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PHILIPPE URRACA WITH

French Pastry Master Class

CÉCILE COULIER

Photography by JEAN-MICHEL COULIER

Discover the jewels of French pastry as made by Philippe Urraca, president of the MOF Pastry Chefs since 2003, and 20 recipes by MOF pastry chefs compiled and published for the first time in this book.

CÉCILE COULIER A food writer, food stylist, author of books,* and television consultant, Cécile Coulier is a pastry lover, to the point that she trained in this speciality at the Ferrandi School, gaining her vocational qualifications in 2010. * She has written a large number of books, among which are

Petits gâteaux de grands pâtissiers, in partnership with the chefs at the Club des Sucrés (La Martinière), Mes gâteaux joliment décorés and Happy Birthday! (Solar), and Amorino, trésors glacés (Chêne). See also Les Meilleurs Desserts de France by Christophe Michalak (Gründ, Un grand pâtissier collection) and Chocolat plaisir by Pierre Marcolini (Solar), in addition to Profiteroles by Philippe Urraca (Solar).

French Pastry Master Class

Philippe Urraca and Cécile Coulier offer THE essential guide to French pastry. This complete work, which presents all of the French pastry classics with extreme accuracy and with detailed step-by-step instructions, offers you all of the techniques, skills, and tricks of the trade for success with your desserts. Financiers, macarons, puffs, tarts, cakes, and entremets, the list is endless.

PHILIPPE URRACA

Teaching, creativity and excellence is the key to this book, which will allow any lover of baking, enthusiasts or professionals, to find a recipe that works, with suggestions and tips from Philippe Urraca Meilleur Ouvrier de France pastry chef.

DE FRANCE

F O R E WO R D Pâtisserie

34

Preparation time: 1 1 ⁄2 hrs Resting time: 45 mins Baking time: 2 hrs–2 hrs 10 mins EQUIPMENT Size 20 fluted pastry tip Size 10 plain pastry tip Sultan pastry tip Disposable pastry bags Silicone dome molds, 7 cm (2 3⁄4 in) in diameter and 4 cm (1 1⁄2 in) in diameter Candy thermometer

Choux Pastry

Religieuse

Choux pastry 125 g ( 1⁄2 cup) water 125 g ( 1⁄2 cup) milk 2.5 g ( 1⁄2 tsp) salt 125 g (1 stick + 1 tbsp) butter, at room temperature 150 g (1 cup + 3 1⁄2 tbsp) all-purpose (T55) flour 250 g (8 3⁄4 oz - about 5) eggs

110 g (3 7⁄8 oz - about 6 1⁄2) egg yolks 60 g ( 1⁄2 cup) all-purpose flour 190 g (1 1⁄2 sticks + 1 1⁄2 tbsp) salted butter

35

INGREDIENTS

MAKES APPROX. 16–20 RELIGIEUSES

RELIGIEUSE W ITH SA LTED BUT TER CAR AMEL

Meringue 90 g (3 1⁄8 oz - about 2 3⁄4) egg whites 90 g ( 1⁄4 cup + 3 tbsp) superfine sugar 90 g ( 3⁄4 cup) confectioners’ sugar Craquelin 140 g (1 1⁄4 sticks) butter, softened 170 g (packed 3⁄4 cup + 1 tsp) brown sugar 200 g (1 1⁄2 cups + 1 1⁄2 tbsp) all-purpose (T55) flour 30 g (2 tbsp) water

38

Pâtisserie

Choux Pastry

Religieuse

MICHEL GUÉRARD

39

S A LT E D B U T T E R C A R A M E L P A S T R Y C R E A M

Salted butter caramel pastry cream 530 g (2 1⁄4 cups) milk

1 vanilla bean 110 g ( 1⁄2 cup + 1 tbsp) sugar

Caramel fondant 100 g ( 1⁄2 cup) sugar 35 g (2 tbsp + 1 tsp) hot water 500 g (1 lb 2 oz) white fondant 35 g (2 tbsp + 1 tsp) cocoa butter Final decoration Edible gold leaf

18. Split the vanilla bean and scrape out the seeds. Add the seeds to the milk in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Let infuse for 15 minutes.

19. Put one-third of the sugar into another saucepan and melt without stirring.

20. When it is completely melted, add another third.

21. Mix and let melt while stirring with a spatula to stop the sugar from splashing over the sides of the pan.

22. Add the rest of the sugar and caramelize. It is ready when it begins to smoke.

When the caramel is cooked, it smokes because it no longer contains water. If it left to cook any longer, it will develop a bitter taste.

25. Away from the heat, pour a mixture made from the egg yolks and flour, previously mixed in a bowl with a little hot milk ( See the principle of  premixing on p. 25), into the pan while blending with a handheld blender.

26. Bring the mixture to a boil while stirring constantly with a whisk.

27. Add the salted butter, cut into small pieces.

28. Mix with the whisk until the butter is completely incorporated.

29. Blend with the handheld blender for a few seconds to fully incorporate the fat particles and until the cream is smooth. Pour the cream over a baking sheet lined with plastic wrap. Cover with plastic wrap in direct contact with the cream.

30. Freeze for 15–30 minutes.

32. Take the salted butter caramel pastry cream out of the refrigerator and transfer it to a bowl. Whisk the cream until smooth, then fill a pastry bag fitted with a size 10 plain tip. Fill the puffs through the bottom and stand them upside down on a rack.

Fill the puffs with enough cream. The cream should rise to the top of the hole. Be careful: too much cream may cause the puff to burst.

MERINGUE

1. Make a meringue. See p. 345.

2. Use a disposable pastry bag fitted with a sultan tip to pipe meringue rings over a nonstick baking sheet.

3. Preheat the oven to 90°C (195°F). Bake the rings for 1 hour 30 minutes.

WHY?

CR AQUELIN

TIP : The brown sugar melts little 4. Always start by making the craquelin before making the choux pastry. In a mixer when baked, which is what gives the craquelin topping its crackly texture. fitted with a flat beater attachment, mix the softened butter with the brown sugar.

42

FILLING THE PUFFS

5. Add the sifted flour, followed by the water. Mix to a smooth dough.

23. Away from the heat (off the stove), stop CAUTION: When the milk is added the caramel by adding the very hot vanilla- to the caramel, a reaction causes the milk to rise suddenly inside the infused milk, all at once or half at a time, pan. Be careful of splashing. while stirring constantly.

24. Mix well.

31. Use the end of a fine pastry tip to make a hole in the bottom of each cooled puff.

TIP :

Philippe Urraca, MOF 1994 MAKES 12 RELIGIEUSES Preparation time: 1 hr Baking time: 30 mins EQUIPMENT Size 10 plain pastry tip Sultan pastry tip Disposable pastry bags Stainless steel rectangular cake ring, 40 x 30 cm (15 1⁄2 x 11 3⁄4 in) Candy thermometer

Craquelin 120 g (1 stick + 1⁄2 tbsp) butter, softened 140 g (packed 2⁄3 cup) brown sugar 165 g (1 1⁄3 cups) all-purpose (T55) flour 25 g (1 tbsp + 2 tsp) water Choux pastry 60 g ( 1⁄4 cup) milk 60 g ( 1⁄4 cup) water 60 g (4 tbsp) butter, at room temperature 75 g ( 1⁄2 cup + 1 1⁄2 tbsp) all-purpose (T55) flour 1 g ( 1⁄6 tsp) salt 150 g (5 1⁄4 oz - about 2 2⁄3) eggs

CHOUX PASTRY Make the choux pastry. See p. 23. Fill a pastry bag fitted with a size 15 plain tip with the pastry. Line two baking sheets with parchment paper and pipe twelve 5-cm (2-inch)-diameter puffs on one, and twelve 2.5-cm (1-inch)-diameter puffs on the other. Place the craquelin disks over their corresponding puffs. Preheat the oven to 220°C (430°F). Put the puffs into the oven and immediately turn it off. Wait 10 minutes and turn the oven back on, this time to 170°C (340°F), and bake for another 20–30 minutes. Transfer the puffs to a rack to cool.

Cover photograph © Jean-Michel Coulier.

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The jewels of French pastry illustrated with 3,000 step-by-step photographies.

INGREDIENTS

CRAQUELIN Make the craquelin. See p. 35. Use a cookie cutter to cut out twelve 6-cm (2 1⁄2-inch)-diameter disks and twelve 3.5-cm (1 3⁄8-inch)-diameter disks. Refrigerate.

After training at a school of fine arts, this lover of the image and printing naturally turned to advertising. He is the artistic director of an agency and particularly appreciates the contrast between the hard-hitting message and the subtlety of graphics and lettering. Twenty-five years later, driven by his admitted love of good food and his long-standing hobby, he adds the same ingredients to his food photos, for the sole purpose of creating an image that whets the appetite.

A leading figure in the pastry arts, he is in great demand the world over. Following in his father’s footsteps, this talented pastry chef opened his first store at the age He already had a strong belief in of7 nineteen. P REFACES highlighting the skills and tradition that formed of the French pastrymaking a7part Foreword by Michel Guértradition. ard He gained recognition as a Meilleur Ouvrier de in 1994. The he places France 8 Foreword by importance Philippe Urr aca on teaching and sharing led him to become president Committee of MOF Pastry Chefs, a role he of9 the Fore word by Cécile Coulier still occupies. pastry As 12 executive  SSE E N T chef I A Land technical director of La Compagnie in 2014 he launched U T E N Sdes I LDesserts, S Profiterole Chérie, a Parisian store specializing in this 14 traditional F O C U S pastry. O N I NPhilippe G R E D IUrraca E N T Sis the only MOF winner on the jury of the television program sera le T prochain Qui 18  IN R O Dgrand U Cpâtissier? T I O N broadcast by France 2.

Pâtisserie

RED BERRY A ND V IOLET RELIG IEUSE

THE PHOTOGRAPHER: JEAN-MICHEL COULIER

PHILIPPE URRACA

MEILLEUR OUVRIER

RED BERRY PASTRY CREAM Combine the milk with the fruit purees in a saucepan and bring to a boil. Remove the pan from the heat and pour a little of the mixture over the previously beaten egg yolks and mix well with a whisk. Add the cornstarch and mix with a whisk until smooth. Add the sugar to the remaining milk and fruit mixture. Pour the yolk, milk, and cornstarch mixture into the pan while blending with a handheld blender. Blend for a few seconds until the mixture is completely smooth.

Red berry pastry cream 370 g (1 1⁄2 cups) raspberry puree 100 g ( 1⁄3 cup) black currant puree 170 g ( 3⁄4 cup + 1 1⁄2 tbsp) sugar 150 g ( 1⁄2 cup + 2 tbsp) milk 120 g (4 1⁄4 oz - about 7) egg yolks 40 g ( 1⁄3 cup) cornstarch 180 g (1 1⁄2 sticks + 3⁄4 tbsp) butter, at room temperature 2 g ( 1⁄2 tsp) violet flavoring

290 g (1 1⁄4 cups) water 100 g ( 1⁄3 cup + 1 tbsp) glucose 20 g (4 tsp) lemon juice 1 g ( 1⁄2 tsp) edible gold dust Red food coloring Chantilly cream 150 g ( 1⁄2 cup + 2 tbsp) light cream (35% fat) 10 g (4 tsp) confectioners’ sugar

Red berry icing 300 g (1 1⁄2 cups) sugar (50 g + 250 g - 1⁄4 cup + 1 1⁄4 cups) 26 g ( 7⁄8 oz) pectin NH 150 g ( 2⁄3 cup) raspberry puree 70 g ( 1⁄4 cup + 2 tsp) black currant puree

Recipes by MOF pastry chefs who give their take on the grand classics of French pastry.

Bring to a boil while stirring constantly with a whisk. Remove the pan from the heat and add the butter, cut into small pieces. Mix with a whisk, then blend with a handheld blender until the cream is completely smooth. Spread the cream out over a baking sheet and cover with plastic wrap in direct contact with it. Freeze for about 15 minutes. RED BERRY ICING Mix 50 g ( 1⁄4 cup) sugar with the pectin in a bowl. Combine the fruit puree, glucose, remaining sugar (250 g - 1 1⁄4 cups), and water in a saucepan and bring to a boil. When the temperature reaches 50–60°C (120–140°F), add the sugar and pectin mixture. Bring to a boil while stirring constantly. Then mix in the lemon juice. Remove the pan from the heat and add the red coloring and gold dust. CHANTILLY CREAM, ASSEMBLY, AND FINISHING Make a hole in the bottom of each puff with the end of a fine pastry tip. Put the red berry pastry cream into a pastry bag fitted with a size 10 plain tip and fill the puffs. Dip the top of each puff into the red berry icing. Make a Chantilly cream by whipping the very cold cream with the confectioners’ sugar. Put the cream into a pastry bag fitted with a sultan tip and pipe a double ring of cream over each large puff. Finish by placing a small puff on top of the religieuse.

An exceptional book for both amateurs and professionals.

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B A B A S

B R I O C H E S

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French Pastry Master Class

C H O U X P A S T R Y

P U F F

PA S T RY

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C R O I S S A N T S

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C H A R L O T T E S

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S P O N G E

327

L O A F

343

M E R I N G U E S

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S O F T

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S H O R T B R E A D

CAKES AND CREAMS CAKES

AND MACARONS CAKES

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Pâtisserie

VANILL A CRE A M PUFF S

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MAKES 15 CREAM PUFFS, 5 CM (2 IN) IN DIAMETER, 25 G  ( 7⁄8 OZ) EACH Preparation time: 1 hr Baking time: 30–40 mins EQUIPMENT Size 20 fluted pastry tip Size 15 plain pastry tip Disposable pastry bags Serrated knife

Choux Pastry

Vanilla Cream Puffs

Vanilla sultan cream Vanilla pastry cream 1 vanilla bean 530 g (2 1⁄4 cups) milk 110 g (3 7⁄8 oz - about 6 1⁄2) egg yolks 60 g ( 1⁄2 cup) all-purpose flour 110 g ( 1⁄2 cup + 1 tbsp) sugar 190 g (1 1⁄2 sticks + 1 1⁄2 tbsp) butter

Whipped cream 120 g ( 1⁄2 cup) light cream (35% fat), whipped

23

INGREDIENTS Choux pastry 125 g ( 1⁄2 cup) water 125 g ( 1⁄2 cup) milk 2.5 g ( 1⁄2 tsp) salt 125 g (1 stick + 1 tbsp) butter, at room temperature 150 g (1 cup + 3 1⁄2 tbsp) all-purpose (T55) flour 250 g (8 3⁄4 oz - about 5) eggs

Finishing Confectioners’ sugar

C H O U X PA S T RY

1. Sift the flour and preheat the oven to 220°C (430°F). In a saucepan, combine the water, milk, salt, and butter in cubes, and bring to a boil. Mix well.

2. Remove from the heat and add all of the flour at once.

4. Return the pan to the heat while stirring 5. Mix until the paste comes away from constantly to dry out the panade. the sides of the pan and forms a ball.

Mep-Patisserie_EN.indb 23

3. Briskly mix with a spatula to hydrate the starch and produce a paste known as a panade.

6. Transfer the paste to a food processor fitted with a flat beater attachment and mix a little to dry out the panade.

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Pâtisserie

28

COFFEE A ND CHOCOL ATE ÉCL AIRS

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Choux Pastry

Éclairs

29

INGREDIENTS

MAKES APPROX. 20 ÉCLAIRS, 11 CM (4 1 ⁄4 IN) IN LENGTH

Choux pastry 125 g ( 1⁄2 cup) water 125 g ( 1⁄2 cup) milk 2.5 g ( 1⁄2 tsp) salt 125 g (1 stick + 1 tbsp) butter, at room temperature 150 g (1 cup + 3 1⁄2 tbsp) all-purpose (T55) flour 250 g (8 3⁄4 oz - about 5) eggs

Preparation time: 1 hr Baking time: 30–40 mins EQUIPMENT Size 20 fluted pastry tip Size 10 plain pastry tip Disposable pastry bags Cooking thermometer

Coffee pastry cream 75 g (1 cup) coffee beans 530 g (2 1⁄4 cups) milk 110 g (3 7⁄8 oz - about 6 1⁄2) egg yolks

60 g ( 1⁄2 cup) all-purpose flour Coffee fondant 170 g ( 3⁄4 cup + 1 1⁄2 tbsp) sugar 250 g (8 3⁄4 oz) white fondant 1 1 190 g (1 ⁄2 sticks + 1 ⁄2 tbsp) butter 100 g ( 1⁄3 cup + 1 tbsp) glucose 18 g (4 tsp) cocoa butter Chocolate pastry cream 100 g ( 1⁄2 + 1 1⁄2 tbsp) coffee extract 5 160 g (5 ⁄8 oz) dark chocolate (70% cocoa) Chocolate fondant 530 g (2 1⁄4 cups) milk 250 g (8 3⁄4 oz) white fondant 7 1 110 g (3 ⁄8 oz - about 6 ⁄2) egg 25 g (1 tbsp + 2 tsp) glucose yolks 25 g ( 5 tsp) cocoa butter 25 g (3 tbsp + 1 tsp) custard 27 g (1 oz) cocoa mass powder 6 g (1 tsp) water 95 g ( 1⁄2 cup) sugar 95 g (6 3⁄4 tbsp) butter

C H O U X PA S T RY

1. Make the choux pastry.

See p. 23.

2. Preheat the oven to 220°C (430°F). Use

a pastry bag fitted with a size 20 plain tip to pipe 11-cm (4 1⁄4-inch)-long éclairs on a nonstick baking sheet (or a lightly oiled, stainless steel baking sheet), spacing them apart for better air flow while they bake.

3. Put them into the oven and immediately

turn it off. Wait 10 minutes and turn the oven back on, this time to 165°C (330°F), and bake for another 20–30 minutes. Transfer the éclairs to a rack to cool.

C O F F E E PA S T RY C R E A M

4. Soak the coffee beans in the cold milk

overnight (at least 12 hours).

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TIP :

You can also add the coffee beans to boiling milk and let them infuse for 4–6 hours, stirring from time to time.

5. Follow the instructions for making

vanilla pastry cream. See p. 25.

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Pâtisserie

SA INT HONORÉ  DE CA PUCINE Arnaud Larher, MOF 2007 SERVES 6–8 Preparation time: 2 hrs Resting time: 1 hr Baking time: About 50 mins EQUIPMENT Stainless steel cake ring, 16 cm (6 1⁄4 in) in diameter Saint Honoré pastry tip Size 10 plain pastry tip Disposable pastry bags Fluted cookie cutter, 3 cm (1 1⁄4 in) in diameter

INGREDIENTS Vanilla shortbread pastry 250 g (2 sticks + 1 1⁄2 tbsp) butter, at room temperature 50 g ( 1⁄2 cup+ 1 1⁄2 tsp) almond meal 160 g (1 1⁄4 cups +  1⁄2 tbsp) confectioners’ sugar 1 g ( 1⁄2 tsp) vanilla powder 100 g (3 1⁄2 oz - about 2) eggs 2 g ( 1⁄2 tsp) fleur de sel 430 g (3 1⁄3 cups + 2 tbsp) all-purpose flour Choux pastry 250 g (1 cup + 2 tsp) milk 110 g (1 stick) butter 5 g ( 7⁄8 tsp) salt 5 g (1 tsp) sugar 140 g (1 cup + 2 tbsp) all-purpose flour 215 g (7 1⁄2 oz - about 4) eggs

Pastry cream 250 g (1 cup) whole milk 25 g (2 tbsp) sugar  1⁄2 vanilla bean 25 g (2 tbsp) sugar 60 g (2 1⁄8 oz - about 3 1⁄2) egg yolks 25 g (1 1⁄2 tbsp) custard powder 20 g (4 tsp) butter 50 g (3 1⁄2 tbsp) cream (35% fat) Raspberry and poppy preserves 250 g (2 cups) raspberries 150 g ( 3⁄4 cup) sugar 7 g ( 1⁄4 oz) pectin NH 6 drops poppy extract

75 g ( 1⁄4 cup + 1 tbsp) raspberry puree Ladyfinger sponge 150 g (5 1⁄4 oz - about 4 1⁄2) egg whites 125 g ( 2⁄3 cup) sugar 100 g (3 1⁄2 oz - about 6) egg yolks 125 g (1 cup) all-purpose flour Poppy syrup 150 g ( 2⁄3 cup) water 130 g ( 2⁄3 cup) sugar Poppy extract

Assembly Colored almond paste Bitter almond Chantilly cream A few Jordan almonds 650 g (2 3⁄4 cups) whipping cream 3 or 4 whole raspberries 50 g ( 1⁄4 cup) sugar 3–4 drops bitter almond extract

VANILLA SHORTBREAD PASTRY Mix the ingredients together in a mixer in the given order. Roll the dough into a ball. Cover with plastic wrap and refrigerate for 1 hour. Roll out the dough into a disk 24 cm (9 1⁄2 inches) in diameter and 2.5 mm ( 1⁄16 inch) thick. Preheat the oven to 160°C (320°F). Grease a cake ring with butter and line it with the dough. Cover the dough with parchment paper and fill with pie weights. Bake for about 16 minutes. Unmold when it has cooled a little. Let cool on a rack.

LADYFINGER SPONGE Beat the egg whites to stiff peaks with the sugar. Fold in the egg yolks, followed by the flour. Preheat the oven to 170°C (340°F). Spread the batter out to a thickness of 8 mm ( 5⁄16 inch) over a baking sheet lined with parchment paper. Bake for 12 minutes. Lift the sponge off the paper and use the cake ring to cut out a 16-cm (6 1⁄4-inch)-diameter disk. Cover the disk with plastic wrap to prevent it from drying out.

CHOUX PASTRY See p. 23. Pipe 3-cm (1 1⁄4-inch)-diameter puffs. Bake for about 25 minutes. Transfer to a rack to cool.

POPPY SYRUP Bring the water and sugar to a boil. Let cool, then add the poppy extract one drop at a time.

PASTRY CREAM See p. 25. Whip the cream to soft peaks and fold into the cold pastry cream.

ASSEMBLY Soak the sponge in the poppy syrup. Spread the preserves over the tart shell, then insert the soaked sponge. Spread part of the RASPBERRY AND POPPY PRESERVES pastry cream over the sponge and smooth. Put the rest of the Mix the sugar with the pectin in a saucepan and add the pastry cream into a pastry bag fitted with a size 10 plain tip and raspberries. Bring to a boil quickly while stirring constantly. Pour fill 10 puffs through the bottom. Use the fluted cookie cutter to the preserves over a tray, cover with plastic wrap in direct contact, cut disks out of the colored almond paste and place one on each and freeze. When the preserves is cold, add the poppy extract. puff. Arrange the puffs around the perimeter of the tart shell. Use a pastry bag fitted with a Saint Honoré tip to pipe a line of BITTER ALMOND CHANTILLY CREAM Chantilly cream between the puffs as well as 4 zigzag lines over the Whip the cream at medium speed with the sugar and bitter middle of the cake. Break up the Jordan almonds and sprinkle over almond extract. Fold in the raspberry puree. the cake, and finish by decorating with a few raspberry halves.

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Pâtisserie

RASPBERRY MACARON

MAKES ABOUT 70 MACARONS Preparation time: 40 mins Resting time: 48 hrs Baking time: 18 mins EQUIPMENT Size 8 plain pastry tip Size 11 plain pastry tip Disposable pastry bags Candy thermometer

INGREDIENTS Shells Tant pour tant 250 g (2 2⁄3 cups) almond meal 250 g (2 cups) confectioners’ sugar Red food coloring 80 g (2 7⁄8 oz - about 2 1⁄2) egg whites, at room temperature

SHELLS Make the macaron shells. See p. 371. RASPBERRY FILLING Combine the raspberries and sugar in a maslin jam pan and bring to a boil while stirring, then add the glucose. Heat to 106–107°C (223–225°F) while stirring constantly and keep at a boil for 4–5 minutes.

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Meringue 250 g (1 1⁄4 cups) superfine sugar 70 g ( 1⁄4 cup + 2 1⁄2 tsp) water 85 g (3 oz - about 2 1⁄2) egg whites, at room temperature Raspberry filling Raspberry compote 200 g (1 2⁄3 cups) raspberries 150 g ( 3⁄4 cup) sugar

20 g (1 tbsp + 1 tsp) glucose 180 g ( 1⁄2 cup) apple compote 12 g (2 1⁄2 tsp) raspberry brandy

Apple compote 50 g (3 1⁄2 tbsp) butter 50 g ( 1⁄4 cup) sugar 1 vanilla bean 300 g (10 1⁄2 oz - about 1 1⁄2) apples, peeled and cored

Add the apple compote ( See p. 163) to the boiling raspberries. Mix with a whisk and bring back to a boil for another 2 minutes while stirring constantly. Add the raspberry brandy and mix. Pour the compote over a sheet pan. Cover with plastic wrap in direct contact and refrigerate for 30 minutes before filling the macarons.  See p. 375, steps 28–32, but fill with the raspberry filling.

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Meringues and Macarons

Raspberry/Pistachio Macaron

381

PISTACHIO MACARON

MAKES ABOUT 70 MACARONS Preparation time: 40 mins Resting time: 48 hrs Baking time: 18 mins EQUIPMENT Size 8 plain pastry tip Size 11 plain pastry tip Disposable pastry bags Candy thermometer

INGREDIENTS Shells Tant pour tant 250 g (2 2⁄3 cups) almond meal 250 g (2 cups) confectioners’ sugar Green food coloring 80 g (2 7⁄8 oz - about 2 1⁄2) egg whites, at room temperature

SHELLS Make the macaron shells. See p. 371. PISTACHIO FILLING Soften the almond paste in a mixer fitted with a flat beater attachment, then gradually incorporate the soft butter until

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Meringue 250 g (1 1⁄4 cups) superfine sugar 70 g ( 1⁄4 cup + 2 1⁄2 tsp) water 85 g (3 oz - about 2 1⁄2) egg whites, at room temperature

Pistachio filling 330 g (1 1⁄4 cups + 1 tbsp) almond paste 150 g (1 1⁄4 sticks +  1⁄2 tbsp) butter, at room temperature 65 g ( 1⁄4 cup) pistachio paste 1 vanilla bean A few chopped pistachios (optional)

the mixture is smooth. Scrape the seeds from the vanilla beans and add, together with the pistachio paste. Mix. You can add a few chopped pistachios to finish. Cover with plastic wrap in direct contact and refrigerate for 30 minutes before filling the macarons. See p. 375, steps 28–32, but fill with the pistachio filling.

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Pâtisserie

LEMON TART

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authors

PHILIPPE URRACA

CÉCILE COULIER

Following in his father’s footsteps, this talented pastry chef opened his first store at the age of nineteen. He already had a strong belief in highlighting the skills and tradition that formed a part of the French pastrymaking tradition. He gained recognition as a Meilleur Ouvrier de France in 1994. The importance he places on teaching and sharing led him to become president of the Committee of MOF Pastry Chefs, a role he still occupies. A leading figure in the pastry arts, he is in great demand the world over. As executive pastry chef and technical director of La Compagnie des Desserts, in 2014 he launched Profiterole Chérie, a Parisian store specializing in this traditional pastry. Philippe Urraca is the only MOF winner on the jury of the television program Qui sera le prochain grand pâtissier? broadcast by France 2.

A food writer, food stylist, author of books,* and television consultant, Cécile Coulier is a pastry lover, to the point that she trained in this speciality at the Ferrandi School, gaining her vocational qualifications in 2010. Her profession allows her to rub shoulders with many renowned chefs, from whom she receives tips and tricks of the trade. She is a true intermediary between the professional world and the public at large, and knows how to make recipes from the great pastry chefs accessible to enthusiasts of all levels. She is skilled at teaching and sharing, and often offers private lessons to nonprofessionals.

Mep-Patisserie_EN.indb 493

THE PHOTOGRAPHER: JEAN-MICHEL COULIER After training at a school of fine arts, this lover of the image and printing naturally turned to advertising. He is the artistic director of an agency and particularly appreciates the contrast between the hard-hitting message and the subtlety of graphics and lettering. Twenty-five years later, driven by his admitted love of good food and his long-standing hobby, he adds the same ingredients to his food photos, for the sole purpose of creating an image that whets the appetite.

* She has written a large number of books, among which are Petits gâteaux de grands pâtissiers, in partnership with the chefs at the Club des Sucrés (La Martinière), Mes gâteaux joliment décorés and Happy Birthday! (Solar), and Amorino, trésors glacés (Chêne). See also Les Meilleurs Desserts de France by Christophe Michalak (Gründ, Un grand pâtissier collection) and Chocolat plaisir by Pierre Marcolini (Solar), in addition to Profiteroles by Philippe Urraca (Solar).

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glossary Acetate sheet: A thin transparent plastic sheet used for making chocolates. It gives them a glossy finish. Aerate: To whip a cream to make it lighter and to give it more volume by incorporating tiny air bubbles. Agar: (Also agar-agar) Japanese red seaweed. Once dried and ground to a powder, it is used as a gelling agent. Aromatize: To incorporate an aroma (liqueur, coffee, chocolate, caramel, etc.) into a preparation. Bain-marie: A cooking method that involves placing a receptacle inside another larger one filled with boiling water. This method, widely used for melting chocolate, ensures a gently supply of heat. Beat: To briskly work a preparation to modify its consistency, appearance, or color; for example, beat egg whites to stiff peaks. Certain mousses must be beaten hot over a bain-marie, or cold in a “reverse bain-marie,” or cold water bath, until they have cooled down completely. Beurre manié: Softened butter mixed with flour or a starch. Beurre noisette: Butter gently heated to evaporate the water it contains. At the beurre noisette stage, its color and smell resemble those of roasted hazelnuts (noisette in French). Blanch: 1. To briskly whisk a mixture of eggs and sugar until it turns pale with a fluffy consistency. 2. To remove the film or skin covering almonds, hazelnuts, walnuts, and pistachios, for example, by boiling and then cooling the nuts. Syn.: Skin. Blind bake: To prebake a pastry, without filling, after having pricked it with a fork and covered it with parchment paper and pie weights or dry beans, so that it does not rise. Body: The quality of a dough or batter made firm or elastic and resistant by brisk kneading. Bring to a boil: To heat a preparation until it boils. Brix: The sugar content of a solution calculated as a percentage. It refers to the dry matter left after mixing or cooking. Brown (cane) sugar: Sugar slightly less refined than white sugar and containing more nutrients. Candy: To dip certain confectioneries (chocolate and fruit fillings, etc.) in a concentrated sugar syrup, hot or cold, to coat them with a film of sugar crystals that becomes glossy when dry. A crystallizing tray, a stainless steel container with a removable rack, is used to produce this effect.

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Caramel: The last stage of cooking sugar before its carbonization. At this stage, it has lost almost all of its water. It is light yellow at 155°C (310°F), which is known as the clear-liquid stage. At 160°C (320°F) it is yellow; and at 165°C (330°F) it is dark yellow, when it is known as a light caramel. Caramelize: To color a sugar-coated preparation under a broiler.

Chablon : A thin layer of melted chocolate applied to the surface of a sponge. Once cold, this layer will form a base that will stop the sponge from falling apart when soaked with syrup. Chalaza: A stringy membrane in an egg that keeps the yolk suspended. Beaten egg is filtered through a conical strainer to remove the chalazae. Chill: To quickly cool a preparation, liqueur, or fruit by putting it into the freezer, refrigerator, or in an ice bucket.

Chinoiser: To filter a preparation (sauces and soups, also eggs and salt used to make a glaze) through a conical strainer (fine strainer). Chocolate pistoles: Chocolate pastilles or disks. Chopped chocolate: Chocolate cut into thin slices. Clarified butter: Butter from which the water and milk solids have been removed by melting, without stirring, over a bainmarie or in a heavy saucepan. Clarify: To filter or decant a syrup or gelée to make more transparent. This term is also used to remove the milk solids and water from butter (see clarified butter). Coat: To cover a cake with a soft whipped cream, using a spatula or spoon. Also, heating a crème anglaise to only 85°C (185°F) gives it a consistency that coats a spoon. Coat a spoon: This refers to cooking a preparation over low heat while stirring constantly with a spatula until it is thick enough to coat without running off (for example, chocolate crémeux for the chocolate tart). To check that is has cooked correctly, soak a spatula in the preparation and make a line with your finger. It is at the right consistency if the line remains visible. Confectioners’ sugar with silica: Silica is a natural additive that prevents the sugar from caking as well as gives it an exceptional fluidity.

Corser: To give elasticity to a dough by kneading for a long time. It is also used to mean enhancing a dish by the addition of aromas, spices, and condiments. Cream: Mixture or fat that has a creamy and smooth consistency; for example, buttercream.

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All photography by © Jean-Michel Coulier, except portrait of Michel Guérard on page 7 (© Tim Clinch) and portrait of Philippe Urraca on pages 8 and 493 (© Stéphane de Bourgies) Cover: © Jean-Michel Coulier ©2016, Editions du Chêne - Hachette Livre for the original edition ©2017, Editions du Chêne - Hachette Livre for the English edition Editorial manager: Laurence Lehoux, assisted by Suzy Cacheux and Éloïse Tétaud Editorial assistant: Céline Davaze, assisted by Aline Abou Saad English translation and proofreading: John Ripoll and Theresa Bebbington for Cillero & de Motta Art director: Élodie Palumbo, under the direction of Sabine Houplain Graphic design: Studio Plastac Layout: Patrick Leleux PAO (Nicolas Chevalier) Production: Nicole Thiériot-Pichon Partnerships and direct sales: Mathilde Barrois (mbarrois@hachette-livre.fr) Press relations: Hélène Maurice (hmaurice@hachette-livre.fr) Photoengraving: Quat’coul Published by Éditions du Chêne (58 rue Jean Bleuzen 92178 Vanves Cedex) Printed in September 2017 by Toppan Leefung Printing in China Copyright Registration : October 2017 ISBN 978-2-81231-741-5 79/3577/0

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