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JULY 2013

ACHE


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note from the editor

photography 005

sofie olejnik

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jon duenas

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julia levine

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berta pfirsich

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danielle suzanne campbell

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james whineray

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gabrielle murphy

Fashion 019

“Prep” by jane and jane

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“floral Blur” by vivienne mok

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“cool Kids in School” by jackie luo

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“smoke Break” by carey quinton haider

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“memories” by sara pellegrino

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“close-up” by irina slipchenko


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editor-in-chief

JACKIE LUO contributing photographers

carey quinton haider jane and jane jackie luo irina slipchenko sara pellegrino vivienne mok

(p. 001 and 002) photographed by JACKIE LUO design and makeup by mimi shou hair by maria henning model is caroline @ neal

hamil agency feature photographers

berta pfirsich danielle suzanne campbell gabrielle murphy james whineray jon duenas julia levine sofie olejnik cover photographed by berta pfirsich styling by jèss Monterde makeup by marta vicente model is Love @ uno models


welcome to issue #8 of ACHE magazine. next month, i’m moving to new york city to start my first year of college, and the thought is daunting. a new world awaits me, with different rules, different expectations, and different paths. the next four years could shape the rest of my life. at first, i was afraid that i’d make a mistake, misstep, and my whole future would unravel. every little action and decision felt so monumental. but then i realized that life is a series of mistakes, decisions, and, sometimes, triumphs. now, i hope to look forward without hesitation or fear, and we at ACHE invite you to do the same. what are you waiting for? take the leap. as always, ACHE is looking for submissions from artists, designers, photographers, writers, bloggers, musicians, and more. we’re open to adding writers, photographers, and editors to our staff, so let us see samples of your work! to submit, send us your full name, age, city and state/country, and a link to an online website or portfolio, along with five to ten low-resolution samples of your work.

weareachemagazine@gmail.com keep living young, keep making art, and keep reading ACHE.

love,

jackie luo editor-in-chief

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MODEL Carolin W. @ izaio management

SOFIE OLEJNIK sofie is a fashion photographer from berlin, germany, who loves colors and shapes. she is enchanted by the expression of her emotions through color. some days, she is pastel pink, and other days, she is dark blue.


MODEL Carolin W. @ izaio management

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MODEL bente @ nface management styling Christiane Schwambach hair and makeup jeannette johansson


MODEL bente @ nface management styling Christiane Schwambach hair and makeup jeannette johansson

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MODELs elisabeth ehrlich and justyna @ seeds management STYLING Julia Quante Wardrobe Audrey Grace Boutique makeup kim keusen hair valentina schwez


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MODELs elisabeth ehrlich and justyna @ seeds management STYLING Julia Quante Wardrobe Audrey Grace Boutique makeup kim keusen hair valentina schwez


MODELs justyna @ seeds management STYLING Julia Quante Wardrobe Audrey Grace Boutique makeup kim keusen hair valentina schwez

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MODEL justyna @ seeds management STYLING Julia Quante Wardrobe Audrey Grace Boutique makeup kim keusen hair valentina schwez

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MODEL Gloria Endres de Oliveira


MODEL Carolin W. @ izaio management

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MODEL lotte @ nface management Styling, Hair, Makeup christiane schwambach


view sofie’s website at sofieolejnik.de

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prep photographed by jane and jane wardrobe is vintage makeup by brittany daigle model is alexa @ elite


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twenty-eight-year-old photographer from portland, oregon

jon due nas


MODEL Sophie @ q6 Model Management Hair and Makeup Destiny Taylor

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jon is a photographer shooting editorial, fashion, and weddings. in his spare time, he enjoys exploring and hiking around oregon, riding his bike, eating tacos with friends, and searching for the best cup of coffee.

MODEL Jennifer @ Option Model Management Hair and Makeup Terri Reece Sunglasses Capital Eyewear


ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Jon Duenas: I’m all about being in the moment. I take photos as a way to slow down and appreciate the moment. Sometimes photography is just an excuse for me get out and experience awesome things and get to know people in ways I wouldn’t otherwise. But when it comes down to it, I hope my work conveys what’s going on in my head when I’m in these moments. I’m not very good at describing these things with words, so photography is a way to express the kind of feeling I get when I stare at the open ocean or look into a moving flame. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? JD: I started shooting on a terrible digital pointand-shoot back in 2004, but that’s when my interest started. I definitely wasn’t one of those photographers who dove in headfirst as soon as they started. My development was a lot slower. I didn’t start taking it seriously until 2008 when I realized I wanted to try and make a living off of it. My work has changed a lot since I started. The biggest constant has been my interest in portraits, but the biggest change is the fact that I started with digital, but now I shoot mostly film (since it’s usually the opposite for most people). AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? JD: The way I shoot is very much in line with my personality. I’m pretty introverted and quiet in my personal life. It takes me some time to warm up to people, and I’m not a huge fan of big groups. So when I’m shooting, I’m pretty much the same. I give direction when I feel I need to, but it’s often said in quiet, hushed tones. And sometimes I just sit and look and think. I’ll explore my subject, waiting for the moment to speak to me. I’m definitely in my head a lot when I shoot. I think these qualities are part of what gives me the kinds of results I get.

AM: Who or what inspires you? JD: As an artist, I’m always inspired by the need for change and progression. I find I constantly get into ruts where I’m burned out on my current work. Inevitably, this motivates me to push through and find some new way of seeing things. I’m also really motivated by my desire to explore, especially out here in the epic scenery of the Pacific Northwest. AM: Why do you use film? JD: Medium format film is unmatched by digital. In recent experiments, I’ve been able to get close to 35mm film with my digital work, but medium format is still so unique. I just love the physical nature of film and how I’m not distracted by looking at a screen. On top of that, shooting film allows my creative decisions to be right in line with the moment. I can look at a scene and think, “This is the type of film and the camera, and this is how I should expose it to get the exact look to match the feeling I’m having right now in this moment.” But with digital, you’re separating that decision from the moment and instead deciding later, and a lot of times it can be hard to remember exactly what you were feeling when you took them. AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? JD: Lately, Tim Walker has been a huge influence, as well as photographers like Paolo Roversi and Sarah Moon. Walker has influenced a lot of my indoor studio work. He’s a master at capturing beautiful set styling along with his model in such a way that neither takes all the focus of the shot. Roversi and Moon have been influencing me and the mood my work takes on. I love the almost Rennaissancestyle drama of their work and lighting. It challenges the popular notion, especially in a lot of fashion photography, of photos having to be technically super clean, sharp perfection. I like a photo with some grain and softness and some raw imperfection of the model and setup, with roughness around the edges showing.

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MODELs Jennifer @ Option Model Management and Nicholas Wilson Hair and Makeup Terri Reece Sunglasses Capital Eyewear

AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? JD: I could mention being published or brag in other ways, but I think any moment thata I can stop and say to myself, “I can’t believe this is my job,” is a win in my book. As for the future, I’d love to travel more for work and do things out of my comfort zone as part of a complete photo campaign or project. Like climb a mountain or be out at sea or live in a country where I don’t know the language. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? JD: Timelessness. That’s definitely my favorite. Everyone gets hung up on shooting trends so much that they become cliché. I’d rather shoot something in a way that never goes out of style. I’m also always drawn to creating photos with a quiet drama or shooting scenes where the subject is just engulfed by an epic expanse of nature. AM: Where do you like to shoot most, and why?

JD: It can really depend on my mood, but anything out in nature, especially somewhere with a big open sky... I don’t think I’ll ever tire of that. I was never much for the outdoors, growing up in the suburbs of a huge city. I’m trying to make up for that now that I live in Portland. AM: Favorite books, movies, and bands/singers, and explain why you love them! JD: Oh, gosh, this is impossible to answer. I’m a sucker for sci-fi and fantasy books/movies/TV shows. I’ve been really into the Game of Thrones series. Lately I’ve been watching more TV than movies, like Mad Men, Breaking Bad, The Wire, and most recently Twin Peaks. Really, anything with really well-done, interesting characters. Those kinds of stories you see a million times but still connect with profoundly every time. Musically, the new Daft Punk has been playing a lot, along with Sigur Ros, My Bloody Valentine, Washed Out, Wild Nothing, and a bunch of others.


MODEL Sophie @ q6 Model Management Hair and Makeup Destiny Taylor

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MODEL Meredith Adelaide Hair and Makeup Kelly Peach


MODEL Meredith Adelaide Hair and Makeup Kelly Peach

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MODEL Jessica @ Major Models Styling Megan Hart Assistant Stylist Anja Verdugo Makeup Nica Demaria


MODEL Jessica @ Major Models Styling Megan Hart Assistant Stylist Anja Verdugo Makeup Nica Demaria

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MODEL Ashley @ Nous Model Management Styling Nicole Burron Makeup Bria València


MODEL Meredith Adelaide

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MODEL lana Nyman


MODEL Emma @ Option Model Management Hair and Makeup Destiny Taylor

view Jon’s website at jonduenas.com

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Floral Blur

photographed by V IV IENNE MOK model is NAST YA @ idole model management


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MODEL Lilya Polokhova

julia levine julia is an eighteen-year-old girl from madison, wisconsin. she just graduated from high school and will be attending ithaca college in the fall for film, photography, and visual arts.

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MODEL Abby ROse


ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph?

and care, more than I would ever do with my digital camera.

Julia Levine: I hope that my work can emotionally connect with others. If people feel sad, curious, or happy, then I’ve done my job. The point, for me, is to inspire a reaction. I also want to develop a connection with the models so that I can shoot them at their truest emotion. My goal is always to capture the essence of a person.

AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work?

AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? JL: I have been shooting since my freshman year of high school. However, I started taking it seriously three years ago, when I began to shoot my friends and others around me. In the beginning, I played with props a lot and attempted to capture the scene as it lay before me. Today, I work more at manipulating a scene and reality so it becomes harder to tell where it was taken and how it was taken so that the viewer can just step into whatever scene I’ve created for them. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? JL: Curious, perceptive. AM: Who or what inspires you? JL: For me, both impressive gestures of grandeur and minor slivers of beauty can spark curiosity. This curiosity fosters inspiration, when the parts of life that mostly go unnoticed are transformed into electrifying experiences. By compartmentalizing beauty into a limited space, say a waterfall or a cathedral, we miss these fleeting moments of beauty—moments that transcend the ordinary and help us see the extraordinary within it. If I enter an elaborate museum or watch a well-regarded movie with the expectation to leave inspired, I probably will. But equally profound inspiration could be found in the way light shines down through snow-coated branches or in a friend’s smile. I find most of my inspiration from the ways people interact daily or act when they believe no one is paying attention. AM: Why do you use film? JL: There is something so organic about film, and, I’m not going to lie, the sound of the shutter is so satisfying. Film also tests the patience of a photographer. Because the frames are limited, I feel more compelled to set each shot up with precision

JL: Sally Mann has had a huge influence on my work. The essence of her work is to capture reality in a mysterious way so that each shot is packed with emotion, but the reality is ambiguous. The story she creates in each shot is what I find most impressive and inspiring, as every frame transforms her children into new people. AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve? JL: After three years, I’ve finally developed a style that I’m comfortable with and that I think suits the emotions and ideas that I wish to convey. With this style in mind, I hope to develop meaning behind each shot so that there is not only an emotion conveyed, but also an explanation behind the emotion. That is my goal for the next few years, to stress concept rather than technique. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? JL: I usually prefer when the model is distant in the photographs because it allows the viewers to place themselves in the position of the model. I also aim for shoots to appear straight out of a dream or some sort of nonexistent location so that it appears as if the location is just an extension of the model’s mind. AM: Where do you like to shoot most, and why? JL: I always shoot outdoors. Natural light is important to me when I’m shooting because it’s in the uncertainty and mystery of the light that I garner most of my inspiration. But I also use street lights and backlighting from buildings, as long as the lighting is already in the scene. AM: Favorite books, movies, and bands/singers, and explain why you love them! JL: I have so many books that I hold dear, but my current favorite is Siddhartha by Herman Hesse. It is simplistically beautiful and I find a lot of peace of mind in the philosophical message it offers. As far as my favorite musicians go, I love The Shins, Alt-J, Gorillaz, Regina Spektor, and The Velvet Underground, to name a few.

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MODEL Marlee Katz


MODEL Stephanie Barclay

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MODEL Abby Rose


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MODEL Abby Rose


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MODEL Ariadna Rocamora


MODEL Ariadna Rocamora

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MODEL Stephanie Barclay


view Julia’s website at julialevine.4ormat.com

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COOL KIDS IN

SCHOOL

photographed by jackie luo styling by jessica kay keller hair and makeup by sara eudy models are caroline @ neal hamil agency, kristin @ neal hamil agency, melissa @ page.713


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On kristin: headband urban outfitters dress american apparel necklace ashleyballantinedesigns.com shoes shoe republic LA

on melissa: beanie pacsun Top urban outfitters leggings Boutique shoes Jeffrey Campbell

On caroline: Bralette nollie Kimono top One clothing Shorts zara shoes Speed limit 98

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On melissa: Hat Forever 21 Dress Wet seal shoes Urban Outfitters on Kristin: Hat Urban Outfitters Top Forever 21 Shorts Forever 21 shoes Forever 21 On caroline: Top Forever 21 Shorts ashleyballantinedesigns.com shoes Thrifted

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On melissa: Top Wrangler Skirt Forever 21 shoes FOrever 21 on Kristin: Top Pacsun shorts Forever 21 shoes Minnetonka On caroline (next page): Top Forever 21 Skirt Target Bangle Forever 21 shoes Urban Outfitters


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berta pfirsich

MODELs Adrienne and Love @ uno models Styling Jess Monterde Makeup Marta Vicente


meet berta pfirsich, the trendiest underground photographer of the moment from barcelona, spain. she’s twenty-four years old, and her work is feminine, fresh, and magical. in the last year, she’s worked for magazines and labels such as vogue china, nylon, material girl, vice magazine, frankie magazine, and monki, leaving her dreamy mark on everything she touches. ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph?

AM: Digital or film? Why?

Berta Pfirsich: I photograph to remember and keep images of my day-by-day forever with me. I need to share these moments with the people I love and the ones I still have to meet. I try to be as honest as possible, and I like to receive the same honesty from others. I take photos because it is what makes me happier, and it’s the best way of communicating.

BP: Film, because it’s real. I always shoot analog; it’s the most natural way to work for me. I don’t like editing photos or using Photoshop, so I try to do things as naturally as possible. I don’t feel comfortable shooting digital, but I will when I have an assistant who does the dirty job for me! Right now, my husband, Michael Skattum, does a lot of Photoshop editing for me, but it is not fun for anyone.

AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started?

AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work?

BP: More or less since I’ve had a conscience. My first camera was a blue Fisher Price with two viewers to see better... kind of an alien. My parents gave it to me to take photos at the summer camp where I used to go as a child. I used to open the camera and destroy some photos with the light. The photos I took were mostly of mushrooms, birds, and low angles of my friends. Of course, my photography has changed and grown up with me... or maybe not that much.

BP: I don’t have a favorite since it depends on my mood. Right now, I’m into more produced shots like Sandra Freij’s work. I would love to assist somebody like her. I’ve always been really influenced by Yelena Yemchuk, too.

AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? BP: I think of the two as the same thing. I would describe myself as naive, sometimes shy, sometimes crazy. Like a newborn. AM: Who or what inspires you? BP: Light. The light is the most important part of my photos. Barcelona definitely affects my daydream style. It would be difficult to do what I do if I were in London, for example! I’m not interested in the urban environment, either. I always try to travel to secret Barcelonan places and shoot there. Now that I’ve started shooting commissioned portraits for celebrities and whatnot, it’s really nice, seeing with your own eyes and finding the magic in somebody you maybe have seen a lot in magazines but never even noticed. That change to reality inspires me.

AM: What, in your opinion, is art? BP: Art is everything we believe in. AM: How does fashion play into your work? BP: I love fashion, big industries, and independent designers. Last year, I worked in fashion a lot, and on the editorials I had freedom to select the looks like little treasures. If I had more time, I would love to style and shoot, but rhythm is important, and fashion is so temporal that I can’t do it right now. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? BP: Mystery, but closeness. AM: Do you prefer shoot on location or in the studio? How are the two different? BP: On location. I shot in studio before, and it’s fine if it has natural light, but that loses the main point of being in studio, so.... But it just depends on whether the place has a soul. It could be a wall or a forest.

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MODEL Louise @ uno models Styling Jess Monterde Makeup Marta Vicente

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MODEL sara @ blow models Styling caroline rent me


MODELs ann and Louise @ uno models Styling Jess Monterde Makeup Marta Vicente

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MODELs ann and Louise @ uno models Styling Jess Monterde Makeup Marta Vicente

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MODEL Love @ uno models Styling Jess Monterde Makeup Marta Vicente


MODEL adrienne @ uno models Styling Jess Monterde Makeup Marta Vicente

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MODEL Ramute @ francina Models Styling Jess Monterde Makeup Marta Vicente


view berta’s website at bertapfirsich.com

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photographed by carey quinton haider styling, hair, and makeup by saint lucifer model is skye sengelmann

smoke break clothing includes amy elizabeth couture, demonia, dr. peepers, harley davidson, nasty gal, and silence + noise


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MODEL Alexandra K.


danielle suzanne campbell danielle suzanne campbell is a twenty-two-year-old photographer from toronto, ontario, in canada. she studied photography at ryerson university from 2009 to 2013, and she has been published in magazines such as function magazine, motive magazine, and zeum magazine.

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MODEL Tara @ spot6 management


ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph? Danielle Suzanne Campbell: I’ve always been interested in reliving my past through photographs. I like to recreate memories of childhood in my work and hope to evoke nostalgia in whomever views it. AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? DSC: Looking back, I was always really fascinated with documenting, first starting with taking disposable cameras on Girl Guides camping trips. I was given my first two-megapixel digital camera in eighth grade, and I was known as the girl with the camera. I’d put together scrapbooks made out of tape and construction paper, and glue in four-by-six prints, notes, and drawings from school and family holidays. It wasn’t until I was seventeen that I really became interested in the idea of composing a photograph. My best friend entered a modeling competition, and she asked me to be her photographer. I quickly fell in love with exploring the weekly themes she was given and brainstorming sets, poses, and wardrobe. Since I’ve started, I’ve become much more comfortable with directing and composing images. My work is starting to shift to something more candid and personal, less static and posed. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? DSC: As a person, I’m a shy, quiet soul, and I’m quite nostalgic. I’m not sure how I would describe myself as a photographer. I always plan shoots ahead of time and have a distinct idea of what the photograph will look like before I even shoot it. I think that’s what drives me as a photographer... the challenge to recreate exactly what I envision in my head. AM: Who or what inspires you? DSC: I’m inspired by my surroundings, fabrics, objects, memories, and unique faces. AM: Digital or film? Why? DSC: I’ve always been torn between the both. When I do a shoot with a creative team, I often shoot digital just because of the immediacy of it. But my personal work is, more often than not, film. The images mean so much more when the film is developed and I get to watch each image appear on my screen during scanning. There’s always the odd image that I

completely forgot I had taken, one from the cottage, day trips with my friends, my boyfriend in bed on a lazy day, my cat in a box. Photos I had taken months before I developed them. I love watching them come to life again and the memories they bring back. AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work? DSC: There will always be the classics, like Tim Walker and Paolo Roversi. But I think my favorite photographs come from the young emerging artists who are similar in age to me. It’s amazing to see the minds of people your own age who are doing the same thing that you are, and I think with that comes a huge respect and understanding for the work. That being said, I really admire Marie Zucker for the dreams she creates and stories she tells through her photographs. AM: What, in your opinion, is art? DSC: An expression of who you are as an individual, or what you stand for. AM: How does fashion play into your work? DSC: My work is predominately portraiture, but I have done a few editorial shoots with some really great styling. I’ve veered from calling myself a fashion photographer because I’ve always been more interested in capturing the essence of a model during a shoot. To me, the clothing is the icing on the cake, just another layer added to the photograph to elevate it, make it more interesting, or help express the story. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? DSC: I really love to capture a sense of youth and playfulness in my work. My fondest memories of growing up are the ones in which I was silly and carefree and playing dress-up. AM: Do you prefer shoot on location or in the studio? How are the two different? DSC: I’ve very rarely shot in the studio. Growing up, I was always running around outside, playing games of make-believe, climbing trees. The outdoor landscape is something that I feel comfortable with and something that I want as a backdrop to my work to further express my viewpoint of nostalgia.

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MODEL Alexandra K.

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MODEL olivia @ spot6 management assistant lauren fairservice Styling kate o’reilly Makeup jenn aqui


MODEL Marta @ peggi lepage

MODELs ievgeniia and marta @ peggi lepage hair Amanda Marchese Makeup Sara marchese

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MODEL katie @ spot6 management art director janine bartels assistant lauren fairservice Styling kate o’reilly Makeup jenn aqui


MODEL cassie h.

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MODELs Emily and Kaitie @ peggi lepage assistant lauren fairservice Styling kate o’reilly Makeup jenn aqui


MODEL Holland Stille Makeup lauren fairservice

view Danielle’s website at daniellesuzanne.com

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MORIES photographed by sara pellegrino styling by chiara caputo wardrobe is vintage hair by bruno gagliano makeup by giulia schirru model is edmĂŠe nicolis di robilant @ zoe models

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JAMES WHINERAY


james whineray is a contemporary photographer living and working in perth, australia.

ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph?

AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work?

James Whineray: I try to make the viewer feel like they’re a part of my pictures. Nothing is too constructed. It’s about being a part of the moment rather than making a moment. Capturing a split second in time.

JW: I’m a big fan of Viviane Sassen’s photographs.. Not sure if I have been influenced so much by her photography. She inspires me to work harder, I guess. I really try to develop my own style rather than be influenced by other people’s work.

AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started?

AM: What have you achieved so far in your photography, and what would you like to achieve?

JW: My father had an old SLR I used to use as a kid. Maybe around fifteen years ago now. I started taking my work seriously in 2008 when a friend suggested I should try and publish something.

JW: I am having my first major exhibition this year. And I would like to print a hardcover book one day. That’s a goal.

AM: Who or what inspires you? JW: I’m mostly inspired by change. I like to keep moving. New surroundings inspire me most. If I stay in one place too long, it’s pretty hard for me to want to take pictures naturally; it becomes very forced. I spend lots of time driving places. AM: Why do you use film? JW: I don’t like technology. I have a digital camera I use for video, and it’s very confusing. White balance and all that junk. I would rather not. I also prefer not being able to see what I’m taking at the time. If it works, it works, and if it doesn’t work, wait for another picture. I’m not into the idea of checking every picture after you take it until you have the perfect image. And, of course, film looks better. Digital is too clinical. It looks like a computergenerated image, which it is.

AM: Where do you like to shoot most, and why? JW: If I’m shooting fashion, I try to make it spontaneous. Meet a girl and spend a day with her, rather than constructing contrived images with a team of six people watching me work. If I’m working on personal work, I’m trying to find something interesting to photograph. I try not to think about my audience too much. AM: Favorite books, movies, and bands/singers, and explain why you love them! JW: Photo books! I’m obsessed with them. I like zines and small self-published works. Anything tangible that you can hold and put on a shelf is priceless. I think the internet has its place, but something published on the internet is only temporary. Print is forever.

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view james’ website at jameswhineray.com/news

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close-up photography by irina slipchenko styling by lena medvedeva model is natalia @ eskimo


Jacket vero moda dress vero moda

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jacket 100hundred shirt stussy


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Sweater mango Blazer Thrifted Skirt lena medvedeva


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Dress Thrifted jacket Thrifted

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MODEL madalina @ premier Models Styling Georgia Boal Russel Hair Jason Cruzier @ dw managemenT Makeup julie cooper @ dw management

gabriel e murphy

gabrielle is a twenty-six-year-old photographer in london, england. she was born in australia but has lived in the uk for the last three years. she studied commercial photography at the royal melbourne institute of technology, specializing in analog photography. gabrielle wants to learn different languages and to travel as much as she can. she loves nature and would call a mountain her home.


ACHE Magazine: What do you try to convey through your work? Why do you photograph?

AM: Who is your favorite photographer, and how have you been influenced by his/her work?

Gabrielle Murphy: I have always been looking at elements of escapism and release in imagery, though sometimes I feel it’s difficult to achieve that feeling standing behind the lens. The main reason I am compelled to photograph is to see that freedom and transformation in the visual. I am also interested in the psychological, too—the delicate, sad, longing, mad, and weird self. But let’s not be too serious! I shoot because it feels good.

GM: It’s too hard to name one. I originally began looking at photojournalists and portrait photographers like Nan Goldin, Nadav Kander, and Lise Sarfarti. My guilty pleasure then became fashion photography. I was indulging in Sarah Moon, Erwin Blumenfeld, and Camille Vivier. I think they have all inspired me in different ways, depending on the questions or angles their photographs convey.

AM: How long have you been shooting? How has your photography changed since you started? GM: I started shooting six years ago. First, experimenting with myself, then onto friends, now models with a team. I guess my work has become more refined, but I would never want to be too polished. Mistakes are happy surprises. Moving around has also shaped my work. There is an incredible variety of willing talent and collaborative exchange within London. I look forward to traveling to more places and continuing with what I used to shoot, snapshots and portraits. AM: How would you describe yourself as a person and as a photographer? GM: As a person, I’m odd, at times brash and awkward, yet sensitive and sentimental. I’m one to assess and question. As a photographer, I am still learning, so it’s difficult to describe myself. I can be shy at times behind the camera, but I am finding it’s easier with time bringing what’s inside my head to the visual forefront. AM: Who or what inspires you? GM: Surrealism, Chris Marker, Sylvie Guillem, Lise Sarfarti, Wim Wenders, electronica, existentialism, and mysticism. AM: Digital or film? Why? GM: Film for its tones, grains and its wonder. I get butterflies each time I develop a roll or collect one from the lab. I think, has it exposed? Did she blink? Is the feeling that I felt seen in the photograph? Film is a constant surprise. Digital is useful, too, especially in the post-production stages. However, for me, it lacks that ultimate surprise and cinematic feeling that analog produces.

AM: What, in your opinion, is art? Simple really! Communication for an absurd world. AM: How does fashion play into your work? GM: In my fashion photographs, I think the clothing is symbolic and loaded with connotations. Sure, fashion can be fun and playful, but I like to work with a considered and sometimes serious idea of fashion to help push my visual ideas further. It helps working with the right people on this. Minds must meet. AM: What mood do you love to capture in your work? Why? GM: I am drawn to sensitivity. I toy with surrealism and yearn to develop my own sort of abstract visual meaning. I think it’s important to answer your own questions in life, and the visual medium gives you a chance to define and explore that. AM: Do you prefer shoot on location or in the studio? How are the two different? GM: I like to shoot on location! Not necessarily outdoors, but a bedroom or warehouse with the right light. It’s fun to enter someone else’s space and use your immediate reaction in placing your subject or observing the light. When I shoot portraits in the warmer months, I pretty much always use natural light and rely on daylight or existing light, like lamps. I like this process, and it’s less of a logistical nightmare than using a studio, which frees up my creative direction. But since I live in London, I am restricted to the studio for most months of the year, and I can experiment with tungsten or HMIs. I sometimes miss shooting in my home country, Australia, and the ease of including the natural and rugged landscape elements into the composition.

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MODEL henrietta @ next Models Styling tomas c. toth Hair and makeup terri capon post-production sean mounce


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MODEL sasha @ iconic Models Styling tomas c. toth Hair terri capon makeup caroline @ dw management


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MODEL sasha @ iconic Models Styling tomas c. toth Hair terri capon makeup caroline @ dw management


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MODEL aline @ storm Models Styling elina galuga Hair and makeup silene tonello


MODEL anna denton Design kathleen dickinson Hair and makeup kat bardsley

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MODEL isabel @ storm Models Styling tomas c. toth Hair and makeup terri capon post-production sean mounce


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ACHE

magazine

ACHE Magazine July 2013  

issue #8 of ACHE magazine, a quarterly magazine created by and for young people around the world. released on july 31, 2013.

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