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2016-17

ACADEMIC REPORT


TABLE OF CONTENTS About Assiniboine ............................................................................................................ 4 2016-17 Enrolments .......................................................................................................... 6 Growth & Salaries .............................................................................................................. 8 Indigenous Enrolment 2016-17 ...................................................................................... 9 2016-17 Delivery Locations ............................................................................................ 10 Student Profile 2016-17 .................................................................................................. 11 International Student Enrolment 2016-17 ....................................................................12 Campuses and Centres ............................................................... ................................... 15


ABOUT ASSINIBOINE Assiniboine Community College first opened its doors more than 55 years ago in February 1961 as the Brandon Vocational Training Centre. Shops and classrooms were located in several buildings throughout the city. The Centre was soon renamed the Manitoba Vocational Training Centre and in 1966 students moved into a new building at 1430 Victoria Avenue East. In December 1969, the Centre became Assiniboine Community College when Manitoba’s three technical vocational schools were made community colleges. Assiniboine offers unparalleled learning environments and responds well to the demands and requirements of the Manitoba labour market. Instructors follow the philosophy of ‘learn by doing’, combining theory with hands-on learning inside classrooms, labs, kitchens, shops, fields and the sustainable greenhouse. Assiniboine is an accredited college with the Government of Manitoba. With campuses in Brandon, Dauphin and Winnipeg, Assiniboine provides comprehensive education opportunities throughout Manitoba. The college also partners with many communities and organizations across the province to deliver customized and community-based education and training. Students may choose to study full-time, part-time or by distance. Assiniboine offers apprenticeship programs, certificates, diplomas, mature student high school, continuing studies and contract training. The college’s educational delivery is offered through a variety of

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approaches, including face-to-face, distance and online, blended learning and integrated programs. Nearly 1,300 students graduated this past academic year. In September of 2007, Assiniboine began the first phase of its move to the former Brandon Mental Health Centre site on the north hill in Brandon, as Culinary Arts and Hotel and Restaurant Management programs moved into state-of-the-art facilities in the Manitoba Institute of Culinary Arts (MICA). The college continued its relocation in 2008, with the construction of the $45 million Len Evans Centre for Trades and Technology. That facility opened to students and staff in September 2010. A sustainable greenhouse, which serves as a hub for applied education research, opened in spring 2013. In 2014, Assiniboine embarked on an exciting journey to develop a campus master plan. After many months of consultation, workshops and open houses with the community, the finished plan was presented to the college’s Board of Governors in early 2015. It was unanimously adopted. The campus master plan sets the stage and direction for our college’s future growth over the next several decades. The plan conceptually outlines the physical structure of the future campus’ built form, open space, and circulation network—all with the aim of providing opportunities to bring out the strengths and values that define our college as a place that provides an unparalleled student experience and engages students, staff, faculty and our community.


ASSINIBOINE’S ANNUAL PROVINCIAL IMPACT TOTALS $613 MILLION “We know that investments in education produce economic and social returns far greater than their costs,” says Assiniboine president Mark Frison. “Continued investment in Assiniboine and post-secondary education is tied directly to the growth and prosperity of our provincial economy. A more skilled workforce makes Manitoba stronger and more competitive.”

10.1% 21.2% Average annual rate of return for taxpayers

Average rate of return on a student’s investment in their education

613million

$

our annual economic impact

ASSINIBOINE HELPS CLEAR A PATH TO EDUCATION AND JOBS In 2017, the college announced a new initiative that will help adult students finish their high school diploma. For the next two years, the college is waiving application fees for students applying to the Mature Student High School (MSHS) program, which it offers at campuses in Brandon and Dauphin, as well as in partnership with communities throughout Manitoba. “We want to eliminate as many barriers as possible to help connect individuals to education pathways,” said Deanna Rexe, vice-president,

academic at Assiniboine. “Manitoba lags behind the majority of Canada in terms of high school completion rates. Our college has an important role to play in narrowing this gap.” Prior to now, there was a $75 fee to apply to the program. The college’s Foundation is supporting the college’s efforts with a $16,000 contribution to help cover the fees over the trial period.

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2016 - 2017 Academic Report Program Table Academic Credential

Program Accounting and Finance Agribusiness Automotive Technician Business Administration² Carpentry and Woodworking Civil Technician Communications Engineering Technology Comprehensive Health Care Aide Comprehensive Health Care Aide Challenge Computer Systems Technology Construction Electrician Culinary Arts² Early Childhood Education Early Childhood Program Management Education Assistant Electronic Technician³ General Business² Geographic Information Systems Heavy Duty Equipment Technician² Heavy Duty Equipment Technician² Horticultural Production Hotel and Restaurant Management² Hotel and Restaurant Management² Industrial Metals Fabrication Interactive Media Arts² Interactive Media Arts² Land and Water Management Network Administration Technology Office Administration² Office Administration² Piping Trades Police Studies Power Engineering Practical Nursing Practical Nursing Refresher Professional Cooking² ⁴ Social Service Worker Sustainable Food Systems Apprenticeship Contract Training Cost Recovery Mature Student High School Undeclared College Total¹

Advanced Diploma Diploma Certificate Diploma Certificate Certificate Diploma Certificate Certificate Diploma Certificate Diploma Diploma Advanced Diploma Certificate Certificate Certificate Advanced Diploma Certificate Diploma Certificate Certificate Diploma Certificate Certificate Diploma Diploma Diploma Diploma Certificate Certificate Certificate Certificate Diploma Certificate Certificate Diploma Advanced Diploma

¹Due to program exclusions, college totals are different from published statistics ²Survey results are grouped, diploma and certificate progams are not collected separately. ³Electronic Technician is the exit certificate of the Communications Engineering Technology diploma program. ⁴Professional Cooking is the exit certificate of the Culinary Arts diploma program.

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--Survey samples less than 5 are reported as null

New Students

Returning Students

24 54 15 147 29 20 13 101 0 0 15 22 27 0 16 1 10 0 15 27 13 4 13 19 5 47 14 17 29 4 17 17 15 221 0 1 25 2 756 2152 2591 387 0 6885

20 45 0 94 0 15 11 16 0 7 0 15 32 0 0 0 9 0 2 14 4 0 8 0 0 23 24 15 17 0 0 0 0 186 0 0 19 2 6 220 330 45 0 1179


Distance Education Enrolment 0 0 0 123 0 0 0 80 36 0 0 0 198 187 70 0 0 11 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 0 24 0 0 0 0 0 6 0 0 0 0 30 93 0 379 858

Total Enrolment 44 99 15 364 29 35 24 197 36 7 15 37 257 187 86 1 19 11 17 41 17 4 21 19 5 70 38 32 70 4 17 17 15 407 6 1 44 4 762 2402 3014 432 379 9301

Attrition Rate 4.5% 8.1% 13.3% 15.6% 17.9% 11.4% 12.5% 23.1% 0.0% 14.3% 13.3% 29.7% 20.3% 0.0% 25.0% 0.0% 15.0% 0.0% 0.0% 4.9% 23.5% 0.0% 9.5% 21.1% 0.0% 15.7% 10.5% 18.8% 39.1% 0.0% 17.6% 17.6% 0.0% 9.8% 0.0% 0.0% 20.5% 0.0%

Number of Graduates 9 40 11 72 18 14 3 94 7 4 13 11 31 28 22 1 8 7 16 8 2 4 1 1 5 16 20 12 13 4 12 14 14 156 0 0 16 2 170 275 45 87 0 1286

Percentage of Graduates Percentage of Average Wage Satisfied with their Graduates Earned program Employed ---85% 100% $43,565 80% --90% 94% $35,217 88% 88% $34,356 80% 90% $45,788 ---94% 100% $36,312 ------80% 66% -80% 100% -94% 100% $33,570 90% 100% $47,698 100% 100% $34,648 ---------83% 66% --------------66% 80% ----33% -----85% 100% $32,808 ---80% --71% 95% $36,304 ---94% 100% $54,121 -------------

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GROWTH & SALARIES Growth Distribution 2015 - 2016¹

2016 - 2017

% Change

Apprenticeship

798

762

-5%

Contract Training

2034

2402

15%

Cost Recovery

3232

3014

-7%

Mature Student High School

455

432

-5%

Regular Program

2594

2774

6%

Grand Total

9113

9384

3%

¹Data as reported in the 2015-16 Academic Report.

Top 15 Average Salaries for our 2016-17 Grads* Program

Salary

Land and Water Management

$54,700

Practical Nursing

$54,121

Accounting and Finance

$50,973

Early Childhood Program Management

$47,698

Civil Technology

$45,788

Agribusiness

$43,565

Power Engineering

$43,010

Industrial Metals Fabrication

$40,286

Comprehensive Health Care Aide

$36,312

Police Studies

$36,304

Business Administration

$35,217

Education Assistant

$34,648

Carpentry and Woodworking

$34,356

Early Childhood Education

$33,570

*Interpret with caution; salaries are as reported in our grad survey results. Sample size may be lower than 5.

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GRADUATION NUMBERS CONTINUE TO GROW Nearly 1,300 students graduated from Assiniboine in 2016-17. “We are always thrilled to be part of celebrating what is one of the largest milestones in a person’s life,” said president Mark Frison. “And while graduates culminate months and years of hard work and dedication, the journey for each of these individuals is really just beginning.” Students graduated from 50 certificate and diploma programs in addition to completing their final levels from seven trade apprenticeship programs. “Enrolment and graduation numbers continue to grow year after year at Assiniboine, and we’re well on track to doubling our number of graduates by 2025,” noted Frison. “Education has a critical role to play in ensuring we have a skilled workforce to support the growth and sustainability of our province.”


INDIGENOUS ENROLMENT 2016-17

Assiniboine believes strongly in strengthening its partnerships with First Nations, Métis, and Inuit peoples through continued collaboration. 2012-13 – 2016-17 Indigenous Enrolments Funding Source

2012-20131

2013-20141

2014-20151

2015-20161

2016-2017

18

27

34

26

20

Contract Training

268

275

275

331

362

Cost Recovery

166

208

192

209

179

Mature Student High School

213

232

193

227

207

Regular Program

352

357

387

381

397

Grand Total

1017

1099

1081

1174

1168

Apprenticeship

¹Data for 2012-2013 to 2015-2016 as reported in the 2015-16 Academic Report.

2012-13 – 2016-17 Indigenous Graduates Funding Source

2012-20131

2013-20141

2014-20151

2015-20161

2016-2017

Apprenticeship

2

3

4

7

7

Contract Training

69

22

84

100

68

Cost Recovery

4

0

6

9

6

Mature Student High School

54

35

52

37

38

Regular Program

89

83

88

81

103

Grand Total

218

143

234

234

222

¹Data for 2012-2013 to 2015-2016 as reported in the 2015-16 Academic Report.

COMMUNITY JOINS TO CELEBRATE ASSINIBOINE GRADUATION IN EBB & FLOW The community of Ebb & Flow First Nation joined for a ceremony and feast to celebrate the achievements of 22 new Assiniboine alumni. The cohort of students completed the Applied Counselling Skills certificate program part-time over two years in Ebb & Flow. All of the students pursued their studies in addition to working in the health and education sectors. Assiniboine has a long history of providing community-based education across the province, often in First Nations communities. For many Indigenous students, one of the biggest barriers to postsecondary education is geographical access. Lorraine Johnson, chairperson for contract training at Assiniboine remarked on the effect 22 graduates with specific counselling training will have.

“I think of the analogy of dropping a pebble into a pond and the ripple of that one small, positive act may have a far-reaching impact. I compare this program to the impact of throwing a handful of pebbles into the same small pond,” said Johnson. “There are about 1,700 residents of this First Nation. Think of the impact that the 22 will have in a community this size.” In the past, Assiniboine has partnered with Ebb & Flow First Nation to deliver programs including Mature Student High School, Pre-employment Construction Electrician, Practical Nursing and Comprehensive Health Care Aide.

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2016-17 Delivery locations 2016-17 Assiniboine Comunity College Permanent and Temporary Sites

1.

Birtle

2.

Brandon

3. Carberry 4. O-Chi-Chak-Ko-Sipi 9

5. Crystal City 6. Dauphin 7.

Ebb & Flow

8. Glenboro 9.

God’s Lake

10. Killarney 11. Melita 12. Neepawa 13. Peguis

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14. Pine Falls 15. Portage la Prarie 6

7

13

20 17 16 4 12 3 2

1

8 11

10

5

Eastern Region 14

15 18

Central Region Western Region

21

17. Sandy Bay 18. Southport 19. Swan River 20. Waywayseecappo

Northwest Region

21. Winnipeg

Northeast Region

22. Swift Current, SK (not shown)

Assiniboine plays an important role in economic development by producing highly regarded graduates for an increasingly diversified mix of urban, rural and remote communities. Key contributors to this ongoing success are the multiple campuses and training sites throughout Manitoba. 10

16. Rolling River


STUDENT PROFILE 2016-17 WHERE STUDENTS COME FROM

GENDER DISTRIBUTION

4% 4%

46% 54%

92%

MALE FEMALE

The film Stories for the Soul: James Chalmers, Marathon Man was awarded an Emmy in the category of Public/Current/Community Affairs – Single Story at the 2016 Upper Midwest Emmy Gala held in Bloomington, Minnesota on October 29, 2016.

AVERAGE AGE BY FUNDING SOURCE 25

Theoret’s professional path began at Assiniboine when he enrolled in the college’s Media Production program (now Interactive Media Arts).

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Contract Training Contract Training Distance

29

“I just loved the model. Learn from the best instructors, get a diploma in two years and they help you find a job. Who wouldn’t love that?” said Theoret.

35

Cost Recovery

28

Mature Student High School

While he was a student, he started with Global News in Regina as part of his program practicum placement. “I was so prepared and ready for what was thrown my way that they offered me a job half way through the practicum,” said Theoret. “That speaks volumes about the instructors at Assiniboine and the curriculum they’re teaching.”

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Regular Program Regular Program Distance

32 29

Overall Average Age

0

5

10

15

20

25

30

From a young age, Rob Theoret had a burning desire to be a filmmaker. While attending school in his hometown of Ste. Rose du Lac, MB, he had a video camera placed in his hands for a school project and he was immediately hooked. That desire and aspiration to work in the film industry recently earned him one of its highest honours: an Emmy.

OUT OF PROVINCE OUT OF COUNTRY MANITOBA

Apprenticeship

ALUMNUS ROB THEORET WINS EMMY

35

40

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INTERNATIONAL STUDENT ENROLMENT 2016-17 In the 2016-17 academic year, international enrolment significantly increased. Students were enrolled in a variety of programs.

WHY INTERNATIONAL EDUCATION? • Contributes to Assiniboine growth • Contributes to population, immigration and labour market development strategies of Manitoba and Canada • Contributes to enrolment and sustainability of programs at Assiniboine

• Can assist in program innovation and faculty development • .Contributes cultural diversity and international perspectives to student experience • Contributes opportunity to develop cross cultural competencies and instruction

ASSINIBOINE LAUNCHES ITS FIRST GENERAL BUSINESS CERTIFICATE COHORT A cohort of thirty international students from India took the big step to further their education in Canada. “We’re excited to have thirty bright, young students starting with us,” said Anna Simonyan, Assiniboine’s international coordinator. “This is the first time we are offering a General Business certificate cohort for international students.”

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Assiniboine Community College is part of the Student Partnership Program (SPP), a partnership between Immigration Refugees & Citizenship Canada’s visa offices in India and Colleges and Institutions Canada that helps students in India streamline and speed up their study visa applications.


DISTRIBUTION OF INTERNATIONAL ENROLMENT BY COUNTRY India China Nigeria USA Jamaica Brazil Ukraine Colombia Mexico Mauritius Russia Pakistan Ecuador Belize Saudi Arabia Malaysia Israel Venezuela Dominican Republic Hungary Vietnam Ghana S. Korea

56% 28% 3% 2% 2% 1% 1% 1% 1% 1% 0.6% 0.4% 0.4% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2% 0.2%

INTERNATIONAL ENROLMENTS 500

475

400 300

232 153

200 85

100 0

37

2012 - 2013

2013 - 2014

2014 - 2015

2015 - 2016

2016 - 2017

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THE JOURNEY TOWARDS INDIGENIZATION Assiniboine Community College recognizes the unique history of Indigenous peoples and is committed to playing an active role in reconciliation. In early 2017, the college released an Indigenization Strategy to help guide us on this important journey, focusing on four initiatives that help reduce barriers to education and educational support to empower Indigenous students to succeed. Education has a central responsibility in reconciliation across Canada, and it is the view of Assiniboine Community College that we move forward together in unity with healthy dialogue, cultural respect, kindness and shared perspectives. Learn more at assiniboine.net/indigenous. Assiniboine Community College campuses are located on the traditional territories of Treaty No. 1 and Treaty No. 2, and the shared traditional lands of Cree, Oji-Cree, Dakota, Dene and Anishinabek/Ojibwe peoples, and the homeland of the Métis nation.

ASSINIBOINE NURSING GRADS IMPRESS WITH NATIONAL EXAM RESULTS Fall 2016 grads all passed the Canadian Practical Nursing Registration Exam In total, 81 September (2016) graduates from the college’s campuses in Brandon and Winnipeg, as well as the Pine Falls rural site wrote the test. “We continue to be incredibly proud of our graduates for their hard work, determination and accomplishments,” said Karen Hargreaves, Dean of Health & Human Services at Assiniboine. The College of Licensed Practical Nurses of Manitoba (CLPNM) provincially accredits Assiniboine’s two-year Practical Nursing diploma program. Once graduates have passed the national licensure exam, they are eligible to work as licensed practical nurses (LPNs) under membership with the CLPNM.

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“Our Practical Nursing program has strong clinical, theory and lab components taught by experienced and talented instructors. Graduates are career-ready with demonstrated critical thinking and teamwork skills,” said Hargreaves. Graduate LPNs secure careers in hospitals, personal care homes, medical clinics, private agencies and the community. With advanced preparation, some entrepreneurial LPNs are even choosing to start their own businesses.


CAMPUSES & CENTRES Victoria Avenue East Campus Parkland Campus

Winnipeg Campus

North Hill Campus

Russell Training Centre

Assiniboine Adult Collegiate

BOARD OF GOVERNORS As of June 30, 2017

As of July 1, 2017

Michael Cox (Chair) Heather Dodds (Vice-Chair) Randy Brown Thomas MacNeill Jamie Robinson (staff representative)

Jeffery Harwood (Chair) Heather Dodds (Vice-Chair) Harvey Laluk Carla Milne Jack Ewatski Johanne Ross Kelly Wilson Lori Dangerfield Anneliesea Parkinson (student representative) Jamie Robinson (staff representative)

SENIOR LEADERSHIP TEAM Mark Frison President

Diane Shamray Vice-President, International

Deanna Rexe Vice-President, Academic

Michael Cameron Dean, Students, Indigenous & Community Development

Karen MacDonald Vice-President, People & Planning

Karen Hargreaves Dean, School of Health & Human Services

George MacLean Dean, School of Trades & Technology Dave Perkins Interim Dean, School of Business, Agriculture & Environment Shannon Brichon Chief Financial Officer

Gabriel Toichoa Chief Information Officer Steve Horne Director, External Relations Danielle Adriaansen Director, Public Affairs

As of June 30, 2017

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VISION

Exceptional learning experiences

MISSION

Transforming lives and strengthening Manitoba through applied education and research

1 4 3 0 V I C T O R I A AV E N U E E A S T B R A N D O N , M B 8 0 0. 8 6 2 .6 3 0 7 | I N F O @ A S S I N I B O I N E . N E T

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