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ppalachian Country Vol. 8 Issue 3 FEBRUARY/MARCH 2012

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Bridal Tea

Recipes from AwardWinning Chefs

A Life of Service History of a Doctor

Trust Your Instincts

Making the Right Choice

Being Unique 15 Creative Ideas for a Wedding

Wine & Arts Festivals

Celebrate Nature this Spring

Beauty

Rustic

Taste the Beauty of the Appalachian Mountains


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letter from the publisher

There is a lot of truth in the title, “Men Are from Mars, Women Are from Venus.” A man and a woman can walk away from a discussion and have a completely different interpretation of how it went. She will think about it for the next six months, analyze every word he said, every facial expression that crossed his face. She will be short (or silent) with him during conversations. On the other hand, he will head to the bed for a nap, sleep like a baby, and the conversation will never occur to him again until she brings it up on their 60th anniversary. I wish I could compartmentalize like that. Women have one big compartment…and everything is in it. Being around a woman means more complication than a man is used to. Everything from our emotions to our closet is subject to our genetic programming. Men find that out as soon as they get married. Nothing is ever as it seems. I am amazed that after all this time, most men still don’t get that the word “fine” means anything but. A loud sigh? That means she thinks he’s clueless. If she says, “Go ahead” it’s a dare. She just wants to watch the disaster that comes with not following her advice. These are basic to understanding a woman. I envy men for being so comparatively uncomplicated. You’ll never see a man crying because he just feels like it. If men have an argument with their buddy, they can slug it out and then go out for some pizza. No one will ever mention it again. If women are involved in a big argument, it will NEVER be forgotten. Even the chance of it being resolved within a few days is highly doubtful. If a man chooses to punish his adversary, it usually involves physical violence. If a woman does, it will involve manipulation and, possibly, poison. If I called one of my female friends “Nut job” or “Brainless” our friendship might effectively be over—FOREVER. If a man says it to his buddy, it’s the ultimate form of affection (there’s also usually some kind of physical violence--a punch to the gut or a headlock). Men also get a huge break when it comes to appearance. Their hair has one style that usually consists of running their fingers through it. One pair of shoes can work for nearly any occasion. As a rule, women fight aging while men with wrinkles are considered to have character. Personally, I love to see lines in a people’s faces. It tells me that they laughed, they lived. It’s much better to meet an interesting person than an attractive person. Whether you are a man or a woman, you have to agree that the two sexes balance each other beautifully. This Valentine’s Day, embrace the differences that make men and women stronger by being with each other. Oh, and if she tells you she’s “fine,” start going over everything that has happened in the past 24 hours. Happy Valentine’s Day!

Jodi Williams

Women always have the last word in an argument. Anything a man adds after that is the beginning of a new argument.-Unknown

What's This?

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Appalachian Country Magazine P.O. Box 1668 Ellijay, GA 30540 706-669-1574 E-mail: acmagazine@hotmail.com Website: www.acmagazine.org

PUBLISHER

Jodi Williams

EDITORS

Ellen Ottinger

PHOTOGRAPHY

Stacey Lanning

LAYOUT/DESIGN

CC Designs

Julie Zagarola

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Tristan Tuttle

Jodi Williams

Betty Kossick

Gerard Monte

Hector Rosano

Joshua Daniels

Melodie Watkins

ADVERTISING SALES

Diana Garber

770-401-9898

PLEASE RECYCLE

Appalachian Country Magazine is published six times a year. All rights reserved under International and Pan-American copyright conventions. Reproduction of this work in whole or in part without the written consent of the publisher is strictly prohibited. Appalachian Country is printed in the United States of America. The articles contained in this magazine are works of journalism and do not represent the opinions or ideas of Appalachian County Magazine and the publisher assume no responsibility for the content of advertisements. While we welcome submissions, the magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. Please do not send originals. The magazine is given away free by advertisers and at selected businesses in the region. A one year subscription is $18 per year for six issues. For renewals, new subscriptions, or any other correspondence, write to P.O. Box 1668 Ellijay, GA 30540.

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A contents C A Life of Service

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Restaurant Spotlight

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Trust Your Instincts

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Bridal Tea

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COVER: Rustic Beauty at Cartecay Vineyards

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Being Unique

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Part Two: A local doctor remembers his world-wide journeys that brought him to north Georgia

Choosing the ring that symbolizes your love can be easy

Gourmet recipes from awardwinning chefs at Madeline's Cafe

Taste the Appalachian Mountains at this country vineyard in Ellijay

15 ideas from professionals in their fields

Spring Wine & Art Festivals

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Calendar of Events

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Business Index

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Celebrate the spring with these welcoming festivals

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A history C

A Life of

part II

service

by Jodi Williams

In our last issue, we told the first part of the story of Dr. Wilbur Schneider, who was born in Brazil and spent his childhood serving with his parents who were medical missionaries.

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After the war was over, Wilbur was still determined to his father into medicine. He finally graduated (his parents happened to be on furlough and were able to attend) and enrolled in medical school in Monterrey, Mexico. The GI Bill covered his expenses and in exchange for the low tuition, the Mexican government asked him to volunteer in a village after he finished his internship and exam. “The test back then was true or false. When I wasn’t sure of an answer, I’d just flip a coin,” he jokes. He more than passed with a score of 98%. In Mexico, he and Margie spent a year in Montemorelos where the new Dr. Schneider delivered his first baby. “I was in a hut with rags, boiling water and a dirt floor,” he says, then adds, “I was scared.” When his assigned time was over, Dr. Schneider moved back to the states, changing jobs and cities frequently, trying to find a place to settle. “We spent a brief time near Richland, Georgia. I treated a woman there who made me promise to vote for her nephew, Jimmy Carter, who was running for governor,” he says. “Then, an administrator from the hospital here in Ellijay had gone to school with Margie and convinced us to move here.” Ellijay was where Dr. Schneider and his wife finally stopped moving. He started his practice here in 1972 and practiced for 27 years. During this time, he lost 8

Margie to cancer. He finally retired in 1999. “I wanted to make it to the year 2000, but my kids convinced me to stop,” he says, the smile now gone. “I miss it so much. I miss the people. I miss taking care of people.” In 2000, he married his second wife, Sue, and together they are the picture of a contented couple. Dr. Schneider has seen many changes in medicine over his 95 years. “Now, physicians always seem like they are in such a hurry. In my time, I was able to give the patient all the time he needed. The beginning of treatment is listening.” He was a general practitioner rather than a specialist. “I delivered babies, treated diseases and was a psychotherapist. People trusted me. We would talk about their lives and I would try to help.” With patients from all over north Georgia, he also made house calls in a time when most of the roads were dirt and barely marked. “I had the

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Dr. Wilbur Schneider smiles at the photos from his wall of patients mine workers from Copperhill coming to me. One time, I got a call from a man to go see his mother in Blue Ridge. I saw her and charged him $10 for my fee.” Dr. Schneider notes the sad loss of a personal relationship in many of the doctor-patient interactions now. “Doctors commute to offices; they have an office in every town. I always kept everything I needed in my black bag. If they needed a shot of penicillin or B-12, I had it ready,” he says. Then adds, “I also never had to pay for malpractice insurance.” There comes a time in everyone’s life where they move from being a product of their circumstances to becoming a product of their choices. Consciously or not, each person must decide whether the world is here to serve him or whether he is here to serve the world. We would be so fortunate to have lived a life half as full as Dr. Wilbur Schneider. He was and is surrounded by people he cares about and who care about him. The man’s life speaks of love… and service to mankind. He’s from a different era; an era where the emphasis in medicine was about making lives Above: Sue better, uncomplicated and Wilbur by lawsuits or insurance Schneider companies. Like his Left: Dr. missionary parents, Schneider and Dr. Schneider served his son, Donny, without thought of in front of his his own personal old office off gain. Whatever one’s the square in life work, that’s an Ellijay. admirable trait.

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Restaurant Spotlight

A staple of East Ellijay, Mucho Kaliente is the place for exquisite Mexican dining. Mucho Kaliente is known for its chicken and steak fajitas along with a plethora of appetizers, specials and side orders. You’ll love the cheese quesadillas, tortillas and especially the chicken palapa, which is a whole chicken breast with mushroom sauce, garlic and red wine. Mucho Kaliente is run by people who love the area, the food and each other. Edgar and Lupe Rodriguez met and fell in love right at Mucho Kaliente! It is very important to them that the restaurant is comfortable for their customers. They want everyone to feel like they are visiting friends, and make it a point to learn customers’ names and make every visit to Mucho Kaliente feel like a party! There is live karaoke on Wednesday and Saturdays and on special occasions they host live bands. Come to Mucho Kaliente where every day is a fiesta! *Take out orders and food for large events (with advance reservations) are available.

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A business C

Trust Your INSTINCTS by Tristan Weeks

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As a newlywed, it is fresh in my mind what it is like to plan a wedding, so I’m going to give you some advice: don’t lose your unique vision for your wedding in the piles of tulle and taffeta others thrust upon you. When you begin to plan your wedding, you can expect that everyone will have an opinion about how you should do things. Your mom might think you need daisies while you want red roses. Your

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bridesmaids might want to wear evening gowns when you prefer them to wear vintage tea dresses. Your future mother-inlaw might want to be in charge of everything! In spite of all the different voices telling you to do things a certain way, remember it is your wedding! (Well, it’s yours and your soon-tobe husband’s wedding.) The two of you can do things however you want! Once you feel

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Allison and Bill Craig free to make your own decisions without giving in to all the opinions of others, think about what you really want. Sometimes it helps to focus on small items that create a large impact, like your wedding rings and bridal jewelry. We consulted Allison and Bill Craig of North Georgia Diamond as our local experts on jewelry. Allison has been a very talented jeweler and designer for the last 26 years. “My dream when we began was to make unique diamond creations,” says Allison, smiling happily. True to her dream, their store creates an experience for couples. The emotions involved in an important purchase like an engagement ring are going to be remembered forever, especially by the woman. “We’ve even had couples get engaged in the store,” notes Allison. When it comes to your wedding rings, there are many options, so why not ask the best for help? North Georgia Diamond carries everything a bride could want from traditional diamond solitaire rings to opulent sapphires You might also consider other unusual yet beautiful gemstones like pink, blue and black center stones, or yellow diamonds. If you’ve got a vision for your bridal set, Bill and Allison work to make your ring dreams come true. “It is our goal to deliver happiness to our customers,” Bill smiles. What about your husband’s ring? Aside from the traditional gold band, there are a host of other metals available for your man’s jewelry. Titanium is a modern favorite for men because it is lightweight. It’s also the same material the space shuttle was built out of! If your husband is a man who is hard on his hands, tungsten is scratch-resistant and heavy, the hardest of all metals. If you’d like the traditional look of gold but with a twist, try cobalt chrome. It has a white platinum look, but is comparable to gold. Any of these choices would be great for your husband! As a way of saying thanks to those bridesmaids

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6.6 ct. black diamond

who agreed to wear your vintage tea dresses, give them a beautiful gift. North Georgia Diamond carries a pearl and leather collection called Anaeli. Each piece is handmade with higher-end pearls and leather. This jewelry is created so that it can be worn in several ways and with each purchase comes a chart showing how to knot the leather. There are pendants to add if that is something you’d like to consider purchasing with the necklace. Bill and Allison also carry two different silver lines that are beautiful and perfect for a bridesmaid’s gift.

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4 ct. blue sapphire

Being in the wedding jewelry business, the Craigs have had many experiences with other wedding service providers. In addition to their wide and varied jewelry selection, they have an onstaff photographer and caterer. North Georgia Diamond is truly a onestop shop for all a bride’s wedding needs. With an interactive Facebook page, a presence on social media sites like Twitter, Yelp, and Four Square, and their own website, they have unparalleled customer service and dedication to their clients. “If you shop with a national chain, they won’t remember your name. We get to know our customers; we know their names

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blue diamond

and their kids’ names.” Bill says. “The better we know our customers, the better we can serve their needs and build a trust that keeps them coming back.” North Georgia Diamond strives to make your experience with them a positive one that will create return customers again and again. Your wedding will be wonderful because you and your fiancé are wonderful. Remember, you have great taste, so don’t fret over the choices you make. Trust your instincts. Remember that your wedding day is about more than the flowers and the jewelry, the food and the fun. It is

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about a promise you make to another person to spend your entire life loving and caring for them in hard times and in good times. That’s a winning bridal strategy that will make you and your husband very happy! If you would like to visit with Bill and Allison at North Georgia Diamond, stop by their showroom at 29 Highland Crossing Ellijay, GA 30540. They can be contacted at (706) 515-1551 or at their website northgeorgiadiamond.com. They love Facebook fans, so be sure to look up their page: facebook.com/northgeorgiadiamond.

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Welcome to Ellijay, Georgia!

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A recipes C

BridalTea S

by Gerard Monte & Hector Rosano

Since its debut less than eight months ago, Madeline’s Cafe & Bakery has taken the city of Jasper and North Georgia by storm. What some may not know is that the parent company, Coast 2 Coast Catering, is in fact a well-seasoned catering & event planning entity originating in Hollywood. Since relocating to Georgia five years ago, the raw talents and creativity of owners Hector Rosano and Gerard Monte have captured the attention of the who's who in the region. This has landed them preferred caterer status with local venues like Venue 2 Remember in Jasper, The Gardens at Great Oaks in Roswell and the upcoming Gibb's Gardens. They truly excel in large scale events and wedding planning. Their menu selection combined with a flair for simple elegance is what brides and other clients rave about when using their services. Whether a wedding, a fund raiser for several hundred, or an intimate dinner for two, Gerard & Hector assist with all phases of planning a special event. They offer full-service catering,

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Shop Local this Season with Your Jasper Merchants!

decorating and flower design for events throughout Atlanta & North Georgia. Madeline's Cafe is also available for private events such as birthdays, engagements, rehearsal dinners and their very popular bridal teas. Appalachian Country has coaxed them to share the following tea-making secrets, along with some of their most requested teatime & cafe sandwich recipes for you to try at home. Visit their website at www. coast2coastcatering.com or www. madelinescafebakery.com to register for their upcoming events, specials and soon-to-open online store. Better yet, stop by Madeline's Cafe & Bakery on your next visit to Jasper. You will be treated to an inspired menu that changes with

every season but is always in good taste.

High Tea Recipe Fill a kettle with fresh water, preferably purified. Bring kettle to boil. Temper teapot by filling with hot water. Remove hot water from teapot and place tea sock, ball or bags in teapot (1 scant teaspoon per cup). Pour boiling water over leaves. Replace teapot lid. Steep for 3 to 5 minutes for black tea. Decant or remove tea sock, ball or bags. Stir and serve with cream, sugar and lemon slices. Cover pot with tea cozy or warmer to keep piping hot.

Salmon Mousse Tea Sandwiches 3 oz. smoked salmon 8 oz. cream cheese, softened Âź tsp. dill

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4 tbs. capers 4 tbs. red onion, finely chopped 1 tomato, thinly sliced and roughly chopped Salt and pepper to taste 4 slices buttermilk bread 4 slices wheat bread Combine salmon, cream cheese and dill in food processor and blend until smooth. Spread onto all bread slices. Thinly layer tomato onto wheat slices. Lightly sprinkle with 1 tbs. capers and top with buttermilk slices, spread side down. Wrap with plastic wrap and chill for 1-2 hours. Remove from refrigerator and cut off crusts with a very sharp or

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Wedding Planning Guide

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Appalachian Country

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Wedding Planning Guide

Tips for a Happy Marriage: Never both be angry at the same time. Never yell at each other. If you have to criticize, do it lovingly. Never bring up mistakes of the past. Neglect the whole world rather than each other. Never go to sleep with an argument unsettled. At least once every day try to say one kind or complimentary thing to your life's partner. When you have done something wrong, be ready to admit it and ask for forgiveness.

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the same direction to reveal a row of cut asparagus pieces down the length of each rectangular sandwich slice. Serve immediately.

Elizabeth Chicken Salad Tea Sandwich

serrated knife. Cut in half, turn ¼ turn and cut in half again to form four squares. Flip over two opposing pieces to create a checkerboard pattern. Serve immediately.

Millie’s Deviled Egg and Asparagus Tea Sandwich ½ c. mayonnaise 4 hardboiled eggs ¼ tsp. salt Pinch white pepper ½ tsp. fresh dill, roughly chopped 1 bunch blanched asparagus (25-35 spears) 4 slices fresh potato bread 4 slices fresh wheat bread

2 boneless, skinless chicken breasts 1 ½ tbs. salt 1 tbs. dry dill weed 1 tbs. rosemary 1 bay leaf ½ tbs. black pepper ½ c. mayonnaise 1 tbs. mustard ½ tbs. garlic chili sauce ¼ c. dried cranberries ¼ c. shelled pistachio nuts 4 slices white bread 4 slices wheat bread Place chicken, 1 tbs. salt, ½ tbs. dill, ½ tbs. rosemary, bay leaf, and ¼ tbs. pepper into a shallow stock pot and cover with cold water. Place uncovered on medium-high heat until water begins to boil. Cook for two more minutes, turn off heat and let cool (or place chicken in a bowl of ice water

Roughly puree egg in food processor. Add mayonnaise, salt, pepper and dill. Blend until combined. Spread generously on all bread slices. Lay asparagus onto the potato bread in alternating directions, assuring all the tips are incorporated into the sandwich slice. Cover each sandwich with the wheat slices, spread side down. Wrap with plastic wrap and chill for 1-2 hours. Remove from refrigerator and with a very sharp or serrated knife, cut off crusts and arrange sandwiches with spears running left to right. Slice each sandwich in half across the spears and again in half in 18

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Appalachian Country

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Welcome to Blue Ridge, Georgia!

to cool instantly). Chop chicken into Âź inch cubes and combine with remaining ingredients. Spread generously on all bread slices. Place white over wheat with filling inside, wrap with plastic wrap and chill for 1-2 hours. Remove from refrigerator and slice off crusts with a very sharp or serrated knife. Cut corner to corner into four triangles. Turn over two opposing pieces to create a checkerboard pattern. Serve immediately.

Cordelia's Pecan Tea Cookies 1 c. unsalted butter, at room temperature 1/2 c. confectioner's sugar, plus more for coating baked cookies 1 tsp. vanilla extract 1 3/4 c. all-purpose flour, plus more for dusting hands 1 c. pecans, chopped into very small pieces Preheat oven to 275o F. Line cookie sheets with parchment paper. Using an electric mixer, cream the butter and sugar at low speed until smooth. Beat in the vanilla. At low speed gradually add the flour. Mix in the pecans with a spatula. With floured hands, take out about

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1 tablespoon of dough and shape into a crescent. Continue to dust hands with flour as you make more cookies. Place onto prepared cookie sheets. Bake for 40 minutes. When cool enough to handle but still warm, roll in additional confectioner's sugar. Cool on wire racks. Appalachian Country

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A community C

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Rust

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stic T

Beauty

by Betty Kossick

he mountains in southern Appalachia are abundant with apple orchards, providing springtime blossoms that tease the senses. In Ellijay, the first awakening of grape vines is displayed by budding leaves on arbors that arouse hopes of ripened grapes and the unsurpassed beauty of Cartecay Vineyards.

purchased his farm in 2007, the land had lain unused for many years. The original farm-site has been established

It’s obvious that the owner, Larry Lykins, is passionate about his vineyard. He moved to Ellijay in 2002 for just that purpose: “I love farming. I’m a farmer first and a vintner second. Farming has been my dream for as long as I can remember. A vineyard/winery has been my dream since 1999.” When Lykins

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circa 1890. He was able to visualize the 13-acre planted vineyard, and designed it by combining the original farm layout with specific vineyard needs, which allows him to harvest the highest quality grapes. He restored the turn of the century dilapidated barn and the chimney from the original homestead, which burned in 2005. “I turned the chimney and the old homestead into what I call the Chimney Patio, where we often have live music.” He points out that the restored chimney is also Cartecay Vineyards’ logo. Cartecay Vineyards holds the distinction of being the first wine vineyards in Gilmer County. The area was chosen because of its terrain, ideal climate, elevation of 1650-1750 feet and the soil, which is conducive to producing excellent wine grapes. The property

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is blessed with natural springs and creeks that supply the gift of water to the vines. Though Gilmer County is traditionally known as the Apple Capital, it also works for grapes. “There’s a saying among grape growers and agriculturists,” says Lykins, “‘If you can grow an apple, you can grow a grape.’” With Cartecay Vineyards, Lykins lives his dreams. His first plantings were accomplished in 2008 with Vidal Blanc and Merlot. Since then plantings of Traminette, Norton (Cynthiana), Catawba and Cabernet Sauvignon were completed. More varieties are in the planning stage and expansion of the vineyards to 25 acres is anticipated. The first harvest for Cartecay Vineyards was in 2010. The first vintages released in September 2011

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were 2010 Vidal Blanc and 2010 Chimney Blush. In November 2011, 2010 Merlot was released, followed by 2011 Chimney Noel. Development of other areas of the business moved along swiftly, such as the recent opening of the tasting barn, officially called the Nealey Barn (named for the family who farmed the land from 1935-2007). The unique southern Appalachia theme of the property with its refurbished tasting barn and chimney is an artful combination of a new Gilmer County business enterprise with the area’s farming history. The business buzzes with various Cartecay events from wine-tastings to special occasion parties to fashionable weddings. “The entire vineyard and events facilities are designed to encompass turn-of-the-century southern Appalachia. The wine

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is styled so as to embody southern Appalachia and encompass the characteristics of the site on which it is situated,” Lykins smiles, obviously passionate about this vineyard. Forty-five guests can comfortably sit in the upper part of the Nealey barn—the old hayloft—and the main level can accommodate 80 standing guests. For outdoors events, the size is limitless, with acres of grapevines and mountain beauty. With weddings a specialty at the vineyard, the scenic views are a definite draw. The peaceful mountain and valley views serve as a natural backdrop for engagement and wedding photography. They almost bestow a blessing on the wedding couple and guests, inviting in the tranquility of the mountains and the vineyards. A warm aspect of Cartecay Vineyards is that the staff is largely made up of family members. Wedding coordinators Pat and Chrissy Daniels (mother and daughter) are a part of the family-related staff. Chrissy explains that her mother manages the tasting barn and she assists with the special events planning, including the live-music events, “We always advertise events on our website calendar cartecayvineyards.com and Facebook page.” She also says that Cartecay Vineyards sells local artist’s work, small gift items, and gift certificates. When harvest time approaches, even the youngest family members pitch in. From children to parents to three farm dogs, everyone watches out for deer and bear that enjoy ripe grapes. A propane crow cannon that sounds like a gun is also used as a deer and bear deterrent, beginning when the fruit starts to ripen.

The wine is styled so as to embody southern Appalachia and encompass the characteristics of the turn of the century in the mountains.

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Appalachian Country

Vanessa Wilbanks is the mother of upcoming May bride Kristen Stiles. She says that Cartecay Vineyards was chosen for her daughter’s nuptials with Matt McGraw because after one visit to Cartecay Vineyards they were both smitten with the ambiance of the site. The history of the setting appeals to this native Georgian couple. “It’s ideal. All thoughts of my daughter’s original plans for a destination wedding were forgotten when she saw Cartecay Vineyards. With the help of the wonderful staff, they’re planning a less-is-more wedding, without attendants, for a small, old timey – but simply elegant – wedding.” Lykins, who is the secretary for the Wine Growers Association of Georgia (georgiawine.com), a co-op marketing group, believes his involvement is important in keeping himself informed and knowledgeable about the wine industry, and that knowledge makes him more valuable to his clientele. He’s also a member of Wine America (wineamerica. org), a national organization. It’s easy to discern that the solitude of the Blue Ridge Mountains provides a tranquil place to come away and truly enjoy a special celebration with friends and family. Though only 75 miles from Atlanta, and 53 miles from Chattanooga, Tennessee, Cartecay is like an island in time, away from the hustle and bustle of often too-busy modern lives. Lykins, his wife, Shay, and the staff invite you to come, relax and celebrate at Cartecay Vineyards. Cartecay Vineyards is located at 5704 Clear Creek Road, Ellijay, GA 30536. Call 706-698-WINE (9463) to plan an evening of relaxation or celebration. To plan an event e-mail coordinator@cartecayvineyards.com www.acmagazine.org

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Being Unique

A planning C

by Melodie Watkins

Every bride wants a wedding that's as special as the love she feels with her groom. It's hard to find that perfect mix of traditional and innovative that makes for a memorable event. We've compiled a list of unique ideas from experienced people in their field (as well as a few of our own) to help you get started thinking creatively. 24

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#1: Hand Knitted Wedding Dress

Karen Moss, Strings and Stitches Yarn Shop in Ellijay, GA My sister and I have always read knitting magazines and once saw a photo of a hand-knitted wedding dress that was amazing! It was made especially for the bride and looked like something destined to become a family heirloom. The one in the photo is from etsy.com.

consider burning sparklers for a festive touch. Have guests light them as the bride and groom leave the wedding. Make sure the photographer is set up for nighttime shooting first!

#6: Personalize the Wedding

Sue Findley and Dianne Dean, Unique Kitchens & Accessories in Jasper, GA Most stores have an in-store registry, but with technology advancing the way it is, many shoppers are almost completely online. We’ve designed a website where brides can register for items and the website is updated each time a purchase is made. Our registry is a convenient way for customers to view products online and either call or stop by to order them. The store even wraps and delivers the gifts to the shower!

Mary Robinson, Mary’s Monogramming and More in Jasper, GA Gifts are customary at weddings, but a busy event sometimes makes it hard to be personal. Monogrammed linens given at a shower or items used for decoration at a reception add a touch of class. The couple can use decorative items later or give them as gifts. The bride and groom will smile at their monogrammed sheets and bridesmaids will always remember that special handbag that has her initials on it. Personalizing a wedding means each of the pieces that make up the event becomes a keepsake.

#3: An Engravable Guest Book

#7: Charm Bracelets

#2: Online Wedding Registry

For a couple who are combining families, try using charm bracelets for the girls. During the ceremony, hand each child a charm from their new parent, symbolizing the child’s inclusion into the parent’s life. For special occasions to come, add a charm to their bracelet, making it something they’ll never forget.

Instead of the traditional book they’ll never look at again, a bride and groom can try using a blank silver tray as the guest book. Using an engraving tool, each guest can sign their name. For the rest of their lives, the couple will have beautiful and functional display of their special day.

#4: A Western Wedding

Linda Magness, Lakota Cove in Jasper, GA At my store, we cater to many horse enthusiasts and have found that western weddings provide an easy theme for a wedding, but aren’t used around here often. From getting married on horseback to having horses in the background, there is nothing more touching than the image of a couple with the animals they love. Western attire including hats and boots for the guests accentuate the theme. Many have used barns for their receptions. Tables can be set in burlap and bandanas fastened on the dining chairs, with matching napkins, candles and name tags on horseshoes at each setting. Use hay bales, wagon wheels, saddles, bridles, and old benches to add to the ambience. Don’t forget the music to help guests kick up their heels!

#5: Sparkling Night Wedding

If the wedding is at night,

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#8: A Love Letter Ceremony Box

Cheryl Frangipane, Southern Grace in Ellijay, GA The most beautiful thing I’ve ever seen at a wedding was a locked love letter box, a beautiful case with a pair of wine goblets and stationary inside. Before the wedding, the bride and groom write a letter expressing exactly what it is about the other that they fell in love with, a special memory they share, or just what that person means to them. Sometime during the ceremony the officiant elaborates on the meaning of the letters as the couple places them into the box to be locked away without being read. Later in their lives, the couple chooses an anniversary or a time of hardship to open the box. At that time, the couple relives that special moment when they said "I do". It can also be saved so that children can read the

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Welcome to Cherokee County, Georgia!

love their parents had for each other.

#9: A Ride down the Aisle

If your ring bearer or flower girl is too shy to walk down the aisle, make it fun by giving them a new tricycle, pulling a wagon.

#10: Nature-Inspired Bouquets

Amie Chambers, Amie’s Bridal in Jasper, GA I’ve been doing weddings for 14 years and there are two that stand out. In my sister’s wedding, we used fresh flowers flown in from Holland, California and Ecuador. They were so exotic and unique! In the next wedding, I put crabapple branches and moss into pedestal pots to make them look like miniature trees, then intertwined roses and greenery in the branches. The wedding cake was decorated with cleaned hickory sticks and fresh roses. But the best part was the bouquet I made – a beautiful flower and bending branch creation the bride had seen in a magazine. It was gorgeous!

#11: Immediate Wedding Photos

Have a casual photographer who takes photos of the bride and groom getting ready, guests arriving, and candid shots during the wedding and receiving line. During the reception following, have the photos uploaded to a slideshow (it takes about 5 minutes), put it with some music and show them on a screen. Guests can see 26

parts of the wedding they would have normally missed. Polaroids are also a nice keepsake for guests if you assign a person to take those photos during the reception.

#12: Personalized Wine Tasting Reception

Larry Lykins, Cartecay Vineyards in Ellijay, GA For a wedding at a vineyard, there is nothing easier than a wine-tasting reception for guests. A simple pairing of different wines and cheeses can be embellished by the couple as much or little as they want. Chocolate, fruits, cakes, sandwiches or a full course meal paired with different wines can make a memorable vineyard wedding even more of a special experience for guests. For a little personalization, our vineyard provides customized labels to commemorate the event—a great wedding accessory or party favor for lucky guests.

#13: Reception Dance Lessons Even shy guests will be tempted to dance if they have someone teaching them. Hire a dance instructor to

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teach simple dances. Or, if you have a country wedding, the instructor can teach line dancing. Once the music starts, no one will want to stop!

#14: Fragrance Inspired Wedding

Gerard Monte & Hector Rosano, Madeline’s Café & Bakery in Jasper, GA We had a bride who worked in the cosmetic industry for over 25 years and wanted her wedding based on a fragrance. We dyed the bread to match the colors in her wedding and fragrance. We incorporated fresh organics, edible flowers and herbs to dress them with and paired it with matching teas. She was delighted and it was a most unusual idea that reflected the personality of the bride.

#15: Flocks of Doves

Nancy Kay Duncan, Georgia Doves in Jasper, GA While on tour in Italy, I saw a bride and groom running through the Boboli Gardens, surrounded by a flock of flying doves. It was a lasting impression. Many times at a wedding, doves are used to honor someone not in attendance or simply to symbolize the union of two souls. My favorite is when the bride and groom hand release a pair of doves following an explanation. As the pair ascends, an entire flock is released, surrounding the bride and groom’s pair, disappearing into the heavens.

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Aarts C

Spring Wine & Art Festivals The ancient Greeks loved their wine and art. Starting in February each year, they would celebrate tasting the new wines with their festival, “Anthesteria”. Then, in March they would celebrate “Dionyssia” to welcome the spring (and drink more wine, of course). If you visit Athens today, you can still participate in the Dionyssia Wine Festival that is the perfect way to taste the wine production of a culture going back to the sixteenth century B.C. Drawing from the ancients’ secrets, artists and vintners today in north Georgia continue their celebration through their own spring festivals and events. So, get out and celebrate the Greek inside!

by Joshua Daniels

FEBRUARY 1 Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association Artist in Residence: Experience a unique style of art as Tom Chambers brilliantly combines acrylic paint and wood into beautiful pieces of art – from rustic to modern and everything in between.  Tom’s work will fascinate and inspire you to see the beauty of nature in a way you’ve never imagined before. Through March 23. 706-632-2144. 11  Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: Yonah Mountain Vineyards in Sautee. 12 Noon, $25.00 per person, which includes the Yonah Mountain Vineyards glass.  Contact the tasting room to pre-pay and to make reservations, 706-8785522. Repeats on varying Saturdays. 11  Wine and Cheese Tasting: Support the arts with this Valentine’s fund raiser at Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association. Enjoy gourmet

wine and cheese, raffle drawings and entertainment as you toast the arts with that someone special. Starts at 7 pm. $25 for members/$35 for non-members. Call or come by the Art Center to order. 706-632-2144. 25    Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above.

winning watercolor artist, Billie f. Mathis inside the Richard Low Evans Gallery, BRMAA.  Opening reception March 30, 5-7pm. 706632-2144.

MARCH

17   Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above.   23-25 Spring Wine Highway Weekend 2012: Wine Growers Association of Georgia (WAG).   Ten participating wineries in the area, Cartecay Vineyards in Ellijay included. georgiawine.com.

3   Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above. 6-23 Youth Art Month: Sponsored by BRMAA, this is a national celebration held every March to emphasize the importance of quality art education for all children. Celebrate YAM as BRMAA exhibits an array of artwork from local Fannin County students, grades K-12, in the Richard Low Evans Gallery.  Opening reception March 6, 4:306:30pm. 706-632-2144. 6-23 The Art of Billie f. Mathis: Come enjoy an exhibit by award-

February/March 2012

10 Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above.

24 Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above. 30-31 Annual Writers’ Conference: Writers can learn how to hone their skills and expand their markets, as well as enjoy numerous special guest speakers during this year’s Writers’ Conference at the Blue Ridge

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Richard Low Evans Gallery, BRMAA, from Southern Appalachian Artist Guild members.  Exhibit will be displayed during the Arts in the Park Festival on Memorial Weekend. southernappalachianartists.org.

Larry Lykins, owner of Cartecay Vineyards in Ellijay shows his wines at a wine tasting. Mountains Arts Association.  Opening reception March 30, 5-7pm, open to the public. Early bird registration through March 1, $60; after March 1, $70. 706-632-2144. 31   Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above.

APRIL 14    Second Saturdays: Second Saturday of each month, April – October,  Nacoochee Village on the lawn of Habersham Winery.  Arts & crafts, music, food and wine tasting.  706-878-9463. 14   Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above. 21   Swinging in the Vines Music Series: Sautee Nacoochee Vineyards. Complimentary wine tastings, hors d’oeuvres, and great music on the deck. 2-5pm. 706-878-0542. 28   Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above.

MAY 4-6 Spring Plein Aire Event: Bring your paints, pastels and canvases and capture the essence of Blue Ridge during this three day event with cash prizes. Plein Air artwork will be on exhibit through May 30 in the Art Center. Entry Fee: $10 members, $15 non-members. blueridgearts.net. May 5-27 SAAG “Appalachian Renaissance” Member Show: Enjoy 2D and 3D creations inside the 28

5   Winefest: Habersham Winery in Nacoochee Village.  This is an opportunity to sample at one location fine wines produced by the Winegrowers Association of Georgia.  Hear great music and see fine arts and crafts made by local artists while enjoying great food.  706-878-9463. 12   Second Saturdays: see above. 12   Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above. 19   Swinging in the Vines Music Series: Sautee Nacoochee Vineyards. Complimentary wine tastings, hors d’oeuvres, and great music on the deck from 2–5pm. 706-878-0542. 26-27 36th Annual Arts in the Park, Blue Ridge, Georgia: One of the top art designations in the country featuring a unique shopping experience in its downtown shops and galleries. Whether your travel plans are in the spring or in the fall, this bi-annual art festival is fun for the whole family. Downtown city park in Blue Ridge, 10 am-5pm. 706-632-2144. 26 Tour de la Cave and Barrel Sampling: see above.  JUNE 9-10   The Georgia Fine Wine Festival (tentative): Blackstock Vineyards in Dahlonega.  Sample fine wines produced by Blackstock Vineyards. Due to the tentative scheduling, make sure to call before you plan a trip. 706-219-2789. 9-July 6 Community Quilt Exhibit: Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association is hosting a quilt exhibition of some of the most beautiful quilts in the area. 706-632-2144.

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February/March 2012


February SUNDAY

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WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 1 2 BRMAA Artist in

Background photo courtesy of North Georgia Diamond

FRIDAY

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Residence Tom Chambers 706-632-2144

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Propogation Gardening Seminar 770-479-0418

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Roses Gardening Seminar 770-479-0418

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Vegetable Gardening Seminar 770-479-0418

"Ellijay's Funniest Videos" Supper Club, GAHA, 706-635-5605 Wine & Cheese Tasting, BRMAA,706-632-2144

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Valentine's Day

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Presidents' Day

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MONDAY

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WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 1

Definition Index: GAHA: Gilmer Arts & Heritage (Ellijay) 706-635-5605 BRMAA: Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association (Blue Ridge) DC: Downtown Canton; DBR: Downtown Blue Ridge; DE:Downtown Ellijay; DJ: Downtown Jasper; DW: Downtown Woodstock; DBG: Downtown Ball Ground

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Youth Art Month @ BRMAA, 706-632-2144

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Coffeehouse SAAG Art Reception, GAHA, 6pm, show runs through April 13

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Gilmer Student Art Reception 3:30pm@ GAHA, show runs through April 13

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Annual Writers' Conference @ BRMAA 706-632-2144

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Spring Wine Highway Weekend 2012 georgiawine.com

Spring Wine Highway Weekend 2012 georgiawine.com Streetfest 2012, DW, 404.435.1699

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Magical Easter Eggstravaganza @ Babyland, Cleveland, GA, 800-392-8279 Annual Writers' Conference @ BRMAA 706-632-2144

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Arts & Events

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SATURDAY 3

March Art of Billie f. Mathis exhibit @ BRMAA 706632-2144 through 23rd

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FRIDAY 2


Business Index

Agriculture Cartecay Vineyard..................................................706-698-9463 Alterations DLC Alterations.......................................................706-276-2490 Antiques & Collectibles Antique Village Mall............................................... 678-493-0847 Memories at Misty Hollow....................................... 706-276-1644 Woodstock Market.................................................770-517-7771 Arts & Events Blue Ridge Mtn. Arts Association............................. 770-632-2144 Digital Escapes.......................................................678-379-3476 Van Gogh's Hideaway..............................................706-253-4040 Attorneys John E. Mahan Atty at Law...................................... 706-635-5955 Automotive Ellijay Tire.............................................................. 706-635-2322 T & C Customs.........................................................770-479-7637 Banking Community & Southern Bank................................... 706-276-8000 United Community Bank.......................................... 706-635-5411 Builders Lakota Cove/Tennessee Log Homes.......................... 770-893-3495 Creative Home Images.............................................678-873-0434 Witt Building Company...........................................706-889-2480 Cabin Rentals/Lodging Chamomile Retreat...................................................404-909-9303 My Mountain Cabin Rentals.....................................800-844-4939 Stressbuster Vacation Rentals................................... 706-635-3952 Chambers of Commerce White County Chamber............................................706-865-5356 Children's Clothing AlexnSis................................................................ 770-485-8085 Clothing & Accessories ACE Hardware.......................................................706-635-2236 Daisy Accessories & Boutique..................................706-253-6996 Mary's Monogramming...........................................706-253-6279 Paula’s Wardrobe................................................706-946-6405 Posh on Main Street.............................................706-258-2237 Dental Services Jasper Family Dentistry............................................706-692-2646 Mountain Dental Associates..................................... 706-515-3500 Education Chattahoochee Technical College..............................770-528-4545 Pleasant Hills Montessori School............................. .706-636-3354 Elevators Blue Moose Elevators............................................. .866-797-5438 Florists Artistic Creations.....................................................706-692-0044 Gym/Health Clubs Ellijay Fitness..................................................706-636-2398 (BFIT) Home & Office Decor ASAP Upholstery...................................................770-590-8089 Chocolate Moose.................................................706-265-1990 Fabric and Fringe.....................................................770-794-8106 Fun Finds and Designs..............................................770-704-0448 House and Garden Boutique..................................678-494-5800 Interiors....................................................................706-276-7000 Junktiques.................................................................706-253-2295 Lakota Cove....................................................... ....770-893-3495 Moore Furniture....................................................706-692-2031 North Georgia Furniture........................................706-635-4202 Outdoor Living Porch & Patio....................................404-550-0270 30

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PJ’s Rusted Buffalo................................................706-515-8111 Pineapple Park....................................................678-494-8494 Southern Grace........................................................706-515-1090 Timeless Vanities.......................................................678-986-2379 Unique Kitchens...................................................... 706-253-6600 Wrapsody in Blue...................................................706-258-2700 Home Improvement A Affordable Garage Doors...................................678-294-4367 ACE Hardware......................................................770-635-2236 Creative Home Images.............................................678-873-0434 Witt Building Company...........................................706-889-2480 Indoor/Outdoor Activities Action Game Exchange...........................................706-253-1150 Camp Highland......................................................678-393-0300 Jewelry & Repair Daisy Accessories & Boutique...................................706-253-6996 North Georgia Diamond.......................................... 706-515-1551 Kitchen Supplies Unique Kitchens....................................................... 706-253-6600 Knitting Supplies Strings & Stitches..................................................... 706-698-5648 Marketing Inspired2Design.......................................................770-781-3452 Monogramming Services Mary's Monogramming...........................................706-253-6279 Medical Falany and Hulse Womens Center.............................770-720-8551 First Mountain Medical........................................706-253-3737 Oasis Medspa........................................................706-253-7326 Office Supplies One Source Business Products................................... 706-276-8273 Outdoor Decor & Supplies Blue Ridge Birdseed Company.................................. 706-258-BIRD Mountain Ridge Garden Center.............................706-698-2815 Pharmacy Jasper Drugs............................................................706-692-6427 Photographer Appalachian Photography........................................ 706-276-6991 Restaurants & Catering 28 Main.................................................................706-698-2828 61 Main.................................................................706-253-7289 Bumblebee's Bakery................................................706-946-2337 Charlie's Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria...................... 706-635-2205 Christy Lees........................................................706-946-5100 Harvest on Main..................................................706-946-6164 Madeline's...............................................................706-253-1052 Magnolia Thomas Restaurant....................................678-445-5789 Mucho Kaliente........................................................706-636-4192 Poole's Barbeque.....................................................706-635-4100 Shane's Rib Shack.........................................706-635-RIBS (7427) Southern Twist..........................................................706-273-1631 Toccoa Riverside Restaurant.................................... .706-632-7891 Salons Magic Touch Hair Salon...........................................706-635-5325 Venues A Venue 2 Remember............................................ .706-299-0700 Cartecay Vineyard..................................................706-698-9463 Wedding Vendors Amie's Bridal ..............................................770-262-3980 Classic Transportation..............................................706-633-3668 Georgia Doves........................................................404-451-5877

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Appalachian Country Magazine Feb/March 2012