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ppalachian Country Vol. 8 Issue 5 JUNE/JULY 2012

What Rental Companies Won't Tell You

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What to Ask When Staying the Night

A Treasure Hunter's Dream

The Best Bargains in North Georgia

Listening to the Children

Georgia's New Law Brings Justice

History of a Chair

Story of a Classic Design

Deli Delights

The Best Got Better

Relief for a Hectic Life

The Butternut Creek Festival

Summer Herbs

Recipes from the Garden

Mid-Summer's

Light

Bring a Little Mountain Wild into Your Home this Summer for the Perfect Relaxing Companion.


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letter from the publisher

It looks like my insurance company will be sending me a check. According to an April article I read in The Washington Post, medical insurance companies will be reimbursing customers this August (coincidentally, of course, before elections) for a “medical loss ratio”. These companies were supposed to adhere to the 2010 health care laws that specify 80% of our premiums have to go to our medical expenses (the rest of it is supposed to cover the insurance company’s costs). Now, that wasn’t my first rodeo. I knew what was going to happen next. Sure enough, one week later I got a letter from my insurance company (the third of its kind in the past year) saying they were raising my premiums… again. They wrote a very nice form letter that was just vague enough for me to have to interpret: What they said: Your rate is changing due to increased consumer demand for services and rising medical costs. What they meant: The government is making us cover more health issues. Yes, we know charging you more money doesn’t make health care affordable, but we aren’t the government and can’t operate at a deficit.

Appalachian Country Magazine P.O. Box 1668 Ellijay, GA 30540 706-669-1574 E-mail: acmagazine@hotmail.com Website: www.acmagazine.org

PUBLISHER

Jodi Williams

EDITOR

Ellen Ottinger

PHOTOGRAPHY

Stacey Lanning

LAYOUT/DESIGN

CC Designs

What they said: Your rate is going up because of medical advances.

Julie Zagarola

What they meant: We needed to write this to make you think you might live longer if you keep paying us.

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Tristan Tuttle

What they said: We are keeping costs down by pursuing the best rates for health care products and services on your behalf.

Jillian Daniels

Betty Kossick

What they meant: We get to tell the doctors what we want to pay them, and keep the rest of the money.

Jane Doe

Diana Garber

Joshua Daniels

Gene Harrison

Andrew Thomas

What they said: We are making more tools available to help you better manage your health and out-of-pocket expenses. What they meant: We want you to think that by paying more out of pocket, it’ll keep your premium costs down. It’s a trick. We have no intention of ever lowering your premium. What they said: We are working to get a higher quality health care from 4

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PLEASE RECYCLE

Appalachian Country Magazine is published six times a year. All rights reserved under International and Pan-American copyright conventions. Reproduction of this work in whole or in part without the written consent of the publisher is strictly prohibited. Appalachian Country is printed in the United States of America. The articles contained in this magazine are works of journalism and do not represent the opinions or ideas of Appalachian County Magazine and the publisher assume no responsibility for the content of advertisements. While we welcome submissions, the magazine is not responsible for unsolicited manuscripts or photographs. Please do not send originals. The magazine is given away free by advertisers and at selected businesses in the region. A one year subscription is $18 per year for six issues. For renewals, new subscriptions, or any other correspondence, write to P.O. Box 1668 Ellijay, GA 30540.

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ADVERTISING SALES

Diana Garber

770-401-9898

Michelle Miller

770-883-0584

Aby Ramey

70-273-6339

(continued) our network providers, such as doctors and hospitals. What they meant: Yeah… we’re going to go with the cheapest option no matter what. We just want to give you a reason why you can’t see that specialist anymore. What they said: You have a choice. What they meant: You can go without insurance. What they said: We encourage you to call with questions.

What's This?

If you want to take home our issues without all the bulk, make it easy by using your smart phone. Make sure you download a QR Reader app from the App Store (it's FREE). Once it's downloaded and ready, start the program and hold your phone camera over this symbol. It'll take you directly to our website where you can browse through your own digital copy of our magazine online. Bookmark it and never miss another issue! How easy is that?

What they meant: We don’t want you to call, but we have to put that in the letter to sound polite. Just in case you take us seriously, though, we have a nice automated system that will make you insane. But don’t expect us to pay for a psychiatrist. So, I suppose when/if I receive a check this fall, I’m going to get another letter from my insurance company telling me how wonderful they are to give me my money back. I believe the estimated average check was around $127 and since my monthly insurance cost has gone up more than that in the past year, at least I have comfort in knowing where my extra premium went for one of those months.

Jodi Williams *Editor's Correction: Last issue's recipe article should have included Southern Twist Restaurant's phone number and address: 706-273-1631 and 941 Maddox Drive, Suite 206. in Ellijay, GA. We apologize for the omission.

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A contents C Restaurant Spotlight

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Listening to the Children

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What Rental Companies Won't Tell You

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Summer Fun

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Summer Herbs

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COVER: Mid-Summer's Light

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A Treasure Hunter's Dream

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Deli Delights

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History of a Chair

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In Their Shoes

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Relief for a Hectic Life

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Calendar of Events

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Business Index

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A new bill will allow children justice long overdue

Things to know when renting a room or house for the night Places to go and activities for the whole family this summer Recipes straight from the garden

Rustic furnishings to bring the outdoors inside your home A bargain hunter's guide to the best deals in north Georgia Madeline's expands into a new market The story of a classic design A day in the life of Georgia artist Denis Byrd Blairsville's annual festival is one of the best in the area

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Restaurant Spotlight

Shane’s Rib Shack has been open in East Ellijay for three years. During that time many loyal customers have sampled the mouth watering ribs, heaping Big Dad barbeque sandwich and wonderful sides and desserts. What many people don’t know is that Shane’s also has the best chicken around. The chicken tenders are huge and can be ordered tossed in one of the signature sauces or simply plain. The chicken tenders come fried or grilled. But, both are tender and juicy. If you like wings, Shane’s also serves some of the best in town. Owner, Steve Stone, would like to say thanks to his loyal customers for making the last three years a success by saying, "If you have not been to Shane’s, please come try it out, I know you will like us!" For those that want to party, Shane’s Caters! Call 706-635-7427 to set up your next event. There is no group too big or too small! Just off of 515, in front of Wal-Mart in Ellijay, stop in and say hello to the friendly staff, try some tender barbecue and leave happy. As the restaurant menu says, “It’s gonna get messy!”

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A family C Listening to the Children

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Quite often I find myself wandering through beautiful downtown Blue Ridge. Recently on an especially beautiful day I stopped to pick up a copy of Appalachian Country. The new edition had just been put in the bright blue box and it caught my eye. First of all let me say this, I do not believe in luck or what if ’s or maybe's. I truly believe God is in every single moment of our life. This particular day I had about 45 minutes to wait for a friend who was treating me to lunch. I sat in my vehicle and read a letter from the publisher. My first thought was Wow! You have to be kidding?   The letter was on a subject that touched my life for many years and a subject my mother wrote hundreds (if not thousands) of letters trying to make politicians, media and even the President of the United States wake up to. For years, children have been subjected to so many forms of child abuse including statutory rape, child molestation and incest. The mental torture of becoming an adult and finally seeking help through counseling has for many years been the only hope for victims. It is almost unthinkable but for years in America our wise law makers had the statute of limitations limited to 7 years after the victim turned 16 years old. Our family was touched by the horror of abuse in a very real way and for many years. My daughters were victims, but I chose to not believe it could happen to my family. My mother was a force to be reckoned with and continually talked about the 8

signs, the changes in the children and the horror of being molested. I could not even imagine the things I was hearing happening to my PERFECT family. My mother was wise beyond my imagination and she knew the signs because she, too, had been a victim. Mother spent many days visiting with my children and finally faced the fact that I would do nothing about this because I could not, would not and refused to believe the truth. Not in my home! I can remember those words like it was yesterday. Not with the person I trusted my children with while I worked, not my family!   My daughters both developed very low self esteem and both turned to an abusive lifestyle. They thought drugs and alcohol can make you forget almost anything. I did not understand addiction; I did not understand the horror of hiding the truth. I also did not understand why another family member who had been abused at 8 turned to a Christian counselor at age 39. Her marriage was in trouble and her husband knew something was really, really wrong. Was it him, was it her, what was it? It was the horror of a little 8 year old who had been raped by her father. She finally found the ability to forgive him and she moved on to have a wonderful life with her husband but there was no recourse for punishing her father. She waited too long. In America, there is no limitation on murder, but when you hurt a child and kill their innocence you only had 7 years to be caught. Until now.  This past spring, Georgia lawmakers voted and passed House Bill

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by Jane Doe 1167 that does away with the statute of limitation on crimes against children under the age of 16. That means that no matter when the crime happened or how old the abused child is, he or she can file criminal charges against his or her abuser. I believe that there was singing in heaven the day the bill received the full support of Georgia law makers because my mother was running around telling everyone. When she was alive, she actually recorded my daughters' accounts of the horrible things that they lived through. I was never able to listen to it, but I have learned not to ignore what children tell me. I wish I had seen the signs of abuse and believed them. If your child was very happy and then becomes very withdrawn... talk to him or her. Watch who you leave your children alone with. There are warning signs for sexual abuse: Do they have trouble walking or sitting? Do they try to avoid a specific person without an obvious reason? Do they display knowledge about sexual acts inappropriate to their age? Do they avoid changing clothes around others? Make sure your children know they should NEVER keep a secret from their parents. They need to know you are there to protect them, no matter what that means. If you haven't lived through a traumatic event like abuse, there is no way to explain the devastation it can cause. The statistics were totally against my daughters recovering or finding peace. I believe we have been blessed, though, because through the love of God and HIS strength, my daughters

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are now doing much better. We still have many issues and I still speak with a counselor. It was my fault. It was my fault. IT WAS MY FAULT. Those words went through my head everyday for years until I turned it over to God and let HIM take the hurt away. My daughters turned to drugs or alcohol to hide the hurt. Recently, I finally learned to understand addiction. Hearing the graphic details and understanding the pain in their faces I found myself in a deep depression. I had nightmares and relived everything that was done to these little girls. I had no choice. I could turn it over to God or let it destroy me. House Bill 1167 gives hope to the hopeless, freedom to the victims and, yes, finally the guilty will be punished. I believe that the punishment can only happen when the victims find the strength they can only find by understanding, it wasn't their fault. Parents, listen to your children. My children today are both writing their life stories as a form of selfhelp. The truth can be told only by the victims and they are choosing to take their lives back. My youngest is calling her story "Dawn of a New Day" and it will become part of her recovery process.  "Innocence Stolen" will help my oldest try to finally recover her self-esteem.  I hope one day to write the greatest journal of all, "Forgiven," because I pray every day my children can forgive me for not listening.

Tips for talking to an abused child -Avoid denial and remain calm. If you display denial to a child, or show shock or disgust at what they are saying, the child may be afraid to continue and will shut down. As hard as it may be, remain as calm and reassuring as you can. -Don’t interrogate. Let the child explain to you in his or her own words what happened, but don’t interrogate the child or ask leading questions. This may confuse and fluster the child and make it harder for them to continue their story. -Reassure the child that they did nothing wrong. It takes a lot for a child to come forward about abuse. Reassure him or her that you take what is said seriously, and that it is not the child’s fault.

Reporting child abuse and neglect If you suspect a child is being abused, it’s critical to get them the help he or she needs. Reporting child abuse seems so official. Many people are reluctant to get involved in other families’ lives. Understanding some of the concerns behind reporting may help put your mind at ease if you need to report child abuse. I don’t want to interfere in someone else’s family. The effects of child abuse are life long, affecting future relationships, self-esteem, and, sadly, putting even more children at risk of abuse as the cycle continues. Help break the cycle of child abuse. What if I break up someone’s home? The priority in child protective services is keeping children in the home. A child abuse report does not mean a child is automatically

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removed from the home - unless the child is clearly in danger. Support such as parenting classes, anger management or other resources may be offered first to parents if safe for the child. They will know it was me who called. Reporting is anonymous. In most states, you do not have to give your name when you report child abuse. The child abuser cannot find out who made the report of child abuse. It won’t make a difference what I have to say. If you have a gut feeling that something is wrong, it is better to be safe than sorry. Even if you don’t see the whole picture, others may have noticed as well, and a pattern can help identify child abuse that might have otherwise slipped through the cracks. If you think you know a child suffering from abuse, don't hesitate to call the national child abuse hotline at 1-800-4-A-CHILD (1-800-422-4453) or contact your local DFCS office. Additional information is available on the Georgia Department of Human Resources website, dhs. georgia.gov

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What Rental Companies Won't Tell You by Tristan Tuttle

The rental office Often, renting a place to stay can be a bit overwhelming. Ever may be virtual. wonder if the information online Christopher Middlebrook of My Mountain Realty in recommends that before agreeing to rent a matches up with what’s actually Morganton cabin, be sure to find out about the rental office. at the properties? There are many vacation Is it a “virtual” office or will the renter be able to talk to in an on-site facility near the property? This questions to consider, so we talked someone relates to the question of staff availability. If a renter needs to the best people in the rental help finding the cabin or if there’s an issue with something there, will there be anyone to help? “My staff lives on My business to find out what other and we accept telephone calls all hours of the rental companies won’t tell their Mountain night. We have handymen that live on My Mountain and we address all issues quickly.  Keeping the guest happy is clients! 10

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Shop Local with Your Ellijay Merchants!

Some rental agencies aren’t clear about the accommodations or cabin access.

My Mountain Cabin Rentals

our main concern.” When possible, rent from a company with an on-site office in case trouble arises. My Mountain Realty (706) 374-4111 fax: (706) 374-4120 www.1mymountain. com.

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Always ask about the accommodations and about access to the cabin. Joy Lyle from Stress Buster Cabin Rentals in Ellijay suggests finding out what all is included in the accommodation package. Are the properties fully furnished or do the renters need to bring things of their own? Stress Buster Cabin Rentals provide everything a renter would need except for groceries, laundry detergent and charcoal for the grill. Other companies might have different policies, so it is important to find out. Also, what are the roads like leading to the cabin? “I’ve had people tell me that other companies didn’t let them know the cabin was on a steep gravel road and they needed fourAppalachian Country

Stress Buster Cabin Rentals

According to owner Joy Lyle, making sure you can get to your accomodations is just as important as the rooms themselves. www.acmagazine.org

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KZ Cabin Rentals

rental prices pay off.

wheel drive.” Nothing brings a vacation down like not being able to get there, so ask, “What’s the best way to get there?” Stress Buster Cabin Rentals (404) 791-4388 or (706) 635-3952  Fax  (706) 635-3951 www.stressbustervacationrentals.com email: stressbuster@ ellijay.com.

There may be hidden fees but often cabin 12

Many guests view renting cabins as like booking a hotel room in that every cost should be included in the nightly rental rate.   The one-time charges that are required above the nightly rent on cabins is mainly because they are privately owned and the actual cost to service and maintain them is significantly higher than hotel rooms that are bunched together in one location. In the North Georgia mountains, cabins can be miles apart and each cabin is different and has different upkeep and cleaning requirements. In spite of those one-time fees, when total prices are compared to those of hotel rentals, cabin rentals are much more cost effective for family vacation needs. For example, a hotel room could cost $200 a night for one room which can hold a max of 3 or 4 people compared to a 6 bedroom cabin rental that holds up to 18 is far less money per person per square foot. Remember, any additional fees for cabin rentals are more than worth the cost when compared to hotel rooms. Also, always make sure you read what the cabin's nightly rental price includes, for example is the nightly rate for the entire cabin, or only a small group of guests? Nothing turns off guests more than seeing a nightly rate on a cabin that sleeps a bunch of people and then realizing at check-out that the rate is only for a small group of people and extra charges are required for extra

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guests per night. KZ Cabins (706) 698-4445 www. kzcabins.com or www.facebook.com/ KZCabins.

It may be possible to get a better deal. Andrea of Chamomile Retreat Country Getaway, located between Ellijay and Blue Ridge, caters her business to busy women who are looking for some peace and quiet on their vacation. As a busy woman herself, she recommends finding out if the location is conducive to rest. Is the cabin quiet and secluded, but not isolated? She also suggests

Chamomile Retreat in Ellijay

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Shop Local with Your Jasper Merchants!

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negotiating the price. “Find out if there are any special deals the company offers. What about a trade of some sort? It never hurts to ask!” Andrea says. “I would love for someone to come and help me in the garden for a trade!” In the end, a vacation rental should be something you can enjoy and afford. Chamomile Retreat Country Getaway (404) 909-9303 www. georgiacountryretreat.com.

Your personality IS a consideration when renting. Fernbrook Inn in Blue Ridge, GA

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Jane Whaley of Fernbrook Inn operates a charming Bed and Breakfast in Blue Ridge. She suggests you consider your own personality when deciding on a rental. If you like interacting with new people, think about renting something other than a cabin or a hotel room. “In an inn or Bed and Breakfast, you are interacting with other people. Most of the time, at least one of your meals is shared with other people.” Jane says. A Appalachian Country

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Bed and Breakfast or an inn is small, quaint and personal with the staff on site. A guest has his or her privacy but knows that the staff is close by. What would be best for your vacation? Fernbrook Inn 404-272-0080 www. thefernbrookinn.com, or email reservations@thefernbrookinn.com. It is important that renters research the rental companies and the properties to make sure they are getting what they truly want out of a property. Know what the property has to offer (or detract from) a vacation. Don’t be afraid to ask questions. It’s your vacation, so be sure you will enjoy it!

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A activities C

n u F r e m m u S

by Joshua Daniels

Camping Going to camp is a classic American tradition for most kids. If you’re looking for bonding time with your family, both children and adults are welcome at Camp Highland in historic Ellijay, Ga. (There is also a day camp in Alpharetta, Ga.) It is a Christian camp designed to lead families to Christ through high-adventure.  Both day camps and extended stays are available.  Facilities include both 16

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a high and low ropes course, rustic camping facilities (with showers and restrooms), challenge courses, zip lines, rock walls, drop zone and more! Understandingly popular, space fills quickly at Camp Highland, so it’s best to call early. Camp Highland’s goal is to treat guests to the thrill of a lifetime, while exposing them to teachable moments that lead them into a deeper walk with Christ. In the past seventeen years Camp Highland has been privileged to touch many lives through Appalachian Country

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Shop Local with Your Blue Ridge Merchants!

this exciting ministry, and this year promises to be as exciting as ever! Counselors are trained to teach the kids about key biblical principles through ageappropriate activities. For more information, visit them online at www.camphighland.com.

Explore Nature Bring your binoculars and step into the Great Outdoors this summer with the Blue Ridge Bird Seed Company as your guide. Located in downtown Blue Ridge, Tom and Sonya Striker have an independent birding specialty with regular bird and nature walks. The free walks are easy access and walking, not to mention relaxed and fun for both children and adults. You can meet skilled birders and explore hot spots you can visit later on your own. Sign up for their newsletter by visiting www.blueridgebirdseed.com.  Blue Ridge Bird Seed Company also hosts regular nature seminars. For more information, call toll free (800) 5842473.

Fishing It’s the casting of a dry fly to a rising trout, the gurgling of

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the stream, the sunlight glistening like diamonds on the water…and it’s the knowledge that there’s something new around each bend of the water. North Georgia’s streams have some of the best fly fishing to offer. If you want to make a relaxing time even more inviting, try using an outfitter. James Bradley of Reel‘em In Guide Service teaches the inexperienced how to cast, takes anglers to prime fishing spots and uses hair and feathers to imitate aquatic insects to tempt trout. With his vast knowledge of the area, he frequently finds some of the most scenic private and public streams in the mountains. No experience is necessary and everything is provided (except for a license and a trout, of course). Learning the art of fly fishing can certainly be a memorable experience talked about for a long time. Call today to schedule your fly-fishing adventure at (706) 273-0764.

Festivals This summer holds quite a few art festivals in the area. Always filled with artistic events, the Blue Ridge Mountain

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VanGoghs Art Classes &Events (Jasper, GA) Fabulous First Friday June 1st 5-7 pm Mosaic Class June 7th Melody Boggs painting class June 8th Cherokee Women drum circle June 10th Drum circle on June 12th Stepping Stone Class June 13th  2-4pm Ellen Minion Painting Sunflowers class June 14th Jewelry making class June 15th Family Tye Dye Tee Shirt Class June 16th Card making Class June 20th Paint with Bailey Jack June 23rd  10-12 Childrens Summer Art Week  June 25-29 9:15-12

VanGoghs in Jasper, GA

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Arts Association in Blue Ridge, Ga. holds exhibitions and concerts throughout the summer. Known as one of the top art communities in the nation, visitors can walk the shopfilled streets or ride on the train that is parked in the middle of the downtown area. Their fall Arts in the Park is an event not to be missed. Also, named one of the top 20 events in the Southeast, Blairsville’s Butternut Creek Festival of the Arts is a mustvisit festival on July 21 & 22 this year. Set by a bubbling creek under shady trees, it's a can't-miss event for fun-lovers! For more information, see their article across from our events calendar and check out the calendar for a full listing of festivals.

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Arts It’s easy to get overwhelmed with all the art shows and events happening, but the easiest thing to do is simply evaluate what your interests are and how much time you want to spend. For example, small businesses like VanGoghs in Jasper, Ga. offers one day classes from painting sunflowers (June 14) to making tie-dyed shirts (June 16). Owner Kathe Hall delights in offering a variety of new classes. Her varied interests show in VanGoghs. It is an eclectic mix of creativity and imagination. Kathe is also a wealth of information about art events in the area. Large centers like Blue Ridge Mountain Arts in Blue Ridge, Ga. offer classes and exhibits that last for weeks. There are also contests to win money and prizes. The next on is the National Juried Nature and Fine Arts Photography Exhibit September 8 – October 14, which will have

Appalachian Country

BRMAA in Blue Ridge, GA

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Welcome to Cherokee County, Georgia!

Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association Summer Events in Blue Ridge, GA June 9 – July 6 Community Quilt Exhibit Celebrate our heritage with the ageold artistic craft of quilting. The Art Center will be arrayed in colorful fabric, woven with care, skill and artistic flare.  Don’t miss one of the most unforgettable exhibits of the year. June 9 – July 6 Bob Nadeau, Motorcycle Mania Photography Exhibit Motorcycle and photography enthusiasts alike will enjoy this one of a kind exhibit filled with images of the world of motorcycling. June 10 U.S. Marine Band Join us for a free concert by the U.S. Marine Band in the Downtown Park. June 16 Maxwell Taylor in Concert, 7pm If you haven’t seen this artist before, you can’t miss him this time around! Come laugh, dance and sing your way to an unforgettable time as Maxwell sings the tunes of over 100 different artists. Tickets on sale now!  June 23 Cancer Motorcycle Benefit Ride Join fellow bikers as they participate in a benefit ride for Thompson Cancer Survival Clinic in Knoxville, TN. Registration is at The Art Center from 10am – 12pm. June 26 – July 19 Summer Youth Art Camp Sign your kids up for a creative summer during our Summer Youth Art Program.  Choose from several classes offered over a 4-week span and let your children's imagination soar.  Classes cost $25 each. (Some may have additional supply fees.) June 30 - September 21 The Art of Toneeke: Through the Portal Enjoy this naturally gifted artist as

Celebrate the breathtaking impressionistic yet traditional pastel & oil creations from award-winning, Georgia artist Marsha Hamby Savage. October 13 & 14 Fall Arts in the Park Join us for the Fall Arts in the Park festival in the Downtown City Park in Blue Ridge, GA. Enjoy nearly 100 of fine art and craft artists, delicious food, great entertainment she shares her various artistic forms and even mother  nature’s colorful interwoven with her spiritual journey array of Fall splendor.  October 20 – and visions of energy and life filled November 9 treasures.    Southern Appalachian Artist Guild August 4 – 31 National Juried Show 3D Exhibit: Off the Wall Join us for 3rd Annual Southern The Art Center and Southern Appalachian Artist Guild National Appalachian Artist Guild are proud Juried Show. This show brings in to present the second annual three artists from across the nation and dimensional only art show, “Off the Wall.”  This show is open to all artists.  within our region to The Art Center.  This year’s show will be judged by September 8 – October 14 William Underwood Eiland, Director Blue Ridge Mountain Photographers of the Georgia Museum of Art. $5000 National Juried Nature & Fine Arts in prize money will awarded to the Photography Exhibit winners.  This juried show is open to November 17 both amateur and professional Who Dun It: Mystery Art Sale photographers in film or digital For a $50 ticket purchase, you will photography.  Monetary prizes totaling come pick from numerous original, $2000 will be awarded including Best one-of-a-kind pieces of artwork created of Show in both the nature and fine by Art Center members. The fun will art categories.  be trying to guess which member is the September 8 – October 14 actual artist of the piece.  Pear Street Painters Exhibit November 17-January 4 Come celebrate the extraordinary Holiday Show & Sale creations of fellow artists from the Pear Find that perfect, unique holiday Street Painters in Rome, GA as they gift as you shop from items created exhibit their work. from one of The Art Center’s 600+ September 14-16 member artists. Remember, if you are Fall Plein Aire Event a member you will receive 10% off any Come paint, sketch or pastel your own purchase over $35. rendition of local scenery September Find out more at www.blueridgearts.net, 14-16, or come enjoy the exhibit of call (706) 632-2144 Tuesday through local art which will be on display Saturday, or e-mail  brmaa@etcmail. September 16-28. com for dates and times on any of the September 29 – January 4 Summer Youth Camp classes.   The Art of Marsha Hamba Savage

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Strings & Stitches Yarn Shop Summer Classes Basic Socks Tuesdays 10-12noon Beginning Knit(3) Weds 10:30-12 Thurs 5:30-7pm Sats 10:30-12 Beginning Crochet private Pick a Project

Strings & Stitches in Ellijay, GA prizes totaling $2000. Let the clicking of needles sooth you this summer as you sit by the river. Strings and Stitches Yarn Shoppe in Ellijay is the largest yarn shop in north Georgia and continually offers classes during the summer in knitting and crocheting.  The owners, Janice and Karen Moss, bring in teachers from all over the area to teach everything from basic knitting to lace and intarsia (creating patterns with multiple colors). Knitting and crocheting is a timehonored tradition for both women and men.  It’s also a chance to create art that 20

June 5th Nancy will do a one day class on the beaded scallop scarf. This is a favorite of Nancy's knit group in FL! Come pick your yarn and head over to the bead shop to match your beads. $15 for class. Other supplies at S&S. June 19th Nancy will do a crochet scarf, fit for a beginning crocheter. This one class event will help improve your basic skills. $15 for class. S&S supplies you can wear or give as treasured gifts. Don’t miss your chance to learn how to make socks, throws, shawls and more this summer at Strings and Stitches! For class information or directions, call (706) 698-KNIT or visit them online at www.stringsandstitches.com.

Picnic Take your family on a classic picnic. Whether it’s for a downtown concert like the ones in Woodstock or a blanket by the lake, picnicking is a great time

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to bond with each other. For a new idea, have each person bring a new recipe so everyone can share or simply save time by picking up take-out. Bring a game of cards or some swimsuits to add more fun to the mix!

Cruising in Cars Come show off your car this summer! Most towns in the north Georgia area have antique car clubs and Jasper is no different. This summer, don’t miss the Jasper Main Street Cruise-In, sponsored by the Jasper Merchants Association. The cruise-ins are held the 4th Saturday of the month and this year will run May-October. The refreshment stand will have hotdogs, hamburgers, chips, drinks and pies or cakes to sell. There will also be 50/50 drawing- where the winner gets half and the charity working gets the other half. All is free to the public. For more information, call (706) 692-2031 or (770) 359-7588.

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Theater One of the most personal entertainments you will find this summer is the home-spun theater productions in the area. Ellijay’s Apple Mountain Playhouse has not only the play Tom Sawyer planned, but week camps for children. If you live in the area and want to participate, auditions are held throughout the year. There is a similar program further north with the Blue Ridge Community Theater, in Woodstock, Canton and in Dahlonega with the historic Holly Theater. Farmer’s Markets Each weekend, almost every town in the area opens up a farmer’s market. Locally grown plants, produce and crafts line tables. It’s a great opportunity to sample new items and find unique ideas for your next project. For more information about what markets are open and directions, call the local chamber of commerce. Check out our events calendar for the submitted ones.

Hometown Fun Each downtown area in north Georgia has its own events and usually the chamber of commerce can help. Ellijay recently started the fabulous “First Fridays” held in the downtown square. Enjoy live music, local artists, and craft vendors in the historic atmosphere.

Visitors can shop late in the fabulous local shops and restaurants. On June 2 & 3, downtown Woodstock will host a Wing & Rock Fest starting at noon. With an eating competition, arts and crafts and a kids play zone, it's a family event not to be missed! Woodstock Summer Concert Series will be presenting Blackberry Smoke on June 9 and a Jimmy Buffet Tribute Band July 14. Put on your dancing shoes for the best community concert series in the state! The July 6 "Tour de Main" is a repeat of last year's popular bicycle parade on Main St.

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This event will celebrate all things relating to cycling. Finally, don't miss the July 4 Freedom Fest with a HUGE parade. On that note, almost every town in the area will be having their own celebration for the 4th of July, usually with parades and cook-outs. Whichever county you choose to visit, make sure and call ahead for reservations and exact times.

Ride the Rails All aboard! In its fourteenth season of operation, the Blue Ridge Scenic Railway is one of the biggest attractions in the north Georgia area. With over 100 volunteers who function as conductors, train crews and car hosts, most volunteers start from a love of trains but soon realize the fun of the BRSR is in interacting with the passengers. The ride 22

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travels in the Toccoa River valley with most of the excursion along the river. The BRSR offers a variety of special trips including twilight trips, Easter Egg hunts, pumpkin pickings, a Firecracker Special and the Santa Express in December. They also offer night trains to Santa’s village on Saturdays in December. The train consists of 11 cars and 2 locomotives. 3 of the cars are open air, 1 is the concession car and 6 are climate controlled coaches. The newest addition is a handicap accessible combination open air and enclosed coach. Wheel chairs lifts can accommodate up to 750 lbs. Capacity of the entire train is 525 passengers. Passengers are assigned a car based on their choice of either enclosed coach or open air car. They can also choose to walk the entire train to view each of the vintage railcars. Restrooms are on board and a concession car provides snacks, popcorn, hot pretzels, hot and cold beverages and some souvenirs. The excursion is a total of 26 miles on the old L & N line from Blue Ridge to McCaysville, GA / Copperhill, TN. The typical trip is 4 hours, made at a leisurely pace of 10-15 miles per hour. July, October and December trips are extremely popular so reservations are strongly encouraged as numerous trips sell out. Passengers are welcome to bring small coolers and a picnic lunch on board or they can purchase lunch in McCaysville / Copperhill at one of several restaurants. Box lunches can also be provided with advance reservations.

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A recipes C

Summer Herbs Easy Mint Tea

This aromatic herb, which proliferates in warm months, can do far more than freshen up a table. Mint can do wonders for digestion, soothe the skin, and sweeten the breath. Try it in this sweet and savory recipe. 2 tablespoons agave nectar 4 ounces fresh mint (1 large bunch), leaves and stems 2 strips lemon zest, about Âź by 2 inches each In a teapot or large measuring cup, combine agave nectar, mint, and lemon zest. Top with 4 cups boiling water and stir to combine. Steep for 5 minutes and strain. Serve hot or over ice.

Mint Water

submitted by Andrea Hinda, Chamomile Retreat in Ellijay 1 or 2 sprigs of fresh mint 8 oz water, cold OR Handful fresh mint One gallon water

1/8 teaspoon salt 1/8 teaspoon pepper In a large bowl, combine all ingredients. Cover and refrigerate for 1 hour. Serve with fresh vegetables.

Steep for half hour or longer to taste. Absolutely refreshing!

Creamy Herb Dip

Balsamic Herb Vinaigrette 1/3 cup olive oil or salad oil

So smooth you'll be tempted to eat it with everything. This creamy dip is delicious paired with fresh vegetables. 3/4 cup Greek yogurt 3/4 cup sour cream 1/4 cup minced fresh parsley 1/4 cup minced chives 2 tablespoons minced fresh dill 1 tablespoon lemon juice 2 teaspoons minced garlic

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Appalachian Country

1/3 cup white or red wine vinegar, rice vinegar, or white vinegar 1 - 2 teaspoons sugar 1 tablespoon snipped fresh thyme, oregano, or basil, or 12 teaspoon dried thyme, oregano, or basil, crushed 1/4 teaspoon dry mustard or 1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard 1 clove garlic, minced www.acmagazine.org

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1/8 teaspoon black pepper 1/3 cup olive oil 1/3 cup balsamic vinegar 1 or 2 teaspoons sugar 1 tablespoon each snipped fresh thyme, oregano, and basil 1 teaspoon Dijon-style mustard 1 clove garlic, minced 1/8 teaspoon black pepper In a screw-top jar combine all ingredients. Cover and shake well. Serve immediately or store covered in refrigerator for up to 3 days if using fresh herbs. Stir or shake well before using.

Rosemary Bread

Rosemary is incredibly versatile. Toss whole sprigs onto hot coals to add flavor when you grill, use the tough stems as skewers, or use the leaves to flavor some of the most mouth-watering dishes you’ll find. If you’ve ever eaten at Macaroni Grill and loved the bread, this recipe is the one you’ll want to try first. Pair it with some olive oil and freshly ground black pepper and you may not make it to the main course. 1 cup water 24

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3 tablespoons olive oil 1 1/2 teaspoons white sugar 1 1/2 teaspoons salt 1/4 teaspoon Italian seasoning 1/4 teaspoon ground black pepper 1 tablespoon dried rosemary

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2 1/2 cups bread flour 1 1/2 teaspoons active dry yeast Place ingredients in the pan of the bread machine in the order recommended by the manufacturer. Select white bread cycle; press Start.

Grilled Mangoes with Herb Dressing

Mangoes are a terrific fruit to pair with the spicy kick that jalapenos bring to a dish. Cilantro is high in antioxidants and fiber, bringing a fresh taste to anything. 2 mangoes, peeled, pitted, and sliced into 1/4-inch slices 3 jalapeno peppers 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped cilantro 1 tablespoon coarsely chopped shallots ½ tsp. garlic, minced 2 tablespoons fresh lemon juice Kosher salt and freshly ground black pepper 3 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil Prepare a stove-top griddle or outdoor grill for mangoes. Meanwhile, in a nonstick saucepan, roast the jalapenos over high heat until the skins char. Turn the heat off, cover the pan, and set aside for 5 minutes. Peel the cooled jalapenos and remove the stems. Slice lengthwise and, over a small bowl, scrape out seeds and discard while allowing the juices to collect in the bowl. Add the cilantro, shallots, lemon juice, and salt and pepper Coarse salt and freshly ground black pepper 2 teaspoons ground cumin 2 garlic cloves, minced 1 cup uncooked Kashi 7 Whole Grain Pilaf 2 bay leaves 3 tablespoons fresh lemon juice 8 cherry tomatoes, quartered 5 tablespoons sliced natural almonds, divided 1/4 cup chopped fresh mint 1/4 cup chopped parsley 4 large romaine leaves

to the bowl and whisk to combine. Whisk in the olive oil. Grill mangoes two minutes on each side and transfer to serving dish. Drizzle jalapeno dressing over grilled mangoes and serve immediately.

Almond Lettuce Wrap 4 tablespoons extra-virgin olive oil, divided 1 small onion, finely chopped

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In a large saucepan, heat 2 tablespoons oil over medium heat. Add onion and season with salt and pepper. Cook until tender and lightly browned, stirring occasionally, about 5 minutes. Add cumin and garlic and cook until fragrant, about 1 minute. Add Kashi, 2 cups water, and bay leaves; season with salt and pepper. Bring to a boil, reduce heat to a bare simmer, cover, and cook until Kashi is tender, about 40 minutes (check occasionally to make sure Kashi isn't sticking; add water if needed). Transfer to bowl; remove and discard bay leaves. Add lemon juice and remaining oil and cool to room temperature, about 20 minutes. Taste and adjust seasonings if necessary. Add tomatoes, 4 tablespoons almonds, mint, and parsley. Toss well. Place a romaine leaf on each of four plates. Spoon mixture into center of the leaves. Sprinkle with remaining tablespoon of almonds.

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A feature C

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Mid-Summer's

Light by Diana Garber

Our deepest appreciation to the Bent Tree Community Inc. in Jasper, Georgia for allowing us to photograph at the Lake Tamarack Spillway Area.

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E

very light in a home tells a story. It can suggest fun and flighty or cozy and comfortable, or anything in between. A lighting fixture’s presentation reflects its owner’s personality. Some people want simple, some want ornate, and with so many choices out there it can be hard to find something perfect. For the creative person in the Georgia mountains, there is always Mountain Wild furniture and fixtures. From cabinets to lamps, they are appealing and artistic. Mountain Wild Lighting takes center stage as it illuminates the ambiance of a typical heirloom style home. In the past, nostalgic people who wanted to give a new look on their lighting fixtures would travel to an antique shop and find something that could be converted into a piece of lighting to give an impression of country or old style. It was expensive to resort to fully embellished fixtures that depicted the desired classic elegance from within. But with the advent of Mountain Wild decor and rustic lighting, home owners can have a rustic-heirloom style home with furniture and fixtures available in the market today. Mountain Wild Lighting is popular for many reasons:

1. It is readily available for renovation needs. Lighting is an easy (and fast) addition to modify a home’s design. With Mountain Wild Lighting, people can easily obtain their desired look and ambiance for any room in the house. 2. Mountain Wild Lighting installs in 28

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a modern home without adjustments. Options like soft diffuse lights or indoor/ outdoor floodlights (which come in a stylish neutral housing and easy-to-adjust orientation) help homeowners have the peace of mind that comes with modern technology. With a wide variety of styles and sizes available, it is easy to make use of a wall-mounted fixture with dual light sources that can be individually operated for direct or indirect lighting. 3. Mountain Wild Lighting depicts life in the olden days. Along with illumination, memories of the past come to mind with the old-fashioned ambiance of these lights. Generally, people who choose Mountain Wild furnishings want to escape the fast and mind-boggling development of today’s fast-paced world. With carefully selected lighting, they are surrounded by reminders of a slower, peaceful time. 4. A Mountain Wild Lighting fixture is an eye-catching decoration that combines all the basic concepts of beauty and creativity rolled into one. Its unique design is truly an exceptional feature that cannot be seen in other modern lighting fixtures available in the market today. 5. Mountain Wild Lighting makes a statement about one’s history. There are some pieces of Mountain Wild lighting that speak about history itself. For example,

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a pair of elk lamps present an original art work from a historically famous artist. They feature a rustic design made from rusted steel. By incorporating history in its designs, Mountain Wild gives the appearance of times gone by.

artisans who specialize in handcrafting the heirloom quality furniture that makes up the Mountain Wild collection. They frequently accept customized orders and personalized designs, while offering only the highest quality, making them easily beat most commercially-available models. Mountain Wild creates quiet corners both indoors and outdoors. The first step in planning is to consider your needs and wants. Evaluate the following – activity (indoor and outdoor), people involved, equipment, lighting, storage, time spent per week, and so on. That will help you come up with a list of priorities that, ideally, includes something for everyone.

6. Mountain Wild Lighting gives warmth to every home. It does not just provide proper illumination but also warmth and a feeling of comfort. Mountain Wild lighting makes a home’s occupants feel the snug and comfy way of living. 7. Mountain Wild Lighting can project a cabin look in your home. Even if a homeowner doesn’t live in a log home, lights give the impression of a cabin and the ambiance of what it feels like to be in the woods. Lighting is just one of the advantages of Mountain Wild Furniture, the collection that serves households well both for indoor and outdoor purposes. They are the special pieces that turn into family heirlooms passed down through generations. Lakota Cove in Jasper, Georgia has many

Some of the most popular heirloom Mountain Wild Furniture pieces:

Patio Furniture – under a porch or outside in the weather. They come in different variations like lamps, tables, chairs, beds, benches and desks. Ranch, Western & Primitive Style Indoor Furniture – hand-carved and specially made in different parts of the country. Unique doesn’t begin to describe it. Rustic touches in the garden - add the finishing bits to the garden, like bringing color to bird houses and feeders. Most of these items are pieces such as decorative wall tile plaques, pottery, planters, or statuary.

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Assess what kind of image your home is most likely to project. Is it conducive to fun activities like making music, painting pictures, exercising, running a home business or pursuing any number of other do-it-yourself projects? If you’re worried about the season of fashion – don't. Heirloom style rustic furnishings aren’t just a fad or fashion...they are forever. Lakota Cove is located at 230 Old Mill White Rd. Ext. Jasper, Ga. For more information, visit www. LakotaCove.com or call (770) 893-3495. www.acmagazine.org

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A shopping C

A Treasure Hunter's Dream by Betty Kossick

Shopping consignment is the smart way to shop in 2012. With Georgia’s economy still colorless, shoppers are constantly looking for values. Recycling gently used goods and furnishings makes living in style, often high-style, possible, even on a tight budget by not only buying but placing items for sale. A big plus is that a shopper can find high quality items for a pittance compared to retail. An added bonus is that shopping green is an enjoyable way to add home dÊcor or fashion wear. The frugality of the hunt is rewarding!


beaded display dolls and kid’s kinds of lighting.

Tucci's Consignment

Tucci’s Consignment Store

The Consignment Revolution is Here 10,000 items carefully displayed throughout 45,000 total square feet in two locations are the pride of what owner Shelly Santucci and Diana von Seeger offer customers. Customers will find uncommon antiques and vintage pieces to stylish contemporary items. “We are not a thrift store; we carry only very select, handpicked merchandise.” On average, 1,000 items are stocked each week. Minutely used staging furniture from model homes are popular sales, and popular brands include Ethan Allen, Havarti’s, Kris, Thomasville and others. Tucci’s carries area consignment upholsterer's work with special order sofa fabrics – and brand-new Atlanta produced mattresses. A kid’s home décor area is alive with kid-speak bling: foam art, signage, hand

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Customers of Tucci’s benefit from the backgrounds of both Shelly, who grew up with her parents’ antique business in Pennsylvania and earned a prominent role in real estate, and world-traveler Diana, who is Tucci’s main buyer. Diana lived several years in France and says, “I was bathed with the culture of the Renaissance.” Then she crossed the globe to New Mexico to indulge in a career in furniture, where she met Shelley. With their mutual dream-come-true, north Georgia now benefits from their business visions. Tucci’s isn’t just a business, it’s an amazing shopping experience.

Woodstock Market

A knowledgeable, non-commission trained customer-service staff serves Tucci’s customers with professional assistance in home interior design. In-store service is free, in-home is a minimal fee. In addition, Tucci’s is open seven days a week and offers military, senior citizen, and fellow designers discounts; 50/50 consignment split; as well as financing options and layaways, with delivery service for customers and pick up for consignors. Frequent shoppers can earn a 10 percent off voucher for one item after 10 store visits. “Furniture doesn’t just fill your home, it enriches your life,” Shelly says. Tucci’s invites first-time consignors, and covers the sales spectrum from an entire estate to just one special piece. Locations: 1155 Barrett Parkway, Kennesaw, 770-429-5550, Fax: 770- 429-555, and 10500 Alpharetta Highway, Roswell, 770-998-2226, Fax: 770-998-2252, info@mytuccis.com.

Woodstock Market

The Gathering Place for Inspired Living Woodstock Market’s Karen Bennett points Appalachian Country

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Fun Finds & Designs

out the store’s varied choices: a mix of vintage, antiques, collectibles, art work, woodwork, handcrafted furniture and décor, repurposed pieces, handmade jewelry, and boutique clothing. More than 100 individual dealers grow their businesses with Woodstock Market. In addition, the store offers the following services: interior design and decorating, lamp and clock repair, custom built furniture and furniture repair and restoration to name a few.

Quality unique items that you don’t see everywhere are what Betty Anderson offers consignment shoppers at the popular Fun Finds & Designs in Canton. Customer service, in-house design, quarterly design workshops that include a wine and dessert buffet, Frequent Shopper Cards, and outstanding furniture displays are what Betty Anderson assures savvy shoppers. “We have something ‘on sale’ every day.”

“Artist’s Market and Antique Show” the first weekend of each month, “Junk Day” parking lot sales, and monthly auctions all draw crowds. “You never know what pleasant surprises you’ll find,” she enthuses about the merchandise she consigns. It’s not likely that anyone will browse Woodstock Market without discovering a must-have item. Location: 5550 Bells Ferry Rd., Acworth, 770-517-7771, www.woodstockmarket.com.

Betty is known for the fun-time Consignment Bus Tours she coordinates. “We load up a bus and travel to several different consignment stores in the area—and lunch is provided.” She adds that consignment shopping is the creative way to shop, in addition to saving pennies-on-the dollar, compared to retail. Many consignment shoppers are also consignors. Anderson notes, “Be smart. Recycle, repurpose and respect your wallet.” Location: 265 Marietta Hwy., Canton, 770-704-0448, www. FunFindsandDesigns.com.

Fun Finds & Designs No Exaggeration About the Fun or Savings 32

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Woodstock Antiques and Consignment The Best Kept Secret is Out Appalachian Country

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Woodstock Antiques & Consignment

Customer service is the byword at Woodstock Antiques and Consignment. In addition to offering customers a mix of antiques with a hint of the new and current trends, specialized assistance is available from Bob Schulte. Services include antique, vintage clock repair, on-site jewelry laser repair and customer design by master goldsmith Fabio Mendez and jeweler Stan Cochran. Vintage Event Rental, within the store, offers farm tables, church pews, and chandeliers for weddings, parties and other events. Holding major events such as an annual storewide extravaganza draws crowds. Every September they “give back” to their customers, with 20 percent off every item in the store.

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Woodstock Antiques and Consignment owners Suzie Chinal and Kimberly London Posey hold rules for their success: “Keep God first,” and “Do unto Others…” As antique collectors, Suzie and Kimberly possess a combined enthusiastic, knowledgeable base to help customers find just the right items they are searching for. Their entire staff promises to work hard for both customers and consignors. An added rare feature for upscale stores is this, “We are ‘dog friendly’ here.” Location: 5643 Bells Ferry Road, Acworth, 678-445-7861, www.woodtstockantiques.net.

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Chocolate Moose in Dawsonville, GA

Chocolate Moose

There’s Fun in the Hunt!

Owner Diane Cowart of Chocolate Moose points out that there are three things that draw consignment buyers and bring them back. First, a beautiful mix for everyone’s taste; second, the excellent quality; and third, the financial savings. Whether you are setting up a first time home, furnishing a college dorm or a child’s playroom, or looking for any other creative décor desired in the place called home, consignment is the place to start. Chocolate Moose has a good mix of antiques, casual, inexpensive or quality furniture heirlooms for the home. It’s a shopper’s paradise. Much of the store’s merchandise is casual elegance at its best. “Particular” is how Diane describes the consignment stock. Hint: Customers are known to fall in love with Chocolate Moose! In addition to the price-tag bargains, there are other incentives that add to the savings: frequent shoppers cards and item discounted 10-20-30 percent 34

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Interiors in Ellijay, GA

and consulting services, including window treatments and bedding. “Whatever your needs, we do our best to please,” Diane assures. Location: 4055 Hwy. 53-E, Dawsonville, 706-265-1990, www. chocolatemoose.biz

Interiors

Consignment at its Finest at 30, 60, and 90 days, respectively. Turnover is usually quick and very few items return to the consignor after 120 days. There is a generous 40/60 split, as well as store credit with discounts for consignors. The consignment area of Chocolate Moose is adjacent to the retail part of the store and offers the same design

Consignment art, Christmas House, Plus Elaine Westmoreland's reputation as a business woman provides a five-star vote to Interiors of Ellijay. Discriminating customers find incredible consignment artwork in most of its forms, direct from the artists, at the wooing Victorian century cottage in Ellijay’s antique district. The consignment sales also highlight

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Appalachian Country

singular designs in children’s clothing. Shopping at Interiors is like entering a fantasy land; the sighs don’t stop. Though many lovely items for various holidays are featured, an abundance of adorned Christmas trees in The Christmas House portion of the cottage are the main eye captors. The Fontanini collection of heirloom nativity figures and scenes is magnificent. Every summer it’s Christmas in July, with the vintage home lit up and decorated. All decorations are on sale, with the special 2012 event scheduled for July 3 and 4. Offerings throughout the historic house cover a spectrum from rustic cabin to elegant dish ware. Fragrances of potpourri, candles and lotions pamper shopper’s senses. In addition, registries for brides- and babies–to-be are popular. Location: 98 River St., Ellijay, 706276-7000, Fax: 706-276-7011, www. hellonorthgeorgia.com/Attractions/ TheChristmasHouseAndInteriors.html www.acmagazine.org

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A business C

Deli Delights L by Jillian Daniels

Last year, our readers read about and visited Madeline’s Café & Bakery in Jasper. (If you haven’t, what are you waiting for?) Droves of readers found out this charming eatery serves some of the most delicious soups, salads, sandwiches and desserts. Now the chefs and owners, Gerard Monte

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and Hector Rosano, have opened an adjacent gourmet deli and gift shop that complements the mouth-watering food served there. “So many customers asked for our cheeses and meats, it was natural to start

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including them in our restaurant,” says Hector. He smiles a bit sheepishly and admits, “It’s always been a dream of mine to have a deli.” At the deli, Gerard and Hector bring their Hollywood catering influence to a menu of ready-made items like imported cheeses, meats and olives. These are the same delicious ingredients used to make their restaurant food. They also carry a line of in-house homemade salad dressings, marinara and BBQ sauces, baked breads, cheese spreads and, of course, the now famous gigantic cakes like the Raspberry Almond Amaretto cake. Customers now have the ability to take home Madeline’s famous ingredients to satisfy cravings anytime they choose. Most customers notice the

eclectic atmosphere of Madeline’s, largely due to the decorating and dinnerware. So many people wanted to bring that feeling home with them that Hector and Gerard opened a delightful gift shop. It features the chefs’ “favorite things” like seasoned Virginia peanuts, Bloody Mary mix, French milled soaps, fragrant candles, vintage European print inspired kitchen towels, silver plate serving pieces, and entertaining and home décor. “We wanted our customers to have an outlet for purchasing hard to find items that make entertaining at home a treat,” says Gerard. The gourmet duo opened the deli and gift shop on May 10, and the grand opening is June 14, 15 and 16. They promise to feature samplings from many of the new dishes. “We want people to join us for lunch those days. Not only will they will receive a 10% discount on gift and deli purchases, but we will be able to celebrate with the people we care about.” Besides the deli and gift shop expansion there is one more addition—Millie’s Diner. Madeline’s was named after Gerard’s mother who was his catering inspiration; she had three sisters who also influenced his culinary background. So when he and Hector acquired their new location in Tate (at the intersection of Highways 53 and 108), it was only natural to name it Millie’s Diner after Madeline’s sister. The new location will feature

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comfort food favorites from the southeast to the southwest—lunch items like grilled meatloaf and jalapeno pimento cheese sandwiches. Millie’s will also serve breakfast all day. They expect to open in mid-July. Look for the announcement or go to www. madelinescafebakery.com to sign up for their email updates. Plan a trip to Jasper’s new hot spot that just got hotter! Madeline’s Café & Bakery is located at 1052 East Church Street in Jasper and is open for lunch Tuesday through Saturday from 11:00AM to 3:00PM. Breakfast is served on Saturday mornings from 8:00 to 10:45. Special occasion cakes, cupcakes and deli platters can be ordered through the café number at 706-253-1052. www.acmagazine.org

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A living C

History of a Chair

by Tristan Tuttle

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There are few pleasures as great as relaxing in the shade with a glass of sweet tea resting on the arm of your Adirondack chair. Most everyone knows what these chairs look like (and probably considered buying one for your front porch or garden), but very few know about the history behind the chair. Named after the Adirondack Mountains in upstate New York, these chairs have found wide popularity all over the world. In 1903, Thomas Lee began to design a chair that would allow his family to enjoy the mountainous views while sitting comfortably on unlevel terrain. The slanted seat and back design was already in use in the area, yet Lee’s design is what is now famous. In an attempt to help his friend Harry Bunnell make enough money to survive the winter, Lee suggested Bunnell take his design and build the chairs to sell. 38

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Without telling his friend, Bunnell filed for a patent in 1904 and began producing what he called The Westport Chair. This chair has a solid piece back as well as solid pieces for the arms and wide boards for the seat. Bunnell sold these chairs for 25 years in the mountains. Today, what we know as the Adirondack-style chair has evolved into something everyone recognizes as a symbol of relaxation and summertime fun. Although the north Georgia mountains are far from upstate New York, it is easy to find an affordable Adirondack chair right in the area. A great Adirondack chair for every budget can be found right here in the north Georgia mountains. Visit these stores and see fantastic choices in every price range. The next step? Deciding where to place the new chair! Happy relaxing!

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Mid-Range H i g Option d h e e c r i r Q P u a w l o ity L n o i Opti Opt on Ace Hardware in Ellijay carries plastic and wooden Adirondack chairs in several different colors for around $25. (Unstained wood chairs start around $30). The plastic chairs are stackable and made of an easy-to-clean material that is both durable and stylishly colored. Ace Hardware also carries matching ottomans. The chairs come in children’s sizes as well, so the whole family can enjoy the summer sun!

ACE Hardware is located at 305 South Main Street in Ellijay, Georgia. They can also be reached at (706) 635-2236. Is is possible to make an order online and have it delivered to the store. For more information, go online to www. acehardware.com.

House and Garden Boutique in Woodstock has great Adirondack furniture with uncompromising quality. Their chairs are handmade from pressure-treated pine with galvanized screws and are hand sanded. They are also available in every color and House and Garden Boutique can match house colors. Adirondack chairs start at $99. (Stained chairs $135, Benches $189, footstools $44, Swings w/ A-Frame $299, bar stools $119, and rocker $119). House and Garden Boutique also carries brand new children’s clothing, wooden indoor benches made from antique bed frames, handmade soaps, and Trapp and Tyler candles as well as decorative wine glasses, home decor accessories and trendy gifts. For jewelry, they have a jewelry appraisal business for wedding and engagement rings (as well as designing custom rings) and other fine jewelry. House and Garden Boutique is easily a onestop-shop for all of your home needs. Look for the giant Adirondack chair on Main Street in Woodstock and you’ll find House and Garden Boutique.

House & Garden is located at 103 Bowles Drive in Woodstock, GA. (678) 494-5800

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Lakota Cove in Jasper is full of beautiful furniture and home décor of the highest quality. Dedicated to the artistry and ingenuity of the American artisan, Lakota Cove only carries the best made pieces by truly great artists. For truly long-lasting furniture, try Lakota Cove’s recycled milk jug Adirondack chairs. These chairs are equivalent in weight and size to more traditional wood patio furniture. To make these pieces, milk jugs are melted, mixed with dye, and molded into 2x4 and 2x6 pieces. The great thing about using this material is there is no fear of cracking, rotting or splintering and they are designed to last a lifetime! Chairs start at $399.99 and gliders start at $599.99. This maintenance-free patio furniture does not fade and comes in 120 different styles and 9 colors; custom orders are always welcomed, of course. Lakota Cove is located at 230 Old Mill White Rd. Ext. in Jasper, GA (770) 410-1315

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A profile C In Their Shoes

A day in the life of an oil painting artist by Andrew Thomas

Currently there are two of Denis Byrd’s pieces on display at the Georgia governor’s office. At 34 years old, he has been featured as one of Atlanta’s up and coming artists. Just a look at his wildly demure works of art shows his love of nature. What is your typical day like? My morning starts off painting, either inside the studio or outside (plein air). Depending on what I am working on I might paint a few hours or all day. I teach classes as well as coach competitive swimming so I will sometimes have to arrange my painting time around this schedule. Often when I paint plein air I am visiting one of the many state or national parks in Georgia. Some of my favorite spots include the area around Carter’s Lake, Sope Creek in Atlanta, or Fort Mountain. What attracted you to art as a career? I have always drawn, ever since I can remember and I started painting in high school. I have always been attracted to classical painting and sculpture. Seeing these pieces I wanted to emulate them and create something

that possessed so much beauty and feeling. I love creating a beautiful painting then being able to share it with others. What medium do you prefer and why? Oil is my preferred medium. I love the texture and the feel and it has a long history as a prominent medium. I actually find it is the most forgiving and lends itself to easy correction. Simply wipe it off or paint over it. I have tried various other mediums. They all have their pros and cons. I do particularly enjoy etching and find its sensitive lines are similar to drawing with a brush. Ultimately I always come

back to oil, it speaks to me the way no other medium does. What are you currently doing? I just participated in the BOWs Art Auction for Art Sandy Springs and am preparing for my second year at the 2012 Emerging Artist Show at Anne Irwin Fine Art in Atlanta. In addition to the upcoming show I am working on several pieces, both plein air and studio work showcasing the various landscapes native to Georgia. These will be compiled into a book scheduled to be released sometime next year. I also will be teaching a workshop in the fall, intro to landscape painting.

"Wine Country" 16" x 20" oil on canvas.

June/July 2012

Appalachian Country

What do you look for in a good art student when you teach classes? I have taught classes in the Atlanta area for several years, most recently at a senior center near the airport. Currently I am focusing on workshops which offer an intensive format for a weekend or longer. My next work shop will be September 14 – 16 in McDonough, Ga. ( ). Generally I find the best students are those eager to learn and have a willingness to embrace new ideas. Sometimes we are our own www.acmagazine.org

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biggest obstacle when it comes to learning something new. As an artist you have to retrain yourself how to see and be sensitive to color and design. This all comes with experience and good guidance. I feel anyone can learn how to paint well and it doesn’t matter what age they start either.

glorious failure. The more you are working with the materials the more comfortable you will become. I keep several small canvases handy for quick paintings. In fact, I have hundreds of small paintings that will never see the light of day but they were valuable steps in the learning process. I have What advice found that the would you more I paint give someone the faster I interested in progress. If you exploring their are drawing artistic side? then draw a The key is lot, painting consistency and then paint a perseverance. It lot. Whatever takes time to learn medium you how to control are using work the materials and at it as often as you only learn you can. To see that by doing. It more of Denis’ doesn’t have to work, check out be a masterpiece his website at sometimes you www.denisbyrd. can learn com. "Morning Fog" 16" x 20" oil on canvas. more from a 42

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Appalachian Country

June/July 2012


A event C

Relief for the Hectic Life:

Blairsville's Butternut Creek Festival by Gene Harrison

L

Life is often hectic and overwhelming, but there is relief the natural way, without medications. Nature's remedy is a get-away weekend to the mountains of north Georgia.

The setting is ideal, with the 70 invited exhibitor booths nestled under majestic trees along the banks of meandering Butternut

Admission and parking are FREE. Also for your convenience, a FREE shuttle service will be operating between parking lots and the festival area, all day, both days. The food will be great. Several food vendors will provide a range of lunch and snack selections for your pleasure. Very talented musical performers will be singing and playing for your enjoyment in the gazebo, located in the heart of the festival area. Covered seating areas are available for your rest and relaxation.

The change of scenery alone works wonders, but even better is coming up July 21-22, 2012 for the 14th Annual Butternut Creek Festival in Blairsville. This is not just any old summer arts and crafts show. For the fourth consecutive year this is one of the “Top 20 Events in the Southeast� as determined by the Southeastern Tourism Society. Last year over 10,000 people attended.

June/July 2012

Creek, surrounded by the Georgia Appalachian Mountains. The artists and crafters participating are the best in the Southeast. Each has been carefully juried to ensure the quality of their work and to achieve a balanced presentation of unique and original art and handcrafted items.

This highly successful and eagerly awaited arts and crafts show is sponsored by the High Country Artisans, Inc., a non-profit local Appalachian Country

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arts group of fewer than 20 members. In addition to artistic exhibitors, there will be several mountain arts demonstrators and four community service booths: annual bake sale of the Union General Hospital Auxiliary, quilting demonstrations by the Misty Mountain Quilt Guild, a quilt raffle by Friends of the Union County Library, and talented artists of the Union County Senior Center. The Festival will be held in Meeks Park. The park is located on the south side of Highway 76/515, 0.7 mile west of the Highway 19/129 intersection. The park entrance is directly across the highway from the North Georgia Technical College campus. There will be public safety officers directing traffic. The festival hours are 10:00 a.m. to 5 p.m. both days. The Meeks Park setting includes playgrounds, walking trails, and picnic facilities. The 14th Butternut Creek Festival is THE arts and crafts show NOT to be missed! Come early, relax in the lovely location, have lunch, enjoy the talented musical performances and demonstrations, stay late, and share in the good life. For additional information, go to butternutcreekfestival.com, email butternutcreekfestival@gmail.com or call 706-781-1221.

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Appalachian Country

June/July 2012


SUNDAY

June MONDAY

TUESDAY

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY

Definition Index: GAHA: Gilmer Arts & Heritage (Ellijay) 706-635-5605 BRMAA: Blue Ridge Mountain Arts Association (Blue Ridge) DC: Downtown Canton; DBR: Downtown Blue Ridge; DE:Downtown Ellijay; DJ: Downtown Jasper; DW: Downtown Woodstock; DBG: Downtown Ball Ground

DW Wing&Rock Fest

3

4

10

Blairsville Scottish Festival @ Meeks Park 9am

Quilt Exhibit @ BRMAA thru July 6 706-632-2144 Motorcycle Photo Exhibit @ BRMAA thru July 6 US Marine Band Concert @ BRMAA 706-632-2144

17

11

Children's Theater Camp in BR thru June 23

5

12

Quilt Exhibit @ BRMAA thru July 6 706-632-2144

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

18

GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20

19

Children's Theater Camp in BR thru June 23

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

Fabulous First Friday @ VanGoghs in Jasper 5-7pm 404-580-5013 DW Main St. Luau Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am First Fridays Celebration in Downtown Ellijay

7

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

20

8

GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20 DW Tour de Main Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am

13

GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20 Children's Art Classes GAHA w/Kathy Shaw

1

80's night DW 6-9pm

6

Children's Theater Camp in BR thru June 23 Motorcycle Photo Exhibit @ BRMAA thru July 6

FRIDAY

14 GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20 Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm Cherry Log Blue Grass Pickin@Senior Center in Ellijay

21

Quilt Exhibit @ BRMAA thru July 6 706-632-2144 Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

Ellijay Garden Club Flower Show GAHA

15

Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am

22

Children's Theater Camp in BR thru June 23 Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am

24

25

Quilt Exhibit @ BRMAA thru July 6 706-632-2144

26

Summer Youth Art Camp @ BRMAA thru July 19

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

SUNDAY 1

MONDAY 2

Quilt Exhibit @ BRMAA thru Motorcycle Photo Exhibit @ July 6 706-632-2144 BRMAA thru July 6

TUESDAY 3

Christmas in July at Interiors in Ellijay

Art of Toneeke @ BRMAA Summer Youth Art Camp 706-632-2144 thru Sept 21 @ BRMAA thru July 19 Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

27

Motorcycle Photo Exhibit @ BRMAA thru July 6 Children's Art Classes GAHA w/Kathy Shaw

28

GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20 Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

WEDNESDAY THURSDAY 4 Quilt Exhibit @ BRMAA5thru

Ellijay Parade &Fireworks Christmas in July at Interiors in Ellijay Independence Day @ Vogel State Park Fireworks @ Blairsville Meeks Park DW Freedom Fest

July 6 706-632-2144

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am DW Farmer's Market DW Wing&Rock Fest Plein Air Class GAHA

9

Blairsville Scottish Festival @ Meeks Park 9am Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am Plein Air Class GAHA DW Blackberry Smoke Concert @ City Park

16

Plein Air Class GAHA

Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am DW Farmer's Market

Ellijay Garden Club Flower Show GAHA Maxwell Taylor Concert @ BRMAA 706-632-2144

23

Mountain Fling @North GA Technical College Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am

DW Farmer's Market Cancer Benefit Ride @ Gilmer Saddle Club BRMAA Show

Watercolor Class @ GAHA

Mountain Fling @North GA Technical College

SATURDAY 2

29

Summer Youth Art Camp @ BRMAA thru July 19 Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am

FRIDAY Fabulous First Friday 6

@ VanGoghs in Jasper 5-7pm 404-580-5013 Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am

30

Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am DW Farmer's Market

SATURDAY 7

Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am DW Farmer's Market

First Fridays Celebration in Downtown Ellijay

Independence Day

8 Art of Toneeke @ BRMAA 706-632-2144 thru Sept 21

9

GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20

16

15

Summer Youth Art Camp Art of Toneeke @ BRMAA 706-632-2144 thru Sept 21 @ BRMAA thru July 19 Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

29

Green Bean Festival in Downtown Blairsville, GA

12

July GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20

13

Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am

23 Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

30

17

24

18

GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20 Summer Youth Art Camp @ BRMAA thru July 19 Children's Art Classes GAHA w/Kathy Shaw

25

Children's Art Classes GAHA w/Kathy Shaw

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

19

26

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

14 Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am DW Farmer's Market DW A1A Concert @ City Park

20

GAHA Juried Art Show in Ellijay thru July 20 Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am

27

Art w/Mark Menendez @ GAHA in Ellijay 10am

DW Farmer's Market

21

Butternut Creek Festival @ Meeks Park in Blairsville Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am Gilmer Saddle Club Racking Show

28

DW Farmer's Market Green Bean Festival in Downtown Blairsville, GA Gilmer Farmer's Market on Ellijay Square 8am Gilmer Saddle Club Horse Show

31

Art of Toneeke @ BRMAA 706-632-2144 thru Sept 21

June/July 2012

Appalachian Country

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Arts & Events

Butternut Creek Festival @ Meeks Park in Blairsville

11

Children's Art Classes GAHA w/Kathy Shaw

Cherry Log Blue Grass Pickin@Senior Center in Ellijay

Drawing Classes @ GAHA 6pm

22

10

Summer Youth Art Camp @ BRMAA thru July 19


Business Index Antiques & Consignment Antique Village Mall............................................... 678-493-0847 Tucci's Consignment....................770-429-5550 or 770-998-2226 Woodstock Market.................................................770-517-7771 Woodstock Antiques & Consignment.......................678-445-7861 Arts & Events Blue Ridge Mtn. Arts Association............................. 770-632-2144 Digital Escapes.......................................................678-379-3476 VanGoghs Hideaway..............................................404-580-5013 Attorneys John E. Mahan Atty at Law...................................... 706-635-5955 Automotive Ellijay Tire.............................................................. 706-635-2322 T & C Customs.........................................................770-479-7637 Banking Community & Southern Bank................................... 706-276-8000 United Community Bank.......................................... 706-635-5411 Builders Lakota Cove/Tennessee Log Homes.......................... 770-893-3495 Witt Building Company...........................................706-889-2480 Cabin Rentals/Lodging Chamomile Retreat...................................................404-909-9303 My Mountain Cabin Rentals.....................................800-844-4939 Stress Buster Vacation Rentals.................................. 706-635-3952 KZ Cabin Rentals............................................... 706-229-4694 Fernbrook Inn..........................................................404-272-4177 Clothing & Accessories ACE Hardware.......................................................706-635-2236 Daisy Accessories & Boutique..................................706-253-6996 Communities Covered Bridge Estates............................................706-669-4177 Dental Services Jasper Family Dentistry............................................706-692-2646 Mountain Dental Associates..................................... 706-515-3500 Education Chattahoochee Technical College..............................770-528-4545 Jasper Christian School............................................770-401-9898 Pleasant Hills Montessori School............................. .706-636-3354 Elevators Blue Moose Elevators............................................. .866-797-5438 Festivals Butternut Creek Festival in Blairsville...........butternutcreekfestival.com Florists Artistic Creations.....................................................706-692-0044 Health Food Stores Natural Marketplace................................................706-253-6933 Health Program Choices in Jasper.....................................................770-401-9898 Home & Office Decor Chocolate Moose................................................706-265-1990 Fun Finds and Designs.............................................770-704-0448 House and Garden Boutique.................................678-494-5800 Interiors....................................................................706-276-7000 Lakota Cove....................................................... ....770-893-3495 Moore Furniture...................................................706-692-2031 Outdoor Living Porch & Patio....................................404-550-0270 Southern Grace.......................................................706-515-1090 Sycamore Crossing..................................................706.632.3366 Timeless Vanities.......................................................678-986-2379 Unique Kitchens...................................................... 706-253-6600 Wrapsody in Blue...................................................706-258-2700 Home Improvement A Affordable Garage Doors...................................678-294-4367 ACE Hardware......................................................770-635-2236 Witt Building Company...........................................706-889-2480 Indoor/Outdoor Activities Blue Ridge Scenic Railroad...................................706-632-8724 Camp Highland................................... ...................678-393-0300 Reel'em In Fishing Guide........................ .................706-273-0764 46

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Insurance Aflac..................................................................770-401-9898 Jewelry & Repair Daisy Accessories & Boutique...................................706-253-6996 North Georgia Diamond.......................................... 706-515-1551 Kitchen Supplies Unique Kitchens....................................................... 706-253-6600 Knitting Supplies Strings & Stitches..................................................... 706-698-5648 Marketing Inspired2Design.......................................................770-781-3452 Office Supplies One Source Business Products................................... 706-276-8273 Outdoor Decor & Supplies Blue Ridge Birdseed Company.................................. 706-258-BIRD Mountain Ridge Garden Center.............................706-698-2815 Pharmacy Jasper Drugs............................................................706-692-6427 Photographer Appalachian Photography........................................ 706-276-6991 Restaurants & Catering 61 Main.................................................................706-253-7289 Bumblebee's Bakery................................................706-946-2337 Charlie's Italian Restaurant & Pizzeria.................... ..706-635-2205 Millie's Diner.......................................................706-253-1052 Madeline's...............................................................706-253-1052 Mucho Kaliente........................................................706-636-4192 Poole's Barbeque.....................................................706-635-4100 Shane's Rib Shack.........................................706-635-RIBS (7427) Southern Twist..........................................................706-273-1631 Salons Magic Touch Hair Salon...........................................706-635-5325

Appalachian Country

June/July 2012


June/July 2012

Appalachian Country

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Appalachian Country Magazine June/July 2012  

The Premier Guide to Arts, Dining, Shopping & Events in the Southern Appalachian Mountains

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