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ALBANY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY A N D H E A LT H SCIENCES PRESIDENT’S REPORT

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HOW WE WILL

“A T H R I V I N G A C P H S C L A I M S T H E S PA C E AT THE INTERSECTION OF THE BASIC SCIENCES, CLINICAL SCIENCES, A N D P O P U L AT I O N H E A LT H S C I E N C E S .”

G R E G D E W E Y, P H . D . PRESIDENT


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THRIVE

TH E S E A R E C H A LLE N G I N G TI M E S FO R CO LLE G E S A N D U N I V E R S ITI E S .

The combination of rising operational costs and anemic enrollment growth have forced many schools to take actions that a few years ago were unthinkable. These range from workforce reductions to the elimination of academic programs and, in some cases, mergers or closures. At ACPHS, we are fortunate to have a tradition of fiscal control that gives us a strong foundation to withstand the current pressures on academia. We also are fortunate to have a history of student success that presents our students with strong career opportunities and has led to ACPHS graduates earning salaries that are currently ranked third highest in the country on the College Scorecard. We are, however, not immune to the forces reshaping higher education. As we determine the path forward in this increasingly competitive landscape, it is not sufficient to consider how we will survive as an institution. Rather, we must think instead about how we will thrive. This is an especially opportune time for us to consider how we move to the next level. The basic sciences continue to move forward at an unprecedented pace, expanding our knowledge of human biology at the biochemical, cellular, and organismal levels. The growth of our knowledge on complex disease states continues unabated. The historic advances in the basic sciences come at a time when we are also seeing an incredible impact of technology on the clinical and population health sciences. Medical devices and diagnostics are being developed that can monitor the physiological state of a patient in real-time, providing a comprehensive snapshot of an individual’s state of health. These developments, in combination with a deeper understanding of genomics, are accelerating the mainstream

adoption of precision medicine. Rapid genotyping technologies are bringing the promise of pharmacogenomics (tailoring a therapy to an individual’s genetic makeup) within reach. Information technology and informatics are also ushering in a new era in population health sciences where electronic health records can be mined to better understand the efficacy of treatments over large patient populations. But these big data approaches can do more than give us insights into efficacy. They can also introduce economics into the process and ultimately help determine how to balance the best therapy with cost effectiveness. These are not short term trends that will quickly fade away. The future of medicine and health care practice will be driven by the integration of the basic sciences, clinical sciences, and population health sciences. To be successful, our students must experience coursework and a research environment that integrates all three into robust programs of study. In the following Report, you will find articles highlighting people, projects, and programs that are advancing us in this direction. You will also “listen in” on a roundtable discussion about cancer that illustrates how knowledge from each of these core areas contributes to our understanding of this complex disease and our pursuit of a cure. So what does a thriving ACPHS looks like? It is an institution that claims the space at the intersection of the basic sciences, the clinical sciences, and the population health sciences – both in terms of research and education. We are educating the next generation of health care problem solvers, and we need to equip them with the tools for success. We are looking to thrive in an evolving health care and health science environment, and this requires that we embrace a future where we integrate basic, clinical, and population sciences.


CHIP OFF THE

OLD BLOCK

“ B E I N G AT AC P H S , I FEEL LIKE I HAVE RETURNED TO MY ROOTS IN THE PHARMACEUTICAL S C I E N C E S .”


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LI K E M A N Y S O N S W ITH R E B E LLI O U S S TR E A K S , J I M GA LLO, PH . D. was determined not to follow in his father’s footsteps. And as often happens in these scenarios, dad had the last laugh. Sort of. Dr. Gallo is Professor and Chair of the Albany Campus’ Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. He joined the College in 2016 following stops at a number of high profile universities and research institutes, but his path here was anything but predictable. He grew up in Wisconsin where his father owned and operated Gallo’s Pharmacy. He spent a lot of time in the pharmacy where he helped out as a stock boy and ran errands, but he never envisioned a career for himself in pharmacy. He would eventually enroll as a student at the University of Wisconsin, but after three years he decided it was time for a change. He had accumulated 90 credits, including an impressive number of courses in math and science, but he felt like he was “drifting.” “I had piled up all of these credits, but practically speaking, I didn’t have a major. I knew what pharmacy was about, and I thought that might give me the focus I was seeking. I had a friend who went to Boston College, so I decided to move to Boston and enroll at Massachusetts College of Pharmacy.” After earning his pharmacy degree, he returned home to work in his father’s pharmacy. But he couldn’t shake the idea of pursuing a career in clinical pharmacy after “catching the bug” as a student at MCP.

He found that at Fox Chase Cancer Center in Philadelphia where the seeds would be sown for the rest of his career work. “At the time, there were 70 primary investigators working at the Center. I had my own grants, but I was also able to collaborate with physicians doing phase one clinical trials. It was the ideal environment for a young researcher like myself.” While working at the University of Georgia, Dr. Gallo had collaborated with a faculty member on a number of grants related to anti-HIV drug research. “One of the concerns about anti-HIV drugs is do they get into the brain. I started to become more interested in this area, and since I was working in a cancer center, I thought I should also be studying brain tumors,” he says. He subsequently did a sabbatical with a brain tumor doctor at Northwestern University, and he has largely dedicated himself to the study of brain cancer ever since, having completed three NIH grants in this area in the past four years. Dr. Gallo’s research utilizes a number of the same assays that are used for drugs for other cancers, but he also screens for blood-brain barrier penetration, a critical factor in the efficacy of brain cancer drugs. “If we have a promising drug, we do a pre-clinical model in a mouse to look at the pharmacodynamics and pharmacokinetics. Unlike many other programs, we then scale our models to humans and make predictions as to how the drugs may behave in the body and which patient populations are most likely to benefit from the drug. This is a form of precision medicine.”

He enrolled at the University of Florida, one of the few schools at the time to offer a Doctor of Pharmacy program, which existed then only as a post-baccalaureate option. He quickly fell under the wing of some faculty members doing research in pharmacokinetics. Almost immediately something clicked for him. “I knew in my first year at Florida that I wanted to do my Ph.D. in this field,” he says.

Of course, as department chair, he must balance his research projects with his other responsibilities as the leader of a ten person (and growing) department. “I’m working to create an environment that provides faculty with the time and resources they need to develop their research programs. As their research flourishes, that will also mean more opportunities for students in our bachelor’s and master’s programs in Pharmaceutical Sciences,” he says.

That’s exactly what he did, earning his Ph.D. in pharmacokinetics from the University of Arizona before heading to the University of Georgia as an Assistant Professor. It proved to be a good entrée point into academia, but he left after seven years in pursuit of a more research intensive environment.

There’s also the matter of recruiting new faculty and managing the other administrative tasks that come with the position. It’s a full plate, but he doesn’t seem to mind. “Being at ACPHS, I feel like I have returned to my roots in the Pharmaceutical Sciences,” he says. No doubt his father would be proud.


RESEARCH I F YO U A R E A S C I E NTI S T D O I N G R E S E A RC H O N H U M A N H E A LTH , your number one target for funding is likely the National Institutes of Health (NIH). NIH is the largest public funder of biomedical research in the world, but NIH supported grants are also the most competitive. NIH received 54,220 research project grant applications in fiscal year 2016, with the overall success rate for funding being less than 20%. Due to the volume of applications and the comparative scarcity of funding dollars, all grants submitted to NIH undergo a demanding peer review process. The first level of review is carried out by a Scientific Review Group composed primarily of non-federal scientists. The second level of review is typically performed by the relevant Institute and Center National Advisory Councils (NIH is made up of 27 Institutes and Centers), but in some instances, NIH may rely on boards made up of scientific and public representatives. The rigor associated with the review process means that NIH grants not only carry with them a level of prestige, they serve as validation for the quality and importance of a given research project. So when two ACPHS faculty members – Associate Professor Meenakshi Malik, Ph.D., and Assistant Professor Tim LaRocca, Ph.D. – were each awarded $480,000 NIH grants within a three-week span in December 2016, it marked an extraordinary accomplishment for the College. It was made even more noteworthy by the fact that Drs. Malik and LaRocca are both members of the same department, the Department of Basic and Clinical Sciences. The greatest beneficiaries of these grants, however, may be ACPHS students, particularly those in the Bachelor’s

program in Microbiology and the Master’s program in Molecular Biosciences. That is because both grants, which are categorized by NIH as R15’s, come with the requirement that the principal investigators use the funding to help “expose students to research.” Dr. Malik’s grant is the renewal of a previously funded NIH grant. It will allow her to continue her study of Francisella tularensis, a deadly bacterium that has been classified by the Centers for Disease Control as a Category A bioterrorism agent. Mentoring students is nothing new for Dr. Malik; she has a long history of integrating students into her lab. Over the three-year period of her previous NIH grant, she authored six publications in peer reviewed journals that included Molecular Microbiology and the Journal of Biological Chemistry. Five different ACPHS undergraduate and graduate students were named co-authors on these publications. Dr. LaRocca joined the College in January 2015, and this represents his first NIH grant. The focus of his project is to gain a deeper understanding of the process by which red blood cells die, and with this knowledge, work to improve treatments for patients suffering from bacterial blood infections and other blood related disorders. Dr. LaRocca already had ACPHS students working in his lab, and this NIH grant will enable more students to gain meaningful research experience at both the undergraduate and graduate levels. As the College continues to build out its capabilities in the Basic Sciences, grants such as these will play a critical role in supporting those efforts while also providing excellent opportunities for students to engage in cutting edge research.


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AND DEVELOPMENT

MEENAKSHI MALIK’S A N D T I M L A R O C C A’ S N E W NIH GRANTS WILL HELP T R A I N T H E N E X T G E N E R AT I O N OF RESEARCH SCIENTISTS.


TWO DEGREES ARE

BETT F O R S T U D E N T S S E E K I N G TO D I F F E R E NTI ATE TH E M S E LV E S in the eyes of future employers and graduate schools, a master’s degree is an excellent option. Albany College of Pharmacy and Health Sciences introduced its first master’s degree program in the late 2000’s and now offers five such programs. Each one has been developed as a complement to, or extension of, an existing undergraduate program(s) which means that there are a number of intentional synergies that exist between the various B.S. and M.S. programs. ACPHS has made the pursuit of a master’s degree easier through the availability of four dual degree programs. Dual degree programs allow students to receive a bachelor’s and master’s degree in five years instead of six – a structure that helps them save both time and money as they prepare for the next step in their careers.

The newest of the College’s dual degree programs was introduced in February 2017. It combines a Bachelor’s in Microbiology and a Master’s in Molecular Biosciences. This dual degree offering has been designed to provide students with a stronger foundation in research, and includes a research rotation in Year 4 followed by a written thesis and defense in Year 5. By attending just one extra year of school, dual degree graduates gain a competitive advantage that will not only provide a boost to their immediate post-graduate plans, but may also be viewed favorably as they seek to advance their careers in the future. It’s a combination that is tough to beat which is why an increasing number of students are being drawn to these programs.


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TER

THAN ONE

DUAL DEGREE PROGRAMS AT ACPHS n

 .S. in Biomedical Technology / B M.S. in Cytotechnology and Molecular Cytology

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 .S. in Biomedical Technology / B M.S. in Clinical Laboratory Sciences

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 .S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences / B M.S. in Pharmaceutical Sciences

n

 .S. in Microbiology / B M.S. in Molecular Biosciences


8  ACP H S

P R ESI DENT’ S R EPORT

BRIDGING THE DIVIDE

“WE NEED TO GET MORE P E O P L E FA M I L I A R WITH THE SKILLS AND K N OW L E D G E T H AT P H A R M A C I S T S P O S S E S S .”


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O N A N Y G I V E N DAY, A S S O C I ATE PRO F E S S O R O F PH A R M ACY PR AC TI C E K ATI E C A R D O N E , PH A R M . D., B C AC P,

doubts, but by the end of my third semester in the program I had developed a real interest in nephrology.”

may be found working with chronic kidney disease patients, conducting medication therapy management consultations, developing online courses for the College’s nephrology concentration, publishing articles, delivering presentations, precepting students, and more. All of which makes it hard to believe that it took three years of school to convince her that pharmacy was the right career choice.

Following graduation, she did a two-year fellowship in nephrology with Dr. Harold Manley, a former ACPHS faculty member. “The fellowship was the synthesis of my previous experiences in community pharmacy, nephrology, and research. It combined everything that I enjoyed doing. It’s what ultimately led me to academia because I saw it as the best opportunity to continue my involvement in all of these aspects of pharmacy.”

“I had been asked by my high school guidance counselor to consider pharmacy, but at the time, I was leaning towards engineering. My image of what a pharmacist did was the shopkeeper in the Norman Rockwell painting. That wasn’t something that appealed to me, which is why ACPHS was the last school I visited when I was looking at colleges,” she says. But when she arrived on campus, she found herself attracted to the close-knit feel of the College and the strong focus on science, which is a hallmark of the pre-pharmacy curriculum. She decided to enroll. Despite positive early experiences at the College, she considered transferring after each of her first two years. Everything changed after her third year when she began working as a pharmacy intern at Price Chopper. “I really enjoyed the opportunity to work with patients in a community setting. It was also interesting to watch the transition between basic sciences and clinical applications play out in the pharmacy. I liked that bridge.” From that point on, there was no turning back. With her commitment to ACPHS and her career path now solidified, Dr. Cardone immersed herself in the College and her future profession. She joined the soccer team, worked in the research lab of Professor Bob Levin, and applied for the Early Patient Oriented Care (EPOC) program, which is where she developed her interest in nephrology. “Before starting the program, students were asked to rank the areas of interest to them. I put dialysis last on the list, and, of course, that’s where I ended up,” she laughs. “[Professor] George Bailie said to me, ‘It’s a good character builder to get up at 6 am and go to dialysis.’ I had my

Fast forward to the present day and Dr. Cardone is now mentoring her own post-graduate trainees. She started a nephrology pharmacy residency two years ago – one of only two such residencies in the country – and recently received accreditation by the American Society of Health-System Pharmacists (ASHP). She is also using her research as a platform to bridge (there’s that word again) pharmacy with other fields such as Public Health. One such project is a collaboration with Associate Professor Wendy Parker in the ACPHS Department of Population Health Sciences. The two are exploring the impact of pharmaceutical care services such as medication adherence and health literacy on the outcomes of patients suffering from chronic kidney disease. The collaboration has resulted in external grant funding a nd academic publications. For someone who once had to be sold on the profession of pharmacy, Dr. Cardone has emerged as one of its strongest advocates and a role model for future pharmacists. She believes that the profession has just scratched the surface of its potential, and she hopes to see its profile further elevated in the eyes of the public. “Within our own profession, we know that we are valuable members of the health care team. But much of the public does not know about the pharmacist’s education or what they do beyond dispensing. Even within the health care team, we need to get more people familiar with the skills and knowledge that pharmacists possess,” she says. “If we are not vocal about our capabilities and contributions, how will anybody know?”


B R E AT H I N G

S C H E N E C TA DY CO U NT Y I S BAT TLI N G A N A S TH M A PRO B LE M , and the Asthma Coalition of the Capital Region is looking to ACPHS, and specifically its students, for assistance. According to the latest data from the New York State Department of Health, Schenectady County ranks 4th among 57 counties in the state (excluding New York City) with 78.1 asthma emergency department visits per 10,000 residents. Following the 2016 opening of College Hometown Pharmacy in the Hometown Health Centers clinic in Schenectady, the Asthma Coalition of the Capital Region (ACCR) approached the College for help with its efforts to improve asthma care. ACPHS Assistant Professor See-Won Seo explains the challenges inherent in asthma treatment: “There is so much that needs to be covered related to asthma devices and medications, and the provider doesn’t always have the time to walk through everything with the patient. Having a pharmacist available to follow up and ‘close the loop’ can go a long way towards improving outcomes with asthma patients.” Through the partnership with ACCR, student pharmacists from the College who rotate through Hometown Health Centers now receive daily reports to help identify patients in the clinic who may benefit from additional asthma counseling. Indicators flagged in these reports may include one or more of the following:  ecent asthma-related ER visits or hospitalizations R A sthma Control Test score ≤ 19, indicating poor control n F ailure to pick up controller asthma medications from the pharmacy n E xcessive refills of a rescue inhaler from the pharmacy n n

Once a patient is identified, the students meet with the patient after regularly scheduled appointments with their provider to review their medications and ensure the patient knows how to properly use their device(s). As part of the meeting, students demonstrate for each patient how their device works and then watch to see that the patient is using it properly. The students also provide disease state education, asthma action plans, and trigger avoidance/identification. Since the program has started, they’ve already noticed instances where providers have increased dosing when, in fact, the problem stemmed from the patient not taking the medicine correctly. “The area where we feel there is the most opportunity for rapid improvement is with the development or update of a patient’s Asthma Action Plan,” says ACPHS Assistant Professor Jacqueline Cleary, whose practice site is in the Hometown Health Centers clinic. “What are the medications they should and should not be taking? When should they know to increase their albuterol based on their symptoms? When is the right time to call the doctor or seek emergent care? Our job is to make sure they know the answers to these questions.” As the program continues to grow, the College plans to integrate 10-15 pharmacy students in their second professional year (P2) to assist with asthma education. When these students become P3’s, they will train a new class of P2’s and that cycle will be repeated each year. Dr. Seo would eventually like to see students receive permission to visit patients’ homes and shadow Healthy Neighborhoods Program professionals. “Pharmacists tend to focus on the medications which can cause them to overlook factors in the patient’s home environment that may be exacerbating their asthma such as smoking or pet dander. When it comes to asthma care, it is important to understand the big picture so that you can ask the right questions and direct the patient to the most effective resources.”


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EASIER AC P H S S T U D E N T S AT COLLEGE HOMETOWN PHARMACY ARE LEARNING HOW THEY CAN H E L P R E D U C E T H E I M PA C T OF ASTHMA ON RESIDENTS O F S C H E N E C TA D Y C O U N T Y.


DE


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MAND ON THE RISE

F O R L A B O R AT O R Y PROFESSIONALS

I N TH E F I E LD O F H E A LTH C A R E , M U C H time is spent discussing and analyzing treatment. What is the best course of therapy? Is the patient capable of adhering to the therapy? Is the prescribed therapy the most cost effective option? But before any conversation can take place about how to best treat a patient, there first needs to be a diagnosis, and in approximately 70% of situations, a patient’s diagnosis is determined after consulting the results of a laboratory test(s). Advances in technology over the past two decades have greatly expanded the range of tests available to providers. There are now approximately seven billion diagnostic tests performed each year in the United States alone! As the amount and sophistication of these tests have grown, the need for clinical laboratory science professionals to evaluate and interpret the results has increased proportionately. Yet, despite these

developments, the number of academic programs for laboratory professionals has been declining since the early 1990’s. The nation’s labs need to fill more than 7,000 jobs annually, but U.S. clinical laboratory education programs are producing approximately 5,000 qualified laboratory professionals each year. The math is pretty simple. Every graduate from an accredited program is going to have a job offer, and in some cases, multiple offers. As ACPHS looks to the future, its continuing commitment to the laboratory sciences (the College offers both B.S. and M.S. degrees in Clinical Laboratory Sciences, in addition to an M.S. in Cytotechnology and Molecular Cytology) positions it well to help address an important need in the nation’s health care system while providing opportunities for students in a field with excellent career prospects.


C U LT U R E OF OPPORTUNITY

“ C U LT U R E S DON’T JUST HAPPEN. THEY ARE F O R M E D .”


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WA LK I NTO TH E O F F I C E O F CO LLE E N M C L AU G H LI N , PH . D. , and certain things strike you immediately – an array of multi-colored post-it notes affixed to the wall, figurines of a tortoise and hare placed conspicuously on her desk, and a sign that says, “Culture eats strategy for lunch.” Dr. McLaughlin joined the College in February 2017 as the founding chair of the Department of Population Health Sciences. Prior to coming to ACPHS, she spent 25 years at the New York State Department of Health (DOH) where she worked in multiple bureaus of the department including the Bureau of Sexually Transmitted Disease Prevention and Epidemiology, the Office of Primary Care and Health Systems Management, the Bureau of Chronic Disease Epidemiology and Surveillance, and the Bureau of Cancer Epidemiology. The Department of Population Health Sciences was formed in spring 2016 as part of a strategic realignment for the College. “We created the department to help facilitate collaborations between the School of Pharmacy and Pharmaceutical Sciences and the School of Arts and Sciences,” explains ACPHS Provost Tarun Patel, Ph.D. “In addition to the six core faculty members in the department, there are three faculty members with joint appointments, and we anticipate that number will grow. These interschool and inter-disciplinary collaborations are going to help advance teaching and research at the College and ultimately enrich the academic experiences of students across all of our programs.” As the founding chair, Dr. McLaughlin will play a key role in building the department and helping establish its identity. She’s more than up to the task. “I strongly believe that cultures don’t just happen, they are formed,” she says. “It starts with how people treat each other, how they communicate, and how they lead. It’s important to me that the faculty members here feel like they are part of a community, not simply members of a department.” “That’s the reason for the ‘Culture Eats Strategy for Lunch’ sign. If you don’t have the right culture in place, even the best strategies are destined to fail.” The Department of Population Health Sciences is home to the B.S. in Public Health (introduced in 2016) and the M.S. in

Health Outcomes Research and Informatics, two programs with natural synergies that haven’t been fully tapped. “Prior to my arrival, the faculty did an excellent job of developing and launching these two academic programs, which are still relatively new,” says Dr. McLaughlin. “I’m looking to build upon the foundation they have established by adding what I have learned through my experiences in the workplace. Together, we will ensure that our students graduate with the skills needed to excel in the field of public health.” Which leads us back to those post-it notes. These represent the vision for a revamped Public Health curriculum, one that expands the range of coursework while still enabling students to specialize in their areas of interest. One of the new courses will be a Seminar in Public Health, a course for juniors that Dr. McLaughlin will teach this fall. “I have always enjoyed working with students. I taught epidemiology in SUNY Albany’s School of Public Health for seven years, and I planned to do more teaching after I retired,” she says. “Now I have an opportunity to do it sooner!” In addition to revisiting the curricula of the Public Health and Health Outcomes programs, Dr. McLaughlin is working with faculty to codify a research agenda for the department. “Our research vision for the department must be one that aligns with President Dewey’s vision for the College,” she says. “Making these linkages between our work and the strategic goals of the institution has been a fun exercise for us and something that I really enjoy.” With so much to do for the naturally energetic McLaughlin, it can be difficult to know where to start. Enter the tortoise and the hare. They serve as reminders of the book Thinking Fast and Slow by Nobel Prize winner Daniel Kahneman. The book explores the forces that govern our thoughts and actions, helping determine when a quick decision is needed and when more deliberate thought is advised. Looking ahead, Dr. McLaughlin has no shortage of ideas for the department including plans to develop a five-year dual degree program in Public Health and Health Outcomes and exploring opportunities to offer continuing education programming for public health professionals. But that’s a whole other set of post-it notes.


AN OUNCE OF

A 2 0 1 5 A RTI C LE F RO M TH E J O U R N A L PATI E NT PR E F E R E N C E A N D A D H E R E N C E states that an estimated half of chronic disease medications are not taken as prescribed. Worse yet, studies have linked non-adherence among sufferers of chronic diseases to poorer treatment outcomes and the progression of disease symptoms and complications. When the disease is type 1 diabetes mellitus (T1DM) and the patient is an adolescent, the consequences of nonadherence can be life altering. Complications from poorly controlled, long-standing T1DM include heart disease, eye damage, pregnancy complications, and kidney disease. Persistent non-adherence beginning in early adulthood can lead over time to the early onset of these conditions. Associate Professor of Population Health Sciences Wendy Parker, Ph.D., and Associate Professor of Pharmacy Practice Katie Cardone, Pharm.D., BCACP, want to prevent such scenarios from taking place. The two faculty members, along with ACPHS students from the Public Health and Pharm.D. programs, are collaborating on a project that seeks to identify the risk factors that may inhibit successful medication self-management among adolescents suffering from T1DM. Since T1DM (sometimes referred to as Juvenile Diabetes) is usually diagnosed in childhood, parents or other caregivers naturally play a significant role in managing the child’s medications. Responsibilities may include obtaining diabetic supplies, administering medications, managing nutrition, obtaining medication-related information, recognizing medication problems, and negotiating insurance plans. Parents begin to play a lesser role in medication-related care as T1DM children move into adulthood, and it is during this transition where the threat of non-adherence increases.

Many young adults struggle in particular when they leave home for the first time (e.g., to go away to College) and have to shoulder more of the responsibilities for their own health. But which adolescents are most at risk and what types of interventions can help avoid adverse health events? Exploring these questions will be the focus of the project, which is being supported by a grant from The John Faunce and Alicia Tracy Roach Fund and administered by the Community Foundation of the Capital Region. For the initial phase of the project, Drs. Parker and Cardone will be partnering with the local chapter of the Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF) to do one-on-one interviews with adolescent T1DM patients and parents. Following the interviews, the research team will then compare the findings with data available in the T1D Exchange Registry, a repository containing clinical, laboratory, and patient-reported data from over 28,000 patients across 75 U.S.-based health clinics. Using mathematical modeling, Drs. Parker and Cardone will seek to isolate potential risk factors for non-adherence across different patient profiles. As Dr. Parker notes, identifying the risk factors is only part of the solution. “Then the challenge becomes, how do you craft the messages to help bring attention to these risks? How does this population want to receive those messages? How do you get them to trust you? It is a lot to consider which is why getting perspectives from multiple disciplines is often needed to determine the best way to attack the problem.” Adds Dr. Cardone, “The ultimate goal of the project is to encourage proper self-management of medications for these adolescents and prevent long term, negative health consequences that may result from non-adherence.”


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PREVENTION C O L L A B O R AT I V E P R OJ E C T SEEKS TO REDUCE THE RISKS OF NON-ADHERENCE I N Y O U N G A D U LT S W I T H TYPE 1 DIABETES.


P U B L I C H E A LT H F O R T H E

PUB


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LIC

GOOD

TH E BAC H E LO R ’ S PRO G R A M I N PU B LI C H E A LTH is the latest undergraduate degree offering from the College, having received approval from the New York State Office of Higher Education in spring 2016.

an aspect of public health that aligns with their career interests.

The Public Health program evolved from the College’s B.S. program in Health and Human Sciences (HHS) which launched in 2009. The Public Health program expands from the core HHS program to integrate a wider variety of coursework in areas that include social science, applied science, epidemiology, statistics, and research.

“As a college centered around human health, the addition of a Bachelor’s program in Public Health is a natural extension of our academic offerings,” says Associate Professor Wendy Parker, Ph.D., who serves as the Director of the Public Health program. “By leveraging our collective strengths as an institution, we have created a true interdisciplinary program that educates students to become scientifically grounded and socially engaged.”

The B.S. in Public Health curriculum – which is based on the accreditation standards published by the Council on Education for Public Health – requires students to select one of two tracks: Community Health or Health Analytics. Each track culminates with a capstone project (typically an internship or research project) in which students focus on

The Bureau of Labor Statistics also sees great opportunities in the field of Public Health. Their employment forecast for Public Health and related areas states, “Growth will be driven by efforts to improve health outcomes and to reduce health care costs by teaching people about healthy habits and behaviors and utilization of available health care services.”


THE

WA R TO E N D A LL WA RS

W H E N PR E S I D E NT R I C H A R D N I XO N signed the National Cancer Act on December 23, 1971, it kicked off what became popularly known as the “War on Cancer.” It’s been nearly 50 years since the bill became law, and while progress has undoubtedly been made in the search for better treatments and outcomes, it quite likely has fallen short of the expectations of those who enacted the legislation. Cancer remains the leading cause of death worldwide and is second only to heart disease in the U.S. According to the National Cancer Institute, approximately 39.6% of men and women will be diagnosed with cancer at some point during their lifetimes. That’s 2 out of every 5 people walking the planet.

But there are also encouraging signs. From 2004-2013, the overall cancer death rate in the United States fell by 13% as the number of cancer survivors increased. The number of people in the United States living beyond a cancer diagnosis reached nearly 14.5 million in 2014 and is expected to rise to almost 19 million by 2024. Yet, each piece of good news seems to be followed by one that casts doubt on our progress against this relentless disease. So where are we making the most gains? Where are we falling behind? Is a cure possible someday, and for that matter, what does a cure even look like? For insights to these and other questions, we gathered a roundtable of ACPHS faculty from the basic sciences, clinical sciences, and population health sciences to share their perspectives on the state of cancer care today and what the future may have in store.


CA N CER R O U N DTA BLE AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  21

JENNA LEBLANC D IRECTOR, M.S. P RO G RAM I N CYTOTECH NOLOGY AN D M O LE C U LAR CYTOLOGY

ALLISON M. BURTON-CHASE AS S I STANT PROFESSOR, DE P T. OF POP U L AT I ON H EA LTH SCIE N C E S

SHAKER MOUSA CH A IR M A N A N D E X E CUT IV E V P, P H A R M ACE UT ICA L R E S E A R CH IN S T IT UT E

TA R U N B . PAT E L P R OVO S T

S T E FA N B A L A Z

S A R A H S C A R PA C E P E T E R S

CH AIR, DEPT. O F P HARM AC E U T I CAL SC IENC ES, VE RM O N T CAM P U S

A S S O CIAT E P R O F E S S O R , D E P T. O F P H A R M ACY P R ACT ICE


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THE CANCER DEATH RATE – ADJUSTED FOR AGE AND SIZE OF THE POPULATIO N – FELL JUST FIVE PERCENT BETWEEN 1950 AND 2009. DURING THIS SAME PERIOD, THE DEATH RATE FROM HEART DISEASE FELL BY NEARLY TWO-THIRDS. WHAT IS IT ABOUT CANCER THAT MAKES IT SO DIFFICULT TO TREAT? PATE L: Here’s the problem. We have 25,000 genes in our bodies – many of which are involved in cancer. You can identify and block certain cancer targets to effectively create a traffic jam, but the cancer cells are highly adaptive, and they know how to maneuver through the traffic. Cancer is like an aggressive driver who finds a back alley to get around the problem. When it heads down one of these alleys is when it’s very hard to treat. MOUSA: This is an opportunistic disease. Tumors operate independently in the body. If there are enough cancer cells, they are able to evade the immune system and build their own blood supply network. This is what allows the cancer to grow and spread, and that is when it becomes difficult to control.

PETERS: I feel that statistic is a bit misleading. Survival rates for some types of cancer have improved significantly through the years. Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) is a great example. As a result of new oral targeted therapies that were approved in the early 2000’s, CML patients are now living nearly as long as non-CML patients.

BURTON-CHASE: I would add that part of the problem is the language that we use. We talk about cancer as if it is a single entity, but cancer is an umbrella term for more than 100 different diseases. The more we learn, the more we realize how complicated it is.

THERE ARE THREE BASIC WAYS TO COMBAT CANCER: PREVENTION, DETECTION, AND TREATMENT. WHICH OF THESE AREAS HOLDS THE MOST PROMISE IN THE COMING DECADE FOR NOTABLY IMPACTING SURVIVAL RATES? PATE L: I would say detection. If you can identify the type of cancer early, you can target the therapy better. This begins to move towards precision medicine.

B U RTO N - C H A S E : I think the best opportunities are on the prevention side. We know that 25-30% of cancer deaths are related to smoking. Another 20-25% are diet related. Some people in the field believe that as many of 90% of cancer deaths can be prevented with behavioral changes. We have put a lot of money into treatment, and we have not gotten the same returns as we have with effective prevention strategies.

PETE R S : I agree. The number of preventable cancer cases is much greater than the number of positive outcomes from any drug therapy currently on the market. LE B L A N C : Cancer is such a multi-factorial disease that I don’t think you can separate these areas. They need to work together. More education is certainly needed as far as prevention is concerned. I’m also a big advocate for screening, and improving the ways we do it, so that we can diagnose the cancer while there’s still time to treat it. PROVOST PATEL MENTIONED “PRECISION MEDICINE” WHICH IS A TERM WE HEAR A LOT ABOUT THESE DAYS. WHAT IS ITS POTENTIAL AND HOW WIDELY IS IT BEING USED TODAY IN THE TREATMENT OF CANCER PATIENTS? M O U SA : Cytotoxic chemicals used to treat most cancers are effectively poison, so you have to be very careful about how they are distributed throughout the body. I strongly believe that to effectively eliminate the tumor you have to surprise it. That means hitting it with a “big load” of chemotherapeutic drugs, perhaps 100x the concentration that we would normally use. The only way to do this without harming the patient’s normal organs is through precision medicine where you can harness the power of nanotechnology, for example, to target the tumor and minimize the spillover to the healthy cells and organs of the body. PETE R S : Some of the newer drugs are small molecules with very specific targets. They still affect normal tissue but not to the degree that you would expect to see when you think about the traditional cytotoxic chemo experience. Knowledge of pharmacogenomics is also being adopted in the treatment of cancer, which is helping us better target which drugs will be most effective in which patients. This is


CA N CER R O U N DTA BLE AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  23

not some futuristic concept – it is something that we are using today in the clinic.

care, and when there is a breakthrough, we tend to do a poor job of educating people about it.

BA L A Z: This is true. Pharmacogenomics is able to tell

LE B L A N C : Most people hear HPV and think “women”

us about factors such as the presence or absence of certain targets, transporters, or metabolizing enzymes, which can help us estimate whether a certain treatment is likely to be successful. However, there is a lot of space left between the basic pharmacogenomic information and what is taking place in the body. What is happening in the cell that changes its behavior to the type of uncontrolled growth we see in cancer? What are the differences between the drug-affected components of the cancer cell and a normal cell? This needs to be analyzed. Precision medicine takes into account knowledge about the kinetics of many different processes, but to harness its potential, we need to know more about the basic mechanisms at work.

and “cervical cancer.” However, HPV is also found in certain head and neck cancers. And it’s not just in females. It’s in males too. But that message does not always come through which underscores the fact that we are falling short on education.

THE 21ST CENTURY CURES ACT ALLOCATES NEARLY $2 BILLION FOR CANCER RESEARCH (THIS INITIATIVE IS REFERRED TO AS THE “CANCER MOONSHOT”). IF YOU WERE IN CHARGE OF THAT MONEY, WHAT TYPES OF INITIATIVES WOULD YOU INVEST IT IN? LE B L A N C : I’d like to see more money directed to the expansion of screening programs. If we can identify biomarkers for more types of cancers, it will help us develop better targeted and tailored treatment therapies. I’d also like to see research that explores the impact of screening at younger ages. Too often we look only when there’s a problem. That’s not a screening program; that’s a diagnostic program.

BA L A Z : There is still a great need for more basic science research into the mechanisms of cancer. The pharmaceutical industry rarely does this type of research, which means government support is critical to driving it, particularly in the early stages.

B U RTO N - C H A S E : I would invest more money in cancer education. We have a poor education system when it comes to cancer, and it is not just with the general public, but the providers as well. We have, for the first time ever, a preventive cancer vaccine (HPV). It is the only cancer vaccine that has ever been developed, yet we do not see the uptake rates that you see in other developed countries. All clinicians do not promote it in the same way. Some make it seem like a choice. We have not had a lot of major advances in cancer

IN OUR ONGOING BATTLE WITH CANCER, WHAT IS YOUR GREATEST CAUSE FOR HOPE? PETE R S : Seeing new classes of drugs coming to fruition and how our knowledge of the basic pathology of cancer is expanding are both reasons for optimism. That is translating to greatly improved survival in cases where we didn’t see it before. For example, when I was in residency, patients with Stage 4 lung cancer used to live six months, and now these patients can live as long as 2-5 years.

B U RTO N - C H A S E : I would say it is patients being advocates for themselves – being more proactive with their providers, sharing more information within families. They are on a much more level playing field than in the past, and better-educated patients typically get better treatment and have better outcomes.

LE B L A N C : We have made tremendous improvements in diagnostics and finding certain cancers earlier. There used to be sites in the body that were very difficult to access like the pancreas. Now endoscopic ultrasound can get to places that weren’t easily accessible before. Endobronchial ultrasound allows us to not only reach lesions in the respiratory tract, but also the surrounding lymph nodes, which helps determine staging. These techniques have really entered the mainstream in the past 10-15 years. The ability to make earlier and more accurate diagnoses has improved outcomes for countless numbers of patients because, in most cases, the earlier you find the cancer, the more effective the treatment will be.

M O U SA : The technological advances are remarkable. It is now about implementation and adoption. We need to find ways to accelerate the marriage between technology and practice.


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WHAT GIVES YOU THE MOST CONCERN? PETE R S : I’m very concerned about prevention getting overlooked, particularly when I read reports that millennials have higher rates of colorectal cancer than Generation Xers and Baby Boomers. I’m also concerned by what seems to be increasing numbers of younger people getting diseases they shouldn’t have. There needs to continue to be epidemiological research to monitor these trends and help inform prevention efforts. PATE L: For me, it’s the shrinking levels of government research funding in the sciences. Right now, the National Cancer Institute (NCI) funds scored grants at around the six percentile. But it’s not only that. Not every approach for treating cancer comes from NCI-funded research. Continued cuts to NIH funding will mean research on other diseases will also suffer. Sometimes it’s a breakthrough in one area of study that fuels an advance in a different field. It’s very interconnected. M O U SA : I could not agree more. If we continue to reduce funding for scientific research, labs are going to shut down. There will be fewer new scientists. In fact, it’s happening now. When I talk to post docs today, they want to go into industry for administrative and management opportunities, not research-based faculty positions. The training and retraining that takes place in academia fosters collaborations. That would all get cut out. This would have decades and decades of deleterious effects on scientific progress and innovation. HOW DO YOU DEFINE A CURE IN THE CONTEXT OF CANCER, AND WHAT IS THE POSSIBLE TIMELINE FOR SUCH A CURE? B U RTO N - C H A S E : Instead of talking about a cure, we should really be talking about remission – for how long and for whom. Optimism is important, and you certainly do not want to take that away, but you have to balance patient expectations with reality. For example, when we talk about survival rates, we mean a certain type of cancer has, say, a 40% survival rate over the next five years. We do not systematically collect and discuss data for 10, 15, 20 years out. That is not always made clear to patients, which is why we need to do a better job of having these conversations. When patients and families get information after the fact, that is when they start to feel like the health care system does not work for them.

PETE R S : In the medical community, we define cure as good long term survival, but that’s not what patients want to hear or accept. People want to feel they can have control over their cancer, but it also contributes to this false sense of outcome. Patients will always ask me, “How long do I have to be on this therapy?” and I explain, “Until you have side effects you cannot tolerate or until it doesn’t work anymore.” It’s hard to have those conversations because sometimes patients think they will be able to take a pill for a month, and they will be cured. Based on what we know today, metastatic disease cannot be cured. You can’t get rid of it. But if you can manage it and keep it from spreading to vital organs, it could take on the shape of a chronic disease similar to how we now treat HIV. M O U SA : I agree with Sarah. If we can localize the cancer and control its behavior, we can treat it like a chronic disease. I think within a decade or two we can get there with many forms of cancer therpeutics. However, that assumes we have adequate government funding for research and are able to resolve some of the related bioethical issues. LE B L A N C : For me, a cure is about moving past a onesize-fits-all approach to care and getting the patient the type of individualized treatment they need.

BA L A Z : Any discussion of a cure must consider the type of cancer and how quickly it becomes mortal. A cure leads to a measurable extension of life. It’s hard to imagine for some types of cancer that we will cure them completely. Depending on the type of cancer, therapies may extend survival by 20 years or far less, but they are all beneficial.

PATE L: Five years of remission is a success, success, success. In remission, patients are checked regularly, and our monitoring continues to improve which means any future treatments are going to begin sooner and hopefully be more effective. PETE R S : If I could just add one more thing … It’s important to keep in mind that we all have the potential to develop cancer. We all have mutations in our DNA that our bodies are trying to fix and repair right now. Mutations accumulate in our genes, but we typically can handle them. Unfortunately some people are not able to manage it for reasons that may have to do with their immune systems, genetics, environmental exposure, or something else altogether. What that trigger is and why and when it occurs – that is the million dollar question.


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T HE PANELI STS S TE FA N BA L A Z , PH . D. is the Chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences in the ACPHS-Vermont Campus. The goal of his research is to better understand the processes affecting the fates and effects of drugs in the body in terms of drug structures and properties.

A LLI S O N M . B U RTO N - C H A S E , PH . D. , is an Assistant Professor in the Department of Population Health Sciences. Her primary area of research is in the behavioral aspects of cancer prevention and survivorship in families with hereditary cancer syndromes.

J E N N A LE B L A N C , M . S ., C T ( A S C P) , is the Director of the Master’s in Cytotechnology and Molecular Cytology program. She also serves as the President of the American Society for Cytotechnology.

S H A K E R M O U SA , PH . D., M BA , is the Chairman and Executive Vice President of the Pharmaceutical Research Institute and Vice Provost of Research. His research explores ways that nanotechnology and biotechnology can be used to improve the detection, prevention, and treatment of cancer.

TA R U N B . PATE L , PH . D., is the Provost at ACPHS. He has received more than 30 externally funded grants, including 16 from the National Institutes of Health. The focus of his research is hepatocellular carcinoma, the most common form of liver cancer. S A R A H S C A R PAC E PETE R S , PH A R M . D., M PH , B CO P, is an Associate Professor in the Department of Pharmacy Practice and a board certified oncology pharmacist with a practice site at the St. Peter’s Health Partners Cancer Care Center. She is the immediate Past President of the Hematology/Oncology Pharmacy Association.


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S C H O L A R LY

ACTIVITY

REPORT JANUARY 1, 2016 – DECEMBER 31, 2016


28  ACP H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLA RLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

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Education, 2016; 80(8): 132.

Jan 1;38(1):16-30.

dog model. Journal of

citrate in a rat model.

of Mortality in Methicil-

Strang AF, Baia P. An

Pharmacy and Pharmacol-

Journal of Pharmacy and

lin-Resistant Staphylococ-

Investigation of Teaching

ogy 2016; 68: 803-809.

Pharmacology 2016; 68:

cus aureus Bacteremia.

and Learning Programs

56-62.

Antimicrobial Agents and

in Pharmacy Education.

Chemotherapy 2016 Apr

American Journal of

Bidell MR, Lodise TP. Fluoroquinolone-Associated Tendinopathy: Does Levo-

Scheetz MH, Crew PE,

floxacin Pose the Greatest

Miglis C, Gilbert EM,

Nimish Patel

22;60(5):3070-5. doi:

Pharmaceutical Education,

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Sutton SH, O’Donnell JN,

Bidell MR, McLaughlin M,

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30  AC P H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLARLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

Lamba S, Strang A,

Cardone KE. “End-Stage

Care Pharmacy Preparato-

Bidell MR, Lodise TP.

Parker WM, Wegrzyn NM,

Edelman D, Navedo D,

Kidney Disease” in Phar-

ry Review and Recertifi-

Levofloxacin-associated

Pai AB, Daoui R, Daoui

Soto-Greene ML, Guarino

macotherapy Casebook:

cation Course, 2016 ed.

tendinopathy: What is the

S, Cardone KE. Health

AJ. Promoting inter-

A Patient-Focused Ap-

Bainbridge JL, Cardone

risk? ACPHS Research Fo-

Literacy and Self-Man-

professionalism: initial

proach, 10th ed. Schwing-

K, Cross LB, et al. Lenexa,

rum, Albany, NY, January

agement of Medications

evaluation of a master of

hammer TL, Koehler JM,

KS: American College of

2016; Making A Difference

among Patients at an

science in health profes-

eds., McGraw-Hill, 2016.

Clinical Pharmacy, 2016:1-

in Infectious Diseases

Outpatient Nephrology

679 - 1-740.

(MAD-ID), Orlando, FL,

Office. AcademyHealth

May 2016.

Annual Research Meet-

sions education degree program. Advances in

Cardone KE. “Nephrol-

Medical Education and

ogy” in Review and

Sarah (Scarpace) Peters

Practice, 2016; 7: 51–5.

Recertification Book for

Adams VR, Peters

Laurie Briceland

Board Certification in Am-

SS. “Lung Cancer” in

Rosa S, Briceland L. Intro-

Matthew Stryker

bulatory Care Pharmacy.

Pharmacotherapy:

ducing students to Phar-

Wegrzyn NM, Parker

Stryker M, Kane M, Busch

American College of Clini-

A Pathophysiologic

macy Ownership through

WM, Pai AB, Daoui R,

R. Lack of Cross-Reactivi-

cal Pharmacy, 2016.

Approach, 10th ed. DiPiro

the development of an

Daoui S, Cardone KE.

JT, Talbert RL, Yee GC,

Entrepreneurial APPE Ro-

Assessing health literacy

ty Following a Switch from

ing, Boston, MA, June 27, 2016.

Alirocumab to Evolocum-

Jacqueline Cleary

Matzke GR, Wells BG,

tation. 2016 AACP Annual

in outpatient nephrology

ab. Excerpts in Phar-

Fudin J, Pratt Cleary J,

Posey LM., eds. New York,

Meeting (abstract).

patients. National Kidney

macy Research Journal

Sparkes S. “Opioid Anal-

NY: McGraw-Hill Educa-

2016;2:1-2.

gesics” in Pain Manage-

tion, 2016.

ment Secrets, Fourth ED. Stryker M, Kane M, Busch

Dubin, Andrew, et al,

R. A Pharmacist-Run

Elsevier Health Scienc-

Proprotein Convertase

es, 2016 (publication

Subtilisin/Kexin Type 9

pending).

(PCSK9) Inhibitor Clinic:

PRESENTATIONS

Foundation Spring CliniBriceland L, Rosa S,

cal Meeting, Boston, MA,

Lubowski T, Jablanski C.

April 2016.

Creation of Experiential Education Honors Policies

Brian Cowles

to Recognize Exemplary

Lipinksi H, Cowles B,

IPPE and APPE Perfor-

Young L. Dobutamine-in-

Monique Bidell

mance. AACP Annual

duced rash in a critically

P O ST E R /PLATFOR M P RESE NTATIONS

Short-Tem Results and

Jessica Farrell

Fimansyah A, Nguyen H,

Meeting, Anaheim, CA,

ill full-term neonate:

Practical Strategies. Phar-

Farrell JF, Kennedy

Bidell M, Han Z, Pettit NN.

July 25, 2016 (abstract).

A case report. ASHP

macotherapy 2016;36(7)

AG. “Psoriatic Arthritis”

Outcomes associated with

e83-e138.

in Ambulatory Care

time-to-antibiotic admin-

Katie Cardone

Las Vegas, NV, December

Self-Assessment Program

istration among patients

Cardone KE, Daoui S,

6, 2016.

Stryker M, Kane M, Busch

(ACSAP), 2016 Book 1,

with febrile neutropenia

Daoui R, Donato KM,

R. An Evaluation of Pro-

Endocrinologic/Rheuma-

in the emergency de-

Parker WM. Factors

Jessica Farrell

protein Convertase Subtil-

tologic Care. Dong BJ,

partment. ASHP Midyear

Affecting Medication

Farrell JF. Pharmacist-

isin/Kexin Type 9 (PCSK9)

Elliott DP, eds. Lenexa,

Exhibition, Las Vegas, NV,

Management among

Developed Letters

Inhibitors in Patients with

KS: American College

December 2016.

Patients with Chronic

Used to Obtained

Diabetes Mellitus. Journal

of Clinical Pharmacy,

Kidney Disease (abstract

Inclusion of Off-Label

of Clinical Lipidology,

2016.

Brown SJ, Lane SM, Bidell

SA-PO924). American So-

Indications of Rheumatic

MR. Assessment of insti-

ciety of Nephrology 2016

Drugs within National

Michael Kane

tutional fluoroquinolone

Kidney Week, Chicago, IL,

Compendia. Scleroderma

Jonklaas J, Kane MP.

use for uncomplicated

November 2016. Journal

Foundation National Pa-

“Thyroid disorders”

infections. ASHP Midyear

of the American Society of

tient Education Confer-

Katie Cardone

in Pharmacotherapy:

Exhibition, Las Vegas, NV,

Nephrology 27:2016.

ence, New Orleans, LA,

Wegrzyn NM, Cardone

A Pathophysiologic

December 2016.

KE. “Are intravenous

Approach, 10th edition.

iron sucrose products

DiPiro JT, Talbert RL, Yee

Falli E, Poucher A, Lom-

Balk N, Rivenburg K,

Loy T, Farrell JF, Bruce

interchangeable? Efficacy

GC, Matzke GR, Wells

bardi CL, Ferri D, Bidell

DiCenzo R. Promoting

SP. Pharmacist- and

and safety of original and

BG, Posey LM, eds. New

MR. Evaluation of an

Pharmacy through

student-developed letters

generic formulations in

York, NY: McGraw-Hill

adjusted body weight-

Recruitment for Two

to national compendia to

hemodialysis patients.”

Education, 2016.

based vancomycin dosing

Campuses in Two States.

acquire off-label status.

guideline. ASHP Midyear

American Association of

ASHP Midyear Clinical

10(3):720, May 2016.

BOOK CHAPTERS

Textbook Update, Ac-

Midyear Clinical Meeting,

July 2016. Cardone KE, Zheng H,

cessPharmacy Web site,

Kane MP. “Endocrine

Exhibition, Las Vegas, NV,

Colleges of Pharmacy An-

Meeting & Exhibition, Las

New York: McGraw-Hill,

Disorders” in Updates in

December 2016.

nual Meeting, Anaheim,

Vegas, NV, December

September 2016.

Therapeutics: Ambulatory

CA, July 23-27, 2016.

2016.


S CHO LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  31

Gina Garrison

Rafie S, Shealy K, Stone

M, Berger A. Clinical

Huang D, Lodise T. Use of

tients (abstract SAT-223).

Quidort A, Wales D,

R, Vernon V. The Women’s

and Economic Burden

PK/PD Systems Analyses

Poster presentation at

Garrison GD, Lindstrom J,

Health PRN Members and

of Multi-drug Resistant

to Determine the Optimal

the European Associa-

Verrico I. Improving Immu-

Accomplishments. Amer-

Pseudomonas sp. (MDRP)

Fixed Dosing Regimen of

tion for the Study of the

nization Rates of Children

ican College of Clinical

Among Patients with

Iclaprim (ICL) for Phase III

Liver – International Liver

Age 19 to 35 months:

Pharmacy (ACCP) Annual

Serious Infections in US

ABSSSI Clinical Trial. Ab-

Congress, Barcelona, ES,

An Interprofessional

Meeting, Hollywood, FL,

Hospitals (abstract 2045).

stract 1971. Poster Presen-

April 2016.

Approach at a Multidis-

October 2016.

Poster Presentation at ID-

tation at IDWeek2016™:

Presenter: Patel.

Week2016, New Orleans,

A Joint Meeting of IDSA,

ciplinary Training Site. American Academy of

Thomas Lodise

LA, October 26-30, 2016.

SHEA, HIVMA, and PIDS.

Yager J, Lodise T, Patel

Pediatrics (AAP) National

Lodise TP, Ye M, Keyloun

Presenter: Lodise.

New Orleans, LA, October

N. Minimum adherence

Conference & Exhibition,

KR, Zhao Q, Gillard P.

26-30, 2016.

threshold necessary to

San Francisco, CA,

Identification of Patients

Mckinnell JA, Corman

Presenter: Huang.

achieve virologic sup-

October 22-25, 2016.

at Greatest Risk for

S, Patel D, Lodise TP.

Carbapenem Resistance

Telavancin vs. Vanco-

Carreno JJ, Lomaestro

Poster presentation at the

Michael Kane

in Patients With Serious

mycin in the Treatment

BM, Tietjan J, Lodise T.

26th European Congress

Stryker M, Kane M, Busch

Hospital-Onset Infections

of Hospital-Acquired

Validation Of A Bayesian

on Clinical Microbiology

R, Hamilton R. An Evalu-

Due to Enterobacteria-

Pneumonia Caused by S.

Approach To Estimate

and Infectious Diseases,

ation of Proprotein Con-

ceae Species (abstract

Aureus: Decision Analytic

Vancomycin Exposure

Amsterdam, NL, April

vertase Subtilisin/Kexin

1794). Oral Presentation

Model (abstract 1250).

In Obese Patients With

2016. Presenter: Patel.

Type 9 (PCSK9) Inhibitors

at IDWeek2016, New Or-

Poster Presentation at ID-

Limited PK Sampling

in Patients with Diabetes

leans, LA, October 26-30,

Week2016, New Orleans,

(abstract 496). Poster

Patel N, Yager J, McGuey

Mellitus (abstract 187).

2016. Presenter: Lodise.

LA, October 26-30, 2016.

Presentation at ASM

L, Hoye-Simek A, Lodise

Presenter: Mckinnell JA.

Microbe 2016, Boston,

T. Relationship between

MA, June 16-20, 2016.

single-tablet regimen

Presenter: Carreno.

and adherence to HIV

National Lipid Associa-

pression (abstract 1995).

tion’s Scientific Sessions,

Berger A, Bhagnani T,

New Orleans, LA,

Wang R, Zhao Q, Ye M,

Martin A, Fahrbach K,

May 18, 2016.

Lodise TP. Does Timing

Zhao Q, Lodise T. Associ-

of Receipt of Appropriate

ation between Carbap-

O’Donnell J, Rhodes NJ,

(abstract 1998). Poster

Stryker M, Kane M, Busch

Antimicrobial Thera-

enem Resistance and

Lodise T, Prozialeck W,

presentation at the 26th

R, Hamilton R. A Pharma-

py Make a Difference

Mortality among Adults

Miglis CH, Natarajan V,

European Congress on

cist-Run Proprotein Con-

Among Patients with

Hospitalized with Serious

Joshi M, Pais G, Lamar P,

Clinical Microbiology and

vertase Subtilisin/Kexin

Serious Infections due to

Infections due to an

Cluff C, Gulati A, Scheetz

Infectious Diseases, Am-

Type 9 (PCSK9) Inhibitor

Resistant Gram-negative

Enterobacteriaceae spp:

MH. 24-Hour Pharmaco-

sterdam, NL, April 2016.

Clinic: Short-Term Results

Pathogens? (abstract

Results of a Systematic

kinetic Relationships for

Presenter: Patel.

and Practical Strategies

1796). Oral Presentation

Literature Review and

Vancomycin (Van) and

(poster 97). American

at IDWeek2016, New Or-

Meta-Analysis (abstract

Novel Urinary Biomarkers

Patel N, Hecox Z, Morse

College of Clinical

leans, LA, October 26-30,

355). Poster Presentation

of Acute Kidney Injury

C, Sullivan S, Hoye-Simek

Pharmacy’s Virtual Poster

2016. Presenter: Lodise.

at IDWeek2016, New Or-

(abstract 517). Poster Pre-

A, Yager J, Lodise T.

leans, LA, October 26-30,

sentation at ASM Microbe

Maintenance of non-HIV

2016. Presenter: Martin.

2016, Boston, MA, June

cardiometabolic comor-

16-20, 2016. Presenter:

bidity control among

O’Donnell.

HIV-infected veterans’

Symposium, May 18, 2016. Luther M, Caffrey A, Dosa

and non-HIV medications

Bizier J, Kane MP, Busch

D, Lodise TP, LaPlante

RS, Bakst G, ElDeiry SE,

K. Vancomycin plus

Natesan S, Pai MP, Lodise

Hamilton RA. Efficacy

Piperacillin/Tazobactam

TP. Determination of

and Safety of Switch-

and Acute Kidney Injury

Alternative Ceftolozane/

Schriever C, Ahmed A,

comparison between

ing Sodium-Glucose

in Adults: A Systematic

Tazobactam (C/T) Dosing

Delehanty KR, Yager J,

single tablet and multiple

Cotransporter-2 (SGLT-2)

Review and Meta-anal-

Regimens for Patients

Farrow G, Kashtan R,

tablet antiretroviral

Inhibitor Therapy in Type

ysis (abstract 1805).

with Infections Due to

Lodise T, Patel N. Com-

regimens (abstract 1991).

2 Diabetes Mellitus. ASHP

Poster Presentation at ID-

Pseudomonas aerugi-

parison of frequencies of

Poster presentation at

Midyear Clinical Meeting,

Week2016, New Orleans,

nosa with high (C/T) MIC

drug-drug interactions

the 26th European

Las Vegas, NV,

LA, October 26-30, 2016.

values (abstract 1959).

between sofosbuvir/le-

Congress on Clinical

December 7, 2016.

Presenter: Luther.

Poster Presentation at ID-

dipasvir and ombitasvir/

Microbiology and

Week2016, New Orleans,

dasabuvir/paritaprevir/ri-

Infectious Diseases, Am-

affairs patients: a

Nicole Lodise

Lodise TP. Wang R,

LA, October 26-30, 2016.

tonavir +/- ribavirin among

sterdam, NL, April 2016.

Bartelme KM, Lodise NM,

Bhagnani T, Zhao Q, Ye

Presenter: Natesan.

HIV/HCV coinfected pa-

Presenter: Patel.


32  ACP H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLA RLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

to Recognize Exemplary

Yager J, Lodise T, Patel

cardiometabolic comor-

pean Association for the

Treatment of Hepatitis C

N. Minimum adherence

bidity control among

Study of the Liver – Inter-

Monoinfection (abstract

IPPE and APPE Perfor-

threshold needed for

HIV-infected veterans’

national Liver Congress,

60260). Poster presenta-

mance. AACP Annual

maintenance of virologic

affairs patients: a com-

Barcelona, ES, April 2016.

tion at IDWeek 2016. New

Meeting, Anaheim, CA,

suppression (abstract

parison between single

Presenter: Patel.

Orleans, LA, October 2016.

July 25, 2016 (abstract).

1993). Platform presenta-

tablet and multiple tablet

tion at the 26th European

antiretroviral regimens

Britt NS, Potter EM, Patel

Congress on Clinical Mi-

(abstract 1991). Poster

N, Steed ME. Derivation

Yager J, Faragon J, Patel

Stryker M, Kane M, Busch

crobiology and Infectious

presentation at the 26th

And Validation Of A

N. Quantifying the mini-

R, Hamilton R. An Evalu-

Diseases, Amsterdam, NL,

European Congress on

Mortality Risk Assessment

mum adherence threshold

ation of Proprotein Con-

April 2016.

Clinical Microbiology and

Model For Vancomy-

associated with the

vertase Subtilisin/Kexin

Presenter: Yager.

Infectious Diseases, Am-

cin-Resistant Entero-

development of reverse

Type 9 (PCSK9) Inhibitors

sterdam, NL, April 2016.

coccal (Vre) Bacteremia

transcriptase mutations

in Patients with Diabetes

Presenter: Patel.

Based On Source Of

among HIV-infected

Mellitus. 2016 National

Infection (session 333).

Veterans’ Affairs patients

Lipid Association’s Sci-

O’Donnell JN, Rhodes NJ, Lodise TP, Prozialeck

Presenter: Patel. Matthew Stryker

WC, Miglis CM, Venka-

Patel N, Yager J, McGuey

Platform presentation

receiving antiretroviral

entific Sessions, Abstract

tesan N, Joshi M, Pais G,

L, Hoye-Simek A, Lodise

at American Society for

therapy (abstract 225954).

Identification: 187.

Lamar PC, Cluff C, Gulati

T. Relationship between

Microbiology Microbe

Poster Presentation at

A, Scheetz MH. 24-hour

single-tablet regimen

Meeting, Boston, MA,

the 2016 ASHP Midyear

Stryker M, Kane M, Busch

pharmacokinetic relation-

and adherence to HIV

June 2016.

Clinical Meeting, Las Ve-

R, Hamilton R. A Pharma-

ships for vancomycin and

and non-HIV medications

Presenter: Britt.

gas, NV, December 2016.

cist-Run Proprotein Con-

novel urinary biomarkers

(abstract 1998). Poster

Presenter: Yager.

vertase Subtilisin/Kexin

of AKI. 1st American

presentation at the 26th

Britt NS, Potter EM, Patel

Society of Microbiology

European Congress on

N, Steed ME. Clinical Out-

Sangiovanni RJ, Yager

Clinic: Short-Term Results

Microbe, Boston, MA,

Clinical Microbiology and

comes In Vancomycin-Re-

J, Donadio A, Farrow G,

and Practical Strategies.

June 2016.

Infectious Diseases, Am-

sistant Enterococcus

Patel N. Use of vancomy-

American College of

sterdam, NL, April 2016.

(VRE)/Methicillin-Resistant

cin in VISN-2 patients who

Clinical Pharmacy’s 2016

Presenter: Patel.

Staphylococcus aureus

have previously experi-

Virtual Poster Sympo-

(MRSA) Bloodstream

enced vancomycin-asso-

sium, Poster Number: 97.

Lee Anna Obos Obos L. Two Phase Phar-

Type 9 (PCSK9) Inhibitor

macy Skills Laboratory

Yager J, Lodise T, Patel

Coinfection Treated With

ciated acute kidney injury

Video Project: Student

N. Minimum adherence

Daptomycin Or Linezolid

(AKI): Predictors and

Reactions and Effect on

threshold necessary to

(abstract 396). Poster

outcomes of secondary

INVITED PR ESENTATIONS

Lab Performance, AACP

achieve virologic sup-

presentation at American

vancomycin-associated

Kelly Bach

Annual Meeting, Ana-

pression (abstract 1995).

Society for Microbiology

AKI (abstract 225960).

Bach K. Delivering a pow-

heim, CA, July 2016.

Poster presentation at the

Microbe Meeting, Boston,

Poster presentation at

erful residency interview

26th European Congress

MA, June 2016.

the 51st ASHP Midyear

presentation. ACPHS/

Nimish Patel

on Clinical Microbiology

Presenter: Britt.

Clinical Meeting and

NYSCHP Residency

Yager J, Lodise T, Patel

and Infectious Diseases,

Exhibition, Las Vegas, NV,

Preparation Symposium,

N. Minimum adherence

Amsterdam, NL, April 2016.

Ahmed AA, Schriever C,

December 2016.

ACPHS, Albany, NY,

threshold needed for

Presenter: Patel.

Amin R, Delehanty KR,

Presenter: Sangiovanni.

October 2016.

Yager J, Patel N. Compar-

maintenance of virologic suppression (abstract

Schriever C, Ahmed A,

ing the Population-Based

Sandra Rosa

Monique Bidell

1993). Platform presenta-

Delehanty KR, Yager J,

Frequency of Contraindi-

Rosa S, Briceland L.

Bidell M. A case of

tion at the 26th European

Farrow G, Kashtan R, Lo-

cated Drug-Drug Interac-

Introducing students to

vomiting, malaise and

Congress on Clinical Mi-

dise T, Patel N. Compari-

tions between Daclatasvir/

Pharmacy Ownership

acute injury (co-presented

crobiology and Infectious

son of frequencies of drug-

Sofosbuvir (DAC/SOF),

through the development

with Yolana Fuks and

Diseases, Amsterdam, NL,

drug interactions between

Grazoprevir/Elbasvir (GZR/

of an Entrepreneurial

David Colman). Medical

April 2016.

sofosbuvir/ledipasvir and

EBV), Ledipasvir/Sofosbu-

APPE Rotation. 2016 AACP

Grand Rounds, St. Peter’s

Presenter: Yager.

ombitasvir/dasabuvir/

vir (LDV/SOF), Ombitasvir/

Annual Meeting (abstract).

Hospital, Albany, NY,

paritaprevir/ritonavir

Paritaprevir/Ritonavir +

Patel N, Hecox Z, Morse

+/- ribavirin among HIV/

Dasabuvir ± Ribavirin

Briceland L, Rosa S,

C, Sullivan S, Hoye-Simek

HCV coinfected patients

(OMB/PTV/RTV + DSV

Lubowski T, Jablanski C.

Bidell M. Fluoroquino-

A, Yager J, Lodise T.

(abstract SAT-223). Poster

± RBV) and Simeprevir/

Creation of Experiential

lone safety: Tipping

Maintenance of non-HIV

presentation at the Euro-

Sofosbuvir (SIM/SOF) for

Education Honors Policies

the risk-benefit scale.

December 2016.


S CH O LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  33

PharmaMed 2016, Dubai,

Continuing Education.

Utica, NY, December 2016.

Cardone K. Update on

Jo Carreno

United Arab Emirates,

November 2016.

Cardone K. Use of SGLT2

Diabetic Kidney Disease

Carreno J. Zika Virus:

Inhibitors in Treating T2D.

(DKD) Management:

Beyond the Hype. Con-

Brodeur MR. Falls and

Continuing Education. Mo-

SGLT-2 inhibitors. Continu-

tinuing Education. Capital

Bidell M. Why complete

Their Prevention: A

hawk Valley Pharmacists

ing Education. National

Area Pharmacists Society,

a pharmacy residency

Geriatrics and Pharma-

Association, Utica, NY,

Kidney Foundation Spring

Albany, NY.

and how to prepare to be

cological Imperative Fall

December 2016.

Clinical Meeting, Boston

a competitive candidate

Risk Identification and

(co-presented with Kate

Intervention for the Com-

Cardone K. Updates In

Cabral). ACPHS/NYSCHP

munity-Dwelling Older

Type 2 Diabetes Man-

Cardone K. Anemia Work-

Residency Preparation

Adult. Public Health Live,

agement: Case-Based

shop: Management of ESA

Programs. Continuing Edu-

Symposium, ACPHS, Al-

SUNY School of Public

Discussion Of Diabetes

Hyporesponse: A Fine

cation. ACPHS, Albany, NY.

bany, NY, October 2016.

Health, October 20, 2016.

Management. Continuing

Balance. Continuing Ed-

Education (co-presented

ucation. National Kidney

Jacqueline Cleary

December 2016.

MA, May 2016.

Carreno J. The Use of Rapid Diagnostics within Antimicrobial Stewardship

Bidell M. Updates in an-

Brodeur MR. Pill Pruning

with See-Won Seo). Mo-

Foundation Spring Clinical

Cleary J. Opioid Induced

timicrobial safety: Focus

- The Art and Science of

hawk Valley Pharmacists

Meeting, Boston, MA,

Respiratory Depression

on fluoroquinolones.

Deprescribing. Office of

Association, Utica, NY,

May 2016.

and In-Home Naloxone

Continuing Education.

Postgraduate Education,

December 2016.

Infectious Diseases Sym-

ACPHS, June 8, 2016.

Use: Application of the Cardone K. Pragmatic

Risk Index for Overdose

Cardone K. Pharmacolo-

Drug Dosing across the

or Serious Opioid Induced

Brodeur MR. Pain Man-

gy, Pharmacokinetics and

Continuum in Kidney Dis-

Respiratory Depression

agement in an Era of Un-

Pharmacodynamics in

ease: Drug Dosing In He-

(RIOSORD) Tool. Con-

Abby Boire

certainty. Pharmacist So-

Diabetic Kidney Disease:

modialysis – Time Over

tinuing Education. Alden

Boire A. Updates in Heart

ciety of the State of New

Give It Your Best Shot:

Matter? Continuing Edu-

March Bioethics Institute

Failure Therapy: What

York (PSSNY), Mid-Winter

Newer Diabetes Agents

cation and Active Learning

Clinical Ethics Confer-

the Pharmacist Needs to

Meeting, Saratoga, NY,

in CKD. Continuing Educa-

Case Session. National

ence, ACPHS, Albany, NY,

Know. April 2016.

January 30, 2016.

tion. American Society of

Kidney Foundation Spring

November 19, 2016.

Nephrology Kidney Week,

Clinical Meeting, Boston,

posium, ACPHS, Albany, NY, February 2016.

Jeffrey Brewer

Katherine Cabral

Chicago, IL, November

MA, May 2016 (session

Cleary J. Pharmacist’s

Brewer JM. Professional

Why Complete a Pharma-

2016.

chair/moderator).

Role in Naloxone Educa-

Organizations Council:

cy Residency? NYSCHP/

AACP Interim Meeting Re-

ACPHS Residency Prep

Cardone K. Newer Agents

Cardone K. Pragmatic

Chi and PLS joint meeting,

port, Effective Leadership,

Symposium, Albany

and Their Implications for

Drug Dosing across the

ACPHS, Albany, NY,

Spring 2016.

College of Pharmacy and

Patients with Chronic Kid-

Continuum In Kidney

November 2016.

Health Sciences, Albany

ney Disease: The Current

Disease: Drug Dosing

NY, October 2016.

and Potential Role of

In Peritoneal Dialysis.

Cleary J. Opioid Induced

SGLT-2 Inhibitors in

Continuing Education

Respiratory Depression

Laurie Briceland Briceland L. Overview of

tion and Distribution. Rho

Antimicrobial Therapy.

Through Thick & Thin: An

Patients with Chronic

and Active Learning Case

and Naloxone Distribu-

Sage College Nurse

Update on Anticoagu-

Kidney Disease. Continu-

Session. National Kidney

tion: Application of the

Practitioner Program,

lants. Continuing Educa-

ing Education. Annual

Foundation Spring Clinical

RIOSORD Tool. Continu-

February 2016.

tion. ACPHS Cardiovas-

Meeting of the Ameri-

Meeting, Boston, MA,

ing Education. Annual

cular Symposium, Albany

can College of Clinical

May 2016 (session chair/

Preceptor Training Day,

Michael Brodeur

College of Pharmacy and

Pharmacy, Hollywood, FL,

moderator).

ACPHS, Albany, NY,

Brodeur MR. FOAM – Free

Health Sciences, Albany,

October 25, 2016.

Open Access Medical ed-

NY, April 2016.

August 2016. Cardone K. Nephrology

Cardone K. Delivering

Review for the Ambu-

Giselle D’Epiro

tion for anyone, anywhere,

Katie Cardone

Medication Therapy

latory Care Pharmacist

D’Epiro G. Vitamin

anytime. American Society

Cardone K. Updates In

Management in the

Review and recertification

Supplementation in

of Consultant Pharmacist

Type 2 Diabetes Manage-

Community. Continuing

course for board certified

Women. University of

Annual Meeting, Dallas,

ment: Guideline Updates.

Education and Certificate

ambulatory care pharma-

Vermont Women’s Health

TX, November 4, 2016.

Continuing Education

Training Program. Mo-

cists (BCACP). American

Conference, 2016.

(co-presented with See-

hawk Valley Pharmacists

College of Clinical Phar-

Brodeur MR. Colonie Emer-

Won Seo). Mohawk Valley

Association, Utica, NY,

macy Spring Conference,

gency Medical Services.

Pharmacists Association,

Spring 2016.

Phoenix, AZ, April 2016.

ucation – Medical educa-


34  ACP H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLA RLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

D’Epiro G. The New Anti-

Presented to high school

Instructional Design Sym-

ment of new antibacterial

Difference (MAD) - ID An-

coagulants. UVM Family

students at TRIO event,

posium, Spring 2016.

therapeutics.” Superbugs

nual Meeting, Champions

Medicine Review Course,

Colchester, VT,

& Superdrugs USA 2016,

Gate, FL, May 6, 2016.

2016.

February 2016.

Jessica Farrell

Michael Kane

ship Hollywood Version

Farrell JF. Proton Pump

Kane M. Diabetes Update.

Instructional Design Sym-

The Drug: Update on

Relationships in Patients

Inhibitors (PPI): How to

American Society of Con-

posium. ACPHS, March

Treatment Options

with Infections: A Focus

Digest the News? Sclero-

sulting Pharmacists Mid-

23, 2016.

(satellite symposium).

on Beta-Lactams and

derma Foundation Na-

State New York Chapter

“The Bug-Drug-Host Triad

Vancomycin. Midwest-

tional Patient Education

Meeting and Education

Kile D. Medication Ad-

in the Era of Antibiotic

ern University, Downers

Conference, New Orleans,

Day, Syracuse, NY,

herence: America’s Other

Resistance: Focus on the

Grove, IL, April 15, 2016.

LA, July 29, 2016.

June 16, 2016.

Drug Problem. ACPHS

Spectrum of ABSSSI.” ID-

Pharmacy Practice Up-

Week2016, New Orleans,

Advanced Pharmacoki-

Farrell JF. The Role of

Kane M. Keynote Address.

date, June 8, 2016.

LA, October 28, 2016.

netics/Pharmacodynam-

Biologics in Psoriatic

The Capital District Resi-

Arthritis. Continuing Ed-

dency & Fellowship Grad-

Nicole Lodise

Economics of Treating

New York State Council of

ucation. ACPHS, Albany,

uation Luncheon, Albany,

Lodise NM. JCPP Phar-

ABSSSI in Different

Health-system Antimicro-

NY, September 2016.

NY, June 8, 2016.

macist’s Patient Care

Settings of Care (satellite

bial Stewardship Program,

Process: Standardizing

symposium). IDWeek2016,

Hosted by Greater New

David Kile

Iselin, NJ, November 16,

Kile D. Profiles in Leader-

2016.

Quantifying Antibiotic Exposure-Effect

ics (continuing education).

Gina Garrison

Kane M. Strategies for

the Approach to Patient

New Orleans, LA, October

York Hospital Association,

Garrison G. 2016 Annual

Diabetes Prevention.

Care. Continuing Educa-

27, 2016.

New York, NY, March 16,

CDC Immunization

Mid-Hudson Regional

tion. Albany College of

Updates for Adult and

Hospital Pre-diabetes

Pharmacy and Health

PK/PD versus frequentist

Infants / Children / Ado-

Epidemic Conference:

Sciences Barbara M.

approaches for drug de-

Combination Therapy for

lescents. AMC Internal

Public Health Impact

DiLascia Women’s and

velopment – Pro (debate).

Serious Gram-Negative

Medicine and Pediatrics

& Prevention of Type 2

Men’s Health Symposium,

ESCMID/ASM Conference

Infections (continuing ed-

Group, Latham, NY.

Diabetes, Poughkeepsie,

Albany, NY, September

on Drug Development to

ucation). New York State

NY, May 14, 2016.

2016.

Meet the Challenge of

Council of Health-system

Antimicrobial Resistance.

Antimicrobial Steward-

Garrison G. 2016 Updates

2016.

in Pharmacotherapy

Kane M. Endocrine Dis-

Lodise NM. Curricular

Vienna, Austria, Septem-

ship Program, Hosted by

for Adult Dyslipidemia.

orders. For Ambulatory

Adoption and Integration

ber 23, 2016.

Greater New York Hospi-

Continuing Education.

Care Pharmacy Prepa-

of the Pharmacists’ Patient

Albany Medical College

ratory Review Course,

Care Process. American

Polymyxins, What Do We

– Internal Medicine and

ACCP 2016 Updates In

Association of Colleges of

Really Know? Allergan

Pediatric Update,

Therapeutics, Phoenix,

Pharmacy (AACP) Teach-

Medical Affairs, Jersey

Nimish Patel

Saratoga, NY.

AZ, April 9, 2016.

ers’ Seminar, Anaheim,

City, NJ, June 30, 2016.

Patel N. Medication Errors

tal Association, New York, NY, March 16, 2016.

in HIV. Continuing Educa-

CA, July 2016. Lipoglycopeptides and

tion. Onondaga Pharma-

Thomas Lodise

Glycopeptides (sympo-

cists Society, Syracuse,

tions: A Synopsis. Grand

Vancomycin PK/PD Effica-

sium). “Antimicrobial

NY, June 2016.

tinuing Education. ACPHS

Rounds at the Baystate

cy (symposium). “Contem-

Toxicodynamics (Orga-

Cardiovascular Update,

Medical Center, Spring-

porary Considerations:

nized in Cooperation

Patel N. Medication Errors

Albany, NY.

field, MA, March 22, 2016.

Cutting Edge Advances

with the International

in HIV. Continuing Educa-

in Vancomycin Therapy.”

Society of Anti-Infective

tion. Capital Area Phar-

Garrison G. 2016 Updates

Kane M. The New Classes

in Pharmacotherapy for

of Diabetes Medica-

Adult Dyslipidemia. Con-

Garrison G. Dyslipidemia:

Kane M. Obesity Is a

2016 ASHP Midyear Clin-

Pharmacology (ISAP).”

macists Society, Albany,

Would every woman

Chronic Disease: Let’s

ical Meeting Las Vegas,

ASM Microbes 2016,

NY, September 2016.

should know. Capital

Treat it That Way. APhA

NV, December 7, 2016.

Boston, MA, June 20,

Region Women’s Business

Annual Meeting, Balti-

Council, Albany, NY.

more, MD, March 7, 2016.

2016.

Patel N. Updates in Epidemiology and Treatment

Exposure-Centric vs. Dose-Centric Drug Devel-

Economics of Treat-

of Sexually Transmitted

Elizabeth Higdon

Teresa Kane

opment Approach (work-

ing ABSSI in Different

Infections. Continuing Ed-

Higdon E. Calamine

Kane T. Aseptic Technique

shop). “Opportunities and

Settings of Care (satellite

ucation. ACPHS, Albany,

Compounding Workshop.

Training Videos. ACPHS

challenges in develop-

symposium). Making a

NY, September 2016.


S CHO LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  35

Patel N. Medication Errors

2016, Bretton Woods, NH.

in HIV. Continuing Educa-

Watson A. CapitalCare

Jacqueline Cleary

tion of the Pharmacists’

Medical Group Diabetes

Project: A System’s

Patient Care Process (2015-2016).

tion. Pharmacists’ Society

See-Won Seo

Support Group: Diabetes

Approach to Reducing

of the State of New York

Performance-Enhancing

Medications and Neurop-

the Burden of Asthma in

Annual Meeting, Rye

Drugs. Continuing Educa-

athy. January 2016.

New York State

American Association of

Brook, NY, June 2016.

tion. ACPHS, Albany, NY,

Grantor: Whitney M Young

Colleges of Pharmacy

Jr. Health Center

(AACP). Chair, Section of

Amount: $12,800

Teachers of Pharmacy

Awarded: June 2016

Practice Faculty Develop-

Sept 2016.

GRANTS

Patel N. Medication Errors in HIV. Continuing Educa-

New Drug Update.

Katie Cardone

tion. Telemedicine series

Continuing Education.

Principal Investigator:

broadcast to all New

Pharmacists Society of

Wendy M. Parker

HONORS AND

York State Department of

the State of New York

Co-Principal Investigator:

APPOINTMENTS

Corrections pharmacists,

Mid-Winter Conference,

Katie E. Cardone

Albany Medical Center

Saratoga Springs, NY,

Project: Health disparities

Jeffrey Brewer

Clinical Pharmacy (ACCP).

HIV Clinic, Albany, NY,

Jan 2016.

and medication manage-

Fellow of the American

Member, Educational

ment strategies among

Society of Health-System

Affairs Committee (2016-

Matthew Stryker

adolescents and young

Pharmacists, 2016

present).

Patel N. Updates in Epi-

Part II: Starting Non-In-

adults with Diabetes

demiology and Treatment

sulin Medication in the

Mellitus

Jacqueline Cleary

Nimish Patel

of Hepatitis C Infection.

Primary Care Setting for

Grantor: John Faunce and

2016 PAINWeek Scholar-

Society of Infectious

Continuing Education.

Type 2 Diabetes. Ameri-

Alicia Tracy Roach Fund

ship Recipient

Diseases Pharmacists:

ACPHS, Albany, NY, Feb-

can Diabetes Association

Amount: $24,943.36

ruary 2016.

– Innovations in Diabetes

June 2016.

ment Committee (Chair2016-present). American College of

Impact Paper of the Year Gina Garrison

Care Annual Meeting,

Thomas Lodise

National Secretary, Rho

Sarah Peters

Patel N. Updates in Epide-

Troy, NY, November 10,

Project: Antibacterial

Chi Academic Honor

President, Hematology/

miology and Treatment of

2016.

Resistance Leadership

Society, 2011-present

Oncology Pharmacy

HIV. Continuing Education.

Association, 2016-17

Group: Minocycline PK in

ACPHS, Albany, NY, Feb-

Alexandra Watson

IC Patients

Nicole Lodise

ruary 2016.

Watson A. Comprehen-

Grantor: Duke Universi-

American Association of

sive Primary Care (CPC)

ty, National Institute of

Colleges of Pharmacy

Joanna Schwartz

Leading Innovation,

Allergy and Infectious

(AACP). Member, Tobacco

Schwartz J. Oral che-

Inspiring Engagement.

Diseases (NIAID)

Control Committee, Public

motherapy safety and

New York Region Full Day

Amount: $35,802

Health Special Interest

adherence. Northern New

Learning Session, Octo-

Term: December 1, 2016 -

Group (2016- present).

England Chapter of the

ber 2016 (panelist).

November 30, 2017

ical Oncology (NNECOS),

Watson A. CapitalCare

Michael Kane, Matthew

Colleges of Pharmacy

October 26, 2016, Bretton

Medical Group Diabetes

Stryker, Robert Hamilton

(AACP). Faculty Champi-

Woods, NH.

Support Group: Ask a

Project: A Real World,

on, Joint Council of Deans/

Pharmacist. September

Observational Study of

Council of Faculties “Cat-

2016.

Weekly Exenatide Added

alyst Team to Integrate

to Basal Insulin in Patients

the Joint Commission of

American Society of Clin-

Schwartz J. Assessment of

American Association of

herbal, dietary supplement and OTC medica-

Watson A. Updates on

with Type 2 Diabetes

Pharmacy Practitioners

tions with chemotherapy.

Diabetes: A Focus on

Mellitus

(JCPP) Pharmacists Pa-

University of Vermont

Guidelines and Pharma-

Grantor: AstraZeneca

tient Care Process (PPCP)”

Breast Symposium,

cotherapy. Continuing Ed-

Pharmaceuticals, LP

(2016-present).

Burlington, VT, October

ucation. ACPHS, Albany,

Amount: $67,387

4, 2016.

NY, June 2016.

Awarded: July 2016

Schwartz J. New Drug

Watson A. Life on Rota-

See-Won Seo,

(AACP). Chair, Council of

Update. Northern New

tions, APhA-ASP student

Jacqueline Cleary

Faculties - Faculty Affairs

England Chapter of the

chapter meeting, ACPHS,

Principal Investigator:

Committee (COF-FAC)

American Society of Clini-

Albany, NY, May 2016.

See-Won Seo

Workgroup on Curricular

Co-Principal Investigator:

Adoption and Integra-

American Association of Colleges of Pharmacy

cal Oncology, October 28,


36  AC P H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLARLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

D E PARTM E NT OF PHAR MACE UTI CAL SCI E N CE S – ALBANY CAMPUS PUBLICATIONS

Musteata FM, Sandoval

Pharmacology: An Over-

ator. 2nd CNS Anticancer

Zheng HA. Trends &

M, Ruiz JM, Harrison K,

view” in Systems Pharma-

Drug Discovery/Devel-

Transformations within

McKenna D, Millington W.

cology and Pharmacody-

opment Conference

Graduate Education.

Rapid, Minimally Invasive

namics. D.E. Mager and

co-sponsored by Society

AACP Annual Meeting,

James M. Gallo

Analysis of Amazonian

H.C. Kimko, Eds., American

of Neuro-Oncology in

Anaheim, CA, July 23,

Wang T, Pickard AJ, Gallo,

Plants Using Solid Phase

Association of Pharmaceu-

association with Annual

2016 (forum organizer/

JM. Histone Methylation

Microextraction, Phyto-

tical Scientists, Springer

meeting. Phoenix, AZ,

chair).

by Temozolomide: A

chemical Fingerprinting,

(ISBN: 978-3-319-44532-

November 16-17, 2016.

Classic DNA Methylating

and LC-MS. Analytica

8), 2016.

Agent. Anticancer Re-

Chimica Acta, 933, p. 124-

search, 36:3289-99, 2016.

133, 2016.

P E E R RE V I E W E D A RT IC L E S

Zheng HA. China-US Gail Goodman-Snitkoff

Clinical Pharmacy

HaiAn Zheng

The Microbiome in Health

Experiential Education

Zheng HA, Crison J. “Drug

and Disease. Grand

Exchange (CPEEE) Pro-

Pickard AJ, Sohn AS,

Musteata FM. Making

Delivery and Product

Rounds at Ellis Hospital,

grams – Achievements,

Bartenstein TF, He S,

Sense of Vitamin D Con-

Design” in Martin’s

October 21, 2016.

Challenges & Promises.

Zhang Y, Gallo JM.

centrations. Future Sci-

Physical Pharmacy and

Intracerebral Distribution

ence OA, 2(1), doi 10.4155/

Pharmaceutical Sciences,

Marcel Musteata

of Pharmacy, Shanghai,

of the Oncometabo-

fso.15.90, 2016.

7th edition. Edited by

Mall I, Zheng HA, Mus-

May 28, 2016 (invited

Patrick Sinko, Lippin-

teata FM. Investigating

speaker).

transdermal diffusion of

lite D-2-Hydroxyglutarate

Fudan University School

in Mice Bearing Mutant

HaiAn Zheng

cott Williams & Wilkins,

Isocitrate Dehydroge-

Alsharif NZ, Abrons JP,

December 2016, ISBN,

vitamin D and 25-hy-

Mall I, Zheng HA, Mus-

nase Brain Tumors: Impli-

Williams D, Zheng HA,

9781496353443.

droxyvitamin D. Pittcon

teata FM. Investigating

cations for Tumorigene-

Ombengi DN, Dakkuri A,

2016, Atlanta, GA, March

transdermal diffusion of

sis. Frontiers Oncology,

Al­Dahir S, Tofade T, Gim

Wu L, Smith H, Zheng

2016 and AAPS-NERDG,

vitamin D and 25-hy-

6:211, 2016.

S, O’Connell MB. Global/

HA, Yu L. “Drug Product

Farmington, CT, April 2016

droxyvitamin D. AAPS-

International Advanced

Approval in the United

(poster presentation).

NERDG Annual Meeting,

Marcel Musteata

Pharmacy Practice

States and Internation-

Singh A, Bartiss R,

Experiences: Host Coun-

al Harmonization” in

HaiAn Zheng

Rahman T, Arabshahi

try, Site and Institution

Developing Oral Solid

Zheng HA, Teng J, Fein-

A, Prasain J, Barnes S,

Considerations. American

Dosage Forms. Academ-

berg D. Teaching a Reg-

HONORS AND

Musteata FM, Sellati TJ.

Journal of Pharmacy Edu-

ic Press, 2nd edition,

ulatory Science Course

APPOINTMENTS

Lipoxin A4, a 5-lipoxygen-

cation, 25;80(3):38. 2016

November 2016, ISBN:

Blended with eLearning

9780128024478.

Lectures and Active

James M. Gallo

Learning. AAPS Annual

Appointed Associate Edi-

CONFERENCE

Meeting, San Diego, CA,

tor, PLOS: Computational

PRESENTATIONS

November 13-17, 2016.

Biology, September 2016.

ase pathway metabolite, modulates immune

B O O K C HAP T ERS

response during acute

Farmington, CT, April

respiratory tularemia.

James M. Gallo

Journal of Leukocyte

Birtwistle MR, Hansen J,

Biology, September 14,

Gallo JM, Muppirisetty

James M. Gallo

Hawke RL, Pereira HA,

2016 (published online

S, Man-Ung P, Iyengar R,

Planning and Scientific

Allen DD, O’Barr SA,

before print).

Schlessinger A. “Systems

Committees and Moder-

Poloyac S, Tropsha A,

2016.

D E PARTM E NT OF PHAR MACE UTI CAL SCI E N CE S – VERMONT CAMPUS PUBLICATIONS P E E R RE V I E W E D A RT IC L E S

Cornilescu G, Carlson S,

the Plant Homeodomain

Subramaniam R, Jagadee-

Organic Process Research

Tonelli M, McClurg UL,

of Inhibitor of Growth

san R, Mathew I, Cen Y,

& Development (in revision).

Binda O, Robson CN, Mar-

3. Journal of Biological

Balaz S. Scalable Synthe-

kley JL, Balaz S, Glass

Chemistry 2016, 291,

sis and Purification

Yana Cen

Stefan Balaz

KC. Mechanism of Histone

18326-18341.

of Acetylated Phosphati-

Wood M, Cen Y. Facile

Kim S, Natesan S,

H3K4me3 Recognition by

dyl Choline Headgroup.

Synthesis of NaMN, NaAD


S CH O LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  37

and Derivatives. Annals of

Karen Glass

Biological Chemistry 2016,

Biology Approach for Sir-

Tamer Fandy

Pharmacology & Pharma-

Kim S, Natesan S,

291, 18326-18341.

tuin Profiling. Sixth Annual

Cen Y, Wood M, Fandy T.

ceutics, 2016, 1, 1007.

Cornilescu G, Carlson S,

ACPHS Research Forum,

DNA Hypomethylating

Tonelli M, McClurg UL,

CONFERENCE

Albany, NY, January 23,

Agents Modulate the

Subramaniam R,

Binda O, Robson CN,

PRESENTATIONS

2016 (oral presentation).

Activity of the Histone

Jagadeesan R, Mathew I,

Markley JL, Balaz S, Glass

Cen Y, Balaz S. Scalable

KC. Mechanism of Histone

Stefan Balaz

Graham E, Rymarchyk S,

6 (SIRT6). 2016 AAPS

Synthesis and Purification

H3K4me3 Recognition by

Kim S, Natesan S,

Cen Y. Design and Syn-

Annual Meeting and

of Acetylated Phosphati-

the Plant Homeodomain

Cornilescu G, Carlson S,

thesis of Activity-based

Exposition, Denver, CO,

dyl Choline Headgroup.

of Inhibitor of Growth

Tonelli M, McClurg UL,

Chemical Probes for Spe-

November 2016 (poster

Organic Process Research

3. Journal of Biological

Binda O, Robson CN, Mar-

cific Sirtuin Isoforms. Sixth

presentation).

& Development, 2017, 21,

Chemistry 2016, 291,

kley JL, Balaz S, Glass

Annual ACPHS Research

177-181.

18326-18341.

KC. Mechanism of Histone

Forum, Albany, NY,

Karen Glass

H3K4me3 Recognition by

January 23, 2016 (poster

Kim S, Natesan S,

presentation).

Cornilescu G, Carlson

Deacetylase Sirtuin

Tamer Fandy

Hassan HE, Keita JA,

the Plant Homeodomain

Gunasekara DC, Zheng

Narayan L, Brady SM,

of Inhibitor of Growth 3.

MM, Mojtahed T, Woods

Frederick R, Carlson

Keystone Symposium on

Cen Y. Novel Probes

UL, Binda O, Robson

JR, Fandy TE, Riofski MV,

S, Glass KC, Natesan

Chromatin and Epi-

for Sirtuins: a Chemi-

CN, Markley JL, Balaz

Glackin CA, Hassan HE,

S, Buttolph T, Fandy

genetics, Whistler, BC,

cal Biology Approach.

S, Glass KC. Histone

Kirshner J, Colby DA.

TE. The combination of

Canada, March 21, 2016

University of Vermont,

Recognition by the ING3

15-Methylene-Eburna-

dimethoxycurcumin with

(poster presentation).

Burlington, VT, April 2016

PHD Finger in the TIP60

monine Kills Leukemic

DNA methylation inhibitor

(invited talk).

Histone Acetyltransferase

Stem Cells and Reduces

enhances gene re-expres-

Kim S, Natesan S, Cor-

Engraftment in a Hu-

sion of promoter-methylat-

nilescu G, Carlson S, Ton-

Graham E, Rymarchyk S,

ACPHS Research Forum,

manized Bone Marrow

ed genes and antagonizes

elli M, McClurg UL, Binda

Wood M, Zhang K, Lin H,

Albany, NY, January 23,

Xenograft Mouse Model

their cytotoxic effect.

O, Robson CN, Markley JL,

Cen Y. Activity-based Sir-

2016 (Abstract).

of Leukemia. ChemMed-

Epigenetics 2016, 11,

Balaz S, Glass KC. Histone

tuin Profiling. Clinical and

Chem 2016, 11, 2392-2397.

740-749.

Recognition by the ING3

Translational Research

Lloyd JT, Gay JC, Carlson

PHD Finger in the TIP60

Symposium, University

SA, Eckenroth BE, Doublie S, Glass KC. Histone

S, Tonelli M, McClurg

Complex. Sixth Annual

Fandy TE, Abdallah I,

Senthil Natesan

Histone Acetyltransferase

of Vermont, Burlington,

Khayat M, Colby DA, Has-

Hassan HE, Keita JA,

Complex. Sixth Annual

VT, April 2016 (poster

Binding and Ligand Rec-

san HE. In vitro character-

Narayan L, Brady SM,

ACPHS Research Forum,

presentation).

ognition by the ATAD2b

ization of transport and

Frederick R, Carlson S,

Albany, NY, January 23,

metabolism of the alka-

Glass KC, Natesan

2016 (Abstract).

loids: vincamine, vinpoce-

S, Buttolph T, Fandy

tine and eburnamonine.

TE. The combination of

Cancer Chemotherapy

Bromodomain. Sixth Cen Y, Wood M, Fandy T.

Annual ACPHS Research

DNA Hypomethylating

Forum, Albany, NY,

Kim S, Natesan S, Cor-

Agents Modulate the

January 23, 2016 (poster

dimethoxycurcumin with

nilescu G, Carlson S, Ton-

Activity of the Histone

presentation).

and Pharmacology 2016,

DNA methylation inhibitor

elli M, McClurg UL, Binda

Deacetylase Sirtuin

77, 259-267.

enhances gene re-expres-

O, Robson CN, Markley JL,

6 (SIRT6). 2016 AAPS

Gay JC, Carlson SA, Glass

sion of promoter-methylat-

Balaz S, Glass KC. Mecha-

Annual Meeting and

KC. Using Isothermal

Hassan HE, Keita JA,

ed genes and antagonizes

nism of Histone H3K4me3

Exposition, Denver, CO,

Calorimetry to Determine

Narayan L, Brady SM,

their cytotoxic effect.

Recognition by the Plant

November 2016 (poster

ATAD2b Histone Binding

Frederick R, Carlson

Epigenetics 2016, 11,

Homeodomain of Inhibitor

presentation).

Affinities. Sixth Annual

S, Glass KC, Natesan

740-749.

of Growth 3. University of

S, Buttolph T, Fandy

ACPHS Research Forum,

Vermont Cancer Center

Tran A, French J, Cen Y.

Albany, NY, January 23, 2016 (poster presentation).

TE. The combination

Kim S, Natesan S, Cor-

Clinical and Translational

Design and Synthesis of

of dimethoxycurcumin

nilescu G, Carlson S, Ton-

Research Symposium, Bur-

Dual-functional Nucleo-

with DNA methylation

elli M, McClurg UL, Binda

lington, VT, April 29, 2016

base Analogs for Labeling

Kim S, Natesan S,

inhibitor enhances gene

O, Robson CN, Markley JL,

(poster presentation).

Nucleobase Transporters.

Cornilescu G, Carlson S,

re-expression of promot-

Balaz S, Glass KC. Mecha-

2016 ACPHS Student Sum-

Tonelli M, McClurg UL,

er-methylated genes and

nism of Histone H3K4me3

Yana Cen

mer Research Presentation

Binda O, Robson CN,

antagonizes their cyto-

Recognition by the Plant

Graham E, Wood M,

and Award Ceremony, Al-

Markley JL, Balaz S, Glass

toxic effect. Epigenetics

Homeodomain of Inhibitor

Rymarchyk S, Zhang K,

bany, NY, November 2016

KC. Mechanism of Histone

2016, 11, 740-749.

of Growth 3. Journal of

Lin H, Cen Y. Chemical

(poster presentation).

H3K4me3 Recognition by


38  AC P H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLA RLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

PATENTS

the Plant Homeodomain

S, Glass KC. Histone

Research Presentations

UL, Binda O, Robson

of Inhibitor of Growth 3.

Binding and Ligand Rec-

and Honors and Awards

CN, Markley JL, Balaz

Keystone Symposium on

ognition by the ATAD2b

Ceremony, Albany, NY,

S, Glass KC. Histone

Yana Cen

Chromatin and Epi-

Bromodomain. University

November 12, 2016

Recognition by the ING3

Sauve AA, Cen Y. “Re-

genetics, Whistler, BC,

of Vermont Cancer Center

(poster presentation).

PHD Finger in the TIP60

agents and Methods for

Canada, March 21, 2016

Clinical and Translational

Histone Acetyltransferase

Sirtuin Capture”, U.S. Pat-

(poster presentation).

Research Symposium, Bur-

Senthil Natesan

Complex. Sixth Annual

ent No. 9,290,791, March

lington, VT, April 29, 2016

Kim S, Natesan S,

ACPHS Research Forum,

22, 2016.

(poster presentation).

Cornilescu G, Carlson S,

Albany, NY, January 23,

Tonelli M, McClurg UL,

2016 (Abstract).

Kim S, Natesan S, Cornilescu G, Carlson S, Ton-

GRANTS

elli M, McClurg UL, Binda

Gay JC, Carlson SA, Glass

Binda O, Robson CN, Mar-

O, Robson CN, Markley JL,

KC. Using Isothermal

kley JL, Balaz S, Glass

Kim S, Natesan S, Cor-

Karen Glass

Balaz S, Glass KC. Mecha-

Calorimetry to Determine

KC. Mechanism of Histone

nilescu G, Carlson S, Ton-

Project: Mechanisms of

nism of Histone H3K4me3

ATAD2b Histone Binding

H3K4me3 Recognition by

elli M, McClurg UL, Binda

Chromatin Binding and

Recognition by the Plant

Affinities. University of

the Plant Homeodomain

O, Robson CN, Markley JL,

Selection by Family IV

Homeodomain of Inhibitor

Vermont Cancer Center

of Inhibitor of Growth 3.

Balaz S, Glass KC. Mecha-

Bromodomains

of Growth 3. University of

Clinical and Translational

Keystone Symposium on

nism of Histone H3K4me3

Grantor: National

Vermont Cancer Center

Research Symposium, Bur-

Chromatin and Epi-

Recognition by the Plant

Institutes of Health (R15

Clinical and Translational

lington, VT, April 29, 2016

genetics, Whistler, BC,

Homeodomain of Inhibitor

renewal)

Research Symposium, Bur-

(poster presentation).

Canada, March 21, 2016

of Growth 3. University of

Amount: $384,000

(poster presentation).

Vermont Cancer Center

Term: February 1, 2016 –

Clinical and Translational

January 31, 2019

lington, VT, April 29, 2016 (poster presentation).

Evans C, Gay J, Glass KC. Functional charac-

Kim S, Natesan S,

Research Symposium, Bur-

Lloyd JT, Gay JC, Carlson

terization of the BPRF3

Cornilescu G, Carlson

lington, VT, April 29, 2016

SA, Eckenroth BE, Doublie

bromodomain. Summer

S, Tonelli M, McClurg

(poster presentation).

SCHOOL OF ARTS AND SCIENCES D E PARTM E NT OF BA S I C AN D CLI N I CAL SCI E N CE S PUBLICATIONS Sean Ali

Journal of Quantum

py Method to the Physics

123, published online on 1

Christopher Cioffi

Information, 2016, 14

of Ferromagnetic

November 2016.

Cioffi CL, Liu S, Wolf MA,

(3); 1630003.

material. Physica A, 2016, 455; 11-26.

Cafaro C, Ali SA. Maxi-

Guzzo PR, Sadalapure K, Siedlik JA, Bergeron C,

Parthasarathy V, Loong

Cooper MA, Emmons R,

DT, J.; Maeng J-H, Carulli

mum caliber inference

Cafaro C, Ali SA, Giffin A.

and the stochastic Ising

Thermodynamic Aspects

Charles Bergeron

Moreau W, Nabhan D,

E, Fang X, Kalesh KA,

model. Physical Review E,

of information Transfer

Boles NC, Stone T,

Gallagher P, Vardiman

Matta L, Choo SH, Pan-

2016, 94 (5); 052145.

in Complex Dynamical

Bergeron C, Kiehl TR. Big

JP. Advanced treatment

duga S, Buckle RN, Davis

Systems. Physical Review

Data Access and Infra-

monitoring for athletes

RN, Sakwa SA, Gupta

E, 2016, 93 (2); 022114.

structure: Case Studies in

using unsupervised mod-

P, Sargent BJ, Moore

Data Repository Utility.

eling techniques. Journal

NA, Luche MM, Carr GJ,

Cafaro C, Ali SA, Giffin A. On the Violation of Bell’s Inequality for all

Cafaro C, Giffin A, Ali

Annals of the New York

of Athletic Training 51(1),

Khmelnitsky YL, Ismail J,

non-Product Quantum

SA. Application of the

Academy of Sciences,

74-81.

Chung M, Bai M, Leong

States. International

maximum Relative Entro-

Volume 1387, pages 112-

WY, Sachdev N, Swamina-


S CH O LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  39

than S, Mhyre AJ. Synthe-

Molecular Microbiology,

Furuya AKM, Sharifi HJ,

Stone T, Kiehl TR,

NY, May 23, 2016 (invited

sis and Biological Evalu-

101(5):856-78. Sept. 2016.

Jellinger RM, Cristofano

Bergeron C. Cutting

oral presentation).

P, Shi B, de Noronha CMC

through the spatial scale

ation of N-((1-(4-(Sulfonyl) piperazin-1-yl)cycloalkyl)

Rabadi SM, Sanchez BC,

(2016). Sulforaphane

complexity of multielec-

LaRocca TJ, Sosunov SA,

methyl) benzamide

Varanat M, Ma Z, Catlett

Inhibits HIV Infection of

trode array neuron record-

Shakerley NL, Ten VS,

Inhibitors of Glycine

SV, Melendez JA, Malik

Macrophages through

ings. New York Academy

Ratner AJ. High glucose

Transporter-1. Journal of

M, Bakshi CS. Antioxidant

Nrf2. PLoS Pathogens

of Sciences Symposium

sensitizes host cells to

Medicinal Chemistry 2016,

defenses of Francisella

12(4): e1005581.

on Neuronal Connectivity

necroptosis in response

59; 8473-8494.

tularensis modulate

in Brain Function and Dis-

to bacterial pore-forming

macrophage function and

Ebot Tabe

ease: Novel Mechanisms

toxins and inflammatory

Cioffi CL, Guzzo PR. Inhibi-

production of proinflam-

Tabe N, Rahman S, Tabe

and Therapeutic Target,

signals. ASM Microbe

tors of Glycine Transport-

matory cytokines. Journal

ES, Doetkott D, Khaitsa M

New York City, NY, March

General Meeting, Boston,

er-1: Potential Therapeu-

of Biological Chemistry,

(2016). Shigatoxin produc-

22, 2016 (abstract and

MA, June 16-20, 2016

tics for the Treatment of

291(10):5009-21.

ing Escherichia coli and

poster presentation)

(poster presentation).

CNS Disorders. Current

March 2016.

Salmonella spp burden in cattle feedlot runoff from

James Doyle

Shakerley NL, Craft M,

Michael Racz

two cattle feedlot facili-

Doyle J, Teng J.

Smiraglia TA, Payal

Hannan EL, Racz MJ,

ties. North Dakota Food

Cyber-CYP: A Student

PS, Sosunuv S, Ten VS,

Cioffi C, Petrukhin KE,

Walford G, Jacobs AK,

Protection Trends, Vol 36,

Self-Directed Interactive

LaRocca TJ. Hyperglyce-

Johnson G. Recent devel-

Stamato NJ, Gesten F,

No. 1, pp. 33-42.

Tool for Learning Cyto-

mia primes cells for pro-

opments in agents for the

Berger PB, Sharma S, King

chrome P450. EdMedia

grammed cell death shift

treatment of age-related

SB 3rd, (2016). Disparities

Eric Yager

2016 Conference, Van-

in a glycolysis-dependent

macular degeneration

in the use of drug-eluting

Kohlmeier JE, Ely KH,

couver, BC, June 29, 2016

manner. 22nd Society

and Stargardt disease.

coronary stents by race,

Connor LM, Yager EJ,

(oral presentation).

for Radical Biology and

2016 Medicinal Chemistry

ethnicity, payer and hos-

Woodland DL, Black-

Reviews, 51, chapter 16;

pital. Canadian Journal of

man MA. Beneficial and

Peter R. Guzzo

Francisco, CA, Novem-

261-278.

Cardiology, 32(16): 987.

detrimental manifestations

Guzzo PR. ConSynance:

ber 16-19, 2016 (poster

e25-987.e31.

of age on CD8+ T-cell

An Emerging Drug Dis-

presentation).

memory to respiratory

covery Company. Capital

Topics in Medicinal Chemistry 2016, 16; 3404-3437.

Timothy LaRocca

Medicine Meeting, San

LaRocca TJ, Sosunov SA,

H. John Sharifi

pathogens. Handbook on

Region Biotechnology

Shakerley, NL, Smiraglia

Shakerley NL, Ten VS,

Furuya AKM, Sharifi HJ,

Immunosenescence: Basic

Innovation Day, Troy, NY,

TA, Patel PS, Walker KM,

Ratner AJ. Hyperglycemic

Jellinger RM, Cristofano

Understanding and Clinical

September 16, 2016.

Craft M, Sosunov SA, Ten

conditions prime cells for

P, Shi B, de Noronha CMC

Applications, Eds. T. Fulop,

RIP1-dependent necropto-

(2016). Sulforaphane

C. Franceschi, K. Hirokawa

Guzzo PR. Novel Thera-

glycemia potentiates a

sis. Journal of Biological

Inhibits HIV Infection of

and G. Pawelec. Springer

peutics for Inflammatory

shift from apoptosis to

Chemistry, June 2016,

Macrophages through

Netherlands, 2016.

Bowel Disease and Irrita-

necroptosis. Eastern New

291(26): 13753-61.

Nrf2. PLoS Pathogens

ble Bowel Syndrome. BIO

York Student Chapter of

International Convention,

the American Society for

San Francisco, CA, June

Microbiology, Albany, NY,

7, 2016.

November 17, 2016 (poster

12(4): e1005581.

PRESENTATIONS

LaRocca TJ. Programmed

VS, LaRocca TJ. Hyper-

cell death dynamics

Binshan Shi

Charles Bergeron

during hyperglycemia

Watanabe S, Simon V,

Bergeron C, Stone T,

and ischemic brain inju-

Kemp B, Machihara S,

Kiehl TR. A pipeline for a

Guzzo PR. Novel Ther-

ries. Journal of Neurology

Kemal K, Shi B, Foley B,

growing data resource:

apeutics for Inflamma-

Jenna LeBlanc

and Neurorehabilitation

Weiser B, Burger H, Anas-

Electrophysiological

tory Bowel Disease and

Envision Your Value,

Research, Nov 2016,

tos K, Chen C, Carter C.

behavior of in-vitro cell

Irritable Bowel Syndrome.

Advocate for the Future.

1(2): 4-12.

The HIV-1 Late Domain-2

cultures. Meeting of the

New York BIO Conven-

American Society of

S40A Polymorphism in

National Science Foun-

tion, New York City, NY,

Cytopathology Annual

Meenakshi Malik

Antiretroviral (or ART)-

dation Workshop on Data

May 11, 2016.

Scientific Meeting,

Ma Z, Russo VC, Rabadi

Exposed Individuals

Science, Learning, and

SM, Catlett SV, Bakshi

Influences Protease

Applications to Biomedi-

Timothy LaRocca

CS, Malik M. Elucidation

Inhibitor Susceptibility.

cal and Health Sciences,

LaRocca TJ. Hyperglyce-

of the Mechanism of Oxi-

Retrovirology, 2016;

New York City, New York,

mia upregulates necro-

Meenakshi Malik

dative Stress Regulation

13(1):64.

Jan 7-8, 2016.

ptosis. Long Island Uni-

Oliva G, Shah R, Lu J,

versity Post, Brookville,

Catlett SV, Pai MP, Rose

in Francisella tularensis.

presentation).

New Orleans, LA, November 2016.


40  AC P H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLARLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

WE, Sakoulas G, Malik

Michael Racz

Science, August 1-4, 2016,

Grantor: National Insti-

M. Characterization of

Gumustop S, Nair AA,

Philadelphia, PA (oral

tutes of Health

gene expression in

Meek PD, Racz MJ,

presentation).

(R15 renewal)

Guzzo PR, Surman MD,

profile associated with

O’Grady TJ, Gumustop

Amount: $480,000

Henderson AJ, Jiang, MX,

daptomycin nonsuscep-

B. Regional patterns of

Ebot Tabe

Term: December 1, 2016 –

Hadden M, Grabowski

tibility in Staphylococcus

pancreatectomy case

Tabe E. A Salicylate

November 30, 2019

J. 1-Azinone-substituted

aureus. Poster presented

volumes and in-hospital

Derivative-Enhanced

in 116th General Meeting

mortality in New York

Antimicrobial Activity of a

Project: Modeling the

No. 9,296,743: March 29,

of American Society for

State between 1999-2014.

Synthetic Peptide against

emergence of antimicrobi-

2016.

Microbiology, Boston, MA,

Digestive Disease Week,

Pseudomonas aeruginosa

al resistance

June 16-19, 2016.

May 2016, San Diego, CA

in-vitro. Public Health

Role: Co-Principal

Jenna LeBlanc

(poster presentation).

and Emerging Microbial

Investigator

President Elect,

Threats 14th Annual

Grantor: Wadsworth

American Society for Cytotechnology

Ma Z, Russo V, Rabadi

May 31, 2016.

pyridoindoles. U.S. Patent

SM, Catlett SV, Bakshi

Nair AA, Gumustop SB,

International Conference,

Center and ACPHS

CS, Malik M. Elucidation

Racz MJ, O’Grady TJ,

September 19, 2016, Alba-

Amount: $375,000

of the mechanism of ox-

Polimeni JM, Gumustop

ny College of Pharmacy

Term: February 16, 2016 –

Nicole Shakerley

idative stress regulation

B, Meek PD. Temporal

and Health Sciences,

February 15, 2019

Young Investigator

in Francisella tularensis.

trends in utilization of

Albany, NY.

Poster presented in

pancreatectomy proce-

116th General Meeting

dures in New York State:

of American Society for

1999-2014. International

Microbiology, Boston, MA,

Society for Pharmacoeco-

Timothy LaRocca

Peter R. Guzzo (Patents)

Binshan Shi

June 16-19, 2016.

nomics and Outcomes

Project: Mechanisms and

Kharenko O, Young PR,

Winning Research Paper

Research 21st Annual

outcomes of erythrocyte

Brown SD, Duffy BC, Liu

at 2016 Education Scien-

Marghani D, Ma Z, Malik

International Meeting,

necroptosis

S, Guzzo PR. Inhibitors

tific Assembly Student

M, Bakshi CS. Charac-

May 2016, Washington,

Grantor: National Insti-

of bromodomains.

Awards competition (with

terization of the role of

DC (poster presentation).

tutes of Health

WO 2016/097863,

Michaela Kinnetz)

Amount: $480,000

June 23, 2016.

Transcriptional Regulator

GRANTS

AraC of Francisella tula-

Binshan Shi

Term: December 1, 2016 –

rensis. Poster presented

Kinnetz M, Shi B. The

November 30, 2019

in 116th General Meeting

Inhibition of Retrovirus

of American Society for

Reverse Transcription

Microbiology, Boston, MA, June 16-19, 2016.

Award from the Society

HONORS AND

for Radical Biology

APPOINTMENTS

and Medicine

Ebot Tabe Guzzo PR, Manning DD.

Young Scholar Award

Ligand-​therapeutic agent

from Dova Press on the

Meenakshi Malik

conjugates, silicon-​based

occasion of the 14th an-

by p53. Annual Meeting

Project: Repression of

linkers, and methods for

nual conference on Public

of the American Society

inflammasome by Fran-

making and using them.

Health and Emerging

for Clinical Laboratory

cisella tularensis

U.S. Patent No. 9,352,049:

Microbial Threats.

D E P A R T M E N T O F P O P U L AT I O N H E A LT H S C I E N C E S PUBLICATIONS

Katz LH, Burton-Chase

Silvera SAN, Bur-

Epidemiology, Biomarkers

Rogith D, Yusuf RA, Hov-

AM, Advani S, Fellman

ton-Chase AM, Phillips

& Prevention (in press).

ick SR, Fellman BM, Pe-

Allison M. Burton-Chase

F, Polivka KM, Ying Y,

L, Thompson CL, Stolley

Burton-Chase AM, Parker

Lynch PM, Pande M,

M, Chang S. Creating

Burton-Chase AM, Kwak

AM, Li Y, Bernsam EV,

WM, Hennig K, Sisson F,

Peterson SK. Screening

and managing a work/

J, Hennig K, Haley WE.

Meric-Bernstam F. (2016)

Bruzzone L. The use of

adherence and cancer

life balance as a junior

Elder Caregiving. In

Patient knowledge and

social media to recruit

risk perceptions in

investigator in the aca-

Reference Module of

Information seeking about

participants with rare

family members of

demic environment – A

Neuroscience and

personalized cancer ther-

conditions: Lynch syn-

colorectal cancer survi-

report from the American

Biobehavioral Psycholo-

apy. International Journal

drome as an example.

vors with Lynch-like

Society of Preventive On-

gy. New York: Elsevier

of Medical Informatics, 88;

JMIR Research Protocols

syndrome. Familial Can-

cology’s Junior Members

(in press).

52-57.

(in press).

cer (in press).

Interest Group. Cancer

terson SK, Burton-Chase


S CHO LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  41

PRESENTATIONS

Effects of education and

es in recruiting patients

Nair AA, Gumustop SB,

AM, Advani S, Fellman F,

other socioeconomic vari-

for medication therapy

Racz MJ, O’Grady TJ,

Polivka K, Ying Y, Lynch

Allison M. Burton-Chase

ables on HIV seroprev-

management (MTM): How

Polimeni JM, Gumustop B,

PM, Pande M, Peterson

Hennig K, Chu R, DeCoster

alence in Russia, India,

to address patient resis-

Meek PD. Temporal trends

SK. (2016) Screening ad-

B, LeBorgne A, Parker

South Africa, and the

tance to participating in

in utilization of pancre-

herence and cancer risk

WM, Campo-Engelstein L,

United States of America.

MTM. Presented at the 3rd

atectomy procedures in

perceptions in colorectal

Burton-Chase, AM. The im-

Poster presented at the

Annual ACPHS Student

New York State: 1999-

cancer survivors with

pact of care coordination

21st Annual International

Research Symposium

2014. Poster presented

Lynch-like syndrome.

on provider satisfaction in

Meeting of the Interna-

at Albany College of

at International Society

Clinical Genetics, 89 (3);

Lynch syndrome survivors

tional Society for Pharma-

Pharmacy and Health

for Pharmacoeconomics

392-398.

and previvors. Poster

coeconomics Research

Sciences, April 2016.

and Outcomes Research

presented at the Albany

(ISPOR), Washington, DC,

Wendy Parker

College of Pharmacy and

May 2016.

Polimeni JM, Iorgulescu

Health Sciences Student

RI, Almalki A, Albu L,

Summer Research Award

Parker WM, Donato

macists’ perspectives on

Parker WM, Chandrase-

Day, Albany, NY,

KM, Burton-Chase AM.

challenges and strategies

Wendy Parker

kara R. (2016) Assessment

November 2016.

Preventive screening and

of patient-centered com-

DeCoster B, Parker WM.

risk for women with Lynch

munication. Presented at

Alliances in Women’s

Katz LH, Burton-Chase

of Macro-level Socioeco-

21st Annual International Yehia A, Denvir P.

Meeting, Washington, DC,

Adherence talk: Phar-

May 2016.

nomic Factors that Impact

Burton-Chase AM, Hennig

syndrome: Initial results

the 6th Annual ACPHS

Health: Our Bodies,

Waterborne Diseases:

K, LeBorgne A, Chu R,

of a case-control study.

Research Forum at Alba-

Ourselves. Invited pre-

The Case of Jordan.

Campo-Engelstein L,

Poster presented at the

ny College of Pharmacy

sentation at Rensselaer

International Journal of

Parker WM. The impact

4th Annual Capital District

and Health Sciences,

Polytechnic Institute’s

Environmental Research

of care coordination on

Feminist Studies Consor-

January 2016.

Colloquium, Science, and

and Public Health.

provider satisfaction in

tium Conference, Albany,

13(12):1181. doi: 10.3390/

Lynch syndrome survivors

NY, January 2016.

ijerph13121181.

and previvors. Poster

Technology Studies DeThomas O’Grady

partment, March 9, 2016.

Chikermane S, Polimeni J,

presented at the 20th

Paul Denvir

Burton-Chase AM, Chan-

Parker WM. Health Dis-

Parker WM, Ferreira K,

Annual Meeting of the

Williams I, Denvir P. I

drasekara R, O’Grady T.

parities. Invited presen-

Vernon L, Cardone KE.

Collaborative Group of

Didn’t Want Them to Tear

Effects of education and

tation at Albany Medical

(2016) The Delicate Bal-

the Americas on Inher-

Apart Everything I Said:

other socioeconomic vari-

College, Health Care and

ance of Keeping It All

ited Colorectal Cancer

Patient and Provider

ables on HIV seroprev-

Society Course, 2016.

Together: Using Social

(CGA-ICC), Seattle, WA,

Perspectives on Sexual

alence in Russia, India,

Capital to Manage

October 2016.

Assault Disclosure. Pre-

South Africa, and the

Parker WM, DeCoster B.

sented at North American

United States of America.

Archives of the Women’s

Multiple Medications for Patients on Dialysis.

Hennig K, Chu R,

Primary Care Research

Poster presented at the

Health Movement and the

Research in Social and

DeCoster B, LeBorgne A,

Group (NAPCRG) Annual

21st Annual International

Boston Women’s Health

Administrative Pharmacy,

Parker WM, Campo-En-

Meeting, November 2016.

Meeting of the Interna-

Collective: Evidence of

S1551-7411(16)30312-

gelstein L, Burton-Chase

tional Society for Pharma-

virtues for seeking and

6. PMID: 27567742

AM. The impact of care

Williams I, Denvir P.

coeconomics Research

building alliances in

DOI: 10.1016/j.sa-

coordination on provider

Survivors’ disclosure

(ISPOR), Washington, DC,

healthcare. Presentation

pharm.2016.07.008.

satisfaction in Lynch

of sexual assault to

May 2016.

at the Association for

syndrome survivors

health care providers: A

Campo-Engelstein L,

and previvors. Poster

pilot study on disclosure

Gumustop S, Nair AA,

Washington DC, October

Santacrose LB, Master Z,

presented at the 20th

barriers and consequenc-

Meek PD, Racz MJ,

6-9, 2016.

Parker WM. (2016) Bad

Annual Meeting of the

es. Presented at the 3rd

O’Grady TJ, Gumustop

Moms and Blameless

Collaborative Group of

Annual ACPHS Student

B. Regional patterns of

Aziz R, Darivelmula S, Raf-

Dads: The Portrayal of

the Americas on Inher-

Research Symposium

pancreatectomy case

faele J, Bhatia R, Parker

Maternal and Paternal

ited Colorectal Cancer

at Albany College of

volumes and in-hospital

WM, Campo-Engelstein

Age and Preconception

(CGA-ICC), Seattle, WA,

Pharmacy and Health

mortality in New York

L. Freezing Fertility or

Harm in U.S. Newspapers.

October 2016.

Sciences, April 2016.

State between 1999-2014.

Freezing False Hope? A

Poster presented

Content Analysis of the

American Journal of Bio-

Bioethics and Humanities,

ethics: Empirical Bioethics,

Chikermane S, Polimeni J,

Adamec A, Courtney K,

at Digestive Disease

Portrayal of Social Egg

7(1): 56-63. DOI:10.1080/2

Burton-Chase AM, Chan-

Donato KM, Denvir P.

Week, San Diego, CA,

Freezing in the US Print

3294515.2015.1053007.

drasekara R, O’Grady T.

Communication challeng-

May 2016.

Media. Presentation at the


42  AC P H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLARLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

Association for Bioethics

cal Meeting, Boston, MA,

ciology of Reproduction,

District Feminist Studies

Competency and Health

and Humanities, Washing-

April 2016.

March 17-20, 2016.

Conference, Troy, NY,

Literacy Task Force

ton DC,

January 2016.

GRANTS

Parker WM, DeCoster B.

Aziz R, Darivelmula S, Raf-

Archives of the Women’s

faele J, Bhatia R, Parker

HONORS AND

Parker WM, Donato KM,

Health Movement and

WM, Campo-Engelstein

APPOINTMENTS

Nnani D, Grabe D.

the Boston Women’s

L. Freezing Fertility or

Disparities in Hyperten-

Health Collective:

Freezing False Hope? A

Allison M. Burton-Chase

Wendy M. Parker

sion Among Women:

Evidence of virtues for

Content Analysis of the

Top-Rated Poster Award,

Co-Principal Investigator:

Exploring Social, Econom-

seeking and building

Portrayal of Social Egg

Collaborative Group of

Katie E. Cardone

ic and Health-Related

alliances in healthcare.

Freezing in the US Print

the Americas on Inherited

Project: Health disparities

Risk Factors. Concordium

Presentation at Eastern

Media. Poster presented

Colorectal Cancer (CGA-

and medication manage-

2016, Crystal City, VA,

Sociological Society

at Capital District Femi-

ICC) Annual Meeting,

ment strategies among

September 11-12, 2016.

mini-conference on

nist Studies Conference,

October 2016

adolescents and young

the Sociology of

Troy, NY, January 2016.

October 6-9, 2016.

Wegrzyn NM, Parker WM,

Reproduction,

Pai AB, Daoui R, Daoui

March 17-20, 2016.

S, Cardone, KE. Health

Wendy Parker Principal Investigator:

adults with Diabetes Vice Chair, Early Career

Mellitus

Parker WM, Donato

Special Interest Group,

Grantor: John Faunce and

KM, Burton-Chase AM.

American Society of Pre-

Alicia Tracy Roach Fund

ventive Oncology

Amount: $24,943.36

Literacy and Self-Man-

DeCoster B, Parker WM.

Preventive screenings

agement of Medications

Alliance Building in

and risks for women

Among Patients at an

Women’s HealthCare. Pre-

with Lynch syndrome:

Member, Medical Adviso-

John Polimeni

Outpatient Nephrology

sentation at Association

Initial results from a

ry Board, Alive and Kickn

Project: An Annotated

Office. Poster presented

for Practical and Profes-

case-control study. Post-

Colorectal Cancer Patient

Bibliography of Calculat-

at Academy Health,

sional Ethics, February

er presented at Capital

Advocacy Organization

ing Economic Rent

Boston, MA, June 2016.

18-21, 2016.

District Feminist Studies

Grantor: Robert Schalken-

Conference, Troy, NY,

Paul Denvir

bach Foundation

January 2016.

Chair, Language and So-

Amount: $500

cial Interaction Division of

Term: June 1, 2016 August 31, 2016

Wegrzyn NM, Parker

O’Neil G, Parker WM.

WM, Pai AB, Daoui R,

Behind the Bump:

Hogan-Moulton A,

Women’s Decision

O’Neil G, Parker WM. Be-

National Communication

Cardone KE. Assess-

Making and Expectations

hind the Bump: Women’s

Association

ing health literacy in

of Assisted Reproduction.

Decision Making and

outpatient nephrology

Presentation at Eastern

Expectations of Assisted

Wendy Parker

patients. National Kidney

Sociological Society

Reproduction, Poster

Member, Alliance for Bet-

Foundation Spring Clini-

mini-conference on the So-

presented at Capital

ter Health Care, Cultural

D E P A R T M E N T O F H U M A N I T I E S A N D C O M M U N I C AT I O N PUBLICATIONS P E E R RE V I E W E D A RT IC L E S

Questions, 1913-1924. Nor-

Rose Hitt

Smith SW, Hitt R, Park

Hitt R, Perrault E, Smith S,

dic Irish Studies Journal,

Smith S, Hitt R, Russell J,

HS, Walther JB, Liang

Keating D, Nazione S,

Vol. 14, 2015, pp. 111-126.

Silk K, Nazione S, Atkin C,

J, Hseih G. An Effort to

Silk K, Russell J. (2016).

Keating D. Risk Belief and

Increase Organ Donor

Scientific message

Margaret Carroll

Barry DeCoster

Attitude Formation From

Registration through

translation and the Heu-

Carroll M. Lough Foyle

DeCoster B, Campo-En-

Translated Scientific

Intergroup Competition

ristic Systematic Model:

Naval Air Station: WWI

gelstein L. Expedited

Messages About PFOA,

and Social Media: A Study

Insights for designing

Memories. Donegal Annu-

Partner Therapy: Clinical

an Environmental Risk

of Two College Campus

educational messages

al, 2016, No. 68.

Considerations and Public

Associated With Breast

Organ Donation Chal-

about progesterone and

Health Explorations. AMA

Cancer. Health Commu-

lenge Campaigns. Journal

breast cancer risks. Jour-

Carroll M. Martin Glynn’s

Journal of Ethics 18, no. 3

nication, doi:10.1080/1

of Health Communication

nal of Cancer Education,

Newspaper Editorials:

(March 1, 2016): 215–28.

0410236.2016.1138350

(published online,

31, 389-936. doi: 10.1007/

Constructing Albany’s

(published online,

January 2016).

s13187-015-0835-y.

Answers to the Irish

May 2016).


S CH O LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  43

Michael Pittman Pittman M. Through the Lens of Gurdjieff: Glimpses

PRESENTATIONS P O ST E R P RESE NTAT I O NS

of Contemporary Sufism in Turkey. Fieldwork in Reli-

Denise L. Coblish

gion, Vol 11, No. 1 (2016).

Preparing Your Writing

Carroll M. Lady Gregory’s

apply. International

and the Diaspora,” City

“The Rising of the Moon,”

Association for the Study

College of New York and

a critical introduction.

of Irish Literatures, Cork,

Columbia University, April

Irish American Heritage

Ireland, July 25-31, 2016.

1, 2016 (Podium Presentation).

Museum, February 2016. Barry DeCoster

Center for the Next Wave

Barry DeCoster

DeCoster B. Is ‘Demedi-

Rose Hitt

of International Students.

DeCoster B. The Social

calization’ Possible as a

Hitt R, Zuang J, Anderson

National Association for

Determinants of Health

Goal for Feminist Health?

J. Breastfeeding Beliefs:

Kenneth Blume

Development Education

and Medicalization.

Feminist Epistemology,

Content Analysis of

Brad K. Berner. The

(NADE) Annual Con-

Health, Care, and Society

Metaphysics, Methodolo-

Newspaper Coverage.

Spanish-American War. A

ference, Anaheim, CA,

first year medical student

gies, and Science Studies

Annual Meeting of the

Documentary History with

March 17, 2016.

course at Albany Medical

Conference, South Bend,

National Communication

College, Feb 10, 2016.

IN, October 2-4, 2016

Association, Philadelphia,

(paper presentation).

PA, November 2016.

RE V IE W A RT I CL E S

Commentaries. (Fairleigh Dickinson University Press, 2014), for Interna-

I NVI T ED P RESE NTAT I O NS

DeCoster B, Parker W. Alliance Building in

DeCoster B, Campo-En-

Hitt R, Zuang J, Anderson

Margaret Carroll

Women’s Healthcare.

gelstein L. Good Public

J. Breastfeeding topics in

Carroll M. Dylan Thomas:

Association for Practical

Health Policy or Sexual

U.S. newspapers. Annual

Renata E. Long. In the

An Introduction. Lecture

and Professional Ethics,

Minority Exclusion? Re-

Meeting of the National

Shadow of the Alabama.

delivered before a

Washington, DC, Febru-

thinking Expedited Part-

Communication Associ-

The British Foreign office

reading of “A Child’s

ary 20, 2016.

ner Therapy. American

ation, Philadelphia, PA,

and the American Civil

Christ-mas in Wales,”

Society for Bioethics and

November 2016.

War (Naval Institute

Irish American Heritage

Kevin Hickey

Humanities, Washington

Press, 2015), for Naval

Museum, Albany, NY,

Hickey K. Walking with

DC, October 6-9, 2016

Michael Pittman

Historical Foundation,

December 2, 2016.

Abel: Journeys with the

(paper presentation).

Influences in Contem-

tional Journal of Maritime History. May 2016.

porary Spirituality: The

Nomads of the African

Naval History Book Carroll M. Albany’s

Savannah by Anna Bad-

DeCoster B. Is ‘Demedi-

Cultural, Religious, and

Catholics in a Protestant

khen. Friends of Albany

calization’ Possible as

Spiritual Roots of G.I.

Stewart Gordon. A History

Republic. Researching

Public Library Book Re-

a Goal for Feminist

Gurdjieff in the Caucasus

of the World in Sixteen

New York Conference,

view Series, Albany, NY,

Health? American Society

and Anatolia. American

Shipwrecks (University

Albany, NY, November

June 14, 2016.

for Bioethics and Human-

Academy of Religion

Press of New England,

17-19, 2016.

ities, Washington, DC,

Regional Conference

Hickey K. Chair of “Music

October 6-9, 2016

(North Eastern-Maritimes

(paper presentation).

Region), Boston College

Reviews, Feb. 2016.

2015), for Steamship Historical Society Power

Carroll M. Alice McDer-

and Art as a Force of Po-

Ships, Spring 2016.

mott’s Someone. New

litical Expressivity.” 41st

England Regional Amer-

Annual New York African

DeCoster B, Parker W. Vir-

istry, Boston, MA,

J. Daniel d’Oney

ican Conference of Irish

Studies Association Con-

tues for Seeking Alliances

April 2, 2016.

“Hubs of Empire: The

Studies, Cape Cod, MA,

ference, New York, NY,

in Healthcare: Archives

Southeastern Lowcountry

November 4-5, 2016.

April 1, 2016.

of Our Bodies, Ourselves.

Laura Rogers

American Society for

Rogers L. Public Archives,

and British Caribbean” in

School of Theology & Min-

American Indian Culture

Carroll M. Bloomsday

Michael Pittman

Bioethics and Humanities,

Shared Spaces: What

and Research Journal,

2016: Ulysses Unbound:

Travels in Gurdjieff’s Mi-

Washington, DC, October

Happens When Incarcer-

Volume 39, No. 3, 2015:

Readings and Ramblings.

lieu: Armenia and Turkey.

6-9, 2016 (paper presen-

ated Men Meet the “Incor-

148-149.

Irish American Heritage

All and Everything Human-

tation).

rigible Girls” of New York.

Museum, Albany, NY,

ities Conference, Salem,

June 2016.

MA, April 20-14, 2016

Kevin Hickey

Composition and Commu-

(Invited Presentation).

Jazzed Images – The

nication, Houston, TX,

Ornithological Arguments

April 6-9 2016.

B OOKS Kenneth Blume

Carroll M. Father Daniel

Historical Dictionary of

W. Cahill: The Irish Letters

U.S. Diplomacy from the Civil War to World War I,

Conference on College

of Jean-Michel Basquiat.

Home. American Con-

P O D I UM P RESE NTATIONS

41st Annual New York

Rogers L, Santicola T,

ference for Irish Studies,

Margaret Carroll

African Studies Associa-

Bogari K,Courtney K,

Rev. Ed. Rowman and

South Bend, IN, March

Carroll M. The Famine Irish

tion Conference on “Music

Kaley A, Pluckrose D,

Littlefield, 2016.

25-29, 2016.

in Albany, NY: Irish please

and the Arts of Africa

Olszewski K, Yehia A. If


44  AC P H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLA RLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

You Try and Make Every

Conference, Keene, NH,

Pharmacists’ Union

HONORS AND

Organizer of 41st Annual

Paper Look the Same;

April 2-3, 2016.

of Greater New York.

APPOINTMENTS

New York African Studies

Researching New York

Tutors, Teachers, and Stu-

Association Conference

dents Explore the Grand

Daniel Smith

Conference, University at

Kevin Hickey

Narratives of Science

Smith D. Radical Politics

Albany, Albany, NY, No-

President of the New York

Writing. Northeast Writing

and Labor Organization:

vember 17-19, 2016 (Paper

African Studies Associa-

Center Association

Leon Davis and the

Presentation).

tion (current).

C E N T E R F O R I N N O VAT I V E L E A R N I N G PUBLICATIONS

Jennifer McVay-Dyche

Innovate Conference, New

Lewis KO, McVay-Dyche

Orleans, LA, April 2016.

2016.

Judy Teng

JM. Practical tools for

Doyle J, Teng J.

creating and sourcing

Fleming G, McVay-Dyche

A, Currie C. Instructional

Cyber-CYP: A Student

video-based lessons:

JM. The improved student

Design for Everyone.

Self-Directed Interactive

Screencasts and TED-

experience. Presentation

NorthEast Regional Com-

Animation Tool for Learn-

Ed. Workshop presented

at the Quality Matters Re-

puting Program, Affiliation

ing Cytochrome P450.

at the Online Learning

gional Conference, New

of EDUCAUSE, Worcester,

Proceedings of EdMedia:

Consortium’s Acceler-

York, NY, March 2016.

MA, November 2016

World Conference on

ate Conference, Lake

Educational Media and

Buena Vista, FL,

Judy Teng

Technology 2016 (pp.

November 2016.

Doyle J, Teng J.

O’Neil E, Teng J, Gauthier

(Invited Panelist).

Cyber-CYP: A Student

HONORS AND

for the Advancement of

Lewis KO, McVay-Dyche

Self-Directed Interactive

APPOINTMENTS

Computing in Education.

JM. One size does not

Animation Tool for Learn-

always fit all: How to tell

ing Cytochrome P450. Ed-

Tammy Garren

CONFERENCE

if your rubric works. Ex-

Media, World Conference

Garren T. 2016 MERLOT

PRESENTATIONS

press workshop presented

on Educational Media &

Peer Reviewer Extraordi-

at the Online Learning

Technology, Vancouver,

naire Award. The Multime-

Tammy Garren

Consortium’s Acceler-

BC, June 2016.

dia Educational Resource

Garren T, Skylstad K.

ate Conference, Orlando,

Flex Your Pedagogical

FL, November 2016.

Teng J. Instructional

Teaching (MERLOT), May

Muscles: Designing a Flex

McVay-Dyche JM,

Design Support for

2016.

Learning Module. Online

Tedesco L. Building the

Pharmacy Educators:

Learning Consortium

infrastructure for innova-

Project-Based Model

Accelerate International

tive collaborative course

and Beyond. American

Conference, Orlando, FL,

design and develop-

Association of Colleges

November 2016 (Pre-con-

ment. Education session

of Pharmacy Annual

ference workshop).

presented at the Online

Meeting, Anaheim, CA,

Learning Consortium’s In-

July 2016.

1624-1629), Association

for Learning and Online

Garren T, Obos L. Two-

novate Conference, New

Phase Pharmacy Skills

Orleans, LA, April 2016.

Zheng A, Feinberg D,

Student Reactions and Ef-

McVay-Dyche JM. Balanc-

ing a Regulatory Science

fect on Lab Performance.

ing act: Creating online

Course Blended with

American Association

videos that honor your

eLearning Lectures and

of Colleges of Pharma-

teaching style without

Active Learning. American

cy Annual Conference,

a full scale video produc-

Association of Pharma-

Anaheim, CA, July 2016

tion team. Information

ceutical Scientists Annual

(poster session).

session presented Online

Meeting and Exposition,

Learning Consortium’s

Denver, CO, November

Teng J. Design and Teach-

Laboratory Video Project:

(April 1-2, 2016).


S CH O LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  45

PHARMACEUTICAL RESEARCH INSTITUTE PUBLICATIONS P E E R RE V I E W E D A RT IC L E S

Brady SM, Shapiro L,

Solid Tumors 2016;6(1):

Muralidharan-Chari V,

LF, Chang HY, Tang HY,

Mousa SA. Current

65-77.

Kohan HG, Asimakopou-

Lin HY, Davis PJ. Novel

los AG, Sudha T, Sell S,

leptin OB3 peptide-in-

and future direction in the management of

Hercbergs A, Davis PJ, Lin

Kannan K, Boroujerdi

duced signaling and

Shaker A. Mousa

scleroderma. Archives of

HY, Mousa SA. Possible

M, Davis PJ, Mousa SA.

progression in thyroid

Abouelnaga A, Mutawa

Dermatological Research

contributions of thyroid

Microvesicle removal of

cancers: Comparison with

GA, Abdelghaffar H, Sobh

2016;308(7):461-471.

hormone replacement

anticancer drugs contrib-

leptin. Oncotarget 2016;

to specific behaviors

utes to drug resistance

7(19):27641-27654.

M, Hamed S, Mousa SA. Establishment and char-

Darwish NH, Sudha

of cancer. Biomedicine

in human pancreatic

acterization of primary hu-

T, Godugu K, Elbaz O,

& Pharmacotherapy

cancer cells. Oncotarget

Radak D, Katsiki N,

man ovarian cancer stem

Abdelghaffar HA, Hassan

2016;84:655-659.

2016;7(31):50365-50379.

Resanovic I, Jovanovic

cell line (CD44+ve). Jour-

EE, Mousa SA. Acute my-

nal of Cancer Research

eloid leukemia stem cell

Hsieh MT, Wang LM,

Muralidharan-Chari

Zafirovic S, Mousa SA,

Updates 2016;5(2).

markers in prognosis and

Changou CA, Chin YT,

V, Mousa SA. Heparin

Isenovic ER. Apoptosis

targeted therapy: Poten-

Yang YS, Lai HY, Lee SY,

neutralizer anticoagulant

and acute brain ischemia

Acheampong A, Mousa

tial impact of BMI-1, TIM-3

Yang YN, Whang-Peng

reversal agent. Drugs of

in ischemic stroke. Current

SA. Targeting strategies

and CLL-1. Oncotarget

J, Liu LF, Lin HY, Mousa

the Future 2016;41(6):341-

Vascular Pharmacology

of cancer stem cells in the

2016;7(36):57811-57820.

SA, Davis PJ. Crosstalk

346.

2016 Nov 3. [Epub ahead

A, Sudar-Milovanovic E,

of print].

between integrin αvβ3

management of solid tumors. Journal of Stem Cell

Davis PJ, Glinsky GV, Lin

and ERα contributes to

Rajabi M, Mousa SA. Lipid

Research and Transplan-

HY, Mousa SA. Actions

thyroid hormone-

nanoparticles and their

Zappa C, Mousa SA.

tation 2016;3(1):1023.

of thyroid hormone ana-

induced proliferation of

application in nanomed-

Non-small cell lung

logues on chemokines.

ovarian cancer cells.

icine. Current Pharma-

cancer: Current treatment

Alshaiban A, Muralidha-

Journal of Immunology

Oncotarget 2016:Jul 21.

ceutical Biotechnology

and future advances.

ran-Chari V, Nepo A,

Research 2016;3147671.

Apr 11 [Epub];8(15):24237-

2016;17(8):662-672.

Translational Lung Cancer Research 2016;5(3):288-

24249.

Mousa SA. Modulation of

Rajabi M, Sudha T, Dar-

300.

sickle red blood cell ad-

Della Badia LA, Elshour-

hesion and its associated

bagy NA, Mousa SA.

Lin HY, Chin YT, Nana

wish NH, Davis PJ, Mousa

changes in biomarkers

Targeting PCSK9 as a

AW, Shih YJ, Lai HY, Tang

SA. Synthesis of MR-49,

Zheng Y, Miao J, Zhang F,

by sulfated nonanticoag-

promising new mechanism

HY, Leinung M, Mousa

a deiodinated analog

Cai C, Koh A, Simmons TJ,

ulant heparin derivative.

for lowering low-density

SA, Davis PJ. Actions of

of tetraiodothyroacetic

Mousa SA, Linhardt RJ.

Clinical and Applied

lipoprotein cholesterol.

l-thyroxine and nano-di-

acid (tetrac), as a novel

Surface modification of a

Thrombosis and

Pharmacology & Thera-

amino-tetrac (nanotetrac)

pro-angiogenesis mod-

polyethylene film for anti-

Hemostasis

peutics 2016;164: 183-194.

on PD-L1 in cancer cells.

ulator. Bioorganic & Me-

coagulant and anti-mi-

Steroids 2016;114:59-67.

dicinal Chemistry Letters

crobial catheter. Reactive

2016;26(16):4112-4116.

and Functional Polymers

2016;22(3):230-238. ElFar AH, Shaheen HM,

2016;100:142-150.

Ardawi MS, Badawoud

ElDaim MA, Jaouni SKA,

Muralidharan-Chari

MH, Hassan SM, Rouzi

Mousa SA. Date palm

V, Kim J, Abuawad A,

Sahli ZT, Jo J, Mousa SA,

AA, Ardawi JM, AlNosani

(phoenix dactylifera):

Naeem M, Cui H, Mousa

Tarazi FI. Clinical man-

NM, Qari MH, Mousa

Protection and remedy

SA. Thymoquinone mod-

agement of restless legs

SA. Lycopene treatment

food. Current Trends in

ulates blood coagulation

syndrome in end-stage

Shaker A. Mousa

against loss of bone

Nutraceuticals 2016;1(2).

in vitro via its effects

renal disease patients.

Bowen N, Mousa SA.

on inflammatory and

CNS Spectrums 2016:1-8.

“Role of antiplatelet

mass, microarchitecture

BOOK CHAPTER S

therapy in neurosurgery:

and strength in relation to

Falcone R, Davis PJ,

coagulation pathways.

regulatory mechanisms

Stain SC, Mousa SA.

International Journal

Yang YC, Chin YT, Hsieh

Efficacy and safety

in a postmenopausal

Emerging therapies for

of Molecular Sciences

MT, Lai HY, Ke CC, Craw-

profiles” in Anticoagula-

osteoporosis model. Bone

pancreatic ductal

2016;17(4):474.

ford DR, Lee OK, Fu E,

tion and hemostasis in

2016;83: 127-140.

carcinoma. Journal of

Mousa SA, Grasso P, Liu

neurosurgery. Loftus CM,


46  AC P H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT SC HOLA RLY AC TIV ITY REPORT

ed. Switzerland: Springer;

Davis PJ, eds. Elsevier,

Davis PJ, Mousa SA.

Keynote Speaker. Al-

Appointed to Editorial

2016:65-89.

London: Academic Press;

“Tetraiodothyroacetic

ternative and Comple-

Board of Nanomedicine

2016:21-38.

acid at integrin αvβ3: A

mentary Medicines. King

and International Nano-

model of pharmaceutical

Abdulaziz University,

medicine.

El-Fawal HA, Rembisz R, Alobaidi R, Mousa SA.

Mousa SA, Muralidha-

anti-angiogenesis” in An-

Jeddah, Saudi Arabia,

“Chemotherapy-mediat-

ran-Chari V, Davis PJ.

ti-angiogenesis Strategies

April 4-8, 2016.

ed pain and peripheral

“Interface between throm-

in Cancer Therapies. Mou-

neuropathy: Impact of

bosis-inflammation and

sa SA, Davis PJ, eds. El-

Keynote Speaker. 6th

for Scientific Review

oxidative stress and

angiogenesis” in Anti-an-

sevier, London: Academic

Global Experts Meeting

Special Emphasis Panel

inflammation” in Oxidative

giogenesis Strategies in

Press; 2016:133-146.

& Expo on Nanomaterials

- ZRG1 F10A-S (20);

stress and antioxidant

Cancer Therapies. Mousa

and Nanotechnology

Fellowships: Physiology

protection: The science of

SA, Davis PJ, eds. Else-

Mousa SA, Sudha T, Davis

Congress and Expo.

and Pathobiology of

free radical biology and

vier, London: Academic

PJ. “Anti-angiogenesis

Dubai, United Arab Emir-

Cardiovascular and Re-

disease. Armstrong D,

Press; 2016:51-68.

therapy and its combina-

ates, April 21-23, 2016.

spiratory Systems, March

Stratton RD, eds. Hobo-

Appointed to NIH Study Section for Center

tion with chemotherapy:

10-11, 2016.

ken, NJ: John Wiley &

Davis PJ, Leinung M, Mou-

Impact on primary tumor

Keynote Speaker. World

Sons, Inc. 2016:367-388.

sa, SA. “MicroRNAs and

and its metastasis” in An-

Congress & Expo on Phar-

Appointed to NIH Study

angiogenesis” in Anti-an-

ti-angiogenesis Strategies

maceutics & Drug Deliv-

Section for Center for

Rajabi M, Srinivasan M,

giogenesis Strategies in

in Cancer Therapies. Mou-

ery Systems. Dubai, UAE,

Scientific Review Special

Mousa SA. “Nanobioma-

Cancer Therapies. Mousa

sa SA, Davis PJ, eds. El-

April 21-23, 2016.

Emphasis Panel - ZRG1

terials in drug delivery” in

SA, Davis PJ, eds. Else-

sevier, London: Academic

Nanobiomaterials in drug

vier, London: Academic

Press; 2016:147-163.

delivery. Grumezescu,

Press; 2016:69-84.

A, ed. William Andrew

CVRS-H (11 II); November Chair of Session on VTE

3-4, 2016.

in Cancer/Surgery. 24th Bharali DJ, Rajabi M,

International Congress

Appointed to NIH Study

Mousa SA, Abutaleb M,

Mousa SA. “Application of

on Thrombosis. Istanbul,

Section for Respiratory

Davis PJ. “Naturally oc-

nanotechnology to target

Turkey, May 4-7, 2016.

Sciences Small Business

Srinivasan M, Rajabi M,

curring anti-angiogenesis

tumor angiogenesis in

Mousa SA. “Nanobioma-

agents” in Anti-angiogen-

cancer therapeutics” in

Keynote speaker. 8th

Small Business Activities

terials in cancer therapy”

esis Strategies in Cancer

Anti-angiogenesis Strate-

World Medical Nanotech-

SEP [ZRG1 CVRS-H 11 B];

in Nanobiomaterials in

Therapies. Mousa SA,

gies in Cancer Therapies.

nology Congress. Dallas,

November 17-18, 2016.

cancer therapy. Gru-

Davis PJ, eds. Elsevier,

Mousa SA, Davis PJ, eds.

TX, June 9-11, 2016.

mezescu, A, ed.: William

London: Academic Press;

Elsevier, London: Academ-

Andrew Publishing;

2016:85-97.

ic Press; 2016:165-178.

International Drug Design

Shaker A. Mousa

Mousa SA, Darwish

Mousa SA, Davis PJ. “New

Congress. Istanbul, Tur-

Project: Tumor targeted

Shaker A. Mousa

NHE, Davis PJ. “Integrin

directions in anti-an-

key, October 13-15, 2016.

irradiation in mice

and Paul J. Davis

antagonists and angio-

giogenesis research”

Mousa SA, Davis, PJ. “An-

genesis” in Anti-angiogen-

in Anti-angiogenesis

Keynote Speaker. Special

ceuticals LLC

giogenesis and anti-an-

esis Strategies in Cancer

Strategies in Cancer

Session on Heparin

Total award: $30,720

giogenesis strategies in

Therapies. Mousa SA,

Therapies. Mousa SA,

Diversifications. Loyola

Period of Performance:

cancer” in Anti-angiogen-

Davis PJ, eds. Elsevier,

Davis PJ, eds. Elsevier,

University, Chicago, IL,

4/1/16 - 6/30/16

esis Strategies in Cancer

London: Academic Press;

London: Academic Press;

October 28, 2016.

Therapies. Mousa SA,

2016:99-123.

2016:179-186.

Publishing; 2016:1-37.

2016:57-89.

Davis PJ, eds. Elsevier,

- Respiratory Sciences

GRANTS Keynote speaker. 4th

Grantor: NanoPharma-

Project: Scale up N-DAT Keynote Speaker. Immi-

for Biological evaluation Grantor: NanoPharma-

London: Academic Press;

Davis PJ, Mousa SA.

LECTURES AND

grant Egyptian Oncology

2016:1-19.

“Tyrosine kinase inhibi-

KEYNOTES

Forum, Luxor, Egypt,

ceuticals LLC

December 14-16, 2016.

Total award: $78,080

tors and angiogenesis” Mousa SA, Yalcin M, Davis

in Anti-angiogenesis

Shaker A. Mousa

PJ. “Models for assessing

Strategies in Cancer

Plenary Lecture and

HONORS AND

anti-angiogenesis agents:

Therapies. Mousa SA,

Award of Excellence. 5th

APPOINTMENTS

Appraisal of current tech-

Davis PJ, eds. Elsevier,

Pan Arab Hematology

niques” in Anti-angiogen-

London: Academic Press;

Association Conference.

Shaker A. Mousa

Label the final Nano-di-

esis Strategies in Cancer

2016:125-131.

Cairo, Egypt, February

Appointed Editor-In-Chief

aminotetrac formulation

11-13, 2016.

of Biomedicines Journal

Grantor: NanoPharma-

Therapies. Mousa SA,

Period of Performance: 4/1/16 - 6/30/16 Project: Amendment to


S CHO LA R LY ACT IV IT Y R EP O RT AC P H S P RE SID E N T’ S RE P O RT  47

ceuticals LLC

Project: Scale up of C-TAT

mize the Loading for L-T3/

Total award: $74,240

and P-bi-TAT for Safety

NPs from 2% to 4%

Period of Performance:

Assessment in Male and

Grantor: Pro-Al Medico

5/1/16 - 10/31/16

Female Mice after Daily

(AGTT)

Exposure at Different

Total award: $66,000

Project: NDAT Process

Doses for 14 Days

Period of Performance:

Chemistry and Novel

Grantor: NanoPharma-

11/1/16 – 01/30/17

Derivatives

ceuticals LLC

Grantor: NanoPharma-

Total award: $89,872

ceuticals LLC

Period of Performance:

Total award: $40,960

09/19/16 - 3/31/17

Period of Performance: 4/1/16 - 6/30/16

Project: Analytical Method Development and

Project: NADT Backups

Pharmacokinetic Studies

Chemistry P-DAT

in Rodents

Grantor: NanoPharma-

Grantor: NanoPharma-

ceuticals LLC

ceuticals LLC

Total award: $61,440

Total award: $75,239

Period of Performance:

Period of Performance:

4/1/16 - 6/30/16

09/26/16 - 6/30/17

Project: Radiosensitiza-

Project: Synthesis and

tion of Pancreatic Cancer

Scale up /Test C-TAT

Grantor: NanoPharma-

against Neuroblastoma/

ceuticals LLC

Antiangiogenic study of

Total award: $122,880

C-TAT and P-bi-TAT vs

Period of Performance:

N-DAT and N-TAT

7/28/16 - 10/31/16

Grantor: NanoPharmaceuticals LLC

Project: Optimization of

Total award: $112,640

Lead clinical Candidate

Period of Performance:

and its anti-cancer effica-

11/28/16 - 6/30/17

cy versus Nano-DAT Identification of Lead

Project: A: Synthesis and

clinical Candidate(s)

scale up of β-C-TAT and

Polymer; Characteri-

Oral PK of β-C-TAT (IV/

zation of Lead Clinical

Oral PK), B: Test C-TAT

Candidate(s) in Crossing

(gamma-C-TAT, Subcuta-

the Blood Brain Barrier;

neous and β-C-TAT, Oral)

Anti-Cancer Efficacy of

Grantor: NanoPharma-

Lead clinical Candi-

ceuticals LLC

date(s) Polymer; and An-

Total award: $112,641

ti-Cancer Efficacy of Lead

Period of Performance:

clinical Candidate(s)

11/28/16-4/30/17

Polymer conjugated Non-Nano DAT or TAT

Project: Service Agree-

derivatives

ment for additional

Grantor: NanoPharma-

work on Amendment of

ceuticals LLC

Synthesis of 10 grams

Total award: $122,880

L-T3 nanoformulations

Period of Performance:

(PLGA-T3 NPs) – Develop

7/28/16 - 6/30/17

L-T3-PLGA NPs coated with Chitosan, 2- Opti-


48  ACP H S

PR ESI DENT’ S R EPORT

FINANCIAL REPORT J U LY 1 , 2 0 1 5 – J U N E 3 0 , 2 0 1 6

STATEMENT OF FINANCIAL POSITION

A SSE TS Cash and cash equivalents___________________ $27,413,499 Investments________________________________ 45,689,914 Other assets________________________________ 1,562,094 Accounts receivable - Students, net_______________ 633,461 Receivables - Government entities, net_____________ 444,200 Pledges receivable___________________________ 1,785,086

TOTA L A S S E TS

Student loan receivable_______________________2,484,854 Other receivables_____________________________ 400,824 Assets held in charitable remainder annuity trust_____ 154,463 Agency funds_________________________________348,174

TOTA L LI A BI LI TI E S

Property, plant & equipment, net________________ 45,621,641 TOTA L A SSE TS ____________________ $ 1 26 , 5 3 8 , 21 0 L IA B IL IT IE S Accounts payable and accrued liabilities_________ $2,013,735

N E T A S S E TS

Deferred income and deposits__________________ 7,203,328 U.S. government grants refundable_______________ 2,367,539 Bonds payable____________________________ 23,456,428 Expected post retirement benefit obligation_______ 2,339,552 Other liabilities______________________________ 1,042,397 Deposits held in custody for others_________________348,174 TOTA L L IA B IL IT IE S_____________________ $ 3 8 ,771 ,1 5 3 NE T A SSE TS

R EV EN U ES

Unrestricted net assets______________________$74,439,659 Temporarily restricted net assets________________ $4,939,168 EXPENSES

Permanently restricted net assets______________ $8,388,230 TOTA L NE T A SSE TS __________________ $ 8 7,76 7, 0 5 7 TOTA L L IA B IL IT IE S A ND NE T A SSE TS _ $ 1 26 , 5 3 8 , 21 0

STATEMENT OF ACTIVITIES

REVENUES

E XP E NSE S

Student tuition and fees, net of financial aid__________ 78.92%

Instruction/Student services_______________________ 44.15%

Auxiliary enterprises_____________________________ 9.33%

Physical plant_________________________________ 25.97%

Government contracts and grants___________________ 4.16%

General administration__________________________ 18.56%

Gifts and pledges_______________________________ 2.91%

Research______________________________________ 5.78%

Investment income______________________________2.04%

Institutional advancement_________________________2.63%

Other sources__________________________________2.26%

Student financial aid_____________________________2.05%

Postgraduate education__________________________ 0.38%

Postgraduate education__________________________0.86%

TOTA L_______________________________________ 1 0 0 %

TOTA L ____________________________________ 1 0 0 %


B OA R D O F TR U S TE E S OFFICERS Marion Morton, ’84, Chair Matthew Bette, Vice Chair Christopher D. Mitiguy, Treasurer Kandyce J. Daley, ’74, Secretary TERM TRUSTEES Stephen Ainlay Raymond Bleser Jr., ’81 Walter S. Borisenok Leigh Briscoe-Dwyer, ’87 Richard H. Daffner, ’63 Thomas D’Ambra James E. Dering Paul DerOhannesian II Chris Di Lascia, ’83 Michael Duteau, ’92 Geno J. Germano, ’83 Rocco Giruzzi, ’58 Susan Learned, ’91 James Notaro, ’84 David Stack, ‘76 Scott Terrillion, ’85 Pamela Williamson

PU B LI S H E D AU G U S T 2 0 1 7 E D I TO R Gil Chorbajian PHOTOGRAPHY Kris Qua DESIGN 2COMMUNIQUÉ


NON-PROFIT ORG. U.S. POSTAGE

PAID PERMIT #349 ALBANY, NY

ALBANY COLLEGE OF PHARMACY A N D H E A LT H S C I E N C E S 106 NEW SCOTLAND AVENUE ALBANY, NY 12208 WWW.ACPHS.EDU

ACPHS President's Report - 2017  
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