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Prepare the most delicious Japanese dishes with recipes from restaurant Tanuki Japanese cuisine is healthful, easy to prepare and exceptionally tasty. Ivan Verhelle of the Japanese restaurant Tanuki shows you step-by-step how to prepare the most delightful sushi, stews, tempura dishes, teppanyaki meals, etc. so you can make them yourself at home! The top photography of Kris Vlegels and the Japanese calligraphy bring an eastern atmosphere to your home.

Tanuki is a famous Japanese restaurant in the heart of Bruges. Chef Ivan Verhelle and his second chef, Akihisa Kawakami, serve home-made sashimi, sushi, tempura and teppanyaki dishes.

www.lannoo.com

IVAN VERHELLE - KRIS VLEGELS

- Japanese Cuisine clearly explained by top chef Ivan Verhelle of restaurant Tanuki - 50 scrumptious recipes - With practical step-by-step photography and instructions

BASIC JAPANESE COOKING

JAPANESE CUISINE EXPLAINED STEP-BY-STEP

Japanese cooking BASIC

SUSHI, TEPPANYAKI AND OTHER JAPANESE SPECIALTIES YOU CAN PREPARE AT HOME Ivan Verhelle - Photography: Kris Vlegels


Table of content Tanuki

Hijiki - JAPANESE BLACK SEAWEED

76 78

12

Sushi

16

WITH MISO RICE VINEGAR VINAIGRETTE

Sushi - JAPANESE RICE SNACKS

18

Horenso Goma Ae - SPINACH WITH SESAME

82

Su-meshi - SUSHI RICE

20

Kinpira Gobo - JAPANESE BURDOCK ROOT

84

Tamago yaki - JAPANESE OMELETTE

22

Shira-Ae - CRUSHED TOFU WITH LOTUS ROOT AND SHIITAKES

86

Sushi-ebi - COOKED SCAMPI

23

Aspara Ebi salad - ASPARAGUS AND SCAMPI WITH KIMI-SU

88

Filling for maki-sushi

24

Saba to Daikon no Miso ni - MACKEREL AND DAIKON IN MISO, COOKED GENTLY

90

Hosomaki - SMALLL SUSHI ROLLS

26

Nama-Kaki no Oroshi-Ponzu Zoë - OYSTERS WITH SOY LIME DIP

92

Futomaki - LARGE SUSHIS ROLLS

26

Tako no Wafu Salad - OCTOPUS SALAD WITH WAFU DRESSING

94

Nigiri - SUSHI FORMED IN THE PALM OF THE HAND

28

Sunomono - OCTOPUS AND JUMBO SHRIMPS WITH JAPANESE RICE VINEGAR

96

Dogfish Oshi Sushi - SWEET GRILLED ON PRESSED SUSHI RICE

30

Hirame Usutsukuri - BRILL SASHIMI ‘NEW STYLE’ WITH YUZU OLIVE DIP

32 34

Dashi - BROTH MADE WITH BONITO FLAKES

36

Misoshiru - MISO SOUP WITH TOFU

38

Asari no Osumashi - CLEAR BROTH WITH CLAMS

40

Noodles

Maguro no Nutamiso Ae - TUNNY AND FINE YOUNG LEEKS

Teppanyaki dishes Moyashi Itame - SOY SPROUTS FRIED ON A TEPPAN

80

98 100

Shake no Teppanyaki - SALMON ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH COARSE SEA SALT

102

Wagyu no Teppanyaki - TENDERLOIN OF WAGYU BEEF ON THE TEPPANYAKI

106

Ika to Tako no Teppanyaki - CUTTLEFISH AND OCTOPUS ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH A SPICY SAUCE 110 Lobster Teppanyaki - LOBSTER TAIL ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH SESAME CREAM

112

42

Dogfish no Teppanyaki - DOGFISH ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH YUZU PEPPER SAUCE

116

Miso ramen

44

Atsu Age no Teppanyaki - DEEP FRIED TOFU ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH UME SAUCE

118

Tanuki udon - THICK MIE NOODLES IN WARM BROTH

46

Okonomiyaki Butatama - HEARTY JAPANESE PANCAKES WITH FRESH BACON

120

Zaru soba - COLD BUCKWHEAT NOODLES WITH SOBA TSUYU (NOODLE DIP)

48

Deep fried dishes

50

One-pan dishes

124

Sukiyaki - JAPANESE FONDUE

126

Yosenabe - LOBSTER AND ANGLER FROM THE POT

130

Tempura - FISH AND VEGETABLES DEEP FRIED IN LIGHT BATTER

52

Kakiage - TEMPURA OF VEGETABLE BEIGNETS

54

Fry no moriawase - TRIO OF PREPARATIONS FRIED IN PANKO

56

Tori no Tatsuta Age - CHICKEN IN GINGER MARINADE

58

Agedashi Tofu - DEEP FRIED Atsu age TOFU IN BROTH

60

Shoga Sherbet - GINGER SHERBET WITH SATSUMA IMO SHOCHU

138 140 142

Desserts Azuki Cake - PASTRY WITH RED AZUKI BEANS

62

San Shurui no Ice - THREE JAPANESE ICE CREAMS

Lobster no ‘Miso-yaki’ - CANADIAN LOBSTER BREADED WITH MISO AND PANKO KAMADO-YAKI

64

Biwa no Matcha cream Tsume - FILLED LOQUAT

Nasu no Misoyaki - GRILLED AUBERGINES

66

Wagyu Sparerib No Yakimono - GRILLED FLAT RIBS OF WAGYU BEEF

68

Yaki Onigiri - GRILLED RICE BALLS

70

Yakitori - SMALL GRILLED CHICKEN SHISH-KEBABS WITH YAKITORI DIP

72

Unagi no Kabayaki - GRILLED EEL WITH SWEET SOY MARINADE

74

Grilled dishes

TAB L E O F C O N T E N T

Side dishes

Japanese shopping list

Broths and soups

6

5

Colophon

134 136

144

TAB L E O F C O N T E N T

7


Table of content Tanuki

Hijiki - JAPANESE BLACK SEAWEED

76 78

12

Sushi

16

WITH MISO RICE VINEGAR VINAIGRETTE

Sushi - JAPANESE RICE SNACKS

18

Horenso Goma Ae - SPINACH WITH SESAME

82

Su-meshi - SUSHI RICE

20

Kinpira Gobo - JAPANESE BURDOCK ROOT

84

Tamago yaki - JAPANESE OMELETTE

22

Shira-Ae - CRUSHED TOFU WITH LOTUS ROOT AND SHIITAKES

86

Sushi-ebi - COOKED SCAMPI

23

Aspara Ebi salad - ASPARAGUS AND SCAMPI WITH KIMI-SU

88

Filling for maki-sushi

24

Saba to Daikon no Miso ni - MACKEREL AND DAIKON IN MISO, COOKED GENTLY

90

Hosomaki - SMALLL SUSHI ROLLS

26

Nama-Kaki no Oroshi-Ponzu Zoë - OYSTERS WITH SOY LIME DIP

92

Futomaki - LARGE SUSHIS ROLLS

26

Tako no Wafu Salad - OCTOPUS SALAD WITH WAFU DRESSING

94

Nigiri - SUSHI FORMED IN THE PALM OF THE HAND

28

Sunomono - OCTOPUS AND JUMBO SHRIMPS WITH JAPANESE RICE VINEGAR

96

Dogfish Oshi Sushi - SWEET GRILLED ON PRESSED SUSHI RICE

30

Hirame Usutsukuri - BRILL SASHIMI ‘NEW STYLE’ WITH YUZU OLIVE DIP

32 34

Dashi - BROTH MADE WITH BONITO FLAKES

36

Misoshiru - MISO SOUP WITH TOFU

38

Asari no Osumashi - CLEAR BROTH WITH CLAMS

40

Noodles

Maguro no Nutamiso Ae - TUNNY AND FINE YOUNG LEEKS

Teppanyaki dishes Moyashi Itame - SOY SPROUTS FRIED ON A TEPPAN

80

98 100

Shake no Teppanyaki - SALMON ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH COARSE SEA SALT

102

Wagyu no Teppanyaki - TENDERLOIN OF WAGYU BEEF ON THE TEPPANYAKI

106

Ika to Tako no Teppanyaki - CUTTLEFISH AND OCTOPUS ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH A SPICY SAUCE 110 Lobster Teppanyaki - LOBSTER TAIL ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH SESAME CREAM

112

42

Dogfish no Teppanyaki - DOGFISH ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH YUZU PEPPER SAUCE

116

Miso ramen

44

Atsu Age no Teppanyaki - DEEP FRIED TOFU ON THE TEPPANYAKI WITH UME SAUCE

118

Tanuki udon - THICK MIE NOODLES IN WARM BROTH

46

Okonomiyaki Butatama - HEARTY JAPANESE PANCAKES WITH FRESH BACON

120

Zaru soba - COLD BUCKWHEAT NOODLES WITH SOBA TSUYU (NOODLE DIP)

48

Deep fried dishes

50

One-pan dishes

124

Sukiyaki - JAPANESE FONDUE

126

Yosenabe - LOBSTER AND ANGLER FROM THE POT

130

Tempura - FISH AND VEGETABLES DEEP FRIED IN LIGHT BATTER

52

Kakiage - TEMPURA OF VEGETABLE BEIGNETS

54

Fry no moriawase - TRIO OF PREPARATIONS FRIED IN PANKO

56

Tori no Tatsuta Age - CHICKEN IN GINGER MARINADE

58

Agedashi Tofu - DEEP FRIED Atsu age TOFU IN BROTH

60

Shoga Sherbet - GINGER SHERBET WITH SATSUMA IMO SHOCHU

138 140 142

Desserts Azuki Cake - PASTRY WITH RED AZUKI BEANS

62

San Shurui no Ice - THREE JAPANESE ICE CREAMS

Lobster no ‘Miso-yaki’ - CANADIAN LOBSTER BREADED WITH MISO AND PANKO KAMADO-YAKI

64

Biwa no Matcha cream Tsume - FILLED LOQUAT

Nasu no Misoyaki - GRILLED AUBERGINES

66

Wagyu Sparerib No Yakimono - GRILLED FLAT RIBS OF WAGYU BEEF

68

Yaki Onigiri - GRILLED RICE BALLS

70

Yakitori - SMALL GRILLED CHICKEN SHISH-KEBABS WITH YAKITORI DIP

72

Unagi no Kabayaki - GRILLED EEL WITH SWEET SOY MARINADE

74

Grilled dishes

TAB L E O F C O N T E N T

Side dishes

Japanese shopping list

Broths and soups

6

5

Colophon

134 136

144

TAB L E O F C O N T E N T

7


   


   


JAPANESE SHOPPING LIST These are the basic essential ingredients for preparing delicious Japanese dishes at home. You find them in every Japanese kitchen. They can be purchased in a supermarket, an eastern speciality shop or in the shopping nook of our restaurant.

GARI I SWEET-SOUR GINGER (1): With sushi you always eat ginger preserved in sweetened vinegar. The ginger usually has a somewhat pink colour but in Japan a preserving liquid of plums is also used to make the ginger somewhat redder. Young ginger roots, preserved in the same manner, are very delicious with grilled fish. KOMBU I DRIED KELP (2): Dried kelp or seaweed is one of the two basic ingredients for dashi, the basic broth of the Japanese cuisine. You buy Kombu in long, dried strips. Wipe the strips off lightly, but do not wash them: the flavour is on the surface. Some cooks gash them somewhat to allow the flavour to be released better. Do not cook kombu, but poach it to avoid a bitter taste. Keep a supply in a well-sealed can or pot. MIRIN I SWEET RICE WINE (3): Mirin is a sweet, golden yellow cooking wine. It contains very little alcohol (11°) and is essential in Japanese cuisine to give glazes and dip sauces a slightly sweet mildness. If you do not have mirin you can substitute sugar: use 1 teaspoon of sugar for 1 tablespoon of mirin. MISO I SOY BEAN PASTE (4): A powerful tasting paste of fermented soy beans, sometimes mixed with rice or another type of grain. The fermentation and ripening time varies from six months to three years. There are various kinds and colours of miso: white or light-coloured kinds for sauces and light miso soups, dark red for hearty soups.

12

J APAN E S E S H O P P I N G L I S T

Miso is typically Japanese and is eaten almost every day by everyone as miso soup. It is very nutritious, contains living enzymes and must therefore be kept in the refrigerator. In Japanese cooking you use miso as seasoning and as a basis for dressings, as well as for stewed and grilled dishes. It is also an ingredient in the preservation of fish, meat or vegetables, comparable to our marinades. HANA-KATSUO I BONITO FLAKES (5): Among the most important ingredients in Japanese cuisine are bonito flakes. They are made of dried bonito, a type of fish related to the tunny. The flakes are used for making dashi. Although the best dashi is made with freshly shredded bonito flakes, at home the Japanese usually use pre-shredded bonito flakes. SHOYU I SOY SAUCE (6): Soy sauce, a fermented mixture of soy beans, wheat, salt and water, is another basic seasoning in Japanese cuisine. Give preference to a thin, light Japanese soy sauce (such as Kikkoman) rather than the thick, Chinese variety. Soy sauce for general use has a dark colour. A somewhat saltier and somewhat lighter coloured type is used to prevent the darkening of light-coloured dishes. TOFU I BEAN CURD (7): Tofu, widely used in Japanese cuisine, is also well-known to us. It has a pleasant, somewhat nutty taste. This easily digested source of vegetable proteins is the basis of many other products.

Tofu is made by curdling soy milk, a process that is quite similar to making cheese. The best tofu is made fresh daily and is sold in blocks. Here and there you also find tofu that keeps longer and even packages of instant tofu. Aburage (golden brown deep fried slices of tofu) is used among other things for inari-sushi. There are various types of tofu, depending on the country but also depending on the processing procedure. In Japan you can divide them into two main types: Kinugoshi tofu This soft, smooth ‘silk’ tofu contains much water. It is eaten raw with soy sauce or in miso soup. Momen tofu This is regular, firm tofu. It is included in various preparations: fried, finely mashed and made into little balls or deep fried, and in combination with fish, meat or vegetables. A very popular momen tofu is the atsu age. It is deep fried in its entirety at a low temperature. Submerged in water and in the refrigerator, tofu can be kept for five or six days. WASABI I HORSERADISH (8): Wasabi is the grated root of an indigenous Japanese plant, which means that horseradish is actually not a correct translation. In sushi bars, wasabi is known under the name ‘namida’ or tears. Its taste is so sharp that it brings tears to your eyes! Wasabi is the usual condiment for dishes with raw fish. You buy it in tubes or as powder that you mix with some water and stir to a smooth paste.

DASHI I FISH BROTH: Dashi is the basic broth of Japanese cuisine. It is prepared from bonito flakes (fish shavings) and kombu (kelp) and it defines the characteristic taste of many Japanese dishes. A good cook can be recognised by his skill at making good dashi. You can also buy instant dashi or dashi-no-moto. Several types have a very good flavour, can be prepared quickly and are handy to use. NORI I SEAWEED SHEETS: Crispy nori, with a sweetish seaweed taste, appears on most breakfast tables in Japan. It is the seaweed that you see wrapped around rice in homes and in sushi bars. Cut in strips nori can also serve as a garnish. Before they are used, the seaweed sheets are roasted for a few seconds above a flame until the colour changes and the aroma is released. Store nori in a well-sealed can or pot. SU I JAPANESE RICE VINEGAR: Japanese rice vinegar has a light, delicate flavour. For the preparation of sushi, a special sushi vinegar is used, a mixture of rice vinegar, sugar and salt. WAKAME I DRIED SEAWEED: This nutritious type of seaweed with long, green, fern-like leaves has a mild taste. Wakame (widely used with sashimi in soups and salads) is usually bought dried. Soak the seaweed in cold water for five minutes before use and then press the excess water out.

J APANE S E S HO P P IN G L IS T

13


JAPANESE SHOPPING LIST These are the basic essential ingredients for preparing delicious Japanese dishes at home. You find them in every Japanese kitchen. They can be purchased in a supermarket, an eastern speciality shop or in the shopping nook of our restaurant.

GARI I SWEET-SOUR GINGER (1): With sushi you always eat ginger preserved in sweetened vinegar. The ginger usually has a somewhat pink colour but in Japan a preserving liquid of plums is also used to make the ginger somewhat redder. Young ginger roots, preserved in the same manner, are very delicious with grilled fish. KOMBU I DRIED KELP (2): Dried kelp or seaweed is one of the two basic ingredients for dashi, the basic broth of the Japanese cuisine. You buy Kombu in long, dried strips. Wipe the strips off lightly, but do not wash them: the flavour is on the surface. Some cooks gash them somewhat to allow the flavour to be released better. Do not cook kombu, but poach it to avoid a bitter taste. Keep a supply in a well-sealed can or pot. MIRIN I SWEET RICE WINE (3): Mirin is a sweet, golden yellow cooking wine. It contains very little alcohol (11°) and is essential in Japanese cuisine to give glazes and dip sauces a slightly sweet mildness. If you do not have mirin you can substitute sugar: use 1 teaspoon of sugar for 1 tablespoon of mirin. MISO I SOY BEAN PASTE (4): A powerful tasting paste of fermented soy beans, sometimes mixed with rice or another type of grain. The fermentation and ripening time varies from six months to three years. There are various kinds and colours of miso: white or light-coloured kinds for sauces and light miso soups, dark red for hearty soups.

12

J APAN E S E S H O P P I N G L I S T

Miso is typically Japanese and is eaten almost every day by everyone as miso soup. It is very nutritious, contains living enzymes and must therefore be kept in the refrigerator. In Japanese cooking you use miso as seasoning and as a basis for dressings, as well as for stewed and grilled dishes. It is also an ingredient in the preservation of fish, meat or vegetables, comparable to our marinades. HANA-KATSUO I BONITO FLAKES (5): Among the most important ingredients in Japanese cuisine are bonito flakes. They are made of dried bonito, a type of fish related to the tunny. The flakes are used for making dashi. Although the best dashi is made with freshly shredded bonito flakes, at home the Japanese usually use pre-shredded bonito flakes. SHOYU I SOY SAUCE (6): Soy sauce, a fermented mixture of soy beans, wheat, salt and water, is another basic seasoning in Japanese cuisine. Give preference to a thin, light Japanese soy sauce (such as Kikkoman) rather than the thick, Chinese variety. Soy sauce for general use has a dark colour. A somewhat saltier and somewhat lighter coloured type is used to prevent the darkening of light-coloured dishes. TOFU I BEAN CURD (7): Tofu, widely used in Japanese cuisine, is also well-known to us. It has a pleasant, somewhat nutty taste. This easily digested source of vegetable proteins is the basis of many other products.

Tofu is made by curdling soy milk, a process that is quite similar to making cheese. The best tofu is made fresh daily and is sold in blocks. Here and there you also find tofu that keeps longer and even packages of instant tofu. Aburage (golden brown deep fried slices of tofu) is used among other things for inari-sushi. There are various types of tofu, depending on the country but also depending on the processing procedure. In Japan you can divide them into two main types: Kinugoshi tofu This soft, smooth ‘silk’ tofu contains much water. It is eaten raw with soy sauce or in miso soup. Momen tofu This is regular, firm tofu. It is included in various preparations: fried, finely mashed and made into little balls or deep fried, and in combination with fish, meat or vegetables. A very popular momen tofu is the atsu age. It is deep fried in its entirety at a low temperature. Submerged in water and in the refrigerator, tofu can be kept for five or six days. WASABI I HORSERADISH (8): Wasabi is the grated root of an indigenous Japanese plant, which means that horseradish is actually not a correct translation. In sushi bars, wasabi is known under the name ‘namida’ or tears. Its taste is so sharp that it brings tears to your eyes! Wasabi is the usual condiment for dishes with raw fish. You buy it in tubes or as powder that you mix with some water and stir to a smooth paste.

DASHI I FISH BROTH: Dashi is the basic broth of Japanese cuisine. It is prepared from bonito flakes (fish shavings) and kombu (kelp) and it defines the characteristic taste of many Japanese dishes. A good cook can be recognised by his skill at making good dashi. You can also buy instant dashi or dashi-no-moto. Several types have a very good flavour, can be prepared quickly and are handy to use. NORI I SEAWEED SHEETS: Crispy nori, with a sweetish seaweed taste, appears on most breakfast tables in Japan. It is the seaweed that you see wrapped around rice in homes and in sushi bars. Cut in strips nori can also serve as a garnish. Before they are used, the seaweed sheets are roasted for a few seconds above a flame until the colour changes and the aroma is released. Store nori in a well-sealed can or pot. SU I JAPANESE RICE VINEGAR: Japanese rice vinegar has a light, delicate flavour. For the preparation of sushi, a special sushi vinegar is used, a mixture of rice vinegar, sugar and salt. WAKAME I DRIED SEAWEED: This nutritious type of seaweed with long, green, fern-like leaves has a mild taste. Wakame (widely used with sashimi in soups and salads) is usually bought dried. Soak the seaweed in cold water for five minutes before use and then press the excess water out.

J APANE S E S HO P P IN G L IS T

13


TSUKEMONO

NIHON CHA

FRESHLY PRESERVED, PICKLED VEGETABLES

JAPANESE TEA

Vegetables of this type - also called oshinko – are a standard part of every Japanese rice meal. Each region has its own kinds of vegetables and preservation method. If one travels in Japan or pays someone a visit, it is the custom to give a portion of tsukemono as a small gift. A few common kinds:  Takuwan: freshly harvested daikon (white rammenas) that is dried for a few weeks, salted and then preserved for a few months in Nuka – dried rice bran. Takuan is often used as filling in maki-sushi. Its natural colour is light yellow. This colour is sometimes strengthened by adding yuzu or orange peel, or by a colouring agent in the industrial version. There are also uncoloured varieties.  Shio-zuke: vegetables preserved in salt (for example, aubergines, cucumbers, Chinese cabbage, mustard leaves, daikon, myoga and ginger) that are then marinated further with vinegar and mirin.  Shibazuke: comparable to shio-zuke, except that shibazuke has a red colour because salted red shiso leaves are used.  Umeboshi: small preserved apricots (thus not plums, as is often thought). They are picked unripe, salted and dried. Sometimes they are prepared with red shiso leaves to produce a nice dark-red colour.

 Sencha green tea  Genmaicha green tea with rice pancakes  Hojicha roasted green tea The Tea Ceremony is part of the foundation of Japanese high gastronomy: ‘kai seki ryori’. The same applies to the art of flower decoration or Ikebana. The Japanese garden in Hasselt regularly has tea ceremonies and gives tea lessons.


TSUKEMONO

NIHON CHA

FRESHLY PRESERVED, PICKLED VEGETABLES

JAPANESE TEA

Vegetables of this type - also called oshinko – are a standard part of every Japanese rice meal. Each region has its own kinds of vegetables and preservation method. If one travels in Japan or pays someone a visit, it is the custom to give a portion of tsukemono as a small gift. A few common kinds:  Takuwan: freshly harvested daikon (white rammenas) that is dried for a few weeks, salted and then preserved for a few months in Nuka – dried rice bran. Takuan is often used as filling in maki-sushi. Its natural colour is light yellow. This colour is sometimes strengthened by adding yuzu or orange peel, or by a colouring agent in the industrial version. There are also uncoloured varieties.  Shio-zuke: vegetables preserved in salt (for example, aubergines, cucumbers, Chinese cabbage, mustard leaves, daikon, myoga and ginger) that are then marinated further with vinegar and mirin.  Shibazuke: comparable to shio-zuke, except that shibazuke has a red colour because salted red shiso leaves are used.  Umeboshi: small preserved apricots (thus not plums, as is often thought). They are picked unripe, salted and dried. Sometimes they are prepared with red shiso leaves to produce a nice dark-red colour.

 Sencha green tea  Genmaicha green tea with rice pancakes  Hojicha roasted green tea The Tea Ceremony is part of the foundation of Japanese high gastronomy: ‘kai seki ryori’. The same applies to the art of flower decoration or Ikebana. The Japanese garden in Hasselt regularly has tea ceremonies and gives tea lessons.


AND NOW TH E S U S H I I TS ELF!

Dogfish no oshi sushi - SWEET GRILLED ON PRESSED SUSHI RICE -

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 1 to 1.5 kg dogfish in filets without skin or bones 10 to 25 g of special corn starch for making brown sauces (to slightly thicken part of the broth) 500 g sushi rice (see page 20) coarse salt (or wasabi) 50 g gari a little pot of Japanese sansho pepper: if you do not use wasabi you can sprinkle a little coarse salt or sanho pepper on the sushi as a finishing touch.

PREPARATION Put all the ingredients for the broth in a sautĂŠ pan and lay the fish filets in it. Bring carefully almost to the boiling point on a low fire. Try not to let the broth actually boil to prevent the fish from breaking up from cooking and making the broth cloudy. Skim off, and let it cook 20 minutes longer. Turn off the fire and let it cool. Boil 250 ml of the cooking liquid down to half volume. Mix the corn starch with it and let it thicken. Skim off and put through a sieve. Let it cool at room temperature. Stir regularly to avoid skin formation on top. Fill the form with sushi rice (about 2 centimetres thick). Lay the fish filets on it carefully and press gently. Let it recover for a few minutes in the form. Take the rice and fish out of it again and cut it in five pieces. Arrange the pieces on a small plate and brush on a little sauce. Sprinkle a little coarse salt or a tad of wasabi on it.

FOR THE BROTH:

100 ml water 100 ml sake (rice wine) 50 ml mirin (sweet rice wine) 25 g sugar 35 ml soy sauce

MATERIALS:

A kata: a rectangular form of 18 by 4 cm for the rice

30

S US HI

Also lay a little pile of gari (sushi ginger) by it.

TIP Make the sauce a day in advance, then it is even more delicious. The sushi rice and sushi are made on the day itself.


AND NOW TH E S U S H I I TS ELF!

Dogfish no oshi sushi - SWEET GRILLED ON PRESSED SUSHI RICE -

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 1 to 1.5 kg dogfish in filets without skin or bones 10 to 25 g of special corn starch for making brown sauces (to slightly thicken part of the broth) 500 g sushi rice (see page 20) coarse salt (or wasabi) 50 g gari a little pot of Japanese sansho pepper: if you do not use wasabi you can sprinkle a little coarse salt or sanho pepper on the sushi as a finishing touch.

PREPARATION Put all the ingredients for the broth in a sautĂŠ pan and lay the fish filets in it. Bring carefully almost to the boiling point on a low fire. Try not to let the broth actually boil to prevent the fish from breaking up from cooking and making the broth cloudy. Skim off, and let it cook 20 minutes longer. Turn off the fire and let it cool. Boil 250 ml of the cooking liquid down to half volume. Mix the corn starch with it and let it thicken. Skim off and put through a sieve. Let it cool at room temperature. Stir regularly to avoid skin formation on top. Fill the form with sushi rice (about 2 centimetres thick). Lay the fish filets on it carefully and press gently. Let it recover for a few minutes in the form. Take the rice and fish out of it again and cut it in five pieces. Arrange the pieces on a small plate and brush on a little sauce. Sprinkle a little coarse salt or a tad of wasabi on it.

FOR THE BROTH:

100 ml water 100 ml sake (rice wine) 50 ml mirin (sweet rice wine) 25 g sugar 35 ml soy sauce

MATERIALS:

A kata: a rectangular form of 18 by 4 cm for the rice

30

S US HI

Also lay a little pile of gari (sushi ginger) by it.

TIP Make the sauce a day in advance, then it is even more delicious. The sushi rice and sushi are made on the day itself.


N O O D LES

Tanuki Udon

- THICK MIE NOODLES IN WARM BROTH Mie noodles or udon originate from Shikoku, the smallest of the four large Japanese islands. At present they are very popular in the whole country. In the thousands of specialised noodle restaurants they are prepared in various ways.

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 200 g udon (mie noodles) 2 spring onions 1 sheet of nori

PREPARATION Bring the water to a boil in a large cooking pot and add the noodles a little at a time. Stir through them gently, so they do not stick together. When the water boils again, add 1.5 decilitre of cold water. Bring it all to a boil again and add 1.5 decilitres more cold water. Wait until the water boils again.

8 teaspoons of tempura granules

Turn the flame low and let the noodles gently boil for 2 or 3 minutes longer until they are al dente.

FOR THE BROTH

Let the noodles drain and dump them in cold water. Stir through them to remove excess gluten and then put them in a sieve.

8.5 dl dashi (see page 36) 3 tablespoons of soy sauce

Mix the ingredients for the broth and bring to a boil.

1 tablespoon of mirin

Keep the broth warm and cut the spring onions fine.

0.5 teaspoon of salt

Heat four deep bowls. Dip the noodles for a few seconds in boiling water to warm them up again and distribute them among the bowls. Pour the warm broth over the noodles. Garnish the dish with the spring onion, the nori and the tempura granules.

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noodles


N O O D LES

Tanuki Udon

- THICK MIE NOODLES IN WARM BROTH Mie noodles or udon originate from Shikoku, the smallest of the four large Japanese islands. At present they are very popular in the whole country. In the thousands of specialised noodle restaurants they are prepared in various ways.

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 200 g udon (mie noodles) 2 spring onions 1 sheet of nori

PREPARATION Bring the water to a boil in a large cooking pot and add the noodles a little at a time. Stir through them gently, so they do not stick together. When the water boils again, add 1.5 decilitre of cold water. Bring it all to a boil again and add 1.5 decilitres more cold water. Wait until the water boils again.

8 teaspoons of tempura granules

Turn the flame low and let the noodles gently boil for 2 or 3 minutes longer until they are al dente.

FOR THE BROTH

Let the noodles drain and dump them in cold water. Stir through them to remove excess gluten and then put them in a sieve.

8.5 dl dashi (see page 36) 3 tablespoons of soy sauce

Mix the ingredients for the broth and bring to a boil.

1 tablespoon of mirin

Keep the broth warm and cut the spring onions fine.

0.5 teaspoon of salt

Heat four deep bowls. Dip the noodles for a few seconds in boiling water to warm them up again and distribute them among the bowls. Pour the warm broth over the noodles. Garnish the dish with the spring onion, the nori and the tempura granules.

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noodles


GRI LLED D I S H ES

Nasu No Misoyaki - GRILLED AUBERGINES -

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 4 small aubergines (Japanese konasu without pits) panko (Japanese bread crumbs) sesame oil yuzu powder (or 1 grated lemon) 8 slices of red bell pepper, cut in slices of 4 mm roasted sesame seeds

FOR THE MISO SAUCE

100 g Japanese white miso 100 g fine sugar 100 ml water

PREPARATION First make the miso sauce: mix all the ingredients and bring to a boil. Bind with the corn starch. Light the Kamado (Green Egg) and keep it warm, or heat the oven to 220 째C. Wash the aubergines and cut them in half lengthwise. Cut a slit lengthwise in the fleshy side of each of the halves. Deep fry them at 160 째C and let them drain well. Lay them on a dish with the flesh side up. Cover them with the miso sauce and sprinkle some panko over it. Brush on some more sesame oil and sprinkle with the grated yuzu or lemon. Arrange the aubergines on the grill and let them grill briefly. Close the lid and scallop them for about five minutes longer. Immerse the slices of red bell pepper briefly in the sesame oil and let them grill briefly. Lay the aubergines on a plate. Lay the grilled paprikas with them. Sprinkle some sesame seeds and some yuzu or lime over it

100 ml mirin (sweet rice wine) 1 egg yolk 10 g corn starch

TIP You can also make this preparation in the over. In that case arrange the aubergines in a buttered oven dish and scallop in a warm oven (220 째C) for 10 minutes.

FOR GARNISHING

4 small soft green Japanese paprika or red sweet bell peppers, cut in rings

66

Grilled dishes

Grilled dishes

67


GRI LLED D I S H ES

Nasu No Misoyaki - GRILLED AUBERGINES -

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 4 small aubergines (Japanese konasu without pits) panko (Japanese bread crumbs) sesame oil yuzu powder (or 1 grated lemon) 8 slices of red bell pepper, cut in slices of 4 mm roasted sesame seeds

FOR THE MISO SAUCE

100 g Japanese white miso 100 g fine sugar 100 ml water

PREPARATION First make the miso sauce: mix all the ingredients and bring to a boil. Bind with the corn starch. Light the Kamado (Green Egg) and keep it warm, or heat the oven to 220 째C. Wash the aubergines and cut them in half lengthwise. Cut a slit lengthwise in the fleshy side of each of the halves. Deep fry them at 160 째C and let them drain well. Lay them on a dish with the flesh side up. Cover them with the miso sauce and sprinkle some panko over it. Brush on some more sesame oil and sprinkle with the grated yuzu or lemon. Arrange the aubergines on the grill and let them grill briefly. Close the lid and scallop them for about five minutes longer. Immerse the slices of red bell pepper briefly in the sesame oil and let them grill briefly. Lay the aubergines on a plate. Lay the grilled paprikas with them. Sprinkle some sesame seeds and some yuzu or lime over it

100 ml mirin (sweet rice wine) 1 egg yolk 10 g corn starch

TIP You can also make this preparation in the over. In that case arrange the aubergines in a buttered oven dish and scallop in a warm oven (220 째C) for 10 minutes.

FOR GARNISHING

4 small soft green Japanese paprika or red sweet bell peppers, cut in rings

66

Grilled dishes

Grilled dishes

67


SI D E D I S H ES

Maguro No Nutamiso Ae

- TUNNY AND FINE YOUNG LEEKS WITH MISO RICE VINEGAR VINAIGRETTE -

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 200 g fresh tunny 2 fine young leeks salt 10 g Japanese wakame roasted sesame seeds

FOR THE NUTA MISO (THE MISO RICE VINEGAR VINAIGRETTE)

100 g miso paste 50 g sugar 20 ml sake 20 ml komesu or kurosu (Japanese rice vinegar) 5 g mustard powder mixed with 5 ml warm water (or 10 to 15 g Dijon mustard with a good and sharp taste) optional: 2 ml soy sauce

PREPARATION First make the vinaigrette: mix all the ingredients with a hand blender, preferably a day in advance. Cut the tunny in strips of 2 by 2 centimetres. Cut the leeks into pieces of 10 centimetres and wash them well. Blanch both very briefly in slightly salted water. Then freshen them immediately in ice water and pat dry. Let the wakame soak and swell up in water for five minutes. Afterward press it out well. Cut the fish and the leeks in bite-size pieces and arrange them on a small plate. Lay some wakame here and there. Put on the vinaigrette. Sprinkle on some roasted sesame seeds.

80

S ide dishes


SI D E D I S H ES

Maguro No Nutamiso Ae

- TUNNY AND FINE YOUNG LEEKS WITH MISO RICE VINEGAR VINAIGRETTE -

INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 200 g fresh tunny 2 fine young leeks salt 10 g Japanese wakame roasted sesame seeds

FOR THE NUTA MISO (THE MISO RICE VINEGAR VINAIGRETTE)

100 g miso paste 50 g sugar 20 ml sake 20 ml komesu or kurosu (Japanese rice vinegar) 5 g mustard powder mixed with 5 ml warm water (or 10 to 15 g Dijon mustard with a good and sharp taste) optional: 2 ml soy sauce

PREPARATION First make the vinaigrette: mix all the ingredients with a hand blender, preferably a day in advance. Cut the tunny in strips of 2 by 2 centimetres. Cut the leeks into pieces of 10 centimetres and wash them well. Blanch both very briefly in slightly salted water. Then freshen them immediately in ice water and pat dry. Let the wakame soak and swell up in water for five minutes. Afterward press it out well. Cut the fish and the leeks in bite-size pieces and arrange them on a small plate. Lay some wakame here and there. Put on the vinaigrette. Sprinkle on some roasted sesame seeds.

80

S ide dishes


SI D E D I S H ES

Sunomono

- OCTOPUS AND JUMBO SHRIMP WITH JAPANESE RICE VINEGAR INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 1 fresh octopus daikon salt 1 tablespoon of hoji-cha (Japanese roasted tea) 4 jumbo shrimps (preferably sea water Black Tiger) 10 g Japanese wakame 1 cucumber

FOR THE AMASU (THE VINEGAR MIXTURE FOR THE MARINADE)

9 ml water 5 g sugar 18 ml komesu or kurosu (Japanese rice vinegar) according to your own taste: 2 ml soy sauce

FOR GARNISHING

roasted sesame seeds 10 g myoga (fresh young ginger) cut into fine julienne and rinsed preserved kiku-no-hana (chrysanthemum flowers preserved in rice vinegar)

PREPARATION Ask the fishmonger to remove the entrails of the octopus. If he sells correctly precooked octopus, you can use that. Otherwise you must cook it yourself. That is done as follows: First give the octopus, according to an ancient tradition, a couple of firm taps with a daikon (white ramanas). Then lay it in a large bowl. Rub it in with salt to remove the excess slime and rinse it under running water. Fill a large cooking pot with water and add a spoonful of salt and possibly a spoonful of hoji-cha. Heat the water to 80 째C. Lay the octopus in carefully and keep the water at 80 째C for 30 minutes. Be careful that the fish is completely under the water. Take the octopus from the water. Hang it on a hook (or lay it on a sieve and put plastic foil over it so it does not dry out) and let it slowly cool off at room temperature. Stick the jumbo shrimps on a skewer and sprinkle them with salt. Let them cook for 1 or 2 minutes in boiling water (never let them keep boiling). Then rinse them in a bowl with ice water or under running water. Let them drain well. Pull the skewers out and peel them. Cut them open along the stomach side and remove the intestinal canal. Let the wakame soak for five minutes. Then press out the excess water. Peel the cucumber half. Cut it lengthwise in two and remove the seeds. Cut it in halve slices, put them in a bowl and sprinkle with salt. Mix everything well, and then let it stand for 10 minutes. Next press it out and set it aside for now. Make the amasu: bring the water to a boil and dissolve the sugar in it. Remove from the fire. Add the rice vinegar and possibly soy sauce. Mix everything well, and let it cool. Cut the octopus in fine slices, and let them marinate in the amasu for 2 minutes together with the jumbo shrimps. Also let the cucumber and the wakame marinate together for 2 minutes. Let the ingredients drain out on a sieve and arrange them in a deep dish or plate. Right before serving, pour a little amasu over them and sprinkle the sesame seeds on top. Finish off according to taste with myoga and kiku-no-hana.

96

S ide dishes


SI D E D I S H ES

Sunomono

- OCTOPUS AND JUMBO SHRIMP WITH JAPANESE RICE VINEGAR INGREDIENTS (for 4 people) 1 fresh octopus daikon salt 1 tablespoon of hoji-cha (Japanese roasted tea) 4 jumbo shrimps (preferably sea water Black Tiger) 10 g Japanese wakame 1 cucumber

FOR THE AMASU (THE VINEGAR MIXTURE FOR THE MARINADE)

9 ml water 5 g sugar 18 ml komesu or kurosu (Japanese rice vinegar) according to your own taste: 2 ml soy sauce

FOR GARNISHING

roasted sesame seeds 10 g myoga (fresh young ginger) cut into fine julienne and rinsed preserved kiku-no-hana (chrysanthemum flowers preserved in rice vinegar)

PREPARATION Ask the fishmonger to remove the entrails of the octopus. If he sells correctly precooked octopus, you can use that. Otherwise you must cook it yourself. That is done as follows: First give the octopus, according to an ancient tradition, a couple of firm taps with a daikon (white ramanas). Then lay it in a large bowl. Rub it in with salt to remove the excess slime and rinse it under running water. Fill a large cooking pot with water and add a spoonful of salt and possibly a spoonful of hoji-cha. Heat the water to 80 째C. Lay the octopus in carefully and keep the water at 80 째C for 30 minutes. Be careful that the fish is completely under the water. Take the octopus from the water. Hang it on a hook (or lay it on a sieve and put plastic foil over it so it does not dry out) and let it slowly cool off at room temperature. Stick the jumbo shrimps on a skewer and sprinkle them with salt. Let them cook for 1 or 2 minutes in boiling water (never let them keep boiling). Then rinse them in a bowl with ice water or under running water. Let them drain well. Pull the skewers out and peel them. Cut them open along the stomach side and remove the intestinal canal. Let the wakame soak for five minutes. Then press out the excess water. Peel the cucumber half. Cut it lengthwise in two and remove the seeds. Cut it in halve slices, put them in a bowl and sprinkle with salt. Mix everything well, and then let it stand for 10 minutes. Next press it out and set it aside for now. Make the amasu: bring the water to a boil and dissolve the sugar in it. Remove from the fire. Add the rice vinegar and possibly soy sauce. Mix everything well, and let it cool. Cut the octopus in fine slices, and let them marinate in the amasu for 2 minutes together with the jumbo shrimps. Also let the cucumber and the wakame marinate together for 2 minutes. Let the ingredients drain out on a sieve and arrange them in a deep dish or plate. Right before serving, pour a little amasu over them and sprinkle the sesame seeds on top. Finish off according to taste with myoga and kiku-no-hana.

96

S ide dishes

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