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The School Of Life

An enquiry into designing ideal educational environment.

Dadhania Achal | A-0612

Research based design dissertation Indubhai Parekh School Of Architecture, November,2017


The School Of Life

An enquiry into designing ideal educational environment.

Dadhania Achal | A-0612

Research based design dissertation Indubhai Parekh School Of Architecture, November,2017


APPROVAL

V.V. P. SANCHALIT UNDERGRADUATE DISSERTATION

APPROVAL INDUBHAI PAREKH SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE V.V. P. SANCHALIT UNDERGRADUATE DISSERTATION RAJKOT OF ARCHITECTURE INDUBHAI PAREKH SCHOOL V.V. P. SANCHALIT The following study isUNDERGRADUATE hereby approvedRAJKOT as credible work on the approved subject, carried out DISSERTATION and presentedINDUBHAI in a manner sufficiently warrant its acceptance as a pre-requisite to PAREKHsatisfactory SCHOOLtoOF ARCHITECTURE The following study is hereby approved as credible work on the approved subject, carried out V.V. P. SANCHALIT the degree for which it has been submitted. RAJKOTto warrant its acceptance as a pre-requisite to and presented in a manner sufficiently satisfactory

INDUBHAI PAREKH SCHOOL OF ARCHITECTURE

the for which it has been submitted. It isdegree understood that by approval, the undersigned does not necessarily endorse or carried approveout of The following study is this hereby approved as credible work on the approved subject, RAJKOT any statement in made, the opinion expressed or conclusion drawn therein andasapproves the study and presented a manner sufficiently satisfactory to warrant its acceptance a pre-requisite to It is understood that by this approval, the undersigned does not necessarily endorse or approve of onlydegree for the and satisfiesashim as to work the requirements laid down bycarried the thesis the forabove which itishas been submitted. The following studypurpose; hereby approved credible on the approved subject, out any statement made, the opinion expressed or conclusion drawn therein and approves the study committee. and presented in a manner sufficiently satisfactory to warrant its acceptance as a pre-requisite to only for the above purpose; and satisfies him as to the requirements laid down by the thesis It is understood that by this approval, the undersigned does not necessarily endorse or approve of the degree for which it has been submitted. committee. any statement made, the opinion expressed or conclusion drawn therein and approves the study only for the above and satisfies him as to does the requirements laidendorse down or byapprove the thesis It is understood that purpose; by this approval, the undersigned not necessarily of

Title: The School of Life

committee. any statement made, the opinion expressed or conclusion drawn therein and approves the study onlyTitle: for theThe above purpose; and satisfies him as to the requirements laid down by the thesis School of Life committee. Studio Co-ordinator and Guide: Prof. Riddhi Shah

Title: The School of Life

Studio Co-ordinator and Guide: Prof. Riddhi Shah

Title: The School of Life Signature Studio Co-ordinator and Guide: Prof. Riddhi Shah Signature Date: Studio Co-ordinator and Guide: Prof. Riddhi Shah Date: Signature Date: Signature

Dadhania Achal, A-0612 Dadhania Achal, A-0612


FOWARD | ACKNOWLEDGEMENTS


This report contains final submission of Semester X, culminating project of Indubhai Parekh School of Architecture Rajkot in Bachelor’s of Architecture course. The featured proposal is an alternative school typology, for the education based philosophies of Madam Montessori, Rudolf Steiner and Sri Aurobindo & The Mother. Although in principle, this is the work of an individual, this proposal has been developed in collaboration with following personnel to all of whom I extensively express my gratitude and thanks to my guide Prof. Riddhi Shah to help me out and guide me through this study, faculties at IPSA who helped me formulate the study in its early stages and my family and friends; Naeem, Deep, Savan G., Shruti, Brinda, Dhruva, Bhargav, Anubhav, Divyang, Mohit, Khushbu K., Anjani, Ajay with whoms support I am able to produce the work in this report.

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PREFACE


Picture this: A wise man. Sitting under a flourishing mango tree. Surrounded by eager minds. The man imparts knowledge and life skills. The man is unbiased and non judgmental. The students are in awe of him; believe him to be the teacher of enlightenment. This is the scene of the first ever classroom. No text books, no air conditioning and no squabbling. Skip a few centuries and we come to the now. The class rooms are over-crowded and the teachers are over worked. “Enlightenment” is just a word in the dictionary. Bags are crammed with books which are poorly drafted and make no sense in teaching a student ‘how to live’. Isn’t that what education was supposed to do? The dictionary meaning of education ‘is the process of facilitating learning, or the acquisition of knowledge, skills, values, beliefs, and habits.’ Can any student claim to have learnt that in the beginning years of their education? Can any teacher claim to have been able to teach that? Gone are the days when a textbook didn’t have the answer to the question on the black board. This is the time for cutthroat competition, where education is a business and the students and their parents are “customers”. Everybody wants results but nobody asks the student if he or she feels satisfied with the education that they receive on a daily basis. And even if someone did, the student wouldn’t know because they have no reference to compare! III


TABLE OF CONTENTS


Acknowledgment I Preface III Table of Contents V List of Plates VII Introduction 1 Proposal The Idea of School 5 History in brief 6 Dr. Maria Montessori 8 Ar. Rudolf Steiner 10 Sri Aurobindo & Mother 12 Prakash Nair 14 Case Studies 17 St Xavier’s School, Ahmedabad 18 Shreyas Foundation, Ahmedabad 20 Neev Primary, Bangalore 22 Eklavya Schools, Ahmedabad 24 Comparative Analysis 26 Inferences from study 28

Project Brief 31 Scope & Acivities Site : Rajkot 35 Location & Geography 36 Context & Site features 38 Concept Evolution 41 Conclusion 51 Appendix I | II | III | IV VIII Bibliography XII List of Illustrations XIII

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Plate 1 Draft Plan 50 | 51 Plate 2 Isometric View 52 | 53 Plate 3 Exploded Isometric View 52 | 53 Plate 4 Sections & Wall Section 52 | 53 Plate 5 Model Photographs 52 | 53

LIST OF PLATES

VII


INTRODUCTION


The eminent architect and author, Herman Hertzberger, in ‘Space and Learning’ believes that a space should be a stimulus for learning. Not being told how it should be done, but in the words of Maria Montessori, “learning to do it yourself.” We think of schools and usually, bright classrooms with blackboards come into mind. The students are eagerly gulping what the teacher is trying to feed their brains. May it be a rural or urban setting, students everywhere require a space which allows them to flourish as individuals and yet, be able to work with peers, just like them. This is a place which doesn’t judge the students’ background and the space helps in establishing a relationship with their peers, environment and their surroundings. The traditional models of education are changing and the space needs to be updated as well. According to the BaLA report (GOI, 2010), education today needs to bridge social, regional and gender gaps, with the active participation of the community in the management of schools. (SSA, 2010) Instead of a nurturing environment, schools are becoming a thriving mass of chaos and money-making business strategy. From kindergarten to high school, the definition of a student-teacher relationship has changed drastically and needs ‘mending’. School environments have to be ever-changing and stimulating to create an atmosphere which nurtures a student’s brain, belonging to any age group. With the advent of education for the masses, there were many theorists and educationists who proposed and re-enacted the way schools function and how to re-create a flourishing environment for both the students and the teachers. There exist schools built on the philosophies and ideals of Rudolf Steiner, Maria Montessori, Sri Aurobindo Gijubhai Bhadeka, Jiddu Krishnamoorthy, etc. These educationists changed the conventional meaning of schools and schooling by providing ways of experimental teaching model which allows the student to select what he or she wishes to study and learn. Although, the ideas and origins of each of these theorists are different, they are increasingly broad-minded and relevant even today. The school design today results in an uninspiring learning environment, mass producing students to obey the laws of the society powered by capitalism. The students of primary education (who are barely children) are spending more time closed in an enclosure than spending time at home or just playing in green, open spaces and this may cause an adverse effect on their lives where they tend to become bored or frustrated of the learning environment. In the long haul, this becomes a comfort zone which may not enable the student to cope with educational life further.

The education system needs an overhaul and the role of building an education system should be left in the hands of an educationist. Instead of focusing on knowledge which may find no use in real (read: post school) life, schools should become thriving spaces to teach children to be independent, engaging and possess a lifelong love for learning. The word school derives from Greek σχολή (scholē), originally meaning “leisure” and also “that in which leisure is employed”, but later “a group to whom lectures were given, school”. This thesis seeks to analyze and ‘insert’ the traditional philosophy based education systems into school building design and to bring back the actual meaning of a school in an institution and learning environment.

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INTRODUCTION | PROPOSAL


Aim

To design alternative school model based on philosophies of various educationists.

Objective • To understand the qualities of the space and role of environment in the learning process • To study and understand the nature of the activities for learning and role of built environment in the induction of values to the learner • To design a space for learning with the translation of inferences from the philosophy of educationists Methodology • To identify issues in current learning environments. • To inquiring for philosophy and educationists who talk about learning environment through literature review, interviews and case study of the same which are on such guidelines. • Taking inference via critical analysis, deriving general guidelines (philosophies) which would help design space for learning. • To demonstrate via design, which addresses the problem of educational built environment in an urban context.

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The Idea of School A brief study of school premise and theories of educationists Maria Montessori, Waldorf, Aurobindo & The Mother and Prakash Nair.

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Mark Dudek asks a fantastic question while trying to understand what is the new type of school design. He asks, “What is the relationship between pedagogical visions and spaces for children?” He explains that in this question lies the key to understanding of good school or pre-school architecture. Whilst we want and need schools which respond to immediate requirements of the contemporary society, the schools we build now are also for a future which is hard to predict. Dudek says that “Designers of school buildings need ‘the vision thing’.” Looking back into history, when school buildings were first being designed as ‘institutions for learning’, they were to be places of thriving radical, educational ideas. Since then and now, the degree of radicalism has only increased since it is to become a system of mass education and constantly, needs to reinvent itself to provide more and more educational places of an ever improving quality. School buildings were not given much thought because they were considered a mandatory part of life and thus, there was an uncertainty attached to it. If it is something which is made compulsory for all, does it really need a specific characteristic to set itself apart? If it is so, why? What is so special about a school building? While learning and education was given much importance, the institutions themselves were just that, institutions. They were grand but not relevant to a cause. The idea to develop a skill-based educational system rather than a chalk-to-the-board approach was to evolve in the early 18th century but it wasn’t until a century later when the theorists and educationists developed school and education systems which provided a very creative and visionary solution of how schools should function; that schools should be considered as a program itself and that they become spaces for wholesome education. Four major theorists questioned the very roots of schooling systems and revolutionized the way education would be imparted to individuals. The philosophies of Maria Montessori, Rudolf Stiener, Sri Aurobindo and Jiddu Krishnamurti. A fifth theorist, Prakash Nair is also considered for his influence on the contemporary education scenario.1

Fig. 1. The Victorian School

After, the UK Elementary Education Act was introduced in 1870, the importance of constructing large schools in dense urban settings became increasingly prevailent. Not did the school boards need the new buildings that held the large number of students, emphasis was placed on shaping young children into obedient, healthy workers. This resuted in symmetrical, rigid plans where both sexes had seperate circulation cores. Class Rooms were orthogonal with very tight desks and teachers carried out classes under the “chalk and talk” premise.2

THE IDEA OF SCHOOL | A BRIEF HISTORY


Fig. 2. Impington Village School | Walter Gropius

Fig. 3. Marl School | Hans Scharoun

Arranged across a gardened landscape, the low density complex denotes an urban sprawl, creating a community aspect, contrast to the strict Vctorian school.

Hans Scharoun challanged the conventional school layout where there is an abundance of of standardised class rooms without differentiation between each age group by adapting more tailored, humane approach.

Classrooms were airy and inviting, there was land for school gardens and most importantly, a large amount of community areas were present.

He explored the intrinsinc social nature of the school community in terms of planning and its organisation, pioneering the analogy of cassroom as separate houses, the corridor a communal street, and public space such as the assembly hall as ta townhall.

To Walter Gropius, the village college was opportunity to change the face of rural education. Not only did the school benefit education, it became a community centre for the whole neighbourhood and provide facilitis for the development of the “whole man”. 2

Classroom wings are detached from the main building to make children feel more seperate and autonomous, with outdoor walkways acting as a street and integrated gardens with landscaping. 2

Hertzberger, Herman. Lessons for students in architecture. Rotterdam: Uitgeverij 010, 1991. Print. 2Lee, Jennifer. “Steiner Academy Five Valleys.” Thesis. University of Bath BSc Architecture, 2014. Issuu.com. 14 July 2014. Web. 1 Feb. 2017. 1

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Dr. Maria Montessori believed that the child’s mind is like a sponge, adjusting and digesting information. Everything that occurs in a child’s life has a profound effect on the child and the quality of early experiences is of great importance to a child’s self construction. Thus, she enabled an education system wherein the children learnt from the environment. Montessori made her students capable enough to believe that education is not what the teacher tells you. The Montessori method is based on children’s natural curiosity and desire to learn. All children go through the same developmental stages but the timing for each child can vary. The teacher provides the materials and environment that aid development and is ready to respond when help is needed. In the classroom, everything is child sized, easy to reach, allowing free choice. Children learn to take care of themselves, their environment and each other. The system helps develop important character traits like self discipline, concentration, freedom and independence. The system suggests that children couldn’t be taught to learn but they can be definitely be shown how to learn. The children choose the activities they want to do, when they want to do them. Observing and nurturing each child, the teacher prepares the environment, offers guidance and directs the child’s energy.3

Fig. 4. The House | Classroom

The L-shaped class room creates 3 distinctive, seperate zones Children work in different environments depending on noise and concentration leves required at the time. Working alone | Small Group | Large Table4

THE IDEA OF SCHOOL | THEORIES - MARIA MONTESSORI

A 2 - step floor variation further contributes to the learning zones - children are not forced to work alongside the whole class at the same time. This allows for different activities to happen simultaneously without distraction. Teachers are encouraged to inhabit their classtoom alongside the students.4


Fig. 5. The Front Lawn | Threshold Space immediately outside the classroom - outside security of classroom but still able to feel the sense of belongingness. Teacher still able to observe from inside the class room. A cave where children can work on projects independently.4

Hertzberger, Herman. Lessons for students in architecture. Rotterdam: Uitgeverij 010, 1991. Print. 4Hertzberger, Herman. Space and learning: lessons in architecture 3. Rotterdam: 010 Publishers, 2008. Print.

Fig. 6. The Street | Public Space Most important part of of school life - a huge classroom, Central point of the street is a brick block podium which can be extended through a ‘bit of parts’ effectively and extremely felxible space. A place to be heard, to perform, to read, to socialize, to debate, to feel taller.4

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Waldorf education, also known as Steiner education, is based on the educational philosophy of Rudolf Steiner, the founder of anthroposophy. Its pedagogy emphasizes the role of imagination in learning, striving to integrate holistically the intellectual, practical, and artistic development of pupils. Steiner’s division of child development into three major stages is reflected in the schools’ approach to early childhood education, which focuses on practical, handson activities and creative play; to elementary education, which focuses on developing artistic expression and social capacities; and to secondary education, which focuses on developing critical reasoning and empathic understanding. The overarching goal is to develop free, morally responsible, and integrated individuals equipped with a high degree of social competence. Qualitative assessments of student work are integrated into the daily life of the classroom, with quantitative testing playing a minimal role in primary education and standardized testing usually limited to that required for college entry. Individual teachers and schools have a great deal of autonomy in determining curriculum content, teaching methodology, and governance.5

Fig. 7. The First Seven Years - Imitation

From birth to the age of seven, the child learns to stand, to speak, to think. This all happens without the presence of formal education but through a combination of latent ability, instinct and meaningful imitation. Teachers aim to teach children whilst rejecting the erosion of childhood and places an emphasis on play. Children learn though dance and ring games. This is the first step towards ‘developing through play’.6

THE IDEA OF SCHOOL | THEORIES - WALDORF (RUDOLF STIENER)


Fig. 8. The Second Seven Years - Imagination

Fig. 9. The Third Seven Years - Truth, Discrimination and Judgment

The second seven years is marked by the most prominent physical change in a child - loss of their milk teeth, growth in height. At this point. the child is wholl y themselves.

The adolescent child starts to search for the truth and experiences the power of their own thinking.

This is clear when the child develops; they have developed a vivid life of imagination and are ready for more formal learning, such as reading, writing and maths. 6

In the upper school, classes are still abundant with creative activities but the emphasis shifts from developing will and feeling to developing thinking. 6

Education Guide 2016 2016 (15 Mar. 2016): n. pag. Print. 6Lee, Jennifer. “Steiner Academy Five Valleys.� Thesis. University of Bath BSc Architecture, 2014. Issuu.com. 14 July 2014. Web. 1 Feb. 2017. 5

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The learning system developed by Sri Aurobindo and the Mother is a free progress philosophy which has five main principles: the physical, the vital, the mental, the psychic and the spiritual. Though this is not an exact system of knowledge-based education, it allows the student to develop their ideas from scratch. Sri Aurobindo’s system of learning is developed on the belief that nothing can be taught, everything is to be learnt on our own, through our own inclinations. The teacher acts as only a guide, rather than as an instructor. The power of imagination and creativity are strongly emphasised upon and practical, simple solutions to problems are encouraged.7

Fig. 10. Porosity in Circulation Freedom of movement and circulation admist the built spaces gives children a sense of liberty.

THE IDEA OF SCHOOL | THEORIES - AUROBINDO & MOTHER


Fig. 11. Integration with Nature Vegetation and sky is visible from every space integrating the nature and structure.

Education Guide 2016 2016 (15 Mar. 2016): n. pag. Print.

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Influenced by Christopher Alexander’s “Pattern Language”, Prakash Nair and Randall Fielding in “The Language of School Design”, explain why a pattern language is required for schools. Nair believes that while Alexander’s book was revolutionary in explaining how following simple rules of town planning can make living in a city or university better. He seeks to apply the same theory to modern school buildings and in the process, make better schools and also bridge the gap between the principles of learning spaces and the actual sub-standard design of a majority of school facilities. At the same time, Nair mentions that these design patterns are just the beginning for creating a basic school architecture model but shouldn’t be considered as a comprehensive vocabulary for school design, as a whole. Subsequent trials of a design vocabulary will lead to a common ground which can be shared amongst all kinds of educational institutes. In the course of their theory, they ask three important questions and try to provide solutions through the Pattern Language Method: • To what extent do state standards and required curriculums dictate the manner in which school buildings are planned and designed? • Do the facilities created as a result of such external educational forces help or hurt learning goals? • How does the physical design of a school affect the social dynamics of the school community?8

THE IDEA OF SCHOOL | THEORIES - PRAKASH NAIR

Fig. 12. The Ford Model The traditional model can be equated to the factory model or assembly line of the Model-T that inspired it. Although intended to be efficient, it assumes learning is passive, teachers are in control and that every student learns in the same way.


Fig. 13. Crow School

The L-shaped classroom of the Crow Island School designed by Eero Saarinen, Perkins, Wheeler and Will, has the ability to function as a learning studio with multiple activity centers.

Fig. 14. Campfire | Cave | Watering Hole

Campfires are a way to learn from story telling or experts. Caves are spaces for individual study and reflection and creative flow. Watering holes are areas to socialize and create a democratic learning space.

Fig. 15. Learning Suites

Learning studios become flexible and can be combined to create one large learning suite where teachers can collaborate. This irregular plan provides opportunities to support a significant number of learning modalities and flexible spaces.

Nair, Prakash, Randall Fielding, and Jeffery A. Lackney. The language of school design: design patterns for 21st century schools. Minneapolis, MN: DesignShare, 2013. Print.

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Shreyas Foundation - Clustered

Neev Primary School - Clustered

Eklavya Education - Fordist Layout

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Case Studies Criterias are as follows • To understand the relationship of open spaces with core learning spaces. • To understand how interpretation of educationist’s thought have been transformed into built form. • Organisation of classrooms with each other and its relationship with their extensions. • Check on how activites are performed inside the learning spaces.

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various functions of the school – classrooms, offices, library, corridors etc. – without resorting to rigid hierarchies and definitions of space. This creates environment that truly belongs to the children, who need not hesitate to claim any area as their own – corridors double as classrooms, courtyards become

St. Xavier’s, HCP / Ahmedabad In designing the St. Xavier’s Primary School, located within the campus of Loyola Hall, the attempt was to fuse work and play, understood as complementary aspects of the education process. The use of R.C.C. columns on a square grid allowed for a play of open, semi-open and closed spaces to accommodate the various functions of the Site Area - 74000 Sq Mts school – classrooms, offices, library, corridors etc. – without Built Up Area - 6500 Sq Mts resorting to rigid hierarchies and definitions of space.

Scale 1:5000

Designed in early 60’s, this primary school building has us of R.C.C. columns on a square grid allowed for a play o open, semi-open and closed spaces to accommodate th various functions of the school – classrooms, offices, librar Si corridors etc. – without resorting to rigid hierarchies an Bu definitions of space.

This creates environment that truly belongs to the childre who need not hesitate to claim any area as their own corridors double as classrooms, courtyards becom

The result has been an environment that truly belongs to the children, who need not hesitate to claim any area as their own – corridors double as classrooms, courtyards become corridors and a pool with fountains becomes a swimming pool. Paintings, murals and sculptures are an integral part of the simple brick and R.C.C structure, forming a setting for the self-learning process which is crucial for children in their early years. Corridors are the same size as the classrooms, and the various activities possible there do indeed turn them into alternative classrooms. A profusion of landscaped, open to sky courts has made it possible to have an informal and non-sterile environment in the school.

Scale 1:2000 0

Scale 10 1:5000 30

Fig. 16. Relation of built form with site.

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Fig. 17. Figure-ground plan of primary school.

Site Area - 74000 Sq Mts Built Up Area - 6500 Sq Mts

The primary building materials are brick and concrete. Cross-spaced load-bearing columns on a 8M grid have been organized to take the weight of the concrete slabs.9 Scale 1:2000

Fig. 18. Connection of corridor and open spaces.

CASE STUDIES | ST XAVIER’S SCHOOL, AHMEDABAD

Fig. 19. Width of corridor is same as classroom’s.


St. Xavier’s, HCP / Ahmedabad Designed in early 60’s, this primary school building has use of R.C.C. columns on a square grid allowed for a play of open, semi-open and closed spaces to accommodate the various functions of the school – classrooms, offices, library, corridors etc. – without resorting to rigid hierarchies and definitions of space. This creates environment that truly belongs to the children, who need not hesitate to claim any area as their own – corridors double as classrooms, courtyards become

Scale 1:5000

Site Area - 74000 Sq Mts Built Up Area - 6500 Sq Mts

Site Area - 120,000 Sq Mts Built Up Area - - Sq Mts

Scale 1:2000 Fig. 20. Diagram of courtyard admist classroom clusters and its relationship with the same.

Fig. 21. Figure-ground section of primary school. Redrawn from the base drawings procured from HCPDCM, Ahmedabad. 9“HCP Design and Project Management Pvt. Ltd.” St. Xavier’s Primary School. Web. 10 June 2017

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ns on a square grid allowed for a play of n and closed spaces to accommodate the s of the school – classrooms, offices, library, without resorting to rigid hierarchies and ace.

with landscape all around the cluster, hence learning spaces needs to be covered with just slab above on for columns seems as open as it could. Each of the learning spaces are given toilets of their own.

ronment that truly belongs to the children, hesitate to claim any area as their own – avier’s, HCP / Ahmedabad le as classrooms, courtyards become ned in early 60’s, this primary school building has use C.C. columns a square a play of free Spaciouson activity roomsgrid withallowed movable for furniture allow semi-open and closed spaces to accommodate the and flexible movement of children. Children have a choice us functions of in thelanguages, school – classrooms, of work mathematics,offices, generallibrary, knowledge and subjects. Children special subject rooms ors etc. – other without resorting to attend rigid hierarchies and for music, dance, art, craft, pottery work, social and natural tions of space.

Materials used are exposed concrete and

Shreyas Education Foundation, Ahmedabad exposed brick work kotastone flooring. Desingned on the philosphy of madam Montessorri, in late 50’s, it has cluster of few class rooms with landscape all around the cluster, hence learning spaces needs to be covered with just slab above on for columns seems as open as it could. Each of the learning spaces are given toilets of their own.

Scale 1:5000

sciences. There are various other facilities to promote interactive and integral learning.

reates environment that truly belongs to the children, Site Area - 120,000 Sq Mts need not hesitate to claim any area as their own –Vikas Up Area - - Sq Mts Four main sections, collectively called the ShreyasBuilt ors double as classrooms, courtyards Kendra, based on mixed age groups, and notbecome by standards,

Materials used are exposed concrete and exposed brick work kotastone flooring.

are as under:

Shishu: age 2.5 to 5 years Arun: age 6 to 7 years Kesari: age 8 to 12 years Kishore: age 13 to Scale 16 years. 1:2000 There are no more than 35 children with one adult. The Shishu and Arun sections follow Montessori system of learning.

Scale 1:5000

Scale 1:2000 0

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Fig. 22. Relation of built form with site.

Site Area - 120,000 Sq Mts Built Up Area - - Sq Mts

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Fig. 23. Figure-ground plan of kindergarten and primary school.

Children have no examinations until class 5. There are no competitions, rewards or punishments. Children do not pass through closed corridors but move on paths, walkways, through courtyards, under open skies and shady trees.10 Scale 1:2000

Scale 1:2000

Fig. 24. Connection of classroom and open spaces.

CASE STUDIES | SHREYAS FOUNDATION, AHMEDABAD

Fig. 25. Extension of classroom into open space.


Shreyas Education Foundation, Ahmedabad

ool building has use owed for a play of accommodate the oms, offices, library, gid hierarchies and

Desingned on the philosphy of madam Montessorri, in late 50’s, it has cluster of few class rooms with landscape all around the cluster, hence learning spaces needs to be covered with just slab above on for columns seems as open as it could. Each of the learning spaces are given toilets of their own.

ongs to the children, area as their own – ourtyards become

Materials used are exposed concrete and exposed brick work kotastone flooring.

ale 1:2000

Scale 1:5000

Site Area - 120,000 Sq Mts Built Up Area - - Sq Mts

Fig. 26. Diagram of courtyard admist classroom clusters and its relationship with the same.

Scale 1:2000

Fig. 27. Figure-ground section of primary school. Redrawn from the base drawings procured from Kamal Mangaldas, Ahmedabad 10 “Facilities : Class Rooms.” Class Rooms | Shreyas School Ahmedabad | Shreyas Foundation Ahmedabad. Web. 10 June 2017

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canopy. Semi-open spaces on the upper floor overlooks the courtyard on the ground floor .

Neev Primary School, Hundred Hands / Bangalore

Riding on the philosophy of the school, the plan consists of many unlabeled, in-between spaces which are flexible, of various scales and open to different uses. The central yard, Site Area - 4500 Sq Mts an extension to the library, is a tall space, filled with diffuse Built Up Area - 2800 Sq Mts light and enclosed by other smaller, more intimate spaces and staircases. Filled with children during the recesses, these are used in multiple ways.

This school is houses primary education, each ;earning space is a clustered with other leraning spaces , glued by court in the centre, all under single metal canopy.

Scale 1:5000

Semi-open spaces on the upper floor overlooks the courtyard on the ground floor .

These places for congregation, interaction and reflection outside the classrooms form the core of the school.

Scale 1:2000

The performance space on the south west corner is an open pavilion surrounded by landscape both within the site and the adjacent coconut orchards. The simple palette of materials(exposed concrete for the slabs and beams, plaster/paint for the walls and Kota on the floors) is clearly articulated. The grid of the structure is reflected in the flooring using rough Kota inlays.

Scale 1:5000 0

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28. Relation of built form with site. Site AreaFig. - 4500 Sq Mts Built Up Area - 2800 Sq Mts

The central yard is surrounded by other spaces of a more intimate scale and overlook terraces from the first floor. Though all of these spaces are visually connected they are distinct and serve to accommodate different scales of congregation. Their proximity to classrooms, the art room, or other such enclosed rooms affect the nature of these spaces.

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Fig. 29. Figure-ground plan of kindergarten and primary school.

Scale 1:2000

Though completely covered by the metal roof, this internal volume still seems connected to the landscape around and the sky.11 Fig. 30. Connection of classroom and open spaces.

CASE STUDIES | NEEV PRIMARY SCHOOL, BANGALORE

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Fig. 31. Extension of classroom into open space.

Site Bui


Neev Primary School, Hundred Hands / Bangalore This school is houses primary education, each ;earning space is a clustered with other leraning spaces , glued by court in the centre, all under single metal canopy. Semi-open spaces on the upper floor overlooks the courtyard on the ground floor .

Scale 1:5000

Site Area - 4500 Sq Mts Built Up Area - 2800 Sq Mts

Site Area - 100,00 Built Up Area - 13

Scale 1:2000

Fig. 32. Diagram of courtyard admist classroom clusters and its relationship with the same.

Fig. 33. Figure-ground section of primary school. Redrawn from the base drawings procured from Hundred Hands, Bangalore. 11 “Neev Primary School.� Neev. Web. 10 June 2017.

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laboratories from junior to senior school levels, libraries, a science park, gymnasium and an institute for teachers' training. A range of building materials and finishes has been used, including exposed concrete, plastered brick, exterior heritage finishing for the walls and a mix of aluminum & mild

the upper floor overlooks the nd floor .

mary School, Hundred Hands / Bangalore

Eklavya School, HCP / Ahmedabad

is houses primary education, each ;earna clustered with other leraning spaces , Education Foundation trust established in 1997 ourt in Eklavya the centre, all under singleis ametal

School designed in late 90’s has preprimary, junior, middle and senior levels, including a middle school computer laboratory, science laboratories from junior to senior school levels, libraries, a science park, gymnasium and an institute for teachers' training. A range of building materials and finishes has been used, including exposed concrete, plastered brick, exterior heritage finishing for the walls and a mix of aluminum & mild

Scale 1:5000

in the outskirts of Ahmedabad, with 6 buildings covering a total built up area of 12,000 sq m. It is a nursery to class XII, Site Area - 100,000 Sq Mts co-educational, English medium day school, devoted to the Built Up Area - 13,840 Sq Mts spacesallon thedevelopment upper floorofoverlooks the1,000 students. round approximately

on the ground floor .

Facilities have been designed by HCP for schools at preprimary, junior, middle and senior levels, including a middle school computer laboratory, science laboratories from junior to senior school levels, libraries, a science park, gymnasiumScale and1:2000 an institute for teachers’ training. A range of building materials and finishes has been used, including exposed concrete, plastered brick, exterior heritage finishing for the walls and a mix of aluminum & mild steel fenestrations.12

Scale 1:2000 Scale 1:5000 0

10

Fig. 34. Relation of built form with site.

Site Area - 100,000 Sq Mts Built Up Area - 13,840 Sq Mts

30

0

5

15

Fig. 35. Figure-ground plan of kindergarten and primary school.

Scale 1:2000

Scale 1:2000

Fig. 36. Connection of classroom and open spaces.

CASE STUDIES | EKLAVYA EDUCATION, AHMEDABAD

Fig. 37. Arrangement of furniture inside classroom.


dred Hands / Bangalore

Eklavya School, HCP / Ahmedabad

ducation, each ;earnher leraning spaces , l under single metal

School designed in late 90’s has preprimary, junior, middle and senior levels, including a middle school computer laboratory, science laboratories from junior to senior school levels, libraries, a science park, gymnasium and an institute for teachers' training. A range of building materials and finishes has been used, including exposed concrete, plastered brick, exterior heritage finishing for the walls and a mix of aluminum & mild

r floor overlooks the

Scale 1:5000

Site Area - 100,000 Sq Mts Built Up Area - 13,840 Sq Mts

Scale 1:2000

Scale 1:2000

Fig. 38. Diagram of courtyard admist classroom clusters and its relationship with the same.

Fig. 39. Figure-ground section of primary school.

Redrawn from the base drawings procured from HCPDCM, Ahmedabad. 12 “HCP Design and Project Management Pvt. Ltd.” Eklavya Foundation. Web. 09 June 2017

25


St Xavier’s - Clustered

St Xavier’s, Ahmedabad

Shreyas Foundation, Ahmedabad

Classroom is a square volume of span 8 meters on both side as illustrated in fig. 38. with linear arrangement of furniture faving single wall.

Among the 3 typologies of the classrooms in this campus designed by different esteemed architects illustrated here in fig. 39 is the one designed by Kamal Mangaldas, the classroom is a spaces enclosed with a deck which rests on for column making it totally transparent.

Each of such class is organised in cluster and 3 or 4 of then open in the extension which also doubles as a corridor having same dimensions as of the classroom making it the place of play for children.

Neev Primary School, Bangalore

Located within densely vegetated environment each of such classrooms offer view on all sides and vegetation cuts of heat and direct sunlight making it an ideal environment of play for children.

Eklavya Education Foundation, Ahmedabad 8000

Comparatively having a considerably less land cover than other referenced cases here, classrooms house similar number of children in them. Each of such class is organised in cluster and 3 of then open in the extension which acts as supporting space for group activites between different classrooms and such cluster opens up to central court suitable for the activities which involves whole of school at the same time.

Classrooms here have different organisations for different age groups and house the similar number of children as rest of the school referenced here. Each classroom here is arranged in linear direction stacked upon each other and have corridor on one side which then connects to the large singular court.

COMPARATIVE ANALYSIS Fig. 40, 41, 42, 43. Analysis of dimensions and organization of classroom in each of the case.

8000

Shreyas


s - Clustered St Xavier’s - Clustered

0

000

Shreyas Foundation - Clustered - Clustered Shreyas Foundation - Clustered Shreyas Foundation

6600

8000

8000

Neev Primary School - Clustered Primary School - Clustered Neev Primary School -Neev Clustered

10000

10000

8400 8000

6600

6600

8400

10000

8000 8000

Eklavya Education Fordist Layout Eklavya Education - Fordist Layout Eklavya- Education - Fordist Layout

8400

8400

8400

8400

8000

Redrawn from the base drawings procured from the HCPDCM, Ahmedabad, Hundred Hands, Bangalore & Kamal Mangaldas, Bangalore.

7200

7200

7200

27


Fig. 44. Diagram showing hierarchy of spaces.

Healthy Lighting Ventilation

INFERENCES FROM CASE STUDIES


Extensions to the core learning spaces which aid in their process of learning. Indistinctiveness between ancillary spaces (circulation corridors, toilet, etc) and spaces of play. Flexibility in interior layout of learning spaces. Looking into spatial relationships to develop social relationships.

Stimulating

Community and Solitude

Adaptable

Elements of surprise Colour and nature Transparency and visual connection Connection to nature

Social and community spaces Space for socialization Refuge/Private spaces

Flexibility Welcoming and familiar

29


Project Brief Activity types and their relationship.

31


Brief The project scope is to explore the application of the philosophies, the school would serve a student population of 800 students. It shall provide education to students from 2 to 19 years old through 3 major components.

Pedagogies

Structure Kindergarten Primary Section Secondary section Activities Farming Gathering and Interaction

School Architecture

Commons Classrooms

Pedagogies

Pedagogies

Outdoor learning Fig. 45. Implication on area program.

Kindergarten (215 Children)

Primary & Middle Section (350 Children)

Secondary Section (200 Children)

Classrooms: Includes sink, large counter area, storage cabinets. Moveable dividers are desired within the space and between space. Dedicated activity area within the classroom.

Classrooms: Includes sink, large counter area, storage cabinets, varying work surface heights. Moveable dividers are desired within the space.

Classrooms: Includes sink, large counter area, storage cabinets, varying work surface heights. Moveable dividers are desired within the space.

Common learning spaces: Spaces common to a group of classrooms,a ble to absrob a variety of pedagogical approach.

Common learning spaces: Spaces common to a group of classrooms,a ble to absrob a variety of pedagogical approach.

Common learning spaces: Spaces common to a group of classrooms,a ble to absrob a variety of pedagogical approach.

Specialized function spaces: Dance and music rooms

Outdoor learning spaces: Each classroom to have connected outdoor play space. Inlcude had and soft seating and sand pits.

Labs: Physics, Chemistry labs and biology labs.

Outdoor Play Areas: Each classroom to have connected outdoor play space. Inlcude had and soft seating and sand pits. Library/Resource Centre

PROJECT | COMPONENTS | AREA SCHEDULE

Workshops: For clay Modeling and crafts. Music and dance: Rooms designed keeping acoustics in mind.

Workshops: For wood work and metal work. Music and dance: Rooms designed keeping acoustics in mind.


The School Of Life, Rajkot (Area Schedule) looolo

Learning

Function

Activity

Nature

User-type

No. of user

No. Spaces

Classrooms (225 Students)

Self Study, Group Work,Briefing

Divided into modules (Age 3-4, 5 and 6)

Toddlers,Children

25 80

Library/Resource Centre

Activity Spaces Kindergarten Administration

Staff Room Toilet Co-ordinator/Head's room Dispensary

Book Section Reading Area Story Telling Staff / Storage Art & Crafts Music Dance/Drama Food Lab 10 seater

Toilet Services

Classrooms(200) Learning Acitvity

Administration Services

Learning

Acitvity

Secondary

Administration

Services

Administration

Shared Facilties

Staff Room Toilet Co-ordinator/Head's room Toilet Drinking water Store

Classrooms(200) Design Labs(Physics + Chemistry + Biology) Art & Craft Dance Workshop Staff Room Toilet Co-ordinator/Head's room Toilet Drinking water Store

Reception + Lobby Principal/Director Vice-Principal Management Office Records Storage Pantry Toilet Dispensary Stationary Universal Toilet

Miscellaneous Library/Resource Centre Auditorium Conference Room Caferteria / Dining hall Kitchen Sports

Self Study, Group Work,Briefing Self Study, Group Work,Briefing Art & Crafts Sculpture & Modeling Music Dance/Drama Carpentry workshop 20 seater

Self Study, Group Work,Briefing

Toddlers,Children Adult

Individual/Group Work

Toddlers,Children

3 30 30 30 30 15 2 at a time 1 3

Total Area (Sq M)

Built form type

9

75

675

Semi-Open/Closed

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 2 1 1

125 75 30 20 50 50 75 50 50 10 20 20

Group Individual Individual Group

Adult/Children

Individual

Children

4

5

Children Adult

1 1

2 5

Drinking water Store

Classrooms(200)

Primary

1 module + 5 Extra

Net Area (Sq M)

Adult

Divided into modules (Age 7, 8, 9 and 10) Divided into modules(Age 11, 12, 13 and 14) Children

Group Individual Individual Individual

Adult

Divided into modules (Age 15,16,17 and 18)

480 480

8

60

1 1 1 1 1 1 1 1 4 2 4

100 75 75 75 75 40 10 20 50 2 5

2150.2

480

30

3

120

Model making 20 seater

30 30 30 20 2 at a time 1

1 1 1 1 2 1 2 2 4

120 120 120 40 10 20 50 2 5

Guest/Parents waiting

1 1 1

Work Storage

Book Section Reading Area Staff / Storage Capacity 600 Capacity 50 Capacity 1000

224

Built up

Experiments, briefing

Closed

Open Closed

M-2 Urinal + 1WC W-2 WC

1 Toilet Block Attached to 2 Class rooms with Child urinal and WC Each Water kiosks

2.5 Sq M per student, Includes sink, large counter area, hard seating, soft seating, works surface with different levels, book shelves, storage cabinets, movables furniture. Closed

70

1654 496.2

60

Adult

400

Total Circulation 30 %

8

Semiopen/Closed

Semiopen 30

60

30 30 30 30 30 20 2 at a time 1

Children Children Adult

100

1664

25

2.5 Sq M per student, 10 Book per student

Children are taught to cook basics

Built up

25

Group Individual Individual Individual

225

1280 384

8

Closed

Library Keepers/Book Storage

Total Circulation 30 %

25

Children Children Adult

250

Remarks 3 Sq M per student, Includes sink, large counter area, hard seating, soft seating, works surface with different levels, book shelves, storage cabinets, movables furniture.

M - 2 Urinal + 1WC & 2WB F - 2WC & 2WB Semiopen Open Closed

M - 4 Urinal + 2WC & 4WB F - 4WC & 4WB Water kiosks

2.5 Sq M per student, Includes sink, large counter area, hard seating, soft seating, works surface with different levels, book shelves, storage cabinets, movables furniture. Closed

720

80

124

Total Circulation 30%

1404 421.2

Built up

1825.2

100 40 30 30 10 3 2 25 25 2

267

Semiopen Open Closed

M - 4 Urinal + 2WC & 4WB F - 4WC & 4WB Water kiosks

10 books per students= 1500 books Children

150 600 50 1000

1 1 2 1

300 750 100 450

1701

Total Circulation 30%

1968 590.4

Built up

2558.4

TOTAL With circulation

6306 8197.8

33


The Site : Rajkot Study includes Geography & Location

35


Geography Rajkot is located at 22.3°N 70.78°E.[13] It has an averWage elevation of 128 metres (420 ft). The city is located on the bank of Aji River and Nyari River which remains dry except the monsoon months of July to September. The city is spread in the area of 170.00 km². Rajkot is situated in the region called Saurashtra in the Gujarat state of India. The significance of Rajkot’s location is owing to the fact that it is one of the prime industrial centres of Gujarat. Rajkot has a central location in the area called the Kathiawar peninsula. The city is located within the Rajkot district in Gujarat. Rajkot city is the administrative headquarters of the district of Rajkot. The district is surrounded by Bhavnagar and Surendranagar in the east, Junagadh and Amreli in the south, Morbi in the north and Jamnagar in the west. Climate

1 2 3 4

Rajkot has a semi-arid climate, with hot, dry summers from mid-March to mid-June and the wet monsoon season from mid-June to October, when the city receives 590 mm of rain on average. The months from November to February are mild, the average temperature being around 20 °C, with low humidity.13

5 6 7

Fig. 46. Diagram showing location of different schools in rajkot city, each dotted ring shows distance of a kilometer from the centre.

RAJKOT | CONTEXT AROUND THE SITE


Site Located near Nyari dam reservior, site is ideally located on the rapidly growing part of the city and is very well connected to the city via different modes of transport.

Kalawad Road VVPCollege

Site has seasonal water stream which flows through the northern part of the 5.5 hactre site becoming an vital element of design. Built around the site is very scarce, with farms all around the site making it a very peacefull and natural environment, ideal for educational purpose. However, site has little or no trees and are all babool trees, but other types of trees can be grown.

Site

There are existing check dams on the site regulating the flow of water through site. Access to site is convinient as it has road on all its periphery.

Nyari Reservoir

Fig. 47. Diagram showing major landmarks near the proposed site.

Image Source - Google Earth Pro 7.1 dated 7/3/17 13 Accuweather.com. Rajkot. 2017

37


This fig. 48 shows the scarceness of the built in the neighbourhood. Farms around the site and barren land on east side of the site. Farm Storage

Site has 3 main adjacent roads, all 3 of them vehicular, 24 meters, 18 meters and 9 meters respectively. Which is helpful to the site as it gives access to all the parts of the site saving us from space wasted in circulation inside the site.

Active farms

Appartment Storage rooms

Site Area 5.6 hectares

Barren Land

School Residences

Scale 1:2000

Fig. 48. Diagram showing site surroundings, buildings in vicinity and site area. 0

SITE | CONTEXT, CIRCULATION, FEATURES

5

15


The site has seasonal water stream going through it, originating from the land adjecent to it by accumulation of rain water from around the vicinity. This stream then flows to the nyari overflow which is 800 meters away from the site. almost 400 meters of length is covered by the site. There are two checkdams regulating the flow of water on site. During Summers only deeper parts of the site has water, and by rains it increase its level by a almost a meter and covers a bit more space in the site.

Scale 1:2000

Fig. 49. Diagram showing seasonal stream passing through the site. 0

Redrawn from the base Image from Google Earth Pro 7.1 & Rajkot DP 2031

5

15

39


Concept Evolution

41


0

Fig. 50. Initial responce to site.

EVOLUTION | DIAGRAMS

5

Fig. 51. Site Zonning and Circulation.

Not to Scale

15


Initial response to the site was to place core learning activites hence placed near the stream gives provision of direct access to it. Idea is to connect all the activity places providing freedom of movement to the children and helps them explore their peers. Exercise was done in order to have maximum sides of class room active hence diagonal organisation of classroom has been worked out.

Fig. 52. Sketches of organisation os activity spaces.

Keeping the built orientation north-south it allowed to open up directly to the stream and corridor to the south having done that all the services were kept on the southern side cooling down the inner main activity place.

Fig. 53. South to North - Service to main Activities.

43


This diagrams shows the idea of how grounds can be modulated in order to create playful spaces which gives a larger set of opportunities to the children and a wider variety of experiences to help them learning concepts of lessons (for life) and help them develop their physical abilities and advocate wholesome growth of him/herself. Such modulations also help climatically if oriented in the appropriate direction and terraces which are generally a huge chunk of unsused space, can be actively integrated as the play space for the children which inturn helps exploring wider use of space.

Fig. 54. Different Activities in Concept section.

Fig. 55. Modulation of ground.

Fig. 56. Ground modulation acts as play area for children.

EVOLUTION | DIAGRAMS


Fig. 57. Concept diagram for integration of nature and learning.

Integration of nature and built environment in such a way that they seemlessly communicate with each other.Each space of the school must act as a space to be inspired from, to play with, to contemplate to. Hence intervation must be as transparent as it could get. 45


Acitvity room has been divided into 3 sub activities where children can play explore on their own and has large counter beside the sand pit with tree in it, each of such room has bathroom attached to it.

EVOLUTION | DIAGRAMS & FIRST DRAFT

Fig. 58. Isometric view of Kindergarten.


Fig. 59. View showing built from the north western side.

0 1 2

4

0 1 2

4

Fig. 60a. Section through primary classrooms.

Fig. 60b. Section through kindergarten.

47


Fig. 61. Spatial organisation of service and server space.

Fig. 62. Broad walkway between classrooms acts as spillovers and space for gathering.

Fig. 63a,b,c. Conceptual section of how soil can be retained thorugh inverted beam and service running through it.

EVOLUTION | DIAGRAMS & DESIGN DEVELOPMENT


Fig. 64. Initial layout using the systems mentioned previously.

49


Fig. 64. Axonometric view of Kindergarten. Fig. 65a,b. Views of Kindergarten administration and from the administration respectively. Fig. 64.

Fig. 65a

EVOLUTION | DIAGRAMS & DESIGN DEVELOPMENT

Fig. 65b


Conclusion

Final Design Drawings

51


53


APPENDIX I | II | ST XAVIER’S SCHOOL, AHMEDABAD | SHREYAS EDUCATION


IX


1

2 2150

4300

3' 2150

4

5

2150

Up

4300

6

7

FFL:-450mm

4300

8

4300

10'

4300

11

2150

2150

4400

4600

D5

D5

2650

002

Single office cubicle

FFL:+00mm

Single office cubicle

2000

001

W5

D7

3680

003

D5

locker

125

D1

closed storage

closed storage

W3

FFL:-450mm

open to sky courtyard

3400

water body

3200

C

04

4650

D5

D7

004

4450

closed storage

closed storage

closed storage

W6

4400

011

009

007

D7

006

FFL:+00mm

D10

D7

D6

closed storage

3250

1950

D6

B

3000

005

4400

7600

D5

W11

closed storage

FFL:+00mm

W5

2550

125

W5

closed storage

Reception counter; refer to detail 102(15)01

7830

ladder racks

white board

ladder racks

easel

ladder racks

easel

D10

W7

1600

D1

3400

W1

1000

seating detail; refer to detail 102(16)01

4100

landscape slope downwards

012

FFL:+00mm

D2

Art room sink; Refer detail 102(16)01

1000 x 1000 x 1600 tank for landscape

D8

023

UP

1

3200

6600

full height storage

01

3400

FFL:+00mm

W7

full height storage

FFL:-450mm

34

E

008

6600

D3

8400

full height storage

D3

F.H.C

D

FFL:-450mm

01

FFL:-450mm

white board

55

F

D10

closed storage

closed storage

cubby units

cubby units

8400

8400

55

7800

D1

seating detail; refer to detail 102(16)01

34

14

2530

3700

4100

9200

Line of roof above

D9

W5

Rammed earth; refer to detail 102(11)

full height storage

bag rack

bag rack

bag rack

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

open book display unit

full height storage

open book display unit

open book display unit

FFL:-450mm

018

D2

55

BOOK DISPLAY UNIT

9000 34

6600

F.H.C

open book display unit

open book display unit

6600

D10

3500 D6

3400

open book display unit

open book display unit

3400

W8

full height library rack

open book display unit

open book display unit

016

open book display unit

3600 015

open book display unit

full height library rack

03

open book display unit

D6

017

02

full height storage

full height built in storage

librarian table

bag rack

FFL:+00mm

12700

FFL:+00mm

FFL:+00mm

white board

9725

W8

L

6600

020

W3

D1

3200

3400

FFL:+00mm

2900

open to sky courtyard 3500

FFL:-450mm

D8

3200

full height storage

014

6600

FFL:+00mm

K

FFL:+00mm

6600

6600

full height storage

3400

4100

D8

W1

M

Line of plinth edge

D10

2500 D10

W7

02

9000

BOOK DISPLAY UNIT

7800

D2

FFL:+00mm

D08

W1

7800 white board

Shaft

N

V1

03

W7

019

W4 D08

Shaft

FFL:+00mm

Staircase; refer to detail102(05)02 Rail detail; refer to detail 102(12)03

34

2900

34

white board

full height storage

white board

6600

500

55 55

8400

021

full height storage

D5

BOOK DISPLAY UNIT

BOOK DISPLAY UNIT

022

14

34

D10

FFL:+00mm

W7

D6

white board

J

FFL:-150mm

W4

H

H'

open to sky courtyard

6600

870

6600

013

6600

FFL:+00mm

55

G G'

W1

BOOK DISPLAY UNIT

1

UP

full height storage

3400

D10

1500 x 2000 x 1500 tank for landscape

Shaft screen; refer to detail 102(17)01

10

2150

FFL:+00mm W6

D5

Staircase; refer to detail 102(05)01 Rail detail; refer to detail 102(08)02

9

2150

FFL:-450mm

A A'

Shaft screen; refer to detail 102(17)01

8'

4300

A

Reception screen, Ramp; refer to 102(19) 04

3

2150

V1

FFL:-450mm

FFL:+00mm

FFL:-450mm

Staircase; refer to detail 102(05)04. Rail detail; refer to detail 102(08)01

A

NOTES: 1. All dimensions are in mm unless mentioned otherwise 2. This drawing is the sole property of 'Hundredhands' and cannot be reproduced in any form without the consent of the architects 3. Only written dimensions are to be followed 4. All drawings must be read in conjunction with relevant structural drawings 5. In case of any differences between architectural and structural drawings, the dimensions on the architectural shall be considered for reference

SCHEDULE OF OPENINGS - DOORS

SCHEDULE OF OPENINGS - WINDOWS LINTEL LVL 2100

NO DESCRIPTION D01 Door and double shutter windows set in a MS frame

OPENING SIZE (1000x2100)+(2200x1400)

SILL LVL 0

NOS. 3+8

NO W01

DESCRIPTION Double shutter windows ( Fixed glass & Mosquito net ) set in a MS frame

SIZE SILL LVL 700 (1350x1400) + (3200x1400)

D02 Door and double shutter windows set in a MS frame D03 Door and double shutter windows set in a MS frame

(1000x2100)+(1600x1400)

0 0

2100

3+2 2+1

W02

Double shutter windows ( Fixed glass & Mosquito net ) set in a MS frame Double shutter windows ( Fixed glass & Mosquito net ) set in a MS frame Double shutter windows ( Fixed glass & Mosquito net ) set in a MS frame

1320X1400

2100

D05 Door set in a MS frame D06 Flush door set in a MS frame

1000x2100

0

2100

6

W05

Sliding Window set in a MS frame

2480x1400

1000x2100

0

2100

6+3

700x1400

(750x2100) +(750x300)

2100

3

Window with fixed glass set in a MS frame

300x2100

D08 Door in MS frame D09 Double leaf door set in a MS frame D10 Double leaf door set in a MS frame with fixed glass on either sides

0 0

2100

4+1

W06 W07 W08

Single shutter windows ( Fixed glass & Mosquito net ) set in a MS frame

D07 Flush door set in a MS frame + ventilation above

Fixed Glass vision panel set in a MS frame

1800x2100

0

2100

1

W09

Double shutter windows ( Fixed glass & Mosquito net ) set in a MS frame

0

2100

8+4

W10 W11 W12

Double shutter windows ( Fixed glass & Mosquito net ) set in a MS frame Sliding Window set in a MS frame Double shutter windows ( Fixed glass & Mosquito net ) set in a MS frame

W13

Sliding Window set in a MS frame

4100x1400

(1000x2100)+(1000x1400)

3500x2100 2100x2100

750x2100

VENTILATORS V1 V2

Top hung ventilator with fixed glass set in a MS frame

2550X600

1500

2100

Top hung ventilator with fixed glass set in a MS frame

700X600

1500

2100

4 1

W03 W04

LINTEL LVL 2100 2100

NOS. 4+3 2

700 700

2100

700

2100

700

2100

700

2100

00

2100

1800x1100

700

2100

5+6 2+2

4100x1400 3500x1400

700

2100

1

700

2100

1450X1400 2600X1400

700

2100

3 1

700

2100

2

-

2100

2

3700x1400 3200x1400

2 2+1

REVISIONS DATE NO

DESCRIPTION

01

30.06.2015

Masonry, door-window, staircase updated

01

30.06.2015

Masonry, door-window, staircase updated

STRUCTURAL CONSULTANTS:

P.H.E CONSULTANTS :

MANJUNATH & CO. #236, 5th Cross, K.G. Nagar Bangalore - 560019. PH: 080 26616601

PRISM CONSULTANCY 135/2, 11th CROSS, FIRST FLOOR, MALLESWARAM, BANGALORE - 560 003 TEL - 080-23449432 / 2356 0141 E-mail ID: prismconsultant@gmail.com E-mail ID: prismconsultant@yahoo.co.in

PROJECT MANAGEMENT CONSULTANT:

ELECTRICAL CONSULTANTS:

3 2+1

APPENDIX III | IV | NEEV PRIMARY SCHOOL, BANGALORE | EKLAVYA SCHOOL, AHMEDABAD

JOB TITLE:

NEEV PRIMARY SCHOOL

DRAWING TITLE: General Arrangement Plans Plans at 1350mm level

Yemalur, Bangalore

ARCHITECTS:

LS CONSULTANTS

# 278, 100 FEET ROAD, 5TH BLOCK, 3RD PHASE,BSK 3RD STAGE, BANGALORE-560085 PH:91-080-26690268/290 E-mail : lsconsultants@gmail.com

Room Index 001 Reception 002 Faculty lounge 003 Faculty head 004 PYP Coordinator 005 Staff toilets 006 Staff toilets 007 Meeting room 008 Art room 009 Pantry 010 Store room 011 Electrical room 012 Classroom 013 Classroom 014 Classroom 015 Dining 016 Washroom (G) 017 Library/AV room 018 Washroom (B) 019 Classroom 020 Classroom 021 Classroom 022 Services 023 Pavilion

HUNDREDHANDS

9/2, Madras Bank Road, Bangalore - 1 PH: 91-80-25593605 / 25593606

STATUS: SCALE: PROJECT NO: DATE:

GFC 1:100 @ A1 102 10.09.2015

DRAWN BY: SREEKANTH PROJ. ARCH.: SREEKANTH CHECKED BY: BIJOY DWG NO.:

102(01)01

REV NO:

R4


XI


Norberg-Schulz, Christian. Genius loci: towards a phenomenology of architecture. New York: Rizzoli, 1980. Print. Khanna, Surbhi. “School Built Environment and Spaces, Its Relationship to Education - Study of physical manifestation of educational ideology.” Thesis. IPSA Rajkot, n.d. Print. Badheka, Gijubhai, and Suraj Prakash. Divaswapna. Delhi: Prakashan, 1999. Print. Hertzberger, Herman. Space and learning: lessons in architecture 3. Rotterdam: 010 Publishers, 2008. Print. “Rishi Valley Education Centre - School.” Rishi Valley Education Centre - School. Web. 22 Jan. 2017. Sharma, Richa, comp. STUDY ON IMPACT OF BaLA (BUILDING as LEARNING AID) IN STATE OF GUJARAT. Rep. Gandhinagar: Gujarat National Law U, 2012. Print. Yorganciogu, Derya. Steven Holl: A Translation Of Phenomenological Philosophy Into The Realm of Architecture. Thesis. The Graduate School Of Natural And Applied Science of Middle East Technical University, 2004. Web.19 Jan. 2017. “SARVA SHIKSHA ABHIYAN MISSION.” SARVA SHIKSHA ABHIYAN MISSION.Web. 22 Jan. 2017. Learning Outcomes at Elementary Stage. Rep. Sarva Shiksha Abhiyan, 16 Jan. 2017. Web. 22 Jan. 2017. Gupta, Sahil. School for alternative education. Rep. Delhi: 2016. Issuu. 15 June 2016. Web. 7 Feb. 2017. “Waldorf education.” Wikipedia. Wikimedia Foundation. Web. 07 Feb. 2017. Walls, Clare Healy. Montessori in a nutshell: a brief introduction to Maria Montessori, her philosophy, and method of education. Ireland: Hello Montessori, 2007. Print. “People’s Palaces: The Golden Age of Civic Architecture.” Neo - Classical. BBC 4. London, 14 Sept. 2010. Television. School building design: Asia: The Institute, Colombo, 1972. Print. “History of Waldorf Education.” Association of Waldorf Schools of North America -> Waldorf Education -> Rudolf Steiner & the History of Waldorf Education.Web. 10 Feb. 2017. Waldorfpeninsula. YouTube. YouTube, 06 Dec. 2013. Web. 10 Feb. 2017. TEDxTalks. YouTube. Montessori = creativity unleashed | Judi Bauerlein | TEDxLivermore, 26 Jan. 2015. Web. 09 Mar. 2017. Eric Munsell. YouTube. YouTube, 27 Jan. 2009. Web. 09 Mar. 2017. “Views On Learning Philosphy - Sunil Handa.” Personal interview. 16 Feb. 2017. “Kamal Mangaldas’ view on learning Environment.” Personal interview. 15 Feb. 2017. Nair, Prakash, Randall Fielding, and Jeffery A. Lackney. The language of school design: design patterns for 21st century schools. Minneapolis, MN: DesignShare, 2013. Print. Branzi, Andrea, and Giulio Ceppi. Reggio children: children, spaces, relations: metaproject for an environment for young children. Milan: Domus Academy Research Center, 1998. Print. Lee, Jennifer. “Steiner Academy Five Valleys.” Thesis. University of Bath BSc Architecture, 2014. Issuu.com. 14 July 2014. Web. 1 Feb. 2017.

BIBLIOGRAPHY | ILLUSTRATION CREDITS


Cover Illustration By Author Fig. 1 to 9 Lee, Jennifer. “Steiner Academy Five Valleys.” Thesis. University of Bath BSc Architecture, 2014. Issuu.com. 14 July 2014. Web. 1 Feb. 2017. Fig. 10 to 17 By Author Fig. 18 & 19 “HCP Design and Project Management Pvt. Ltd.” St. Xavier’s Primary School. Web. 10 June 2017. Fig. 20 to 29 By Author Fig. 30 & 31 “Neev Primary School.” Neev. Web. 10 June 2017. Fig. 32 to 35 By Author Fig. 36 & 37 “HCP Design and Project Management Pvt. Ltd.” Eklavya Education. Web. 10 June 2017. Fig. 38 to 45 By Author Fig. 46 & 47 Redrawn from the base Image from Google Earth Pro 7.1 & Rajkot DP 2031. Fig. 48 to 65 By Author

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The School Of Life  

This report contains final submission of Semester X, culminating project of Indubhai Parekh School of Architecture Rajkot in Bachelors of Ar...

The School Of Life  

This report contains final submission of Semester X, culminating project of Indubhai Parekh School of Architecture Rajkot in Bachelors of Ar...

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