpose  of  this  paper  is  to  explore  the  role  of  the  consultants  by  analysing  the  activities  they  perform  in  Enterprise  Systems  implementations. 

2. The role of consultants in an Enterprise System implementation project – literature  review  Enterprise  Systems  are  a  complicated  component  of  business  software,  which  affects  most  of  a  company’s  busines processess and takes from half a year to several years to implement. To succesfully complete such an  implementation  a  specialised  knowledge  of  the  system  (product  knowledge)  is  needed.  Combined  with  the  company‐specific knowledge (Chan and Rosemann 2001) and other knowledge types, it allows to obtain the  final outcome of the implementation project, which is the system configured and customized according to the  requirements  of  a  specific  organization  (Esteves  et  al.  2003).  As  the  knowledge  about  the  system  is  highly  specialized  and  extensive,  it  should  be  provided  by  dedicated  experts  (Haines  and  Godhue  2003).  These  experts may originate from inside the organisation if a specialised ES unit is available there or may be hired for  the project from a consulting enterprise, not necessarily being the system vendor at the same time. A look at  the  web  pages  of  the  Tier  1  Enteprise  Systems  vendors  SAP,  Oracle  and  Microsoft  reveals  that  all  of  these  vendors  maintain  a  partner  network  of  independent  consultancies,  offering  expertise  in  implementing  the  Enterprise Systems that they sell. The role of these partners, as perceived by vendors, is depicted in Table 1: 

84


Przemysław Lech  Table 1: Role of consulting partners according to corresponding ES vendors  SAP  Source page:  http://www.sap.com/our‐ partners/index.epx    “SAP partners play a critical role in  helping organizations of all sizes  identify, purchase and implement  the ideal solution to address their  unique business needs. [...] SAP  partners deliver the exceptional  value, purchasing choice,  consultation and implementation  services [...]” 

Oracle Source page:  http://www.oracle.com/us/solutions/ midsize/partners/index.html    “Together, Oracle and our network of  more than 19,000 partners provide  customers around the world with  industry‐leading solutions and services  that address the needs of fast‐growing  companies and government entities  with limited budgets.”   

Microsoft Source page:  http://dynamics.pinpoint.microsoft. com/en‐US/home    “The Microsoft Dynamics  Marketplace helps you discover  innovative applications and  professional services from  Microsoft partners worldwide.” 

As it can be concluded from Table 1, for the systems mentioned there, the solution/service provider and the  system provider tend to be the two independent entities. Therefore for Tier 1 Enterprise Systems, the typical  project  landscape  consists  of  three  parties  (Haines  and  Godhue  2003;  Ko  et  al.  2005):  the  adopting  organisation (implementer, client), the system vendor and the consulting enterprise (consultant) that helps the  adopting  organisation  successfully  implement  the  system.  There  may be  variations  from  this  model,  such  as  when the consulting services are delivered either by the internal IT department of the adopting organisation or  by the vendor itself. In an independent setting however, the system vendor provides the ‘vanilla’ system, and  the  implementation  project  is  run  by  the  adopting  organisation  and  the  consulting  enterprise.  Haines  and  Godhue (2003) describe the interrelations between the three parties in the following way:    ‘Each  of  these  three  parties  contributes  in  different  ways  to  the  project.  The  implementer  has  the  detailed  knowledge of its own particular business processes, organizational context, and competitive situation, which is  essential  for  successful  implementation.  The  vendors  provide  the  implementer  with  hardware  and  software  and  offer  training  programs  in  connection  with  their  products.  The  consultants  are  brought  into  ERP  implementation projects to provide additional skills, knowledge, or simply manpower that is not available at  the implementer or the vendor, or is too expensive if procured from the vendor.’    Surprisingly,  the  involvement  of  consultants  in  an  Enterprise  System  implementation  project  is  emphasised  only by a small number of authors (Chan and Rosemann 2001, Chang et al. 2013; Haines and Goodhue 2003;  Ko et al. 2005; Lech 2011) and omitted by others.    Haines and Godhue (2003) state that the large portion of a project’s cost is attributed to the consulting fees  due  to  the  fact  that  the  implementing  organization  does  not  have  the  internal  knowledge  and  skills  to  implement the system successfully. They mention three main roles the consultant may play in a project: the  role of a project manager, role of a mentor/trainer and the role of a technical implementation assistant. The  consultants’  role  as  a  knowledge  source  is  also  stressed  by  Chan  and  Rosemann  (2001).  Chang  et  al.  (2013)  highlight the importance of consultants in the implementation due to breadth and complexity of the system  and  the  one‐time  nature  of  the  project  that  limits  the  desire  to  invest  in  a  permanent  workforce  with  necessary  knowledge.  They  state  that  ‘consultants  provide  technical  and  business  expertise,  reduce  the  learning burden of clients, configure appropriate ERP systems, and train users to fully exploit the technology.’  Their  research  concentrates  on  the  control  mechanisms  imposed  on  consultants  due  to  possible  agency  problems.  The    outcome  controls  were  identified  as  the  main  control  mechanism  used  by  the  client  organization due to the fact that the client organization lacks knowledge on the implementation process to be  able to apply behaviour controls, while both outcome and behaviour controls were applied by the consulting  enterprises  to  control  their  consultants.  Ko  et  al.  (2005)  state  that  enterprises  typically  use  external  consultants for ES implementations and in their research they concentrate on the factors affecting knowledge  transfer  from  consultants  to  clients  during  the  implementation  project,  while  Lech  (2011)  studies  the  knowledge transfer procedures basing on ten case studies. The work split between the consultants and clients  as  well  as  activities  performed  by  the  consultants,  throughout  the  ES  implementation  phases  are  briefly  described  there  also.  These  activities  include  running  analytical  workshops,  preparing  the  system  design  document,  configuring  the  system,  providing  modification  (customization)  specifications  to  programmers, 

85


Przemysław Lech  testing the system (together with the adopting organisation team members) and occasionally training the end‐ users.     Concluding  the  literature  review,  consultants  are  considered  to  be  the  necessary  actor  in  the  Enterprise  System implementation project due to the fact that implementing organizations usually lack knowledge about  the  system  to  be  implemented  and  have  limited  incentive  to  gain  this  knowledge  internally  due  to  non‐ repetitive character of the project. The main role of the consultants is to supply the client with the necessary  system knowledge and perform the tasks, necessary to configure and customize the system according to the  business needs of the customer but they may also play the role of a project manager or mentor/trainer. The  Enterprise  System  implementation  project  is  the  constant  interaction  between  the  client’s  employees  and  consultants, which involves, but is not limited to knowledge transfers in both directions. None of the papers  cited above has considered the analysis of a consultant’s role in the project as the primary research focus and  therefore the aim of this paper is to fill this gap.    A  role  can  be  defined  as:  ‘a  set  of  activities  that  are  carried  out  by  an  individual  or  group  with  some  organisationally relevant responsibility’ (Huckvale and Ould 1995). Therefore the main attribute that describes  a  role  is  a  set  of  activities  performed  by  a  person  or  a  group  that  holds  that  role.  The  observation  of  work,  performed by this person or a group leads to understanding of that person’s or group’s role in the organization  (Barley  and  Kunda  2001).  Barley  and  Kunda  (2001)  also  distinguish  between  non‐relational  and  relational  aspects  of  role:  relational  elements  of  work  require  interpersonal  interaction,  while  non‐relational  ones  do  not.  As  it  was  already  stated  before,  the  Enterprise  System  implementation  project  is  a  complicated  undertaking  which  requires  tight  cooperation  between  the  parties  involved.  Therefore  the  study  of  the  consultants’ role cannot be separated from its interactions with the client. The following sections present the  results of the empirical study of the activities, performed during the ES implementation projects. 

3. Research results  3.1 Methodology  The research question posed in this paper was the following:     What  activities  are  performed  by  the  functional  consultants  (and  their  Project  Manager)  during  the  Enterprise System implementation?    Five  ES  implementation  projects  were  included  in  the  study.  In  one  of  the  cases  the  consultants  originated  from the system vendor organization and in the other four, the implementation was done by the consulting  enterprises  independent  from  the  vendor.  Every  of  the  five  projects  was  done  by  a  different  consulting  company. The source of evidence was project documentation, determining the task split between the client  and  the  consultants:  appendixes  to  the  contracts  and  Project  Charters,  depending  on  the  project.  The  activities’ descriptions were extracted from the documents and the coding procedure was used to form one  consistent list of activities. In four projects the documentation provided lists of activities on a similar level of  detail (and for the remaining one – only a general level activities were indicated). If an activity existed in more  than one project, usually only slight alignment in naming was needed. The activities were grouped by project  phase and general level activity. Although there are many models of the Enterprise system lifecycle available in  the literature (for the overview see e.g. Soja and Paliwoda‐Pękosz 2013), all the enterprises being subject to  the study used the phases definition according to the SAP ASAP methodology.     This way a full list of project activities with the assignment to the responsible party was created.  

3.2 Project activities analysis  The results of the study are presented in Table 1 and 2. The activity was included in the list if it was detected in  at least one project. Activities were divided into sub‐activities whenever possible. The frequency was assigned  to lowest possible activity level (the general activity for one project in which there was no detailed information  and to sub‐activities for the remaining four projects). As it was stated above, the ES implementation project is  a  highly  interactive  process  which  requires  tight  cooperation  between  the  client  and  the  consultants  on  all  stages.  This  fact  was  reflected  in  the  documentation  of  all  the  five  projects:  for  each  activity  a  leading  and 

86


Przemysław Lech  supporting stakeholders were mentioned. The below tables show only the actors identified as leading for each  activity.    Table 1: Project activities divided into phases and responsibility split  General activity 

Project activity  Sub‐activity 

Preparation of the  project plan  Definition of project  organizational  structure and team  formulation          Preparation of project  procedures           

Preparation of project  charter document  Key users initial  training  Preparation of project  infrastructure (rooms,  computers, etc)  System hardware  preparation  Kick‐off meeting  Installation and  preparation of  development and test  systems  Preparation of system  administration  procedures  Definition of a  company structure      Definition of business 

Consultant

Phase 1: Project preparation:  2 

Responsibility (frequency)  Client  Consultant  and client 

No informatio n 

2

1

1

Definition of project roles  Implementation teams  onboarding  Key‐users/process owners  identification and onboarding  Decision‐making grant to the  key users   

3 ‐ 

1 3 

‐ 1 

‐ ‐ 

3

1

3

1

1

1

Risk management procedures  preparation  Communication procedures  preparation  Change management  procedures preparation  Quality management  procedures preparation  Problem escalation/open items  management procedure  preparation  Status reporting procedure  preparation  ‐ 

3

3

3

2

1

3

2

1

2

1

2

4

1

4

1

1

4

1 Phase 2: Business Blueprint  ‐  2 

1

3

1

1

1

1

4

Company structure definition  Company structure reflection in  the system   

‐ 3 

3 ‐ 

‐ ‐ 

2 2 

87


Przemysław Lech 

General activity 

Project activity  Sub‐activity 

processes     Master data definition      Interfaces  specification  Data migration  specification  Reports, forms  (printouts) and  extensions  specification  Authorization concept      End‐users training  plan  Preparation of the  Business Blueprint  document, containing  the above design  items  Business blueprint  approval  System configuration  Preparation of the test  environment  System unit (modular)  tests          Development of  extensions, forms,  reports and interfaces  Master data  conversion  preparation  Master data migration  tools preparation  Integration tests        Authorizations  definition in the  system  System 

Consultant

Responsibility (frequency)  Client  Consultant  and client 

No informatio n 

Business processes definition  Business processes reflection in  the system    Master data definition  Master data reflection in the  system  ‐ 

‐ 3 

3 ‐ 

‐ ‐ 

2 2 

‐  2 

2  ‐ 

‐  ‐ 

3  3 

1

1

3

1

4

1

4

Definition of roles in the  organization  Design of authorization profiles  in the system  ‐ 

‐ 

‐ 

1

4

1

4

4

1

4

1

‐ ‐ 

‐ 1 

‐ ‐ 

‐ ‐ 

Phase 3: Realization  5  4 

Test scenario template  preparation  Test scenarios preparation  Test execution  Test supervision  ‐ 

5

1 1  4  3 

4 4  1  ‐ 

‐ ‐  ‐  ‐ 

‐ ‐  ‐  2 

1

2

3

3

2

Test scenarios preparation  Test execution  Test supervision  ‐ 

1  0  4  2 

3  4  ‐  2 

‐  ‐  ‐  ‐ 

1  1  1  1 

88


Przemysław Lech 

General activity 

Project activity  Sub‐activity 

documentation    

 

End‐users training  Productive system  preparation  Preparation of the  productive start plan  Master data migration  to productive system        Preparation of the  after go‐live support  plan  Productive use of  system  Support of daily  activities  Problem reporting  Problem solving 

Consultant

Configuration documentation  3  Customization documentation  4  (for extensions, reports,  interfaces, forms)  End‐user manuals  4  System administration  2  procedures  Phase 4: Go‐live preparation    1    3 

Responsibility (frequency)  Client  Consultant  and client 

No informatio n 

‐ ‐ 

‐ ‐ 

2 1 

1 1 

‐ ‐ 

‐ 2 

4 1 

‐ ‐ 

‐ 1 

3

1

1

Master data preparation  Master data input to productive  system with the use of interface  Manual master data input  ‐ 

‐ 4 

4 ‐ 

‐ ‐ 

1 1 

‐ 2 

4 ‐ 

‐ ‐ 

1 3 

5

Phase 5: Go‐live and support  ‐ 

3

2

‐ ‐ 

‐ 3 

3 ‐ 

‐ ‐ 

2 2 

Table 2: Cross‐phase project activities and responsibility split  Project task/activity  General activity  Sub‐activity  Project management  activities        Change management  (scope and  organizational  changes) 

Consultant

Project status meetings  Risk analysis and mitigation  Steering committee meetings  ‐ 

‐ ‐  ‐  ‐ 

Responsibility (frequency)  Client  Consultant  and client  ‐  1  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐ 

3 3  3  4 

No information  ‐  1  1  1  1 

The results will be discussed by project phase:    Project preparation    Project  preparation  is  a  phase  which  results  in  the  final  confirmation  of  project  scope,  budget  and  schedule  (which are usually defined in the pre‐implementation phase) as well as definition of the project plan (split into  phases together with the definition of products and milestones, and detailed schedule), project organisation  (project  sponsorship,  project  management,  implementation  teams,  roles  definition  and  assignment),  and  procedures  (communication,  risk  management,  change  management,  problem  solving  and  escalation).  The  project methodology is also agreed during that phase. The product of this phase is Project Charter document,  which includes all of the above mentioned items.   

89


Przemysław Lech  Two  of  the  client  companies  left  the  preparation  of  the  project  plan  to  the  consultants,  while  two  others  participated  in  the  formulation  of  the  plan  (in  one  project  there  was  no  information  regarding  project  plan  preparation).  As the consultants have experience from previous, similar projects and possess knowledge on  the implementation methodology, they play the leading role in the preparation of the project plan, although  the input from the client organization, regarding specific circumstances, that may alter standard approach is  also necessary.     The definition of project organizational structure and team formulation was done together by the clients and  consultants. The detailed information on the task split for this activity is available from four projects. Definition  of project roles was done by the consultants in three out of four cases. As the knowledge on what has to be  done to successfully implement the system is possessed by the consultants it is justified to assign this task to  them.  The  client  had  to  identify  the  team  members  for  each  role,  taking  into  consideration  the  necessary  knowledge and decision‐making power.    Preparation of the project procedures was done mostly by the consultants, who also performed the key user  trainings. Clients were responsible for the preparation of the technical infrastructure for the project.     Summing  up,  during  the  project  preparation  phase  the  consultants  were  responsible  for  the  supply  of  the  project methodology and knowledge from previous projects, which was codified in the form of project plan,  organizational  structure,  and  procedures.  They  were  also  responsible  for  the  initial  knowledge  transfer  regarding the system in the form of key‐users training.    Business Blueprint    During the Business Blueprint phase the detailed analysis of business processes and requirements is made by  the  consultants,  who  later  design  the  way  these  requirements  will  be  reflected  in  the  system.  The  main  outcome is the Business Blueprint document, including the definition of system configuration, as well as RICEF  (reports, interfaces, conversions, extensions and forms).     The  main  activities  in  this  phase  are  related  to  the  company‐specific  knowledge  transfer  from  the  clients  to  consultants,  who  ‘translate’  this  knowledge  into  the  system  design.  The  clients  were  responsible  for  the  company  structure,  business  processes  and  master  data  definition.    Later  the  consultants  designed  how  the  company  structure,  business  processes  and  master  data  will  be  reflected  in  the  system.  Interfaces  specification, as well as reports, forms, and extensions specification was done by the consultants (there is data  regarding  that  step  only  in  the  documentation  of  one  project,  although  it  definitely  had  to  be  done  also  in  other  four).  Interfaces  specification  was  done  either  by  the  consultants  or  the  client.  In  one  project  the  consultants  also  prepared  the  system  administration  procedures  and  training  plan  in  that  phase.  Other  activities included installation of the system (done either by the consultants or the client), and authorization  concept,  which  consisted  of  the  definition  of  roles  in  the  organization  done  by  the  client  and  design  of  the  authorization profiles which reflect these roles in the system, done by the consultants. Preparation of the final  document was left to the consultants in four projects and to the client in the remaining one.     The main role of the consultants in this phase is therefore absorption of company‐specific knowledge from the  key‐users and preparation of the system design (Business Blueprint).    Realization    The result of the realization phase is the configured system, together with RICEF, ready for testing.    System configuration was done by the consultants in all five projects. Preparation of the test environment was  done by the consultants in four, and together with the client in one project. The test scenarios was done by  the  consultants  and  the  tests  were  executed  by  the  clients  in  four  project,  under  the  supervision  of  consultants. One  company  left  the  testing to  the  consultants.  Consultants  also  developed all  extensions  and  prepared master data migration tools. Master data conversion was done by the clients in two projects and by  the  consultants  in  one.  The  consultants  were  also  responsible  for  the  system  documentation.  The  authorizations  were  done  either  by  the  consultants  or  by  the  clients.  This  phase  involved  non‐relational 

90


Przemysław Lech  activities,  performed  by  the  consultants,  namely  system  configuration,  RICEF  development  and  system  documentation. The only relational task was tests, done by the clients and supervised by the consultants.    Go‐live preparation    Go live preparation should result in the system ready for productive start and users trained and ready to work  with  the  new  system.  End  user  training  was  done  by  the  consultants  only  in  one  project.  The  other  four  projects  applied  the  train‐the‐trainer  approach.  This  means  that  the  key‐users  acquired  the  necessary  knowledge  by  participating  in  the  project  and  they  were  responsible  for  the  preparation  of  the  training  materials and execution of the trainings for the end‐users. Preparation of the system for the productive start  as well as development of the productive start plan (including the detailed sequence of activities, required to  start  the  work  in  the  new  system)  was  done  by  the  consultants  in  three  and  by  the  client  in  one  project.  Regarding master data transfer to the productive system, clients were responsible for preparation of the data  and consultants for data upload to the system. In two cases the consultants also prepared the plan for post go‐ live activities.    Therefore the main role of the consultant in this phase was preparation of productive start plan, master data  migration, and productive system preparation for go‐live.    Go‐live and support    In the last phase of the implementation project the system is launched. All the users start working with the  system and the role of the consultants, was to support the daily activities of the users, as they may still lack  knowledge regarding the new system, as well as solve problems reported by the users.     Cross‐phase activities    In addition to the above, some activities were performed repeatedly in each phase. These included project management activities and change management, and were performed jointly by the consultants and the clients.

4. Conclusions The purpose of this paper was to explore the role of the consultants by analysing the activities they perform in  Enterprise Systems implementations. The list of major activities was prepared by combining and merging data  from five ES implementation projects. Then the task split between the consultants and adopting organization  was analysed and presented.     The  role  of  the  consultants  in  the  project  preparation  phase  was  to  supply  of  the  project  methodology  and  knowledge  from  previous  projects,  which  was  codified  in  the  form  of  project  plan,  organizational  structure,  and procedures, as well as deliver the initial knowledge about the system to the key users. Then they had to  absorb the company specific knowledge to be able to combine it with the system knowledge and deliver the  project  design  in  the  Business  Blueprint  phase.  Realization  phase  involved  system  configuration,  RICEF  development  and  system  documentation  as  well  as  test  preparation  and  supervision.  In  most  projects  the  knowledge  about  the  system  was  gradually  delivered  to  the  key‐users  during  the  project,  so  that they  were  able to test the system and train the end‐users by themselves, but in one project the testing and training was  done solely by the consultants. Then the consultants prepared the system for the productive start, migrated  the  master  data  provided  by  the  clients  and  supervised  the  daily  work  of  the  users,  resolving  the  emerging  issues  at  the  same  time.  Throuthought  the  whole  project  the  project  management  activities  were  jointly  performed by the clients and the customers. Comparing to the roles, identified by Haines and Godhue (2003),  this research confirms that the main role of the consultants was to be the technical implementation assistant,  project  manager  and  trainer.  The  role  of  a  mentor  was  not  identified  in  this  study.  The  contribution  of  this  paper is the definition of detailed activities, that form the above mentioned roles. 

References Aloini, D., Dulmin, R. and  Mininno, V.  (2007). „Risk management in ERP project introduction: Review of the literature”,   Information & Management, Vol. 44, No.6, pp.547‐567  Barley, S. and Kunda, G. (2001) “Bringing Work Back In”, Organization Science, Vol. 12 No 1, pp. 76–95.  

91


Przemysław Lech  Chan, R. and Rosemann, M. (2001) “Managing knowledge in enterprise systems”, Journal of Systems and Information  Technology, Vol. 5 No. 2, pp.37–54 Chang, J.Y.T. et al. (2013), “Controlling ERP consultants: Client and provider practices”’ Journal of Systems and Software,  86(5), pp.1453–1461.   Davenport, T. (1998) “Putting the Enterprise into the Enterprise System”, Harvard Business Review, July – August, pp. 1‐11  Esteves J.and Bohorquez V. (2007), “An Updated ERP Systems Annotated Bibliography 2001‐2005”, IE Working Paper  WP07‐04  Esteves, J., Chan, R. and Pastor, J. (2003), “An Exploratory Study of Knowledge Types Relevance Along Enterprise Systems  Implementation Phases”,  4‐th European Conference on Organizational Knowledge and Learning Capabilities,  pp. 13– 14  Haines, M.N. and Goodhue, D.L. (2003), “Implementation partner involvement and knowledge transfer in the context of  ERP implementations”, International Journal of Human‐Computer Interaction, Vol.16 No. 1, pp.23–38.   Huckvale, T. and Ould, M. (1995), “Process Modelling – Who, What and How: Role Activity Diagramming, in Business  process change : concepts, methods, and technologies”, in:  Grover, V. and W. J. Kettinger, (Eds), Harrisburg, Pa. Idea  Group Pub  Ko, D.‐G., Kirsch, L.J. and King, W.R. (2005) “Antecedents of Knowledge Transfer from Consultants to Clients in Enterprise  System Implementations”, MIS Quarterly, Vol. 29, No.1, pp.59–85  Koch, S. and Mitlöhner, J. (2010) “Effort estimation for enterprise resource planning implementation projects using social  choice – a comparative study”, Enterprise Information Systems, Vol. 4 No.3, pp.265‐281  Lech, P. (2011) “Knowledge Transfer Procedures From Consultants to Users in ERP Implementations”, Electronic Journal of  Knowledge Management, Vol. 9 No.4, pp.318–327  Muscatello J. and Chen I. (2008) “Enterprise Resource Planning (ERP) Implementations: Theory and Practice”, International  Journal of Enterprise Information Systems, Vol. 4, No 1, pp. 63‐77  Poba‐Nzao P., Raymond L. and Fabi B. (2008) “Adoption and risk of ERP systems in manufacturing SMEs: a positivist case  study”, Business Process Management Journal, Vol. 11, No.4, pp. 530 – 550 Rosemann, M. (1999) “ERP software characteristics and consequences”,  Proceedings of the 7th European Conference on  Information Systems, Copenhagen  Simon, A., Schoeman, P. and Sohal, A.S. (2010) “Prioritised best practices in a ratified consulting services maturity model  for ERP consulting”, Journal of Enterprise Information Management, Vol. 23, No.1, pp.100–124  Sedera D. and Gable G. (2010) “Knowledge Management Competence for Enterprise System Success”, Journal of Strategic  Information Systems, Vol. 19, pp. 296‐306  Soja P. and Paliwoda‐Pękosz G. (2013) „Impediments to Enterprise System Implementation over the System Lifecycle:  Contrasting Transition and Developed  Economies”, The Electronic Journal of Information Systems in Developing  Countries, Vol. 57, No. 1, pp. 1‐13  Vilpola, I.H. (2008) “A method for improving ERP implementation success by the principles and process of user‐centred  design”, Enterprise Information Systems, Vol. 2 No.1, pp.47–76 Wang, E.T.G. and Chen, J.H.F. (2006) “Effects of internal support and consultant quality on the consulting process and ERP  system quality”, Decision Support Systems, Vol 42, No.2, pp.1029–1041 Wu J‐H., Shin S‐S., Heng M. (2007, “A methodology for ERP misfit analysis”, Information & Management, Vol. 44, pp. 666‐ 680 

92


A Systematic Literature Review on Business Cases: Structuring the  Study Field and Defining Future Research Dimensions  Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes  University of Antwerp, Antwerp Management School, Antwerp, Belgium  kim.maes@ams.ac.be  wim.vangrembergen@ua.ac.be  steven.dehaes@ua.ac.be    Abstract:  Many  organisations  perceive  business  cases  as  a  valuable  instrument  for  the  justification  and  evaluation  of  information technology (IT) investments. This attention from practice has been ascertained by academic scholars resulting  in a growing number of publications in both top academic and practitioner journals since 1999. However, most researchers  only mention some aspect of a business case somewhere in the course of their article and few include the business case  concept  in  their  main  research  scope.  As  a  result,  much  knowledge  on  business  case  research  is  scattered  throughout  literature and a clear definition of what actually constitutes a business case is still missing. The fact that the study field on  business cases is emerging stimulates misunderstanding and may cause discouragement for future research endeavours.  Therefore,  the  present  paper  aims  to  understand  and  integrate  the  current  state  of  research  on  business  cases  in  an  attempt  to  realise  two  objectives  with  clear  contributions.  First,  we  tackle  the  problem  of  scattered  knowledge  by  organising fragmented knowledge into a newly developed Business Case Research Framework that clearly structures the  study  field  into  six  dimensions.  Second,  we  identify  what  constitutes  the  business  case  concept  and  provide  a  clear  definition  to  resolve  the  misunderstanding  among  scholars.  Based  on  the  literature  findings,  we  share  interesting  observations  suggesting  promising  opportunities  for  future  research.  A  systematic  literature  review  methodology  is  performed in a selection of top academic and practitioner journals.    Keywords: business case, framework development, systematic literature review, concept definition, future research 

1. Introduction According to both business and information systems (IS) researchers, a business case can help to evaluate an  investment endeavour before large resources are invested (Erat and Kavadias 2008; Kohli and Devaraj 2004).  Since  the  turn  of  the  century,  a  growing  number  of  scholars  are  becoming  more  interested  in  the  topic  of  business cases. Figure 1 provides a year‐by‐year overview of the number of articles mentioning business case,  which are published in a selection of top academic and practitioner journals. Since 1999, a noticeable increase  can be ascertained in both journal types. Some of these publications have business case within the scope of  their research or address considerable attention to the subject (e.g. Franken, Edwards and Lambert 2009; Krell  and Matook 2009; Ward, Daniel and Peppard 2008). Most however, mention some aspect of a business case in  the course of their article such as its importance, its purpose, its content or who is involved in its development  without further elaboration on the business case concept (e.g. Hsiao 2008; Lin and Pervan 2003). Hence, much  knowledge  on  business  case  research  is  scattered  throughout  literature.  Only  a  handful  of  scholars  provide  some  definition  on  what  constitutes  a  business  case,  but  a  clear  definition  is  still  missing.  For  instance,  a  business case is more than just “a formal summary of benefits that a firm anticipates from an IS investment”  (Krell and Matook 2009). Post (1992) was among the first calling for additional research on business cases in  order to develop a deeper understanding of their impact. Yet, so far few have answered this call to focus on  business cases within their research. The lack of a clear definition and the fragmentation of knowledge may  stimulate misunderstanding and consequently discourage further research.    The present paper addresses the call for additional research, as business cases are an important instrument in  value  creation  through  (IT)  investments.  As  a  result,  we  want  to  understand,  accumulate  and  integrate  the  current state of research on business cases. This fragmented knowledge is organised into a newly developed  Business  Case  Research  Framework  that  clearly  structures  the  study  field.  An  improved  definition  on  what  constitutes  a  business  case  is  proposed.  Interesting  observations  suggesting  promising  future  research  opportunities  are  shared  as  well.  By  doing  so,  the  systematic  literature  review  contributes  in  two  ways  (Webster  and  Watson  2002).  First,  it  shows  that  little  research  has  substantially  addressed  the  topic  of  business  cases  so  far.  Second,  it  provides  a  new  theoretical  understanding  on  a  research  topic  in  which  the  current knowledge is dispersed over numerous academic and practitioner publications. 

93


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes 

Figure 1: Distribution of articles by year over the past twenty‐one years 

2. Methodology A  comprehensive  description  of  the  literature  review  process  is  desirable  according  to  Vom  Brocke  et  al.  (2009). The objective of the systematic literature review is to understand and accumulate the current state of  research  on  business  cases  with  the  aim  to  organise  the  fragmented  knowledge  into  a  newly  developed  framework. It focuses on publications dealing with business case as a management practice only in passing or  in a considerable manner. An exhaustive search is performed in top academic and practitioner journals which  have  been  selected  based  on  journal  ranking  publications  (e.g.  Vom  Brocke  et  al.  2009;  Mylonopoulos  and  Theoharakis  2001)  and  the  ISI  web  of  knowledge  5‐year  impact  factor  in  the  business  and  finance  category  (only  for  finance  journal  selection).  The  search  is  executed  in  multiple  e‐databases  (EBSCO,  JSTOR,  ScienceDirect,  Swetwise,  WILEY)  and  on  journal  websites  with  “business  case”  in  full  text  and  a  time  frame  between 1990 and 2011. Unfortunately, for some journals the time frame was not entirely available. Yielding  495 initial results, each paper was thoroughly analysed to understand the context in which the term ‘business  case’  is  being  employed.  All  irrelevant  papers  only  mentioning  ‘business  case’  in  the  reference  list,  journal  advertising or as in “proving the business case of...” have been omitted. This step has led to a final list of 169  relevant papers including one paper (Sarkis and Liles 1995) that has been added through backward searching.  All  relevant  publications  were  then  analysed  through  qualitative  content  analysis  to  structure  and  interpret  individual  text  fragments  (Mingers  2003).  Based  on  these  findings,  we  identified  six  dimensions  that  characterise  an  aspect  of  the  business  case  concept.  Each  dimension  is  a  way  to  perceive  the  business  case  from  a  certain  angle:  its  application  area,  goals,  content,  stakeholders,  as  a  process  or  the  risk  factors  if  a  business case is not employed in a adequate manner. Together, these dimensions constitute the Business Case  Research Framework displayed in Figure 2. (Bryman 2001) 

Figure 2: Business case research framework 

3. Dimensions defining a holistic business case research framework  The Business Case Research Framework reflects the versatility of the business case concept as a research topic.  To accumulate and structure the study field, the content of each dimension is discussed hereafter. In line with  Elo  and  Kyngäs  (2008),  sub  dimensions  were  created  to  structure  text  fragments  within  each  dimension. 

94


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes  Alternatively,  some  of  them  have  been  directly  linked  to  three  stages  of  an  investment  life  cycle:  before,  during and after implementation (Hitt, Wu and Zhou 2002). 

3.1 Business case application area  The  literature  findings  show  a  wide  variety  of  investments  in  which  a  business  case  can  be  employed.  This  insight has led to a first business case dimension titled the business case application area and defined as the  specific type of investment for which the development of a business case can be beneficial to achieve one or  more of its goals. As portrayed in Table 1, this dimension is further divided into two major sub dimensions. On  the one hand, a business case is developed for investments with a technological orientation incorporating both  software  applications  (e.g.  e‐business,  data  warehousing  system)  and  infrastructure  (e.g.  broadband  development, RFID). On the other hand, a diverse set of investments with an organisational focus can benefit  from  a  business  case  as  well.  These  investments  can  range  from  a  strategic  alliance  to  corporate  social  responsibility and gender diversity. For instance, the latter provides an argumentation to get more women into  leadership roles (Wellington, Kropf and Gerkovich 2003).  Table 1: Business case application area   

Technological orientation 

Organisational orientation 

Business case application area  Software reuse  E‐business  Software repositories  Software product line adoption  Offshore sourcing  Material requirements planning  E‐health records  Global data synchronization network  Group decision support systems  Point‐of‐sale debit services  Data warehousing system  Broadband development  E‐government  RFID  Strategic vision for IT  Global shared service centres  Strategic alliances  Effective global business teams  Executing strategic change  Project management office  Corporate social responsibility  Collaborative innovation  Gender diversity  Business rules  New product development  Business processes  Supply chain integration  Quality management  IT and service‐oriented architecture   

3.2 Business case content  A business case document is considered to be a structured overview of specific elements that characterise an  investment, such as objectives, costs and benefits (Hsiao 2008). During the literature review, multiple of these  elements  have  been  identified  in  various  publications.  To  integrate  this  fragmented  representation  of  what  should be included in a business case, this paper has clustered all elements into one business case dimension  that  is  defined  as  the  business  case  content.  The  content  is  further  structured  through  sub  dimensions  clarifying content elements that are related to each other as presented in Table 2. Over the years new insights  have been put forward in this dimension. For instance, the need to determine intangible or qualitative benefits  next  to  financial  and  quantitative  benefits  has  been  suggested  (Gregor,  Martin,  Fernandez,  Stern  and  Vitale  2006; McAfee 2009). Furthermore, a simple enumeration of the investment objectives and which tangible and  intangible benefits can be expected does not suffice anymore (DellaVechia, Scantlebury and Stevenson 2007).  Table 2: Business case content    Investment  description  Investment  objectives  Investment  requirements  Investment 

Business case content  Project planning and roadmaps (tables, figures)  Drivers for change  Project description    Explicit project objectives  Align and link objectives of:  ‐ business and IS  Performance goals  ‐ investment and organisation  Business goals  Requirements  Technical needs  Resource requirements  Market needs  Customer needs  Strategic requirements  Organisational needs    Benefits and costs (business and technological)  Cost‐benefit analysis 

95


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes    impact 

Investment risks  Investment  assumptions,  considerations  and scenarios  Investment  governance 

Business case content  over consecutive years:  Financial investment justification  ‐ tangible and intangible  Financial plan / benefits plan  ‐ monetary and non‐monetary  Feasibility study  ‐ quantifiable, measurable and observable  Organisational changes  ‐ certain and uncertain  Link investment metrics to business  ‐ direct and indirect  performance  ‐ realistic  Business variables and measures are  Clear benefit definition  targeted against baselines prior to investing  Investment risk factors (technical and business‐ Risk management plan  change risks)  Realistic assumptions  Intervening variables  Organisational, strategic, operational,  Best practices research  technological issues  Investment options  Time / organisational constraints  Realistic technology scenarios  Qualitative considerations    Roles and responsibilities  Compliance  Accountability   

3.3 Business case process  While  most  scholars  perceive  a  business  case  as  a  document,  some  have  built  a  process  to  guide  its  development.  Sarkis  and  Liles  (1995)  are  first  to  develop  a  high‐level  business  case  process  including  five  interrelated  steps:  identify  system  impact,  identify  transition  impact,  estimate  costs  and  benefits,  perform  decision  analysis,  and  audit  decision.  Ward  et  al.  (2008)  extended  the  seminal  process  incorporating  critical  tasks such as the identification of business drivers and investment objectives, the recognition of financial and  non‐financial benefits, the identification of benefits owners and the linkage between investment changes and  benefits.  In  addition,  various  scholars  mention  the  use  of  a  business  case  casually  during  some  stage  of  an  investment  life  cycle.  De  Haes,  Gemke,  Thorp  and  van  Grembergen  (2011)  add  that  the  development  of  a  detailed  business  case  can  be  preceded  by  a  high‐level  business  case  in  which  a  first  rough  outline  of  the  investment  purpose  and  implications  is  delineated.  According  to  Franken  et  al.  (2009),  a  business  case  can  assist  in  the  performance  monitoring  during  investment  implementation.  Once  the  investment  has  been  finalised,  the  business  case  helps  to  independently  evaluate  the  investment  outcome  during  the  post‐ implementation review (Jeffrey and Leliveld 2004; Shang and Seddon 2002). We identified various tasks within  literature with regard to a business case and linked them with the investment stages as presented in Table 3.  Table 3: Business case process tasks    BEFORE  implementation 

Business case tasks  Understand investment relevance  Split business case:  ‐ into high‐level and detailed business cases  ‐ per sub investment  Assess investment:  ‐ feasibility (organisational, financial, technical)  ‐ viability (economic, marketability, strategic)  Identify, structure and determine explicit metrics and values of:  ‐ benefits, costs and risks (if successful and in case of failure)  ‐ resource requirements (financial, timing, staff)  ‐ user requirements  ‐ critical success factors  Link benefits and changes explicitly  Develop a:  ‐ work plan, action plan, roadmaps  ‐ benefits‐delivery plan  Develop and validate:  ‐ proof‐of‐concept, prototype  Perform and determine:  ‐ what‐if analyses and failure analysis  ‐ preferred solutions  ‐ investment alternatives 

96


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes   

DURING implementation 

AFTER implementation 

Business case tasks  Assign responsibilities and accountabilities:  ‐ investment team  ‐ investment sponsor  ‐ benefit owners  in relation to investment objectives and benefits  Identify and assure:  ‐ stakeholder opinion (via workshop, …)  ‐ stakeholder ability to achieve investment change  ‐ stakeholder confirmation of business case  ‐ stakeholder commitment (e.g. top management)  Evaluate the business case  Communicate business case (stress investment vision, objectives, stakeholder commitment)  Approve the business case or stop the investment  Audit investment decision  Allocate investment resources  Establish evaluation team  Monitor, evaluate and report on:  ‐ investment progress, budget and performance  ‐ investment changes  Review and update business case based on:  ‐ investment progress and performance  ‐ new insights from stakeholders  ‐ organisational, technical and, market changes  Identify and assure:  ‐ stakeholder opinion (via workshop, …)  ‐ stakeholder ability to achieve investment change  ‐ stakeholder confirmation of business case  ‐ stakeholder commitment (e.g. top management)  In case of investment failure, reassess business case, assumptions and feasibility  Evaluate investment performance against stated investment objectives, industry benchmarks  or an ideal performance level  Understand failure reasons  Acquire lessons learned  Audit investment performance  Determine further investment opportunities and business cases  Reward in relation to performance 

3.4 Business case goals  The development and use of business cases can help to achieve multiple objectives. For instance, it facilitates  the collection of basic information and clear responsibility assignment (Smith, McKeen, Cranston and Benson  2010).  It  can  also  be  utilised  as  a  communication  instrument  as  well  to  convince  people  and  to  get  top  management  commitment  (Peppard  and  Ward  2005;  Davenport,  Harris,  De  Long  and  Jacobson  2001).  Investments  can  be  compared  and  prioritised  through  a  business  case  to  identify  high‐priority  and  quick  winning  investments  (Smith  et  al.  2010;  LeFave,  Branch,  Brown  and  Wixom  2008).  It  can  be  an  objective  instrument to evaluate the investment outcome and to demonstrate its impact (Ward et al. 2008). During the  literature  analysis,  this  wide  variety  of  objectives  has  been  integrated  into  a  business  case  goals  dimension  which  is  defined  as  any  particular  reason  why  a  business  case  should  be  developed  and  which  tangible  and  intangible  contributions  it  can  bring  to  the  organisation.  The  business  case  goals  are  organised  through  the  investment stages and presented in Table 4. 

3.5 Business case stakeholders  Literature findings indicate that a diversity of people are involved with a business case. Some of these people  are responsible for its development or to give approval and provide funding to the investment while others are  only consulted (Avison, Cuthbertson and Powell 1999; Smith and McKeen 2008). This multitude of people has  been  categorised  into  a  dimension  focusing  on  business  case  stakeholders  which  is  defined  as  those  people  that can affect or are affected by the business case and have a stake in one or more business case tasks and in  the achievement of the business case goals. Most stakeholders can be found in the business and not in IT. The 

97


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes  business is responsible for the development and communication of the business case through its business unit  executives or the investment sponsor (Beatty and Williams 2006; Teubner 2007) whether or not assisted by a  business architect (Fonstad and Robertson 2006). Ross (2003) states that this responsibility should be shared  with IT. Stakeholders from business and IT are put together to assess investment feasibility and its potential  added  value  to  the  organisation  as  this  requires  in‐depth  knowledge  on  social,  economic  as  well  as  technological implications (Charette 2006). A devil’s advocate is added to the evaluation team to objectively  critique  the  business  case  and  depersonalise  the  discussion  (Frisch  2008).  Literature  demonstrates  that  the  business  case  is  primarily  a  business  responsibility.  Although  IT  people  are  explicitly  involved  before  implementation as portrayed in Table 5, they seem to be no longer involved after the investment decision has  been made. Literature only mentions the finance organisation and post‐implementation review team in these  phases.  Table 4: Business case goals   

BEFORE implementation 

DURING implementation  AFTER  implementation 

Business case goals  to ensure an investment owner is assigned  to ensure basic investment information is       collected  to identify how IT and business changes will     deliver the identified benefits  to increase the investment success rate  to link benefits to organisational changes     and to investment objectives  to convince people  to ensure involvement, support and get     commitment  to increase motivation and stimulate action  to obtain investment resources (funding,  staff, time…)  to obtain additional investment resources     (funding, staff, time…)  to remove unattractive investments  to execute a post evaluation  to objectively evaluate investment outcome 

to improve the relationship and develop  trust  to communicate an investment's concept,     status and results among its stakeholders  to transfer knowledge  to compare investments  to balance risks between investments  to filter out unattractive investment ideas  to identify "low‐hanging fruits"  to identify high‐priority investments  to prioritise investments  to get investment approval  to make well‐founded investment decisions  to successfully launch an investment  to disallow additional resources for an     unattractive investment    to demonstrate an investment's impact   

Table 5: Business case stakeholders   

BEFORE implementation 

DURING implementation  AFTER  implementation 

Business case stakeholders  Board of directors  Executive committee  CEO / CFO / CPO / CIO  Strategy management group  Senior management  Business executives / managers together  with     IT managers and business architects  Business unit manager  Business / investment sponsor  Business planning board  Portfolio management team  Project investment department  Capital IT project management board  Project centre of excellence  Project manager 

Finance organisation / staff  Capital control group  IT steering committee  IT management team  Business demand office on IT side  Internal/external end users from    business and IT  Division information managers  Designers  Operation managers  Uninvolved project leaders and auditors  Human resources/organisation department  A devil’s advocate     

Finance organisation 

Post‐implementation review team 

Finance organisation 

98


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes 

3.6 Business case risk factors  Based  on  the  previous  five  business  case  dimensions,  an  organisation  should  be  able  to  understand  how  to  build a sound business case (content, process, goals and stakeholders) and for which investment types such a  business  case  can  be  applied.  However,  if  an  organisation  does  not  adequately  employ  these  guidelines  impending unidentified risks may negatively impact the investment outcome. Therefore, the literature analysis  has led to the identification of a last dimension focusing on the risk factors in relation to the business case and  which potential results this might deliver, as presented in Table 7. Some risk factors are linked to investment  stages  such  as  lack  of  financial  knowledge  among  IT  staff,  growing  complexity  due  to  inter‐organisational  investments and weak partnership between business and IT (e.g. Jeffrey and Leliveld 2004). Other risk factors  give  insight  into  important  aspects  that  are  worth  attention  during  the  business  case  process.  For  instance,  organisational  culture,  personal  characteristics  of  a  manager  or  top  management  turnover  can  negatively  impact the business case quality and the resource availability during the investment (Earl and Feeny 2000).  Table 6: Business case risk factors and impact   

Business case risk factors  Potential impact  Difficulties to formulate and position a business  ‐ not developing a business case  case because:  ‐ developing a weak business case  ‐ IT staff lack working knowledge of financial  ‐ an ad hoc approach to execute investments  concepts  ‐ benefits cannot be managed effectively  ‐ a weak partnership exists between business  ‐ systems development for the sake of  and IT  technology  ‐ it is hard to calculate strategic and tactical  ‐ progress is difficult to measure  benefits  ‐ evangelists set their own targets  ‐ inter‐organisational investments increase  ‐ investment approved by elbow grease (based  complexity  on effort to convince people instead of on  ‐ investment is perceived as IT and not as  quality)  business  ‐ stakeholders are not included from the  beginning  Business case not presented:  ‐ stakeholders do not understand investment  BEFORE  ‐ in appropriate language  objectives  implementation  ‐ with realistic, neutral, complete and valid  ‐ risks are described to persuade rather than to  arguments  inform  ‐ with investment alternatives or options  ‐ creating a narrow yes‐or‐no framework  ‐ with strong leadership to convince decision‐ ‐ too much focus on financial arguments  makers  ‐ an 'IT‐doesn't‐matter' management attitude  ‐ with clear accountabilities and according  rewards  The business case evaluation and approval:  ‐ overspend of time and money  ‐ is based on technical instead of business  ‐ under‐delivery of benefits  criteria  ‐ slow down or annulment of an investment  ‐ focus on short term benefits instead of long  ‐ less initiative will be taken to build and  term needs  present a business case  ‐ is not executed thoroughly and quickly  ‐ target the business case presenter and not the  investment  A business case is not:  ‐ investment not adjusted to market changes  DURING and  ‐ not further employed after its development  and needs  AFTER  ‐ regularly reviewed  ‐ lessons learned cannot be collected and  implementation  understood  A business case can be influenced by:  ‐ inconsistent business case quality  ‐ organisational culture  ‐ changing sponsorship  Environmental  ‐ decision‐makers  ‐ changing resource availability  influences to  ‐ personal characteristics (e.g. CIO role /  business case  influence behaviour)  ‐ top management turnover  A business case's project framing diminishes  ‐ enabling project escalation  Business case  flexibility  ‐ additional approaches should be employed  limitations  Investment justification based only on a  including executive level allocation and annual  business case  CIO allocation 

99


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes 

4. Discussion The systematic literature review reveals multiple observations on upcoming research evolutions and interests  in  the  study  field  of  business  cases.  In  this  discussion  we  will  focus  on  the  most  interesting  suggesting  promising  opportunities  for  future  research.  As  a  starting  point,  we  contribute  with  a  new  definition  of  the  business case concept based on the literature findings:  A  business  case  is  a  dynamic,  formal  document  specifying  all  relevant  information  of  an  investment,  which  is  purposefully  used  throughout  the  entire  investment  life  cycle  by  key  stakeholders.  Observation 1: Business cases are applicable in variety of investments, organisations and industries    The  business  case  application  area  is  wide  and  diverse  indicating  that  its  use  is  not  only  useful  in  the  implementation  of  IT  investments  but  also  in  organisational  investments  or  social  changes  throughout  the  organisation.  Moreover,  business  cases  can  be  used  in  different  types  of  industries  such  as  the  insurance  industry  or  the  fashion  industry  (Nelson,  Peterson,  Rariden  and  Sen  2010),  as  well  as  in  different  types  of  organisations  ranging  from  SMEs  to  multinationals  and  governments  (Ballantine,  Levy  and  Powell  1998).  However,  the  literature  does  not  describe  whether  a  business  case  should  be  developed  or  managed  differently  in  relation  to  the  type  of  investment,  industry  or  organisation.  Hence,  it  could  be  interesting  to  investigate whether the implementation of other business case dimensions should be adjusted accordingly.    Observation 2: A business case is more than financial numbers     The content of a business case document is no longer limited to financial numbers. Today, both quantitative  and  qualitative  benefits  should  be  identified  and  defined.  Smithson  and  Hirschheim  (1998)  argue  that  an  organisation  taking  only  quantifiable  benefits  into  account  will  have  no  strategic  alignment  between  investment  and  organisational  objectives  whereas  business  cases  built  with  only  monetary  impacts  are  questionable (Urbach, Smolnik and Riempp 2010). Ward et al. (2008) found that qualitative benefits provide a  more complete image of the potential business value of an investment. These benefits are frequently omitted  due  to  their  political  sensitivity,  difficulties  in  handling  them  and  their  potential  to  hinder  in  the  approval  procedures  (Farbey,  Land  and  Targett  1999).  Furthermore,  researchers  call  (i)  for  a  link  between  the  investment objectives and organisational goals (Bruch and Ghoshal 2002; Ward et al. 2008), and (ii) for a link  between the impact of anticipated changes and their respective benefits (e.g. Avison et al. 1999). Only these  linkages can consider a clear understanding of the investment impact during evaluation and decision‐making.  As  many  of  these  new  insights  have  not  yet  been  integrated  and  explicitly  linked  in  the  business  case  literature, we ask for future research to develop an innovative business case template.    Observation 3: It is not just about developing a business case    Many scholars present a business case as a useful and valuable instrument at the beginning of an investment  to get a thorough understanding of the investment application (e.g. Balaji, Ranganathan and Coleman 2011;  Davenport  et  al.  2001.  This  has  been  perfectly  captured  by  the  multi‐step  approach  for  business  case  development  by  Ward  et  al.  (2008).  Nevertheless,  the  steps  to  develop  a  business  case  do  not  equal  the  business  case  process  as  a  whole.  A  business  case  can  be  purposefully  employed  in  case  of  major  changes  affecting the investment or project escalation, which might require a review of the business case to be in line  with the prevailing reality or to justify the continuation of the investment (Brown and Lockett 2004; Flynn, Pan,  Keil and Mähring 2009; Iacovou and Dexter 2004). After implementation, a business case can help to evaluate  the  investment  outcome,  and  to  understand  failure  reasons  and  lessons  learned  for  future  business  case  developments and investment implementations (Fonstad and Robertson 2006). Until today, these additional  tasks surpassing business case development have not been integrated. As Al‐Mudimigh, Zairi, Al‐Mashari and  others (2001) argue that a business case is a useful and effective instrument throughout all investment stages,  such integration should lead to a full business case process in parallel with the investment life cycle.    Observation 4: Business case knowledge is scarce and limited to case development    Current knowledge on business cases is largely concentrated on the development of a business case (e.g. Ward  et al. 2008), thus before the investment decision is made. This applies to the business case process tasks, its 

100


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes  goals,  the  stakeholders  and  the  identified  risk  factors.  For  instance,  only  six  goals  and  four  stakeholders  are  identified  during  and  after  the  investment  implementation.  Hence,  we  can  conclude  that  research  on  these  dimensions  of  a  business  case  during  and  after  the  implementation  of  an  investment  is  still  in  its  infancy.  Although many scholars mention its usefulness during these investment stages (e.g. Al‐Mudimigh et al. 2001;  Franken et al. 2009), none have specifically drawn attention to this during their research. We argue that future  research is necessary to build new theoretical knowledge that can further enhance our understanding in order  to help practitioners willing to apply this knowledge.     Observation 5: Finance scholars have yet to discover business case research    Next  to  senior  management,  people  of  the  finance  organisation  are  closely  involved  in  many  tasks  of  the  business case process. For instance, they execute the financial analysis, provide business case templates and  train people on how to employ these, fund the investment idea, monitor the investment budget and business  case,  and  facilitate  the  post‐implementation  review  (Smith  et  al.  2010;  Westerman  and  Curley  2008).  Consequently,  one  could  argue  that  the  study  field  of  business  cases  might  be  of  great  interest  to  finance  scholars yet no relevant article mentioning ‘business case’ has been found in finance journals. This might imply  that business case research is still not on the radar of finance scholars publishing in top finance journals, so we  would like to invite them to enrich this emerging study field.    Observation 6: Stakeholders are an integral part of business case usage    Various publications identify multiple stakeholders that can be involved with a business case (e.g. De Haes et  al.  2011;  Fonstad  &  Robertson  2006),  yet  none  provides  a  complete  list  of  who  should  really  be  involved.  Hence, we are interested to know how many stakeholders should be involved in the business case process to  achieve  an  optimal  result.  Including  too  many  stakeholders  will  become  difficult  to  organise  and  the  new  information  provided  by  each  additional  stakeholder  diminishes  gradually  due  to  information  saturation.  Future research could also investigate the implications of positioning particular stakeholder responsibilities in  another hierarchical level or business area. For instance, with regard to a customer relationship management  investment, what might be the impact of changing the business unit executive by the marketing manager as an  investment sponsor (i.e. changing seniority for relevant domain expertise)? 

5. Conclusion Although the interest in business case research is growing, the study field is still in its infancy: business case  knowledge is scattered and a clear definition is missing. Therefore, the present paper integrated the current  state of research on business cases into a newly developed Business Case Research Framework and developed  a new definition of the business case concept. We have also found multiple interesting observations based on  literature findings that suggest promising opportunities for future research. The applicability of a business case  is broader than just IT investments. Researchers tend to shift from document thinking to a process approach  on business cases and urge to enrich its content with qualitative information. Stakeholders are key in business  case  usage  yet  further  research  could  investigate  their  role  and  impact  from  new  angles.  In  addition,  the  knowledge  base  on  business  cases  is  scarce  especially  in  the  finance  field  and  in  their  use  beyond  the  development phase. 

References Al‐Mudimigh, A., Zairi, M., Al‐Mashari, M., & others. (2001). ERP software implementation: an integrative framework.  European Journal of Information Systems, 10(4), 216–226.  Avison, D., Cuthbertson, C., & Powell, P. (1999). The paradox of information systems: strategic value and low status. The  Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 8(4), 419–445.  Balaji, S., Ranganathan, C., & Coleman, T. (2011). IT‐Led Process Reengineering: How Sloan Valve Redesigned its New  Product Development Process. MIS Quarterly Executive, 10(2), 81–92.  Ballantine, J., Levy, M., & Powell, P. (1998). Evaluating information systems in small and medium‐sized enterprises: issues  and evidence. European Journal of Information Systems, 7(4), 241–251.  Beatty, R., & Williams, C. (2006). ERP II: best practices for successfully implementing an ERP upgrade. Communications of  the ACM, 49(3), 105–109.  Brown, D., & Lockett, N. (2004). Potential of critical e‐applications for engaging SMEs in e‐business: a provider perspective.  European Journal of Information Systems, 13(1), 21–34.  Bruch, H., & Ghoshal, S. (2002). Beware the Busy Manager. Harvard Business Review, 80(2), 62–69.  Bryman, A. (2001). Social Research Methods. Oxford, UK: Oxford University Press. 

101


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes  Charette, R. (2006). EHRs: Electronic Health Records or Exceptional Hidden Risks? Communications of the ACM, 49(6), 120– 120.  Davenport, T., Harris, J. G., De Long, D. W., & Jacobson, A. L. (2001). Data to Knowledge to Results:  Building an Analytic  Capability. California Management Review, 43(2), 117–138.  De Haes, S., Gemke, D., Thorp, J., & van Grembergen, W. (2011). KLM’s Enterprise Governance of IT Journey: From  Managing IT Costs to Managing Business Value. MIS Quarterly Executive, 10(3), 109–120.  DellaVechia, T., Scantlebury, S., & Stevenson, J. (2007). Three CIO advisory board responses to managing the realization of  business benefits from IT investments. MIS Quarterly Executive, 13–16.  Earl, M., & Feeny, D. (2000). How to be a CEO for the information age. Sloan Management Review, 41(2), 11–23.  Elo, S., & Kyngäs, H. (2008). The qualitative content analysis process. Journal of Advanced Nursing, 62(1), 107–115.  Erat, S., & Kavadias, S. (2008). Sequential testing of Product designs: Implications for Learning. Management Science, 54(5),  956–968.  Farbey, B., Land, F., & Targett, D. (1999). Moving IS evaluation forward: learning themes and research issues. The Journal of  Strategic Information Systems, 8(2), 189–207.  Flynn, D., Pan, G., Keil, M., & Mähring, M. (2009). De‐escalating IT projects: the DMM model. Communications of the ACM,  52(10), 131–134.  Fonstad, N., & Robertson, D. (2006). Transforming a company, project by project: The IT engagement model. MIS Quarterly  Executive, 5(1), 1–14.  Franken, A., Edwards, C., & Lambert, R. (2009). Executing Strategic Change: Understanding the Critical Management  Elements That Lead to Success. California Management Review, 51(3), 49–73.  Frisch, B. (2008). When Teams Can’t Decide. Harvard Business Review, 86(11), 121–126.  Gregor, S., Martin, M., Fernandez, W., Stern, S., & Vitale, M. (2006). The transformational dimension in the realization of  business value from information technology. The Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 15(3), 249–270.  Hitt, L., Wu, D., & Zhou, X. (2002). Investment in enterprise resource planning: Business impact and productivity measures.  Journal of Management Information Systems, 19(1), 71–98.  Hsiao, R. (2008). Knowledge sharing in a global professional service firm. MIS Quarterly Executive, 7(3), 399–412.  Iacovou, C., & Dexter, A. (2004). Turning Around Runaway Information Technology Projects. California Management  Review, 46(4), 68–88.  Jeffrey, M., & Leliveld, I. (2004). Best practices in IT portfolio. MIT Sloan Management Review, 45(3), 41–49.  Kohli, R., & Devaraj, S. (2004). Realizing the business value of information technology investments: an organizational  process. MIS Quarterly Executive, 3(1), 53–68.  Krell, K., & Matook, S. (2009). Competitive advantage from mandatory investments: An empirical study of Australian firms.  The Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 18(1), 31–45.  LeFave, R., Branch, B., Brown, C., & Wixom, B. (2008). How Sprint Nextel reconfigured IT resources for results. MIS  Quarterly Executive, 7(4), 171–179.  Lin, C., & Pervan, G. (2003). The practice of IS/IT benefits management in large Australian organizations. Information &  Management, 41(1), 13–24.  McAfee, A. (2009). Shattering the Myths About Enterprise 2.0. Harvard Business Review, 87(11), 1–6.  Mingers, J. (2003). The paucity of multimethod research: a review of the information systems literature. Information  Systems Journal, 13, 233–249.  Mylonopoulos, N., & Theoharakis, V. (2001). On site: global perceptions of IS journals. Communications of the ACM, 44(9),  29–33.  Nelson, M., Peterson, J., Rariden, R., & Sen, R. (2010). Transitioning to a business rule management service model: Case  studies from the property and casualty insurance industry. Information & management, 47(1), 30–41.  Peppard, J., & Ward, J. (2005). Unlocking Sustained Business Value from IT Investments. California Management Review,  48(1), 52–70.  Post, B. (1992). A Business Case Framework for Group Support Technology. Journal of Management Information Systems,  9(3), 7–26.  Raymond, L., Pare, G., & Bergeron, F. (1995). Matching information technology and organizational structure: an empirical  study with implications for performance. European Journal of Information Systems, 4(1), 3–16.  Ross, J. W. (2003). Creating a Strategic IT Architecture Competency: Learning in Stages. MIS Quarterly Executive, 2(1), 31– 43.  Sarkis, J., & Liles, D. (1995). Using IDEF and QFD to develop an organizational decision support methodology for the  strategic justification of computer‐integrated technologies. International Journal of Project Management, 13(3), 177– 185.  Shang, S., & Seddon, P. (2002). Assessing and managing the benefits of enterprise systems: the business manager’s  perspective. Information Systems Journal, 12(4), 271–299.  Smith, H., & McKeen, J. (2008). Creating a process‐centric organization at FCC: SOA from the top down. MIS Quarterly  Executive, 7(2), 71–84.  Smith, H., McKeen, J., Cranston, C., & Benson, M. (2010). Investment Spend Optimization: A New Approach to IT  Investment at BMO Financial Group. MIS Quarterly Executive, 9(2), 65–81.  Smithson, S., & Hirschheim, R. (1998). Analysing information systems evaluation: another look at an old problem. European  Journal of Information Systems, 7(3), 158–174. 

102


Kim Maes, Wim van Grembergen and Steven De Haes  Teubner, R. (2007). Strategic information systems planning: A case study from the financial services industry. The Journal of  Strategic Information Systems, 16(1), 105–125.  Urbach, N., Smolnik, S., & Riempp, G. (2010). An empirical investigation of employee portal success. The Journal of  Strategic Information Systems, 19(3), 184–206.  Vom Brocke, J., Simons, A., Niehaves, B., Riemer, K., Plattfaut, R., & Cleven, A. (2009). Reconstructing the Giant: On the  Importance of Rigour in Documenting the Literature Search Process (pp. 1–13). Presented at the European  Conference on Information Systems.  Ward, J., Daniel, E., & Peppard, J. (2008). Building better business cases for IT investments. MIS Quarterly Executive, 7(1),  1–15.  Webster, J., & Watson, R. (2002). Analyzing the Past to Prepare for the Future: Writing a Literature Review. MIS Quarterly,  26(2). doi:10.2307/4132319  Wellington, S., Kropf, M., & Gerkovich, P. (2003). What’s holding women back. Harvard Business Review, 81(6), 18–19.  Westerman, G., & Curley, M. (2008). Building IT‐Enabled Innovation Capabilities at Intel. MIS Quarterly Executive, 7(1), 33– 48. 

103


Integrating Green Information Systems into the Curriculum Using a  Carbon Footprinting Case  Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle  University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa  Carolyn.McGibbon@uct.ac.za  Jean‐Paul.VanBelle@uct.ac.za    Abstract: This research aims to advance the discourse on how universities can achieve sustainable campus operations by  integrating  sustainability  in  research  and  teaching.  In  particular,  this  paper  explores  the  issues  around  incorporating  sustainability  into  the  undergraduate  curriculum.  Integrating  Green  Information  Systems  (Green  IS)  theory  and  practice  into  the  curriculum  of  students  majoring  in  Information  Systems  and  Computer  Science  brings  a  multi‐disciplinary  and  holistic thinking aspect to the curriculum whilst sensitizing both staff and students to sustainability issues. The uniqueness  of this paper is that it explores how Green IS can be integrated into the curriculum, using an approach based on the theory  of coherent practice, which enables students to become empowered through direct exposure to real‐world problems, such  as sustainability. The theoretical framework is based on the Green IS model proposed by Butler (2012) and the paper aims  to extend the institutional influences of Green IS to include a network element. This research paper is exploratory in nature  but  should  be  of  particular  interest  to  practitioners,  IS  educators,  as  well  as  furthering  research  of  monitoring  and  evaluating carbon footprints.    Keywords: sustainability, green information systems (green is), carbon footprint, is curriculum, coherent teaching practice 

1. Introduction Although scholars in Information Systems were initially reluctant to engage with environmental sustainability  (Melville 2010) an increasing number of researchers have engaged with the topic and traction has been gained  by  the  fast  emerging  field  of  Green  Information  Systems  (Green  IS).  A  number  of  frameworks  have  been  developed for energy informatics (Watson, Boudreau and Chen 2010), carbon footprinting (Butler 2012) and  other  sustainability  issues,  leading  to  a  rich  but  somewhat  incoherent  source  of  theory  for  teaching  and  learning.  Incorporating  the  Green  IS  body  of  knowledge  into  the  curriculum  of  Higher  Education  began  recently,  both  in  Africa  (Scott,  McGibbon  and  Mwalemba  2012)  and  elsewhere.  However,  as  will  be  demonstrated  below,  Green  IS  provides  a  wealth  of  material  for  IS  educators  to  enrich  their  teaching  (Topi  2012).    Our  understanding  of  Green  IS  derives  from  the  idea  of  an  integrated  and  co‐operating  system  of  people,  processes  and  technology  aimed  at  supporting  sustainability  objectives  (Watson  et  al.  2010).  This  paper  focuses  on  how  this  may  be  integrated  into  the  curriculum.  We  believe  sustainability  is  one  of  the  greatest  challenges of our time (Giddens 2009; Hansen 2011) and it is incumbent upon educators to prepare the next  generation for this challenge (Cortese 1992). The multidisciplinary nature of information systems, positions it  as  uniquely  able  to  cultivate  sustainability  awareness,  innovation  and  holistic  systems  thinking  in  the  higher  education context (Elliot and Lavarack 2012). This case study was undertaken at the University of Cape Town  (UCT),  arguably  Africa’s  leading  institution  of  Higher  Education  in  a  number  of  areas  of  excellence.  UCT  has  committed itself to reporting its carbon footprint and other sustainability metrics on a regular basis, through  the International Sustainable Campus Network / Global University Leadership Forum (ISCN 2010; UCT 2011).    The  theoretical  underpinning  of  this  research  is  Butler’s  (2011)  model  for  Green  IS,  which  draws  on  institutional theory and presents a frame for exploring the factors which influence the adoption of Green IS by  an  institution.  This  paper  commences  with  a  literature  review,  followed  by  a  description  of  the  project,  including a teaching case. Finally, an adaptation to the theoretical framework is proposed and directions for  future research are indicated. 

2. Literature review  2.1 Green IS  The field of Green IS has gained traction, thanks to a plethora of Green IS research agendas developed by a  variety  of  scholars  (Chen,  Watson,  Boudreau,  and  Karahanna  2009;  Elliot  and  Lavarack  2012;  Melville  2010;  Pitt, Parent, Junglas, Chan, and Spyropoulou 2011; Watson et al. 2010). The challenges include going beyond 

104


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle  the  motivation  of  cost‐cutting  (DesAutels  and  Berthon  2011;  Molla  and  Abareshi  2012)  to  elaborating  how  sustainability may be a strategy for gaining competitive advantage (Orsato 2006). Much of the recent research  draws on institutional theories to frame a Green IS research agenda (Butler 2011; Parker and Scheepers 2012)  and  challenge  researchers  to  greater  levels  of  active  engagement  and  advocacy  in  shaping  green  policy.  Researchers  have  shown  how  Green  IS  can  be  developed  through  a  practice  perspective  (Ijab,  Molla  and  Cooper  2011)  while  others  argue  that  information  systems  can  be  potent  change  actors  in  pursuit  of  sustainability (Bengtsson and Agerfalk 2011).     The theoretical framework for this paper articulates what we believe is a coherent explanation for the forces  at play in the organizational diffusion of Green IS. The framework is grounded in the paradigm of institutional  theory, which has seen many other useful applications in IS research (Orlikowski and Barley 2001). The value of  a conceptual framework is that it provides a sense of order to understanding the context of a research topic  (Leshem  and  Trafford  2007).  The  relevant  territory  to  this  investigation  includes  the  following  concepts:  stakeholders,  institutional  pressures  (regulative,  normative  and  cultural‐cognitive),  and  social  mechanisms  (Campbell  2005).  The  framework  also  includes  Green  IS  comprehension,  adoption,  implementation  and  assimilation, to lower emissions as shown in Figure 1 (Butler 2012).  

Figure 1: Green IS theoretical framework (source: Butler 2012) 

2.2 Sustainability in higher education  The confluence of Green IS and Sustainability in Higher Education research has led to the development of a  model  of  IS‐enabled  innovation  for  universities  (Elliot  and  Lavarack  2012).  This  research  is  built  upon  considerable earlier scholarship, including the seminal work on education for a sustainable future by Cortese  (1992) and significant calls by academics for systems‐wide changes to universities for sustainable goals (Ferrer‐ Balas  et  al.  2010).    Much  research  has  been  done  to  link  sustainability  to  curricula  (Lozano  2010)  although  limited work has been done in the African context (Scott et al. 2012). The role of educators as facilitators of  conceptual change has been documented in the literature, including the need to make students aware of the  critical role of the IS actor (Byrne and Lotriet 2007). This has led to new theory development, including work by  Scott  (2012)  who  developed  an  innovative  educational  philosophy,  which  she  termed  a  theory  of  coherent  practice  ‐  an  integrated  and  interactive  learning  experience  for  students  majoring  in  Information  Systems.  Support  for  this  developmental  approach  comes  from  the  approach  of  Cockburn  (2002)  who  described  the  learning experience as consisting of three stages of skill development: “following”, “detaching” and ultimately  becoming “fluent”.  

105


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle 

3. Methodology A teaching case for UCT was developed using the forementioned philosophy to initiate integration of carbon  footprinting  into  the  curriculum.  This  was  used  as  an  educational  device  although  it  must  be  noted  that  a  teaching  case  is  not  as  rich  or  complete  as  a  fully‐fledged  case  study  (Darke,  Shanks  and  Broadbent  1998).  There is a rich history of case study research in the IS discipline, dating back at least thirty years (e.g. Markus  1983), since this method allows for the study of phenomena in their real world context. Further support comes  from  the  emerging  field  of  research  on  Education  for  Sustainability  (EfS)  where  case  studies  are  the  predominant  research  approach,  as  they  offer  meaningful  insights  and  rich  data to  describe  context‐specific  educational  praxis  (Barth  and  Thomas  2012).  Archival  evidence  as  well  as  student  reflective  essays  were  employed and content analysis and coding of the empirical data was conducted using ATLAS.ti, a data analysis  software tool. Support for this is found in the literature (e.g. Ngwenyama and Nielsen 2013). 

4. Project description  As  part  of  the  competence  development  of  Computer  Science  students  majoring  in  Information  Systems,  interventions  were  structured  according  to  the  stages  of  behaviour  described  as  following,  detaching  and  becoming  fluent  by  Cockburn  (2002)..  The  participation  in  a  real‐world  sustainability  project  challenged  students  to  consciously  perceive  projects  from  multiple  perspectives  and  move  towards  fluency  by  the  integration  of  theory  and  practice.  This  iterative  process  of  integrating  theory  and  practice  resonates  with  Lewin’s (1952, p 169) view that: “[t]here is nothing so practical as a good theory”.    Using Butler’s framework for Green IS, the students were challenged to explore the relevance of the elements  underlying institutional order (regulative, normative and cultural‐cognitive pressures). Although there were no  regulations  coercing  the  university  to  monitor  its  carbon  footprint,  it  was  argued  that  normative  pressures  from  peer  universities  provided  the  impetus  for  implementation.  Furthermore,  an  informal  network  of  researchers, consultants, students and lecturers provided a social structure underpinning the intervention. The  project  extended  the  baseline  carbon  footprint  research  previously  conducted  by  postgraduate  students  (Letete,  Mungwe,  Guma  and  Marquard  2011.  This  set  the  scene  for  the  curriculum  for  the  IT  Project  Management course being used as our teaching case. The cohort of 23 students were organised into groups,  each with the responsibility of measuring specific elements of the carbon footprint and recommendations to  reducing emissions – the ultimate goal of the theoretical framework (Butler 2012).    This process was in line with one of the key principles of the ISCN/GULF Charter: to integrate sustainability into  the  curriculum  (ISCN  2010).  Students  were  taught  to  apply  project  management  principles  using  Scott’s  philosophy  of  coherent  practice.  Additional  educational  goals  were  to  create  awareness  of  the  issue  of  environmental  sustainability  and  to  embed  green  values  into  their  consciousness.  The  course  content  was  enriched  by  guest  lectures  on  the  theory  of  Green  IS  and  carbon  footprinting.  Data  was  collated  by  the  university’s sustainability consultant. Motivated to make a difference in the world through IS (Walsham 2012),  the  students  were  organised  into  different  groups  corresponding  to  the  sources  of  diverse  scopes  of  greenhouse gases (Figure 2). 

Figure 2: University sources of GHG emissions (Curry and Donnellan 2012) 

106


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle  Data was collated from a range of sources across campus. For example, electricity consumption monitored by  Smart meters across campus yielded data which could be used with the application of an emission factor to  obtain part of the Scope 2 contribution to the total footprint.    The next section outlines the teaching case which was given to students during the “Follow” process (Cockburn  2002). 

4.1 Teaching case  Situated on the spectacular slopes of Devil’s Peak of the iconic Table Mountain range, UCT is a symbol of hope  for  the  future,  holding  the  dreams  of  the  next  generation  of  scientists,  artists,  managers,  professionals  and  other leaders of tomorrow. It faces a serious challenge: it is committed to reporting on its Carbon Footprint,  yet it does not yet have the capacity to do this. Can you help the Vice‐Chancellor to deliver on his promises?    The university is committed, through innovative research and teaching, to engagement with the key issues of  the natural and social worlds. One of these is environmental sustainability, as seen in its strategic plan:  “Our  country  faces  a  number  of  critical  threats  to  the  success  of  its  development.  …  UCT  will  appoint  experts  to  lead  and  co‐ordinate  intellectual  projects  that  draw  on  the  strengths  of  individual departments across the university to enhance our impact in addressing the problems of  public  schooling,  climate  change  and  sustainable  development,  violent  crime,  poverty  and  unemployment” (UCT Strategic Plan 2010‐2014, p14).  UCT had a history of engaging with environmental issues, particularly in the Science Faculty, which produces a  consistent body of research to highlight biodiversity concerns. However, it was not until 1990 that an official  institutional  response  was  formulated,  when  the  V‐C  of  the  day,  Dr  Stuart  Saunders,  was  a  signatory  to  the  document  which  became  known  as  the  Talloires  Declaration,  the  first  official  commitment  by  university  administrators  across  the  globe  who  pledged  to  incorporate  sustainability  and  environmental  sustainability  into  higher  education  (Adlong  2013).  The  document  has  since  received  commitments  from  more  than  350  university presidents in more than 40 countries. However, the 1990s were the dying days of the Apartheid era,  and the university’s political commitment to oppose the government was a high priority, drawing many of its  slack resources, and thus leaving the implementation of the Talloires Declaration on the back burner. It was  not  until  after  political  transformation  had  been  achieved  and  a  programme  for  the  subsequent  social  transformation  developed  that  sustainability  found  its  way  back  onto  the  agenda  when  the  incumbent  V‐C  Njabulo Ndebele recommitted UCT to environmental sustainability.     Student  activism  on  the  issue  coalesced  around  2007  when  students  in  the  Department  of  Botany  took  a  leadership  role  to  develop  the  Green  Campus  Initiative  (GCI).  They  noted  predictions  that  a  three  degree  increase in temperature would lead to extinction of extensive parts of the country’s flora and wildlife by 2050.  UCT  had  historically  led  social  change,  and  had  the  potential  to  lead  the  way  in  addressing  this  issue  (Hall  2008). The GCI vision was to create a Green Campus Unit, an independent connection point between academic  and administrative staff and students. The role would be to determine the GFG footprint of UCT, set reduction  targets, prepare and implement reduction projects, according to international standard and develop the use of  UCT  as  a  living  laboratory  for  educational  purposes  (Hall  2008).  The  innovative  plan  envisaged  bringing  together a team to develop and implement sustainability related plans and it was proposed that the energy  saving reductions incurred would cover the costs of running of the unit.    Deputy V‐C Martin Hall advised the university to adopt a methodology for implementing an integrated Green  Campus Policy Framework (which was adopted by the senate and council in 2008). In his recommendations, he  advised  the  university  to  partner  with  external  expertise  ‐  the  Carbon  Trust’s  Higher  Education  Carbon  Management Programme (Hall 2008). The vision was a comprehensive one, involving raising awareness and a  systemic analysis of the university’s carbon footprint.     The  Energy  Research  Centre  (ERC)  in  the  Engineering  Faculty  succeeded  in  obtaining  funding  from  the  European Union for an internship programme to measure the campus carbon footprint. Thapelo Letete was  doing his Master’s in Chemical Engineering and was the lead author. He remarked that the 2007 project was  “long  overdue”  (Letete  et  al  2011).  He  and  his  team  faced  numerous  challenges,  particularly  with  regard  to  data gathering. He said that establishing the university’s carbon footprint was critical for two reasons: to have 

107


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle  a  value  to  compare  against  other  academic  institutions,  but  also  to  have  a  baseline  against  which  future  mitigations could be measured. The operational areas which the team examined are discussed below.    Electricity    The campus has two electricity substations ‐ one on the lower campus and the other at the Medical School.  Electricity is also supplied by the municipality to the Hiddingh campus, the Graduate School of Business and  the  residences.  Data  for  the  two  substations  as  well  as  the  GSB  was  obtained  from  UCT’s  Properties  and  Services  department,  while  satellite  residence  data  was  obtained  from  the  Finance  Office  of  the  Student  Housing Department. The team was unable to obtain electricity consumption data for the Hiddingh campus or  the non‐residential satellite campuses. Another challenge was that the GSB had a joint electricity bill with the  Breakwater  Lodge,  which  offers  tourist  accommodation, so  assumptions  had  to  be  made  with  regard  to  the  GSB’s electricity consumption.    To  estimate  the  carbon  footprint  arising  from  the  use  of  electricity  on  campus,  the  amount  of  electricity  in  kWh was multiplied by the CO2 emissions factor obtained from Eskom, the sole supplier of electricity to the  City of Cape Town. A transmission loss factor of 5.58% and a distribution loss factor of 1.74% were applied. As  a result, the emission factor used was 1.054 kg CO2/kWh. Not surprisingly, electricity consumption proved to  be by far the largest contributor to UCT’s carbon footprint (Figure 4) since electricity consumption contributed  a total of 68 300 tons to the campus carbon footprint. 

Figure 3: Overall UCT CO2 emissions determined in 2007 (Letete et al 2011)  Commuting    Staff and student commuting was analysed with a transport survey to determine different modes of transport.  More than 2000 students and staff members responded to the survey. This represents a significant proportion  of  the  campus  population  and  also  served  to  raise  awareness.  However,  it  was  found  that  only  16%  of  the  commuters used bicycles or walked, effectively commuting to campus carbon free.     Assumptions had to be made for each mode of transport. For example, it was assumed that buses carried 60  passengers and taxis could carry 15 commuters. Fuel consumption was assumed to be 9.5 l/100km for private  cars,  and  4  l/100km  for  motorbikes  and  scooters.  Emission  factors  for  diesel  and  petrol  were  used  for  cars,  taxis  and buses.  The  distribution  of  GHG  emissions  due  to  daily commuting  to campus  is  shown  in  Figure  4.  Note that the UCT‐provided “Jammie Shuttle” service has been included in the figures for completeness. 

108


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle 

Figure 4: Distribution of GHG emissions due to daily commuting.  Jammie Shuttles    Diesel consumption for the Jammie Shuttle (a free campus bus transport service for staff and students) was  obtained  from  the  Production  Manager  in  the  University’s  Properties  and  Services  Department.  Emission  factors were then used to determine the resulting carbon emissions. The contribution of Jammie Shuttles to  the carbon footprint was estimated to be only just under 1%, less than one‐thirteenth the contribution from  private car commuting.    Official flights    Academics at the university travel to present papers on the national and international stage as part of their  work commitments. Since academics use different travel agents, Letete wrote that the challenge of obtaining  flight data for the entire university was “an impossible task”. Instead he obtained travel insurance data which  was administered centrally by the travel insurance office to estimate official flights. To calculate the emissions,  distances  were  obtained  using  Travel  Math  and  a  long‐haul  flight  emission  factor  of  0.15  tCO2‐eq  per  passenger per 1000 km.    Solid Waste    The  Carbon  Footprint  exercise  by  Letete  predated  the  current  waste  disposal  system,  in  which  an  external  contractor,  Wasteman,  started  a  contract  with  Properties  and  Services  to  remove  waste  from  the  campus,  recycle  all  recyclables  and  deliver  non‐recyclable  material  to  landfill  sites.  Estimations  were  made  in  this  regard, using data from three months in 2009. A global warming factor of 25 was used for methane.    Liquified Petroleum Gas    Liquified  petroleum  gas  (LPG)  is  used  in  the  residences  for  cooking  food  and  also  used  in  laboratories,  for  burners  and  heaters.  Data  was  obtained  for  these  deliveries  from  the  Finance  Department  and  it  was  calculated that a total of 259.3 t of LPG was used over the course of the year, contributing 755.2 tonnes of  carbon‐equivalent emissions.     Letete observed that the total carbon emissions which his team estimated at 84 900 tCO2‐eq per year was an  underestimation due to the unavailability of data and it could well be much higher. Serious emissions include  the  lack  of  data  on  local  flights  as  well  as  the  guestimate  of  waste.  This  underestimation  is  a  serious  shortcoming, as it implies that it may not be an accurate baseline. 

109


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle  A  more  robust  method  of  collating  the  data,  using  Green  IS  (integrated  information  systems  to  enable  environmental sustainability objectives) could go a long way to enable the campus to meet its mission. 

5. Early findings from the empirical analysis  Our  empirical  analysis  shows  that  network  cultivation  was  the  dominant  mechanism  used  in  the  process  of  collating  the  carbon  footprint.    A  systematic  analysis  of  reflexive  essays  written  by  students  yielded  112  observations (as shown in Table 1 below) of which 47 related to network cultivation. A co‐occurrence analysis  seeking  linkages  between  pressures  and  mechanisms  failed  to  draw  strong  correlation  between  network  cultivation and the current three institutional pressures, suggesting that there may be a gap in the framework,  a fourth pressure.  Table 1: Empirical observations about institutional pressures and social mechanisms  Pressures and Mechanisms 

Density

Cultural‐cognitive pressure 

2

Normative pressure 

7

Regulative pressure 

2

Bricolage

10

Coercive

2

Diffusion

12

Framing

14

Mimetic

2

Network cultivation 

47

Normative mechanism 

4

Strategic leadership 

8

Translation Total 

2 112 

6. Theoretical elaboration  The empirical analysis showed that the three institutional pressures described by Butler (regulative, cultural‐ cognitive and normative) did not adequately explain the overwhelming network cultivation mechanism used  during  the  project.  Although  the  university  was  not  coerced  by  regulative  pressures  to  monitor  its  GHG  emissions, there were strong normative and mimetic mechanisms at play, resulting from pressure applied by  other universities. However, this did not explain endogenous drive for a Green IS. Requests to the university  hierarchy  to  invest  in  new technology  to enable  the  automation  of carbon  footprinting  met  with  resistance.  Currently,  the  key  actor  appears  to  be  an  informal  network,  consisting  mainly  of  staff  but  with  some  post‐ graduate students, across different sections of the campus who are driving a Green IS research agenda. It was  their  initiatives  which  prompted  an  official  invitation  from the sustainability co-ordinator to  the  IS  Department  to  use  student  manpower  for  modelling  the  GHG  footprint  of  the  university,  as  well  as  to  investigate other Green IS. A network of this sort is accounted for by the theory of the embeddedness of social  relations (Granovetter 1985). Support for this comes from Campbell (2005), who argues for the recognition of  four types of embeddedness – network, regulatory, normative and cognitive. We thus propose that a fourth  pillar – network pressures – be added to Butler’s model.  Other proposed enhancements to Butler’s model are  to  examine  not  only  the  factors  involved,  but  also  the  linkages  between  these  concepts,  as  well  as  the  possibility of feedback loops, as it is possible that the linear pathway of the model is over‐simplified. Support in  the literature for this may be found in elements of actor network theory (e.g. Callon 1986) as the university  currently does not have sufficient momentum to adopt a Green IS and researchers needed to use the process  of interessement to lock student actors into new roles.    Figure  5  below  summarizes  our  experiences  so  far  with  a  first  iteration  of  introducing  Green  IS  into  the  curriculum  as  a  way  of  raising  the  profile  of  the  issue  of  GHG  at  a  higher  educational  institution.  The  blue  circles  represent  those  factors  which  have  played  a  significant  role  in  the  early  phases.  We  believe  that  the  dynamic  aspects  of  the  multiple  phases  (of  gradually  increasing  awareness  and  engaging  additional  stakeholders)  are  reflected  better  by  adding  feedback  loops  (here  indicated  by  the  double  arrows).  The  enrolment of additional stakeholders (especially government and suppliers) will activate additional pressures 

110


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle  i.e.  increase  the  existing  normative,  cultural‐cognitive  and  network  as  well  as  possibly  adding  regulative  pressures. This will, in turn, lead to the further deployment of institutional and social mechanisms as Green IS  is  fully  diffused  across  the  university  and  becomes  permanent  and  fully  embedded  component  of  UCT’s  operations.  This  would  then  lead  to  achievement  of  the  ultimate  goal  of  lowering  UCT’s  greenhouse  gases  significantly. 

Figure 5: Revised framework for early introduction of Green IS in a higher education context.  The  limitations  of  this  study  must  be  recognized.  It  was  noted  at  the  outset  that  this  research  project  is  exploratory.  Another  major  constraint  of  this  project  is  the  limited  scope:  integration  has  been  largely  restricted  to  one  course,  whereas  for  sustainability  projects  to  succeed,  a  more  holistic,  synergistic,  transdisciplinary approach is needed (Lozano 2010). 

7. Conclusion The purpose of this research was to explore how a university could achieve sustainable campus operations by  integrating sustainability into its research and teaching. This was done by incorporating Green IS theory and  practice into the curriculum of UCT students majoring in Information Systems.     Doing a first calculation of the university’s carbon footprint (Letete et al 2011) provided the essential baseline  for  further  studies  of  carbon  footprinting  and  against  which  future  mitigation  of  GHG  emissions  on  campus  could be measured. It also provides a basis for comparison with other academic institutions, though climatic,  environmental  and  other  regional  differences  must  be  taken  into  account  in  such  comparisons.  Finally,  it  enabled the production of a teaching case which allowed subsequent students to “follow” what had previously  been  done  (Cockburn  2002).  The  research  thus  provides  a  unique  study  not  only  of  how  Green  IS  can  be  integrated into the curriculum, but also of how to enable students to become involved in carbon footprinting.  Our  theoretical  contribution  is  the  recommendation  for  extending  the  institutional  influences  of  Green  IS  in  Butler’s framework to include a network element; adding a dynamic view with feedback loops and explicating  which  model  components  appeared  to  play  a  leading  role  in  a  first  iteration  of  the  process  at  a  higher  education institution. 

Acknowledgments The authors thank Dr Elsje Scott and Gwamaka Mwalemba for their invaluable contributions. 

References Adlong, W. (2013). "Rethinking the Talloires Declaration." International Journal of Sustainability in Higher Education, Vol  14, No. 1, pp 56‐70. 

111


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle  Barth, M. and Thomas, I. (2012). "Synthesising case‐study research ‐ ready for the next step?" Environmental Education  Research, Vol 18, No. 1, pp 751‐764.  Bengtsson, F. and Agerfalk, P. J. (2011). "Information technology as a change actant in sustainability innovation: Insights  from Uppsala." Journal of Strategic Information Systems, Vol 20, No. 1, pp 96‐112.   Butler, T. (2011). "Compliance with institutional imperatives on environmental sustainability: Building theory on the role of  Green IS." Journal of Strategic Information Systems, Vol 20, No. 1, pp 6‐26.  Butler, T. (2012). "Institutional Change and Green IS: Towards Problem‐Driven, Mechanism‐Based Explanations." In Y. K.  Dwivedi, M. R. Wade and S. L. Schneberger (Eds.), Information Systems Theory (Vol. 28, pp. 383‐407): Springer New  York.  Byrne, E. and Lotriet, H. (2007). "Transformation in IS education: Whose concepts should be changing?" South African  Computer Journal, Vol 38, pp 2‐6.  Callon, M. (1986). Some elements of a sociology of translation: domestication of the scallops and the fishermen of St.  Brieuc Bay. In: Law J. (Ed.), Power, Action and Belief: A new Sociology of Knowledge? Sociological Review  Monographs, 32, 196–233.  Campbell, J. L. (2005). "Where do we stand? Common mechanisms in organisations and social movements research." In G.  F. Davis, D. McAdam, W. R. Scott and M. N. Zald (Eds.), Social movements and organisational theory (pp. 41‐68). New  York: Cambridge University Press.  Chen, A. J., Watson, R. T., Boudreau, M.‐C. and Karahanna, E. (2009). Organizational adoption of Green IS and IT: An  institutional perspective. Paper presented at the ICIS 2009 Proceedings.  Cockburn, A. (2002) Agile Software Development, Boston: Addison‐Wesley.  Cortese, A. D. (1992). "Education ‐ for an environmentally sustainable future." Environmental Science and Technology, Vol  26, No. 6, pp 1108‐1114.  Curry, E. and Donnellan, B. (2012). Sustainable Information Systems and Green Metrics. In S. Murugesan and G. R.  Gangadharan (Eds.), Harnessing Green IT: Principles and practices (pp. 167‐198). Chichester: Wiley.  Darke, P., Shanks, G. and Broadbent, M. (1998). "Successfully completing case study research: combining rigour, relevance  and pragmatism." Informations Systems Journal, Vol 8, pp 273‐289.  DesAutels, P. and Berthon, P. (2011). "The PC (polluting computer): Forever a tragedy of the commons?" Journal of  Strategic Information Systems, Vol 20, No. 1, pp 113‐122.  Elliot, S. and Lavarack, J. (2012). IS‐enabled innovation to overcome resistance and improve contributions to sustainability  by universities: An IS research agenda. Paper presented at  PACIS 2012.  Ferrer‐Balas, D., Lozano, R., Huisingh, D., Buckland, H., Ysern, P. and Zilahy, G. (2010). "Going beyond the rhetoric: system‐ wide changes in universities for sustainable societies." Journal of Cleaner Production, 18(7), 607‐610.  Giddens, A. (2009). The Politics of Climate Change. Cambridge, United Kingdom: Polity.  Granovetter, M. (1985). "Economic action and social structure: The problem of embeddedness." American Journal of  Sociology, Vol 91, No. 3, pp 481‐510.  Hansen, J. (2011). Storms of my grandchildren. London: Bloomsbury.  Huberman, A. M. and Miles, M. B. (1983). "Drawing Valid Meaning from Qualitative Data: Some Techniques of Data  Reduction and Display." Quality and Quantity, Vol 17, No. 4, p 281.  Ijab, M. T., Molla, A. and Cooper, V. C. (2011). A theory of practice‐based analysis of Green Information Systems (Green IS)  use. Paper presented at ACIS 2011.  ISCN. (2010). ISCN/GULF Sustainable Campus Charter.    Leshem, S. and Trafford, V. (2007). "Overlooking the conceptual framework." Innovations in Education and Teaching  International, Vol 44, No. 1, pp 93‐105.  Letete, T. C. M., Mungwe, N. W., Guma, M. and Marquard, A. (2011). "Carbon footprint of the University of Cape  Town." Journal of Energy in Southern Africa, Vol 22, No. 2, pp 2‐12.  Lozano, R. (2010). "Diffusion of sustainable development in universities' curricula: an empirical example from Cardiff  University." Journal of Cleaner Production, Vol 18, No. 1, pp 637‐644.  Melville, N. P. (2010). "Information Systems innovation for environmental sustainability." MIS Quarterly, Vol 34, No.1, pp 1‐ 21.  Molla, A. and Abareshi, A. (2012). "Organizational green motivations for Information Technology: Empirical study." Journal  of Computer Information Systems, Vol 52, No. 3, pp 92‐102.  Ngwenyama, O. and Nielsen, P.A. (2013). “Using organizational influence processes to overcome IS implementation  barriers: lessons from a longitudinal case study of SPI implementation.” European Journal of Information Systems  advance online publication 22 January 2013; doi: 10.1057/ejis.2012.56.  Orlikowski, W. J. and Barley, S. R. (2001). "Technology and institutions: What can research on information technology and  research on organizations learn from each other?" MIS Quarterly, Vol 25, No. 2, pp 145‐165.  Orsato, R. J. (2006). "Competitive environmental strategies: When does it pay to be green?" California Management  Review, Vol 48, No. 2, pp 127‐143.  Parker, C. M. and Scheepers, R. (2012). Applying King et al.'s taxonomy to frame the IS discipline's engagement in Green IS  discourse. Paper presented at the 23rd Australasian Conference on Information Systems, Geelong.  Pitt, L. F., Parent, M., Junglas, I., Chan, A. and Spyropoulou, S. (2011). "Integrating the smartphone into a sound  environmental information systems strategy: Principles, practices and a research agenda." Journal of Strategic  Information Systems, Vol 20, No. 1, pp 27‐37. 

112


Carolyn McGibbon and Jean‐Paul Van Belle  Scott, E., McGibbon, C. and Mwalemba, G. (2012). Attempts to embed green values in the Information Systems curriculum:  a case study in a South African setting. Paper presented at the ECIS, Barcelona.  Topi, H. (2012). "Wealth of Information for IS educators: education tracks at key conferences." ACM Inroads, Vol 3, No. 4,  pp 12‐13.  UCT. (2011). University of Cape Town (UCT) ISCN‐GULF Sustainable Campus Charter Report 2011. Cape Town.  Walsham, G. (2012). "Are we making a better world with ICTs? Reflections on a future agenda for the IS field." Journal of  Information Technology, Vol 27, No. 2, pp 87‐93.  Watson, R. T., Boudreau, M.‐C. and Chen, A. J. (2010). "Information Systems and environmentally sustainable  development: Energy Informatics and new directions for the IS community." MIS Quarterly, Vol 34, No. 1, pp 23‐38. 

113


Electronic Health Record Requirements for Private Medical Practices  in Namibia: A Pilot Study  Julius Oyeleke1 and Meke Shivute2   1  Department of Business Computing, Polytechnic of Namibia, Windhoek, Namibia   2 Department of Information systems, Faculty of Commerce, University of Cape Town,  Cape Town, South Africa   jkoyeleke@yahoo.com   Meke.shivute@uct.ac.za    Abstract: Patient’s medical history in the private sector in Namibia is commonly recorded in paper‐based systems. Paper‐ based systems are usually limited to one medical institution and this leads to isolated and scattered patient information  amongst  several  private  medical  practices.  The  purpose  of  this  study  was  therefore  to  investigate  how  medical  practitioner’s  capture,  manage  and  access  patient  data.  User  requirements  were  elicited  to  identify  practitioner’s  needs  and further determine if there is a need for a centralized electronic health record system to enable them to communicate  with other practitioners in the private health sector. A pilot study was conducted with four private medical practices,  in  order to identify practitioner’s needs. Structured Interviews were used as method to elicit user requirement from health  practitioners.  Findings  from  this  study  reports  intensive  use  of  paper‐based  system  and  the  current  system  lacking  standardized medical records, leading to inconsistencies and integrity issues in data storage. The significance of this study  is to identify practitioner’s needs as a first step to systems design. The aim is to improve access to patient data and ensure  delivery of efficient and effective health services to patients. Future studies should look into designing or recommending  electronic health record systems that can be used to answer to the needs of practitioners in the Namibian private health  sector.    Keywords: electronic record system, Namibia, requirements gathering, e‐health, healthcare, Southern Africa 

1. Introduction    Highly  complex  amounts  of  confidential  information  that  must  be  communicated  between  different  health  institutions  characterize  healthcare.  The  current  paper‐based  system  used  by  many  private  practices  in  Namibia has limitations and it significantly impacts the quality of care and services delivered to patients and in  severe cases, it can even lead to death of patients.  For this reason, the health sector including public health  institutions and private institutions should look into technology related investments to improve quality of care.  There  are  increasing  investments  in  the use  of Electronic Health  Records  (EHR)  systems  and private  medical  practices are seeking for ways to enhance efficiency and effectiveness to render quality services to patients.    The healthcare industry has taken a new wave in the use of technological applications for medical care, data  processing  and  overall  management  of  health  institutions.  Electronic  health  records  (EHR)  in  healthcare  are  considered  to  improve  the  efficiency  and  effectiveness  of  processes  in  medical  practices.  Furthermore,  EHR  aim  to  improve  the  quality  of  healthcare,  empower  medical  practitioners  decision‐making  and  improve  healthcare delivery to patients. In their paper,  (Car et al, 2011), discusses benefits ranges from cost savings,  greater  patient  involvement  in  healthcare,  secondary  use  of  data,  improved  quality  and  improved  data  exchange between healthcare settings.    Efficient  access  to  patient  medical  records  by  medical  practitioners  is  of  utmost  importance  to  the  practitioner’s  job.  Because  delayed  access  or  lack  thereof  may  result  in  loss  of  life,  which  could  have  been  easily  prevented,  considering  readily  available  information  to  assist  practitioners  in  preventing  such  a  loss.  Delay or inability to access patient information could occur when patients visit a different physician than their  regular  or  family  doctor  where  their  medical  history  and  files  are  kept.  Silos  of  patient  data  is  scattered  amongst different practices, leading to data redundancy and inconsistencies. Most medical practitioners in the  Namibian private sector use paper‐based medical records system to capture and store patient data. Processing  and  transferring  this  information  to  other  practitioners  for  referrals  proves  to  be  difficult  needless  to  undertake important clinical decisions.     Despite  the  aforementioned  benefits,  implementation  of  Information  systems  in  health  care  have  been  characterized  by  numerous  challenges  such  as  technical  problems,  resistance  to  change  from  medical  staff,  poor communication and fit of systems and users (Cresswell et al. 2011; Ammenwerth et al. 2006). Evaluations 

114


Julius Oyeleke and Meke Shivute 

and requirements gathering is therefore an important phase in EHR systems because it helps to identify user  needs and in turn avoid resistance to change when the system is ultimately implemented.    The  first  section  of  the  study  provides  a  background  setting  for  the  study;  literature  is  further  discussed  on  electronic  medical  records  use  in  developing  countries.  The  final  section  reports  on  user  requirements  and  recommendations are made for future studies.  

2. Background   The  Namibian  health  sector  is  divided  into  public  health  care,  which  primarily  provided  by  state  health  institutions  through  the  Ministry  of  Health.  On  the  other  hand  I  the  private  sector  services  are  provided  by  Faith  based  organizations  and  the  private  health  institutions.  This  study  focused  private  medical  institutions  with special focus on physicians running private medical practices to supply services to patients. Most private  medical  practices  in Namibia  are  using paper‐based  systems  to  capture  and  store patient  data.  Paper‐based  system are known to be ineffective and contribute to a number of inefficient and in some cases low quality  health  care  rendered  to  patients.    Most  developing  countries  are  still  using  paper‐based  system  for  patient  record keeping and hamper the performance and quality of health care. Despite the difficulties in deploying  health  information  systems  a  number  of  developing  countries  have  invested  in  integrating  EHR  into  their  workflow system.     EHR  systems  streamline  activities  of  practitioners  by  facilitating  easy  access  to  and  better  management  of  patient records. Research by (Nucita et al. 2009), demonstrates the use of an electronic medical record system  called  DREAM  (Drug  Resources  Enhancement  Against  AIDS  and  Malnutrition)  for  HIV/AIDS  patients  in  sub  ‐ Saharan African. The software efficiently manages patient and clinical data in the health organization. DREAM  is  currently  in  use  in  10  (ten)  sub‐Saharan  Africa  the  system  can  host  and  maintain  over  seventy  Three  thousand  (73,000)  patients  data  which  help  in  improving  the  effectiveness  of  therapy  based  on  epidemiological research.    DREAM  is  currently  implemented  in  10  countries  in  Africa,  with  31  centers  and  18  molecular  biology  laboratories.  Amongst  the  countries  that  are  part  of  the  DREAM  project  are  Mozambique,  Malawi,  Angola,  Tanzania  and  Kenya.    The  DREAM  software  is  focused  and  limited  to  HIV/AIDS  and  the  private  health  institutions  needs  more  diversified  software  that  focuses  on  other  functions  such  as  administration,  patient  records and other patient related data. Other benefits of EHR systems highlighted in (Sf et al. 2005) study are  namely;  Improvement  in  legibility  of  clinical  notes,  Decision  support  for  drug  ordering,  including  allergy  warnings  and  drug  incompatibilities,  Reminders  to  prescribe  drugs  and  administer  vaccines,  Warnings  for  abnormal laboratory results, Support for programme monitoring, including reporting outcomes, budgets and  supplies,  Support  for  clinical  research,  and  management  of  chronic  diseases  such  as  diabetes,  hypertension  and  heart  failure.  (Menachemi  &  Collum  2011),  classifies  benefits  of      EHR      as  organizational,  societal  and  clinical.    Clinical  benefits  are  discussed  to  include  improvements  in  the  quality  of  care  and  more  effective  handling of patient data (free from errors), contrary organizational benefits are more focused on operational  and  performance  benefits.  Lastly  societal  benefits  are  more  related  to  research  and  population  health.   Physicians running private practices can reap the same benefits given appropriate use of such systems in their  health.    There have been a number of developments in the area of EHR systems standards. In their paper (Hilbel et al.  2007) describe  how  (Digital  Imaging  and Communication  in Medicine) DICOM ECG facilitates  digital  viewing,  exchange and archiving of medical images. This can be classified under clinical benefits of using EHR in private  medical practices. Other benefits of using EHR systems are improve eligibility of clinical notes (Gp et al. 2003),  Decision  support  for  drug  ordering,  including  allergy  warnings  and  drug  incompatibilities    and  Reminders  to  prescribe drugs and administer vaccines (Hunt et al. 2013).       Electronic Health records systems are also used in the following countries and they have proved to deliver the  benefits  mentioned  above.  In  Haiti,  an  HIV‐EMR  system  is  used  for  History,  physical  examination,  social  circumstances and treatment recorded. The case of Haiti demonstrates use of EHR in a remote area with no  infrastructure and limited technical expertise ((Gp et al. 2003). Uganda also uses a careware HIV system that  provides  comprehensive  tools  for  tracking  HIV  patients  and  their  treatment  that  includes  billing  data  of 

115


Julius Oyeleke and Meke Shivute 

patients, their medications and clinical assessment.  Malawi on the other hand also makes use of EHR which  focuses administration of patient demographics, medication, laboratory tests and X‐rays (Gp et al. 2003).     A study by Chon, Nishihara and Akiyama (2011), discusses the importance of automating manual documents,  to foster a common definition for clinical and business transactions. Their study classifies medical records by  types, namely; Level one (1) focusing on the department level i.e. medical data can be shared between same  divisions  in  same  department.  Level  two  (2)  is  interdepartmental  this  means  clinical  or  patient  data  can  be  shared between different department. Level three (3) is a hospital wide sharing of information or patient data.  Level  four  (4)  is  sharing  information  within  different  facilities  i.e.  sharing  of  patient  information  with  other  service  provider’s  i.e.  between  different  hospitals  and  Level  five  (5)  this  level  involves  inter‐facility including  care management information. i.e. a form of extension of level 4.    Namibian private medical practices could emulate the use of the above EHR systems as used Japan. Levels of  EHR systems highlighted in their study (Chon, Nishihara and Akiyama (2011) fits in with requirements collected  in  this  survey.  These  requirements  covey  importance  of  physicians  essentials  as  they  relate  to  types  of  electronic records that caters departments, inter‐departmental, facility and hospital wide.    Given the benefits discussed above, there are potential disadvantages that can hamper the implementation of  EHR especially in developing countries. These challenges are namely basic infrastructure, financial constraints,  changes in workflow, adoption issues and privacy and security concerns (Menachemi & Collum 2011).     The  above  studies  are  a  demonstration  that  EHR  systems  are  useful  for  developing  countries  and  there  are  immense  benefits  to  health  institutions  that  deploys  such  systems.  This  study  therefore  aims  to  identify  practitioner’s needs as a first step to systems design. A qualitative approach is used in analyzing practitioner’s  needs. “Theoretically‐informed research is needed to help informatics both researchers fields organizational,  successfully believe to and practitioners understand and institutional implementing applications in health care  settings” (Chiasson et al. 2002). Theories provide lenses through which to look in order to diagnose a problem  and focus attention on various aspects of data.     This study draws on the design science theory where focus is drawn on the first research cycle (Hevner 2007).  Hevner’s framework proposes design science research cycles as, relevance cycle, design and rigor cycle. The  relevance  cycle      features  context  that  provides  user  requirements  for  research  as  inputs  and  also  looks  at  criteria for evaluation of research results (Hevner, 2007). The rigor cycle offers past knowledge to the research  and design cycle is dependent on the two previous cycles, as this is the phase where the design of artifact is  done.    User  requirements  are  collected  in  this  study  and  focus  is  drawn  to  the  relevance  cycle  where  opportunism and problems are identified in the actual application environment. Techniques used to elicit user  requirements are described in the next section.   3. Elicitation techniques  There  are  different  types  of  elicitation  techniques  used to  collect user  requirements.  (Young 2002),  explains  that  there  are  over  40  elicitation  techniques  and  not  all  of  them  are  effective.  In  his  study  he  listed  and  explained  a  number  of  effective  techniques  and explained  that they can  be  used  in combination.  Interviews  were identified as one of the effective elicitation techniques and this study therefore used surveys to collect  information from physicians using structured questionnaires.    Methods  of  capturing  and  storing  data  were  examined  in  order  to  understand physician’s  needs.  Interviews  were administered using a questionnaire with both open and closed ended questions. The interview questions  were designed with sections that cater for different area of specialties selected for case studies. In order to get  representation, physicians were classified in terms of medical specialty ranging from general practitioners, a  dentist  and  a  pediatrician.  Other  interviews  were  conducted  with  healthcare  organizations  namely  NMC  (Namibian Medical Council) and NHP (National Health Plan) to acquire further details.     The  data  collection  was  sourced  from  three  general  practitioners,  one  pediatrician  and  dentist.  Since  most  private practices normally have only the practitioner and a clerk or nurses, the maximum people interviewed  per  institution  were  two  and  in  some  cases  the  receptionist  was  included.  Interviews  were  used,  as  an  elicitation  technique  because  it  was  deemed  the  most  convenient  method  compared  to  observation  as 

116


Julius Oyeleke and Meke Shivute 

majority of  physicians  were  not  comfortable  being  observed  by  an  external  researcher.  This  was  due  to  confidentiality  issues  surrounding  patient  information.  Even  though  there  were  other  techniques  such  as  prototyping that could be used for elicitation, it was too costly for a pilot study. Therefore considering all other  elicitation methods, interviews were the best method to use for a pilot study. Future studies can use modeling  and prototyping to expand on the requirements collected in this pilot study in order to eliminate ambiguities  and inconsistencies.    Convenience  sampling  was  used  to  select  the  sample  of  physicians  and  Castillo  and  Joan  (2009)  define  convenience sampling as “a non‐probability sampling technique where subjects are selected because of their  convenient  accessibility  and proximity  to  the  researcher”.  The  majority  of physicians targeted  for  interviews  could not participate in the survey due to busy schedules and lack of interest in participating in the survey. As  a result, convenience sampling was chosen as a sampling method on the basis of availability of key informants  (Struwig & Stead 2004). 

4. Survey results  Results from the physicians surveyed indicated that most of them were familiar with the existence and use of  Electronic health records, but however the majority of them still were using manual processes in capturing and  storing patient information. An interesting finding was that most practitioners maintained a separate software  application  that  they  primarily  used  for  billing  purposes.  Most  physicians  dominantly  used  the  manual  filing  system by writing down the patient’s information for diagnosis and these notes are kept in the patient file. All  the practitioners interviewed indicated that they capture and store patient data using the manual filing system.  Every file consists of an identification number based on the individual clinic practitioner’s choice. The number  on the file was later used is used to uniquely identify patients in a given practice.     Challenges  identified  with  the  paper‐based  medical  system  were,  data  redundancy,  inconsistencies,  security  and  confidentiality  of  patient  information.  Data  redundancies  and  inconsistencies  were  mainly  a  cause  of  misplaced files leading to opening new files for the patients. As a way of handling this challenge, all physicians  agreed that their paper‐based records are assigned unique numbers to uniquely identify the patients and they  further arranged in alphabetical order on the shelves and they have to page through each file based on the  patient  surname  to  trace  the  file  when  patients  come  for  consultation.  All  Physicians  also  indicated  that  developing  and  implementing  Electronic  Record  system  would  improve  efficiency  and  facilitate  mobility  of  medical data within their own practices and other Doctors.  Apart from the realizing the benefits offered by  EHR, they motioned a great concern regarding the security and sensitivity of medical data in accordance with  medical ethics; patient medical information should not be revealed without the patient consent. Therefore the  access issue would also be a concern i.e. who has access to patients medical records and to what extent the  access  should  be  granted.  This  concern  would  be  handled  by  setting  and  ensuring  roles  are  assigned  in  electronic, to grant privileges only to doctors that are allowed to view certain data.     According to practitioners, lack of confidentiality compromise the standard of services offered to their patients.  Cases where patients have access to details of the doctor’s diagnostic note creates problem. Doctors at times  write their findings using abbreviations and some summarize their diagnosis. Since the notes are meant for the  individual doctor, therefore it is against the ethics of the practice to expose patients’ medical information.      Amongst other challenges identified during interviews, were silos of patient information in the private sector.  The  main  concern  was  how  to  get  physicians  to  share  and  collaborate  to  share  patient  information.  They  explained that in situations where patients change doctors or relocate to other town, it was very hard tracing  the patient history, and this lead to incomplete patient data for diagnosis purposes.  In emergency situations,  the current doctor would have to repeat the same exercise to acquire the patient history from the previous  doctor. This could have been easily accessible by the current doctor if a centralized system was in place, as this  promotes  data  sharing  amongst  medical  practitioners  in  different  locations.  Other  shortcomings  with  the  current  paper‐based  system  are  miss‐filed  documents  i.e.  a  situation  whereby  the  receptionist  or  the  nurse  swaps the file or misplaces it which takes ages to trace. Following up on shortcomings, physicians were asked  to suggest what the EHR system needs were to address the above challenges. Most physicians supported the  idea of using the system as a solution to addressing current challenges and improving health service delivery.   They  further pointed  out  that  using a  system  that has  an  email  functionality  enable  them  to  instantly  email 

117


Julius Oyeleke and Meke Shivute 

basic patient data such X‐ray images to other institutions or colleagues seamlessly and further pulling reports  from the system based on the patient records. 

5. Requirements and discussion  This  section  reports  on  the  information  gathered  from  the  sample  groups  namely:  general  practitioners,  dentist and a pediatrician. The data gathered was analyzed and reported based on the different aspects of the  medical practitioner’s day‐to‐day business operations and processes. Views from the above respondents will  be summarized into perceived user requirements for an EHR system.     The needs identified by physicians were centered around functional and systematic needs. The requirements  were therefore split into functional and systems requirements and requirements were linked to Clancy (2003),  core functionalities of an electronic health system. The requirements specified by the surveyed practitioners fit  in the core functionalities proposed by Clancy (2003).     Physicians  specified  that  they  require  an  administration  feature  to  maintain  general  patient  data  such  as  personal details and other administration related functions. This is closely related to the Health Information  and data and administration  process core functionalities mentioned  in Clancy’s  study.  Table  1  shows  a  brief  description of the requirements collected from practitioners.  Table 1:  Requirements from practitioners   Requirement Category  Administrative 

Reporting Appointment scheduling     

Requirement General references 

Description Maintain General References 

Nationality User access  Users details  Static report  Parameterized Report  In patient  Outpatient  Hospitalized patients 

Maintain Nationality  Maintain Users  Maintain User Access  Standard reporting  Ad hoc reports  Record of Inpatients  Record outpatients  Record of admitted patients 

The Administration function will aid practitioners to capture patient data and maintain patient health history.  It is therefore important that the patient information is recorded in a way that will add knowledge to clinician  and  other  user  of  the  data  e.g.  pharmacist  and  other  related  health  bodies  (Bates  et  al.,  1999).  The  administrative  aspect  of  healthcare  is  one  of  the  areas  that  require  careful  attention,  as  this  is  the  point  of  data  entry  into  any  medical  practice.  Electronic  records  will  be  more  efficient  in  handling  daily  healthcare  processes  like  hospital  admission,  booking  of  appointment  of  inpatient  and  outpatient  client  (Petrick  et  al.,  2002).  This  is  relevant  to  order  entry  as  EHRS  provide  interface  for  practitioners  to  enter  patient’s  demographic information on the computer directly instead of paper‐based record.    Reporting is an integral and crucial part of every organization, and healthcare is not an exception. Therefore  different functions  of  healthcare  require  different  reports  based  on the  needs  of patient  and other external  bodies that might need the report for referral needs and any other purposes. This would facilitate report and  make research easier to be carried out I the medical field, as the EHRS would provide different kind of readily  available report. This is another way to prove the effectiveness and efficiency that the healthcare provider will  have with the EHRS.    The appointment‐scheduling requirement is closely linked to the decision support function. Decision support  helps practitioners to take appropriate clinical decisions (Rollman et al., 2002). This would help reduce medical  errors and patients will receive effective and quality care. Use of decision support systems greatly enhances  services rendered to patients.     Other functionalities enable management of results from laboratories and other clinical entities by maintaining  electronic records and it promoting efficiency and cost of healthcare services (Bates et al, 2003). Most private  health  institutions  in  Namibia  are  still  using  paper‐based  systems  and  running  orders  as  part  of  the  administrative function would allow practitioners to do away with paper and take all order transaction directly  on the system this would in turn improve the effectiveness and efficiency of the healthcare services rendered 

118


Julius Oyeleke and Meke Shivute 

to patients  (Bates  &  Gawande,  2003).  Furthermore,  it  will  help  practitioners  to  enter  orders,  drugs,  and  laboratory test and other clinical related data on the EHR system.     Finally, Management of electronic communication plays an important role in facilitation health data between  practitioners, medical staff and patients. It is of utmost importance that there are supporting applications to  promote interaction between various entities in the health domain. Communication tools like messaging, mail  and chat applications demonstrates the ability to share and send electronic files which in turn escalate the and  efficiency  of  practitioners  (Kuebler  &  Bruera,  2000).  This  would  facilitate  communication  and  sharing  of  medical data as well, which is a way to improve access to medical information for practitioners.     Not  only  do  physicians  need  good  electronic  communication  but  also  to  maintain  good  patient  support.  Physician’s  testimonies  and  dialogue  has  proved  that  using  electronic  systems  to  handle  patient  data  will  improve  their processes  in  control  of  chronic  illness  and  other  related clinical data  (Finkelstein  et  al.,  2000).  The survey results supports (Clancy’s 2003) study that the important core functionalities the list above though  during  the  process  of  data  gathering,  the  dentist  mentioned  he  would  like  the  system  to  keep  patients  photographs,  print  a  report  on  patient  prescriptions  to  pharmacists  directly  from  the  system,  print  medical  certificates that can be sent to the employer of the patient as part of the functions which fit perfectly under  the reporting module. Concluding recommendations are discussed in the next section. 

6. Conclusion Private medical physicians in Namibia are using paper‐based systems to capture and store patient’s medical  data.  Paper‐based  systems  pose  a  number  of  challenges  that  hampers  effective  service  delivery  from  physicians.  The  purpose  of  this  study  was  to  investigate  how  medical  practitioner’s  capture,  manage  and  access patient data.     A  pilot  study  was  conducted  with  four  private  medical  practices,  in  order  to  identify  practitioner’s  needs.  Structured Interviews were used as method to elicit user requirement from health practitioners.  Findings from this study reports that the current paper‐based system is inefficient in capturing and retrieving  patient  medical  records.  The  current  system  does  not  support  standardized  medical  records,  leading  to  inconsistencies and integrity issues in data storage. The significance of this study was to identify practitioner’s  needs  as  a  first  step  to  systems  design  in  order  to  improve  access  to  patient  data  and  ensure  delivery  of  efficient and effective health services to patients.    The  survey  reported  administrative,  reporting  and  appointment  related  requirements  as  some  of  the  important systems requirements. The above‐mentioned user requirements were centered around functional  and  systematic  needs  .The  different  core  functionalities  were  then  explained  and  it  was  indicated  that  Administration, report and appointment scheduling requirements were indicated as the most important needs.  The challenge in developing a new system lies in cost issues, and practitioners will have to look at options of  acquiring  existing  applications  in  the  market  and  have  it  customized  to  suit  the  needs.  Private  health  institutions could alternatively look into deploying Open source EHR systems such OpenMRS to attend to their  needs.     This  study  was  pilot  study  and  was  a  first  step  to  explore  current  methods  used  to  capture,  store  and  disseminate patient information. Further research should therefore look into detailed analysis and using the  identified requirements to recommend an existing EHR application or alternatively design a new system to suit  the Namibian healthcare industry. Consideration of requirements from other regions should be regarded since  system requirements could differ based on geographical location.  

References    Ammenwerth, E., Iller, C. & Mahler, C., 2006. IT‐adoption and the interaction of task, technology and individuals: a fit  framework and a case study. BMC medical informatics and decision making, 6, p.3. Available at:  http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=1352353&tool=pmcentrez&rendertype [Accessed May  2, 2013].  Bates, D. W., Teich, J. M., Lee, J., Seger, D., G. Kuperman, J., Ma’Luf, N., Boyle, D., & Leape L. (1999). The Impact of  computerized physician order entry on medication error prevention. J Am Med Inform Assoc 6 (4):313‐21.  Bates, D. W., & Gawande, A. A. (2003). Improving Safety with Information Technology. N Engl J Med 348 (25):2526‐34. 

119


Julius Oyeleke and Meke Shivute 

Car, J., Anandan, C., Black, A., Cresswell, K., Pagliari, C., McKinstry, B., Procter, R., Majeed, A. and Sheikh, A. (2008), The  Impact of eHealth on the Quality & Safety of Healthcare – A Systematic Overview and Synthesis of the Literature,  report, NHS Connecting for Health Evaluation Programme.  Castillo, J. J. (2009). Convenience sampling. Experiment‐Resources. Com.  Chiasson, M., Davidson, E. & Pouloudi, N., 2002. Integrating Information Systems Theory and Health Informatics Research. ,  00(c), p.7695.  Chon Abraham, Eitaro Nishihara, Miki Akiyama, Transforming healthcare with information technology in Japan: A review of  policy, people, and progress, International Journal of Medical Informatics, Volume 80, Issue 3, March 2011, Pages  157‐170, ISSN 1386‐5056, 10.1016/j.ijmedinf.2011.01.002.  (http://www.sciencedirect.com/science/article/pii/S1386505611000049)  Cresswell, K., Worth, A. & Sheikh, A., 2011. Implementing and adopting electronic health record systems: How actor‐ network theory can support evaluation. Clinical Governance: An International Journal, 16(4), pp.320–336. Available at:  http://www.emeraldinsight.com/10.1108/14777271111175369 [Accessed May 3, 2013].  Gp, D., Ra, D. & Se, C., 2003. The Lilongwe Central Hospital Patient Management Information System : A Success in  Computer‐Based Order Entry Where One Might Least Expect It. , p.7059.  Hevner, A.R., 2007. A Three Cycle View of Design Science Research. Journal of Information systems, 19(2), pp.87–92.  Hilbel, T. et al., 2007. Innovation and Advantage of the DICOM ECG Standard for Viewing , Interchange and Permanent  Archiving of the Diagnostic Electrocardiogram Division of Cardiology , University of Heidelberg , Heidelberg , Germany  University of Applied Sciences , Gelsenkirche. Computers in Cardiology, 34, pp.5–8.  Hunt, D.L. et al., 2013. Effects of Computer‐Based Clinical Decision Support Systems on Physician Performance and Patient  Outcomes A Systematic Review. , 280(15).  Kuebler KK, Bruera E. "Interactive collaborative consultation model in end‐of‐life care." J Pain Symptom  Manage. 2000;20:202‐9.  Menachemi, N. & Collum, T.H., 2011. Benefits and drawbacks of electronic health record systems. Risk management and  healthcare policy, 4, pp.47–55. Available at:  http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=3270933&tool=pmcentrez&rendertype=abstract  [Accessed March 19, 2013].  Nucita, A. et al., 2009. A global approach to the management of EMR (electronic medical records) of patients with  HIV/AIDS in sub‐Saharan Africa: the experience of DREAM software. BMC medical informatics and decision making, 9,  p.42. Available at:  http://www.pubmedcentral.nih.gov/articlerender.fcgi?artid=2749819&tool=pmcentrez&rendertype=abstract  [Accessed March 18, 2013].   Petrick, N., Sahiner, B., Chan, H.P., Helvie, M. A., Paquerault, S., & Hadjiiski, L. M. (2002). Breast Cancer Detection:  Evaluation of a Mass‐Detection Algorithm for Computer‐Aided Diagnosis ‐‐ Experience in 263 Patients. Radiology 224  (1):217‐24.  Rollman, B. L., Hanusa, B. H., Lowe, H. J., Gilbert, T., Kapoor, W. N., & Schulberg, H. C. (2002). A randomized trial using  computerized decision support to improve treatment of major depression in primary care. J Gen Intern Med 17  (7):493‐503.  Sf, H., Mbchb, F. & Szolovits, P., 2005. Refereed papers Implementing electronic medical record systems in developing  countries. informatics in Primary Care, 13, pp.83–95.  Struwig, F.W. & Stead, G.B., 2004, Planning, designing and reporting research, Pearson Education, Cape Town.  Young, R.R., 2002. Recommended Requirements Gathering Practices. , (April), pp.9–12.   

120


Selected Factors Influencing Customers' Behaviour in e‐Commerce  on B2C Markets in the Czech Republic   Michal Pilík  Tomas Bata University in Zlín, Faculty of Management and Economics, Zlín, Czech Republic  pilik@fame.utb.cz     Abstract: The influence of the new media, predominantly the Internet and mobile technologies, on customers' behaviour is  increasing steadily every year. One of the basic functions of the Internet beside its high information, communication and  entertainment value is the possibility of trading. Europe is currently the biggest e‐commerce market in the world and on‐ line markets are becoming an essential part of the economy in most countries  and contribute significantly to  their GDP.  The development of e‐commerce at the same time increases the demands and expectations of the customers regarding  the  quality  of  the  service  offered,  security,  and  general  trust  in  on‐line  shopping.  The  article  presents  the  results  of  the  Czech  Grant  Agency  research  P403/11/P175:  The  factors  influencing  customers'  on‐line  behaviour  in  e‐commerce  environment on B2C and B2B markets in the Czech Republic, which was conducted between June and November 2012 and  which involved almost one thousand participants. The aim of the research was to analyze customers' behaviour in on‐line  purchases on B2C markets in the Czech Republic. Based on these results, 88 % of Czech customers use on‐line shopping, 33  % of whom shop on‐line regularly and 55 % irregularly.     Keywords: consumer behaviour, e‐commerce, e‐shop, security 

1. Introduction Electronic commerce has become a large and important segment of the new digital economy over the last ten  years.  (Hostler  et  al.,  2012)  Rapid  development  of  the  Czech  Internet  market  is  confirmed  by  the  figures  showing  numbers  of  shoppers  and  sales  of  e‐shops.  84%  of  Czech  Internet  users  had  some  experience  with  shopping online in 2011 and the majority of them spent less than 4,000 CZK per month on online purchases.  (Gemius.com, 2011) Data from 2012 indicated that 90 % of internet users in the Czech Republic already have  some experience with purchasing online, which is an increase by 6 % compared to 2010. (Mediaguru.cz, 2012)  At the beginning of 2013, we can conclude that the number of Internet users who shop online is still increasing  and has exceeded 90 %, which is also proven by the research.    Czech users  mostly  shop  online  in  e‐shops which  have  already been  used  by  three‐quarters  of  respondents.  More than half of the users have tried a comparison shopping website and nearly a third of them used a deal  of the day aggregator. (Mediaguru.cz, 2012) 

Figure 1: Number of Czech internet users who have used e‐commerce services (Mediaguru.cz, 2012)  The economic situation has a significant influence on the amounts spent on the Internet. Customers use the  Internet to save money, but the amounts being spent are decreasing. Czech users shop online more frequently  but in smaller quantities. "The average value of the customer´s cart at the checkout is declining as customers  get  used  to  shopping  on  the  Internet.  It  has  decreased  by  about  40  %  in  the  last  3  years  and  is  now  below 

121


Michal Pilík  2,000 CZK. We expect it to continue to decline," says David Antić from BerZbozi.cz and the Association of mass  shopping  portals.  (marketingovenoviny.cz,  2012)  "Czech  Internet  retailers  were  able  to  maintain  revenue  growth even in the worst years of the crisis. One of the main reasons for this was their flexibility and ability to  continuously offer lower prices than brick and mortar shops. However, Czech customers have already learned,  that even though the price is one of the key factors, it is preferable to choose among proven and trusted e‐ shops“ points out Pavel Kulhavý, director of the Audit Department, PwC CR. (pwc.com, 2012)    In  2012,  B2C  e‐commerce  sales  grew  21.1  %  to  top  $1  trillion  for  the  first  time,  according  to  new  global  estimates by eMarketer. This year, sales will grow 18.3 % to $1.298 trillion worldwide, eMarketer estimates, as  Asia‐Pacific surpasses North America to become the world's No. 1 market for B2C e‐commerce sales. Sales in  North America grew 13.9 % to a world‐leading $364.66 billion in 2012. B2C e‐commerce sales in Asia‐Pacific  grew more than 33 % to $332.46 billion in 2012. (eMarketer.com, 2013)    PwC conducted a study titled “Customers take control” which has brought some interesting results. According  to this study more than a fifth (22 %) of e‐shop customers around the world made their first online purchase in  life during 2011. The study also revealed a significant room for further increase in activity of customers on the  Internet. Chinese, being the most active, shop online on average more than eight times a month. Europeans  shop  online  less  than  three  times  per  month  with  the  exception  of  the  British  (four  times  per  month).  (pwc.com,  2012)  China,  unsurprisingly,  is  the  primary  growth  driver  in  the  region.  The  country  will  surpass  Japan  as  the  world’s  second‐largest  B2C  e‐commerce  market  this  year,  taking  an  estimated  14  %  share  of  global sales, as its total reaches $181.62 billion, up 65 % from $110.04 billion in 2012. (eMarketer.com, 2013)     The  Czech  market  registers  around  21.000  active  e‐shops  which  only  last  year  generated  a  turnover  of  approximately 37 billion CZK. If we compare the size of the Czech market with the size of the British market,  which has roughly 30000 active e‐shops, then the Czech Republic is with its number of active e‐shops truly an  “e‐shop superpower”. The main reason for being so appealing to 73% of Czech e‐shop customers is the motto  to “save time”. For 64 % of customers it is important that they can easily compare prices, 59 % praise greater  selection of goods. For 23 % of customers it is just simply "shopping without a crowd". The greatest demand is  for clothes, electronics and books, about 17 % of e‐shops focus mainly on fashion and style. (Uďan, 2012) 

2. E‐commerce definition and description  Electronic  commerce  is  the  use  of  advanced  electronic  technology  for  business.  Both  parties  of  business  information,  product  information,  sales  information,  service  information  and  electronic  payment  and  other  activities are achieved with mutually agreed trading standards through the network, the advanced information  processing  tools,  and  the  computer.  Online  shopping  or  online  retailing  is  a  form  of  electronic  commerce  whereby  consumers  directly  buy  goods  or  services  from  a  seller  over  the  Internet  without  an  intermediary  service.  (Tao,  Li,  Dingjun,  2011)  Ramanathan  et  al.  (2012)  describes  previous  interpretation  of  e‐commerce  simply  as  transactions  over  the  Internet.  However,  over  the  years,  e‐commerce  has  been  interpreted  to  include  a  variety  of  organisational  activities  including  selling,  buying,  logistics,  and/or  other  organization‐ management activities via the Web or doing business over information networks. (Ramanathan et al., 2012) In  the last decade, the growth and generalization of Internet use has made it possible to increase sales through e‐ commerce websites. (Iglesias‐Pradas et. al, 2012)    All marketers try to identify consumers’ buying behaviour. But they are in opposite to sophisticated customers  who are able to use and analyse more information sources than before and to make the best buying decision.  They are more comfortable than in previous years because they are used to having better services now. The  effectiveness  of  advertising  is  decreasing  and  it  is  more  difficult  to  persuade  customers  to  buy  company’s  products. The combination of these factors can influence the final price.      The analysis of consumer behaviour is a key aspect for the success of an e‐business. However, the behaviour of  consumers in the Internet market changes as they acquire e‐purchasing experience. (Hernándes et al., 2010)  Hernándes et al. (2010) claims that the growth of e‐commerce has made it clear that customer behaviour has  evolved. Customer behaviour does not necessarily remain stable over time since the experience acquired from  past purchases means that perceptions change.    

122


Michal Pilík  Consumer decision process is so generic that it can be applied to consumer behaviour in any channel, including  the Internet. (Roberts, 2008)  

3. Factors influencing on‐line buying behaviour: security, privacy, satisfaction and trust  Each customer decision is influenced by many factors. Figure 2 shows the chosen groups of factors influencing  on‐line buying behaviour. These factors were analysed during the research.    There  are  many  factors  shaping  online  behaviour  and  this  article  describes  the  most  significant  ones.  In  an  online market, issues such as security, privacy and risk perceptions are important factors affecting consumers´  purchasing  decision.  Unlike  the  physical  market,  consumers  may  be  dealing  with  remote  vendors  they  have  never met and products that cannot be touched and felt (Teo, Liu, 2007). Trust is a fundamental principle of  every business relationship. (Hart, Saunders, 1997; Corbitt et al., 2003)    In e‐commerce, consideration of security refers to customer perceptions of the security of the transaction as a  whole  (including  means  of  payment  and  mechanisms  for  the  storage  and  transmission  of  all  personal  information). A lack of perceived security is a major reason why many potential consumers do not shop online  because  of  common  perceptions  of  risks  involved  in  transmitting  sensitive  information,  such  as  credit  card  numbers, across the Internet. (Chang, Chen, 2009)    Satisfaction  is  the  consumer’s  fulfilment  response.  Further  a  fulfilment,  and  hence  a  satisfaction  judgment,  involves at the minimum two stimuli—an outcome and a comparison referent. Szymanski and Hise (2000) and  this  study  conceptualize  e‐satisfaction  as  the  consumers’  judgment  of  their  Internet  retail  experience  as  compared  to  their  experiences  with  traditional  retail  stores.  (Evanschitzky  et  al.,  2004)  Satisfaction  is  an  affective  response  to  purchase  situations.  Oliver  (1997)  defines  satisfaction  as  the  summary  psychological  state resulting when the emotions surrounding disconfirmed expectations are coupled with the prior feeling of  consumers about the consumer experience. (Chang, Chen, 2008) 

Figure 2: Factors influencing on‐line buying behaviour (own survey) 

4. Factors influencing on‐line shopping in the Czech Republic  The  on‐line  questionnaire  survey  during  the  period  June  ‐  November  2012  was  used.  The  questionnaire  includes 41 questions and the main goal was to get know the current situation on field of on‐line buying in the  Czech  Republic  focused  on  factors  influencing  on‐line  buying  behavior.  SPSS  software  was  used  for  data  evaluation.    Pseudo  random  selection  of  respondents  was  used.  925  respondents  attended  the  research  and  706  completed questioners were evaluated. As we can see in Table 2 the sample includes 283 men (40,1 %) and  423 women (59,9 %). It almost follows the sex structure in the Czech Republic. 

123


Michal Pilík  Table 1: Sample demographics (own survey)    Gender    Age   

Study Level   

Level of Internet  Literacy   

Male  Female  16‐24  25‐34  35‐44  45‐54  55‐64  65+  Primary education  Secondary school  without graduation  Secondary school  with graduation  University degree 

N 283  423  195  243  128  77  38  25  25 

% 40.1  59.9  27.6  34.4  18.1  10.9  5.4  3.5  3.5 

56

7.9

232

32.9

393

55.7

Beginner

64

9.1

Common user  Advanced user  Professional 

452 165  25 

64.0 23.4  3.5 

4.1 Research questions  The following research questions were set prior to the research:  ƒ

RQ1: Internet users who are concerned about security also have great distrust in online shopping and at  the same time fear the loss of privacy and misuse of personal data. 

ƒ

RQ2: According to the customers, security is a significant technical factor influencing online shopping.  

ƒ

RQ3: Confidence  in  the  e‐shop  as  a  psychological  factor  affecting  behaviour  during  online  shopping  is  perceived by more than 40 % of online customers as an important factor in choosing an e‐shop. 

ƒ

RQ4: Experience  with  using  the  Internet  has  a  significant  influence  on  the  behaviour  during  online  shopping. 

4.2 Research goals and methodology  Quantitative  marketing  research  was  used  for  collecting  primary  data.  A  structured  on‐line  questionnaire  survey was used during the period June ‐ September 2012. The questionnaire included 41 questions and the  main goal was to get to know the current situation in the area of on‐line buying in the Czech Republic focusing  on factors influencing on‐line buying behaviour. SPSS software was used for data evaluation.     The primary goal of this paper is to present selected factors influencing customers' behaviour in e‐commerce  on B2C markets in the Czech Republic.    The research goals for purpose of this paper are:  ƒ

to analyse basic demographics characteristics and their influence to on‐line buying; 

ƒ

to describe what are the main fears by using on‐line shops in the Czech Republic and their relations; 

ƒ

to analyze technical and psychological factors affecting online shopping. 

5. Basic demographics characteristics and their influence on on‐line buying  Figure 3 describes the current situation on Czech on‐line market. As we can see 87.5 % of Czech Internet users  use this media for purchasing products or services. But only 32.7 % buy on‐line regularly. It means that most  Czech Internet users buy on‐line but only irregularly and still use traditional shops for majority shopping. 

124


Michal Pilík 

Figure 3: Internet buying in the Czech Republic in % (own search)  We can see the comparison of online shopping with the age of users in Table 2. It is obvious that respondents  in  the  25‐34 category  buy  online  regularly  more  often  than the other age categories.  They  are  active  online  more  often  than  others  and  work  very  well  with  the  latest  technologies  and  PCs.  As  we  can  see,  54  %  of  respondents buy online but irregularly and 43 % of respondents in the age category 25‐34 buy online regularly.  Only  3  %  of  respondents  don't  use  Internet  for  buying  products  or  services  in  the  age  category  25‐34.  The  general  trends  which  are  illustrated  in  the  same  Table  2  are:  all  age  categories  are  active  online,  they  buy  online but we can see these consequences: (1) number of people who do not purchase online is increasing,  depending  on  the  growing  age,  (2)  people  aged  25‐34  buy  online  most  regularly,  (3)  all  age  categories  are  active shopping online, (4) most people buy irregularly online.  Table 2: Age Categories and on‐line buying (own search)   

Age

Yes, regularly

16-24 years 34 % 

25-34 years 43 % 

35-44 years 32 % 

45-54 years 22 % 

55-64 years 3 % 

65+ years 4 % 

Yes, irregularly

62 %

54 %

57 %

55 %

40 %

20 %

No

4 %

3 %

11 %

23 %

57 %

76 %

Total

100 %

100 %

100 %

100 %

100 %

100 %

Buying on-line

As we can see in Figure 4 age and level of Internet literacy has the biggest influence on on‐line buying. The  relationship between on‐line buying and age is weak (0,383, p = 0.01). Correlation is significant at 0.01 level.  There  is  a  weak  positive  relationship  between  these  two  variables.  Determination  coefficient  is  15  %  and  it  represents weak tightness of these variables.    The  relationship  between  on‐line  buying  and  level  of  Internet  literacy  is  weak  as  well  (‐0,407,  p  =  0.01).  Correlation  is  significant  at  0.01  level.  There  is  a  weak  negative  relationship  between  these  two  variables.  Determination coefficient is 17 % and it represents weak tightness of these variables. Based on this result we  can reject the research question 4 (RQ4) that experience with using the Internet has a significant influence on  the behaviour during online shopping. Dependence was proved to exist, but as mentioned above, it is weak.  

125


Michal Pilík 

Figure 4: Basic demographics characteristics and their influence to on‐line buying (own search) 

6. Fears connected with internet shopping in the Czech Republic  All  on‐line  users  have  some  worries  about  purchasing  on‐line.  It  does  not  signify  if  they  purchase  on‐line  regularly or irregularly. The main worries are presented in Figure 5. We can see that most people are afraid of  complaints products or their testing (61 %). 37 % of respondents marked misuse of personal data and security  as  an  important  barrier  against  Internet  shopping  acceptance.  It  is  surprising  that  only  44  %  of  respondents  marked misuse of personal data as a relevant worry because the fear of security and personal information is  generally very high in the society. On the other hand, this information is also positive because it seems that  Czech on‐line customers start to trust this medium.    If we compare the approach of regular, irregular and non‐ online buyers, we can see that all of these segments  have the same worries. The impossibility of product testing, problems with complaints, problems with product  return and misuse of personal data are the main worries about on‐line purchasing. 

Figure 5: Fears by Internet shopping in the Czech Republic (own survey)  The correlation between the concern about security when shopping online, distrust, loss of privacy and misuse  of personal data can be seen in Table 3 below. Based on these results, we can confirm the research question 1  (RQ1:  Internet  users  who  are  concerned  about  security  also  have  great  distrust  in  online  shopping  and  also  fear the loss of privacy and misuse of personal data). These factors do not show a very strong correlation, but  there is a weak positive correlation. The strongest positive correlation is between the fear of loss of privacy  and concerns of misuse of personal data (0.370, p = 0.01). Based on a statistical analysis, the correlation can be 

126


Michal Pilík  considered moderate at 0.01 level. The determination coefficient is 14 % and it represents a weak tightness of  these variables. Other results are shown below.  Table 3: Correlation between security, distrust, loss of privacy and misuse of personal data (own processing  using SPSS)    Security 

Pearson Correlation  N  Pearson  Correlation  N  Pearson  Correlation  N  Pearson  Correlation  N 

Distrust

Loss of privacy 

Misuse of personal data 

Misuse of  Loss of privacy  personal data  .305**  .262** 

Security 1 

Distrust .234** 

706 .234** 

706 1 

706 .231** 

706 .103** 

706 .305** 

706 .231** 

706 1 

706 .370** 

706 .262** 

706 .103** 

706 .370** 

706 1 

706

706

706

706

**Correlation is significant at 0.01 level (2‐tailed).    Table 4 presents technical and psychological factors considered to be the most important according to online  customers. Individual factors are rated on a scale of 1 to 4 where 1 expresses the most significant influence  and  4  expresses  the  least  significant  influence.  As  we  can  see,  having  the  Internet  access  is  considered  the  most  significant  technical  influence  on  online  shopping.  Technical  equipment  and  security  when  using  the  Internet is considered to be also very important for online shopping.   Table 4: Factors affecting online shopping according to the opinion of online customers (in %)   

1

2

Technical

3

4

Available technical equipment 

32.2

47.1

14.1

6.6

Security when using the Internet 

43.0

45.1

9.1

2.8

Internet access 

68.1

25.7

3.7

2.5

19.6

7.5

Psychological

Attitudes

20.6

52.3

Possible loss of privacy 

19.9

44.8

27.7

7.6

Trust in the Internet as a medium 

34.3

49.8

13.5

2.4

Confidence in a given e‐shop 

46.9

45.3

6.8

1.0

Lifestyle

34.1

49.7

12.1

4.1

Experience with using the Internet 

51.6

41.3

5.3

1.8

Based on  the  results  we  can  conclude  that  confidence  in  a  given  e‐shop  is  perceived  by  the  customers  as  significant. Nearly 47 % of respondents found it to be the most important factor and 45.3 % perceived it as a  significant factor. This result tells us that that nearly 93% of respondents perceived confidence in an e‐shop as  very significant. Therefore, we can confirm the research question 3 (RQ3). Online customers perceive the issue  of security similarly. 88% of respondents perceive it as a significant factor in deciding whether to choose the  Internet as a place for their purchases. Therefore, we can confirm the research question 2 (RQ2).    As the results in Table 5 and 6 show, overall Cronbach's alpha is 0.700 / 0.679, which is very high and indicates  strong internal consistency among the six psychological factors items. Essentially this means that respondents  who tended to select high scores for one item also tended to select high scores for the others.   Table 5: Reliability statistics – psychological factors Cronbach's Alpha .700 

127

N of Items  6 


Michal Pilík  Table 6: Reliability statistics – technical factors Cronbach's Alpha .679 

N of Items  3 

7. Conclusion and discussion  The Internet and its tools no longer feel unfamiliar. Still the majority of its users are afraid of online purchases  even  though  there  are  a  number  of  advantages.  Young  generation  is  an  exception.  The  Internet  enables  (together with new marketing approaches) customers as well as companies to quickly, efficiently buy and sell  goods or services. The area of e‐commerce is still a new phenomenon in the Czech Republic, which is worth  exploring and developing. Czech people use the Internet as a medium for purchasing products or services but  they  are  still  a  little  bit  sceptical  because  they  do  not  use  it  regularly.  The  impending  second  wave  of  the  economic  crisis  gives  rise  to  new  e‐shops.  About  800  new  e‐shops  are  created  each  month  in  the  Czech  Republic out of which 200‐300 best survive. Customers obviously benefit from this situation. There is a very  strong  competition  on  the  Internet,  as  well  as  in  the  traditional  business  environment.  As  a  result  of  this  competition,  prices  of  goods  and  services  are  constantly  decreasing  benefiting  the  customer.  We  can  also  observe  that  the  prices  no  longer  seem  the  most  crucial  factor  influencing  customers’  behaviour.  More  frequently, online shoppers follow other criteria, such as security, trust, satisfaction, privacy and others typical  for this particular shopping environment.  

References Corbitt, B. J., Thanasankit, T., YI, H. (2003) Trust and e‐commerce: a study of consumer perceptions. Electronic Commerce  Research and Application, Vol. 2, No. 3, pp 203‐315.  eMarketer.com (2013) Ecommerce Sales Topped 1 Trillion First Time 2012. [online], Copyright 2013 eMarketer Inc.  http://www.emarketer.com/Article/Ecommerce‐Sales‐Topped‐1‐Trillion‐First‐Time‐2012/1009649  Evanschitzky, H., et al. (2004) E‐satisfaction: a re‐examination, Journal of Retailing, Vol. 80, No. 3, pp 239‐247.  Gemius.com (2011) Již 84% českých uživatelů internetu nakupuje online. [online], ©2013 GEMIUS SA.  http://cz.gemius.com/cz/novinky/2011‐02‐17/01  Hart, P., Saunders, C. (1997) Power and trust: critical factors in the adoptions and use of electronic data interchange.  Organizational Science. Vol. 8, No. 1, pp 23‐42.  Hernández, B., Jiménez, J., Martín, M. J. (2010) Customer behavior in electronic commerce: The moderating effect of e‐ purchasing experience, Journal of Business Research, Vol. 63, No. 9–10, pp 964‐971.  Hostler, R. E., Yoon, V. Y., Guimaraes, T. (2012) Recommendation agent impact on consumer online shopping: The Movie  Magic case study, Expert Systems with Applications, Vol. 39, No. 3, pp 2989‐2999.  Chang, H. H., Chen, S. W. (2008) The impact of customer interface quality, satisfaction and switching costs on e‐loyalty:  Internet experience as a moderator, Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 24, No. 6, pp 2927‐2944.  Iglesias‐Pradas, S., et al. (2013) Barriers and drivers for non‐shoppers in B2C e‐commerce: A latent class exploratory  analysis, Computers in Human Behavior, Vol. 29, No. 2, pp 314‐322.  Marketingovenoviny.cz. (2012) Průměrný online nákup v ČR má hodnotu 2000 korun, nejpopulárnější je platba na dobírku.  [online], © Helena Kopecká 2001‐2013. http://www.marketingovenoviny.cz/?Action=View&ARTICLE_ID=11952  Mediaguru.cz (2012) E‐commerce 2012: Lídry trhu jsou Aukro a Heureka. [online], Copyright © 2013 PHD, a.s.  http://www.mediaguru.cz/2012/10/e‐commerce‐2012‐lidry‐trhu‐jsou‐aukro‐a‐heureka/#.UVmHspaBvJK  Oliver, R. L. (1997). Satisfaction: A behavioral perspective on the consumer. McGraw‐Hill.  PWC (2012) Průměrný Evropan nakoupí na internetu 2‐3krát měsíčně. [online], © 2012‐2013 PricewaterhouseCoopers.  http://www.pwc.com/cz/cs/tiskove‐zpravy/2012/prumerny‐evropan‐nakoupi‐na‐internetu‐2‐3krat‐mesicne.jhtml  Ramanathan, R., Ramanathan , U., Hsiao, H. L. (2012). The impact of e‐commerce on Taiwanese SMEs: Marketing and  operations effects. International Journal of Production Economics. Vol. 140, No. 2, pp 934–943.  Roberts, M. L. (2008). Internet marketing: integrating online and offline strategies. (2nd ed.), Thomson, Mason.  Szymanski, D. M., Hise, R. T. (2000). E‐satisfaction: An initial examination. Journal of Retailing, Vol. 76, No. 3, pp 309–322.  Tao, Z., Li, Z., Dingjun, Ch. (2011). The Predicting Model of E‐commerce Site Based on the Ideas of Curve Fitting. 2011  International Conference on Physics Science and Technology (ICPST 2011). 22, 641‐645.  doi:10.1016/j.phpro.2011.11.099  Teo, T. S. H., Liu, J. (2007) Consumer trust in e‐Commerce in the United States, Singapore and China. Omega – International  Journal of Management Science, Vol. 35, No. 1, pp 22‐38.  Uďan, M. (2012) ČR je zemí e‐shopům zaslíbená. [online], 2012 © Cybergenics. http://blog.shoptet.cz/cr‐je‐zemi‐e‐ shopum‐zaslibena/ 

128


Information Asset Management: Who is Responsible and  Accountable?  James Price1 and Nina Evans2   1 Experience Matters, Adelaide, Australia  2 University of South Australia, Adelaide, Australia  james.price@experiencematters.com.au  nina.evans@unisa.edu.au    Abstract:  The  key  resources  that  are  inputs  to  the  production  process  of  an  organisation  are  Financial  Assets,  Human  Assets,  Physical  Assets  and  Information  Assets.  Each  of  these  sets  of  assets  needs  to  be  effectively  deployed  to  meet  business objectives. Information, which is a critical business resource for most organisations, is typically poorly managed  and the potential, tangible benefits from improving Information Management (IM) practices are seldom realised. Business  governance refers to the decisions that must be made to ensure effective business management and also to who makes  these  decisions,  i.e.  who  is  responsible  and  accountable.  Qualitative  research  via  confidential  interviews  was  conducted  with  C‐level  executives  and  Board  members  of  Australian  and  South  African  organisations  in  both  private  and  public  sectors,  to  identify  their  perceptions  of  the  issues  preventing  the  effective  management  of  Information  Assets  in  their  organisations.  A  significant  finding  is  that  a  key  issue  preventing  effective  information  management  is  a  lack  of  business/corporate governance. Questions about what information management decisions must be made – and by whom ‐  are  not  being  raised.  If  they  are,  responsibility  and  accountability  is  often  inappropriately  imposed.  This  paper  aims  to  address this concern.    Keywords: information assets, governance, responsibility, accountability 

1. Introduction To  achieve  their  corporate  objectives,  organisations  provide  products  and  services  through  the  conduct  of  their  daily  business  activities.  These  business  activities  are  enabled  by  the  deployment  of  the  organisation’s  available and typically scarce resources, namely their Financial (money / budget), Physical (plant, equipment,  IT),  Human  (people)  and  Information  Assets.  How  efficiently  and  effectively  organisations  deploy  their  resources determines their business performance.     In the modern knowledge‐based economy intangible assets such as data, documents, content and knowledge  are  critical  to  the  operation  of  every  organisation  (Freeze  &  Khulkani,  2007;  Wilson  &  Stenson,  2008;  Salamuddin et al., 2010; Jhunjhunwala, 2009). These intangible assets are referred to as Information Assets in  this  paper.  Information  Assets  drive,  record  and  enforce  organisational  strategy  and  growth.  They  also  help  leaders to make informed decisions to improve customer acquisition and retention, employee recruitment and  retention  and  enhance  employee  motivation  and  loyalty  (Steenkamp  &  Kashyap,  2010).  Organisational  knowledge is regarded as a key factor in management practices (Garcia‐Parra et al., 2009) and the capacity to  create,  transfer  and  employ  knowledge  contributes  to  organisational  success  and  sustainable  competitive  advantage (Drucker, 1994; Spender, 1994; Nonaka & Takeuchi, 1995; Davenport & Prusak, 1998; Teece, 2007).     Practitioner  experience  and  anecdotal  evidence  in  the  form  of  numerous  failed  Information  Technology  (IT)  initiatives,  ineffective  business  practices  and  a  lack  of  understanding  of  the  cost,  value  and  benefit  of  effectively deploying information in all levels of organisations, generated a lack of confidence that Information  Assets are being effectively managed (Experience Matters, 2012). For example, a major energy retailer nearly  killed an excavator driver by providing him with an obsolete site plan that did not show the whereabouts of an  11,000 volt cable. A major oil and gas producer declared that if they managed their money in the same way  that they managed their information they would “be broke in a week”. In response, the authors initiated this  research  project  to  investigate  the  reasons  for  poor  decisions  regarding  Information  Assets  and  lack  of  accountability for their deployment.     Whilst  there  is  copious  academic  and  industry  material  on  various  aspects  of  Information  Management,  the  first phase of this project, namely the Literature Review, shows that very little research has been done on why  Information Assets are not better managed.    

129


James Price and Nina Evans  The second phase of the research was conducted in Australia and South Africa (Evans et al., 2011; Hunter et  al.,  2011),  to  determine  whether  organisations  recognise  Information  Assets  that  are  of  value  to  their  operations  and  how  these  assets  are  managed.  Preliminary  findings  indicate  that  every  organisation  acknowledges  that  it  has  Information  Assets  that  are  of  value  to  its  operations.  Data,  information  and  knowledge underpins and enables every business activity encompassing both value chain / productive activity  and support activities including Finance, HR, Legal, IT, Treasury etc. Participants commented that all they have  in  their  business  is  information  and  knowledge  and  that  the  business  would  grind  to  a  halt  without  these  assets.  Despite  this,  few organisations  manage these  assets  with  the  same  rigor  as  they  manage  their  other  scarce  resources  and  not  one  of  these  organisations  could  claim  exemplary  practice  in  the  deployment  of  those assets.    The findings of these phases of the research were sufficiently compelling to justify further investigation. The  third  phase  focused  on  the  reasons  why  Information  Assets  are  not  effectively  deployed  in  organisations.  Multitudinous  reasons  for  poor  Information  Management  were  proffered,  categorised  as  Executive  Awareness,  Business  Governance,  Leadership  &  Management,  Justification  and  Tools.  The  Business  Governance related aspects of our findings are reported in this paper.     The remaining three phases of this project are as follows. Phase 4 will be a quantitative analysis to interrogate,  validate and prioritise findings. This will allow a more granular investigation and enable comparison between  industries,  geographies,  cultures  etc.  Phase  5  has  commenced  and  will  determine  the  business  impact  to  organisations  of  poor  Information  Management.  Anecdotal  evidence  suggests  that  benefits  to  organisations  from  improving  their  Information  Management  practices  is  conservatively  estimated  at  $20,000  per  person  per  year.  Finally,  building  on  existing  work,  Stage  6  will  address  the  ultimate  objective  of  this  project  by  developing  a  methodology  to  resolve  the  barriers  that  we  have  identified  to  effective  Information  Management.    The format for the remainder of this manuscript is as follows. In the next section, terms are defined for the  purpose  of  this  paper.  Then,  literature  which  relates  to  the  deployment  of  Information  Assets  is  discussed.  Then the presentation of the research approach and methods provides a context for the project. The identified  governance  related  barriers  are  then  addressed,  followed  by  conclusions  and  suggestions  what  future  investigation might entail. 

2. Terms and definitions  Available  literature  highlights  the  lack  of  precision  prevalent  in  the  language  of  this  topic.  Terms  including  business  or  corporate  governance,  information  assets,  information  governance,  IT  governance  and  management are defined here to provide clarity for this discussion.    There is a clear distinction between governance and management. Governance refers to what decisions must  be  made  (decision  domain)  and  who  makes  the  decisions  (locus  of  accountability  for  decision‐making)  to  ensure  effective  business  management.  Management  involves  making  and  implementing  these  decisions  (Khatri, 2010; Evans & Price, 2012).     A  clear  distinction  is  also  made  between  business  /  corporate  governance,  information  governance  and  information technology governance. A common definition of business / corporate governance is “the system  by which companies are directed and controlled” (Cadbury, 1992; Gregory & Simmelkjaer, 2002). Information  governance is defined as “the specification of decision rights and an accountability framework to encourage  desirable  behaviour  in  the  valuation,  creation,  storage,  use,  archival  and  deletion  of  information.  It  includes  the  processes,  roles,  standards  and  metrics  that  ensure  the  effective  and  efficient  use  of  information  in  enabling an organisation to achieve its goals” (Logan, 2010). Based on the analysis of 60 different articles, IT  governance  is  about  “IT  decision‐making:  the  preparation  for,  making  of  and  implementation  of  decisions  regarding  goals,  processes,  people  and  technology  on  a  tactical  and  strategic  level”  (Simonsson  &  Johnson,  2005).     Finally,  various  terms  and  definitions  can  be  employed  to  describe  Information  Assets.  These  assets  are  intangible and, for the purpose of the project described in this paper, Information Assets include all explicit,  codified data, documents and published content, irrespective of medium (e.g. hard copy, soft copy, microfiche 

130


James Price and Nina Evans  and  head‐space)  and  format  (e.g.  Word  document,  spreadsheet,  email,  drawing  and  HTML),  as  well  as  tacit  knowledge.  These  intangible assets  are  inputs  to  the  business.  Intangible  assets  such as  relationship  capital,  brand awareness and goodwill, that are typically outputs of the business, are excluded. Tangible assets such as  Financial Assets (money), Physical Assets (buildings, plant and equipment, computer hardware and software)  and Human Assets (people) are also excluded from this definition (Evans & Price, 2012).    This paper addresses business / corporate governance (as opposed to information and information technology  governance) related issues associated with the effective deployment of Information Assets.  

3. Literature review   3.1 Information assets  Various  authors  refer  to  non‐tangible  assets  as  intangibles,  information  assets,  knowledge  assets,  intangible  capital (Fincham & Roslender, 2003b; Lev, 2001; Tomer, 2008), intellectual capital, intellectual assets (Bismuth  & Tojo, 2008; Litschka et al., 2006; Robertson & Lanfranconi, 2001), intangible resources (Bontis et al., 1999)  and  knowledge  resources  (Grover  &  Davenport,  2001).  Steenkamp  and  Kashyap  (2010)  describe  Intangible  Assets as those assets that contribute to the organisational strategy, but are not recognised and disclosed in  the  balance  sheet.  Knowledge  Assets  are  described  as  “the  only  meaningful  resource”  (Drucker,  1993),  the  “indisputable  value  drivers  to  success”  (Jhunjhunwala,  2009:  211),  the  “most  important  production  factor”  (Steenkamp & Kashyap, 2010) and according to Bontis et al. (1999) it is “today’s driver of company life”. Chen  and Lin (2004: 116) emphasise that the value created by intangible assets (such as human capital) prevails over  that  created  by  tangible  assets  (such  as  machines).  Rodgers  and  Housel  (2009)  suggest  that  modern  day  organisations  need  to  more  actively  identify  and  measure  these  key  resources  and  drivers  of  value  in  the  organisation.  The  ability  to  drive  value  from  Information  Assets  depends  on  organisations’  governance  and  management  practices.  It  is,  therefore,  critically  important  that  these  assets  are  well  understood,  properly  managed and that they play a major role in the strategic management process (Swartz, 2007).  

3.2 Governance Modern debate concerning business governance is mainly informed by three publications, namely Sir Adrian  Cadbury’s  Financial  Aspects  of  Corporate  Governance  (Cadbury,  1992),  the  OECD’s  Principles  of  Corporate  Governance  (Johnston  2004)  and  the  US  Congress’  Sarbanes‐Oxley  Act  (Sarbanes  and  Oxley,  2002).  The  Cadbury  Report  and  the  Principles  of  Corporate  Governance  present  general  principles  upon  which  to  base  business  governance  to  run  an  organisation  effectively.  The  Sarbanes‐Oxley  Act  embodies  several  of  the  principles proposed by Cadbury and the OECD in US legislation.    In his report titled Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance, Cadbury (1992) refers to corporate governance  as being a driver of business performance that is achieved at both micro and macro levels. He asserts that a  country’s  economy  and  competitive  position  depend  on  the  drive  and  efficiency  of  its  companies,  and  the  effectiveness  with  which  their  boards  discharge  their  responsibilities.  “They  must  be  free  to  drive  their  companies  forward,  but  exercise  that  freedom  within  a  framework  of  effective  accountability”  (Cadbury,  1992).  Anecdotal  evidence  suggests  that  the  business  benefit  to  companies  of  improving  their  information  management  practices  is  significant  (Experience  Matters,  2012).  Governance  of  Information  Assets  for  the  purpose of business performance is therefore important.    However, more recently and in the light of the failures of Enron, WorldCom and others, business governance  appears  to  have  shifted  its  focus  from  improving  business  performance  towards  reducing  business  risk  by  preventing  corporate  misbehaviour.  Corporate  governance  has  been  defined  as  "a  system  of  law  and  sound  approaches by which corporations are directed and controlled focusing on the internal and external corporate  structures with the intention of monitoring the actions of management and directors and thereby mitigating  agency risks which may stem from the misdeeds of corporate officers” (Sifuna, 2012). Whilst important, this  focus  on corporate  misbehaviour  necessarily  reduces  attention  on  improving  business  performance  and  this  theme emerged strongly from the research.     When  corporate  governance  is  applied  to  the  management  of  information  assets,  it  is  done  via  the  usual  lenses  of  Strategy,  Internal  Controls  and  Risk  (Information  Technology  Advisory  Committee  CICA,  2002).  However, it is predominantly applied to the management of IT (Trites, 2003), rather than to the management 

131


James Price and Nina Evans  of  information;  the  organisation’s  focus  is  therefore  on  its  infrastructure  rather  than  its  content.  Recent  articles addressing the role of the CIO still refer mainly to IT (Peppard, 2010) and current job descriptions still  refer  to  the  Chief  Information  Officer  (CIO)  as  a  job  title  for  the  Head  of  Information  Technology  within  an  organisation.  In  and  of  itself,  the  infrastructure  adds  no  value,  it  only  adds  risk  if  it  doesn’t  work.  It  is  the  content that contributes the business value. By focusing on reducing the cost of IT and the risk of IT failure,  organisations  potentially  impose  responsibility  and  accountability  on  the  wrong  people.  This  theme  also  emerged strongly from the findings.    There  is  little  evidence  to  suggest  that  the  management  of  Information  Assets  ranks  high  on  the  Board’s  agenda. This topic is also discussed in this paper. 

4. Research The  research  method  was  based  upon  the  qualitative  Narrative  Inquiry  technique,  in  which  research  participants’ recollections and interpretations of personal experiences were captured one hour interviews and  documented (Tulving, 1972; Scholes, 1981:205; Bruner, 1990; Czarniawska‐Joerges, 1995; Swap et al., 2001).  The narratives or stories proffered by interviewees invariably reflected observations gained from real business  experience, ranging from demonstrable success to manifest failure. The participants included Board members  and C‐level executives, such as Chief Executive Officers (CEO), Chief Financial Officers (CFO), Chief Information  Officers  (CIO)  and  Chief  Knowledge  Officers  (CKO)  of  predominantly  large  Australian  and  South  African  organisations in both private and public sectors (refer to Table 1).   Table 1: Research participants  PARTICIPANT NUMBER 

TITLE

INDUSTRY

P1

CKO

Utilities (Pipelines) 

P2

Managing Partner 

Services (Legal) 

P3

CKO

State Government 

P4

CFO

Utilities (Rail) 

P5

Data Management 

Banking, Finance and Insurance 

P6

CEO

Services (HR) 

P7

CFO

Banking, Finance and Insurance 

P8

CFO

Services (Automotive) 

P9

CEO

Manufacturing (Process) 

P10

Board member 

Various, mostly banking 

P11

CIO

Banking, Finance and Insurance 

P12

CIO

Government (Local) 

P13

CEO

Services (Information) 

P14

CIO

Banking, Finance and Insurance 

P15

CFO

Banking, Finance and Insurance 

P16

CFO

Resources (Oil and Gas) 

P17

CFO

Banking, Finance and Insurance 

An interview protocol was used to provide a consistent approach across a number of interviews (Swap et al.,  2001). Planned prompts (predetermined) and floating prompts (an impromptu decision to explore a comment  in more detail) enabled the researchers to delve into detail as required. The interviews were audio recorded  and the interview transcripts were thoroughly reviewed to identify categories of data and emerging themes.  As  data  gathered  from  qualitative  interviews  were  compared  it  either  supported  the  creation  of  new  categories  or  provided  support  for  existing  categories.  A  large  number  of  issues  ‐  that  support  the  findings  from  the  literature  review  ‐  were  identified  in  a  thorough  data  analysis.  These  issues  were  subsequently  clustered  into  five  different  categories,  namely  Awareness,  Governance,  Leadership  and  Management,  Justification and Tools. The business governance related issues are discussed in the next section.  

132


James Price and Nina Evans 

5. Research findings  The researchers took care to achieve sufficient granularity to draw meaningful conclusions. Root cause analysis  can  be  applied  to  the  point  where  all  identified  barriers  are  attributable  to  poor  business  governance.  However,  that  approach  does  not  provide  the  insight  required  for  pragmatic  problem  resolution  which,  as  explained in the Introduction, is the ultimate objective of this project.    The researchers paid attention only to what was said, rather than what wasn’t said. For instance, not a single  executive  identified  a  fundamental  difference  between  an  organisation’s  Information  Assets  and  its  other  assets, namely that information is managed by every person whereas the other assets are managed by a small  group of people. Similarly, no executives identified that their organisations are unable to determine the cost of  managing their information assets.     The research findings showed a lack of business governance applied to the management of Information Assets.  One executive emphasised the lack of governance of Information Assets by declaring that if his organisation  managed its Financial Assets with same lack of accountability, discipline and rigor as it manages its Information  Assets, the company “would be broke in a week”.     Many reasons were advanced for why there is a failure of governance in most organisations, discussed below  and  summarised  in  Table  1.  Managing  information  is  an  enterprise  wide  activity,  yet  very  few  people  in  an  organisation are able to take an enterprise wide approach resulting in a lack of ownership and accountability.  As  managing  and  using  information  is  done  by  every  person  in  an  organisation,  information  management  should  be  an  enterprise  function.  The  Chief  Executive  sits  at  the  nexus  between  the  Board  above  and  the  divisional heads below and is often the only person who can take such an enterprise wide view. The CFO of an  automotive association said, “The Chief Executive …is the only one who has the true enterprise view of this  whole organisation… he sets the strategy and the vision of the organisation”.    The  Board  of  Directors  often  does  not  understand  the  value  of  the  organisation’s  information  or  in  their  opinion they have bigger issues to deal with. A Director of a financial institution said, “From a Director's point  of view, there are two main things we get involved with. The first thing is setting the strategy and providing  oversight  of  that  strategy.  The  second  thing  is  when  things  go  wrong,  working  out  what  to  do.  This  stuff  doesn't  fit  into  the  strategy  and  it  usually  doesn't  fit  into  the  ‘things  gone  wrong’  because  you  don't  see  it.  Unless something goes wrong, [information management] is outside the framework of what we're there for  which is setting in place the strategy and oversight of the strategy of the organisation. Is there a better way of  doing it? Maybe, but it's just not on the agenda”. However, an inherent contradiction exists because the same  Director said, “Who is in trouble if [things go wrong]…, if the contract gets lost or the insurance policy can’t be  found?  Ultimately  the  board  does…It's  ultimately  the  board”.  It  may  be  that  the  communication  about  information  management  is  ineffective.  A  CKO  said,  “The  communication  about  information  management  didn’t get to the board in the last organisation I was in. It just didn’t. I’m not sure why, I think they just dealt  with bigger picture stuff and more around business development and operations.”    Management doesn’t see Information Management as a problem and there is a profound lack of interest in  determining  and  allocating  ownership  and  accountability  for  the  management  of  information.  An  Australian  banking  executive  said,  “Who  is  responsible  for  managing  information  hasn’t  been  nutted  out  in  this  organisation”. The CIO of a South African financial institution said, “You need rules, and the question is, who  the heck is going to make the rules?” The CKO of a State Government Agency said, “Our information assets are  important, but are we going to have a division of people looking after our information? No, none; there is no  one really. I mean, there's personal responsibility but we all have our fingers in the information.”    To  have  an  effective  information  management  environment,  the  appropriate  governance  and  management  tools  need  to  be  implemented.  A  banking  executive  said:  “At  board  level  and  at  CEO  level  do  they  see  information and knowledge as a critical business asset? I think they do but it’s the connection between what  they believe, and the middle layers of management who put that into effect…If it doesn’t get credited, nothing  gets done, it’s got to be in your scorecard. If it’s not in your scorecard, you can talk about it at the top but it  never gets connected down to the bottom. So at the coalface it will never get resolved, we’ll just keep spinning  our wheels.”   

133


James Price and Nina Evans  Without responsibility and accountability at executive level, KPIs are not imposed throughout the organisation  and  measurement  is  not  possible.  A  CKO  said,  “I  don't  think  we've  got  a  strong  culture  of  value,  measuring  value and I think we think about benefits, but even that's not really ‐ we talk benefits but we don't necessarily  measure benefits very well. We measure output.”     Often finding an appropriate Information Management owner is difficult. A CKO said, “There was nobody who  would take ownership. We're still in our infancy on how the governance will work. Our big win at the moment  is getting company secretary to get this as part of his portfolio.” A CFO said, “At the end of the day the general  manager of risk has the responsibility. So the risk actually has got final say.” A CEO said, “We don’t have such a  thing as our knowledge or our valuable information. What we do have is owned by the various department  owners  as  they  choose  to  own  it.  We  don’t  have  any  cross  functional  or  cross  organisational  information  owner. How do I make an excuse for not doing that ‐ it doesn’t seem sensible does it?” A CKO said, “Is there  one  person  who  is  ultimately  responsible  for  the  management  of  the  information  and  knowledge  of  the  Agency? Is [information management] high on the executives’ agenda? I don't think the executive thinks about  it.”    Typically organisations do not understand the difference between Information Management and Information  Technology  and  Information  Management  responsibility  is  often  assigned  to  the  Chief  Information  Officer  (CIO)  who  is  effectively  an  IT  Manager  with  neither  the  interest  nor  the  skills  to  address  Information  Management. A CKO said, “The CIO was no use. He wasn't my person. He didn't help me at all. He knew, he  understood, but  he couldn't  fight  my  battle  for  me.  He  wasn't  interested  because  it  wasn't  an  issue  to  him.  Nobody had come to him and said you need to get information in order. For him, his biggest issue was speed  and access. It wasn’t until they’d fixed up the speed and access problems that it became apparent that there  were issues with the information that people were accessing.”    As  everyone  manages  information  and  much  of  Information  Management  is  behavioural,  the  person  responsible has to be a strong change agent. This is often not an IT Manager’s strength. A South African CEO  said, “Sponsorship needs to come from … strategic level because otherwise you've got no success rate ‐ there  just won't be any success rate. However, sponsorship usually from the IT division,…not from the value chain. A  South African CIO said, “Change needs a change champion and needs somebody that's strong enough to pull  you  through  that  low  part  in  the  change  cycle,  and  that  person  needs  to  be  a  visionary.  He  needs  to  understand where you're going, needs to see the longer term objectives. If you haven't got one of those, you'll  lose your way when things start to get a bit tough, and that's when most change initiatives just peter out and  stop.”  Table 1: Observation and quotation  Observation  IM is an enterprise wide activity, yet few  people have an enterprise wide remit  The Board isn’t interested 

Participant CFO 

Management isn’t interested 

CIO

Management tools are not implemented  Benefits are not measured 

Executive CKO 

Responsibility is lacking 

CEO

IM is confused with IT  Information Management generates  behavioural change requiring sponsorship  and management 

CKO CEO 

Director

Quotation The CEO is the only one who has the true  enterprise view of this whole organisation  Is there a better way of doing it? Maybe, but  it's just not on the agenda  You need rules [but] who the heck is going to  make the rules?  If it doesn’t get credited, nothing gets done  We don't necessarily measure benefits very  well. We measure output.  We don’t have any cross functional or cross  organisational information owner  [The CIO’s] biggest issue was speed and access  There just won't be any success rate 

6. Summary and conclusions  The  findings  of  this  research  supports  the  literature  that  organisations  have  demonstrated  governance  and  management proficiency in the administration and deployment of their Financial, Human and Physical assets,  but  that  most  fail  to  implement  the  accountability,  frameworks,  management  structures  and  measurement  required  to  effectively  deploy  the  other  vital  input  to  their  production  process,  namely  Information  Assets. 

134


James Price and Nina Evans  Every  organisation  consulted  in  this  research  recognised  that  their  information  is  a  vital  business  input,  yet  they acknowledge that their information management practices should be improved. The evidence, that a key  issue preventing effective information management is a lack of business / corporate governance of one of four  critical business assets, namely information and knowledge, is overwhelming. Boards and management do not  appear  to  understand  information  management,  they  don’t  know  how  the  cost,  value  or  benefit  of  their  information and they don’t see it as a high priority for their organisations. Governance of the organisation with  respect  to  its  information  and  knowledge  is  neither  designed  nor  implemented  and  responsibility  for  the  management of information is often given to people who are neither skilled nor interested.    Questions  about  what  information  management  decisions  must  be  made  –  and  by  whom  ‐  are  not  being  raised.  If  they  are,  responsibility  and  accountability  is  often  imposed  inappropriately.  As  every  executive  interviewed  acknowledges  that  their  Information  Assets  are  of  value,  even  critical  to  their  organisation’s  success,  it  is  important  to  know  why  the  correct  governance  questions  are  not  being  asked  and  what  the  implications are.    The  evidence  of  significant  barriers  to  the  effective  management  of  Information  Assets,  including  a  lack  of  governance, is compelling. The authors have decided to continue with the project and have planned in detail  the following activities. Firstly, a detailed examination of the Board and its role in Information Management  will  be  conducted.  Next,  a  significant  validation  exercise  will  exhaust  and  prioritise  barriers.  Then,  Business  Impact Assessments will be done to determine the lost value to organisations from their failure to effectively  manage their Information Assets. 

References Bismuth, A. & Tojo, Y. (2008). Creating value from intellectual assets. Journal of Intellectual Capital 9(2), 228‐245.   Bontis, N., Dragonetty, N.C., Jacobsen, K. & Roos, G. (1999). The knowledge toolbox: a review of the tools available to  measure and manage intangible resources. European Management Journal, 17(4), 391‐402.  Bruner, J. (1990). Acts of Meaning. Harvard University Press: Cambridge, MA.  Cadbury, A. (1992). Financial Aspects of Corporate Governance Gee Publishing, London  Chen, H.M. & Lin, K.J. (2004). The Role of Human Capital Cost in Accounting. Journal of Intellectual Capital, 5(1), 116‐130.  Czarniawska‐Joerges, B. (1995). Narration of Science? Collapsing the division in Organization Studies. Organization, 2(1), 11‐ 33.  Davenport, T.H. & Prusak, L. (1998). Working Knowledge. Harvard Business School Press, Boston, MA.   Drucker, P.F. (1993). Post‐capitalist Society. Oxford: Butterworth‐Heinemann. Edward Elgar: Cheltenham.  Drucker, P.F. (1994). The Age of Social Transformation. The Atlantic Monthly, 53‐80.  Evans, N., Hunter, G. & Price, J. (2011). Intellectual Assets of Organisations. Communications of Global Information  Technology (COGIT), 3, 55‐65.  Evans, N. & Price, J. (2012). Barriers to the effective deployment of Information Assets: An Executive Management  Perspective. Interdisciplinary Journal of Information and Knowledge Management (IJIKM), 7, 177‐199.   Experience Matters. (2012). Available at: www.experiencematters.com.au.   Fincham, R. & Roslender, R. (2003). The Management of Intellectual Capital and its Implications for Business Reporting.  Research Report for the Research Committee of The Institute of Chartered Accountants of Scotland, Edinburgh.  Freeze, R.D. & Kulkarni, U. (2007). Knowledge Management Capability: Defining Knowledge Assets. Journal of Knowledge  Management, 11(6), 94‐109.  Garcia‐Parra, M., Simo, P., Sallan, J.M. & Mundet, J. (2009). Intangible Liabilities: Beyond Models of Intellectual Assets.  Management Decision, 47(5), 819‐830.  Gregory, H. & Simmelkjaer, R. (2002). Comparative Study of Corporate Governance Codes Relevant to the European Union  and its Member States, European Commission, Internal Market Directorate General, 28.  Grover, V. & Davenport, T.H. (2001). General Perspectives on Knowledge Management: Fostering a Research Agenda.  Journal of Management Information Systems, 18(1), 5‐21.  Hunter, G., Evans, A. & Price, J. (2011). Internal Intellectual Assets: A Management Interpretation. Journal of Information,  Information Technology and Organizations, 6.  Information Technology Advisory Committee. (2002). 20 Questions Directors Should Ask About IT Canadian Institute of  Chartered Accountants.  Jhunjhunwala, S. (2009). Monitoring and measuring intangibles using value maps: Some examples. Journal of Intellectual  Capital, 10(2), 211‐223.   Johnston, D. et al. (2004). OECD Principles of Corporate Governance OECD.  Khatri, V. and Brown, C. (2010) Designing data governance. Communications of the ACM. 25(1):148‐152.  Lev, B. (2001). Intangibles: Management, Measurement and Reporting. Brookings Institution Press, Washington.  Litschka, M., Markom, A. & Schunder, S. (2006). Measuring and analyzing intellectual capital assets: an integrative  approach. Journal of Intellectual Capital, 7(2), 160‐73. 

135


James Price and Nina Evans  Logan, D. (2010). What is Information Governance? And why is it so hard? Blog entry (accessed 2 February).  Nonaka, I. & Takeuchi, H. (1995). The Knowledge Creating Company: How Japanese Companies Create the Dynamics of  Innovation. Oxford University Press, New York, NY.  Peppard, J. (2010). Unlocking the Performance of the CIO California Management Review 52(4).  Robertson, D.A. & Lanfranconi, C. (2001). Financial reporting: Communicating intellectual property. Ivey Business Journal,  65(4), 8‐11.   Rodgers, W. & Housel, T.J. (2009). Measures for organizations Engaged in a Knowledge Economy. Journal of Intellectual  Capital, 10(3), 341‐353.  Salamuddin, N., Bakar, R., Ibrahim, H. & Hassan, C.H.E.H. (2010). Intangible assets valuation in the Malaysian capital  market. Journal of Intellectual Capital, 11(3), 391‐405.   Sarbanes, P. and Oxley, M. (2002). Sarbanes Oxley Act US Congress.  Scholes, R. (1981). Language, Narrative, and Anti‐Narrative. In On Narrativity. Mitchell, W. (Editor), University of Chicago  Press, Chicago, 200‐208.  Sifuna, A. (2012). Disclose or Abstain: The Prohibition of Insider Trading on Trial. Journal of International Banking Law and  Regulation.  Simonsson, M. and Johnson, P. (2005). Defining IT Governance – a consolidation of literature Internal report of the  Department of Industrial Information and Control Systems, KTH, Royal Institute of Technology, Sweden.   Spender, J.C. (1994). Making Knowledge. Collective Practice and Penrose Rents. International Business Review 3, 353‐367.  Steenkamp, N. & Kashyap, V. (2010). Importance and contribution of intangible assets: SME managers’ perceptions. Journal  of Intellectual Capital, 11(3), 368‐390.  Swap, W., Leonard, D., Schields, M. & Abrams, L. (2001). Using Mentoring and Storytelling to Transfer Knowledge on the  Workplace. Journal of Management Information Systems, 18(1), 95‐114.  Swartz, N. (2007). Data Management Problems Widespread. The Information Management Journal, September/October  issue.   Teece, D.J. (2007). Capturing Value from Knowledge Assets: The New Economy, Markets for Know‐How, and Intangible  Assets. California Management Review, 40, 55‐79.  Tomer, J.F. (2008). Intangible Capital: Its Contribution to Economic Growth. Well‐Being and Rationality. Edward Elgar,  Cheltenham.  Trites, G. (2003). Director Responsibility for IT Governance St Francis Xavier University, Canada  Tulving, E. (1972). Episodic and Semantic Memory. In Organization of Memory, Tulving, E. and Donaldson, W. (Editors)  Academic Press: New York, 381‐404.  Wilson, R.M.S. & Stenson, J.A. (2008). Valuation of information assets on the balance sheet: The recognition and  approaches to the valuation of intangible assets. Business Information Review, 25,167. 

136


An Integrated Model for Evaluating ICT Impact in the Education  Domain  Mirja Pulkkinen  Department of CS&IS, Faculty of IT, University of Jyväskylä, Finland  mirja.k.pulkkinen@jyu.fi    Abstract: New technology enablers as the cloud computing paradigm, the Web 2.0 tools and learning games, seem to carry  strong  potential  to  tackle  the  challenges  of  the  education  sector:  Employment  market  requires  flexible  competency  development,  social  skills,  lifelong  learning,  while  public  resources  are  diminishing.  ICT  and  information  management  in  educational  institutions  is  a  continuously  developing  area.  New  software  and  systems  offered  for  the  domain  should  be  considered  with  a  portfolio  approach  to  systems  and  technologies.  This  paper  investigates  the  questions  of  how  to  evaluate  the  value  created  with  ICT,  and  how  to  assess  the  value  of  solutions  proposed  for  the  education  sector.    This  requires  research  collaboration  across  disciplines,  but  also  attending  to  the  relevant  bodies  of  knowledge  both  in  pedagogy,  didactics  and  institution  management,  but  also,  and  to  a  greater  extent,  in  ICT  management  and  solution  development.  This  paper  investigates  the  possibilities  to  evaluate  the  value  of  ICT  in  education,  taking  as  starting  point  existing  evaluation  models.  These  are  adapted  for  the  education  domain,  supported  with  case  evidence  from  individual  solutions  (consisting  of  hard‐  and/or  software)  currently  offered  to  educational  institutions.  These  range  from  software  applications to infrastructure solutions. A guiding frame for the impact evaluation is constructed for different stakeholders  making  decisions  on  ICT  deployment.  The  research  method,  design  science  (DS)  applied  here,  supports  an  effort  that  requires collaboration of different fields of research in both education and in information systems (IS). In this study, the  reference  discipline  is  the  IS  field  of  inquiry,  and  it  adds  to  the  knowledge  of  IS  in  education  domain  with  proven  approaches for ICT value evaluation.     Keywords: value of IS, ICT impact, education, design science, DSRM  

1. Introduction The  problem  addressed  in  this  study  is  the  evaluation  of  software  based  solutions  (information  systems,  IS)  offered for the domain of learning and education. The research on learning technologies has both tradition,  and  a  lively  current  discussion,  around  concepts  like  e‐Learning  or  the  more  recent  variety  m‐Learning,  the  technology  enhanced  learning  (TEL,  especially  in  Europe,  Duval&Klamma  2008),  coming  up  the  e‐Education  especially in the context of developing economies but in general giving a broader view and putting emphasis  on the institutional aspect instead a single classroom.      New  developments  in  software,  systems  and  devices  (hardware)  and  their  applications  have  sooner  or  later  found  their  way  also  into  the  practices  of  the  education  domain.  This  seems  typically  to  be  driven  by  the  enthusiasm of both individual teachers and pioneering institutions (market pull) but also market push (Phaal et  al. 2004) by solution developers. As a key problem area, found at a joint event Summit on TEL Innovation and  TEL Futures (organized by the TELMap www.telmap.org project with two other EU initiatives: Visir http://visir‐ network.eu/ and HoTEL http://hotel‐project.eu/) is the lack of large scale adoption of ICT in education. All of  these EU funded activities delve into this problem, and the challenge of turning the now existing technology  potential  into  the  21st  century  education  environment.  However,  another  point  emphasized  is,  that  despite  heavy  investments  in  ICT  R&D  at  the  EU  level,  and  also  national  engagement  in  equipping  educational  institutions,  the  ICT  in  teaching  and  learning  are  diffused  too  hesitantly  to  become  mainstream.  If  regular  educational institutions still operate to the most part in the ways of past millennium, how can they be turned  into flexible environments playing the new game of the social computing and cloud services era? A national  project, SysTech http://www.systechlearning.fi/?lng=en is studying new solutions for education to support this  change.  Putting  emphasis  on  the  impact  and  value  co‐created  by  technical  solutions  and  pedagogical  enhancements might advance both new solutions and the mainstreaming of mature technologies.     Learning  technologies  are  deployed  in  other  settings  as  well  (e.g.  by  employers  at  workplaces,  commercial  training providers etc.), but here, we think of a European setting where education institutions, mostly run by  public governments make decisions on their ICT assets and procurement. We especially focus on the tertiary  level,  and  aim  at  developing  recommendations  for  higher  education  institutions  (HEIs).  However,  these  insights  for  the  stakeholders  can  be  applied  to  all  institutional  education.  The  digital  literate  generations  enrolling are welcomed, but institutions are puzzled with the choices of technology and application, and under  the  limitation  of  diminishing  public  funding.  This  study  aims  at  giving  a  frame  for  decision  making  on 

137


Mirja Pulkkinen  institutional  ICT  developments,  and  is  a  reflection  of  burning  practical  questions  in  the  education  administrations. 

2. Research method  With this study, the Design Science (DS) paradigm (Hevner et al. 2004) is presented and recommended, since it  adapts  well  to  a  multidisciplinary  effort  which  learning  technologies  require.  The  DS  process  (Peffers  et  al.  2008)  has  similarity  to  the  software  process  (Sommerville  1998),  i.e.  solution  design  and  development.  Research rigor and the interchange with bodies of theoretical knowledge (Hevner et al. 2004) are the distinct  features in research. Knowledge bases in both the domain (e.g. education) and ICT (with sub‐areas) account  for constructing solutions for the domain and can simultaneously be tested and maybe extended. A research  effort leaning of the Peffers et al. (2008) process model (Simon et al. 2011, Pulkkinen&Simon 2013) suggests  the deployment of theoretical frames from different areas of expertise to elicit requirements and to evaluate  the  construction  of  solution  artifacts.  Plainly:  the  teacher  community  develops  their  activity  with  learners,  providing  input  into  the  software  process,  whereas  developers  of  prototypes  use  the  knowledge  but  also  provide  input  into  the  learning  designs.  This  co‐creation  process  takes  the  six  steps  (Figure  1),  and  for  the  present study this process is used for the evaluation framework creation as follows:   ƒ

Problem identification.  A  development  opportunity  is  identified  as  the  research  focus  area.  The  significance of the problem and the potential benefits of the solution provide the motivation to project a  research  effort.  The  problem  discussed  here  is  how  to  capture  and  evaluate  the  impact  of  new  ICT  solutions, of which there are five examples.  

ƒ

Definition of  the  objectives  of  the  solution.  The  projected  solution  combines  knowledge  from  different  disciplines. However, the knowledge bases should be appreciated in their own right. In empirical work, the  observations  are  guided  by  the  theoretical  background  in  the  chosen  discipline.  Both  the  pedagogical  approach  and  the  technology  application  can  be  developed  in  one  effort.  This  study  builds  on  the  IS  evaluation  theories,  and  aims  at  contributing  with  a  domain  specific  evaluation  framework  for  this  discipline.  

ƒ

Design and Development. Supported by the theoretical knowledge from the previous phase, the defined  problem is studied to construct a solution, or to answer the research question(s). Knowledge on existing  tools,  techniques  and  practical  know‐how  (of  the  solution  domain,  and  regarding  the  technologies  deployed) are taken in into the process to enable the solution construction. Sometimes one of the fields  (education or technology) is represented only as theory or as practical knowledge, thus theory building (or  testing)  contributes  only  to  one  discipline.  Here,  the  contribution  is  an  adaptation  of  the  evaluation  models to the education domain.  

ƒ

Demonstration is a step typical for research involving software development. At this phase, a prototype  solution  is  demonstrated  for  the  target  audience  (or  a  substitute),  and  it  is  ensured  that  with  the  theoretical starting points, and with the selected techniques and tools as well as practical knowledge, it is  possible to build a functioning solution. Here, the IS evaluation framework is demonstrated by testing it  against the five solutions under study.    

ƒ

Evaluation phase gives feedback on the solution constructed, and validates the theoretical developments  if such occur in the undertaking. Evaluation of a constructed solution is different from the evaluation of  created  new  knowledge.  A  software  application  (prototype)  is  best  evaluated  by  real  users,  but  the  evaluation of a theoretical construct is evaluated in a peer review and in follow‐up research.    

ƒ

Communication. To  qualify  as  research,  both  the  process  and  the  outcome  are  reported  in  discipline  specific way, bringing out the line of argumentation of the chosen discipline. 

The iterative process can be triggered at different starting points: Problem, objective, design and development,  and  evaluation  centered  approaches.  The  process  is  iterative  and  encourages  an  incremental  approach.  Collaborative research efforts by mixed teams of education and IS experts are guided by this process model to  elicit new insight for their respective disciplines (Pulkkinen & Simon 2013). Innovations thrive at the boundary  of  communities  of  practice,  but  an  often  forgotten  aspect  is  that  knowledge  thrives  within  (not  across)  a  knowledge  community.  Communities  should  have  the  opportunity  to  deepen  knowledge  prior  to  exchange  with  another  community  (Boland  &  Tenkasi  1995).  Prerequisite  is  new  specialist  knowledge,  but  interplay  between communities makes an ecosystem for innovations.  

138


Mirja Pulkkinen 

Figure 1: Design science research method (DSRM) process model (Peffers et al. 2008) 

3. Phase 1 problem area  The  problem  area  is  the  question  of  technology  selection  for  acquisition  and  development  of  overall  ICT  capability in educational institutions. The present study arises from twofold need. The TELMap project sets the  task to elicit recommendations to HEIs. TELMap target is to construct a technology roadmap (Phaal et al. 2004)  method for education sector. The question:   ƒ

How to  make  decisions  on  ICT  developments  for  HEI  technology  roadmap:  select  products/services,  prioritize developments?  

A national project called SysTech, aims at systemic research and development of education technologies, nine  ICT providers as project partners offer solutions for different levels, primary to higher education. In search for  (positive) ICT impacts, the question to ask is:   ƒ

How to define the value or benefit of the solution in use for educational institutions?  

This study focuses on the SysTech work package on impact evaluation, so we leave out questions covered in  e.g.  the  WP  on  user  experience  (UX),  operatin  at  the  individual  level  while  the  focus  in  this  study  is  the  organizational  impact.  Collaboration  with  the  experts  of  the  education  domain  (pedagogy,  didactics  and  educational  institution  administration)  –  is  a  general  requirement  in  impact  studies.  However,  information  systems  (IS)  knowledge  provides  the  foundation  for  impact  evaluation.  The  solutions  may  require  new  approaches,  think  of  e.g.  a  game  solution  or  an  evaluation  with  an  e‐portfolio.  Thus  there  are  several  knowledge communities (Earl 2001) who should contribute and also build their knowledge for the evaluation  of a solution reflected on their knowledge of the domain field.      In an institutional setting, software is to most part not used in isolation, but as part of the ICT assets and their  management. Thus the information management (IM, also an IS sub‐discipline) is the main user of the targeted  Framework for ICT evaluation in educational institutions. The benefit from a new procurement depends among  other  things  on  the  already  existing  systems,  covering  a  number  of  functionalities.  This  overview  is  largely  missing in learning technology studies, that tend to look at narrow scopes with one system at a time, rather  than considering the enterprise architecture (Bernard 2005) of the institution. The analysis frame suggested as  a  result  opens  a  research  agenda  for  an  enterprise  architecture  (EA)  approach  for  education  solution  evaluation.     As the research questions, we have two sides of the same coin: The educational institution decisions and the  software industry offering. Minting the sides together is the user experience, offering tools and techniques to  elicit  the  utility,  usefulness  and  usability  of  the  offered  solutions  and  their  fit  for  the  field  of  application  (Bannister 2001). However, before the choices, justifications for a new asset should be there.  

4. Problem definition, theoretical starting points   The  prevalent  emerging  ICT  trends  with  maybe  the  most  impact  and  proposed  value  for  organizational  ICT  currently are the cloud services and social computing. Especially distance education has been a forerunner in 

139


Mirja Pulkkinen  the  use  of  Internet  services.  Universities  were  among  first  institutions  to  develop  global  data  networks  and  VLEs since the 90’s. In pedagogy, this boosted new approaches as well, as networking stimulated e.g. the social  aspects  of  learning.  More  recently,  systems  and  software  for  all  domains  are  undergoing  what  has  been  described a ‘tectonic change’: the emergence of cloud services (Antonopoulos & Gillam 2010). These enable  both individuals and enterprises to access over portals sophisticated application functionalities without initial  implementation  cost.  Enabled  by  growing  bandwidths,  network  transfer  capacities,  as  well  as  large  scale  computing  capabilities  the  users  may  rely  on  SaaS  (software  as  a  service)  solutions.  Instead  of  licensed  software  running  on  in‐house  data  centers,  enterprises  may  hire  capacities  (infrastructure  as  a  service,  IaaS  and  computing  platforms  as  a  service,  PaaS)  paying  only  per  usage  of  capacity  they  need  (Figure  2).  Communication  and  group  work  support  functionalities  come  usually  with  the  cloud  services,  which  the  education  domain  embraces.  However,  for  the  evaluation  of  these,  or  alternatives  needs  a  systematic  approach. It already happened, that only after purchasing tablets for whole age groups, a school finds out that  their WiFi does not handle the network traffic: a failure of managing interplay between the levels.    Whereas the cloud represents the technological facet, at the application side the new developments in ICT are  summarized as the Web 2.0 phenomenon (Andersson 2007), or social computing. The service consumers make  use  of  the  services  that  provide  support  for  distributed  groups,  a  key  enhancement  for  education.  New  behaviors  emerge  with  the  technology  enablers.  Cloud  services  and  web  platforms  enable  easy  networking,  sharing  and  publishing.  With  a  myriad  of  portable  devices,  cloud  services,  platforms,  learning  games  are  in  offering, but public sector funding is shrinking. Evaluation of them is crucial.  

Figure 2: Cloud stack simplified: Service types (Khasnabish et al. 2010, Antonopoulos&Gillam 2010)  When  planning  developments,  the  value,  i.e.  desirable  impact  of  the  ICT  capability  created  (Melville  et  al.  2004),  should  be  established.  This  is  (or  should  be)  a  prerequisite  for  any  procurement  or  service  contract.  Moreover, there should be a roadmap for concerted, stepwise development of activities and the needed ICT  developments to support them. To capture the mechanisms how impact is realized and measured requires an  analysis of the activities and their development prospects.      ICT  impact  models  have  been  created  to  capture  the  generated  business  value,  and  how  measuring  the  financial balance of the value and the involved cost. Weill and Broadbent (1998) model for the measuring of  the  value  of  an  ICT  investment  shows  the  dependencies  of  diverse  ICT  assets,  and  highlight  the  difficulty  to  single out one of them to determine value. The cloud stack (Figure 2) helps to interpret the model (Figure 3),  as  the  service  conceptualizations  correlate  with  the  representation  of  different  levels  of  assets.  ICT  infrastructure  and  applications  bring  value  to  individual  users,  user  groups  and  the  whole  organization  only  through use in the organizational activities (Soh & Markus 1995, Ward and Peppard 2002, Bannister 2001). The  measures for value in the capability level of the ICT evaluation model deal mostly with cost of implementation  and  roll‐out  in  organization  as  well  as  foreseen  cost  of  maintenance.  Any  adoption  of  a  novel  technology  implies  use  of  resources  (Melville  et  al.20014).  An  approximation  can  be  elicited  by  looking  at  Total  Cost  of 

140


Mirja Pulkkinen  Ownership (TCO, Mutschler et al. 2007) models, which suggest several cost points in the context of ICT related  solution  deployment.  To  a  TCO  sum  resources  are  taken  that  may  in  given  contexts  be  even  scarcer  than  money:  The  human  resource  development  for  use  and  maintenance,  time  required  etc.  The  more  diversity  there is in the systems portfolio, the more resource goes into maintenance of a number of systems instead the  few necessary with sufficient functionality. With cloud services, a marketing argument is that no investment  into infrastructure is needed. However, if an infrastructure is in place, fees for new level 2 SaaS are simply an  additional cost, and no tier 1 costs are reduced.  

Figure 3: ICT value in organizations (Weill & Broadbent 1998)  The operative level (Level 3) and performance of individuals (Level 4) of an area of activity creates the actual  value that can be supported and enhanced by ICT assets. Levels 1 and 2 are a prerequisite, but the value is  created at the third and fourth, in other words in the use, quite as proposed by Soh & Markus (1995). This is  where the institution is carrying out its mission. The way to analyze the activities is to model the activity as e.g.  business  processes  that  allow  analyzing  and  measuring  how  resources  are  turned  into  outcomes  in  the  activities.  In  an  educational  institution,  there  may  be  other  aspects  that  are  looked  at  in  relation  to  technologies, but learning, a concept that is assigned a myriad of facets (Ford 2004) remains the core.     Institutional development means change at this level: Change in the way how processes are understood and  executed  to  enhance  the  activity  and  outcomes,  or  the  student/learner  activity  and  all  direct  and  indirect  support for it (activity of teacher/facilitator and the administration). 

5. Solution design and development   The  next  DSRM  step  is  the  artifact  construction  to  guide  the  evaluation  of  ICT  solutions  at  educational  institutions. To capture and evaluate ICT value (i.e. desirable impact on organizational activities and goals), the  institution needs to point where in their activities the ICT artifact (an IS, software system or application) the  impact  should  appear,  to  be  able  to  know  what  indicators  to  measure.  For  this  phase,  besides  theoretical  knowledge,  we  also  take  knowledge  of  the  domain  and  of  the  practical  knowledge  to  create  the  solution  (Pfeffers  et  al  2008).  In  an  investigation  of  HEI  activity,  four  main  areas  of  activity  (process  areas)  were  established for the respective ICT support affordances (Simon et al. 2011). Theories of organization studied for  enterprise  ICT  management  discern  three  types  of  decision  making  (Bernard,  2005:51):  institutional,  (operations)  management  and  the  (practical)  operation  itself.  The  following  table  (Table  1)  lists  the  activity  areas,  their  meaning  at  the  organization  levels.  The  ICT  support  functionalities  established  in  educational  technologies  (Levy  et  al.  2003)  are  in  the  last  column.  The  main  activity  areas  in  evaluating  ICT  benefit  realization  (value)  are  the  functions  performed  in  institutional  education.  The  indicators  for  the  impact  of  a 

141


Mirja Pulkkinen  new ICT solution implementation must be derived from these areas. Table 1 shows the areas by organizational  level and the system or software functionality to support the area. The areas explained:     Planning learning: Going through the above mentioned levels, this means setting up a learning opportunity at  the  institution  level,  i.e.  a  curriculum,  broken  down  to  learning  units  (courses),  which  is  then  planned  as  an  instantiation by a teacher in as a series of classes, exercises, study materials etc. The student is, following the  guidelines of the chosen target degree and curriculum, planning the courses to take, the exams to take, the  assignments to write etc.     Learning and learning facilitation activities which are mostly carried out by the students and teachers in the  settings planned in the curricula and learning units, and also supervision and guidance. The institution side of  the  activity  can  be  summarized  as  ‘facilitating  learning’.  (Levy  et  al.  2003:  Course  materials,  reference  materials, other components; “delivery” of learning units; evaluation at learning unit level; student and tutor  “feedback”)     Evaluation  and  assessment.  At  the  institutional  level,  the  evaluation  means  managerial  control  and  quality  management.  In  teaching  and  learning,  it  is  besides  assessment  of  student  achievements,  also  the  students  giving feedback on teaching and the institutional arrangements.     Administrative  activities  entail  managing  the  student  life  cycle  information  from  application  to  degree  certificate: student selection and enrollment to curriculum programs, managing the student information and  administrative guidance.    For  the  education  domain,  the  due  diligence  is  to  establish  and  evaluate  the  current  state  of  enterprise  architecture (Bernard 2005). The recommendation to give e.g. HEIs are the following questions:   ƒ

What is presently in their systems (and technology) portfolio?  

ƒ

Do the existing assets support all main activity areas sufficiently (to be analyzed more detailed)?  

ƒ

Do the systems support information flows between the activities? I.e., when admission is granted, and a  student’s  information  entered  into  a  database,  is  it  accessible  by  other  systems  (e.g.  LMS,  VLEs,  other  learning solutions like online games) as well?  

ƒ

Does the achievement information pile up to be accessible at a glance in a LMS? 

ƒ

What is the required resource to run and maintain the current systems?  

ƒ

And what  is  the  short,  mid,  and  long  term  investment  prospect  for  infrastructure  and  platforms,  what  targets and priorities guide the development roadmap?  

ƒ

Is there a need for in‐house data center or could all‐round cloud services be the solution?  

ƒ

Are the  users  left  free  choice  between  free  (i.e.  advertisement  funded)  Web  2.0  services  with  no  institutional guidelines and information security policy?  

Some learning  management  systems  (LMS)  or  learning  platforms  support  all  four  of  the  activity  areas  from  planning  to  evaluation  including  the  communication  (Computer  mediated  communications,  CMC)  functions  (Levy et al. 2003), but there may be several LMS or other software for a part of these functions.     Building  capabilities  in  ICT,  the  institution  must  take  into  consideration  all  activity  areas,  the  application  portfolio, and analyze gaps in the system support (seamless flow and accessibility of information). Secondly,  the  technology  enablers  should  be  considered:  New  solution  procurement,  renewal  of  solutions  (enhancing  maintenance measures), cloud service use.    Feasible  solutions  should  be  considered  to  be  implemented  in  the  order  of  priority,  which  is  derived  again  from  the  analysis  of  the  activities.  The  interplay  of  the  areas  (administration,  planning,  and  carrying  out  learning and support activities) should be kept in mind. A guiding model is suggested to relate the outcomes  (impact on the activities and their results) to the resources spent for the solution.       

142


Mirja Pulkkinen  Table 1: Categories of education activities and functions of supporting systems   Level of organi‐ zational activity ‐>    Main activity area 

Institutional level    Educational  institution  management  Set up a learning  opportunity:  Curriculum, learning  units 

“Operations management”  Learning facilitation  / (Teacher) 

Operation   Learning / Study  (Student) 

Elements of  educational  systems (Levy et  al. 2003) 

Instantiation of a  learning unit, series  of class activities,  plan the materials  and resources 

Curriculum design    Design and  specification of  the VLE 

Learning support /  learning activities 

Facilitating the  teaching delivery     

Assessment Evaluation 

Evaluating the  operations (teaching,  learning  achievements at  general level)  Student data account  management  Administrative  guidance and  supervision 

Facilitating learning:  delivery of learning  units (teaching)  feedback,  supervising, tutoring      Assessment at  learning unit level 

Planning what  opportunities to  take, sign up for  units (relevance  grows with level of  education)  Learning activities 

Planning learning 

Administrative activities 

Updating student  achievement  information 

Being assessed,  giving feedback 

Manage personal  account of  achievements 

VLE Course materials,  Reference  materials,  Other  components,  CMC  Evaluation  Feedback 

(Not covered in  Levy et al. 2003):  E.g. Student data  management 

6. Demonstration and evaluation of the construct     In this phase, the construct that is based on the theoretical knowledge, the matrix presented above, and the  know‐how for organizational ICT  management  and  evaluation,  is demonstrated  against  real  solutions.  These  represent “the other side of the coin”, i.e. the software solutions and services offered to the education domain  market. Five types of software solutions:   ƒ

Learning games (offered both offline and online),  

ƒ

A portfolio and training support system,  

ƒ

Enhanced LMS built on MS Sharepoint and MS office tools  

ƒ

A mobile publication system 

ƒ

A learning solution based on GPS (for e.g. the study of the environment).  

To define the value proposition of the solutions, and the impact measurements for each of these solutions, the  value creation/measurement chain is suggested (Figure 4) derived from the model by Soh and Markus (1995)  further developed by Ward&Peppard (2002) and Bannister (2001). The value indicators should emerge from  the  activity  (administrative,  learning  facilitation,  learning  in  the  areas  planning,  executing,  evaluating  and  administering) presented in Table 1.     In Table 2, the software solutions studied are assigned to these areas.  Benefits generally realize in three areas,  for which relevant indicators should be established.      1) Resource related. A solution may make tasks redundant, or reduce the needed resource (e.g. time, effort  spent by teacher or administrative staff) for a task; e.g. automated data collection and processing.    2) Quality related. It is improving the quality of the information and its accessibility (e.g. student information  and achievement records, enables enhanced data analytics on student data for quality management purposes)    

143


Mirja Pulkkinen  3) Enhancing learning. It is impacting the learning and learning facilitation, improving the student activity (e.g.  the use of social computing features, publishing features etc.). This type of benefit relates to the ‘soft values’  included in the TCO models, meaning perceived intangible benefit of the system that makes it preferred by the  users.  

Figure 4: Measuring the value proposition of educational ICT assets: Indicators derived from activity  Table 2 shows a tentative placement of the solutions studied into the activity areas at the organizational levels  as defined in Table 1. To revise their systems portfolio, an institution should develop their institution specific  instantiation  of  this  scheme.  Functionality  of  systems  and  applications  has  to  be  known  for  the  analysis.  A  systems portfolio tool helps in that.     In  the  SysTech  project,  we  have  the  case  of  novel  solutions  presented  for  the  domain.  The  solutions  introducing  further  functionality  improve  the  system  performance.  This  has  been  indicated  in  brackets  ()  in  Table  2:  as  an  example,  if  the  “Platform  solution”  hosts  public  pages,  where  the  learner  may  obtain  information and apply for admission, it supports the student/learner in their ‘Planning learning’ phase. If it also  had  a  functionality  to  support  the  teacher’s  preparations  of  the  learning  delivery,  it  supports  as  well  the  learning facilitating staff at this phase.    With  a  systematic  analysis,  the  new  features  enabled  by  technologies  as  cloud  software  and  Web  2.0  applications  can  be  analyzed  in  the  education  context.  If  e.g.  covering  data  analysis  feature  is  implemented  and  the  solutions  developed  to  support  interoperability,  future  assessment  of  learner  achievements  might  take place implicitly, by tracing the learner activity from i) games, ii) the GPS based learning solution, besides  the assessment with a iii) portfolio tool and the records of iv) a LMS. For the school administration, the data  analysis  features  of  the  online  platform  tool  might  enable  multi‐faceted  analytics  of  the  activities  in  the  organization, supporting the administration and management. Learning may also be subtle: networking with  online  games  could  enable  the  assessment  of  teamwork  and  social  skills.  Activity  logs  provide  evidence  for  training these.      The  constructed  framework  gives  an  initial  answer  to  the  problems  of  the  educational  institution  and  the  solution  provider.  However,  this  is  only  a  beginning,  and  a  closer  study  of  the  activity  areas  as  education  inquiry to provide the insights what to look for in a single solution. For the holistic evaluation of an institution’s  ICT assets the construct can be used as a guiding frame.     It also shows where there is innovation potential as opportunity to enhance the software with new features or  to  improve  existing  ones.  The  conception  of  new  software  proposed  for  education  domain  aims  at  more  efficient or effective resource use, improvement of the quality of outcome, or enhancing the user experience  for e.g. improved motivation extra‐curricular learning. 

7. Conclusions   Value and impact of information systems is as necessary to evaluate in the education domain as it is evaluated  in  commercial  organizations.  A  systematic  way  to  evaluate  the  ICT  support  for  an  educational  institution  is  suggested in this study, with a constructed evaluation scheme to analyze the coverage of the ICT support for  the activities of an educational institution. Much further work is needed, thus the tentative scheme provides  also a research agenda for focused studies of domain specific functionalities and features in software provided 

144


Mirja Pulkkinen  for  different  activity  areas.  New  ways  to  support  assessment  across  solutions  was  taken  as  an  example  of  enhancement with great potential.   Table 2: The solutions studied and the area of value creation   Level of organi‐ zational activity /   

Institutional level   

Main activity area 

Educational institution  management 

Planning learning 

Platform solution 

Learning facilitation  / Teaching  The learning  facilitators 

Platform solution 

Learning / Study   

Educational systems  / functionalities  thereof 

The learners 

Public pages on  platform for study  planning 

Administrative tools    Design and  specification of the  VLE 

Learning support / 

Platform solution 

Offline & 

Offline & 

learning activities 

Mobile publication 

online games 

online games 

Mobile publication  solution 

GPS solution 

Portfolio solution  GPS solution 

VLEs / Learning  platforms / LMS    [External]  material  repositories,  CMC 

Games Evaluation and  assessment 

(Platform solution,  with data analysis  function) 

Portfolio solution  (Embedded  assessment  functionality: 

(Platform solution,  with feedback  functionality) 

Evaluation &  Feedback  functionalities 

The platform  solution; 

as part of VLE/LMS 

Offline & online  games, GPS learning  solution) 

Portfolios

Administrative activities 

Platform solution 

(Portfolio solution,  with student data  administration  functionality) 

(Portfolio solution,  with student data  administration  functionality) 

Administrative databases /  LMS  administrative  functionalities  Portfolio  management  systems 

The potential benefits of cloud services, Web 2.0 applications and learning games should be evaluated as part  of the ICT asset management. An enterprise approach would greatly help to simplify and rationalize the ICT  support at educational institutions.   

Acknowledgements   This  paper  was  firstly  inspired  by  the  TELMap  project  (EU)  and  I  wish  to  thank  Vana  Kamtsiou  for  inspiring  discussions. Secondly, the SysTech project (Finnish National Agency for Technology and Innovation) for funding  this research and the impact evaluation team for giving the idea for this study.  

145


Mirja Pulkkinen 

References Antonopoulos, N. & Gillam, L., (Eds., 2010) Cloud Computing Principles, Systems and Applications. Springer.   Andersson, P. (2007) What is Web 2.0? Ideas, technologies and implications for education.  JISC Technology and Standards  Watch, Feb. 2007.   Bannister, F. (2001) Dismantling the silos: extracting new value from IT investments in public administration. Information  Systems Journal. Volume 11, Issue 1, pages 65–84.  3 Bernard, S. (2005) An Introduction to Enterprise Architecture EA . Linking Business and Technology. Author House  publishing.  Boland, R. and Tenkasi, R. (1995) Perspective making and perspective taking in communities of knowing. Organization  Science Vol 6 No 4, pp. 350‐372.  Duval, E. and Klamma, R. (2008) Guest Editorial: Special Issue on EC‐TEL 2007 January‐March 2008 (Vol. 1, No. 1) pp. 9‐10.  In: IEEE Transactions on Learning Technologies. IEEE Computer Society Press.  Earl, M. (2001). Knowledge management strategies: Toward a taxonomy. Journal of Management Information Systems,  18(1), 215–233.  Ford, N. (2004) Towards a model of learning for educational informatics. Journal of Documentation Vol. 60 No. 2, 2004 pp.  183‐225.  Khasnabish, B., Chu, J., Ma, S., Meng, Y., So, N., & Unbehagen, P. (2010). Cloud reference framework. draft‐khasnabish‐ cloud‐reference‐framework‐00 IETF. Retrieved from http://datatracker.ietf.org/doc/draft‐khasnabish‐cloud‐ reference‐framework/    Levy, P., Ford, N., Foster, J., Madden, A., Miller, D., Nunes, M.B., McPherson, M. and Webber S. (2003) Educational  informatics: an emerging research agenda. Journal of Information Science, 29 (4) 2003, pp. 298–310.   Melville, N., Kraemer, K. & Gurbaxani, V. (2004). Information Technology and Organizational Performance: An Integrative  Model of IT Business Value. MIS Quartely , 28 (2), 283‐322.  Mutschler, B., Zarvic, N. & Reichert, M. (2007). A Survey on Economic‐driven Evaluations of Information Technology.  University of Twente Publications.  Simon, B., Pulkkinen, M., Totschnig, M. and Kozlov D. (2011) The ICOPER Reference Model Specification, D7.3b of the  ICOPER project, online at www.icoper.org   Soh, C. & Markus, M. (1995). How IT Creates Business Value: A Process Theory Synthesis. Proceedings of the sixteenth  International Conference on Information Systems (s. 29‐41). Amsterdam: AIS  Sommerville, I. (1998) Software Engineering. Addison‐Wesley.   Ward, J. and J. Peppard (2002) Strategic Planning of Information Systems. Wiley&Sons.    Weill, P. & Broadbent, M. (1998). Leveraging the New Infrastructure: How Market Leaders Capitalize on Information  Technology. Boston, Harvard Business School Press. 

146


Swedish and Indian Teams: Consensus Culture Meets Hierarchy  Culture in Offshoring  Minna Salminen‐Karlsson  Uppsala University, Uppsala, Sweden  Minna.Salminen@gender.uu.se    Abstract: This article describes how the employees and managers in the Swedish and Indian offices of a European‐based  MNC  work  towards  new  governance  models  in  IT  offshoring  relations.  The  focus  is  on  the  differences  in  organizational  cultures  between  Sweden  and  India  and  their  impact  on  the  management  of  and  cooperation  within  distributed  teams.  Most  research  on  IT  offshoring  has  been  conducted  on  US–Indian  and  British–Indian  cooperations,  where  the  US  and  British organizational cultures are more similar to the hierarchical Indian one. As a complement to the existing research,  the flat and consensus‐oriented Swedish organizational culture is of particular interest when studying organizational issues  in  IT  offshoring  to  India.  The  empirical  material  consists  of  103  qualitative  interviews  with  employees  and  managers  at  different levels in the Swedish and Indian offices of a European‐based MNC. The results show that in addition to problems  commonly faced in IT offshoring, such as resistance to offshoring and language problems (accentuated in the non‐English‐ speaking  context  of  Sweden),  the  differences  in  organizational  cultures  caused  particular  problems.  Swedish  managers  were used to delegating work to subordinates who work  independently towards an internalized goal, while Indian team  members expected more guidance and control. As their proven management methods did not function well in the Indian  context, Swedish managers needed to invent a management style that worked. The differences in the cultures also led to  conflicts  concerning  recruitment  and  attrition  issues.  However,  the  Swedish  company  culture,  where  the  Swedish  team  members  viewed  the  Indian  team  members  as  colleagues,  facilitated  mutual  organizational  learning  which  led  to  satisfactory  cooperation.  This  article  uses  the  framework  of  Wenger  (1998)  to  explain  1)  what  problems  members  of  communities in practice in the consensus‐oriented Swedish organizational culture encounter when cooperating with India,  and the solutions they find and 2) what kind of prerequisites are needed for an on‐site team of ‘old‐timers’ to be willing to  integrate offshore ‘newcomers’ for cooperative work and transfer of tacit knowledge.    Keywords: organizational culture, organizational learning, management styles, ICT offshoring, India, Sweden  

1. Introduction This article looks at the cooperation between Swedish and Indian teams in one multinational IT company in  the light of social learning theory, more precisely Wenger’s theory of learning in communities of practice.  Swedish  and  Indian  company  cultures  are  vastly  different.  Swedish  company  culture  is  characterized  by  equality,  qualitative  assessment  of  performance,  consensus  orientation,  conflict  avoidance,  teamwork,  ‘soft’  management  (which  means  not  giving  orders  but  trusting  the  employees  to  act  on  their  own  sense  of  responsibility) and control that is more implicit than explicit. (Gustavsson, 1995; Wieland, 2011). Wieland finds  ‘lagom’ (moderation) to be an important characteristic of theSwedish company culture.According to Wieland,  ‘lagom’  implies  that  the  employees  take  care  of  each  other’s  well‐being  and  resist  managerial  pressures  by  conforming  to  this  cultural  norm.  Styhre,  Börjesson  and  Wickenberg  (2006)  exemplify  the  special  characteristics of Swedish company culture in describing the reactions of the Swedish employees in two cases  where Swedish companies merged with Anglo‐American ones. The main concerns of the employees were the  perceived  emphasis  on  top  management  control,  the  perceived  lack  of  trust  by  management  towards  employees,  the  inequality  of  co‐workers,  the  short‐term  financial  focus  and  the  individualist  culture,  which  were seen as being in opposition to the collectivist Swedish organizational culture. In these circumstances the  Swedish  employees  strived  to  preserve  their  personal  responsibility,  their  pride  in  their  work  and  their  cooperative working methods.    In contrast, Indian company culture is described as hierarchical and paternalistic. Upadhaya (2009), Matthew,  Ogbonna  and  Harris  (2012)  and  Gertsen  and  Zølner  (2012)  all  describe  how  the  multinational  companies  working  in  India  do  not  openly  adhere  to  traditional  hierarchical  company  models,  but  in  fact  work  in  a  controlling  and  paternalistic  way.  In  particular,  Gertsen  and  Zølner  describe  how  the  company  value  of  employee empowerment in a Danish headquarters was interpreted in the Indian office: while the Danish vision  was independent employees acting on their own responsibility, in the Indian context the vision was translated  into  managers  fostering,  nurturing  and  empowering  their  employees  in  a  clearly  hierarchical  relationship.  Matthew, Ogbonna and Harris maintain that organizational rhetoric and even organizational values in software  companies are a mixture of modern Western management techniques and traditional Indian company cultures 

147


Minna Salminen‐Karlsson of  hierarchy,  paternalism  and  rigidity.  Upadhaya,  however,  takes  a  more  critical  stance  and  asserts  that,  in  spite  of  an  empowerment  rhetoric  and  concerns  for  employee  welfare,  employees  believe  that  ‘“traditional  Indian”  organizational  culture  persists  in  the  form  of  hierarchical  structures,  bureaucratic  mentality  and  “feudal” relationships’ (p. 7).  Noorderhaven and Harzing (2009) stress that a social interaction model is needed to fully explain knowledge  flows between subsidiaries in a multinational corporation, and that valuable learning relationships can emerge  without  explicit  organizational  measures.  The  present  article  agrees  with  their  assertion,  and,  in  contrast  to  their  statistical  study,  this  research  is  based  on  an  interview  study  with  Swedish  and  Indian  teams  in  a  multinational  corporation.  In  the  present  study,  most  mutual  learning  was  discovered  in  teams  which  had  frequent interaction.    Social  learning  models  are  not  often  used  in  research  into  knowledge  flows  in  multinational  enterprises  (Noorderhaven & Harzing, 2009). One of the reasons might be that it is difficult to find true communities of  practice which are geographically dispersed. Case studies of learning and knowledge transfer in IT offshoring  relations deal predominantly with teams where cooperation is problematic (Biró & Fehér, 2005; Cohen & El‐ Sawad, 2007; Hirschfeld, 2004; Kotlarsky, 2008; Sahay, Nicholson & Krishna, 2003). This is often the case, for  example, because of power differences between a Western client and a provider in  a country which from a  Western perspective, at least until recently, has been seen as ‘second’ or ‘third’ world. Many studies deal with  problems that have their origins in power differences and cultural differences—these may be national as well  as  organizational.  The  practical  conclusion  is  often  that  offshoring  requires  a  clear  division  of  tasks  which  should  be  clearly  defined  and  standardized  and  cannot  be  dependent  on  tacit  knowledge  (EU  Foundation,  2004). In contrast, this article agrees with the observation of Sahay, Nicholson and Krishna (2003) that such  standardization  tends  to  create  problems  in  the  different  local  contexts  and  that  standards  do  not  work  without  extensive  communication  and  participation.  Wenger  (1998)  discusses  the  difference  between  reification  and  participation,  where  standards  and  formal  documents  would  represent  reification,  while  a  collaboration consisting of continuous discussion would represent participation. According to Wenger, the one  cannot exist without the other in the life of a community of practice.     While  the  results  of  earlier  research  have put  an  emphasis  mostly  on  reification,  the aim  of  this  paper  is  to  broaden  the  research  on  knowledge  flows  in  multinational  enterprises  by  focusing on  teams  which  perform  successful IT offshoring by relying, to different degrees, on transcontinental participation and transfer of tacit  knowledge. The question to be answered is, what issues do these kinds of virtual teams face in their internal  cooperation and their organizational contexts?  

2. The case: Capsicom teams   Capsicom  (a  pseudonym)  is  a  multinational  IT  company with  headquarters  in  Europe  and  with  thousands  of  employees around the globe. Capsicom entered the Swedish market by acquiring a previously Swedish‐owned  company,  and  now  has  several  local  offices.  The  Swedish  Capsicom  employees  were  confronted  with  offshoring after the acquisition. Sweden offshores almost exclusively to Capsicom’s offices in India.    Four different teams were studied in depth, and interviews were conducted both with managers and with a  number  of  employees  of  different  levels  of  experience,  in  Sweden  and  in  India.  To  get  more  breadth  in  the  sample, Swedish and Indian leaders from four other teams were also included. All in all, 36 people in Swedish  teams and 49 people in Indian teams were interviewed. Five locations in Sweden and two locations in India  were visited. In addition, people in high administrative positions in India, in particular in HR (14 persons), and  people  with  particular  responsibilities  for  the  offshoring  relations  in  Sweden  (4  persons)  were  interviewed,  amounting to a total of 103 interviews at Capsicom. Three researchers were involved in the interviews: one in  India,  one  in  Sweden  and  one  in  both  locations.  The  interviews  in  the  teams  were  based  on  two  different  interview guides: one for the ordinary employees and one for team leaders. The questions were the same in  both locations, though the interviews in Sweden were done in Swedish. The interviews of senior managers in  India and offshoring champions in Sweden did not strictly follow a guide, but were adapted to gain relevant  information from the interviewees’ areas of expertise.     Frequent  discussions  between  the  researchers,  two  with  a  Swedish  and  one  with  an  Indian  background,  provided  insights  into  interesting  issues  and  different  perspectives  already  during  the  interviewing  process. 

148


Minna Salminen‐Karlsson The  interviews  were  transcribed  verbatim  and  coded  using  Atlas.ti  software.  For  this  paper,  a  relevant  selection of the codes and citations were used.    The eight teams followed different offshoring models. This paper focuses on an integrated model where the  Swedish and Indian teams form a common virtual team. This model was found in different forms in Capsicom,  and it seems to have its roots in the culture of the Swedish teams before the acquisition by Capsicom and the  initiation  of  offshoring  on  a  large  scale.  These  geographically  dispersed  teams  not  only  worked  together  by  means of communication technology, but they also strived to do it as if they were located at the same site. An  overall  offshoring  ideology  at  Capsicom  was  to  have  blended  deliveries,  but  the  virtual  teams  in  this  study  learnt that this way of working was not really supported, and in some instances the Capsicom practices did not  address the needs of virtual teams.    These  kinds  of  virtual  teams  can  be  designated  as  ‘communities  of  practice’  according  to  the  definition  of  Wenger,  McDermott  and  Snyder  (2002):  'groups  of  people  who  share  a  concern,  a  set  of  problems,  or  a  passion about a topic, and who deepen their knowledge and expertise in this area by interacting on an ongoing  basis'  (p.  4).  In  this  study,  Capsicom  teams,  which  exhibited  these  characteristics  in  spite  of  being  geographically  dispersed,  are  called  virtual  communities  of  practice,  or  virtual  CoPs.  The  teams  at  Capsicom  exhibited the characteristics to different degrees, and the expression ‘pure virtual CoPs’ is occasionally used to  refer to those teams which best corresponded to the characteristics. 

3. Initiation phase: Creating the community  The initiation of offshoring cooperation is crucial for its further development. The start of offshoring for most  teams  at  Capsicom  was  not  received  favourably;  a  direct  order  came  from  above,  causing  anxiety  and  confusion. However, in the pure virtual CoPs, this situation had been tackled by the team members: after the  initial  confusion,  there  had  been  a  common  engagement  for  handling  the  situation  as  well  as  possible,  including most, if not all, team members. The solution that was agreed on was to include the new members in  India in the team as equal members:  I think the whole team was somewhat doubtful, wondering how this would end, how it would be,  because we had been working so tightly together […]. But, finally, we came up with these ideas, if  we do it this way, so … I think that first we were asking ourselves, how will we solve this, for it  was never a question, how can we avoid this, but we accepted it, after the surprise, and we said,  yes,  but  then  we  have  to  do  it  so  it  will  be  really  good.  And  there  was  this  stubbornness  and  engagement, and now we have to set up communications, and we have to get them here, and we  have to … it must not be some people who sit there far away and write code for us, and we don’t  know what we get, and maybe they don’t know how, no, we must have very tight communication  here.  Aspects such as good personal relationships and trust seem to have been crucial for both knowledge transfer  and  governance.  In  management  recommendations,  relationships  and  trust,  even  if  mentioned,  are  often  overshadowed  by  knowledge  transfer  and  governance  models  (see,  for  example,  Carmel  &  Tjia,  2005).  The  governance  and  knowledge  transfer,  which  satisfied  both  Swedish  and  Indian  members  in  Capsicom  virtual  teams was reached mainly through personal relationships.    In the interviews, the creation of the pure virtual CoP teams was not described as something that emanated  from a team leader, but something that ‘we’ figured out. Most of the Swedish teams in the study had been  working together for a long time, and were relatively ‘tight’ groups. In such situations, there is a considerable  risk  that  the  group  will  want  to  continue  to  be  the  tight  group  and  to  keep  the  new  part  of  the  team  at  a  distance. One explanation for the development at Capsicom can be found in the quotation above: in general,  these teams had the impression that working tightly together was crucial for the quality of the product, and  having people far away would jeopardize that quality. The teams adhered to the particular Swedish informal  and  consensus‐based  organizational  culture  and  saw  teamwork  as  the  natural  and  only  way  to  conduct  successful work, in particular in IT development. Deciding to work in a manner that extended the team and  integrated the newcomers was a solution to the problem created by the order from above to offshore.    The  most  successful  teams  had  obviously  been  functioning  well  before  offshoring.  Setting  up  routines,  acquiring  communication  technology,  and  inviting,  educating  and  entertaining  Indian  colleagues  seems  in  some cases to have become something of a team project. This team effort seemed sometimes to have been 

149


Minna Salminen‐Karlsson met with some resistance. Getting the right technical resources to facilitate tight communication was at times  an initial hurdle. In those teams which managed to get permission to allow all new Indian team members to  visit  Sweden,  both  the  Indians’  understanding  of  Swedish  organizational  culture  and  the  Swedes’  understanding of English was greatly facilitated.    According to Gupta and Govindarajan (2000), motivation to share knowledge between offshoring partners is  often affected by the onshore staff’s anxiety about losing their jobs. Thus, an important condition for creating  virtual  CoPs  was  that  generally  the  employees  were  not  concerned  about  their  own  jobs.  There  were  interviewees who were not happy about offshoring in general taking away jobs from Sweden, but the same  person could express both negative and positive attitudes on different levels:  In  general  I  would  say  that  we  should  give  people  jobs  here  in  Sweden,  and  not  send  jobs  somewhere else, but I also think that we have always done this. Throughout history, and, well,  it’s not the next village we engage now, or the next country, but now it is a country far away, ok. I  would  also  say  that,  in  some  way,  I  mean,  they  provide  their  services  and  they  also  need  something to live from and this is their possibility to grow, so then it’s kind of ok. […]. In a way it’s  much more fun to work with them than with somebody sitting in another city in Sweden. Because  you learn, it’s another reality.  In  the  virtual  CoPs,  many  interviewees  commented  on  how  enriching  it  was  to  work  with  people  living  in  a  different environment. They were not sure that the company gained anything from offshoring, but they had  been  personally  enriched.  Thus,  the  attitude  that  offshoring  is  good  for  the  company  but  bad  for  the  employees  was  turned  around.  There  were  also  several  interviewees  who  viewed  the  global  distribution  of  wealth from the Indian point of view, saying that Indians also had the right to sell their skills.    Problems can be created when two organizational cultures meet and an adaptation process is initiated. In the  Capsicom  teams,  by  the  time  of  the  interviews,  cooperation  had  often  been  running  for  some  time  and  different kinds of team cultures had been developed. The team cultures of the virtual teams, including both  Swedish and Indian employees, were built on the Swedish team culture which had existed before offshoring  and  which  had  typically  relied  heavily  on  informal  communication.  For  example,  being  present  at  the  workplace had been encouraged by the managers and appreciated by the employees in several teams, in spite  of  the  MNC  policy  to  encourage  homeworking.  The  geographical  distance  was  a  constant  problem  for  this  culture, in particular for the Swedes, who compared this experience to the previous state of affairs, where the  team  could  interact  directly  at  the  office.  The  Swedish  managers  and  team  members  indicated  that  the  problem  was  not  that  part  of  the  work  was  in  India,  but  that  the  work  was  outside  the  office;  Swedish  homeworkers or team members sitting in other offices in Sweden were cited as examples of similar problems.  The Swedish teams customarily adapted their schedules so that meetings were scheduled before noon, during  Indian  office  hours,  but  several  Swedish  team  members  missed  the  possibility  in  the  afternoons  of  asking  a  quick question or having more casual discussions with their Indian colleagues. 

4. Learning from cooperation  When the Swedish employees were asked what they had learnt from the offshoring cooperation, the answers  related to three aspects: being more clear and direct in communication, improving their skills in English and  learning about another culture.     The  general  approach  of  the  Swedish  managers  had  been  to  give  their  Indian  team  members  the  same  freedom as their Swedish team members. However, they had learnt to be more specific in their requirements,  asking the Indian team members such direct questions about the progress of the work that might have been  interpreted  as  offensive  in  a  Swedish  context.  The  need  to  be  detailed  and  explicit  with  the  Indian  team  members was described as problematic and but also as a learning experience:  You  know,  when  you  are  in  Sweden,  there  is  consensus  in  the  conference  room,  and  you  have  talked for an hour and everybody gets up and somehow everybody understands what they are  supposed to do. Of course that doesn’t work if you are working with a group who are sitting very  far away and are working in a totally different manner, so I have learnt to be much more explicit.  I have learnt to order people around. To say: do this, and be very clear about it. I had never done  that before offshoring came up, and it was a bit difficult in the beginning, though now I think it  feels quite good. I just say, ´do this’, and that’s it. 

150


Minna Salminen‐Karlsson The comments on language problems followed the same pattern: it had been hard in the beginning, but it was  a useful and rewarding learning experience to use more English at work.    Language  problems  are  one  of  the  major  stumbling  blocks  in  daily  offshoring  cooperations,  even  when  the  client  representatives  are  native  English  speakers.  Cohen  and  El‐Sawad  (2007)  found  that  the  ‘language  barrier’ encountered by the British employees in their case study for the most part did not concern language  at all, however, but cultural positioning and a form of resistance to offshoring.     In  Capsicom,  language  was  seen  as  a  problem  by  the  Swedish  employees.  While  the  problem  could  be  attributed partly to the resistance found by Cohen and El‐Sawad (2007), real problems of understanding were  also  experienced  by  the  Swedes.  Although  the  corporate  language  of  Capsicom  was  English,  many  of  the  employees worked mainly in Swedish with Swedish customers, so daily interaction in English was a problem in  itself.  Even  those  employees  who  felt  confident  about  their  skills  in  English  found  that  the  Indian  pronunciation made it sometimes difficult for them to understand their new colleagues.    Some  teams  solved  the  language  problem  by  interacting  mainly  through  e‐mail.  The  Indian  colleagues  were  not entirely happy with this form of communication, but had learnt that this was the way the Swedes wanted  it. However, in some teams, many people stated that they were happy to have a reason to refresh their English  skills, and asserted that if one was interested enough, the language problems were manageable.    Learning  about  another  culture  was  described  positively  from  the  very  beginning.  The  employees  described  their satisfaction with learning to interact with different kinds of people, their interest in any news from India  in the media and their experiences when they had visited their colleagues in India..     The Indian team members, when asked what they had learnt from the cooperation, mentioned issues related  to working methods, in particular working with less hierarchy, planning the work with realistic estimates, and  job culture.    In her review of Swedish offshoring firms, Hovlin (2006) found that the Swedish self‐image emphasized such  strengths  as  ‘complex  problem‐solving,  teamwork,  management,  knowledge  of  system  operations  etc.’.  A  number  of  the  Swedish  interviewees  in  the  Capsicom  study  also  stated  that  they  had  taught  the  Indians  modern work methods.   We have made them work with modern processes of systems development, like those that have  emerged after the year 2000. … It is important that every employee puts their foot down, every  employee makes time estimates. It’s not the boss who says that this will take three weeks. That  boss doesn’t have the faintest idea, but he says something because he has to say something …  First, you have to time estimate together, and when you start developing, it’s again the developer  who  has  to  say  how  long  it  will  take.  …  And  these  models  lead  to  better  products  and  better  quality.  And  we  have  taught  them  to  work  this  way.  So  they  have  moved  forward  almost  30  years.  This  would  likely  have  been  refuted  by  the  higher‐level  Indian  managers,  who  spoke  positively  about  the  Indian processes of IT development. However, the ordinary Indian team members seemed to partly confirm  the Swedish opinions. For example, one of the Indian interviewees gave this perspective on learning what the  Swedes called modern systems development:  I learnt how to plan the project, how to plan a single task. … how to plan the things, what are the  responsibilities you have. You should know completely what responsibilities you have and when  work comes across, then you should plan before you start.  The non‐hierarchical interaction pattern and the Swedish way of expressing criticism in a soft and sometimes  concealed  manner  were  approaches  that  the  Indian  team  members  appreciated  from  the  start.  They  embraced the model where they could directly contact their Swedish colleagues, instead of getting only single  tasks from an Indian team leader. They did not perceive any problems with the Swedish approach. However, it  took some time before they understood these practices and could react to them in an appropriate way. There  had  been  a  mutual  process,  where  the  Swedes  had  learnt  to  be  more  explicit  and  detailed  in  their  requirements  and  somewhat  more  open  with  their  criticism,  and  the  Indians  had  learnt  to  take  greater 

151


Minna Salminen‐Karlsson responsibility  for  their  work  tasks  and,  to  some  extent,  to  discern  the  edge  that  could  be  concealed  in  the  Swedes’ ‘soft’ criticism. 

5. CoPs, recruitment and attrition   The recruitment of staff was a clear source of conflict between on‐site and offshore employees, with respect  to  power  and ownership.  The  Swedish  team  leaders  and  Swedish  employees  stressed  that,  to  find  the  right  people, they should be allowed to take part in the selection process.  If I’m going to employ somebody or hire somebody, of course I interview them, for, I mean, one  person is not like another. I need to have somebody who can speak my language and I have to  know that he knows how to do what he has to do. … But there was this attitude that if you are  going to have somebody Indian, you just take one off the shelf.   The  general  attitude  among  the  Indian  HR  managers  was  that  on‐site  personnel  should  stipulate  skill  specifications  and  that  HR  would  supply  the  team  with  a  qualified  person  from  the  Indian  job  market.  For  Swedish  on‐site  managers,  listing  detailed  qualifications  was  not  only  a  new  exercise,  but  the  Swedish  terminology was not always understood by the Indian HR managers. This process did not work well.     In  a  hierarchical  organizational  culture,  personal  characteristics  are  not  that  important,  as  long  as  the  work  gets done, while in a virtual team, personal characteristics such as taking responsibility and being proactive,  helpful and communicative are important as well as the technical skills. The fact that virtual teams consist of  persons rather than competencies was often not taken into account in the recruitment and staffing practices  of the Indian offices.    In the most successful CoP teams, the Swedes had been able to take part in the selection of the key members  of the Indian team. However, later hiring was often left for the Indian team leader to manage, after he and his  selection criteria had been influenced by the Swedish experience. These team leaders did not always follow  the standard staffing procedures of the HR department, but identified people they thought would best suit the  team. In this way, the virtual team felt that the new employees were recruited according to the team’s needs,  and the HR department did not have to deal with direct interference from on‐site.    The  Indian  attitude  towards  attrition  was  also  a  cause  of  conflict.  Again,  it  was  an  issue  of  power  and  ownership, and this was of more concern to the Indian managers than the issue of recruitment.    Some of the managers in Sweden feel that X, Y, Z resources belong to me in India. If they do not  do the work or if they leave and go then my quality suffers. My point is, you offshore some work  to  us.    Now,  whether  X,  Y,  Z,  is  doing  it  or  A,  B,  C  is  doing  it,  it  is  none  of  your  concern.  If  the  quality is bad talk about it, … we will set right the quality, but don’t assign it to a person saying if  the person is gone, my job is not happening. That is not the right way of positioning things.  The Swedish managers of virtual CoPs viewed this matter differently. They were not simply offshoring some  work to India; they had Indian subordinates with whom they had frequent contact. As a result of this attitude,  they felt a responsibility for and an ownership of the team members. For them it was of foremost importance  whether the work was done by X, Y, Z or by A, B, C.      However, there were also practical aspects to the problem. For example, an onsite manager could pay for a  sizeable salary increase to prevent a key person from leaving the team, while the Indian office had a salary and  promotion  system,  and  diverging  too  much  from  it  would  be  problematic  for  the  organization.  The  Indian  office  also  had  a  practice  of  encouraging  rotation  between  teams  to  provide    professional  development  opportunities for, in particular, their junior employees. This, in turn, led the Swedish team leaders to believe  that  the  attrition  rate  for  the  company  was  much  higher  than  it  actually  was—a  low  13%,  which  the  Indian  managers proudly mentioned in the interviews.    The Indian managers asserted that the quality of the products delivered did not suffer from attrition, that they  had learnt to handle attrition in relation to production and that they had back‐ups and structured knowledge  transfer.  This  was  not  the  opinion  of  the  Swedish  managers  working  in  virtual  CoPs,  where  the  reified  and  codified  knowledge  was  only  part  of  all  the  knowledge  that  the  team  used,  while  the  rest  was  acquired  by  participation  in  daily  interactions.  Losing  a  person  meant  that  another  person  had  to  be  introduced  by  ‘working alongside experts and being involved in increasingly complicated tasks’ (Li et al., 2011). 

152


Minna Salminen‐Karlsson Transferring tacit knowledge is impeded by staff turnover (Hirschfeld, 2004). This was not seen as an issue in  the Indian offices, which viewed themselves as supplying explicit and definable competences, while it was a  major problem for virtual CoPs.  

6. Conclusions As  communities  of  practice,  the  Capsicom  teams  reflected  the  characteristics  laid  out  by  Wenger  (1998):  mutual engagement, joint enterprise and shared repertoire, and by Li et al. (2011): ‘the support for formal and  informal interaction between novices and experts, the emphasis on learning and sharing knowledge, and the  investment  to  foster  the  sense  of  belonging  among  members’  (p.  7).  The  Swedish  teams  can  be  viewed  as  communities of practice, where old‐timers were suddenly confronted with a number of newcomers, and the  Indian team members’ increasing familiarity with both the work concepts and the social interaction patterns of  the group was part of the normal (according to Wenger) trajectory of newcomers in a community of practice.    The Capsicom teams also seem to be a model case in the sense that there appeared to have been few power  issues,  and  in  some  teams  the  old‐timers  had  made  explicit  decisions  to  integrate  the  newcomers  into  the  team.  However,  the  geographical  distance  hampered,  in  particular,  informal  interaction  and  the  creation  of  shared  repertoire,  not  only  because  the  distance  necessarily  curtailed  both  formal  and  informal  interaction,  but also because the contexts where the team members acted were somewhat different in the two locations,  providing different frameworks in creating repertoires. Differences in organizational contexts were reflected in  recruitment practices and in the Swedes’ proximity to the customer (due to most customers’ preference for  interacting in Swedish). Differences in cultural contexts were reflected in a higher turnover in the Indian labour  market and in a younger work force. Language problems disturbed the formal and informal interactions, the  sharing of knowledge and the creation of a shared repertoire. However, the effects varied and the difficulties  could, to a certain extent, be overcome by mutual engagement and, in particular, the Swedish investment in  fostering a sense of belonging in the newcomers.    Are virtual CoPs a better way of organizing offshoring work than virtual teams which distribute work so that  less  overseas  communication  is  needed?  Our  interviews  indicate  that  employee  satisfaction  with  offshoring  was  higher  in  those  teams  which  were  closer  to  the  pure  CoP  model,  and  that  more  mutual  learning  was  reported. It is reasonable to expect that these teams were healthier and probably had a more creative team  spirit.    The emergence of virtual communities of practice seems to have depended on a few conditions which were  present. The basic condition was an existing, at least relatively well‐functioning, community of practice with a  firm belief that dividing the work between two separate entities would result in inferior quality. That is, both a  motivation  to  integrate  the  Swedish  and  Indian  teams  and  a  well‐grounded  ability  to  work  in  teams  was  required. It is probably not a coincidence that such teams existed in Capsicom Sweden, in the non‐hierarchical  Swedish organizational culture.     It was also important that offshoring was not regarded as a threat to one’s personal employment security, or  that of one’s colleagues. Capsicom had made a number of layoffs during the years, but, according to a trade  union  representative,  these  were  only  partly  due  to  offshoring.  In  the  virtual  CoPs,  losing  jobs  to  India  was  discussed in more general terms, and not as something that affected the team in question.    A third condition was that of resources. Those teams which had the opportunity to make mutual visits were  generally  closer  to  the  pure  CoP  model.  The  same  could  be  said  in  regard  to  technical  communication  resources.    Will  virtual  CoPs  increase  in  number  or  will  they  stay  as a  marginal  phenomenon  in  offshoring  relationships  and  offshoring  research?  The  virtual  CoPs  at  Capsicom  did  mostly  highly  qualified  work,  which  resists  standardization and commodification better than more routine tasks. The basic condition, a well‐functioning  onsite team with a conviction that integrating the newcomers, rather than simply outsourcing work to them,  cannot be easily created by management. It can likely only emerge in a non‐hierarchical environment. It may  not  continue  to  exist  even  in  Capsicom,  after  the  present  employee  generation,  many  of  whom  have  been  maintaining  the  culture  of  the  original  local  company,  has  retired.  Thus,  virtual  CoPs  can  be  expected  to  remain  a  marginal  phenomenon,  in  particular  in  large  MNCs.  However,  work  in  such  teams  is  an  important 

153


Minna Salminen‐Karlsson research  area,  because  a  community  of  practice  is  a  prerequisite  for  transferring  tacit  knowledge,  which,  in  turn, is a prerequisite for creative and efficient work in IT development teams. 

Acknowledgements This study was financed by the Swedish Research Council and the Swedish Council for Working Life and Social  Research. 

References Biró, Miklos and Féhér, Peter (2005) “Forces affecting offshore software development”, Lecture Notes in Computer  Science, vol 3792, pp 187‐201.  Carmel, Erran & Tjia, Paul (2005) Offshoring Information Technology. Sourcing and Outsourcing to a Global  Workforce.Cambridge: Cambridge University Press.  Cohen, Laurie and El‐Sawad, Amal (2007) “Lived experiences of offshoring: An examination of UK and Indian financial  service employees’ accounts of themselves and one another”, Human Relations, Vol 60, No 8, pp 1235‐1262.  European foundation for the improvement of Living and Working Conditions (2004), Outsourcing of ICT and Related  Services in the EU, Luxembourg: Office for Official Publications of the European Communities.  Flecker, Jörg, Holtgrewe, Ursula, Schönauer, Annika, Dunkel, Wolfgang and Meil, Pamela (2007) Restructuring Across Value  Chains and Changes in Work and Employment. Case Study Evidence from the Clothing, Food, IT and Public Sector.  http://www.forba.at/data/downloads/file/362‐Case_Study_Report_D10.1.pdf   Gertsen, Martine Cardel and Zolner, Mette (2012) Recontextualization of the corporate values of a Danish MNC in a  subsidiary in Bangalore. Group & Organization Management, vol 37, no 1, pp 101‐132.  Gupta, Anil K. and Govindarajan, Vijay (2000) “Knowledge Flows Within Multinational Corporations”, Strategic  Management Journal, Vol 21, No 4, pp 473‐496.  Gustavsson, Bengt (1995) Human Values in Swedish Management. Journal of Human Values, vol 1, no 2, pp. 153‐171.  Hirschfield, Karin (2004) “Moving east: Relocations of eWork from Europe to Asia.” In Ursula Huws & Jörg Flecker (eds)  Asian Emergence: The World’s Back Office?, Brighton, The Institute for Employment Studies.  Hovlin, Karin (2006) Offshoring IT services: A Swedish perspective, Östersund, Institutet för tillväxtpolitiska studier (ITPS).  Kotlarsky, Julia (2008) “Globally distributed component‐based software development : an exploratory study of knowledge  management and work division.” In Julia Kotlarsky,  Ilan Oshri and Paul van Fenema (red) (2008). Knowledge  processes in globally distributed contexts, Basingstoke, Palgrave Macmillan.  Li, Linda C., Grimshaw, Jeremy M., Nielsen, Camilla, Judd, Maria, Coyte, Peter C., and Graham, Ian D (2011) “Evolution of  Wenger's concept of community of practice.” Implementation Science,  Vol 4, No 11.  http://www.implementationscience.com/content/4/1/11   Matthew, Jossy, Ogbonna, Emmanuel and Harris, Lloyd C. (2012) Culture, employee work outcomes and performance: An  empirical analysis of Indian software firms. Journal of World Business, vol 47, no 2, pp. 194‐203.  Noorderhaven, Niels and Harzing, Anne‐Wil (2009) “Knowledge‐sharing and social interaction within MNEs”, Journal of  International Business Studies, Vol 40, pp 719–741.  Sahay, Sundeep, Nicholson, Brian and Krishna, S. (2003) Global IT Outsourcing. Software Development Across Borders,  Cambridge, Cambridge University Press.  Styhre, Alexander, Börjesson, Sofia and Wickenberg Jan (2006) Managed by the other: cultural anxieties in two Anglo‐ Americanized Swedish firms. International Journal of Human Resource Management, vol 17, no 7, pp 1293‐1306.  Upadhaya, Carol (2009) Controlling offshore knowledge workers: Power and agency in India’s software outsourcing  industry. New technology, Work and Employment, vol 24, no 1, pp. 2‐18.  Wenger, Etienne (1998). Communities of practice: Learning, meaning, and identity, Cambridge, Cambridge University  Press.  Wenger, Etienne, McDermott, Richard and Snyder, William M. (2002). Cultivating communities of practice: a guide to  managing knowledge, Boston, Harvard Business School Press.  Wieland, Stacey M. B. (2011) Struggling to manage work as a part of everyday life: Complicating control, rethinking  resistance, and contextualizing work/life studies. Communication Monographs, vol 78, no 2, pp 162‐184. 

154


Project Communication Management in Industrial Enterprises  Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová   Slovak University of Technology, Faculty of Materials Science and Technology in Trnava,  Institute of Industrial Engineering, Management and Quality, Trnava, Slovak Republic  jana.samakova@stuba.sk  jana.sujanova@stuba.sk  kristina.koltnerova@stuba.sk    Abstract: Trends in project management show an enhanced role of the project manager with focus not only on hard skills  but  also  on  soft  skills  (see  the  research  (Čambál,  Cagáňová  and  Šujanová  2012)).  The  ability  to  motivate,  develop  and  manage  project  team,  solve  interpersonal  conflicts  and  to  effectively  communicate  are  important  skills  of  successful  project  manager.  On  the  other  hand  a  good  project  manager  must  be  able  to  organize  resources,  to  plan  and  prepare  detailed working procedures, to approve the executed work and manage according to the project scope costs, schedule,  quality  and  risks.  All  these  tasks  must  be  accomplished  together  with  the  parallel  communication  with  all  stakeholders.  Therefore  it  is  important  that  project  managers  and  all  parties  seek  for  effective  forms  of  communication.  To  do  so  improvement  of  communication  skills,  managing  communication  tools,  techniques  and  methods  become  to  be  essential  for the project success. The contribution deal with efficient project communication and the main research question of this  paper  is:  "Do  industrial  enterprises  have  prepared  written  document  (methodology)  for  project  communication  management?" Based on the theoretical knowledge an empirical research on the analysis of the current state of project  management communication has been carried out in industrial enterprises in Slovak Republic. The research was conducted  through  qualitative  and  quantitative  research.  The  main  objective  of  the  research  was  to  analyse  the  utilization  of  the  methodology  for  the  project  communication  management  in  industrial  enterprises.  The  research  was  carried  out  in  85  industrial  enterprises  that  have  been  process,  project  or  functional  oriented.  According  to  the  research  results  and  compared  with  researches  and  case  studies  published  in  scholarly  articles  we  came  to  the  conclusion  that  project  management  communication  can  be  considered  as  an  important  area  within  the  project  management.  However  66%  of  industrial enterprises in Slovakia have not prepared any written document (methodology, process steps) to manage project  communication.  Therefore,  the  third  part  of  the  paper  presents  the  proposal  of  the  framework  for  the  project  communication. Project communication framework is defined as a combination of logical related communication methods  and  tools  for  a  successful  initialization,  planning,  implementation,  monitoring  and  administrative  closure  of  the  project  communication. The basic idea of the project management communication framework is divided according to the process  groups of project management (Initiating, Planning, Executing, Monitoring and Controlling and Closing Process Group). For  each  process  group  project  communication  process  described  in  sub  processes  was  developed  and  described.  The  framework was designed for all industrial enterprises, but it is best applicable for the project and process‐oriented medium  and  large  industrial  enterprises.  This  contribution  is  part  of  a  research  project  VEGA  1/1203/12  ‐  Management  of  information quality in project management.     Keywords: project, project communication management, methodology, framework 

1. Introduction   Slovak enterprises perceive Project Management as a way to improve their competitiveness (Brieniková et al.,  2010).  In  the  activity  of  present  organizations  unique  activities  –  projects  are  becoming  more  and  more  important  (Relich,  2010).  The  project  management  contains  such  elements  as  management  of  time,  cost,  communications,  procurement,  quality,  risk  or  scope  of  project  (Relich,  2012). Communication  in  project  management  and  in  project  is  very  important  point.  The  common  management  skill  of  effective  communication  is  crucial  to  project  access  because  project  management  involves  formal  and  informal  communication  at  different  levels  in  the  organization.  Such  communication  includes  all  the  activities  and  behavior by which information or ideas are transferred between the project manager and individuals working  on the project. The project manager must give directions, hold meetings, and relay information and ideas to  and  from  the  project  team  members,  superiors,  clients,  contractors,  functional  managers,  other  project  managers and outsider personnel (Verma, 1996).    Communication is the basis of everything and is thus the key to effective project management. Even in biblical  times,  the  importance  of  project  communication  was  contained  in  the  chronicle  of  the  Tower  of  Babel,  whereby it was reported that God caused a construction project to fail by interrupting communication through  the creation of multiple languages. Without a common basis for communication, any project is bound to fail.  Communication is the basis for project performance in any organization. Information is power, and those who  have it will hold the key to project success (Badiru, 2008). 

155


Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová  The term project communication is emerging in the literature on project management and has a very limited  place in the literature on external corporate communication (Ramsing, 2009).    Effective communication is one of the main elements of project management. Communication is a critical part  between  people,  ideas  and  information.  The  “Triple  C  Model”  talks  about  it.  Triple  C  model  symbolizes  the  integrated  stages  of  communication,  cooperation  and  coordination  in  a  project  environment  (Figure  1).  The  model  is  an  effective  project  planning  and  control  tool.  Triple  C  model  facilitates  better  understanding  and  involvement  based  on  foundational  communication.  The  Triple  C  approach  elucidates  the  integrated  involvement  of  communication,  cooperation,  and  coordination.  Communication  is  the  foundation  for  cooperation,  which  in  turn  is  the  foundation  for  coordination.  Communication  leads  to  cooperation,  which  leads to coordination, which leads to project harmony, which leads to project success. The Triple C model was  first used in 1985 (Badiru, 2008). 

Figure 1: Triple C model (Source: Badiru, 2008) 

1.1 Functional, process and project‐oriented companies  The project manager´s skills and abilities have great impact on the project communication. Communication in  project  management  takes  three  forms:  verbal,  nonverbal  and  written.  In  a  project  environment,  communication  refers  to  the  exchange  of  messages  and  information  to  convey  meaning  and  knowledge  between and among the project manager, project team, internal and external stakeholders.     Project  communication  can  be  defined  as  the  vehicle  through  which  project  stakeholders  share  information  from  different  functional  areas  that  is  essential  to  the  successful  implementation  of  the  project  (Pinto  and  Pinto, 1990).    The orientation of the company plays an important role in project communication. There are some differences  in  the  communication  in  functional,  processes  and  project‐oriented  companies  (Kováž,  Hrazdilová  and  Kožíšková, 2004):  ƒ

Functional‐oriented company – every employee has a supervisor. Powers and responsibilities are  clearly  defined. Communication is linearly vertical.  

ƒ

Process‐oriented company – teamwork work as well as soft methods of management and flat organization  are preferred. Communication is mostly horizontal.   

ƒ

Project‐oriented company – individuals are grouped into working teams for a limited time according to the  duration of the project, horizontal management is preferred as well as a team cooperation and horizontal  communication  (Kováž,  Hrazdilová  and  Kožíšková,  2004).  Project‐oriented  companies  have  specific  strategies,  specific  organizational  structures  and  specific  cultures  for  managing  projects,  programs  and  project portfolios (Gereis, 2010). 

1.2 The main areas of project communication management  Taking into account differences in the management of project communication in functional oriented, process‐ oriented  and  project‐oriented  companies  we  have  selected  four  main  areas  that  should  be  the  part  of  the  project communication management. In each area was defined the typical elements of project communication  management (Figure 2). 

156


Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová 

PROJECT COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT

COMMUNICATION

COMMUNICATION

COMMUNICATION

COMMUNICATION

ENVIRONMENT

CHANNEL

COGNITIVE

SYSTEM

- Communication

- Communication

- Communication strategy - Organizational structure - Project culture

methods

differences

- Communication tools

- Communication

- Communication

skills

- Feedback system - System of sharing and distribution of information

frequency - Support of communication

Figure 2: The main areas of project communication (Source: Author (Samáková, 2012))  

1.3 Research questions – hypothesis   In  the  contribution  were  chosen  three  research  questions,  which  will  be  pursued  in  the  following,  practical  part of the article:  ƒ

Do the  industrial  enterprises  in  Slovakia  have  prepared  a  written  document  (instructions  in  the  form  of  methodology, process steps) to manage project communication? 

ƒ

Does the level of project management communication affect the quality and success of the project? 

ƒ

Is sufficiently developed area of project management communication in the international methodologies  and standards for project management (ICB®, PMBoK®, PRINCE2®, ISO 10006)? 

2. Theoretical research ‐ analysis of the project communication according to the selected  project management methodologies and standards   Before we will be described and analysed project communication in Slovak industrial enterprises, we will start  with  the  comparison  of  project  communication  processes  on  the  basis  of  the  theoretical  research  of  international  project  management  standards  and  methodologies.  The  aim  of  theoretical  research  was  to  analyse  the  designing  of  project  communication  in  international  methodologies  and  standards  of  project  management.  The  aim  was  to  determine  if  in  the  methodologies  and  standards  are  defined  the  templates,  which  showed  a  simple  process  how  to  manage  the  project  communication.  For  the  comparison  we  have  selected:  standard  ICB®  (IPMA®  Competence  Baseline)  issued  by  IPMA®  (International  Project  Management  Association®),  methodology  PMBoK®  (Project  Management  Body  of  Knowledge®)  issued  by  PMI®  (Project  Management Institute®), methodology PRINCE2® (Project in a Controlled Environment®) issued by OGC (Office  of Government Commerce) in UK and standard STN ISO 10006 (Quality management systems – Guidelines for  quality management in projects) (see the research (Samáková and Šujanová, 2013)).      ICB®  describes  the  qualifications  of  project  management.  There  are:    technical  competences,  behavioral  competences  and  contextual  competences.  Project  communication  is  part  of  the  technical  competences.  Communication  covers  the  effective  exchange  and  understanding  of  information  between  parties.  Effective  communication  is  vital  to  the  success  of  projects,  programs  and  portfolios.    The  right  information  has  to  be  transmitted to relevant parties, accurately and consistently to meet their expectations. Communication should  be useful, clear and timely. Communication under this standard may take many forms: oral, written, static or  dynamic, formal or informal, volunteered or requested. This communication may use a variety of media such  as  paper  or  electronic  means.  Communication  may  take  place  in  conversations,  meetings,  workshops  and  conferences, or by exchanging reports or meeting minutes (Caupin, 2008).    ® PMBOK   is  the  most  engaged  in  project  communication.  Project  communications  management  includes  the  processes  required  to  ensure  timely  and  appropriate  generation,  collection,  dissemination,  storage,  and  ultimate disposition of project information. It provides the critical links among people, ideas, and information 

157


Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová  that  are  necessary  for  success.  Everyone  involved  in  the  project  must  be  prepared  to  send  and  receive  communications in the project “language” and must understand how the communications they are involved in  as  individuals  affect  the  project  as  a  whole.  Project  communication  includes:  identify  stakeholders,  plan  communications,  distribute  information,  manage  stakeholder  expectations  and  report  performance  (PMI,  2008).    PRINCE2® is the least engaged in project communication. The area of project communication is described in  the  part  “processes”,  following:  The  communication  management  strategy  addresses  both  internal  and  external communications. It should contain details of how the project management team will send information  to,  and  receive  information  from  the  wider  organization(s)  involved  with,  of  affected  by,  the  project.  In  particular, where the project is part of a programme, details should be given on how information is to be fed  to the programme (Murray, 2009).     STN ISO 10006 – in this standard are described communication‐related processes. The communication‐related  processes aim to facilitate the exchange of information necessary for the project. The communication‐related  processes  are:  communication  planning,  information  management  and  communication  control  (STN  EN  ISO  10006:2004, 2004).    Comparison  of  the  above  mentioned  project  management  methodologies  and  a  standard  is  very  difficult  because  of  their  different  concepts  and  objectives.  More  they  differ  also  terms  and  vocabulary.  They  apply  different  areas  of  knowledge,  tools,  techniques,  procedures,  material  presentation  and  other  aspects  of  project  communication.  The  summary  of  the  project  communication  in  international  methodologies  and  ® ® ® standards (ICB , PMBoK , PRINCE2 , STN ISO 10006) is presented in table 1.  Table 1: Comparison of project communication in international methodologies and standards (Source: Author  (Samáková, 2012))  Monitored elements  ICB®  Communication strategy  Organizational structure  Project  culture 

   

Communication methods  Communication tools  Support of  communication  Communication  frequency 

   

Communication differences  Communication skills 

Feedback system  System of sharing and  distribution of  information 

 

Explanatory Notes         

Project management methodologies and standards  PMBoK®  PRINCE2®  STN ISO 10006  Communication environment  9                  Communication channel  9  9   

Communication cognitive      Communication system    9 

   

   

 

 

   methodology or standard does not include a specific element  methodology or standard describes the element only briefly   9 methodology  or  standard  describes  in  detail,  what  the  specific  element  addresses   

On  the  basis  of  theoretical  research  can  be  concluded  that  international  standards  and  methodologies  of  project management describe those elements only generally and characterize them very little or not at all. The  analysis shows that it is necessary to deal with the project communication further. A comprehensive summary  of the standards and methodologies are shown in table 1. 

158


Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová 

3. Empirical research – analysis of project communication in industrial enterprises  The  analytical  part  of  this  paper  focuses  on  the  analysis  of  the  current  state  of  project  communication  management  in  industrial  enterprises  in  Slovakia.  The  analysis  was  realized  through  qualitative  and  quantitative research.    The  aim  of  this  paper  is  to  analyse  how  in  industrial  enterprises  projects  the  project  communication  is  managed and also if the companies have working version or policy document (methodology, process steps) for  the project communication management.  

3.1 Qualitative research of project communication management   Qualitative research was used as a pilot study of project communication management. The aim was to analyse  how  project  managers  perceive  the  problems  of  project  communication  management  in  practice.  For  the  research purpose we interviewed project managers in three medium‐sized industrial enterprises (number of  employees from 50 to 249) and one in a large industrial enterprise (over 250 employees). Information about  project  management  communication  has  been  identified  through  semi‐structured  in‐depth  individual  interviews. Data were collected during the September and October 2011.    According to the qualitative research we came to the following conclusions:  ƒ

Project managers  frequently  understand  project  communications  management  as  creation  of  the  “Communication matrix "and treatment of the "Stakeholder analysis". 

ƒ

Internal project  communication  policy  documents  do  not  contained  supplementary  tools  like  forms  and  templates for the project communication management. 

ƒ

Project managers are interested in the project communication management methodology that will take  into  account:  communication  environment,  communication  channel,  communication  cognitive,  communication system. 

ƒ

For the management of the project communication, project managers do not follow international project  management methodologies and standards. 

3.2 Quantitative research of project communication management  Quantitative research of the project communication management was realised by the questionnaire research.  In the research participated 85 enterprises that apply the project management (project sponsor 41 %, project  managers 32 %, heads of department 9%, project team members 8 %, other 10%). The research took place in  January  2012.  The  aim  of  research  was  to  analyse  how  in  Slovak  industrial  enterprises  is  the  project  communication  managed  and  applied.  The  proportion  between  functional,  process  and  project‐oriented  enterprises is presented in figure 3.  

FOC – Functional Oriented Companies PjOC – Project-Oriented Companies PrOC – Process-Oriented Companies

Figure 3: Industrial enterprises in Slovak republic (Source: Author (Samáková, 2012))  The key question of the questionnaire was: "Indicate on a scale 5‐1 the extent to which you identify with these  statement: “Project communication management can be considered as an important tool for improvement of 

159


Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová  the quality and success of the projects." As shown in figure 4, 95 % of respondents agree and strongly agree  with the statement. 

strongly agree

Figure  4:  Project  communication  management:  tool  for  improving  of  quality  of  projects  (Source:  Author  (Samáková, 2012))  Next research problem was to determine if industrial enterprises deal in project management with areas such  as:  communication  environment,  communication  channel,  communication  cognitive  and  communication  system.  On  the  basis  of  the  survey  we  can  conclude,  that  all  companies  do  not  use:  communication  environment,  communication  channel,  communication  cognitive,  and  communication  system  in  the  project  communication management. We can see (Table 2) that it were the project oriented companies’ that mostly  use  the  defined  areas  of  the  project  communication  management.  Only  in  the  case  of  the  communication  environment  higher  percentage  of  the  process  oriented  enterprises  (30%)  as  project  oriented  enterprises  (24%) apply the communication environment. In the case of functional oriented enterprises the percentage of  those  that  apply  defined  areas  of  the  project  communication  management  was  lower  than  30%  only  in  the  case of the communication system it was 41% of enterprises.   Table  2:  Percentage  of  enterprises  engaged  in  the  project  communication  management  (Source:  Author  (Samáková, 2012))  Are you engaged in the project  communication management in following  areas?  Communication environment  Communication channel  Communication cognitive  Communication system 

Functional   oriented  enterprise  17 %  22 %  9 %  41 % 

Process‐ oriented enterprise  30 %  27 %  5 %  48 % 

Project‐ oriented enterprise  24 %  28 %  10 %  61 % 

From the  above  presented  data  we  can  conclude  that  process  oriented  and  project  oriented  enterprises  in  higher ratio put their emphasis also on communication environment, communication channel, communication  cognitive  and  communication  system  as  an  integral  part  of  the  project  communication  management  as  the  functional oriented companies.    Another research area of the questionnaire was to identify either the project communication is defined in the  project management or not. Based on the analysis results (Figure 5) 66 % of respondents are not dealing in the  project  management  with  the  project  communication,  21%  have  a  project  communications  as  part  of  the  project charter. Only 13% of respondents from industrial enterprises devote with the project communication.  According to the quantitative research we came to the following conclusions:  ƒ

Project communication should be considered as an important part of the project management. 

ƒ

® Enterprises does  not  apply  international  project  management  standards  and  methodologies  (ICB ,  ® ® PMBoK , PRINCE2 ), but they have developed their own methodologies. 

ƒ

Majority of  industrial  enterprises  in  Slovakia  (66%)  do  not  have  the  written  document  (policy),  for  the  project communication. 

160


Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová  ƒ

Industrial companies have recognised the importance of the project communication and are interested in  the project management communication methodology. 

Figure 5: Use of the project communication in the project managing (Source: Author (Samáková, 2012)) 

4. Project communication management framework   For  the  improvement  of  the  project  management  communication  we  have  defined  project  communication  framework as a combination of logical related communication methods, tools and techniques for a successful  initialization, planning, implementation, control and administrative closure of the project communication. The  project  communication  management  framework  define  the  communication  process  in  the  project  management  process  groups  (initiating,  planning,  executing,  monitoring  and  controlling  and  closing  process  group) – figure 6. Each process group contains the process of project communication, which is divided into the  defined sub process.  Project communication management framework

Process groups of project management

Process of project communication

Tasks of sub processes

Outputs from sub process

Initiating, planning, executing, monitoring and controlling and closing process group Initialization, planning, implemen- tation, control and administrative closure Methods, tools and techniques

Template and scheme

Figure 6: Scheme of the project communication management framework (Source: Author (Samáková, 2012))  Detailed description of the project communication framework is in the figure 7.    This framework is applicable in different size of industrial enterprises, but the best results could be obtained in  the project and process‐oriented medium and large industrial enterprises. 

161


Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová 

PROJECT COMMUNICATION MANAGEMENT Communication strategy

INITIATING

Initialization of project communicati on

Project communication organizational structure Project culture management

List of stakeholders Stakeholder expectations

PLANNING

Responsibility matrix of project communication

Planning of the project communicati on

Groupware Matrix Schedule for communication Minutes of meeting Communication Matrix Meeting rules Phone call rules Call phone minutes

EXECUTING

Implementati on of the project i ti

Writing documents Rules of Email Rules of nonverbal communication

MONITORING AND CONTROLLING

CLOSING

Project website

Control of the project communicati on

Project communication Inspection Report

Administrati ve closure of the project communicati

Control of documents Principles of archiving

Figure 7: Scheme of the project communication management framework (Source: Author (Samáková, 2012)) 

5. Conclusions   Project management has the particular significance. Especially, the identification of project success or failure is  desirable,  what  is  usually  connected  with  specific  methods  and  techniques  (Relich  and  Banaszak,  2011).Communication plays an important role in project management. Diverse project environment in many  cases cause the problems that can be considered as a communication problems. The communication skills of  project managers are often proved by overlapping areas of responsibility, grey lines of authority, delegation of  the  problems,  lack  of  motivation,  very  complex  organizational  structures  and  conflicts  among  the  various  project participants. Effective communication helps to gain interpersonal acceptance and commitment and can  also serve as a good motivating factor. Because of the unique features of projects and the way project teams  are  organized  in  a  matrix  fashion,  effective  communication  is  vital  for  project  success.  Overlapping  responsibilities,  frequent changes  in  scope and constraints,  complex  integration and  interface  requirements,  decentralized decision‐making processes and a potential for conflict all pose communication challenges. Often, 

162


Jana Samáková, Jana Šujanová and Kristína Koltnerová  a significant number of project problems are caused by poor and / or ineffective communications. Because of  all  these  difficulties,  communication  is  the  biggest  single  factor  influencing  the  quality,  effectiveness,  satisfaction and productivity of a project team.  Thus, one of the most critical roles of the project manager is  that  of  communicator.  The  project  manager  must  try  to  create  an  environment  that  is  conducive  to  open  communication and the development of trust among project participants. (Verma, 1996). Project manager and  all  stakeholders  should  establish  effective  communication  channels  and  tools  incorporated  into  the  project  communication management documents and policies where the proposed project communication framework  could  be  considered  as  a  basis  for  the  project  communication  management  methodology  design.  The  framework  follows  the  principle  of  the  project  communication  management  divide  into  the  project  management  process  groups  (initiating,  planning,  executing,  monitoring  and  controlling  and  closing  process  group).  Each  process  group  contains  the  process  of  the  project  communication  (initialization,  planning,  implementation,  monitoring  and  administrative  closure  of  the  project  communication)  developed  by  sub  process. 

Acknowledgements This contribution is part of a research project VEGA 1/1203/12 “Management of information quality in project  management”. 

References Badiru, A. (2008) Triple C Model Of Project Management: Communication, Cooperation, And Coordination, Crc Press,  London.  Brieniková, J. Et Al. (2010) ‘The Project Management Education In The Slovak Republic’, In: Efficiency And Responsibility In  Education. Erie 2010: Proceedings Of The 7th International Conference, Prague, Pp. 59‐63.  Caupin, G. And Knoepfu, H. (2008) Ipma Competence Baseline: Version 3.0. Ipma, Netherlands.   Čambál, M., Cagáňová, D. And Šujanová, J. (2012). ‘The Industrial Enterprise Performance Increase Through The  Competency Model Application‘. In: The 4th European Conferences On Intellectual Capital. Ecic 2012: Proceedings ‐  Arcada University Of Applied Science, Helsinki, Finland, Pp. 118‐126.  Gareis, R. (2008) Process & Project, Manz, Austria.   Kováž, F., Hrazdilová, K. And Koźíšková, H. (2004) The Theory Of Industrial Businesses Ii., Fame, Zlín.  Murray, A. (2009) Managing Successful Projects With Prince2, Tso Ireland, London.  Pinto, M., Pinto, J. (1990) Project Team Communication And Cross‐Functional Cooperation In New Program Development,  Journal Of Product Innovation Management, Vol. 7, No. 3, Pp. 200‐212.  Project Management Institute (2008) A Guide To The Project Management Body Of Knowledge (4.Th Edition), Pmi, Usa.  Ramsing, (2009) Project Communication In A Strategic Internal Perspective, Corporate Communications: International  Journal, Vol. 14, No. 3, Pp. 345 – 357.  Relich, M. (2010) A Decision Support System For Alternative Project Choice Based On Fuzzy Neural Networks, Management  And Production Engineering Review, 2010, Vol. 1, No 2, Pp. 10‐20.  Relich, M. (2012) An Evaluation Of Project Completion With Application Of Fuzzy Set Theory, Management, 2012, Vol. 16,  No 1, Pp. 216‐229.  Relich, Banaszak. (2011)  Reference Model Of Project Prototyping Problem, Foundations Of Managemen:  International  Journal, 2011, Vol. 3, No 1, Pp. 33‐46.  Samáková, J. (2012). Proposal Of The Project Communication Management Methodology As A Tool For Quality Improve Of  Projects In Industrial Enterprises In The Slovak Republic. Stu Mtf, Trnava.   Samáková, J. And Šujanová, J. (2013) ‘Project Management Certification Approaches In Slovak Industry Enterprises’. In:  Efficiency And Responsibility In Education. Erie 2013: Proceedings Of The 10th International Conference, Prague,  Pp. 542‐549  Stn En Iso 10006:2004 (2004) Quality Management Systems. Guidelines For Quality Management In Projects.  Verma, V. (1996) Human Resource Skills For The Project Manager, Pmi, Usa. 

163


Information Security in Enterprises – Ontology Perspective  Stephen Schiavone1, Lalit Garg2 and Kelly Summers3  1 University of Liverpool, Fountain Hills, Arizona, USA   2 University of Liverpool, University of Malta, Malta  3 Medicis Pharmaceutical Corp, Scottsdale, Arizona, USA  steve.schiavone@my.ohecampus.com   lalit.garg@my.ohecampus.com    krsummers@sbcglobal.net     Abstract: Enterprises continue to be the target of a wide and diverse range of security attacks. Regardless of the type of  security‐based framework,  or  the  levels  of effort  and  investments  made  in  technology,  enterprises  remain  vulnerable  to  attacks  that  consequently  have  negative  business,  social  and  political  repercussions.  An  enterprise’s  lack  of  an  effective  defensive posture and resilient countermeasures are best understood in the context of dynamic complex systems behavior  and systems thinking approach to enterprises and security. This research paper examines key issues that undermine the  ability of an enterprise to develop a viable and effective security posture. Recognition of such concerns then provides input  and  direction  into  the  development  of  an  alternative  approach  to  information  security  for  enterprises  expressed  in  the  development of Enterprise Ontology and security based Business Capability Framework that is derived from the strategic  goals and objectives of the organization. The proposed solution considers the creation of an enterprise‐specific ontology  that expresses the enterprise as a complex system. A security framework is developed that recognizes the enterprise as a  set of business capabilities that have measureable strategic outcomes against which business decisions regarding security  are made. To ensure a balanced implementation of security, a business value model is defined that is a function of financial,  operational  and  quality  assurance  measures.  The  concept  of  value  chain  is  used  to  represent  the  relationship  between  strategy and enterprise domain resources of which security is an integral component and driver rather than a post or ad  hoc consideration. Validation of the Enterprise Ontology and Information Security Capability‐Driven Framework is derived  from  the  creation  of  a  business  strategy  to  business  capability  value  map  and  the  quantification  of  key  business  and  security  metrics.  A  set  of  ontology‐based  competency  questions  allows  the  business  to  make  informed  and  judicial  decisions  regarding  how  and  where  security  should  be  applied.    Successful  analysis  of  the  results  of  this  study  demonstrates the usefulness of the model in guiding the organization to assess current security risks and make informed,  business‐motivated security decisions and deployment strategies that are balanced in accordance with the scarce resource  of the enterprise whilst maintaining alignment to the strategic imperatives of the organization. Further opportunities exist  to  improve  the  creation  and  quality  of  Enterprise  Ontology  through  reuse  and  auto  discovery  techniques.  The  ability  to  respond in a timely manner driven from selective causal feedback loops to changes in the business model whilst evaluating  impact against the enterprise’s current set of business and technical capabilities and business strategy becomes a critical  success factor in the development of an effective security model for the enterprise. The development of a more rigorous  and  systematic  approach  to  modeling  the  enterprise’s  current  state  and  assessment  of  future  state  scenarios  using  the  business  capability  framework  creates  consistent  and  repeatable  process  within  the  organization.  Semantically  driven  conceptual  models  of  the  enterprise  may  also  be  expressed  in  key  security  technologies  and  systems  that  support  the  organization  by  forming  a  collection  of  ontology‐aware  integrated  technologies  that  respond  and  react  collectively  to  attacks.    Keywords: ontology, complex systems, enterprise strategic planning, reliability, business capability, IT security 

1. Introduction The  purpose  of  this  research  paper  is  to  propose  a  unified  approach  to  information  security  for  enterprises  expressed in the form of a framework centered on business capabilities derived from an enterprise’s strategic  goals and objectives (Burton, 2010). The framework proposed is referred to as Capability‐Driven Information  Security Model (CDISM). The idea behind unification is twofold:   ƒ

The enterprise is viewed as a complex and dynamic system (Sterman, 2000) that modifies its behavior by  changing its internal structure in response to internal and external pressures that are typically commercial  and financial in origin (Sackmann, 2008).  

ƒ

Cyber‐attacks are considered instances of complex systems (McAfee, 2011) insofar as they are purposeful,  adapt  to  their  environment  (through  causal  feedback  loops),  replicate  and  modify  their  surroundings  (Falliere, Murchu and Chien, 2011).  

In the context of complex systems, a successful risk management strategy must consider known and unknown  (improbable)  cyber‐threats.  The  former  is  managed  by  understanding  business  impact  of  a  known  threat  through  probabilistic  cause  and  effect  modeling.  The  latter  is  managed  by  understanding  emergent  effects 

164


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers  created by indeterminate cascading failure effects (Rebovich, 2011). The development of an effective security  approach must be holistic, encompassing the entire structure of the system rather than atomic, focusing on  discrete elements within the system driven by what is known or obvious. The focus of security becomes the  protection of the interdependent resources responsible for the successful execution of an enterprise’s strategy  rather than the protection of an enterprise’s general assets that are supported by contemporary models (Fenz  and Neubauer, 2009).  The CDISM framework becomes an integrated rather than fragmented approach to the  security of the enterprise, incorporating in one single consideration the interdependent resources of people,  process and technology.  Complexity thinking examines the issues of cyber‐attacks in a novel way (Meadows,  2008). Successful cyber‐attacks are achieved not because of their ingenuity and technical sophistication, but  because  the  enterprise  unwittingly  sets  up  the  necessary  conditions  for  such  attacks  to  be  successful.  If  an  enterprise considers cyber‐attacks linear, the risk management and countermeasures activities are based upon  (linear) cause‐and‐effect principles applied to events known (a priori), limiting the effectiveness of any security  model  applied  (Simmonds  et  al.,  2006).  As  new  cyber‐attacks  are  deployed,  the  enterprise  assesses  its  likelihood of occurrence and probabilistic impact forcing the enterprise to be forever in a reactive mode driven  by cause‐and‐effect mechanics. A security model that reacts to an ever‐growing number of cyber‐threats will  typically  strain  and  exhaust  the  resources  of  an  enterprise.  It  is  unrealistic  for  an  enterprise  to  secure  itself  against  all  known  cyber‐threats.  A  more  effective  and  efficient  approach  is  to  selectively  focus  on  security  issues  facilitated  by  what  the  enterprise  considers  worthy  of  safeguarding  dictated  by  strategic  imperatives,  delivered through business capabilities. Such capabilities are in turn serviced and supported by a collection of  interrelated  and  interdependent  resources  (entities).  Such  an  approach  shifts  the  focus  and  conversation  of  security from external considerations (reactive mode) to internal analysis and deliberations (proactive mode),  enabling the enterprise to judiciously allocate resources in accordance business risk benefit. Such an approach  evaluates  the  resilience  and  reliability  of  the  enterprise  structure  (resources)  without  necessarily  understanding  the  essence  of  the  attack.  The  approach  facilitates  a  proactive  method  based  essentially  on  improbable events.     CDISM  framework  is  based  upon  the  principles  of  unification,  complex  systems  behavior,  failure  analysis,  reliability and resilience (dependability) and alignment to business strategic imperatives.    The research goals are summarized as follows:   ƒ

To define and develop an enterprise‐wide information security model that leverages ontological concepts  and principles to express the complex and dynamic nature inherent within an enterprise.  

ƒ

To develop an operational description of the notion of security, detailing metrics and measures necessary  to facilitate enterprise‐wide resource allocation management to aid the execution of business strategy.  

ƒ

To define  a  conceptual  framework  that  ensures  focus  and  alignment  between  an  enterprise’s  mission  statement,  business  strategy,  security  viewpoint  (condition  or  status),  and  enterprise  domain  resources  responsible for the execution of its strategy. 

2. Design approach  The ability of an enterprise to devise a cohesive and coherent security model is dependent on understanding  several important aspects of information security as applied to complex enterprises. In particular, it requires:  ƒ

Ontology for the enterprise, a clear and precise description of the nature and context of an organization  and its ecosystem of element interactions.  

ƒ

Understand the  properties  of  improbable  threat  events  and  its  impact  to  the  underlying  structure  and  performance of the enterprise.  

ƒ

Dependable security  metrics  and  performance  measures  applied  at  the  (holistic)  enterprise  level  and  (atomic) resource level.  

ƒ

A conceptual  framework  (Clark,  Guba  and  Smith,  1977)  that  defines  an  appropriate  security  model  mapped against an explicit business strategy and enterprise capability.  

ƒ

Understand the internal structure and emergent behavior (Mason, 2012) of the enterprise during failed‐ state scenarios. 

165


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers 

3. Ontology Expression  of  the  complex  nature  of  the  domain  enterprise  is  achieved  through  the  creation  of  Ontology  repository  using  Protégé  (Protégé,  2012).  Development  of  Enterprise  Ontology  benefits  business  decision‐ makers in that the complex relationship is expressed in business terms rather than information technology and  security  terms.  Understanding  the  nature  of  the  relationships  between  elements  (resources)  within  the  enterprise  facilitates  common  understanding  of  the  enterprise  and  allows  reevaluation  of  the  enterprise’s  business capabilities in light of new or changing forces and factors impacting the ability of the enterprise to  execute its strategy (Lambrix, 2010). The developed Enterprise Ontology is based upon the knowledge of an  existing  commercially  viable  organization,  Medicis  (Medicis  Pharmaceutical  Corporation,  2012)  leveraging  existing business  strategies  and  resources  and  those derived  from  other  sources  to create  a  more  elaborate  model  (Renkema,  2000  and Weill  and  Broadbent,  1998).  The  domain  of  the  enterprise  is  shown  in Figure  1.  This  view  represents  the  key  relationships  between  major  class  and  sub‐class  type  within  the  ontology.  The  enterprise specific ontology is based on an approach defined by Noy and McGuinness (2002) and is comprised  of eight super class types: Enterprise, Enterprise Capability, Enterprise Domain Resources, Extended Enterprise,  Enterprise  Governance,  Enterprise  Reference  Architecture,  Enterprise  Mission,  and  Enterprise  Value.  Descriptions of the most influential are discussed as follows: 

Figure 1: Enterprise domain 

3.1 Enterprise Defines  the  entity  enterprise  from  which  the  Mission  Vision,  Mission  Strategy  and  Mission  Objectives  class  instance  is  created.  The  class  instance  describes  the  identity  of  the  enterprise  and  its  reason  for  existence  (Guevara, 2011). 

3.2 Enterprise capability  The class Business Capability contains the business model class instance that describes the goals and objectives  of the example capability seen in quantitative and qualitative terms. The class Business Capability properties  define  the  dependent  Domain  Resources  required  to  deliver  such  a  capability  and  importantly  define  the 

166


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers  business value proposition in terms of Financial (Downes and Goodman, 2010), Operational (Smith, 2010) and  Quality Assurance performance measures.  

3.3 Enterprise domain resources  Enterprise  Domain  Resource  is  the  most  complex  class,  consisting  of  thirty‐four  sub‐classes  of  which  the  topmost  are:    Application  Services,  Business  Services  including  business  process  models  (Deloitte,  2012),  Human  Capital  and  Technical  Services.  This  class  represents  the  enterprise  resource  classes  required  to  support and execute a Business Capability (Barroero, Motta and Pignatelli, 2010). 

3.4 Enterprise extended  This class is important in terms of enterprise security and defines the ecosystem within which the enterprise  functions as a part of its business model. The underlying premise maintains that the security of the enterprise  extends beyond its four walls. 

3.5 Enterprise reference architecture  The concept behind the creation of sub‐classes within this entity is the reduction of the degree of variability or  heterogeneity  from  within  the  complex  system.  This  is  accomplished  through  the  influence  of  established  standard design patterns applied to each class of domain resource. This approach minimizes potential conflicts  between  the  interdependent  resources  by  moving  the  complex  system  from  a  state  of  potential  chaos  to  relative stability.   

3.6 Enterprise value  The  purpose  of  the  class  Enterprise  Capability  is  to  generate  Enterprise  Value  in  the  form  of  the  Value  sub‐ classes:  Product,  Services,  Shareholder,  Social  and  Ethics  (Nightingale,  2005).  The  class  Enterprise  Value  is  aligned to Enterprise Mission and Enterprise Capability.  Table 1: Ontology competency questions  Competency Question  Define the required Security Quality  Assurance measures needed to support  the enterprise’s current Mission. 

Rationale This establishes the design parameters that a Business Capability will  function.  This is usually expressed in business narrative (summarized in  Table 2).  This describes in business terms the dependability index, investment value  Define the current Enterprise Capability,  and effectiveness measures for the enterprise expressed in Financial,  i.e. its baseline (reference) model.  Operational and Security measures (summarized in Table 3).  This describes the resource targets and level of effort and investment  What is the effort needed to meet the  required to support a Business Capability. The business value derived from  performance requirements of a newly  such an enquiry drives a balanced business decision in terms of cost, risk and  defined Enterprise Business Capability.  benefit (summarized in Table 3). 

Table 2: Business strategy mapping to business capability and performance measures  Business Capability  Improve product innovation and delivery into new Markets maximizing revenue (product  [A]  diversification).  Value Metrics and Measures Focus on speed to existing markets and new markets. Market share and revenue creation  [B]  are primary drivers. Operating efficiency is important, as are CR, STR, and TTMI.  Operations model is high available indicating high reliability and low failure impact.  Objectives (Intangible Goals)  Improve R&D capability, increasing product innovation and prototyping.  [C]  Improve logistics and supply chain i.e. maintain 24x7x365 operations.  Operations model is high available indicating high reliability and low failure impact.  Required Financial  CR = 2.0, Profitability = 10.4%, EPS = 10, Revenue = $25,000,000, STR = 0.9.  Performance Measures [D]  Required Business  MSI = 7%, NCI = 10%, NPI = 15%, OTI = 22%, PPI = 82%, SII = 60%, TTMI = 1.5.  Performance Measures [E]  Systems Capability  Rc = 0.995, Ec = {0.999, 0.9, 3000}, Sc = {0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 0.5}, Ic = $1,000,000, Vc = 20%.  Performance Measures [F]  Assessment [G]  Product Diversification Strategy  (BusinessModelDomesticA) 

167


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers 

4. Results Alignment  of Enterprise  Resources  to  business  value  is  achieved by  understanding  the  knowledge contained  within  Enterprise  Ontology  and  defining  the  security  quality  assurance  measures  and  leveraging  the  CDISM  framework.  

4.1 Ontology   This  is  achieved  by  interrogating  the  ontology  repository  in  light  of  a  set  of  pre‐established  competency  questions (Noy and McGuinness, 2002), examples of which are shown in Table 1.     The results of such enquiries are partly summarized in Table 2. Important information contained in this table is  expressed  in  both  qualitative  terms  (columns  A,  B  and  C)  and  quantitative  terms  (columns  D,  E  and  F).  The  business  capability  definition  of  Product  Diversification  Strategy  is  expressed  within  the  ontology  as  a  class  type  BusinessModelDomesticA  (column  G).  The  table  describes  a  single  business  capability  (A)  that  contains  three  classes  of  performance  measures  that  are  functions  of  Enterprise  Business  Value  viz.,  Financial  (D),  Operational  (E)  and  Security  (F).  The  strategic  value  of  the  capability  is  defined  in  terms  of  revenue  and  profitability  goals,  market  share  and  product  performance  goals  (Smith,  2010)  such  as  Product  Profitability  Index  (PPI),  Market  Share  Index  (MSI)  and  Time  to  Market  Index  (TTMI).  The  resultant  security  (quality  assurance)  measures  are  an  interpretation  of  the  former  two  metrics  expressed  in  terms  of  resource  dependability,  effectiveness,  investment,  information  sensitivity  and  strategic  value.  This  provides  the  Enterprise with areas of focus, direction and location of security efforts. 

4.2 Security quality assurance (SecSTAT)  Security in this research is viewed as the ability of an enterprise to maintain operational and financial viability  (Jallow et al, 2007) during normal operating state, performance and reliability degradation or total failure of its  strategic business capabilities. To minimize catastrophic events, Enterprise resources must isolate a failed state  event (Rc) by minimizing emergent effects that arise within the system as the result of a breakdown or failure  (Kristen  et  al,  2008).  The  class,  Enterprise  Reference  Architecture  becomes  a  critical  success  factor  in  the  construction  of  fail‐safe  resources  driven  from  the  capabilities  design  requirements  (Peterson,  2007).  The  cause of a failure may be the result of a cyber‐attack (intentional) or error (unintentional fault).     Security is multidimensional and is a function of the following variables. Business Capability’s Strategic Value  (Vc),  is  expressed  as  {0.25  ≤  Vc  <  0.20}  and  measures  the  percentage  of  revenue  contribution.  Capability  Dependability, (Rc) is expressed as {0.995 ≤ Rc <0.990} and is the measure of resilience of a resource. Capability  Effectiveness,  (Ec)  is  expressed  as  {Ac,  Uc,  Pc}  and  is  the  performance  characteristics  of  a  resource.  Business  Information  Sensitivity  Classification,  (Sc)  is  expressed  as  {Is,  Ps,  Ss,  IPs}  and  is  the  type  and  class  of  business  information that is created by the Business Capability. Investment (Ic), is expressed as {0.101 ≤ Ic <0.095} and  represents  the  run‐maintain  costs  of  the  resources  responsible  for  executing  the  business  capability.  Preservation of the integrity and trustworthiness of a Business Capability is then expressed as a relationship  between Business Value and Financial and Operational Measures. Their relationship is expressed in Figure 2.    The relationship between business value and security quality assurance measures ensure that the focus and  effort  required  to  secure  the  enterprise  is  aligned  to  its  strategic  goals  (Jallow  et  al,  2007).  As  the  business  model  is  defined  and  changes  due  to  external  market  pressures  or  internal  efficiency  drivers,  performance  measures (operations and finance) will change forcing the business value proposition (associated to a Business  Capability) to change. As security is a function of business value, particular aspects of the security model must  change in response. The effect of the shift is the recalibration of the enterprise’s core resource capabilities and  triggers  a  reevaluation  of  effort  and  focus  in  the  management  of  the  security  model.  Table  3  details  the  enterprise’s current resource‐specific operational state and compares this to the required (desired) state that  is created by either a new, enhanced or modified business capability.     Analysis of the Business Capability’s required dependability (security) measure (Rc) is 0.995 and a capability’s  operational availability Ec {Ac} of 0.999. This suggests that the probability of a business disruption event of P  A(0.005) and P B(0.001) is likely to occur over the life of the capability due to resource failure or unavailability  of key resources. This is expressed by the equation P(A+B)=P(A)+P(B)‐P(A)P(B) (O’Connor and Kleyner, 2012).    

168


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers 

Figure 2: Business value model  Table 3: Current resource level capability compared to target capability  Object Type    Super Class 

Required Capability 

Resource Dependency Dimension – Determined Current Capability 

EnterpriseCapability EnterpriseDomainR EnterpriseDomain EnterpriseDomain EnterpriseDomain esource  Resource  Resource  Resource  Class  BusinessCapability  ApplicationDomain BusinessServicesD TechnicalServices TechnicalServices   Resource  omainResource  DomainResource  DomainResource Sub Class  DomesticCapability  BusinessSystemsD DevelopNewProd InfrastructureDo InfrastructureDo omainResource  uctsAndServicesB mainResource  mainResource  usinessProcess  Individual Class  BusinessModelDom BusinessSystemsER ChemicalDevelop ComputePlatform NetworkZone1  Instance  esticA  P  ment ClinicalTrials Tier1  Financial Measures            EPS  10.0  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  STR  0.9  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  Revenue  25,000,000  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  Net Profit  10.4  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  CR  2.0  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  Operational            Measures            7.0  MSI  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  10.0  NCI  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  15.0  NPI  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  22.0  OTI  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  82.0  PPI  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  60.0  SII  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐  1.5  TTMI  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐                SecSTAT Measures          0.995  Rc  0.999  0.999  0.999  0.999  {0.999,0.9,3000}  {0.990,0.4,3000}  Ec  {0.999,0,0}  {0.999,0,0}  {0.999,0,0}  Sc  {0.4,0.6,0.8,0.5}  {0.4,0.9,0.9,0.6}  {0.4,0.8,0.9,0.9} {0.1,0.9,0.9,0.8}  {0.9,0.8,0.7,0.7}  Ic  1,000,000  120,000  0  10,000  10,000  Vc  20.0  ‐  ‐  ‐  ‐ 

The loss  of  dependability  and  operational  availability  will  impact  the  business  value  of  the  capability  Vc  ($25,000,000) resulting in a potential loss (in this example) of revenue circa $150,000. Emergent effects of the  failure are considered by examining the failure effects of the interdependent relationship between resources  based on the ontology shown in Figure 3.    

169


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers  Information Security (Sc), expressed by {0.4, 0.6, 0.8, 0.5}, indicates that the information flow of the capability  contains  data  that  is  high  in  private,  sensitive  and  intellectual  property  (due  to  new  product  research  and  development). Loss of Sc can have larger organizational implications than simply a loss of revenue. Examination  of the individual resource Sc parameters becomes an area of security focus. Sc is related to the dependability  value  of  each  resource.  Loss  of  intellectual  property  can,  in  worst  case,  result  in  the  loss  of  the  business  capability viz., Vc = zero (Ekelhart, Fenz and Neubauer, 2009).     Each  resource  individual  class  instance  contains  the  attributes  associated  with  Security  assurance  measures.  This  is  influenced  by  the  classes  Enterprise  Governance  and  Enterprise  Reference  Architecture.  Based  on  its  ontology, the cumulative values for Rc, Ec, Sc, and Ic are computed and compared to the needs of the business  capability. Variances between actual state and desired state provide the organization with a means to measure  the effort required and where to allocate scarce resources. 

Figure 3: Ontology of enterprise domain resources 

4.3 Information security conceptual framework  A  Business  Capability  is  seen  as  the  proficiency  or  capacity  of  the  enterprise  to  deliver  business  value  to  its  customers  by  leveraging  interdependent  resources  spanning  the  entire  organization  (Kristen  et  al  2008).  To  ensure  alignment  between  Enterprise  Strategy,  Business  Capability,  Business  Value  and  related  domain  resources  (internal  and  external),  a  framework  is  established.  In  the  context  of  this  research,  a  Business  Capability  Information  Systems  Model  (CDISM)  is  developed  (Figure  4)  by  binding  principles  of  Enterprise  Ontology, Enterprise Strategic Planning, Business planning and Information Technology and Security Principles.  The  components  of  the  framework  are  Enterprise  Capability  Assessment,  Business  Capability  to  Strategy  Alignment,  Business  Capability  to  Resource  Mapping,  Business  Capability  to  Resource  Alignment  and  Operational Run State. (Excluded from this study is the Operational Run State process that provides reinforcing  and  balancing  causal  feedback  loops.)  Each  phase  receives  input  from  a  number  of  internal  and  external 

170


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers  sources,  which  may  include  Ontology,  Enterprise  Strategy,  business  planning,  governance  and  regulatory  compliance directives and Information Technology engineering directives.     Ontological  expression  of  the  enterprise  resource  relationship  as  derived  from  the  CDISM  framework  is  presented in Figure 3. The ontology describes the complex nature of the concepts and relationships between  the interdependent resources (Smith and Welty, 2001) that are required to successfully execute and meet the  objectives set for the business capability called Product Diversification Strategy. Figure 5 provides a conceptual  view  of  the  relationship  between  Enterprise  Resources  Sub‐class  DomesticCapability  and  sub‐class  BusinessSystemsDomainResource  (Milanovic,  Milic  and  Malek,  2008).  A  similar  model  (not  shown)  is  developed to illustrate the relationship at the technical services level.  Enterprise Capability Assessment

Business Capability to Strategy Alignment

Business Capability to Resource Mapping

Business Capability to Resource Alignment

Input and Constraint Values [Ontology]

Input and Constraint Values [Ontology]

Input and Constraint Values [Ontology]

Input and Constraint Values [Ontology]

Ontology (Domain, Attributes, Relationships

Ontology (Domain, Attributes, Relationships

Ontology (Domain, Attributes, Relationships

Ontology (Domain, Attributes, Relationships

Mission Statement, Vision Statement, Business Strategy, Business Value Definition, Business Objectives, Business Critical Success Factors,

Business Capabilities Defined, Business Capabilities aligned to Strategy, Strategic Value (Vc) Effectiveness (Ec) Dependability (Rc) Investment (Ic) Sensitivity (Sc)

Taxonomy of services viz.:

Reference and Standards Models:

Business Services, Business Processes, Business Activities and Tasks, Application Services, Application Components, Technical Services, Technical Components, Information Classification.

Enterprise Architecture, Systems Engineering, Business Process, Controls (CoBiT, ITIL, 6-Sigma, PMO), Security Frameworks, Legal and Regulatory, Commercial agreements, Security Ontology

Strategic Road Map, R&D Pipeline.

Internal entities: Shareholders, Stakeholders, Organization business units, people.

Operational Run State

External Entities: Customers, Consumers, Vendors, Suppliers, Partners, Alliances, Compliance, Legal, Geography, Territories.

Figure 4: Capability‐driven information security mode  Enquiry of Enterprise Ontology will determine for a particular capability the degree to which resources at the  atomic level will meet the strategic objectives set at the Enterprise Strategy level. Examination of the nature of  the underlying  structure  and  relationships will  determine  the degree  to  which  certain  resource  attributes  of  Dependability (Rc), Effectiveness (Ec), Privacy (Sc), and investments (Ic) are aligned to the requirements of the  enterprise. Examination of potential failures and cascading effects at the individual class instance provides the  enterprise with the ability to determine the impact of failure and the level of investment required to meet its  strategic objectives.    The  process  defined  within  the  CDISM  framework  is  repeatable  throughout  the  business  life  cycle  of  the  enterprise.     This  research paper  presents  an  alternative  approach to  dealing  with  the  rise  of  cyber‐threats  made  against  enterprises.  The  uncomplicated  world  of  cause  and  effect  analysis  and  actions  in  response  to  threats  and  attacks are no longer sufficient and are in many instances outmoded as emerging cyber‐threats have adopted  the nature and characteristics of complex systems. Security frameworks must consider the complex nature of  the enterprise and must understand and appreciate its internal structure and behavior in response to entity or  resource failures. To enable the development of an alternative security model this paper identifies three main  prerequisites.  Firstly,  there  must  exist  Enterprise  Ontology  ‐  a  universal  model  that  is  clear  and  precise  and  describes  the  complex  structure  explicitly.  Secondly,  security  must  be  defined  in  terms  that  would  allow  an  enterprise  to  understand  clearly  its  meaning  and  apply  it  appropriately  as  it  makes  strategic,  tactical  and  operational  decisions.  Finally,  to  ensure  that  the  complex  structure  of  an  enterprise  maintains  alignment 

171


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers  between  interdependent  resources  and  strategic  imperatives,  a  framework  is  needed  to  leverage  ideas  of  strategy and business value as it creates or modifies business capabilities. Alignment within the framework is  achieved through business value that is a function of Financial, Operational and Security measures.  

Figure 5: Enterprise resource reference model  In  this  study,  Enterprise  Ontology  was  created  to  describe  the  complex  structure  of  a  real  world  enterprise  (modified).  Business  value  was  defined  in  terms  of  a  set  of  metrics  that  cascades  directly  from  the  organization’s business strategy and expressed in a single business capability (Product Diversification Strategy).  Ontology  was  used  to  understand  the  organization’s  current  strategic  competency  and  capacity  at  the  resource  level  (individual  class  instance  level).  Such  knowledge  was  used  to  evaluate  the  requirements  of  a  future  capability  against  current  capabilities.  A  Capability‐Driven  Information  Security  Model  (CDISM)  was  utilized to derive in a systematic manner the areas of focus within the enterprise and level of effort required to  protect its interests during the execution of its business strategy.     Analysis  of  the  results  reveal  that  Enterprise  Ontology  is  an  important  mechanism  for  explaining  and  understanding  the  complex  nature  of  an  enterprise  as  it  interacts  with  internal  and  external  entities.  Examination of the properties of entities and nature and relationship between select resources provides clarity  of  their  role,  purpose,  interdependency  and  failure  effect.  The  resultant  baseline  forms  the  foundation  for  determining work effort required to support changes made to a business strategy. Security is applied at both  the granular and holistic level to ensure that the entire system does not shift into a state of chaos. 

Conclusion The  focus  of  this  research  is  to  rethink  the  current  approach  to  Enterprise  Security  by  shifting  focus  from  a  simple  cause  and  effect  (linear)  probabilistic  risk  model  to  a  unified  approach  where  emergent  behavior  caused by cascading failures is modeled and the internal structure and nature of the resources that define the  enterprise is made more dependable.     Several  opportunities  exist  to  enhance  and  automate  the  creation  of  enterprise  Ontology  by  examining  the  attributes and relationships of its resources and to eliminate (architectural) variability that drives complexity.  The  stability  and  security  of  a  system  is  its  ability  to  maintain  an  accepted  level  of  equilibrium  during  the  execution of its strategy. Such a condition is predicated on the belief that each resource has a known state that  is  understood  by  it  and  other  (interdependent)  resources.  Changes  to  a  resource’s  internal  condition  would  then trigger semantically based events that would indicate a probable failed state. Within a complex system, 

172


Stephen Schiavone, Lalit Garg and Kelly Summers  resources  that  are  “ontologically  aware”  could  trigger  a  self‐preservation  containment  (fail‐safe)  event  removing the need to collect and centrally maintain and analyze large amounts of syntax‐based events. 

References Barroero, T., Motta, G. & Pignatelli, G. (2010) Business Capabilities Centric Enterprise Architecture, In the Proceedings of  EAI2N 2010, International Federation for Information Processing, pp.32‐43.  Burton, B. (2010) Eight Business Capability Modeling Best Practices, Gartner Research, ID Number G00175782, Gartner Inc.  Clark, D., Guba, E. & Smith, G. (1977) Functions and Definitions of Functions of a Research Proposal, Bloomington: College  of Education Indiana University.  Downes, J. & Goodman, J. (2010) Barron’s Finance and Investment Handbook, New York: Barron’s Education Series, Inc.  Deloitte Consulting (2012) Industry Print [Online]. Available from: http://www.deloitte.com/view/en_US/us/index.htm  (Accessed: 20 September 2012).  Ekelhart, A., Fenz, S. & Neubauer, T. (2009) AURUM: A Framework for Information Security Risk Management, In  nd Proceedings of the 42  Hawaii International Conference on System Science.   Falliere, N., Murchu, L. and Chien, E. (2011) W32.Stuxnet Dossier [Online]. Available  from:http://www.symantec.com/content/en/us/enterprise/media/security_response/whitepapers/w32_stuxnet_do ssier.pdf (Accessed: 4 July 2012).  Fenz, S. & Neubauer, T. (2009) How to Determine Threat Probabilities using Ontologies and Bayesian Networks, In  Proceedings of CSIIRW ’09 ACM.  Guevara, D. (2011) Australian Symposium/ITxpo Roundtable Exemplifies Strategic EA Challenges, Gartner Research, ID  Number G00227138, Gartner Inc.  Jallow, A. et al. (2007) Operational Risk Analysis in Business Process, BT Technology Journal, January, 25 (1), pp. 168 ‐ 177.  Kristen, R. et al. (2008) Formalizing Risk with Value‐Focused Process Engineering [Online]. Available from:  http://is2.lse.ac.uk/asp/aspecis/20080138.pdf (Accessed: 20 August 2012).  Lambrix, P. (2010) Ontology Alignment: State of the Art and An Application in Literature Search [Online]. Available from:  www.ida.liu.se/~patla/talks/lambrix‐rostock10.pdf (Accessed: 21 October 2012).  McAfee (2011) Global Energy Cyberattacks: “Night Dragon” [Online]. Available from:  http://www.mcafee.com/us/resources/white‐papers/wp‐global‐energy‐cyberattacks‐night‐dragon.pdf (Accessed: 9  July 2012).  Meadows, D. (2008) Thinking in Systems, Chelsea Green Publishing.  Medicis Pharmaceutical Corporation (2012) Medicis [Online]. Available from: http://www.medicis.com (Accessed: 20  November 2012).  Milanovic, M., Milic, B. & Malek, M. (2008) Modeling Business Process Availability, In the Proceedings of the IEEE  International Congress on Services 2008 – Part I, pp. 315 – 321.  Nightingale, D. (2005) Enterprise Value Stream Mapping (EVSM) Workshop [Online]. Available from:  http://lean.mit.edu/component/docman/doc_download/517‐enterprise‐value‐stream‐mapping‐at‐mit?Itemid=1  (Accessed: 20 August 2012).  Noy, N. & McGuinness, D. (2002) Ontology Development 101: A Guide to Creating Your First Ontology [Online]. Available  from: ftp://ftp.ksl.stanford.edu/pub/KSL_Reports/KSL‐01‐05.pdf.gz (Accessed: 24 October 2012).  O’Connor, P. and Kleyner, A. (2012) Practical Reliability Engineering, John Wiley and Sons, Inc.  Peterson, G. (2007) Security Architecture Blueprint [Online]. Available from:  http://www.arctecgroup.net/pdf/ArctecSecurityArchitectureBlueprint.pdf (Accessed: 20 August 2012).  Protégé (2012) Protégé, the National Center for Biomedical Ontology, National Institute of General Medical Sciences  [Online]. Available from: http://protege.stanford.edu/download/registered.html (Accessed: 20 September 2012).  Rebovich, G. (2011) Systems Thinking for the Enterprise. In: Rebovich & White, ed. 2011. Enterprise Systems Engineering:  Advances in the Theory and Practice. New York: CRC Press.  Renkema, T. (2000) The IT Value Quest: How to Capture the Business Value of IT‐Based Infrastructure, New York: John  Wiley & Sons, Ltd.  Sackmann, S. (2008) Assessing the Effects of IT Changes on IT Risk – A Business Process‐Oriented View [Online]. Available  from: http://ibis.in.tum.de/mkwi08/17_IT‐Risikomanagement_‐_IT‐Projekte_und_IT‐Compliance/05_Sackmann.pdf  (Accessed: July 30 2012).  Simmonds, A., Sandilands, P. & Ekert, L. (2006) An Ontology for Network Security Attacks, Sydney: University of Technology.  Smith, M. (2010) The Gartner Business Value Model: A Framework for measuring Business Performance, Gartner Research,  ID Number G00175097, Gartner Inc.  Smith, B. & Welty, C. (2001) Ontology: Towards a New Synthesis, In Proceedings of the FOIS’01 ACM, October.  Sterman, J. (2000) Business Dynamics: Systems Thinking and Modeling for a Complex World, Boston: McGraw‐Hill  Companies Inc.  Weill, P. & Broadbent, M. (1998) Leveraging the New Infrastructure: How Market Leaders Capitalize on Information  Technology, Boston: Harvard Business School Press. 

173


Organisational Value of Social Technologies: An Australian Study  Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski  RMIT University, Melbourne, Australia  mohini.singh@rmit.edu.au  konrad.peszynski@rmit.edu.au    Abstract:  This  paper  discusses  the  value  of  social  technologies  in  organizations.  It  is  based  on  ‘value  focused  thinking’  approach to establish the fundamental objectives of social technology applications in organizations. Data for the study was  gathered  from  interviews  with  26  individuals  in  10  organizations  about  the  value  of  social  technologies.  Value  focused  thinking  approach  helped  structure  the  interview  responses  to  establish  value  of  social  technology  in  terms  of  business  improvements. The findings highlight innovation of internal processes, creation of organisational identity and new business  models, integrated business functions, as well as employee support to be important values of social technology enabled  innovation  in  organisations.  Other  values  include  low  cost  interactive  marketing,  news  dissemination,  organizational  transparency and customer service. This research suggests that internal organizational applications of social technologies  are just as valuable as external applications.    Keywords: organizational value of social websites, social technologies, value focused thinking approach, organisational  value of Web 2.0 technologies 

1. Introduction           Web  2.0  based  social  technologies  including  blogs,  wikis,  YouTube,  MySpace,  Flickr,  Twitter  and  Facebook  evolved in the last decade, and are being extensively used by individuals (Treese, 2006), government agencies  (Osimi, 2008) and by organisations across a multitude of industry sectors such as health, education, retail, and  transport  (Boulos  and  Wheelert,  2007;  McAfee,  2006).  Organisational  applications  of  social  technologies  support novel ways of interacting with customers and new business opportunities (Boulos and Wheelar, 2007),  team work (Jue et al, 2010) and a greater interaction with stakeholders (Constanides and Fountain, 2008). An  exploratory  Australian  study  (Singh,  and  Davison  and  Wickramasinghe,  2010)  highlighted  that  for  business  organisations social technologies are a major innovation in managing relationships with its stakeholders, and  for collaborating and networking with business partners. Social technologies are replacing complex knowledge  management systems in organisations with ‘blogs’ and ‘wikis’ for knowledge sharing and transfer (Lee and Lee,  2006) and are providing organisations with low‐cost, low‐risk marketing channels (Forrester Marketing Forum,  2009).     Although social technologies in business organisations is notable, the focus of earlier research has been on its  taxonomy (Kim et al., 2010), definition, history and scholarship (Boyd, 2007) risk, trust and privacy concerns  (Fogel and Nehmad, 2009), changes in user behaviour (Patchin and Hinduja, 2010), and self disclosure (Posey  et al., 2010). Business related research on social technologies to date is sparse. It includes an exploratory study  that identified social technology dynamic capabilities (Singh, Davison, and Wickramasinghe, 2010), features of  enterprise 2.0 (Bughin, 2008 and McAfee, 2009), an analysis of literature on social technology impact (Sena,  2009) and business impact of Web 2.0 technologies (Andriole, 2010). Keitzman, et al., (2010) addressed social  media  applications  in  organisations  from  the  perspective  of  how  individuals  in  the  organization  use  these  tools.     Since  social  technologies  entail  unique  characteristics  of  user  created  content,  multi‐platform  access,  transparency  and  synchronous  as  well  as  asynchronous  communication  (Kim  et  al,  2010),  it  is  imperative  to  establish  organizational  implications  of  its  use.  A  comprehensive  study  on  organizational  value  of  social  technology enabled applications is not available. Value in terms of business benefits from social technologies  in organizations is yet to be determined. This paper begins to fill the void by investigating the value of social  technologies in ten large Australian organizations that were early adopters of this media.     This study is based on the ‘value‐focused thinking’ (Keeny, 1992) approach to establish organizational value of  social technologies. ‘Value‐Focused Thinking’ approach helps identify the means‐end value structure in certain  decision  contexts.  Research  reported  in  this  paper  indicate  that  social  technologies  support  and  improve  marketing  and  customer  service  support;  promote  organizational  transparency;  increase  stakeholder  interaction; enhance employee support and augment innovation.   

174


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski  The paper is organized into seven sections. Following this introduction the second section discusses relevant  literature  on  business  applications  of  social  technologies  in  organizations.  The  third  section  discusses  earlier  research on the benefits of IT in organizations. The fourth section describes the research methods adopted to  estimate  organizational  value  of  social  technologies.  The  fifth  section  describes  how  we  organized  social  technology values from value focused thinking, and the sixth section discusses contributions, future research  and limitations of this study. Concluding remarks are included in the seventh section.  

2. Organisational use of social technologies  Social technology applications in organizations are generally service based, supporting greater interaction of  users,  encouraging  them  to  contribute,  review  and  edit  content  due  to  its  characteristics  of  easy  content  creation and low operation costs (Kim et al, 2010). Social technologies are used by business organizations as a  marketing tool and social dissemination of news and exchange of ideas (Constantinides and Fountain, 2008;  Demetrious,  2008)  for  collective  intelligence  (Chesbrough,  2006);  and  knowledge  networks  (Jarvenpaa  and  Majchrzak, 2008).     As  a  marketing  tool,  Constantinides  and  Fountain  (2008)  and  Demetrious  (2008)  explain  that  social  technologies enable new forms of interaction with customers as well as explain one‐to‐one marketing with its  characteristics  of  openness,  participation  and  networks.  This  opinion  is  supported  by  Li  and  Bernoff  (2008)  who suggest that with social technologies organisations can gather customer likes and dislikes about products  and services and push information of interest to their customers. Blogs are used as a cost effective channel to  promote products and services, as well as for one to one interactive marketing (Drezner & Farrell, 2004), and  sharing  and  refining  business  knowledge  (Soriano  et  al,  2009).  Bughin  (2008)  and  McAfee  (2009)  publicized  enterprise  2.0  as  an  outcome  of  social  technologies  achieved  from  peer  to  peer  interactions,  collective  intelligence, social networks, and knowledge sharing via blogs and customer collaboration by attracting a lot of  SNS  on  the  organsiational  sites  (Edery,  2006).  Chesbrough  (2006)  further  confirms  that  social  technologies  enable  collective  intelligence,  new  ways  of  presenting  data  (mashed  up),  is  easy  to  use,  promotes  digital  democracy, collaboration and development of new business models. This is re‐inforced by Twentyman (2008)  who  extended  organizational  use  of  social  media  to  sourcing  best  recruits  for  positions  by  tapping  into  the  social networking sites, and Weill (2006) is of the opinion that enterprise 2.0 has the potential for large returns  and a competitive advantage.    Organisational  use  of  social  technologies  from  the  above  literature  discussion  is  presented  in  Table  One  below:  Table 1: Business applications of Social technologies  Social Technology Application  One to one interaction 

Business Function  Marketing 

Customer support and service 

Marketing – customer  relationship management  Marketing 

Capturing customer likes and dislikes  from customer networks  Data and content (mashed up,  dynamic, metadata, scalability)  Digital democracy  Collective intelligence  Best recruits  Peer to peer support  Enterprise 2.0  Low costs and new business  opportunities  Greater interaction with  stakeholders 

Knowledge Management  Knowledge sharing and  networks  Team work  Employees  Employee support  New business models  Competitive advantage  Stakeholder collaboration  and relationship management 

References Boulos and Wheelert (2007);  Constantinides and Fountain (2008);  Demetrious (2008); Drezner & Farrell  (2004)  Li and Bernoff (2008); Drezner & Farrell  (2004)  Li and Bernoff (2008);  Lee and Lee (2006); Kim et al (2010);  Turban et al (2010); Soriano et al, (2008)  Jarvenpaa and Majchrzak (2008);  Chesbrough (2006)  Jue, et. al, (2010; Chesbrough (2006)  Twentyman (2008)  Bughin (2008); McAfee (2009)  Bughin (2008); McAfee (2009)  Boulos and Wheeler (2007); Weill (2006);  Forrester Marketing Forum (2009).  Singh, Davison and Wickramasinghe (2010) 

Information presented in Table One indicates that in organizations social technologies are used for marketing,  customer support and knowledge management.  It also helps organizations identify and source employees for 

175


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski  their  positions,  team  work  and  employee  support,  achieving  a  competitive  advantage  from  low  cost  opportunities and stakeholder relationship management.  

3. Value of information technology in organisations  Information  technologies  are  widely  deployed  in  organisations  to  improve  operational  efficiencies  and  financial  performance.  The  impact  of  IT  on  organisations  can  be  tangible  as  well  as  intangible  (Sheng  et  al,  2005). Tangible benefits are usually associated with improvements in financial performance such as improved  marketshare (Banker and Kauffman, 1988; Barua et al, 1995), reduced labour costs (Singh and Byrne, 2005),  profitability  (Brown  et  al,  1995),  cost  savings  (Mukhopadya  et  al,  1995),  and  productivity  (Hitt  and  Brynjolfsson,  1996).  Melville  et  al.,  (2004)  explained  that  economic  value  is  achieved  from  IT  resources  and  positive  financial  performance,  confirmed  by  earlier  empirical  studies  (Devaraj  and  Kohli,  2000;  Bhardawaj,  2000).      Intangible benefits of IT include enhanced coordination with business partners (Buhalis, 2004), higher product  quality  (Ryan  and  Harrison,  2000),  improved  customer  service  (Anderson  et  al.,  2003),  increased  knowledge  about customers (Cooper et al., 2000) and competitive advantage (Bhatt and Grover, 2005; Devaraj and Kohli,  2003; Griffiths and Finlay, 2004; Melville et al., 2004; Sethi and King, 1994).     The  notion  of  performance  and  competitiveness  achieved  from  information  technologies  has  been  continuously researched over the last decade. Joshi et al., (2010) referred to changed competitive landscape  with continuous innovation through IT‐enabled capabilities. Chi et al., (2010) identified competitive advantage  through  IT  network  structure,  Chari  et  al.,  (2008)  explored  the  impact  of  IT  investments  and  diversification  strategies on firm performance and Aral and Weill (2007) explained performance variations due to resource  allocations.     Social technologies are a new type of information technology that organizations are increasingly adopting to  improve competitiveness and entrepreneurship. However, due to their unique characteristics of interactivity,  transparency  and  openness  value  of  social  technologies  in  organisations  is  yet  to  be  established.  This  study  therefore aimed to understand organizational value of social technologies in ten Australian organizations that  were early adopters of these technologies.  

4. Research methodology  Values according to Keeney (1999) are principles for evaluating the desirability of any possible consequence  and  are  hence  essential  to  assess  the  ‘actual  or  potential  consequences  of  action  and  inaction’  in  a  given  decision context. Keeney also explains that in value‐focused thinking no limits are enforced on what we care  about.  Value  focused  thinking  has  been  used  in  identifying  the  value  of  Internet  commerce  to  customers  (Keeney, 1999), the value of mobile technology in organizations (Nah, Siau and Sheng, 2005), and the value of  information systems security in organizations (Dhillon and Torkzadek, 2006).     In Value Focused Thinking approach (VFT) (Keeney, 1999) values that are of concern are made explicit by the  identification of  objectives.  An  objective  is  a  statement or  something one  desires  to  achieve  (Keeney,  1992)  with  three  features  of  a  decision  context,  an  object  and  a  direction  of  preference.  A  VFT  study  result  is  the  outcome of a means‐ends objective network, which depicts fundamental objectives, means objectives and the  relationships between the objectives (Sheng, Nah and Siau, 2010).     The steps of VFT are as follows:  ƒ

Develop an initial list of objectives and convert them into a common form. As suggested by Keeney (1999)  objectives can be identified from ‘wish lists’, problems and shortcomings, alternatives and consequences 

ƒ

Structure objectives to distinguish between fundamental objectives and means objectives. Fundamental  objectives concern ‘the ends that decision makers value in a specific context’, and means objectives are  ‘methods to achieve ends’ (Keeney, 1999).  

ƒ

Building the means‐ends objective network. The final step in the VFT approach is to build the means‐end  objective network which provides a model of the specific interrelationships among the means objectives  and their relationships to fundamental objectives. The relationships depicted in the means‐ends objective  network allow a clearer understanding of how the means and fundamental objectives were established.   

176


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski 

5. Data collection and analysis  We interviewed a total of 26 individuals in ten organizations ranging from 1 to 4 people in each organization all  of  who  were  involved  with  social  technology  projects.  Keeney  (1999)  suggested  that  asking  the  people  concerned is a good way to identify values, and Dhillon and Torkzadeh (2006) confirmed that the number of  people interviewed can vary from 2 to 100. For this research, people interviewed were those that agreed to  participate in this research, and were managing social technology projects in their organisations. The range of  industries  represented  by  the  respondents  includes  IT,  travel,  education,  automotive,  retail  and  finance.  Respondents  were  from  teams  made  up  of  people  from  IT  departments,  marketing,  accounts  and  social  technology project leaders.     The  interviews  were  conducted  face  to  face  to  identify  social  technology  values.  Each  interview  lasted  approximately 45 minutes, was recorded and later transcribed. The researchers also took notes during each  interview. Each interview session continued until no further values could be elicited from each respondent.     Data collection was accomplished using the following processes:  ƒ

At the  initial  meeting  the  values  of  social  technologies  in  the  organisation  was  recognised.  Although  a  review of literature was undertaken for some background information on the value of social technologies,  interviews  were  used  to  educe  values  on  social  technologies  from  individuals  involved  in  the  project.   Further  probing  with  the  question  ‘why  was  this  important’  was  undertaken  to  develop  an  in‐depth  understanding (Keeney, 1994) of the values.  

ƒ

The means and ends objectives were derived from the interview transcripts. All subjective responses from  the interviews were reduced to a common form (Miles and Huberman, 1994). The initial list was grouped  together  by  the  researchers  to  enable  clustering  of  similar  objectives  and  removal  of  redundancies  and  duplicates. The statements were then written in a common format, ie an objective or a subobjective. By  carefully reviewing the content of each subobjective, 8 clusters were developed. These clusters were then  labelled and are presented as means objectives (means) with evidence from interviews. This is attached as  Appendix Two.  

ƒ

The objectives were classified as either fundamental (ends) in relation to the decision context or a means  (ways) to achieve the fundamental objectives as shown in the means‐ends objective network (Figure 1 –  Appendix One). For example, when a general objective was identified to be maximising marketing effort,  further  probing  established  a  social  technology  marketing  strategy,  brand  promotion  and  reduced  marketing  costs  as  means  leading  to  the  end  (fundamental)  value  maximising  marketing  and  customer  service.  Similarly  other  values  presented  in  the  means  objective  network  (Figure  One  –  Appendix  One)  were achieved. As a result, 6 fundamental objectives (ends) are listed in Table 1.   

6. Research results  From an initial list of 89 means objectives and 8 candidate fundamental objectives presented in Appendix Two,  six  fundamental  objectives  were  identified.  These  are  presented  in  Table  1.  Issues  transcribed  from  the  interviews are presented in Table 2 – Appendix 2.  The means‐end objective network is presented as Figure 1  in Appendix One.   Table 2: Fundamental objectives  Fundamental Objectives (ends)  Enhanced customer service and marketing activities 

Means Objectives (ways)  Enhance online community  Maximize input from prospective customer Maximise  customer insight  Maximize customer interaction  Maximize product information via st  Integrate soc tech strategy into marketing strategy  Maximize brand promotion  Reduce advertising cost  Maximise trust  Maximize info integrity, authenticity & trust  Maximize organization promotion  Maximize internal/external interaction  Maximize info dissemination via soc tech 

Organizational transparency 

177


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski  Fundamental Objectives (ends)  Innovation 

Enhanced stakeholder interactivity and collaboration 

Integrated business processes 

Employee engagement and support 

Means Objectives (ways)  Enhance organizational innovation  Maximize use of soc tech  New business models  Enhance soc tech culture  Maximize soc tech integration into the intranet  Enable new business models  Enhance collaboration  Enhance stakeholder participation  Manage stakeholder relationship  Enhance database for soc tech transactions  Minimize ad hoc resource allocation  Integrate soc tech activities into internal processes  Maximize info management  Link soc tech strategy to IT strategy  Integrate soc tech into intranets  Maximize internal communication via soc tech  Recruit graduates  Maximize HR abilities with soc tech 

7. Findings and discussion  We  identified  six  fundamental  objectives  (ends)  in  this  research  using  the  value  focused  thinking  approach  representing  organizational  values  (Figure  1)  gained  from  social  technologies.  These  are  discussed  in  the  following section in light of the existing social technologies and extant theory on the benefits of information  technologies for organizations.     Enhanced customer service and marketing activities    This  research  indicates  that  social  technologies  are  useful  tools  for  providing  effective  customer  service  support.  It  supports  a  greater  interaction  with  the  organization  and  its  customers  as  well  as  connects  customers to other customers. The organization is able to capture customer concerns from the social media  based discussions, reviews and questions in a quick and effective way to design and deliver what customers  want,  improve  on  what  customers  complain  about  and  provide  assurances  and  relevant  information  to  customers interactively on a one to one basis. Marketing effectiveness with product and service promotion at  very  low  costs  is  achieved  from  social  technologies.  This  finding  confirms  Cunnigham  and  Wilkins’  (2009)  suggestion that with social (Web 2.0) technologies reduction in marketing costs is achieved. Organisations are  able  to  promote  goods  and  services,  as  well  as  customer  experiences  via  YouTubes.  It  enables  inclusion  of  successful  case  files,  dissemination  of  new  product  information,  gauge  customer  opinions  and  incorporate  customer insights for marketing campaigns.  Organisations achieved greater brand recognition, and reach to  new customers and customers’ friends with product information confirming Edery (2006) and Hemp’s (2006)  theory  that  Web  2.0  enables  a  host  of  new  customers  on  this  new  arena.  This  finding  also  extends  Constantinides  and  Fountain’s  (2008)  theory  that  social  media  is  an  effective  marketing  tool,  and  Bughin  (2008)  and  McAfee’s  (2009)  theory  that  it  enables  one‐to‐one  interactions,  collective  intelligence  and  customer collaboration.     Enhanced stakeholder interactivity and collaboration    With social technologies customer experience is easily consolidated from different sales people, participation  from new partners is encouraged, and a better relationship with all stakeholders is maintained. New business  models  are  generated  that  support  a  greater  collaboration  and  interactivity  with  stakeholders  improving  business and marketshare. Participation from new partners and a collaboration of different business functions  was also achieved. This finding is commensurate with Constanides and Fountain (2008) who suggest that social  technologies support a greater interaction with stakeholders.    Corporate Identity and transparency    Although much of the extant literature emphasizes on individual identity (Keitzman et al. (2011) this research  highlights that organisations are able to promote corporate identity and transparency via social technologies. 

178


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski  The unique social technology characteristics of openness, transparency and networks enable organizations to  present large amounts of information via this media to a much wider community promoting the organization  and  assuring  integrity.  Customers  and  business  partners  are  able  to  monitor  information  on  organizational  blogs for example, to establish authenticity and honesty about products and services, standards used, quality  of  products,  and  other  information  about  the  organization  they  are  dealing  with.  It  allows  organizations  to  present dynamic content on social technologies to promote and shape their brand as well as monitor what is  being said about them. Information presented on blogs is also captured by other media such as newspapers  and business magazines further promoting the organization. This research identified that social technologies  proffer transparency and openness, as well as helped organizations attain identity and recognition quickly and  easily.     Innovation    Social  technologies  helped  organizations  develop  a  new  frontier  for  communication,  interaction  with  stakeholders, information dissemination and is a source for new recruits. This new social technology culture  required  innovation  of  processes  and  new  ways  of  doing  things  such  as  managing  relationships  with  stakeholders and capturing insights from customers and business partners on a number of issues. Interaction  with all stakeholders in one space without time constraints made possible by social technologies proved to be  very useful for organizations. They are able to discuss information with sales managers from all branches on  this  media  for  collective  intelligence  on  marketing  and  sales,  with  suppliers  for  the  management  of  supply  chains,  with  offshore  partners  for  the  management  of  outsourced  business  processes  and  with  other  stakeholders for better management of all business operations. Use of social technologies has also enhanced  collaboration  between  business  functions  within  the  organizations  supporting  cross  functional  teams  and  better  sharing  of  information.  When  increased  communication,  stronger  collaborations  and  connections  are  achieved from social technologies, change in strategic and marketing plans, leadership styles and organization  structure is required extending Mol and Birksahw’s (2008) explanation of management innovation. This finding  on  innovation  also  confirms  Chesbrough’s  (2006)  theory  that  social  technologies  result  in  new  business  models.     Integrated business processes    Social  technologies  are  used  for  information  dissemination  both  internally  and  externally.  Information  from  social  technologies  are  loaded  onto  organizational  databases  for  data  mining  and  collective  intelligence  on  new business opportunities in marketing and collaboration. This research also highlighted the minimization of  ad  hoc  resource  allocation  with  streamlined  processes  and  enhanced  productivity  is  achieved  from  social  media. It clearly brought to light information integration for managerial and strategic decisions with data from  social  technologies  transmitted  and  integrated  with  internal  organisational  processes.  Virtualization  of  marketing  and  customer  service  processes,  as  well  as  employee  and  business  partner  interactions  extend  Peppard et al’s (2007) explanation of the business and process changes an organization needs to incorporate  to realize the benefits of a new technology.     Employee engagement and support    Findings of this research indicate that organisations are integrating social technologies into their intranets for  internal  news  dissemination,  to  enhance  peer  to  peer  interactions,  and  a  greater  interaction  between  employees  from  different  levels  by  incorporating  social  technologies  into  organizational  intranets.  Organisations are competing for key talent for which social technologies are proving to be useful to identify  the best recruits for the organization. With social technologies employees feel more engaged, feel they make a  difference and are recognized for their contributions. New ways of capturing pertinent information from social  technologies  made  available  via  organizational  intranets  leads  to  knowledge  creation  and  enhanced  social  capital  amongst  employees.  Whilst  some  of  the  above  findings  are  new,  knowledge  networks  created  from  social  technologies  for  and  by  employees  confirmed  Jarvenpaa  and  Majchrzak’s  (2008)  description  of  social  technology applications for employee support.  It extends Kosalge and Tole’s (2010) theory that with Web 2.0,  an organization can better engage with and energise employees.     Literature  discussed  earlier  in  this  paper  identified  organizational  value  of  social  technology  to  be  low  cost  marketing,  customer  relationship  management,  knowledge  management,  team  work,  collective  intelligence, 

179


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski  employee support, new business models, stakeholder collaboration and a competitive advantage. Findings of  this exploratory research include integrated organizational processes for cross functional decisions based on  information  analysed  from  social  media,  stakeholder  relationship  management,  new  business  models  for  marketing and collaboration, innovation, organizational identity promoting openness and transparency, peer  to  peer  employee  support  and  collaboration  between  employees  of  all  levels  to  be  organizational  values  attained from social media. Although knowledge management was not apparent with these early adopters of  social technologies, the most important contribution this research makes is that value of social technologies is  both internal and external to organsiations.     Some of the organisational values of social technologies discussed above are similar to the intangible benefits  achieved  from  IT  discussed  earlier  in  this  paper.  These  include  enhanced  collaboration  with  stakeholders  (Buhalis,  2004),  improved  customer  service  (Quinn  and  Bailey,  1994),  and  increased  knowledge  about  customers (Cooper et al., 2000).  Although evidence of competitive advantage was not clear in this research,  innovation  and  increased  knowledge  capabilities  (Chi  et  al.,  2010)  were  definitely  evident.  Findings  of  this  research can also be explained with Peppard et al’s, 2007) ‘benefits dependency network’ to illustrate social  technology capabilities to be new IT capabilities, new ways of doing things with social technologies to be the  business changes required to achieve the benefits (values) from this new IT.  

8. Conclusion Value  of  social  technologies  in  organizations  was  established  using  the  ‘value  focused  assessment’  theory  determining  the  means  and  fundamental  objectives.  It  provided  a  systematic  approach  for  articulating  and  organizing means and ends (ways of achieving values). It highlighted social technology capabilities, how they  can  be  deployed  in  organizations  and  what  benefits  can  be  achieved  from  them.  An  important  contribution  this research makes is that organizations can capitalize on internal values of social technologies (innovation,  integrated  business  processes,  employee  engagement  and  support)  as  much  as  external  (enhanced  stakeholder  interactivity,  customer  service  and  marketing  activities,  corporate  identity  and  transparency)  organizational  identity,  business  promotion,  stakeholder  and  customer  relationship  management).  It  also  confirms  that  social  technologies  are  a  type  of  information  technology  as  much  of  the  extant  IT  theory  on  benefits  can  be  applied  to  social  technology  values.  For  organisations,  this  research  indicates  that  social  technologies  create  a  network  for  innovative  marketing  opportunities,  enhance  collaboration,  support  team  work  and  recruitment  of  employees,  provide  customer  services,  lead  to  integrated  business  processes  and  support a greater understanding of customer demands.     Based  on  the  initial  work  presented  in  this  paper,  three  broad  categories  of  research  opportunities  exist.  Therefore  further  research  could  address  firstly  the  objectives  identified  in  this  research  can  be  tested  for  organizations  in  different  regions  of  Australia  and  the  world  to  confirm  the  values  discussed  in  this  paper.  Secondly, to work with these same organizations to confirm the relationship between means objectives and  fundamental  objectives  established  in  this  research.  Thirdly,  to  work  with  organizations  in  greater  depth  to  establish objectives that can be classified as tangible benefits and compare them with IT tangible benefits.   

9. Limitations Research  findings  discussed  in  this  paper  are  from  one  state  in  Australia  with  organizations  that  are  early  adopters  of  social  technologies.  Some  organizations  were  using  a  lot  of  these  networking  sites  while  others  had implemented only a few. Values in this research were subjective, acquired from interviews. Quantification  of the values might result in a different set of fundamental objectives.    

180


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski 

Appendix 1: Figure 1 means‐ends objective network 

181


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski 

Appendix 2: Table three means objectives and evidence from interviews  Maximise communication with customers  Add value to existing online communities  Create a destination for customer responses  Allow prospective customers to participate in product  discussions online  Enable customers to access YouTubes on products  Disseminate customer relevant events/information  Quick responses to customer queries  Showcase customer experiences  Promoting engaging content  Support customer interaction  Encourage customer feedback  Enhanced customer service  Maximise transparency  Customers want authenticity and honesty  Security and integrity of information  Increase trust   

Maximize integration of internal business processes  Feed information into transactions database  Easily load relevant information on youtubes  Integrate ST activities with internal processes  Minimize ad hoc resource allocation  Information management from ST responses  Integration of ST marketing and customer service  A new business model   

Maximize marketing effort  Move the existing brand recognition online  Provide relevant content online to lift the brand  Promote case files globally  Achieve a competitive edge in marketing  Brand promotion  Use ST as a marketing tool  ST a new marketing strategy  Incorporate customer insights  Identify customer demands  Reduce advertising costs   

Enhance employee support  A comprehensive intranet with interactive content  Employee interaction  Use ST for internal news dissemination  Promote transparency  Mobility of workers  Peer to peer communication  Better information sharing between employees  Improved internal communication  Smart phone access to employee related information  Ability to influence global thinking    Maximise corporate identity  News updates  Use ST for marketing  Reduce negative customer responses  Promote the organization  Support internal/external interaction  Business promotion  Info on organisational blogs used by other media  (newspapers and magazines)  Increase social technology use  Get more to use social technologies  Introduce ST culture  Minimize trial and error ST strategies  Linking ST to IT strategy  Communication with external stakeholders  Graduate recruitment via ST  Reasonable innovation across the organization  Ability to incorporate multimedia  Dynamic content with easy updates – customers/employees  Internal and external communication    Maximise interaction with stakeholders  Gain customer experience from all head salespeople  Participation from stakeholders in this space  Collaboration between different business functions  Manage stakeholder relationship  Encourage participation from new partners  Supports conglomerates with several stakeholders   

References Anderson, M. C., Banker, R. D., & Ravindran, S. (2003) The new productivity paradox, Communications of the ACM, 46(3),  91‐94.  Andriole, S. J. (2010) Business Impact of Web 2.0 Technologies. Communications of the ACM 53 (7), 87 – 79.  Aral, S., & Weill, P. (2007) IT Assets, Organizational Capabilities, and Firm Performance: How Resource Allocations and  Organizational Differences Explain Performance Variation, Organization Science, 18(5), 763‐780.  Banker, R. D., & Kauffman, R. J. (1988) Strategic Contributions of Information Technology: An Empirical Study of ATM  th Networks. Proceedings of the 9  International Conference on Information Systems, Minneapolis, MN, 9, 141‐150.   Bharadwaj, A. S., (2000) A resource based perspective on information technology capability and firm performance: an  empirical investigation, MIS Quarterly, 24(1), 169‐196.  Bhatt,G. D., Gover, V. & Gover, V. (2005) Types of Information Technology capabilities and their role in competitive  advantage: An empirical study’, Journal of Management Information Systems, 22(2), 253‐277. 

182


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski  Boulos, M. G. And Wheeler, S. 2007.  ‘The emerging Web 2.0 social software: An enabling suite of sociable technologies in  health and health care education’. Health Information & Libraries Journal, 24, 2‐23.  Boyd, D. (2007) Why Youth (Heart) Social Network Sites: The Role of Networked Publics in Teenage Social Life. In D.  Buckingham (Ed.), MacArthur Foundation Series on Digital Learning – Youth, Identity, and Digital Media Volume, pp.  119‐142, Cambridge, MA: MIT Press.  Bughin, J. (2008) The rise of enterprise 2.0, Journal of Direct, Data and Digital Marketing Practice, 9(3), 251‐259.  Buhalis, D. (2004) eAirlines: strategic and tactical use of ICTs in the airline industry, Information and Management, 41, 805‐ 825.  Chari, M., Devaraj, S., & David, P. (2008). The impact of information technology investments and diversification strategies  on firm performance. Management Science, 54(1), 224‐234  Chesbrough, H. W. (2006) Open Business Models, Boston, MA, Harvard Business School Press.  Chi, L, Ravichandran, T., & Andrevski, G. (2010) Information Technology, Network Structure, and Competitive Action,  Information Systems Research, 21(3), 543‐570.  Contaninides, S. & Fountain, S. J. (2008) Web 2.0: Conceptual Foundations and Marketing Issues, Journal of Direct, Data  and Digital Marketing Practice, 9(3), 231‐244.  Cooper, B., Watson, H. J., Wixom, B. H., & Goodhue, D. L. (2000) Data warehouse supports corporate strategy at first  American corporation, MIS Quarterly, 24(4), 547‐567.  Cunningham, P. & Wilkins, J. (2009) A Walk In The Cloud’, Information Management Journal, 43(1), 22‐54.   Demetrious, K. (2008) Corporate Social Responsibility, new activism and public relations, Social Responsibility Journal, 4,  104‐119.  Devaraj, S. & Kohli, R. (2003) Performance Impacts of I.T: Is Actual Usage the missing link?, Management Science, 49(3),  273‐289.  Dhillon, G., & Torkzadeh, G. (2006) Value‐focussed assessment of information system security in organisations, Information  Systems Journal 16, 293‐314.   Drezner, D. W., & Farrel, H. (2004) The Power and Politics of Blogs, Proceedings of the 2004 American Political Science  Association.  Duffy, P., & Burns, A. (2006) The use of blogs, wikis, RRS in education; A conversation of possibilities, Proceedings of the  Online Teaching and Teaching Conference, Brisbane.  Edery, D.,(2006). Reverse product placement in virtual worlds. Harvard Business Review, 84, 12, 24.  Fogel, J., & Nehmad, E. (2009) Internet social network communities: Risk taking, trust, and privacy concerns, Computers in  Human Behaviour, 25, 153 ‐160.   Forrester Research (2009), “Forrester Marketing Forum: Social Technologies Allow for More Accessible Innovation in Down  Economy”, viewed 7 May 2009: <http://crm.sys‐con.com/node/934450>.   Griffiths, G. H., & Finlay, P. N. (2004) IS‐enabled sustainable competitive advantage in financial services, retailing and  manufacturing, Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 13, 24‐59.   Hemp, P. (2006). Are you ready for e‐tailing 2.0? Harvard Business Review, 84, 10, 28.  Ives, B. & Learmonth, G. (1984). The information system as a competitive weapon, Communications of the ACM, 27(12),  1193–1201.  Jarvenpan, S., & Majchrzak, A. (2008) Knowledge Collaboration Among Professionals Protecting National Security: Role of  Transactive Memories in Ego‐Centred Knowledge Networks, Organization Science, 19(2), 260‐276.  Joshi, K. D., Chi, L., Datta, A., & Han, S. (2010) Changing the competitive landscape: Continuous Innovation Through IT‐ Enabled Knowledge Capabilities, Information Systems Research, 21(3), 472‐495.  Jue, A. L., Marr, J. A. and Kassotakis, M. E. (2010), Social Media at Work, Jossey‐Bass, USA.  Keeney, R. L. (1999) The Value of Internet commerce to the customer, Management Science, 45, 533‐542.  Kietzman, J. H., Hermkens, K., McCarthy, I. P. and Silvestre, B. S. (2011). Social Media? Get serious! Understanding  functional building blocks of social media, Business Horizons, 54, 241‐251.   Kim, W., Jeong, O., & Lee, S. (2010), On Social Web sites, Information Systems, 35, 215‐236.  Kosalge, P. and Tole, O. (2010). Web 2.0 and Business: Early results on perceptions of Web 2.0 and factors influencing its  adoption, in AMCIS proceedings.   Lee, S. H. T. & Lee, H. H. (2006) Corporate Blogging Strategies of the Fortune 500 companies, Management Decisions, 44(3),  316‐3334.   Li, C. & Bernoff, J. (2008) Harnessing the Power of the Oh‐So‐Social Web, MIT Sloan Management Review, 49(3), 36‐42.  McAfee, A. (2009) Enterprise 2.0: New Collaborative tools for your organisations toughest challenges, Harvard Business  School Publishing, Boston.  McAfee, A. P. (2006) Enterprise 2.0: The Dawn of Emergent Collaboration, MIT Sloan Management Review, 47(3), 20‐28.  Melville, N., Kraemer, K., & Gurbaxani, V. (2004) Information Technology and Organizational Performance: An Integrative  Model of IT Business Value, MIS Quarterly, 28(2), 283‐322.  Mol, M. J. & Birkinshaw, J. (2009) The sources of management Innovation: When firms introduce management practices,  Journal of Business Research, 62(12), 1269‐1280.  Mukhopadya, T., Kekre, S., & Kalathur, S. (1995) Business value of information technology: a study of electronic data  interchange, MIS Quarterly, 19(2), 137‐156.  Nah, F., Siau, K., & Sheng, H. (2005) The Value of Mobile Applications: A utility Company Study, Communications of the  ACM, 48(2), 85‐90. 

183


Mohini Singh and Konrad Peszynski  Osimi, D., (2008) Web 2.0 in Government: Why and How?, JRC European Commission Scientific and Technical Report, ISSN  1018‐5593.  Patchin, J. W. & Hinduja, S. (2010) Changes in adolescent online social networking behaviours from 2006 to 2009,  Computers in Human Behaviour, 26, 1818‐1821.  Peppard, J., Ward, J. & Daniel, E. (2007) Managing the Realization of Business Benefits from IT Investments. MIS Quarterly  Executive, 6 (1) 1 – 11.  Posey, C., Lowry, P. B., Roberts, T. L., & Ellis, T. S. (2010) Proposing the online community self‐disclosure model: the case of  working professionals in France and the U. K. Who use online communities, European Journal of Information Systems,  19, 181‐195.   Quinn, J. B., & Bailey, M. N. (1994) Information technology: increasing productivity in services, Academy of Management  Executives, 8(3), 28‐51.  Sena, J. A. (2009) The Impact of Web 2.0 on Technology, International Journal of Computer Science and Network Security,  9(2), 378‐385.  Sethi, V., & King, W. R. (1994) Development of measures to access the extent to which an information technology  application provides competitive advantage, Management Science, 40(12), 1601‐1627.  Sheng, H., Nah, F. F., & Siau, K. (2005) Strategic implications of mobile technology: A case study using Value‐Focussed  Thinking, Journal of Strategic Information Systems, 14, 269‐290.   Singh, M., & Byrne, J. (2005) Performance Evaluation of E‐Business in Australia, Electronic Journal of Information Systems  Evaluation, 8(1), 71‐80.  Singh, M., Davison, C., & Wickramasinghe, N. (2010) Organisational Use of Web 2.0 Technologies: An Australian  Perspective. Proceedings of the Sixteenth Americas Conference on Information Systems, August, 12‐15.  Soriano, J., Lizcano, D., Canas, M. A., Reyes, M., & Hierro, J. (2009) Fostering Innovation in a Mashup‐oriented Enterprise  2.0 Collaboration Environment, Accessed 7 August 2011 from http://www.telefonica.com/home_eng.shtml  Treese, W. (2006) Web 2.0: Is it Really Different?, Putting it Together, June.   Turban, E., Lee, J. K., King, D., Liang, T. P., & Turban, D. (2010)  Electronic Commerce: a managerial perspective (6 ed.),  Prentice Hall.  Twentyman, J., (2008) Talking about my second generation, Personnel Today, 8(9), 20 ‐23.  Weil, D. (2006) The Corporate Blogging Book, NetAcademy, Penguin Group. 

184


An Evaluation of Potential Benefits of Mobile BI  Olgerta Tona and Sven Carlsson  Informatics, Lund University School of Economics and Management, Lund, Sweden  Olgerta.Tona@ics.lu.se  Sven.Carlsson@ics.lu.se    Abstract:  The  new  generation  of  mobile  devices,  such  smartphones  and  tablets,  make  users  no  longer  constrained  to  traditional devices, such as PCs and laptops, in order to access needed information. This has given rise to an innovation in  Business Intelligence (BI) coined mobile BI, which is currently embraced by different organizations. Information systems (IS)  innovations are in general accompanied by “buzzwords”, and it is essential to understand and comprehend them in terms  of potential benefits, strategies, and capabilities. Whereas BI has been researched, the nature and trend of mobile BI has  not been addressed. This paper contributes to the BI field in general and specifically to the mobile BI field by shedding light  on mobile BI. This is done by exploring the course of mobile BI in relation to traditional BI and highlighting main differences,  which make a real difference in terms of benefits. Semi‐structured interviews with key stakeholders in the mobile BI field  are conducted. The analysis shows that mobile BI is complementary to traditional BI rather than its substitute. The former  is  oriented  towards  consuming  information  and  the  latter  in  authoring  information.  Mobile  BI  is  likely  to  empower  the  mobile users with instant information anytime, anywhere whereas in traditional BI the data analysts and office users are  the main target group. In terms of analyses, complex analyses are performed in traditional BI, while the simple analysis,  access of information anytime, anywhere, alerting and notification are accentuated in mobile BI. Mobile BI is expected to  bring benefits in terms of efficiency and effectiveness such as decision making anytime, anywhere, reduction of decision  time especially in critical situation like emergencies, enhanced communication among decision‐makers, collaboration with  third parties, and better customer service.     Keywords: mobile BI, traditional BI, innovation 

1. Introduction Business  Intelligence  (BI)  systems  provide,  based  on  analytics,  the  information  that  users  need  in  their  decision–making  processes  (Watson  and  Wixom  2007).  Many  companies  recognize  the  importance  of  corporate data and information and decide to implement BI due to increased competition and BI’s potential  significant  impact  on  individual  and  organizational  performance  (Luftman  and  Ben‐Zvi  2011,  Watson  and  Wixom 2007). BI is always being continuously improved in order to meet users’ expanding expectations and  market changes. Today individuals in organizations are requiring updated, real time information anywhere at  any time and the BI vendors are working to align their strategies and products with the business requirements  and  changes  in  the  BI  market.  Recently,  mobile  BI  has  emerged  as  a  sub‐field  of  BI.  Mobile  BI  enables  the  mobile  workforce  to  attain  knowledge  by  providing  access  to  information  asset  anytime  anywhere.  Along  these lines mobile BI users are encouraged to take decisions ‘on the move’. Being a sub‐field of BI, questions  are raised if it is promising the same capabilities, benefits and decision‐making support as traditional BI or are  the capabilities different from traditional BI?    Traditional BI delivers the BI solutions via web‐portals or desktop applications requiring users to have access to  their  PCs  or  laptops  connected  to  their  organization’s  network;  whereas  mobile  BI  introduces  a  new  way  of  delivering through the new generation of mobile devices. The mobile industry is experiencing a tremendous  growth  and  a  new  employee‐driven  IT  revolution  is  taking  place  within  organizations  because  of  the  emergence  of  powerful  consumer  technologies  (Harris  et  al.  2012).  In  terms  of  mobile  workforce  support,  mobile  BI  involves  mobile  devices  by  which  the  users  can  have  instant  and  faster  access  to  the  network  anytime anywhere such as via smartphones and tablets. Some industry surveys have revealed an increase in  the use of these mobile devices for business purposes. It is predicted that by 2014, about 80% of businesses  will support a workforce using tablets (Gartner 2011). Furthermore, the CIO Insight showed that 46% of the  surveyed  companies  have  deployed  smartphones  as  mobile  clients  and  31%  of  the  companies  have  their  tablets  in  testing  phase  (Currier  2011).  On  one  hand  there  are  the  employees  who  find  these  devices  more  useful, easier to use and faster to obtain information in comparison to the tools provided by the organization  and  on  the  other  hand  there  are  the  executives  who  perceive  innovation,  productivity  and  employee  satisfaction as the main derivatives from the devices (Harris et al. 2012).    Due to the presence of the new generation of mobile devices and the increase of mobility, the interaction of  the  organizations,  individuals  and  society  is  significantly  changing  (Ladd  et  al.  2010).  O’Donnell  et  al.  (2012) 

185


Olgerta Tona and Sven Carlsson  found that senior executives have already started to implement mobile BI in their companies for a variety of  operational purposes and developing BI on the mobile devices is one of the main topics of concern among the  practitioners.  Vendors  are  promoting  mobile  BI  as  a  new  way  to  improve  decision‐making  efficiency  and  effectiveness by providing the needed information anytime and anywhere to the decision makers.      Information systems (IS) innovations are in general accompanied by “buzzwords”, which become the subject of  the discourse of a broad community including vendors, adopters, academics, consultants and journalists and it  is  essential  to  understand  and  comprehend  the  innovations  in  terms  of  potential  benefits,  strategies  and  capabilities (Gorgeon and Swanson 2011). Whereas BI has been quite extensively researched, the nature and  trend of mobile BI as an innovation is still not clearly defined. Because of mobile BI’s novelty, little academic  research has been conducted. The contribution of this paper is to shed light on mobile BI, as an innovation, by  exploring  the  course  of  mobile  BI  in  relation  to  traditional  BI  and  highlighting  their  main  differences;  differences that make real differences in terms of benefits.     The  remainder  of  the  paper  is  organized  as  follows.  In  Section  2  the  fundamental  differences  between  PC/laptops, tablets and smartphones devices are highlighted. Section 3 presents the research approach. This is  followed by a presentation and discussion of the results. Conclusions and future research are presented in the  final section. 

2. PC/laptops vs. tablets vs. smartphones  In recent years, the mobile industry has experienced a tremendous growth. Many and many different mobile  devices are being developed and launched. Considering the fast development, mobile device categories are in  continuous convergence and overlapping with each other making it hard to define a clear distinction between  them.  Mobile  BI  originated  as  a  result  of  mobile  users’  need  to  have  access  to  the  information  they  need  anytime anywhere and also the availability of the mobile devices to connect to the network anytime anywhere.    In this section an overview of the main devices through which BI is delivered is presented. They are compared  based on the dimensions proposed by Pitt et al. (2011a). This comparison adds value in understanding better  the differences, which may be influenced by the features of devices per se, between traditional BI (delivered  through  PC/laptops)  and  mobile  BI  (delivered  mainly  through  tablets  and  smartphones).  We  believe  that  besides mobility, the form factors of the devices play an important role in mobile BI usage and consequently  may have an impact on its main benefits.     According to Cochran and Witman (2012) all the devices such as laptops, tablets and smartphones can be used  in an organization based on the business needs of a user group. Smartphones are smaller devices than tablets  in  terms  of  screen  size  and  keyboard.  However,  both  tablets  and  smartphones  have  accelerometer  and  gyroscope, which are related to the motion sensing accuracy and measuring the rate of movement—laptops  lack  these  features.  Additionally  they have  GPS  (Global  Positioning  System)  which provide  the  user with  the  specific location and time in real time. (Pitt et al. 2011a, Pitt et al. 2011b)    Based on Pitt et al. (2011a) three main dimensions may be used to evaluate and rate the devices: configure‐ ability,  consume‐ability  and  context‐ability.  Configurability  is  related  to  the  ability  of  the  devices  to  rapidly  change  the  input  and  output  of  the  information;  consume‐ability  shows  the  degree  of  information  consumption; context‐ability indicates the context awareness of devices in terms of time and space.  Table 1: Rating the devices based on three dimensions (Pitt et al. 2011a)  Characteristic 

PC/Laptops

Tablets

Smartphones

Configure‐ability

Low

High

High

Consume‐ability

High

High

Low

Context‐ability

Low

High

High

Because of the low rate of changing the input/output of information, PC/laptops are considered to have a low  configure‐ability compared to the tablets and smartphones.     Smartphones have a smaller size screen to consume the information, whereas PC/laptops and tablets have a  larger one. This makes them more comfortable for users when consuming the information, leading to a higher  consume‐ability for the latter two. 

186


Olgerta Tona and Sven Carlsson  Tablets  and  smartphones  are  rated  higher  on  the  context‐ability  dimension  because  of  their  capabilities  in  context awareness. 

3. Research approach  Since  research  on  mobile  BI  is  scarce  and  we  were  interested  in  how  stakeholders  perceive  mobile  BI,  we  decided to use a qualitative approach. The empirical data is collected through interviews with representatives  from mobile BI vendor companies and consultancy. The interviewees selected are key players in the mobile BI  field. The purpose of the interviews was to tap into the interviewees’ experiences, perceptions and ideas on  mobile BI. The interviewees at the mobile BI vendors are the ones with adequate knowledge in the area, and  the consultant has been working with Mobile BI in different companies for two years. The interviewees and  the cases are listed below (see Table 2).   Table 2: List of the participants  Nr. 

Cases

Responsibility of the interviewee 

Location

1

Japersoft

Director Product Marketing 

San Francisco, US 

2

Qliktech

Product Manager 

Lund, Sweden 

3

QNH

Mobile BI Consultant 

Amsterdam, Netherlands 

4

Smart eVision 

Vice President 

Naperville, IL, US 

5

Tableau

Product Management Director 

Seattle, WA, US 

6

Transpara

Pleasanton, CA, US 

7

Yellowfin

Vice President/Founder  Strategic Alliances and Technical Account  Manager 

Melbourne, Australia 

The participants were contacted via e‐mail. Due to their different geographical locations, all but the Qliktech  case  interview  were  conducted  via  Skype.  The  interviews  lasted  for  approximately  one  hour  each.  Semi‐ structured interviews were chosen because it made it possible to add or ask the questions in different ordering  as  the  interviews  unfolds.  The  interviews  were  recorded  with  the  consent  of  the  interviewees.  They  were  transcribed and e‐mailed back to the participants for comments or feedback. Once confirmation was obtained,  the transcripts were ready to be analysed. The software Nvivo7 has been used for coding and analyzing the  transcripts.   

4. Results and discussion  Due to technological advancements, business opportunities are perceived by the vendors as the main reason  for encompassing mobile BI in their overall strategy.     ‘It is actually, no longer mobile BI versus other strategies, mobile is part of the overall delivery.’ (Interviewee,  Tableau).  The  vendors  saw  a  customer  demand  for  supplying  mobile  users  with  the  capabilities  to  access  information  whenever  they  need  it.  All  the  interviewees  revealed  differences  between  traditional  BI  and  mobile BI; as well between smartphone mobile BI and tablet mobile BI. To better understand and comprehend  mobile  BI  innovation,  we  will  start  with  a  comparative  analysis  between  mobile  BI  and  traditional  BI.  The  differences between the two that bring real differences in terms of benefits and possibilities will be discussed.  The discussion will use the three dimensions: configure‐ability, consume‐ability and context‐ability (Pitt et al.  2011a).   

4.1 Configure‐ability   The users can access the information they need anytime, anywhere and quicker via mobile BI than traditional  BI. According to Yuan et al. (2010) this is mainly due to the capabilities of mobile devices which are wireless,  connect easily to networks and therefore accessing the information faster. Besides the fact that users carry the  mobile devices with them almost all the time, an important role is also played by the design. Users can change  the preferences faster with the touch screen button and get information instantly, although other applications  may be running at the same time on the device. Therefore, resulting in a higher configure‐ability compared to  traditional BI.   

187


Olgerta Tona and Sven Carlsson  ‘A scenario: if you are on the desktop, you have the opportunity to right click on a point, and get a  menu of options, but in a mobile device you can't. That doesn't exist. So, one of the examples we  have done to adopt to it, that is rather than having a right click, now when you click, you get a  menu options of most commonly used features available at your fingertips. So, when people want  to filter in a particular point, that used to be a right click operation, and now in the mobile there  is one click and the menu option is right there.’ (Interviewee, Tableau)  The main reasons behind the easy to use mobile BI interface concerns both the mobility and the form factor of  the  devices.  Being  mobile  limits  one’s  capabilities  to  handle  difficult  and  complex  interfaces.  Additionally,  constrained by the form factors of the devices such as small screen and other limited capabilities the design of  mobile BI is simplified. This makes BI more accessible to “non‐traditional” BI users. Consequently, this affects  fast  turnaround,  where  the  required  information  is  obtained  quickly  (Alter  1980).  This  kind  of  turnaround  is  beneficial  in  different  contexts  where  the  decision‐makers  find  themselves  such  as  working  in  the  field,  at  customer sites, monitoring and meetings where getting the right information at the right moment is essential.   ‘And now with Mobile BI what the CFO can do is to open his iPad in the morning when he is in the  back office. He favorites or marks the information that he is going to show that afternoon to the  report session, so in that way he is controlling, self‐servicing, he feels confident with the system  and  the  information,  and  when  he  is  presenting  it,  he  is  also  confident  in  front  of  people,  the  board, the financial people...so it is really important for those guys.’(Interviewee, QNH)  Making different decisions regardless of the place and time leads to reduction of decision time, thus increasing  decision‐making  efficiency.  However  this  benefit  depends  upon  the  type  of  organization.  There  are  some  financial companies where in most cases you have to wait till the end of the month to make sense out of the  data and although you have the information at the palm of the hand, you still have to wait to make decisions:  ‘Financial thinks in months periods, book‐keeping periods. Everything that happens in between is like in a time  vacuum. Just…not happening until the end of the month. So, you can get real time financial information but it  tells you nothing.’ (Interviewee, Consultant). On the other hand there are the more “operational” where the  data  must  be  up  to  date  24/7,  known  as  mission  critical  data.  There  are  also  organizations  operating  in  turbulent or high‐velocity environments having to address critical tensions like the tension between the need  for  quick  decisions  and  the  need  for  analytical  decision  processes  (Carlsson  and  El  Sawy  2008).  These  organizations are likely to benefit from mobile BI.  ‘So, for example, in a bio tech company in San Francisco, somebody got an alert on their phone  and was able to see the data that one of the batches of the drug was going bad; the temperature  has  dropped  below  or  something  went  wrong  and  they  were  home  as  it  was  weekend  or  something; they were able to rush in and save the batch and it was around 500,000 dollars batch.  So, one instance software pays for 10 times over at least and I will say most of our customers do  that.’ (Interviewee, Transpara)  This case is consistent with the findings of Yuan et al. (2010) and Gebauer and Shaw (2004) where the use of  notifications  in  real  time  is  correlated  to  the  need  for  handling  emergency  situations.  For  this  bio‐tech  company  time  is  critical  and  alerting  on  time  empowers  the  users  by  giving  them  access  to  the  essential  information at the right time. The users had the necessary ‘weapons’ to take decision about fixing the batch,  although they were not in the office; a fast decision which resulted in reduction of decision cost (Holsapple and  Sena 2005). 

4.2 Consume‐ability PC/laptops have a larger screen than smartphones and tablets, a criterion which affects the way information is  consumed and how the users interact with the information shown on these devices (Pitt et al. 2011a). In terms  of BI, according to the interviewees, there exists a distinction between the information shown in traditional BI  and  mobile  BI.  As  long  as  the  users  have  access  to  their  PCs  and  laptops  they  can  view  and  work  with  dashboards, which basically show the main Key Performance Indicators (KPI) of the organization. Additionally,  they can access nearly all the necessary reports and perform different analyses, varying from simple analyses  to most complex ones. On the other hand, even mobile BI users have access to the main dashboards, but they  are restrained by a limited number of reports and may perform some simple analyses mainly on their tablets.  Main causes of these differences are subject to the limiting factors of the design, such as: the smaller screens,  electronic keyboards and reduced processing power. In traditional BI, there is a bigger screen, a keyboard and  a mouse where the user can click and drill down to as many details as wants; whereas in mobile BI, you have 

188


Olgerta Tona and Sven Carlsson  an  electronic  keyboard  and  touch  screen  capabilities,  which  may  limit  the  information  shown  in  the  screen.  Additionally, mobility is another factor which limits the user to spend too much time on the application while  ‘on the road’. Therefore the user is inclined to do less complex analyses.    Interactive interaction in the BI case is related to the interaction of the user with the information provided by  either traditional BI or mobile BI. Conducting analyses encompasses a lot of interactions between the user and  the information. During the interviews, in terms of user profiles, the analysts were the ones highlighted as the  heavy users of traditional BI. They are the people who spend more time in data analyses and the ones who are  expected  to  perform  more  complex  analyses.  ‘We  are  not  currently  seeing  data  analysts,  or  you  know  high  power  users,  people  that  need  really  a  lot  to  analyze  we  are  not  seeing  them  in  using  mobile  devices’  (Interviewee,  Jaspersoft).  Data  analysts  prefer  more  the  interactive  navigation  provided  by  the  stationary  devices  such  as  PC  and  laptops  followed  by  a  slight  preference  for  the  tablets  (Mayer  and  Weitzel  2012).  Therefore  the  navigation  provided  by  traditional  BI  is  more  interactive  and  preferred  by  the  analysts‐‐the  heavy users of traditional BI.     Besides the analysts, there is a large group of consumers who need the necessary information related to their  own work and task in order to take decisions or act. According to Mayer and Weitzel (2012) these users need  predefined navigations which could be offered by nearly any devices. One of the interviewees believed that if  an organization provides to consumers the necessary data they need, such as the main KPIs, or other key data  through their mobile devices the number of mobile BI users might increase significantly. Having information at  the palm of the hand anytime anywhere means decisional empowerment (Holsapple and Sena 2005), where a  wider  spectrum  of  users,  not  necessarily  limited  only  to  top  management  or  middle  management,  are  empowered to make decisions. The target user group of mobile BI is large in number and it mostly consists of  non‐traditional  BI  and  mobile  users.  In  an  effort  to  classify  IS  mobile  users,  Dahlbom  and  Ljungberg  (1998)  classified them as wanderer, traveller and visitor. In addition to this classification, Andersson (2011) suggested  the ranger as a fourth category. Wandering is related to the local mobility within the working environment; a  traveller usually travels from one place to another; the visitor spends some time in another location; a ranger  is  completely  detached  from  the  organization  and  very  rarely  visits  the  organization.  In  terms  of  mobile  BI  users  three  main  categories  are  observed:  executives,  sales  employees  and  field  personnel.  We  classify  executives as travellers since they are usually away on business trips, on the move, e.g. in cars, on trains and  planes, or in meetings. The sales employees have a resemblance to the ranger, as they need to go to different  locations and having meetings with their customers and clients; being away from the office most of the time.  Field personnel are rangers who very rarely go to the office and by having access to mobile BI they have all the  information they need. Based on Andersson (2011), mobile BI use seems to be complimentary to traditional BI  use  in  the  cases  of  executives  (travellers).  For  sales  employees  (rangers)  and  field  personnel  (rangers)  traditional BI is not an option.    In  terms  of  consume‐ability  the  interviewees  found  differences  between  the  smartphones  and  tablets  also.  Small screens are problematic when the issue of data representation comes into play (Pitt et al. 2011a). The  tablet  users  will  find  more  information,  full  dashboards  or  reports  and  perform  some  analytical  capabilities  although at a simple level; whereas smartphone users mainly see dashboards and are more oriented towards  the monitoring function, being alerted on time and communicating with the appropriate people for different  problems and issues that may arise during the monitoring or alerting. Alerting and notifications are considered  important  in  supporting  emergency  situations.  The  bio‐tech  company  example  (Section  4.1)  supports  the  argument of how mobile BI by means of its alerting function can be critical in addressing an emergency.    Another  distinction  found  during  the  interviews  is  authoring  (creation)  of  the  information  compared  to  the  consumption of  the  information.  The  majority  of  our  interviewees  discussed  that  most  of  the  authoring  still  happens in the traditional way via the PC, not in the mobile environment. ‘So, today, authoring for example,  starting  a  brand  new  visualization,  we  don't  do  that  on  the  web,  so  we  don't  do  that  on  the  mobile  either.  That's  something  that  still  requires  a  desktop  product  to  do.’  (Interviewee,  Tableau).  This  relates  to  what  Gebauer and Shaw (2004) have discussed in their research, that mobile technologies have been widely applied  in consumer‐oriented areas. Besides the form factor of mobile devices, mobility detects the consumption of  information in mobile BI rather than its creation due to its mobile users who are most of the time on the move  and need faster access to information having no time in creating it.  

189


Olgerta Tona and Sven Carlsson 

4.3 Context‐ability   Based on Pitt et al (2011a) smartphones and tablets have a higher context‐ability than the laptops. One of the  main distinctions between mobile and stationary work is the context‐‐defined by time and location (Yuan et al.  2010). Based on a specific context, mobile BI users can search for the right information on their mobile devices  and  get  the  answer  they  were  looking  for.  Therefore  they  have  access  to  the  data  they  need  at  specific  moments and places, in contrast to traditional BI, where the users need to go back to their offices.     Enhancing  the  customer  service  is  mentioned  as  a  benefit  of  mobile  BI  and  this  mainly  due  to  the  empowerment of the sales employees. “..going to a client site, in a meeting, they [sales employees] use their  mobile  device  to  show  some  products  or  use  some  data  to  their  clients  or  partners”  (Interviewee,  Smart  eVision). Having the information anytime anywhere allows joint collaboration with the customer where they  can both take a  decision based  on  the  information  provided  by  mobile  BI.  So, collaboration  is  emerging not  only between the employees in the same organization which basically is expected, but also between the clients  and customers. ‘Mobile device by nature is social. The reason why you carry a phone around is to be able to  connect to other people or places. So, collaborative BI is really really the key’. (Interviewee, Qliktech). This leads  to faster customer care service and higher satisfaction as there is a decision time reduction.     Therefore,  these  systems  enhance  communication  among  participants  who  are  responsible  for  the  decision  making process (Holsapple and Sena 2005) and one of the interviewees argues that ‘key to our mobile app is  collaboration and you can effectively collaborate effortlessly.’ (Interviewee, YellowFin). It relates to the finding  of Mayer and Weitzel (2012) where communication is more accentuated on smaller devices and as such this  functionality  adds  value  to  the  usage  of  mobile  BI  by  enhancing  the  communication  between  the  decision‐ makers.  Additionally,  being  mobile  increases  the  need  to  communicate  faster  and  efficiently  in  order  to  be  able to take decisions ‘on the move.’ 

5. Conclusions This paper sheds light on mobile BI innovation by exploring the course of mobile BI in relation to traditional BI  and  highlighting  its  promises  in  terms  of  benefits.  Mobility  and  the  form  factors  of  the  devices  cause  differences  between  mobile  BI  and  traditional  BI,  differences  which  are  reflected  in  terms  of  benefits.  This  research concludes that mobile BI is complimentary to traditional BI rather than a substitute and differences  exist between them in terms of user profiles, level of analytics and functionalities. These differences in mobile  BI  are  expected  to  bring  different  benefits  in  terms  of  efficiency  and  effectiveness  such  as  decision  making  anytime  anywhere,  reduction  of  decision  time  especially  in  critical  situation  like  emergencies,  enhanced  communication among the decision‐makers, collaboration with third parties and better customer service.    However, the potential benefits of mobile BI assessed through this study are based on the vendors of mobile  BI. Therefore this research calls for additional studies where the focus shall be on firms as real users of mobile  BI. Additionally, a number of opportunities for future research are revealed. For example, how mobile BI usage  affects decision‐making processes as well as other organizational processes, power, and attention. Is mobile BI  having  an  impact  on  the  structure  of  the  organization  because  of  its  flexibility  and  if  yes,  how?  More  concretely, research can focus on the impact of mobile BI use in organizations operating in turbulent and high‐ velocity  environments.  Carlsson  and  El  Sawy  (2008)  argue  that  these  organizations  must  address  critical  tensions, including: (i) the tension between the need for quick decisions and the need for analytical decision  processes;  (ii)  the  tension  around  the  managerial  need  for  action  and  the  need  for  the  safest  execution  of  decisions that may be bold and risky; (iii) the tension around empowering middle managers and management  teams at various organizational levels in the midst of powerful and impatient top executives; (iv) the tension  between  programmed  quick  action  learning  loops  and  the  increased  requirement  for  emergence  and  improvisation.  Studies  can  address  how  and  why  mobile  BI  use  might  or  might  not  support  organizations  in  addressing the tensions.    These are some of the issues that need particular attention in the mobile BI research agenda.  

References Alter, S. (1980) Decision support systems: current practice and continuing challenges, Reading, Mass, Addison‐Wesley. 

190


Olgerta Tona and Sven Carlsson  Andersson, B. (2011) Harnessing Handheld Computing – Managing IS Support to the Digital Ranger with Defensive Design.  In: Jain, H., Sinha, A. & Vitharana, P. (eds.) Service‐Oriented Perspectives in Design Science Research. Springer Berlin  Heidelberg.  Carlsson, S. and El Sawy, O. (2008) "Managing the five tensions of IT‐enabled decision support in turbulent and high‐ velocity environments", Information Systems and e‐Business Management, Vol 6, No. 3, pp 225‐237.  Cochran, M. and Witman, P. (2012) Where do Tablets fit in the Organization's Workstation Inventory?  European  Conference on Information Management and Evaluation, Cork, Ireland, pp 47‐54.  Currier, G. (2011) Emerging Technology Adoption Trends, CIO Insight.  Dahlbom, B. and Ljungberg, F. (1998) "Mobile Informatics", Scandinavian Journal of Information Systems, Vol 10, No. 1, pp  227‐234.  Gartner (2011) "Gartner Predicts 2011: New Relationships Will Change BI and Analytics", Vol, No.  Gebauer, J. and Shaw, M. J. (2004) "Success Factors and Impacts of Mobile Business Applications: Results from a Mobile e‐ Procurement Study", International Journal of Electronic Commerce, Vol 8, No. 3, pp 19‐41.  Gorgeon, A. and Swanson, E. B. (2011) "Web 2.0 according to Wikipedia: Capturing an organizing vision", Journal of the  American Society for Information Science and Technology, Vol 62, No. 10, pp 1916‐1932.  Harris, J., Ives, B. and Junglas, I. (2012) "IT Consumerization: When Gadgets Turn Into Enterprise IT Tools", MIS Quarterly  Executive, Vol 11, No. 3, pp 99‐112.  Holsapple, C. W. and Sena, M. P. (2005) "ERP plans and decision‐support benefits", Decision Support Systems., Vol 38, No.  4, pp 575‐590.  Ladd, D. A., Avimanyu, D., Saonee, S. and Yanjun, Y. (2010) "Trends in Mobile Computing within the IS Discipline: A Ten‐ Year Retrospective", Communications of the Association for Information Systems, Vol 27, No. Journal Article, pp 285.  Luftman, J. and Ben‐Zvi, T. (2011) "Key Issues for IT Executives 2011: Cautious Optimism in Uncertain Economic Times", MIS  Quarterly Executive, Vol 10, No. 4, pp 203‐212.  Mayer, J. H. and Weitzel, T. (2012) Appropriate Interface Designs for Mobile End‐User Devices‐‐Up Close and Personalized  Executive Information Systems as an Example. 45th Hawaii International Conference on System Science (HICSS).  O'donnell, P., Sipsma, S. and Carolyn, W. (2012) The “Hot” Issues in Business Intelligence: The View of Practitioners. In:  Respício, A. & Burstein, F. (eds.) Fusing Decision Support Systems into the Fabric of the Context. Amsterdam: IOS  Press.  Pitt, L., Berthon, P. and Robson, K. (2011a) "Deciding When to Use Tablets For Business Applications", MIS Quarterly  Executive, Vol 10, No. 3, pp 133‐139.  Pitt, L., Parent, M., Junglas, I., Chan, A. and Spyropoulou, S. (2011b) "Increasing the smartphone into a sound environment  information systems strategy: Principles, practices and a research agenda", Journal of Strategic Information Systems,  Vol 20, No. 27‐37.  Watson, H. J. and Wixom, B. H. (2007) "The Current State of Business Intelligence", Computer, Vol 40, No. 9, pp 96‐99.  Yuan, Y., Archer, N., Connelly, C. E. and Zheng, W. (2010) "Identifying the ideal fit between mobile work and mobile work  support", Information and Management, Vol 47, No. 3, pp 125‐137. 

191


Analysis of IT Projects in the Models of Enterprise Value Building: A  Summary of Research Between 2010–2012  Bartosz Wachnik  Warsaw University of Technology, Faculty of Production Engineering, Institute of  Production Systems Organisation  bartek@wachnik.eu    Abstract:  The  research  results  presented  here  refer  to  the  issues  linked  to  the  role  of  information  technologies  in  enterprise value building models that can be found in the current economic structure. The scope of this article is to present  an analysis of the data collected in an annual research cycle and the resulting conclusions, describing management support  IT projects in three groups of enterprises, representing three models of enterprise value analysis, i.e. the value chain, the  value shop and the value network. The research was questionnaire‐based and covered a total of 160 enterprises and 210 IT  projects  carried  out  in  those  enterprises.  The  presented  comparative  research  results  indicate  a  map  of  characteristics  within the typology of IT projects carried out in Poland in three different groups of enterprises. The essence of the research  is to present a distribution of management support IT systems, the size of the projects, chosen application implementation  strategies and the method of IT project investment economic evaluation in specific enterprise groups. The research results  may be interesting for researchers specialising in IT project realisation and for practitioners realising projects for companies  belonging to these groups.       Keywords: models of enterprise value building, IT Project, effectiveness, IS investments 

1. Introduction Currently, the subject literature is dominated by three models of enterprise value analysis, i.e. the value chain  (Porter,  1985),  the  value  shop  and  the  value  network  (Stabell,  Fjeldstad,  1998).  In  enterprises  functioning  according  to  M.E.  Porter’s  model,  the  end‐product  value  is  obtained  through  processing  raw  materials  into  final products. The enterprise value analysis by M.E. Porter (1985) is mostly used in manufacturing companies.  C.B. Stabell and O.D. Fjeldstad (1998: 2) have proven that M.E. Porter’s (1985) value analysis is not sufficient  and it does not cover all types of enterprises that presently function within the structure of our economy.    In the value shop model, value is most often built through resolving individual customer tasks. According to  C.B. Stabell and O.D. Fjeldstad (1998: 2), the difference between the value shop and the value chain lies in the  fact that in the value chain, an enterprise conducts a fixed number of operations in order to deliver a standard  product  in  big  quantities,  while  in  case  of  the  shop  the  activities  performed  and  the  resources  used  are  adjusted to a specific, often unique problem that needs to be solved. Enterprises functioning according to the  value shop model are, for example, consulting firms, architects, design studios and accounting firms.      In  the  value  network  model,  value  is  built  through  linking  customers  or  mediating  between  them.  It  can  be  either a direct link (e.g. in telecommunications companies) or an indirect one (e.g. in banks). According to C.B.  Stabell  and  O.D.  Fjeldstad  (1998,  2),  management  of  an  enterprise  that  builds  its  value  based  on  the  value  network logics is focused on perfecting the quality and the number of links between customers. Examples of  management tasks include the maximum usage of infrastructure capacity, finding innovative forms of service  delivery and collection of payments, assessing the long‐term customer value and identifying clusters and links  between the networks.    Examples  of  enterprises  functioning  according  to  the  value  network  are  recruitment  companies,  real  estate  agencies,  insurance  companies,  banks  and  telecommunications  companies.  The  aim  of  this  publication  is  an  analysis of IT projects in three groups of enterprises that represent three models of enterprise value analysis,  including  the  IT  project  typology  proposed  by  the  author  (Wachnik,  2012:  115).  The  article  presents  chosen  data  analyses  collected  in  an  annual  research  cycle  and  the  resulting  conclusions,  describing  management  support  IT  projects  among  enterprises  representing  three  models  of  enterprise  value  analysis,  i.e.  the  value  chain, the value workshop and the value network. In this case, the research objective is to analyse effective  design,  solution  delivery  and  the  usage  and  influence  of  information  technology  in  the  three  groups  of  enterprises.  The  research  results  may  be  interesting  both  for  researchers  specialising  in  the  analysis  of  management IT systems implementation and for practitioners completing IT projects.  The opening chapters of  the  paper  discuss  the  role  of  information  technologies  in  the  models  of  enterprise  value  building,  research 

192


Bartosz Wachnik  assumptions and the method used. Subsequently, the results of research on IT projects in the enterprise value  building models are presented and the crucial conclusions formed.   

2. The role of information technologies in enterprise value building models  The  general  concept  of  enterprise  value  management  originates  from  research  (Rappaport,  1986:83)  presenting  the  concept  that  through  maximising  the  profits  of  shareholders,  the  benefits  of  all  the  parties  linked to the enterprise are maximised. Managing enterprise value means directing the enterprise so that the  management activities and processes are aimed at maximising its value while considering the best interest of  the  owners  and  the  capital  they  engage.  The  subject  literature  describes  that  the  economic  value  of  an  enterprise is  equal to the sum of its discounted operating net cash flow stream, which means that each factor  influencing the flow can potentially shape the enterprise value. The impact of these factors derives from long‐ term  strategic  decisions  and  current  operational  decisions.  The  essence  of  value  management  (Copeland,  Koller,  Murrin,    1997:  95)  is the  process  of  decision‐making  through  focusing  on  the most  important  factors  shaping  enterprise  value,  known  as  generators  or  value  drivers.  In  the  subject  literature,  there  is  a  predominant  classification  of  value  generators  (Rappaport,  1986:83)  based  on  three  main  components,  i.e.  cash  flows  from  operating  activities,  discount  rate  and  liabilities.  The  division  of  value  generators  into  two  groups  (Dudycz,  2001:  43)  is  particularly  noteworthy:  Main  drivers:  Free  cash  flows,  Value  increase  period,  Capital cost: Lower level drivers: Return on capital employed, Intellectual capital.    In  the  literature,  there  is  no  single  binding  definition  of  intellectual  capital  (Ujwary‐Gil,  2010:  32)      and  additionally  the  expression  “intellectual  capital”  takes  on  many  different  forms.  According  to  T.A.  Stewart  (2001:  34),  intellectual  capital  is  intellectual  material:  knowledge,  information,  intellectual  property  and  experience that can be used for creating wealth. Another definition L. Edvinsson, M.S. Malone (2001: 49)  says  that  intellectual  capital  is  knowledge,  experience,  organisational  technology,  customer  relations  and  professional  skills  that  allow  a  company  to  achieve  a  competitive  edge.  Intellectual  capital  in  a  modern  enterprise are patents, trademarks, practical experiences, management’s vision, the accumulated knowledge  of the whole company and its specific employees, customer relations and business models supported by tools  using  modern  technology.  On  the  basis  of  literature  research,  indicates  that  the  predominant  approach  is  defining  three  major  components  within  intellectual  capital:    Human  capital,  structural  capital,  customer  capital (relational). An important input of management support information systems into the development of  intellectual capital is collecting and processing data, information and knowledge existing in different forms in  an organisation and making them available to the users depending on their needs. The role of management  support information systems in the development of intellectual capital is:   ƒ

Collecting and ordering data, information and knowledge existing in the organisation. 

ƒ

Coordination of planning and realising tasks in the operational and strategic horizon. 

ƒ

The possibility  to  identify  potential  chances  or  threats  to  the  organisation  through  access  to  the  data,  information and knowledge   

ƒ

Perfecting inference and decision‐making 

None of  the  information  systems  can  substitute  for  visionary  managers  who  are  able  to  design  the  idea  of  competitive edge for their organisations within the frames of intellectual capital. Nevertheless, many examples  point to the fact that the best way of creating unique services and products is interdisciplinary integration of  creativity  and technology,  an  important  characteristic  of intellectual  capital  development.  It  is  important  for  management  support  information  systems  to  obtain  an  interdisciplinary  synergy  within  three  main  components of the intellectual capital, i.e. human capital, structural capital and customer capital, which results  in increasing the probability of achieving a competitive edge by the organisation.      

3. Research assumptions and the method used  The  choice  of  research  subject  matter  stemmed  from  the  belief  that  the  character  of  management  support  information  system  project  implementation  could  depend  on  the  group  of  enterprises  that  represent  three  different models of enterprise value analysis, i.e. the value chain, the value shop and the value network. The  method  and  characteristic  of  realisation  in  these  types  of  projects  necessitates  specific  functional  requirements  for  systems  and  a  level  of  business‐IT  alignment.  Understanding  the  views  and  the  cognitive  maps  of  companies’  top  management  is  of  crucial  significance  to  the  description  of  the  prevailing  logics  of  action  within  the  scope  of  management  support  IT  projects  implementation  among  a  wide  spectrum  of 

193


Bartosz Wachnik  enterprises in Poland. It is important from the perspective of research on effective enterprise value building  with  the  use  of  IT  in  Polish  economic  conditions,  with  a  growth  of  GDP  on  the  level  of  4.3%  in  2011  and  a  seasonally unadjusted GDB growth by 2% in 2012. The research was conducted on an inter‐regional scale, with  companies  located  in  Mazovia  and  Lower  and  Upper  Silesia.  Questionnaires  were  collected  from  160  enterprises who answered questions about 210 completed IT projects in the period between 2011 and 2012.  In  the  year  2012  in  Poland  there  were  75,789  active  enterprises  with  10‐49  employees,  15,694  enterprises  with 50‐249 employees and 3,107 enterprises with more than 250 employees. Table 1 presents the percentage  of  ERP,  CRM  and  e‐commerce  class  management  support  IT  systems  usage  in  respective  enterprise  groups.  The data comes from GUS (Central Statistical Office of Poland) and it refers to the year 2012.     Table 1: The structure of IT system usage in respective enterprise groups in Poland in the year 2012. Source:  Główny Urząd Statystyczny (Central Statistical Office) ‐ http://www.stat.gov.pl. Accessed 10.03.2013.   

ERP systems  CRM systems  Enterprises that have their own www page  Enterprises that have their own www page enabling users to order  products according to their own  specification  Enterprises that have their own www page enabling personalisation  of page contents for frequent/ regular users 

Enterprises   10‐49  employees  8,4%  12,9%  63%  10,6% 

Enterprises 50‐249  employees  27,7%  29,5%  85,8%  12,5% 

Enterprises more than 250  employees  68,4%  57,1%  93,3%  12,3% 

6,8%

10,6%

15%

In the  conducted  research  on  the  analysis  of  IT  projects,  the  questionnaire  questions  corresponded  with  chosen  attributes  of  the  proposed  typology  of  IT  projects  [14].  The  enterprises  qualified  for  the  research  complied  with  the  following  criteria:  80  to  1000  employees,  the  company  has  its  own  IT  department,  the  minimum turnover of 40m Polish zloty, it’s around 10 m EUR. The enterprises included companies that have a  wide  autonomy  in  their  IT  strategy  realisation,  with  both  Polish  and  foreign  capital.  Table  2  presents  the  structure of the examined IT projects.  Table 2: Summary of enterprise and project study group structure source: Own study    The number of enterprises  The number of projects 

The value chain  45  68 

The value shop  50  55 

The value network  65  87 

Total 160  210 

The selected companies achieved good or average results in their industry – so they are neither leading nor  marginal  companies.  The  enterprises  selected  for  the  research  belonged  to  the  small  and  medium‐sized  enterprise  group.  The  research  was  aimed  at  reaching  people  directly  or  indirectly  engaged  in  the  implementation  of  management  support  IT  projects.  The  respondents  were  company  owners,  directors,  members of the board, financial directors or IT directors. After completing questionnaire research, the author  carried  out  an  in‐depth  analysis  based  on  completing  workshops,  i.e.  a  series  of  meetings  with  chosen  company representatives in order to verify the answers and conduct additional interviews. The author carried  out 7 meetings in the ‘value chain’ enterprise group, 12 meetings in the ‘value shop’ enterprise group and 13  meetings in the ‘value network’ enterprise group. The workshops were aimed at conducting a deeper analysis  of the logics of action in the analysed enterprises. 

4. Analysis of IT project in models of enterprise value building.   Table 3 presents the structure of two types of IT projects, i.e. the project of building an IT system developed  from  scratch  and  an  IT  system  pack  adaptation  project  divided  by  three  enterprise  groups  representing  the  value chain, the value shop and the value network.   Table 3: The structure of IT project types divided by three enterprise groups source: Own study   

The value shop 

Building an IT system from scratch 

The value  chain  34% 

The value network 

58%

61%

A standard IT system pack adaptation project 

66%

42%

39%

Table 4  shows  the  structure  of  IT  system  types  within  the  completed  projects  divided  by  three  enterprise  groups representing the value chain, the value shop and the value network. 

194


Bartosz Wachnik  Table 4: The structure of IT system types within the completed projects divided by three enterprise groups and  the types of management support IT systems source: Own study   

The value chain 

The value shop 

The value network 

Building an IT  system from  scratch 

System pack  adaptation  project   

Building an IT  system from  scratch   

System pack  adaptation  project   

Building an  IT system  from scratch 

System pack  adaptation  project   

ERP

0%

27%

0%

22%

0%

38%

CRM

9%

13%

16%

13%

17%

12%

WMS

0%

13%

0%

0%

0%

0%

SCM

9%

4%

0%

0%

0%

0%

RFID

0%

4%

0%

0%

4%

0%

Barcodes

0%

11%

0%

9%

6%

0%

e‐learning

0%

0%

0%

13%

4%

9%

DMS

9%

0%

38%

9%

15%

3%

BI

0%

16%

0%

30%

0%

35%

CIM

0%

4%

0%

0%

0%

0%

XML/EDIFACT

17%

2%

19%

0%

17%

0%

Internet and  mobile  applications 

57%

4%

28%

4%

38%

3%

Table 5  shows  the  size  structure  of  management  support  IT  projects  divided  by  three  enterprise  groups  representing the value chain, the value shop and the value network. The size of an IT project has been defined  on the basis of three criteria, i.e. the number of end users, the number of key users and project duration. None  of the enterprise groups has conducted a big or a large IT project. All three enterprise groups have a higher  percentage of small IT projects.   Table 5: The size structure of management support IT projects divided by three enterprise groups representing  the value chain, the value shop and the value network source: Own study  Project size 

The value  chain  37% 

The value  shop  36% 

The value  network 

44%

49%

52%

Medium‐sized projects – number of end users 20 ‐ 100; number of key  users up to 10; duration 6‐12 months 

19%

15%

23%

Big projects ‐ number of end users up to 1000; number of key users 50‐100;  duration 2‐3 years 

0%

0%

0%

Large projects ‐ number of end users over 1000; number of key users  100; duration 4‐6 years 

0%

0%

0%

Microprojects – number of end users 1‐5; number of key users 1‐2; duration up  to 3 months  Small projects – number of end users 5‐20; number of key users up to 5; duration  3‐6 months 

25%

Table 6 and Figure 1 present the structure of strategy types that lead IT system implementations divided by  three  enterprise  groups  representing  the  value  chain,  the  value  shop  and  the  value  network.  The  group  of  companies belonging to the value chain model is dominated by the market survival strategy, while in the group  of companies belonging to the value shop model the platform for changes strategy prevails. In the group of  companies  from  the  value  network  model,  the  strategy  of  achieving  saltatory  innovation  is  predominant.  In  the enterprise group belonging to the value chain model, the same number of respondents chose the saltatory  innovation strategy and the platform for changes strategy. In case of companies belonging to the value shop 

195


Bartosz Wachnik  model,  the  lowest  number  chose  the  strategy  of  achieving  saltatory  innovation,  while  in  case  of  the  value  network model, the market survival strategy was the least popular choice.  Table  6:  IT  system  implementation  strategy  structure  divided  by  three  enterprise  groups  representing  the  value chain, the value shop and the value network source: Own study  Strategy type  Market survival strategy. Strategy linked to the enterprise’s survival on the market treats an IT system implementation  as a tool allowing the company to survive on the market.  Achieving saltatory innovation. Strategy linked to the need to achieve innovations saltatorily treats an IT system  implementation as a tool allowing to quickly achieve a single process innovation.  Platform for changes strategy. Platform for changes strategy treats an IT system implementation as a platform for  introducing permanent, step changes in enterprise organisation and management during the period of the system  lifecycle in the enterprise. 

Figure  1:  The  structure  of  respondents’  answers  to  the  questions  concerning  an  IT  system  implementation  strategy structure divided by three enterprise groups representing the value chain, the value shop  and the value network. Source: Own study. (See Table 6)  Table 7 and Figure 2 show the structure of an IT project investment model divided by three enterprise groups  representing  the  value  chain,  the  value  shop  and  the  value  network.  Both  the chain value  model  enterprise  group and the value network group are dominated by the original investment model. In the case of companies  from  the  value  shop  group,  the  interim  model  is  predominant.  Cloud  computing  proved  to  be  still  the  least  popular investment model in the three groups.  Table 7: The structure of an IT project investment model divided by three enterprise groups representing the  value chain, the value shop and the value network source: Own study  Investment model  Cloud processing (virtualisation). A processing model based on using services delivered by external organisations. It  means that the original investment, i.e. server and license purchase or the necessity to install and administer  software, is eliminated.  Original investment model. A model based on investment realisation, i.e. purchasing all the necessary equipment and  software, as well as software installation and administration services, in the initial phase. 

Interim model. An interim model between the cloud‐processing model and the original investment model,  e.g. collocation service.  Table  8  and  Figure  3  present  the  structure  of  project  groups  that  completed  selected  IT  projects  divided  by  three enterprise groups representing the value chain, the value shop and the value network. All three groups  are dominated by the model of a mixed project group, consisting both of enterprise employees and external  consultants.   

196


Bartosz Wachnik 

Figure 2: The structure of respondents’ answers to the questions concerning an IT project investment model  divided  by  three  enterprise  groups  representing  the  value  chain,  the  value  shop  and  the  value  network source: Own study. (See Table 7)  Table 8: The structure of project groups that completed selected IT projects divided by three enterprise groups  representing the value chain, the value shop and the value network source: Own study  Project groups  Internal team. Only the employees of the enterprise where the project is being completed participate. 

External team. Only the employees of the project supplier participate.  Mixed team. The project group consists of both of the enterprise’s employees (the so‐called key and end  users) and external consultants. 

Figure  3:  The  structure  of  respondents’  answers  to  the  questions  concerning  investment  model  divided  by  project groups that completed selected IT projects divided by three enterprise groups representing  the value chain, the value shop and the value network. Source: Own Study. (See Table 8)  Tables 9, 10 and Figures 4, 5 present the information concerning performing economic analyses of IT project  investments from the ex‐ante and ex‐post perspective. In all three enterprise groups, a lack of ex‐ante and ex‐ post  economic  analysis  of  IT projects prevailed.  The  main  reason  for  failing  to perform  this  type  of  analyses  was a lack of interest on the side of the top management, as shown in Table 11 and Figure 6.      

197


Bartosz Wachnik  Table  9:  Information  concerning  performing  economic  analyses  of  IT  project  investments  from  the  ex‐ante  perspective source: Own study  Information on economic analysis performance in an IT project investment (ex‐ante)  Performed (ex‐ante) economic analysis of an IT project investment  Lack of ex‐ante economic analysis of an IT project investment 

Figure 4:  The  structure  of  respondents’  answers  to  the  questions  concerning  information  on  performing  economic analyses of IT project investments from the ex‐ante perspective source: Own study. (See  Table 9)  Table  10:  Information  concerning  performing  economic  analyses  of  IT  project  investments  from  the  ex‐post  perspective source: Own study  Information on economic analysis performance in an IT project investment (ex‐post)  Performed (ex‐post) economic analysis of an IT project investment  Lack of ex‐post economic analysis of an IT project investment 

Figure  5:  The  structure  of  respondents’  answers  to  the  questions  concerning  information  on  performing  economic analyses of IT project investments from the ex‐post perspective source: Own study. (See  Table 10)  Table 11: Main reasons hindering the performance of an economic analysis in IT projects source: Own study.   Main reasons hindering the performance of an economic analysis in IT projects  Top management’s lack of interest in performing an analysis  Lack of knowledge and tested models allowing to perform an economic analysis  Difficulties with specifying the benefits (indirect and direct) and costs entailed by the completed projects 

198


Bartosz Wachnik 

Figure 6: The structure of respondents’ answers to the questions concerning  the main reasons hindering the  performance of an economic analysis in IT projects source: Own study. (See Table 11) 

5. Conclusions The  selected  results  of  analysed  material  presented  in  this  paper  from  research  on  IT  projects  in  three  enterprise groups, representing three value building models, conducted by the author in 2011 and 2012, allow  us to formulate the following crucial conclusions.    First of all, companies representing the chain value model chose IT projects consisting of adapting a standard  IT system pack most often, as opposed to two other company groups, i.e. from the value shop and the value  network. In all three enterprise groups, IT projects consisting of adapting a standard pack were dominated by  ERP and BI system implementations. It stems from two facts: firstly, the life cycle of an ERP system product  enforcing upgrades, re‐implementations, new implementations and secondly, in the period of stagnation and  recession that we experienced in Europe between 2009 and 2011, many enterprises decided to implement BI  class analytical systems for more effective monitoring and control of their operational activity, especially the  costs.  The  majority  of them treated  a  BI  system  implementation  as  one  of  the  important components  of  an  informatisation strategy during the difficult times (Dyczkowski, 2011). It is worth noting the fact that among  projects  consisting  in  building  an  IT  system  from  scratch,  in  all  three  enterprise  groups,  two  types  of  application building prevail, i.e.:  ƒ

Interfaces linking IT systems through XML/EDIFACT standards, directly resulting from the requirements for  entrepreneurs  using  the  European  Union  funds  from  measure  8.1,  i.e.  support  for  economic  activity  as  regards electronic economy.  

ƒ

Internet and mobile applications that are in the phase of product life cycle development. 

Secondly, analysing the size of completed projects, considering the number of end users, the number of key  users  and  the  project duration,  none  of  the  enterprise  groups  has  conducted  a  big  or  large  IT  project.  In  all  three  enterprise  groups,  small  IT  projects  prevail.  Additional  interviews  with  enterprise  representatives  indicated that most enterprises have already completed the majority of big IT projects and that they are not  planning to carry out this type of project in the near future. Currently, enterprises from the three groups are  focused  on  implementing  highly  specialised  management  support  applications  in  narrow  fields,  e.g.  for  statistical analysis and recommendations for product and service price setting on the market,  and calculating  service charges, the so‐called billing, within small‐scale projects.      Thirdly, enterprises from each of the groups followed different strategies in completing IT projects. The value  chain model enterprises completed their projects according to the market survival strategy. It results chiefly  from  two  reasons,  i.e.  implementing  financial‐accounting  modules  within  ERP  systems,  that  are  naturally  obligatory  in  enterprise  management,  and  implementing  appropriate  IT  systems  complying  with  e.g.  value  management  standards  in  the  “Life&Science”  industry  production,  i.e.  FDA,  GMP.  The  value  shop  model  enterprises  completed  their  projects  according  to  the  strategy  of  treating  an  IT  project  as  a  platform  for  changes.  Additional  interviews  with  selected  enterprise  representatives  have  shown  that  managers  often  decided  to  perform  a  DMS  application  on,  e.g.  the  SharePoint  platform,  that  was  intended  as  a  customer 

199


Bartosz Wachnik  service management system, arguing that they have not found a standard pack that could be adapted to their  needs  and  that  would  meet  their  requirements.  The  majority  of  analysed  DMS  applications  had  the  characteristics  of  new  functionality  development  facilitation  required  for  widening  the  range  of  provided  services. The value network model enterprises completed their projects according to the strategy of achieving  saltatory  innovation.  It  results  mostly  from  the  fact  that  this  enterprise  group  includes  enterprises  from  the  financial sector, as well as telecommunications and data transmission services operators. Enterprises from the  value network model group dedicate less resources to infrastructure investment, transaction applications that  allow them to standardise and automate a big group of activities, focusing on analytical applications, chiefly  innovative  transformation  systems  influencing  enterprise  business  model  change  and  allowing  to  gain  competitive  advantage.  Implementing  a  banking  platform  in  the  Polish  bank  AliorSync  may  serve  as  an  example.    Furthermore, enterprises from all three groups chose two dominating IT project investment models, i.e. the  original investment model consisting in an original purchase of the necessary equipment, software and service  licence and the interim model, between the original investment model and the cloud computing model. It is  worth noticing the new cloud processing model among management support IT systems. Apart from owners  seeking savings, the development of the cloud processing model is also influenced by an increase in popularity  of mobile Internet and mobile applications. Additional interviews with chosen enterprise representatives have  shown that managers see the following conditioning as limiting to the cloud processing model development in  Poland, i.e.:  ƒ

Technological ‐  linked  to  the  access  to  appropriate  infrastructure,  i.e.  broadband  Internet,  telecommunication and data transmission devices, guaranteeing the safety of stored and saved data.  

ƒ

Financial‐commercial ‐  linked  to  an  insufficient  service  offer  in  the  cloud  processing  model.  Some  companies  offer  their  services  in  the  cloud  processing  model  for  the  same  prices  as  to  entities  in  developed countries, hence making the offer unattractive to Polish companies.  

ƒ

Lack of legal regulations precisely defining responsibility for the stored data and for the potential results of  data leak.  

ƒ

Lack of  knowledge  concerning  service  functionality,  technology  and  trade  offer  in  the  cloud  processing  model. 

Moreover, enterprises  from  all  three  groups  completed  IT  projects  in  a  mixed  team,  i.e.  the  project  group  consisted of both enterprise employees and external consultants. Additional interviews with chosen enterprise  representatives have proven that in case of developing an IT system from scratch, external consultants were  engaged mainly as project managers or programmers competent in a given specialisation. It is noteworthy that  many  managers  referred  to  their  negative  experiences  from  the  90s  and  the  early  2000s,  when  companies  would decide to single‐handedly implement an ERP, CRM, DMS and BI systems or create their own software,  intentionally avoiding external companies and consultants in order to save money. In those cases, the projects  would not end successfully and in the final clearing, the budget would increase drastically.     Finally, in all three enterprise groups, both from the ex‐ante and the ex‐post perspective, a lack of economic  analysis  of  IT  project  investments  is  predominant.  Importantly,  both  in  the  ex‐ante and  ex‐post  perspective,  the  highest  number  of  companies  not  completing  an  economic  analysis  has  been  found  in  the  group  of  enterprises  from  the  chain  value  model  and  the  lowest  in  the  value  network  group. The  indirect,  significant  reasons were a lack of interest in carrying out such analyses among top management and a lack knowledge of  how such analyses are performed.    Additional interviews with chosen enterprise representatives have shown that the companies representing the  value  chain  and  the  value  shop  functioned  according  to  corporate  governance  rules  on  IT  that  recommend  controlling and monitoring the effectiveness of implemented IT management support systems [9], as opposed  to the enterprises from the value chain model that had not yet implemented corporate governance on IT and  thus performed such analyses less often. Additionally, during the interviews, the respondents pointed out that  enterprises  less  frequently  performed  these  analyses  from  the  ex‐post  perspective,  i.e.  after  the  implementation,  as  this  type  of  analyses  may  indicate  mistakes  and  errors  in  the  choice  of  system,  implementation partner or, finally, project completion.    

200


Bartosz Wachnik  To  sum  up,  it  is  interesting  that  top  managers  of  most  enterprises  in  all  three  groups  are  not  interested  in  answering the questions of how to measure economic effectiveness in IT system implementation projects and  how to maximise the business value of IT technology investments, unless they are forced to do so by corporate  governance on IT.      The author hopes that the research results presented in this paper may help achieve two goals, i.e. indicating  the character and the role of IT projects completed in Poland in the groups of enterprises representing three  enterprise  value  building  models  and  thus  allowing  for  a  wider  verification  of  knowledge  in  this  area  and  contributing  to  a  more  effective  realisation  of  mid  and  long‐term aims  included  in  strategies  for creating  an  economy based on innovations, information, knowledge and trust in Poland. 

References Copeland T., Koller T., Murrin J. (1997) Valuation: Measuring and