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ALWAYS AUDREY

Featuring classic, rare and previously unpublished photographs of Audrey Hepburn by: Lawrence Fried An award-winning photojournalist who covered the political, social, and artistic events of his time for Look, Saturday Evening Post, The New York Times, Vogue and Parade magazine. In post-war New York, Fried immersed himself in theatreland, where he first met and photographed the bright young star of Gigi, Audrey Hepburn. Norman Parkinson The most celebrated fashion photographer of the twentieth century, Parkinson created the age of the supermodel. In the 1950s, he photographed Audrey Hepburn as she grew from stage actor into star of the big screen, including a series of shots taken at her rented villa in Ceccina, Italy. Milton H. Greene In the 1950s and 60s, ‘Colour Photography’s Wonder Boy’ shot for Life, Look, Harper’s Bazaar, Town & Country and Vogue. His fifty sessions with Marilyn Monroe have become legendary, whilst his work with Audrey Hepburn documented the star at defining points in her early career, as a young stage actor and emergent Hollywood star. Douglas Kirkland As a photographer working at the cutting edge of fashion, photojournalism and portraiture for nearly 60 years, Douglas Kirkland has a far-reaching archive of photographs that includes stunning images of Audrey Hepburn. Kirkland’s work with the star spanned a decade during which the actor was at the height of her career. Terry O’Neill Throughout a long and distinguished career, Terry O’Neill has worked with iconic musicians, politicians, the British Royal Family, international sporting stars, models and actors. He spent time in the 1960s photographing Audrey Hepburn on two film sets, capturing the humour and poise of the star behind the scenes. Eva Sereny As an on-set photographer, Eva Sereny worked with some of the most recognisable and celebrated directors and actors of the 1970s and 80s. She encountered Audrey Hepburn on the set of the star’s last film, Always, in 1989, documenting the actor in a stunning series of ethereal images.

From Audrey Hepburn’s debut on Broadway in Gigi to her last film, Always, six brilliant photographers open their archives to share images of the star – many published here for the first time.

ALWAYS AUDREY Blur the lines between twentieth-century cinema and twentieth-century photography, and one name comes sharply into focus: Audrey Hepburn. Gamine, stylish, generous and immensely talented, in front of the camera Hepburn’s star quality was balanced with a cultured elegance and a humour that inspired the great celebrity photographers of her time.

ALWAYS AUDREY

Six iconic photographers. One legendary star

In Always Audrey, six extraordinary photographers share images from their archives, rare and unseen, many published here for the first time: fashion photography pioneer Norman Parkinson, masters of celebrity portraiture Douglas Kirkland and Milton H. Greene, photojournalist Lawrence Fried, and Terry O’Neill and Eva Sereny, both of whom photographed Hepburn on set. Each brought their unique perspective to Hepburn, documenting the actor as her career progressed, from a 1951 breakout role on stage in Gigi, through to her final film, Always, in 1989. Always Audrey includes an insightful interview with curator, collector and former Head of Photographs at the National Portrait Gallery, Terence Pepper.

For more information about Iconic Images, please go to: www.iconicimages.net To see the full catalogue of books published by ACC Art Books, please go to: www.accartbooks.com ACC ART BOOKS Sandy Lane, Old Martlesham Woodbridge, Suffolk IP12 4SD, UK Tel 01394 389950 Email: uksales@accartbooks.com

Audrey Hepburn photographed by

ACC ART BOOKS 6 West 18th Street, Suite 4B New York NY10011, USA Tel 212 645 1111 Email: ussales@accartbooks.com ICONIC IMAGES ISBN: 978-1-78884-032-3

ËxHSLHSIy840323zv&:<:;:!:! £45.00/$65.00

www.accartbooks.com

Audrey_Cover.Final10.indd 1

IC NICIMAGES FINEART ARCHIVES PUBLISHING CREATIVE

LAWRENCE FRIED NORMAN PARKINSON MILTON H. GREENE DOUGLAS KIRKLAND TERRY O’NEILL EVA SERENY Interview with

TERENCE PEPPER 18/07/2019 10:26


INTRODUCTION Carrie Kania, Creative Director at Iconic Images

If you were to merge the history of twentieth-century cinema with twentiethcentury photography, the two lists would have one distinct name in common: Audrey Hepburn. Never has there been a star captured so often by the most notable photographers of her time than this actor. Gamine, stylish, generous and immensely talented, this one single star shone brightly when the camera lens turned to her. Hepburn has been immortalised by iconic image makers and photographs of the actor have been synonymous with grace and elegance. In Always Audrey, six extraordinary names in photography open their archives to share images – classic and unknown, rare and unseen, many published here for the first time. The photographs collected here, along with an insightful interview with curator, collector and former Head of Photographs at the National Portrait Gallery, Terence Pepper, are some of the most memorable ever taken of the star. Fashion photography pioneer Norman Parkinson, celebrity portraiture masters Douglas Kirkland and Milton H. Greene, photojournalist Lawrence Fried and the on-set photography of Terry O’Neill and Eva Sereny all give us an opportunity to see how they looked at and worked with the star. Audrey Hepburn began her career working in the theatres of London. Belgian-born, she moved to the British capital when she was just 19, to continue her ballet training with hopes of transitioning to work on the stage. She soon began performing as a chorus girl and making minor appearances in British films. Then a role that would change her life landed in her lap – Gigi. It was the author of the novel herself, Colette, who spotted the young actor and exclaimed “I have found my Gigi!” Hepburn was quickly cast for the New York stage production and sailed to New York City. It was early on in the run, which was an immediate success with audiences and reviewers, that 22-year-old Hepburn met 25-year-old New York native Lawrence Fried, who was working for several publications at the time. For these photographs, taken in 1951, Fried would simply follow Hepburn around for a few days, as the young ingénue glided through New York City’s Times Square. A casual day in the life of a

new star, Fried would accompany the actor to an automat, her modest hotel room, backstage for a television promotional appearance and in her dressing room, preparing to take the stage in the role that was to make her famous. These extraordinarily special photographs have rarely been seen. At a more formal portrait session, Fried would photograph Hepburn in a glamorous ballgown. All the work done at this session has been lost through the annals of time, with only these three, published here, surviving to give us a glimpse of Audrey Hepburn at the very beginnings of her career. British photographer Norman Parkinson was 20 years into a nearly 70year career as a ground-breaking fashion and portrait photographer. He was a frequent credit in the most notable magazines of the day and was a forerunner in taking the models out of the studios and placing them on location. Around the same time as Lawrence Fried, Parkinson was also called upon to take some pictures of Hepburn. For Parkinson’s Hepburn portraits, however, the great master decided to photograph this charming new actor against a modest studio backdrop, using colour and black and white film. Only a few pictures were published at the time, in the widely read and highly regarded women’s magazines British Vogue and the American edition of Glamour. Parkinson’s portraits were accompanied by articles proclaiming that this wonderful new actor would soon be lighting up the cinema in major leading roles. Around the same time, Milton H. Greene would also visit Hepburn while on assignment for Life magazine. The 29-year-old Greene was at the very start of his illustrious career and his fashion and celebrity portraits would soon see him crowned ‘Color Photography’s Wonder Boy’. For their first meeting, in one spirited series, Hepburn donned a flouncy skirt and sailor top, her costume whilst playing Gigi, and danced around Greene’s studio. Greene and Hepburn, both single, were smitten and the two had a brief romance. Following the success of Gigi, Hepburn went off to film her first major feature, Roman Holiday. The film secured her place as an international movie – and style – star. The magazines loved to run images of Hepburn and her unique sartorial

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There is not a woman alive who does not dream of looking like Audrey Hepburn HUBERT DE GIVENCHY

sense would launch trends and help make the designers she wore household names. It was after Roman Holiday that Hepburn would reconnect with two of the photographers who worked with her during Gigi: Norman Parkinson and her old love, Milton Greene. Greene would work with Hepburn twice in two very different locations. First, in 1953, Greene would visit Hepburn in Malibu, whilst filming Sabrina. Greene would favour colour film and there on the beach, the wind-swept actor with red lipstick and her trademark short, close hairstyle, would be immortalised by Greene’s camera; images were published in Look magazine in a feature that would dub her ‘Actress of the Year’. A few years later, in 1955, Greene and his wife, Amy, would visit Hepburn and her husband, Mel Ferrer, in a charming home the couple were renting whilst filming War and Peace. The house at Villa Rolli, in the Lazio region of Italy, would have an outdoor woodburning oven and the couples would bake peasant bread. Also visiting Hepburn in Villa Rolli would be Norman Parkinson, for images that would be published in British Vogue. He visited Hepburn and Ferrer for a wonderfully fresh feature that showed the newlyweds at their Italian home,

complete with their pet donkey, Bimba. It was during this visit that Parkinson would capture a colour portrait of the young star, wearing a Givenchy afternoon cocktail dress in pink, standing against a fuchsia wall of bougainvilleas. This photograph would forever cement the photography legend and his fleeting muse, Audrey. After a decade of blockbuster films, including Sabrina, Breakfast at Tiffany’s and Funny Face, Hepburn was one of the most photographed women in the world. And two new photographers were eager to have the opportunity to work with the big star. Douglas Kirkland, who famously worked with Marilyn Monroe in 1961, when Kirkland was just 21, favoured a simple studio – similar to Parkinson – and photographed a series of portraits of Hepburn in promotion for her role in How to Steal a Million. Once again draped in Givenchy, these beautiful close-ups were to become signature portraits in the image history of the actor. Kirkland also happened to meet another young woman whilst on the set in Paris, Françoise. Kirkland and Françoise quickly fell in love and the couple, married for nearly 50 years, continue to collaborate to this day. Terry O’Neill, who shot to photographic stardom with early images of The

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(Left): Audrey Hepburn with Alec Guinness and William Fox in ‘The Lavender Hill Mob’ (released 1951). (Below): Audrey Hepburn, as Nora the young ballerina, and Valentina Cortese in ‘Secret People’ (released 1952)

When did you first ‘see’ Audrey Hepburn? Where did the fascination with her – and her image – begin for you? Checking through my film diary for 1965, where as a movie-mad teenager I fastidiously catalogued all the films I saw that year, I noticed that the first Audrey Hepburn feature film I saw was The Lavender Hill Mob (1951), which was shown at my school in 1965. The film was one of the most successful at the British box office at the time, and Hepburn appears briefly in an opening sequence set in a South American airport lounge. She is shown approaching Alec Guinness to offer him a cigarette, strangely similar to her very first British film Laughter in Paradise in 1951. In this film she plays a cigarette girl and utters the short line, “Who wants a ciggie?”. Despite her very brief appearance in this film, I would discover decades later that an image just of her made it to the cover of the March 1951 ABC Film Review [see page 13].

When did you first start to collect photographs, cuttings, postcards and magazines of Audrey? My first collecting obsession was as a child growing up in Malaysia when I started collecting fizzy drink bottle tops. I was sent away to boarding school in England, aged nine, and remember coming back home and learning the collection had (rightly) been thrown away. After that I was collecting press cuttings on The Beatles in the mid-sixties which morphed later into postcard collecting, which is how I became interested in the history of photography. An early card I acquired was of Audrey Hepburn in Sabrina (1954) although I mainly collected art reproduction cards while visiting museums and art galleries. I first started collecting magazines with Audrey Hepburn as cover star at monthly ephemera fairs in the 1970s and for the ‘Audrey Hepburn: Portraits of

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Another discovery was a colour transparency from 1952 that I hadn’t seen published before of Audrey in costume for Gigi. Both images for the exhibition were printed for the 1981 show, but because of constraints only one could be included. The 1955 image of Audrey with her legs almost intertwining with the donkey became a classic and frequently exhibited image when it then entered the National Portrait Gallery collection. Any favourite memory in terms of collecting – or discovering – Audrey Hepburn photographs? My most exciting discovery of rare Audrey prints was spotting two images on eBay taken by Larry Fried that were owned by a French dealer who was asking a high price. At that stage, when I bought them, I had no idea about the photographer’s life or whereabouts, but after careful research, finally tracked down that although he had died aged 56 in 1983, his two daughters (Patricia ‘Tish’ Fried and Lauren Wendle) were living in America and had a largely unsorted archive. Over the last few years of meetings and correspondence we established a strong bond and the fact that his rediscovered archive is revealed here after all those years of being lost is, perhaps, the most rewarding exploration. For most of my career I have been trying to track down the work of Antony Beauchamp (1918-1957), onetime son-in-law of Winston Churchill through his marriage to the actress Sarah Churchill. He died as a result of suicide and was the

son of another photographer, Florence Entwistle, who worked under the name ‘Vivienne’. When she died without a discoverable death certificate or will, his surviving archive appeared totally lost. At a late stage after the ‘Audrey Hepburn: Portraits of an Icon’ catalogue had gone to press, I was contacted by a member of the public, Stan Wolfson who told me he had found early undiscovered images of Audrey Hepburn taken by Beauchamp. Two were published on the National Portrait Gallery exhibition blog, but this is the first time that they appear in a book [see pages 14-15]. Beauchamp was the first British professional photographer to work with Audrey Hepburn. He went to see her at the theatre in 1949 and went backstage to ask her if he could take a studio portrait of her and include her as a model for the Marshall & Snelgrove department store. A credited portrait of her in costume for Sauce Tartare was published in the 14 September 1949 issue of The Sketch and others for Marshall & Snelgrove appeared uncredited in leading magazines including Queen and Vogue between December 1949 and January 1950. Their photographic collaboration continued over the years and involved her appearance in New York and in Italy on the set of War and Peace. Around this time, the legendary surrealist and theatre photographer Angus McBean requested a sitting for an advertising image with Audrey Hepburn for a skin lotion commercial. McBean had first met Hepburn when he was commissioned to take a cover photograph of her with her co-stars for

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(Opposite page): Audrey Hepburn in two publicity photographs, taken by Bud Fraker for the Paramount Film production, ‘Sabrina’ (released 1954). (Above and Right): Full frame photograph by Norman Parkinson of Audrey Hepburn in costume as Gigi for her first play on Broadway, with a cropped enlargement as run in the March 1952 issue of British ‘Vogue’

Cecil Landeau’s revue Petite Sauce Tartare (1949) at Ciro’s Club in London. He felt her looks and personality were perfect for the advertising image. Audrey Hepburn was buried in the sand in a surrealist landscape with two classical columns and it has become one of the most acknowledged pieces of twentieth-century photography. Although Hepburn was not credited as the model, the image appeared in every chemist shop throughout Britain as well as advertisements in leading magazines. In 1985 for British Film Year, I selected this image of Hepburn for a comprehensive ‘History of British Cinema’ exhibition at the National Portrait Gallery. Finding a vintage original print of this photograph proved problematic until we discovered one in the Royal Photographic Society in Bath. McBean was given permission to make a copy negative of the vintage print and subsequently sold many copies. Many years later when I curated an exhibition on Angus McBean I was contacted by his studio assistant who worked with him when this sitting took place. He had kept a rare vintage print made at the time at McBean’s Endell Street studio which the National Portrait Gallery were very fortunate to be able to acquire for their collection. What is your most personally treasured item in your collection? My most treasured images of Audrey Hepburn are two film publicity portraits taken by Bud Fraker for Sabrina. I’d love to own the Cecil Beaton photograph of Audrey on a bicycle with her dog Assam on the Hollywood set of My Fair

Lady (1963) and Terry O’Neill’s photograph of Audrey with a white dove on her shoulder [see page 273] on the set of Two For The Road (1967). After leaving the National Portrait Gallery I was asked to help curate several Cecil Beaton exhibitions by Joanna Ling, Curator of the Sotheby’s Cecil Beaton Studio Archive, and her assistant Emma Nichols; first in Istanbul, then Stockholm and later in Madrid. This image of Audrey Hepburn on a bicycle and another in full costume for My Fair Lady were the standout hits from those shows. For the Madrid exhibition the venue made a life size print. The six photographers included in this book – Fried, Greene, Parkinson, Kirkland, O’Neill and Sereny – cover several decades of Hepburn’s life, from the 1950s up until her last film, Always, in 1989. Photographically, do you see a big change in how Audrey treated the camera? How did she evolve in front of the camera? The portfolios of works included here date from 1951, when Audrey first triumphantly appeared in New York on Broadway in Gigi, to her last film, Steven Spielberg’s Always. I thought I had seen nearly all the images taken of Audrey by these photographers – Lawrence Fried, Norman Parkinson, Milton H. Greene, Douglas Kirkland, Terry O’Neill and Eva Sereny, but I was very excited that further in-depth research of their archives and the scanning of negatives and transparencies has revealed many more images for the first time, particularly in

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When up-and-coming photojournalist Lawrence Fried met up-and-coming actress Audrey Hepburn, he was 25 and she was 22. It was New York, 1951, and the post-war city was exploding with people, art, and culture. Hepburn was on the cusp of meteoric fame, starring in her first Broadway role as Gigi. Fried initially photographed her backstage â&#x20AC;&#x201C; having a costume fitting and working with her dresser as she prepared for her performance. But Fried, whose work was influenced not just by his fellow street photographers like Winogrand, Meyerowitz, and Feingersh, but also by photographic essayists like W. Eugene Smith, wanted to get Hepburn out into the street, exploring the city. The result was a series of revealing and narrative photos of the two contemporaries delighting in the magic of New York. Fried caught Hepburn gazing up at her own name in Broadway lights, buying a pair of stockings, enjoying a cup of coffee in a cafĂŠ. Over several days together, Fried captured a spontaneous and effervescent Hepburn, exulting in the time and place. A man of great charm and humour, Fried was known for putting his subjects at ease and allowing them to be themselves. He had a special affinity for actors, having studied theatre himself on the GI bill after the war. In New

York, he immersed himself in the world of the theatre, creating images of established luminaries like Billy Wilder, Jules Dassin, Marlene Dietrich and Ingrid Bergman. But, as a young man fresh from World War II, he naturally gravitated to his generational peers. Soon he was creating iconic images of emerging stars such as James Dean, Marlon Brando, Paul Newman, Julie Harris, Julie Andrews and Shirley MacLaine. He excelled at capturing the essence of his subjects by pulling them out of themselves and creating a warm and easy-going connection. Consequently, his work has a freedom and energy to it, and his subjects seem as delighted with him personally as they are with being photographed. Hepburn would soon become one of the most celebrated actresses of her era. Having survived the hardships of German-occupied Holland and the Dutch Famine of 1944, Hepburn eventually arrived in England in 1948, with the intention of becoming a ballerina, but the deprivations of her wartime childhood had left their mark and she suffered from acute anaemia and respiratory problems. Told she lacked the constitution for ballet, she focused on acting instead. By 1951 she had appeared in a handful of tiny British film roles, including One Wild Oat, Laughter in Paradise and The Lavender Hill Mob.

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Hepburn would soon become one of the most celebrated actresses of her era

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Hepburn had been plucked from obscurity by the author herself, who was staying at the same hotel in the South of France while Hepburn was filming a small British-French film, ‘Monte Carlo Baby’. Colette took one look at the girlish features of Hepburn and declared, ‘I have found Gigi!’

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ALWAYS AUDREY

Featuring classic, rare and previously unpublished photographs of Audrey Hepburn by: Lawrence Fried An award-winning photojournalist who covered the political, social, and artistic events of his time for Look, Saturday Evening Post, The New York Times, Vogue and Parade magazine. In post-war New York, Fried immersed himself in theatreland, where he first met and photographed the bright young star of Gigi, Audrey Hepburn. Norman Parkinson The most celebrated fashion photographer of the twentieth century, Parkinson created the age of the supermodel. In the 1950s, he photographed Audrey Hepburn as she grew from stage actor into star of the big screen, including a series of shots taken at her rented villa in Ceccina, Italy. Milton H. Greene In the 1950s and 60s, ‘Colour Photography’s Wonder Boy’ shot for Life, Look, Harper’s Bazaar, Town & Country and Vogue. His fifty sessions with Marilyn Monroe have become legendary, whilst his work with Audrey Hepburn documented the star at defining points in her early career, as a young stage actor and emergent Hollywood star. Douglas Kirkland As a photographer working at the cutting edge of fashion, photojournalism and portraiture for nearly 60 years, Douglas Kirkland has a far-reaching archive of photographs that includes stunning images of Audrey Hepburn. Kirkland’s work with the star spanned a decade during which the actor was at the height of her career. Terry O’Neill Throughout a long and distinguished career, Terry O’Neill has worked with iconic musicians, politicians, the British Royal Family, international sporting stars, models and actors. He spent time in the 1960s photographing Audrey Hepburn on two film sets, capturing the humour and poise of the star behind the scenes. Eva Sereny As an on-set photographer, Eva Sereny worked with some of the most recognisable and celebrated directors and actors of the 1970s and 80s. She encountered Audrey Hepburn on the set of the star’s last film, Always, in 1989, documenting the actor in a stunning series of ethereal images.

From Audrey Hepburn’s debut on Broadway in Gigi to her last film, Always, six brilliant photographers open their archives to share images of the star – many published here for the first time.

ALWAYS AUDREY Blur the lines between twentieth-century cinema and twentieth-century photography, and one name comes sharply into focus: Audrey Hepburn. Gamine, stylish, generous and immensely talented, in front of the camera Hepburn’s star quality was balanced with a cultured elegance and a humour that inspired the great celebrity photographers of her time.

ALWAYS AUDREY

Six iconic photographers. One legendary star

In Always Audrey, six extraordinary photographers share images from their archives, rare and unseen, many published here for the first time: fashion photography pioneer Norman Parkinson, masters of celebrity portraiture Douglas Kirkland and Milton H. Greene, photojournalist Lawrence Fried, and Terry O’Neill and Eva Sereny, both of whom photographed Hepburn on set. Each brought their unique perspective to Hepburn, documenting the actor as her career progressed, from a 1951 breakout role on stage in Gigi, through to her final film, Always, in 1989. Always Audrey includes an insightful interview with curator, collector and former Head of Photographs at the National Portrait Gallery, Terence Pepper.

For more information about Iconic Images, please go to: www.iconicimages.net To see the full catalogue of books published by ACC Art Books, please go to: www.accartbooks.com ACC ART BOOKS Sandy Lane, Old Martlesham Woodbridge, Suffolk IP12 4SD, UK Tel 01394 389950 Email: uksales@accartbooks.com

Audrey Hepburn photographed by

ACC ART BOOKS 6 West 18th Street, Suite 4B New York NY10011, USA Tel 212 645 1111 Email: ussales@accartbooks.com ICONIC IMAGES ISBN: 978-1-78884-032-3

ËxHSLHSIy840323zv&:<:;:!:! £45.00/$65.00

www.accartbooks.com

Audrey_Cover.Final10.indd 1

IC NICIMAGES FINEART ARCHIVES PUBLISHING CREATIVE

LAWRENCE FRIED NORMAN PARKINSON MILTON H. GREENE DOUGLAS KIRKLAND TERRY O’NEILL EVA SERENY Interview with

TERENCE PEPPER 18/07/2019 10:26

Profile for ACC Art Books

Always Audrey  

Always Audrey