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AUGUST 2012

ACHE


AUGUST 2012


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note from ACHE

a letter by the editorin-chief of ACHE to readers of the magazine.

p ho to gr ap h y parker fitzgerald

interview with our cover photographer, parker fitzgerald, twenty-eightyear-old from portland, oregon.

sophie van der perre we spoke with dutch photographer sophie van der perre, twentyfour-year-old from amsterdam.

lill-veronica skoglund

meet lill-veronica, twenty-one-year-old from bournemouth, england.

martina giammaria

martina, italian photographer from milan, shows us photographs that evoke soft femininity.

hanna kristina

twenty-one-year-old hanna kristina speaks with ACHE about her work.

m us ic what we’re listening to: thoughts ACHE’s playlist for a moment of introspection, including songs by bonobo and caribou.

what we’re listening to: hip-hop a playlist of songs by artists like a$ap rocky, kanye west, and jay-z.

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fashion sand on my skin

laura allard-fleischl brings us an editorial featuring model shanna jackway @ red11.

style icon: jenn im

jennifer, style guru of youtube channel clothes encounters, shares her thoughts on fashion, movies, and california.

straight talk

fashion editorial from lotte simmons features alex @ bookings.

style icon: amy scheepers

port elizabeth, south africa, brings us amy scheepers, twenty-twoyear-old photographer and lookbooker.

the sun sets in the city

emma lauren presents her editorial, shot with ana @ muse at dusk.

writing ashes

a short story by beatrice z. hart, nineteen-yearold from savannah, georgia.

misfit

a short story by beatrice z. hart, nineteen-yearold from savannah, georgia.

art pakayla biehn

ACHE presents pakayla biehn, san franciscan painter of a series of double exposures.

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CREDITS jackie luo, editor-in-chief jackie fu, editor cover by parker fitzgerald, featuring model meredith painting (p.001-002) by pakayla biehn painting (p. 003-004) by pakayla biehn “paranoid� font by kevin yuen kit lo special thanks to everyone who contributed work to the magazine!


welcome to issue #6 of ACHE magazine. hello, readers! it’s been a while since our last release, but we hope to be back on track for the next issue. we’re preparing for a busy new school year, and we hope to introduce you to more brilliant young people than ever. this issue includes a number of huge talents, including jenn im of the youtube channel clothes encounters, cover photographer parker fitzgerald, and painter of double exposures (including the one on this page!) pakayla biehn. as always, ACHE is looking for submissions from artists, designers, photographers, writers, bloggers, musicians, and more. we’re open to adding writers, photographers, and editors to our staff, so let us see samples of your work! to submit, send us your full name, age, city and state/country, and any other information we might need, along with your work.

weareachemagazine@gmail.com keep living young, keep making art, and keep reading ACHE.

love,

jackie luo editor-in-chief

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parker fitzgerald say hello to parker henry fitzgerald, twenty-eight-year-old photographer from portland, oregon. we’ve followed his work for a while, and now we’re bringing it to you!

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ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Parker Fitzgerald: I suppose it sounds overly grandiose, but I sincerely hope to convey a sense of transcendent beauty through my photos. I’ve never been too terribly concerned with selfexpression, and I think that the end purpose of art is to share aspects of the transcendent with others. C.S. Lewis once wrote of the painter that “light itself was your first love: you loved paint only as a means of telling about light.” I think this applies to me as a photographer. I want to tell others about light—I don’t care too particularly about which method I use to do so, but I do really enjoy photography. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? PF: I have been shooting seriously since late April of 2009. Since then, as might be expected, I’ve evolved considerably as a photographer. The first major change photographically, for me, was the switch from digital to film. I almost never shoot digitally these days for anything other than proofing. But that transition took me the better part of the last two years. During that time, I came into contact with all sorts of cameras, lenses, and films—all of which served to change and mold how I take pictures. I tend to get bored easily, so that has motivated me to keep searching for new and interesting ways to take photos. I feel like the second I start changing, that’s when irrelevancy has a way of setting in. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? PF: I don’t know if I’m the right one to answer this question! As a person, I’d say that I tend to be on the tall side, I may occasionally talk too much, and at times I might be a bit too cynical for my own good. But at the end of the day, I think I am well-grounded by my faith in God, a degree of intellectual curiosity, and the wise council of those around me whom I love (such as my brother James). As a photographer, I try to be earnest, unpretentious, and idyllic.

AM: Who or what inspires you? PF: Again, a hard question, if only because it is so important. Frankly stated, I am inspired to do what I do by what I believe. I am not too starryeyed about becoming famous or revolutionizing the industry or anything like that. I just hope to make a decent living by doing what I do and to be able to point others toward the divine with the work I create. Other than that, I can find inspiration in anything beautiful, good, true, or Japanese. AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? PF: Without a doubt, right now, I’d say that I’m most influenced by Autumn de Wilde. There are so many things that draw me to her work, and, more than any other photographer I know, she exemplifies what I hope to achieve professionally. I think the most impressive part about her is that she is able to move around in so many different genres of photography. She shoots heavily for both the entertainment and fashion industries and is able to walk a very distinct line between portrait, travel, and editorial photography and photojournalism. Adding to that, she still shoots a lot of film, and you have one awesome woman. I hope to be able to give her a hug one day. AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? PF: Achievement is such a fluid term. I constantly feel like I’m underachieving—especially for my age. Having said that, though, I think my biggest accomplishment thus far is just being able to build a business out of photography. It’s required so much self-educating to get to where I am, and I wouldn’t trade the experience for most things. But as for what I’d like to achieve, I hope to refine my shooting ability, create a more stable, more productive business, and develop my ability to conceptualize. As for the particulars, I suppose a lot of it is just about being wise enough to recognize opportunity and then being ambitious enough to move when you have to in order to take advantage of the situation.


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AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why?

AM: Last year, you shot with Amanda Seyfried! How did that happen?

PF: I prefer to convey something of the quiet, beautiful, strong, and mysterious in my work. Earnest is another word I like recently. Idyllic, too. Authentic has been a popular theme recently, but the problem with authenticity is that it isn’t, in itself, necessarily a good thing. One can be authentically ugly, or authentically debased. I think we all should be trying to stray away from the vulgar and towards the beautiful. I hope to convey that ideal in my photos.

PF: Well, that’s actually a bit of a long but providential story. Essentially, one of my Flickr followers turned out to be very well-connected. Through her, I was able to meet the director of a movie being filmed in Portland in which Ms. Seyfried was starring. After they were done with the shooting, the day before Amanda was to leave, the director set up a little get-together between her and me, and that was that. I had almost two hours to shoot with her—just me, her, and her dog. I can’t help but feel in retrospect that I underutilized the opportunity! (laughs) It’s not often one gets that much one-on-one time with someone like her. It goes to show, though, that you never know where opportunity will come from and that it’s really important for you to put yourself out into the world.

AM: Where do you like to shoot most, and why? PF: I used to say in nature, or specifically, the Columbia Gorge. But to be honest, I’ve been feeling more and more pressure to move away from a “pretty girl in the forest” motif. This year, I’ve been trying to move my work into a studio more often, or indoors, at the very least. There is something that just always appeals to me about a beautiful girl amongst the leaves, though, so who knows? AM: What are some of your favorite movies, books, and bands? PF: My favorite movies of all time are still the Lord of the Rings movies! There is something that stirs in my heart every time I watch them. As for books, I recently have been reading a lot of Dostoevsky. Tolkien, of couse, is at the top of my list as well. George MacDonald is another favorite. C.S. Lewis can do no wrong. As for music, that’s a bit trickier. I’ve been following a lot of Portland-area bands ever since moving here, and they make up the majority of the music I listen to on a daily basis. There are a few go-to groups, though, which consist of the likes of Other Lives, Radiohead, Fleet Foxes, Arcade Fire, Wilco, Feist, and more. A few random musicians on repeat these days are Gotye and Kimbra. My best friends have a band named Greylag, too, which I highly recommend.

AM: You’re always happy to share what film and camera you use, something that’s not so common for photographers. Which cameras and types of film do you use, and which are your favorites? PF: I started listing the cameras and films I was using because of all the emails I got asking. Even still, though, I constantly get messages from people. Right now, I use five main cameras. I use a Canon 5D Mark II as my main digital camera, a Contax 645 for medium-format, a Zeiss Ikon ZM as my main 35mm camera, a Contax T2 for a 35mm point-and-shoot, and lastly a Polaroid 195 for Polaroid work. For film, I generally use Kodak Portra and either Fuji 160S or 400H. I don’t shoot slide film or black-and-white very often, although I really dig Tri-X. Hopefully this will cut back on some of those emails!


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VIEW PARKER’S FLICKR AT FLICKR.COM/PHOTOS/PARKERFITZGERALD


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TOP american retro SHORTS american retro

SAND ON MY SKIN photographed by LAURA ALLARD-FLEISCHL assisted by BRIDIE WITTON model is SHANNA JACKWAY at RED11


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BODYSUIT american retro BRA lonely hearts SHORTS american retro NECKLACE sophie curlett


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DRESS american retro NECKLACE sophie curlett


BODYSUIT lonely hearts NECKLACE sophie curlett

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BODYSUIT lonely hearts NECKLACE sophie curlett

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PANTS american retro BRA lonely hearts NECKLACE sophie curlett


TOP lonely hearts SHORTS american retro NECKLACE stylist’s own

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sophie VAN DER

perre


MODEL iris van diepen

we’ve followed sophie’s work for years, and we were finally lucky enough to interview her for the readers of ACHE. sophie is a twenty-four-yearold photographer from amsterdam, and her work draws out the beauty of the female form and the softness and vulnerability of the virgin suicides.

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MODEL milou wansink


ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Sophie van der Perre: In my work, everything is about emotions. Showing your true self, being yourself. I want to convey feelings and amuse the watcher and make him or her remember the photo after seeing it. I photograph because it’s the only thing that feels completely right. It makes it possible for me to enclose myself from all things and feelings that are going on around me and concentrate only on what I am photographing that moment; it makes me enter my own world and create things. And it makes me very, very happy. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? SvdP: I’ve been shooting for quite a while now. I’ve always photographed in my life, even when I was very young, photographing my friends with disposable cameras everywhere I went. But I never really took it seriously until I took a fashion photography course at a time when I was very confused about what I wanted to do with my life, and I discovered that this was what I wanted to do. My photography has become more fashion-oriented, I guess. It’s hard to judge. There are definitely changes, but, for me, it’s hard to point them out. I think an important one is that I now also shoot real models when I use to only shoot friends. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? SvdP: I’m a very enthusiastic person. I have lots of friends, but I only open up to a few. I’m independent, and I love traveling, so I try not to get to attached to people. When I’m photographing, I try and search for that one thing that combines me and the one I’m photographing. I want to explore her or his world and pull real emotions out of that person. I’m trustworthy and make people feel comfortable, and I think of situations to photograph together. I love creating stories, so it’s never just a one-man show when I’m shooting. But I can also get really bossy and know exactly what I want. AM: Who or what inspires you? SvdP: Nature and human nature inspire me. People I meet along the way don’t have to be beautiful to inspire me. Charisma is important.

AM: Why do you use film? SvdP: It suits my work better, it brings more flair to a photo, and I actually love not knowing what I’m shooting. It gives me a strange feeling of confidence. Also, it helps the person photographed because he or she isn’t thinking the whole time how to pose better. They have no idea how they are posing because they can’t see it. I think the colors are more warmer with film and the whole process. I just love it. AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? SvdP: My favorite photographer is Mark Borthwick. I love his work. I love how his mind works and how he combines it with drawing and painting. He just gives me energy when I look at his work. AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? SvdP: For me, I have already achieved things I used to dream of. They’re maybe simple things, but I never thought I would accomplish them so fast. My internship with Ryan McGinley is one of them, as are my worldwide exhibitions in cities such as Paris, New York, Munich, and Ghent. I had the honor to co-host the extra space with the exhibition of Moby. That was all very exciting. I’ve also been in magazines such as Elle Girl Korea, BG Magazine in Ecuador, ILOVEFAKE, and some newspapers here in Holland. At the end of the year, I will be participating in an exhibition in Rome about youth with other great photographers, and a book will come out of it. And I’m really proud to be able to take part in that. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? SvdP: I love romance, obviously, and loneliness, but I especially love freedom and excitement! I think these are all subjects I’m drawn to because I feel them or want to feel them. For me, it’s important that you can read something out of the face of the model, that it’s not empty but full of emotions. AM: Where do you like to shoot most, and why? SvdP: Nature or old houses. Places that inspire me.

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MODEL milou wansink STYLING babette tielrooij


MODELS sarah van rij, bamboo van kampen, milou wansink STYLING babette tielrooij

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MODELS sarah van rij and milou wansink STYLING babette tielrooij


MODELS sarah van rij, bamboo van kampen, milou wansink STYLING babette tielrooij

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MODELS sarah van rij and bamboo van kampen STYLING babette tielrooij

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(top) MODEL sarah van rij (right) MODEL kaya @ elvis models STYLING babette tielrooij


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MODEL sarah @ elvis models


MODEL sarah van rij

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MODEL milou wansink


MODEL milou wansink

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MODEL shona lee gal @ future faces STYLING amfi students for ant magazine


MODEL shona lee gal @ future faces STYLING amfi students for ant magazine

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MODEL martijn nekoui and debby blauwendraad STYLING janneke rodenburg

MODEL iris van diepen


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MODEL laila cohen


MODEL birgitte

VIEW SOPHIE’S WEBSITE AT SOPHIEVANDERPERRE.COM

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STYL E IC O N

PHOTOGRAPHER david cortes (davidmcortes.tumblr.com)


asg;j

Jennifer Im jennifer im is a twenty-one-year-old from san fransisco, california. she was born and raised in los angeles but moved to northern california to attend school, where she’s majoring in communications. jenn created clothes encounters, her youtube channel, to share her personal fashion and inspirations, and she is rapidly becoming one of the most popular style gurus on youtube. at a height of just five-one, jenn is poised to take on the online world of personal style, and we’re excited to watch.

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ACHE Magazine: How did you develop your taste in clothing? What are some of your influences? Jennifer Im: Fashion was systematic for me in high school. I stressed each morning, asking myself which top goes with which bottom or how to match color palettes. After I graduated, I came to realize that there was no magic formula. Fashion is about expressing yourself. That realization was liberating, and the clothes I wore became a way to express what I’m feeling internally and externally. Trends are ephemeral anyway, so there’s no need to worry whether you’ve nailed a “perfect” outfit or not. When I plan an outfit, I’m influenced by my mood, what I’ve watched, who I’ve talked to, what I’ve seen or heard. I take fashion inspiration from my environment. AM: In your videos, you often list Goodwill as a place where you buy a lot of your clothes. What’s some advice you can give when it comes to thrifting? JI: Patience. A thrift store is no regular retail store. Clinging to every clothes hanger may be a unique piece waiting to be found. You have to give it time and examine each hanger, or you’ll never know about that big missed opportunity. That’s the thrill. My biggest advice? Don’t thrift when you don’t have time. AM: How would you describe your sense of style? JI: Provocative granny! I mix granny-esque prints with youthful, daring, fresh, even masculine cuts, pieces, and silhouettes. It’s really a mix of everything. AM: If you had to choose three must-have articles of clothing to keep forever, what would they be, and why? JI: Definitely my pair of suede nude platforms from Dolce Vita. I love how they add a few inches to my stems. Second is my pleated leather skirt. It adds the perfect amount of toughness to any ultra-feminine top. The third is a white button-down. I love the versatility. It can be worn casually with a few buttons open with your favorite pair of denim jeans. You can have a preppy look by buttoning it all the way up paired with some crisp khaki chinos. AM: Do you have any long-term goals in fashion? If so, what are they, and if not, what do you want to do instead? JI: It’s hard to say if I even have a have a long-term goal in fashion. I’ll always be fashion-conscious, and I’m open to the possibility of it, but right now

my heart is set on event coordinating. With Clothes Encounters, I’m trying to show that fashion isn’t out of reach. Anyone can express themselves with their clothes and look good doing it. AM: When did you start making Youtube videos? What made you decide to start your own channel? JI: I started my channel with my best friend, Sarah, around two years ago. Prior to creating our channel, I was obsessed with watching hauls on Youtube. At the time, there was little to no focus on thrifting, so I thought we could fill the void. Plus, it would give both of us a chance to showcase our personal style. Summer of 2010 was when we popped open my Macbook, took out my dinky point-and-shoot, and started filming. AM: Your videos have been steadily growing in popularity for months now! How has it affected your life, if at all? Do you get recognized in public, receive free clothing and other products, that sort of thing? JI: I do get recognized! It’s something that consistently blows my mind because I feel so normal. It’s a wonderful feeling, and I appreciate the chance to say hello face-to-face, but honestly I still feel a bit embarrassed. I’m just this girl, you know? AM: If you could live in any other era, what would it be, and why? JI: If I had to choose, then maybe the 1960s? I’d love to experience the counterculture of that era. That said, I’m perfectly content with living in the era we live in today. I love being able to look back at any given time, devour the films/books/culture, and incorporate that part into modern day. We get to pick, choose, mix and match anything you want from previous trends in the past. It’s like one big fashion buffet (a delicious one!). Plus, with the internet, each person has the chance to showcase what they care about and so easily share it with others. I feel lucky to be part of the first generation that has had that ability. AM: We hear that you live in California. What’s your favorite thing about living there, and how has it affected you? JI: Definitely the access to the myriad different landscapes. Everything is only an hour or two a way. You can make a day trip to the mountains, the desert, the beach, or the city, all depending on what you want to do that day. And the sushi is divine.


JENNIFER IM’S

TOP LISTS B E S T S TREET S H O PS

BEST ON LIN E SHOPS

TOP T REN DS

goodwill

solestruck

collars

thrift store outlets

asos

forest green

wasteland

ebay

turtlenecks

h&m

pastels

urban outfitters

western wear

FAVORITE MOV IE S

AN EDUCATION 2009

ETERNAL SUNSHINE OF THE SPOTLESS MIND 2004

LIFE AQUATIC 2004

LOST IN TRANSLATION 2003

FANTASTIC PLANET 1973

FAVORITE TV SHOWS

COLBERT REPORT 2005 to present

THE DAILY SHOW with JON STEWART 1996 to present

PARKS AND RECREATION 2009 to present

MODERN FAMILY 2009 to present

TWIN PEAKS 1990 to 1991

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PHOTOGRAPHER felisha tolentino (www.felishatolentino.com)


PHOTOGRAPHER david cortes (davidmcortes.tumblr.com)

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PHOTOGRAPHER david cortes (davidmcortes.tumblr.com)


PHOTOGRAPHER david cortes (davidmcortes.tumblr.com)

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youtube.com/user/clothesencounters

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straight talk photographed by LOTTE SIMONS model is ALEX at BOOKINGS


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WHAT WE’ R E LI ST E N I NG T O :

T H O UG HTS the school year is coming up again, and we have twelve songs to help you get away from it all and just think. take some time for yourself. be introspective. reflect.

SIXES & NINES Birkwin Jersey LE PETIT PRINCE (from meine meinung) cubesato LOFTICRIES Purity Ring KIARA Bonobo GORILLA Clams Casino SUN (altrice’s only what you gave me remix) Caribou MY BOO (balam acab remix) Ghost Town DJs BOILING (feat. sinead harnett) Disclosure BANGSLESS (the range remix) Howse FAME BOOZER’S LULLABY TOKiMONSTA SH8KR Headless Horseman IT FEELS GOOD TO BE AROUND YOU Air France NOSUMMR4U oOoOO

CHECK OUT ACHE’S PLAYLISTS ONLINE AT PLAYLIST.COM/ACHEMAGAZINE!

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MODEL marie asperud ASSISTANT marianita hustveit


lill-veronica skoglund twenty-one-year-old photographer from bournemouth, england

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ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Lill-Veronica Skoglund: I photograph because I’m compelled to do so. I’ve always been a creative person, but I’ve never been as passionate or torn about my own creations as when I was introduced to photography. What I wish to convey depends on every piece and every series, but it’s always a feeling of some sorts. I don’t always succeed in that, but I’m always working at it. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? LVS: I’ve been shooting since late fall of 2007. My work has changed in that I now, obviously, have more knowledge and experience than I had when I first started shooting. What hasn’t changed, however, is my desire to learn more, and almost everything I’ve done and am doing at the moment is based on that. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? LVS: I’d say that, as both a person and a photographer, I can be frazzled, stressed, scared, and insecure. But I’m also very much a dreamer, a side of myself that I try to let dominate. AM: Who or what inspires you? LVS: I can find inspiration in anything and everything (and sometimes nothing!), but I’m mainly inspired by music, childhood memories, movies and TV shows, and people I meet or see. AM: Digital or film? Why? LVS: I shoot mostly digital because that’s how I was introduced to photography. It wasn’t a choice of one over the other; it just was. I do enjoy shooting film, though I seem to have the worst luck with it, but I feel far more comfortable working digitally. AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? LVS: Tim Walker, Paolo Roversi, Sally Mann, and Ellen Rogers are all favorites of mine. I don’t know specifically how they’ve influenced my work, other than that their work is inspiring to me and that when I see what is possible to create with photography, it drives me to do more and want more of myself. AM: What, in your opinion, is art? LVS: Oh, no, this is a tough one! Some people think that art can be anything, which I think is evident in what is regarded as art today. However, I think that work that shows talent, passion, and skill (meaning I’m not all that impressed by paint splatter, even if it does show your “emotional turmoil”) and leaves you feeling and wondering about the piece beyond “Why the hell is this called art?” is art. AM: How does fashion play into your work? LVS: It plays into my work in the sense that I try to capture in it what fashion, for me, is. Creating a fantasy. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? LVS: Maybe nostalgia. Something sweet and something sad at the same time. I wouldn’t say I’ve mastered that yet, but I’m trying. There’s definitely a desire in me to create pieces that have more of a feeling in them, and although I think I touch upon it at times, I crave more of it in my work. AM: Do you prefer shoot on location or in the studio? How are the two different? LVS: Both have advantages and disadvantages. In the studio, you have to be more conscious about the light and the subject, as that is usually all that will be captured. On location, if you work the way I tend to work, you have to do with the light that is given, and you have to be conscious of the surroundings, making sure that they complement and don’t disturb. I like working both ways, though I’m not as comfortable in a studio setting as I am on location.


MODEL nadia emine zen skoglund

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MODEL vegard haukland ASSISTANT anne kulusveen


MODEL therese skundberg fidje ASSISTANT hanne husby johnsen

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MODEL marianne takle


MODEL marianne takle

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MODEL marianne takle


MODEL therese skundberg fidje ASSISTANT hanne husby johnsen

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MODEL marie asperud ASSISTANT marianita hustveit

VIEW LILL-VERONICA’S WEBSITE AT LILLVERONICASKOGLUND.COM

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a l y a k a p n h bie

PHOTOGRAPHER kendall paulsen


does this picture, along with the ones following it, look familiar to you? it should. but you probably saw it in photographic form, and these are (believe it or not) paintings. meet pakayla biehn from san francisco, one of the most talented young artists we’ve seen in a while. she paints doubleexposures with a photorealism that few can parallel. enjoy!

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PHOTOGRAPHER sabino aguad


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PHOTOGRAPHER chloe aftel


PHOTOGRAPHER max tomlinson

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PHOTOGRAPHER tanya prilukova


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PHOTOGRAPHER von marcus


VIEW PAKAYLA’S WEBSITE AT YOUSHOULDTAKECARE.COM

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DRESS dahlia SHOES romwe BAG v intage NECKL ACE cake leag ue


ST Y L E ICO N

amy scheepers amy scheepers is young and talented, a fashion photographer and blogger from port elizabeth, south africa. she’s obsessed with tea, clothing, and cats, and she goes through life with her head in the clouds and her toes in the sand. look into her personal style with ACHE magazine.

ACHE Magazine: Describe your personal style. Amy Scheepers: I would say it’s a good mixture of scruffy and girly. I have a natural inclination toward anything bohemian and don’t like for anything to look too perfect. AM: Who has influenced your style the most? How? AS: I honestly don’t think I could point out one single person who has done this. When it comes to my influences, it’s a big mix of random pictures found online, bloggers, models off duty, strangers on the street, and actors in movies I love. AM: What is your favorite magazine? Why? AS: LOVE Magazine. The editorials are amazing. As a photographer and fashion lover, I could not ask for better.

AM: If you had to choose ONE must-have accessory to keep forever, what would it be, and why? AS: A brown leather satchel. Perfect bag in my opinion. AM: What do you hope to achieve in fashion? AS: Fashion photography is my first and foremost priority, and ultimately I strive to be happy and content with my career in that department and to achieve all my goals. I would also love to get more into the styling of shoots as well. In terms of my blog, it has already outdone all of my expectations as it was only started for fun. Anything that comes from it now is a wonderful extra, but I would love for it to have some meaning in the big world of fashion one day.

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“anywhere i can see the ocean makes me feel at home.”

AM: Pick your favorite runway shows of all time. AS: I love shows for their art. I don’t look at them in terms of how wearable the garments are. My favorite shows include both Chanel’s Spring 2012 and McQueen’s S/S 2008. AM: Which decade would you like to live in, and why? AS: The 60s! All that wonderful art, music, and clothing... I’m rather upset about the fact I didn’t live back then! AM: What is your favorite thing about the place in which you live? How has it affected you? AS: The beach. Anywhere I can see the ocean makes me feel at home. AM: Where do you see life taking you? AS: So many different possible directions. All I know for sure is that I want to travel and experience the world, and I want to achieve all of which I’ve dreamed for my photography. Ultimately, I would love to end up in Paris. I stayed there once before, and that city has my heart. I could lose myself there easily.


AMY SCHEEPER’S

TOP LISTS B E S T S TREET S H O PS

TOP T REN DS

silver spoon

pastels

wardrobe babette

BES T ON LIN E SHOPS

cutouts

h&m

dahlia

quirky prints

zara

urban outfitters

midis anything ocean-inspired

asos free people romwe

FAVORITE MOV IE S

GAME OF THRONES 2011 to present

LOST 2004 to 2010

FACTORY GIRL 2006

ACROSS THE UNIVERSE 2007

FANTASTIC MR. FOX 2009

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T OP made SKIRT chic w i sh C OLL AR romwe NECKL ACE v intage SHOES mati ss e


T OP olive SKIRT silver spoon C OLL AR silver spoon SHOES mati ss e

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T OP as os SKIRT love PONCHO shoppalu NECKL ACE a bird named f rank SHOES shoppalu


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T OP cotton on SHORT S motel rock s C OLL AR romwe SHOES mati ss e BAG v intage


T OP cot ton on SKIRT olive SHOES mati ss e

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T OP romwe SKIRT romwe C OLL AR romwe SHOES mati ss e


T OP c yan + magenta SKIRT silver spoon SHOES mati ss e BAG v intag e

VIEW AMY’S LOOKBOOK AT LOOKBOOK.NU/ASCHEEPERS

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martina giammaria martina giammaria is a fashion photographer from milan, italy. she was born in the twentieth century, a chaser and victim of dazzles until a flash blinded her permanently. she is rarely on time.


MODEL s asha @ glamour ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP g ian marco s antu s

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PHOT O GR APHERS mar tina g iammar ia and feder ico ciamei MODEL zuz ana @ ice ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP mar ialessia colombo


ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Martina Giammaria: I don’t know why I take photographs. I probably wouldn’t if I could draw. I think I need to create something. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? MG: I’ve been shooting from a long time, but it’s only some years since I started doing it conscientiously. It was easier before, more natural. Now I need a project, a clear idea, and a result to which I can aim. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer?

AM: Digital or film? Why? MG: Both, but digital is only for nice and clean images, those that keep you “outside.” AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? MG: My favorites change continuously. Now I like the ones who work the way I want to: Asger Carlsen, Tereza Zelenkova, Erik Wåhlström, Koen Hauser, and others that you can see on this Tumblr that I update with Federico Ciamei (untitledgirlfriend.tumblr.com). AM: What, in your opinion, is art?

MG: Unconstant, incoherent.

MG: “The artist’s job is not to succumb to despair, but to find an antidote to the emptiness of existence,” from Midnight in Paris.

AM: Who or what inspires you?

AM: How does fashion play into your work?

MG: A concept, an idea that comes often from someplace that has nothing to do with photography. And a lot of photographers that I see on the internet.

MG: Fashion gives me the opportunity to work with other people and create a team. Sometimes I need a team to work on something; it’s stimulating.

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MODEL s asha @ glamour ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP g ian marco s antu s


MODEL s asha @ glamour ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP g ian marco s antu s

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PHOT O GR APHERS mar tina g iammar ia and feder ico ciamei MODEL adka @ ice ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP mar ialessia colombo


MODEL s asha @ glamour ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP g ian marco s antu s

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MODEL s asha @ glamour ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP g ian marco s antu s

PHOT O GR APHERS mar tina g iammar ia and feder ico ciamei MODEL lorena @ alpa ST YLING f rances co ar tibani MAKEUP valentina pintu s


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PHOT O GR APHERS mar tina g iammar ia and feder ico ciamei MODEL adka @ ice ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP mar ialessia colombo


MODEL v iolet

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PHOT O GR APHERS mar tina g iammar ia and feder ico ciamei MODEL lorena @ alpa ST YLING f rances co ar tibani MAKEUP valentina pintu s


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PHOT O GR APHERS mar tina g iammar ia and feder ico ciamei MODEL zuz ana @ ice ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP mar ialessia colombo


DESIGNER claudio michele dicorato MODEL mar ia g razia MAKEUP silv ia persica

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PHOT O GR APHERS mar tina g iammar ia and feder ico ciamei MODEL zuz ana @ ice ST YLING maela leporati MAKEUP mar ialessia colombo


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PHOT O GR APHERS mar tina g iammar ia and feder ico ciamei MODEL lorena @ alpa ST YLING f rances co ar tibani MAKEUP valentina pintu s


VIEW MARTINA’S WEBSITE AT MARTINAGIAMMARIA.COM

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JUMPER amer ican apparel BR A amer ican apparel SUNGL ASSES amer ican apparel

the sun sets in the city


photograpHEd by emma lauren makeup by gayle carbajal hair by tracey hussey model is ana @ muse

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DRESS urban outf itters


JUMPER amer ican apparel BR A amer ican apparel SUNGL ASSES amer ican apparel

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DRESS urban outf itters


T OP amer ican apparel PANT S amer ican apparel

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T OP amer ican apparel


DRESS amer ican apparel

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MODEL lizzie @ prof ile MAKEUP carle y burke

HANNA KRISTINA


hanna is a twenty-one-year-old fashion and portrait photographer based in london and kent in southeast england. she’s currently in her second year of university, working toward a degree in photography. she loves cats, lace, and parties.

ACHE Magazine: Why do you photograph? What do you try to convey through your work? Hanna Kristina: I photograph to escape into a world where I have control and can use every ounce of my creativity and imagination. I want to convey natural beauty. I try to capture the model acting naturally, conveying her personality. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? HK: I have been shooting fashion since I was eighteen, so three years now. At the start, I had no particular style; it was more of a learning process and experimenting with what I enjoyed. My photography has changed so much in the last three years. I now feel like I have my own style. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? HK: As a person, I am an ordinary twenty-one-yearold female enjoying life. Photography brings me out of my shell. AM: Who or what inspires you? HK: Everything around me... people, emotions, stories, sounds. I believe inspiration can come from anywhere if you open your mind. AM: Digital or film? Why?

HK: I shoot both, but mostly film at the moment as I love the rawness of film. The colors and grain, along with little light leaks. I think film is magical. AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? HK: Tim Walker. His book, Pictures, is just incredible. Every shoot conveys such beauty. Every photograph tells a story. At some point, I would like to create big, constructed scenes like him. AM: What, in your opinion, is art? HK: “Art,” to me, can be anything. Something that is beautiful or something that makes you think. I don’t think art has any guidelines. AM: How does fashion play into your work? HK: For submission work, I keep to the season’s trends with help from stylists. The theme and mood of a shoot is much more important to me than the fashion aspect. Fashion photography is great, as it gives almost complete freedom. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? HK: I usually like to evoke a quiet, natural mood. I don’t pose my models. I tell them to sit, stand, or lie naturally.

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MODEL lizzie @ prof ile MAKEUP carle y burke


MODEL lizzie @ prof ile MAKEUP carle y burke

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S/S 2012 LO OKBO OK FOR DAHLIA MODEL layla young @ s elec t MAKEUP alice howlett


S/S 2012 LO OKBO OK FOR DAHLIA MODEL layla young @ s elec t MAKEUP alice howlett

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MODEL josy @ prof ile MAKEUP carle y burke


MODEL ella @ prof ile

VIEW HANNA’S WEBSITE AT HANNAKRISTINA.COM

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ashes The house seemed so much darker without Leo. I cursed as I went to light a cigarette and noticed my hand, shaking like a leaf. Leo hated me when I was nervous. “Stop shivering!” he’d snap, and I’d whisper some apology, and I’d bite my lip so he didn’t see it tremble, but he’d notice anyway, and then he’d sigh and stroke my cheek with his thumb and pull me closer and— How could he go like this? When he knew how much he meant to me? How much I needed him? The smoke left my mouth in a slow, deliberate stream before it lazily drifted towards the open bathroom window. My lipstick stained the snow white filter a deep red, familiar red, hazy red. My red. Of course Leo left. They’re all the same, in the end. I watched the sunlight play in the smoke as I inhaled. It filled my lungs begrudgingly, as if I were dragging it from its bed. Its bed, reduced to ashes, devouring itself in one fluid movement. The house was empty without Leo. His books had lined my walls, his furniture huddled in my living room, his toothbrush wrestled with mine—Leo took the time to infiltrate every room of my house, every aspect of my life, every detail of my day, he wrote me notes, he made me lunch, he folded my clothes, he made my bed, our bed, he— He ran. He ran from me. He did exactly what I told him he would do, what he swore he never would. He did what Andrew and Philip and Jason and Eric and— Inhale. Exhale. Nicotine ran through my veins, tried to calm my aching nerves.

beatrice z. hart nineteen savannah, ga

But he was different! He was so much better than the others! Leo swore he’d take care of me, Leo swore he’d never hurt me like Alex or Matthew or Ryan or William, Leo swore he was different, Leo swore he understood. They never understand. There’s nothing to understand, there’s nothing here, nothing but ashes. The ashes of my cigarette. The ashes of us, Leo and me, our house made of cards burning down around me, and Leo, Leo lit the match, Leo left me here to die in the flames of our forgotten life together, our happiness hoisted onto a funeral pyre, the sacrificial lamb, Leo happy with some new girl, some normal girl, someone he deserves— I never deserved Leo. He knew it, he had to have known, he had to have known he was settling. He always called me his porcelain doll, pale skin with haunting eyes and painted lips. Hadn’t he seen the cracks at first? Hadn’t he sworn they made me all the more beautiful? His fragile porcelain doll, something to cradle, something to coddle, something to nourish back to health. I tried to tell him this was as healthy as I get, he was buying damaged goods—wasn’t the package marked “dead on arrival”? Hadn’t he read the fine print? We were so perfect. We were a house of cards built on sand, held together with Scotch tape and wishful thinking. And he lit the match. He lit the match and ran. Nicotine, begging my mind to slow down, on behalf of my black and blue heart. Leo didn’t understand that I wasn’t sad. I would cry and cry and cry, and he would beg me, “Don’t cry


don’t cry don’t cry why are you crying are you sad?” No Leo no I’m not sad I’m not sad! “Then why cry?” I don’t know Leo! I don’t know! I’m not here! “Of course you’re here, I’m here, we’re okay, you’re okay.” And my tears would slow. And I would stare at him. And the corners of my mouth would twitch, and I might smile. And I would say his name, and I would take his hand, and I would look at him, and I would say, darling... darling, I’m never okay. Not really. Inhale. Exhale. They’re all the same, in the end. I never deserved Leo. But we were so perfect, and we were limitless, bright-eyed and beautiful. He was my angel. But I was his demon. What a cliché. Leo started drinking. Leo couldn’t handle me. Leo couldn’t be with me. Leo said he loved me. The smoke burned my eyes, and I choked. And suddenly I was sad, and I was empty, and I felt everything—everything and nothing. Tears, and I was underwater, enveloped in a tent of blue, the color of my loathing, and red, my red, my love laid bare on the bathroom floor, my loathing, his loathing, blue and red, spinning, spinning, spinning— He lit the match and ran. My life, the filter of a cigarette, snow white stained red, burning, reduced to ashes, devouring itself in one fluid movement. It took Leo two years to realize he was better than me. Two years of me and my baggage, dragging him down to the floor, the bathroom floor, red of his

loathing, my loathing— On one front we agreed, Leo and I. I destroyed everything I touched. Red of my lips, red of my love, my life, my cheeks, my flesh. Red, I had been red for so long! Blue, underwater, loathing, leaving, loathing... Inhale. Inhale. Water in my lungs. My world, my lips, my life an empty blue, lonely blue, violent blue, aching blue— Breathless. Floating. His porcelain doll, smashed to pieces on the white tile floor, stained red, the color of my loathing. His loathing. The one thread, holding us together. A thousand stars inside my head, pounding on my skull like fists upon a door, a siren’s song, wailing through my skeleton of glass, shattering my thoughts, blanketing my world in a sheet of grey. We were so perfect. We were a house of cards built on sand, held together with Scotch tape and wishful thinking. And he lit the match. He lit the match and ran. Inhale. Exhale. They’re all the same, in the end. Ashes, ashes, we all fall down.

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misfit She saw him only once. He didn’t appear to see her; he only had eyes for the print in front of him. He stared at it sullenly, his eyes almost empty, hollow. He looked... starved. Deprived, of something. The edges of his figure seemed blurred to her. He looked dark and sickly, as if he were slowly greying, decaying. She didn’t know what he was. He lacked grandiose wings, or bravado, or righteousness, or horns, or fangs, or cloven hooves. He neither shone with the brilliance of God nor burnt with the fury of His Adversary. He merely was, standing before the depiction of God and Adam. He merely wept. He merely was. She stood rooted to the spot but extended one trembling hand in his direction, wishing she had the courage to go to him. He leaned closer to the wall as she watched. He swayed slightly, as if a subtle breeze would knock him off his feet. Nothing drew his attention from the poster, peeling away from the heat of the rushing trains and the bustling people of the platform, full of noise and light and sound. Yet no one seemed to notice him. They simply looked right through him. His lips quivered delicately as tears slid down his ashy, greying cheeks. She felt a few tears escape her eyes too, and fought the urge to bat them away. He had seen something beautiful in this print, this rendering of Michelangelo’s finest. Something beautiful, yes—but also something terribly, personally tragic. He was a breath away from the grimy poster now,

beatrice z. hart nineteen savannah, ga

his lips still quivering, almost frantically now. His hands, balled into fists at his sides, loosened and made as if to touch the wall, the poster, palms out, finger spread—but still he hesitated. The longing in him made her breath catch in her throat. She was close enough to see his every move. The way his little finger twitched, how the muscles of his sinewy back spasmed slightly beneath his thin, wrinkled shirt, was not lost on her. He reached out one index finger and placed it, shaking, in the tiny gap between the finger of God, the divine, and the finger of man, of Adam, the imperfect. It fit perfectly. His lips turned up in a feverish, euphoric smile of the most melancholy joy she had ever seen. She shut her eyes tightly to keep the tears back. A man bumped her shoulder as he ran to catch his train, jarring her from her reverie. The waif had vanished. He had seen all he needed to see.


WHAT WE’ R E LI ST E N I NG T O :

HI P -HOP for those of you who’d rather listen to hip-hop than indie rock or folk, we have a playlist for you, too! here are eleven songs with a beat.

PALACE A$AP Rocky FREAKS AND GEEKS Childish Gambino MERCY Kanye West TOUCH THE SKY Kanye West vs. The xx SHE NEEDS ME (remix) Kendrick Lamar ALL I DO Logic SHE (feat. frank ocean) Tyler, The Creator HARD KNOCK LIFE (ghetto anthem) Jay-Z GOLDIE A$AP Rocky RIDE IT EVERY TIME Kingdom & Girl Unit YOU (feat. lil wayne) Lloyd

CHECK OUT ACHE’S PLAYLISTS ONLINE AT PLAYLIST.COM/ACHEMAGAZINE!

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a ch e m agazin e

ACHE Magazine August 2012  

issue #6 of ACHE magazine, a quarterly magazine created by and for young people around the world. released on august 10, 2012.

ACHE Magazine August 2012  

issue #6 of ACHE magazine, a quarterly magazine created by and for young people around the world. released on august 10, 2012.