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Assistive Technology . . .Pg 5

Volume 24, Number 10

www.accesspress.org

Computer woes delay payments, hiring of staff

State insurance exchange eyed for ease of use, accessibility

by Access Press staff

by Access Press staff The long-awaited start of MNsure, Minnesota’s new online health insurance exchange was October 1. Implemented as a result of the federal Affordable Care Act. MNsure has been highly anticipated by those seeking affordable health insurance. But it has also drawn attention as consumers with disabilities are concerned about the functionality and ease of use. MNsure’s rollout has not been without hiccups. An accidental release of personal data last month raised concerns. There are also concerns that not every aspect of the program would be available right away. The Affordable Care Act requires everyone in the United States to have health insurance, either through an employer or through individual and family policies. Anyone who doesn’t have insurance will have to pay a penalty. Insurance exchanges are a way of providing coverage for those who don’t have the other options. MNsure officials said that the insurance exchange website, www.MNsure.org, is designed for easy access for people with disabilities, so that all consumers can find the services they

Computer problems that delayed payments to home health care and personal care attendant (PCA) agencies have caused frustrations and prompted calls for change. It also caused worries for thousands of service providers who wondered if they could even make payroll. The Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) has worked since mid-September to fix problems with its MN-ITS service. MN-ITS is used by Minnesota Health Care Programs service providers to handle billing and to process background checks for new workers. State officials said they are working to make sure the claims and background information are processed promptly and properly. Quality Living Home Health Care of Winona and Care Planners of St. Paul were two of the affected Payment issues - p. 4

seek in a format they need. The website is designed to meet state standards for accessibility and ease of use. Additionally, consumers with hearing or speech disabilities may contact the toll-free MNsure Contact Center line via their preferred telecommunications relay service at 1-855-366-7873 (1855-3MNSURE). MNsure is committed to accessibility and provides reasonable accommodations to qualified individuals with physical or mental disabilities. If an individual needs help accessing any MNsure information or services, contact the MNsure Accessibility and Equal Opportunity Office at AEO@MNsure.org or 612279-8955. MNsure will offer a total of 141 plans for individuals and families. Sixty-three plans will be available to small businesses. Premium rates vary by factors including age, region where a person lives and smoking. Plan levels are divided into bronze, silver, gold and platinum, with platinum being the most comprehensive and costly. A bronze policy covers about 60 percent of average expected costs, while a MNsure- p. 5

Picture yourself having fun with friends at the 2013 Charlie Smith Award Get your best smile ready and attend the 2013 Access Press Charlie Smith Award banquet, Friday, November 1 at the Minneapolis Airport Marriott in Bloomington. This year’s honoree is Cal Appleby from Augsburg College. He and two of his late collaborators, Vern Bloom and Wayne Moldenhauer, helped countless people gain access to college. They also pioneered a number of programs for people with disabilities. One new feature this year is the chance to pose in front of a backdrop and have your picture taken. Gather your friends and smile for the camera. Of course there will also be the silent auction and pick-your-prize raffle, and social time before the dinner and program. Visit with friends, bid on lots of great items and enjoy seeing displays about the 2013 nominees. Doors open at 5:30 p.m., with a cash bar and punch available. The sit-down dinner and award cerJoAnn Cardenas Enos and Mary Kay Kennedy with their emony start at 7 pm. Access Press ‘Outstanding Board Member’ awards in 2007 The venue is fully acFile photos cessible and spacious. It has ample off-street parking for people with disabilities. Meal choices are vegetarian, chicken piccata or beef bourguignon. If mailing in one’s reservation without an official RSVP card, please note accordingly so the proper dinner is ordered. There are several ways to reserve tickets. Go to www.accesspress.org and click on the line for the awards event. Or mail a payment to: Access Press, Attn: Dawn, 161 St. Anthony Ave., Suite 910, St. Paul, MN 55103. A third option is to call the office and do the transaction over the phone, at 651-6442133. Tickets and table hosting opportunities remain, so don’t miss this always-fun event for Minnesota’s disability community. Cost is $45 per person or $325 for an 8-person table (save $35) in advance. Tickets are $50 per person day of The late Kevin Sullivan, founder of In Home Personal Care, and Kim Tanfield enjoyed the evening in 2008. the event, at the doors. ■

October 10, 2013 Nonprofit Org. U.S. Postage PAID Twin Cities. MN Permit No. 4766 Address Service Requested

“Looking for logic in all the wrong places.” — Anonymus

NEWS DIGEST

Hooray for Hollywood! (Or the disability community version of it.) Plan to see The Real Story, the new Access Press documentary. Page 3 Then make plans to attend the upcoming Reelabilities Film Festival, coming to the Twin Cities for the first time. Page 3 Deaf baseball player deserves a Hall of Fame spot. Page 2 Our Directory of Organizations provides a wealth of resources. Pages 7-10 Artability program offers classes for those who want to be creative. Page 11

INSIDE Accessible Fun, pg 13 Events, pg 12 People & Places, pps 11 and 14 Radio Talking Book, pg 14 Regional News, pgs 6


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EDITOR’S DESK

Tim Benjamin Here it is October already, and finally we’re getting some rain and fall temperatures. Like it or not, the rain is what we need and the cool temps are why we call it Minnesota. September was a beauty of a month, though—no one could complain about that mild weather. It was perfect. We’ve got a lot of things going on in the disability community this month. Read this issue with your calendar ready to mark up. First, Access Press is planning the Charlie Smith award banquet that will celebrate Cal Appleby. I hope all of you will come to meet Cal and learn, if you don’t already know, about the amazing contributions that this man has made to create a better environment for people with disabilities on the Augsburg College campus. Cal and his associates at Augsburg have made for a welcoming environment in a very busy urban setting. Also at the banquet will be a new feature: a professional photographer taking portraits. So if you haven’t got your holiday card photo yet, this might be your chance.

Another big event will be the premiere of The Real Story, a new documentary produced by Access Press and Jerry Smith, with production costs contributed by UCare. The film is all about media coverage of disability issues. The premiere will be hosted by the Disabled Students Cultural Center at the McNamara Alumni Center, University of Minnesota, on Monday, October 28, starting at 6:30 pm. A panel discussion with newsmakers, scholars, and activists follows the film. You are invited and admission is free. A second screening of The Real Story will be held Monday, November 4, at 4 pm at the U of M’s Coffman Union. Both events are sponsored by Access Press and the U of M's DSCC, with contributions from Handi Medical and NetPistols. Both screenings are free and open to the public. A reception follows the screenings and panel discussions. All of these events will be happening over a short period of time, so pull out your dress duds for hitting the film premiere scene and for your picture-taking at the Charlie Smith Awards. We’ll look forward to seeing you. Let us know if your organization would like to host a screening for clients and employees to enjoy, talk about, and above all, learn from. The film explores how the media can both help us—and, if we don’t manage it, hurt us.

On the front page, we have an article about MNSure, the new online insurance exchange for Minnesota residents. There were some flaws on October 1, the first day of operations, but there were also far more people going to the website than were expected. The website was designed with accessibility from the beginning, and from what I hear, it’s not fallen short of expectations. Our article has several resources for people with disabilities to help navigate through the complications of comparing insurance plans. This month we also have an update and on the Olmstead planning commission. This article is a must-read because of the implications for all people with disabilities. There’s been some difficulties on the state website for reimbursements to the personal care attendant agencies. These problems are not good for any of us, even if the agency that you are involved with has not had problems. There are a few agencies that have been having a very difficult time even making payroll because of the delays in connecting to the state reimbursement website, MN-ITS. We know our PCAs work too hard to have their pay delayed, even for a day. DHS is saying that this problem will be repaired and that it won’t be affecting reimbursements or background checks in the future. Did I say that I hope to see you at one of the Access Press events in the coming month? I really do. Stay safe and prepare for the winter cold. It will be here before we know. ■

HISTORY NOTE

Deaf outfielder deserves a place in the Hall of Fame by Daniel J. Vance MS, LPC, NCC

Each year, I make my best pitch for the induction of William Ellsworth “Dummy” Hoy into the National Baseball Hall of Fame in Cooperstown, N.Y. He definitely should be there. And what better time to make the pitch than right before the World Series? Hoy was deaf and one of the best outfielders ever. The Ohio native began his professional baseball career in 1886 in Oshkosh, Wis. He played for the Washington Nationals, Louisville Colonels, Chicago White Sox, and Cincinnati Reds

Volume 24, Number 10 • Periodicals Imprint: Pending ISSN Co-Founder/Publisher Wm. A. Smith, Jr. (1990-1996)

Executive Director Tim Benjamin

Co-Founder/Publisher/ Editor-in-Chief Charles F. Smith (1990-2001)

Assistant Editor Jane McClure

Board of Directors Brigid Alseth, Steve Anderson, Kristin Jorenby, Elin Ohlsson, Halle O'Falvey, Carrie Salberg, Walt Seibert and Kay Willshire Advertising Sales Michelle Hegarty 612-807-1078

Business Manager/Webmaster Dawn Frederick Cartoonist Scott Adams Production Ellen Houghton with Presentation Images Distribution S. C. Distribution

Editorial submissions and news releases on topics of interest to persons with disabilities, or persons serving those with disabilities, are welcomed. We reserve the right to edit all submissions. Editorial material does not necessarily reflect the view of the editor/publisher of Access Press. Paid advertising is available at rates ranging from $12 to $28 per column inch, depending on size and frequency of run. Classified ads are $14, plus 65 cents per word over 12 words. Advertising and editorial deadlines are the last day of the month preceding publication, except for employment ads, which are due by the 25th. Access Press is a monthly tabloid newspaper published for persons with disabilities by Access Press, Ltd. Circulation is 11,000, distributed the 10th of each month through more than 200 locations statewide. Approximately 450 copies are mailed directly to individuals, including political, business, institutional and civic leaders. Subscriptions are available for $30/yr. Lowincome, student and bulk subscriptions are available at discounted rates. Application to mail at Periodicals Postage Prices is Pending at the St. Paul, MN 55121 facility. POSTMASTER: Send address changes to Access Press at 161 St. Anthony Ave, Suite 901, St. Paul, MN 55103. Inquiries and address changes should be directed to: Access Press care of The Kelly Inn Offices; 161 St. Anthony Ave; #910 St. Paul, MN 55103; 651-644-2133 Fax: 651-644-2136 email: access@accesspress.org www.accesspress.org

from 1888-1902. In that era, deaf players often had the nickname “Dummy.” Hoy was the third deaf player in the Major League. He was on the 1901 White Sox team capturing the first American League pennant, and has been inducted into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame. He had 2,054 career hits, a .288 lifetime batting average, 1,004 walks, led both leagues in walks once, one league in steals, threw out three runners at home in one game, and had 600 career steals. He held the Major League record until 1920 for most games played by a centerfielder. Above all, he most likely was the reason umpires began using hand signals to indicate balls, strikes, and outs. Recently I corresponded with Steve Sandy, who for more than two decades has led the charge for Hoy’s induction. Sandy was born deaf. In an email, he said, “I’ve been on this project since 1989 and haven’t given up yet on getting Dummy Hoy into the National Baseball Hall of Fame. Dummy Hoy is a Deaf icon.” He has contacted sports reporters, done television interviews, and helped get the word out through letter writing, social media, lecturing and more. Sandy played a role in getting Hoy into the Cincinnati Reds Hall of Fame and is producer of a proposed two-hour feature film, which will be the fourth film

about Hoy’s amazing life. Besides playing baseball, Hoy supervised hundreds of deaf employees at a Goodyear manufacturing plant during World War I and became a company executive. He was the first athlete inducted into the American Athletic Association of the Deaf Hall of Fame. At age 99, he was honored to throw out the first pitch in Game 3 of the 1961 William Ellsworth “Dummy” Hoy Yankees-Reds World Series. Sandy has been putting together a petition in support of Hoy and so far has 3,000 signatures. His goal is 25,000. Visit his Facebook site at Dummy Hoy: A Deaf Hero. Sandy urges readers to “make some noise” to help Hoy make the Hall. Editor’s note: More on Hoy’s remarkable life and career can be found online. Hoy became deaf after a bout with from meningitis at age three. In Hoy’s early years, the word “dumb” was used to describe someone who could not speak, rather than as a pejorative. Histories note that Hoy himself often corrected individuals who addressed him as William. He referred to himself as “Dummy” which is ironic considering he was one of the most intelligent and physically gifted athletes of his day. ■ The History Note is a monthly column sponsored by the Minnesota Governor’s Council on Developmental Disabilities, www.mncdd.org and www.partnersinpolicy making.com


October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

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The Real Story

Media coverage of disability issues is documentary’s focus “The Real Story” is a story worth seeing. The documentary about media coverage of disability issues in Minnesota premieres at 6:30pm Monday, October 28th at the University of Minnesota’s McNamara Alumni Center, 200 SE Oak St., Minneapolis. A panel discussion with journalists, news-makers, scholars, and activists will follow the film. A second screening and event is 4-7 p.m. Monday, November 4 at the U of M’s Coffman Union, 300 Washington Ave. SE, Minneapolis. Both events are free and open to the public. Refreshments will be served. The on-campus events are sponsored by the University of Minnesota’s Disabled Student Cultural Center, with support from Disability Services. Narrated by Kevin Kling, “The Real Story” explores biases in media coverage of disability issues in Minnesota and nationally. It also examines the role of grassroots and mainstream media outlets in reporting on stories important to all people with disabilities. The documentary was produced by Access Press, Minnesota’s disability community newspaper, and Verso Creative with generous support from UCare. Newspaper staff and community members worked with producer and documentarian Jerry Smith to prepare the film. One theme of “The Real Story” is how news coverage of disability issues has changed over the years. Minnesota has often led the nation in responding to the concerns of the disability community by reporting on the issues that affect them. Investigative journalists, particularly in Minnesota, have been instru-

Reelabilities set to roll The Reelabilities Film Festival makes its Twin Cities premiere November 1-5 in Minneapolis, bringing an array of films by and for people with disabilities. The Twin Cities will be one of several cities hosting films by and about people with disabilities as part of the nationwide event ReelAbilities: New York Disabilities Film Festival is the largest festival in the country dedicated to promoting awareness and appreciation of the lives, stories and artistic expressions of people with different disabilities. Started in in 2007, the festival presents award winning films by and about people with disabilities in multiple locations throughout each host city. Postscreening discussions and other engaging programs bring together community members to explore, discuss, embrace, and celebrate the diversity of our shared human experience. Efforts to plan the film festival started several months ago. Those involved are pleased with the overwhelmingly positive response. “We’ve touched a nerve in the community,” said Norm Munk, chief executive officer of Partnership Resources Inc. The St. Louis Parkbased nonprofit provides employment and arts experience opportunities for people with developmental disabilities. Many community partners have joined together to promote ReelAbilities. Twin Cities Public Television has been promoting the festival, as has the cable access show Disability Viewpoint. KARE 11 News will feature the film festival October 19. Munk said festival planners are grateful for the outpouring of support for the festival. “It’s like the community has been waiting for an opportunity like this for a long time. We’ve had an unbelievable show of support.” Bringing the film festival to the Twin Cities means the opportunity to see films from around the world. “These are not typical movies with stars,” Munk said. “These are films by, for and

about the community. They really honor our world.” Venues for films, performances and other events are MacPhail Center for Music, 501 S. 2nd St., Minneapolis, and the Film Society’s St Anthony Main Theatre, 115 SE Main St., Minneapolis. The Pracna on Main restaurant by St. Anthony Main Theater will also host events. The Film Society of Minneapolis St. Paul, Minnesota’s leading exhibitor of independent and international cinema, and host of the annual Minneapolis St. Paul International Film Festival. All venues are fully accessible. Events start at noon, Friday, November 1with a glee club performance and other fun at McPhail. The free opening reception is 5 - 7 p.m. that evening at Pracna on Main. For the complete schedule of events, go to www.reelabilities.org and click on Minneapolis/St. Paul. Nine films from around the world are planned in the Twin Cities. One is “Anita”, which is in Spanish with English subtitles. It is about a young woman with Down syndrome who gets separated from her mother after a bomb explodes at their Jewish Community Center in Buenos Aires. As Anita wanders the city, searching for her mom– alone for the first time ever–she discovers an inner strength few could have expected. Another film, “Ocean Heaven,” is from China. Jet Li, in his first dramatic role, stars in this moving story of a father’s tireless love for his autistic son and his attempt to teach his son the life skills necessary to survive on his own. It is a poignant tribute to parents’ infinite love for their children. The United States-made film “Shooting Beauty” tells the story of fashion photographer Courtney Bent. Her career took an unexpected turn when she discovers a hidden world of beauty at a center for people living with significant disabilities. Shot over the span of a deReelabilities - p. 15

mental in advancing the cause of equal rights for people with disabilities. Starting in the 1940s and culminating in the 1970s, journalists reported on the horrible condition of state institutions for people with intellectual and developmental disabilities. That reporting led to changes that improved the lives of many people. Still, stories intended to be factual are often influenced by misconceptions that are ultimately harmful to people with disabilities. In some cases, the mainstream media has recognized its biases in reporting. But in others stereotypes persist. Longtime Minnesota broadcast journalist Don Shelby said, “It wasn’t that we [the mainstream media] became enlightened, it was because those people in those communities with these disabilities found their voices and they spoke up.” Too often, stories about disability are more inspirational than factual, or rely on old stereotypes that perpetuate misconceptions about what it means to live with a disability. People are either portrayed as heroic figures or as objects of pity. “People with disabilities aren’t just those heroes or those people who rise and walk when there’s five minutes left with the Family Channel movie of the week. That doesn’t happen in reality,” said John Tschida, Vice President of Public Affairs and Research at Courage Kenney Rehabilitation Institute. “I think that we used to do stories a lot more that were more charity stories that’s like here’s a guy who can play basketball in a wheelchair,” said Jon Tevlin, columnist for the Star Tribune. Another change reflected in media coverage is the rise in self-advocacy. Being a self-advocate is a benchmark of the community now as people are encouraged to speak up for themselves. Television can do an especially effective job of amplifying voices of the community. Today many more journalists and media outlets are more careful about making assumptions and realize, to get “The Real Story” they have to listen to the disability community. One change seen over the years is the emergence of news media by and for people with disabilities. Speaking on the role of disability-focused media like Access Press, said Margot Imdieke Cross of the Minnesota State Council on Disability. “What I love about publications that focus on disability issues is they focus on the facts. They focus on what’s going on. They don’t get caught up in the emotional aspect of disability.” An excerpt from “The Real Story” will be shown at the November 1 Access Press Charlie Smith Award Banquet. ■


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ASSISTIVE TECHNOLOGY

Employment can become a reality with the right technology Striving for Employment through Assistive Technology Assistive technology offers the possible benefits of more independence and job options. IT allows a person to change possibilities into realities. The word “technology” may have people thinking a device has to be complex, but much assistive technology is simple. It is defined as is not only a technical device but any kind of adaptation or a system to achieve a goal. It is a continuum of tools from no tech to low-tech to high-tech. A pencil can illustrate assistive technology as it is a tool that allows you to write, which without a pencil it would be difficult to remember everything. Assistive technology includes assistive, adaptive, and rehabilitative devices for people with disabilities and also includes the process used in selecting, locating, and using them. It promotes greater independence by enabling people to perform tasks that they were formerly unable to accomplish, or had great difficulty accomplishing. It provides enhancements to, or changing methods of interacting with, the technology needed to accomplish such tasks.

Every corner of life can be enhanced by using the right type of device or technique. According to the Job Accommodations Network, 50% of utilized assistive technology is free or less than $20. There are 100 million people with disabilities globally.

Disability and Employment It is a natural fit for the business sector and disability community to end the gap in employment opportunities. The reality is that hiring an individual with a disability is a good business decision

and it is a realistic goal for both the employer and employee. Seventy percent of disabled Americans want to work full-time, but only about 21 percent do, according to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics. Resources can increase those numbers. A typical small business can obtain more than $20,000 in tax credits and savings on training if it hires a disabled employee while also gaining good will, said Barbara A. Otto, chief executive of Health & Disability Advocates. Hiring an individual with a disability has been proven over the years to be a good hiring decision. Other benefits include less-tangible but still-important ones such as higher retention and productivity, gaining access to new markets, and improved customer loyalty and brand trust. People with a disability have fewer accidents and workplace injuries, reducing workers’ compensation costs. Days off because of illness or medical appointments are fewer than the general working population. Productivity is higher for all types of employment situations and turnover is less frequent, reducing training costs.

Payments issues - from p. 1 agencies. Quality Living owner Gary Poblocki told KSTP-TV that he spent days trying to access the state’s computers and file the required claims. Poblocki said he had not had a problem with the system in the 10 years he has owned his home health care business. Care Planners also had problems filing its claims and was another agency featured by KSTP-TV. “Yesterday they put a recording on that there was a problem and then it hung up on you. I was like ‘Are you serious?’” said Christopher Hansen with Care Planners. About 52,000 health care providers use MN-ITS. Because of the different timing of billing cycles, it’s not clear how many agencies were affected. The billing system is especially critical from a financial standpoint, because agencies that file receipts are then reimbursed with Medicaid dollars.

The problem grew so widespread, self-advocate Lance Hegland worked through Minnesota Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities to post an online survey and gather information. The survey ended October 9. Hegland plans to present his findings to the consortium and the Minnesota Home Care Association. By the end of September Hegland had received 27 responses. Of those responding, almost all provider organizations experienced difficulty processing billing for services delivered because the MN-ITS service had been unavailable at some point between September 15-21. Nearly 62% of respondents indicated the service was unavailable more than half of the time. Although only a small handful indicated challenges processing background studies, a few providers indicated challenges with other

critical activities through MN-ITS related to service delivery, including obtaining service agreements for new clients, getting individual PCA identification numbers for new PCAs, and receiving important time-sensitive responses from DHS regarding eligibility, billing, and other administrative inquiries. Between 15 to 20% of respondents believe the health and safety of their clients may be at risk due to the outage. One respondent indicated he was experiencing challenges staffing client needs in a timely manner because of the outage. More than half of the respondents were concerned that they may have financial challenges if they are unable to submit and process all their billing and receive the scheduled reimbursement payment for services delivered before they are required to process

their upcoming payroll. Almost 25% of respondents feared that their business may be at some risk of closing because of potential financial challenges created by the outage. More than half of respondents felt that DHS should at least distribute a short memorandum summarizing the cause of the outage in addition to strategies they will use to prevent similar challenges and risks to Minnesota’s long-term care delivery system in the future. Roughly 25% of respondents felt that DHS should invest in a more extensive investigation and subsequent report to the community due to the significant challenges and risks created for our communities. Two-thirds of respondents indicated they would consider endorsing community efforts to request a response from DHS. ■

by Jennifer Mundl, MS, ATP Courage Kenny Rehabilitation Institute

The month of October is Disability Awareness and Employment Month, raising awareness nationally about disability employment issues. The theme for 2013 is “Because we are EQUAL to the Task.” There are many obstacles to gainful employment when a potential or current worker has a disability. Through the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) and assistive technology, employment has improved creating new and exciting opportunities. “Reasonable accommodations” is a term used with the issues involving employment for people disability. A reasonable accommodation is a device, tool, or process allowing individual with a disability to compete with all potential hires. What follows is a sample of resources that make the possibility of being employed a reality.

Making Impact The prevalence of disabilities in America has made an impact on society. • Of the estimated 54 million Americans living with a disability, 20 percent are employed or seeking employment. • People with disabilities bring valuable skills to the workforce. For example, more than 600,000 scientists and engineers currently employed in the United States have disabilities. • Some of the top innovators in the United States have disabilities, including the chief executive officers of Ford Motor Company, Apple, Xerox, and Turner Television. ■ The next Assistive Technology column will highlight the work of Cummins Engineering.


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Olmstead subcabinet wrapping up work shortly The long-awaited draft of Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan is now on the Minnesota Department of Human Services (DHS) website. The draft reflects comments made at public hearing held around the state over the past several weeks. The plan will help ensure Minnesotans with disabilities have the opportunity to learn, work and enjoy life in the most integrated setting. The subcabinet has a meeting tentatively scheduled for final plan approval, at 9:30 a.m. Tuesday, October 22 in the state capitol room 123, 75 Rev. Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., St. Paul. Check to see if the meeting is being held. Anyone needing accommodations or modifications because of a disability, let staff know what type of accommodation or modification is needed, at opc.public@state.mn.us. Make contact

at least two weeks before the meeting and provide information in the email about the type of assistance needed. Changes and additions to the plan are ongoing, with the goal of having the plan completed later this year. Agency teams are working to incorporate expert and stakeholder feedback in developing specific plans in areas such as employment, housing, and transportation. The current draft (along with other resources, such as notes from subcabinet listening sessions) on Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan web pages, at www.dhs.state.mn.us and go to the Olmstead page. To provide feedback, use the contact form on the Minnesota Olmstead Plan website or send an email to opc.public@state.mn.us All states are required to have an Olmstead Plan, as a result of a June

MNsure - from p. 1 platinum policy covers about 90 percent of costs. The higher the premiums and the more extensive the coverage, the lower the out-of-pocket costs such as deductibles and co-pays. Anyone using the exchange is advised to take time to compare health insurance policies, because the policies can be complicated. “MNsure is pleased to offer Minnesotans a wide array of plans with some of the lowest premiums in the country,” said Brian Beutner, Chair, MNsure Board of Directors. “For many Minnesotans, financial help through MNsure will mean that they will be able to afford health care coverage for the first time.” Plans sold through MNsure will offer coverage that will include prescription drugs, maternity, preventative visits, and hospitalization, among others. “Minnesotans in every corner of the state, regardless of income, age, or medical history, will be able to choose from multiple plans to find the coverage that is right for them,” said April Todd-Malmlov, Executive Director of MNsure. Questions were raised when the geographic variations in insurance were compared. For example, a policy that costs $408 per month in the Twin Cities could cost more than $800 in Roch-

ester. Although state officials said the variation in premiums will be moderated if not eliminated by premium tax credits available to many consumers from the federal government, the regional gaps raised questions. Federal law calls for states to be divided into “rate regions” that health insurers use when setting premiums. Minnesota is divided into nine MNsure regions. People who buy policies rather than getting insurance through employers, and small businesses with fewer than 50 workers, could start using the Minnesota exchange October 1. People can also use MNsure to enroll in Medicaid and MinnesotaCare public health insurance programs. But because not all of the information was likely to be posted in time for the startup date, site users may have to follow web links or wait for information. As Access Press went to press, parts of the website were still being put into place. Agencies around the state were still training their federally required consumer advisers or “navigators” to help people through the system. But dozens of agencies around the state were still hurrying to train their navigators in time for the October 1 startup. For general questions about MNsure, call 1-855-3MNSURE (1-855-3667873). ■

1999 U.S, Supreme Court decision. The State of Georgia was sued for unnecessarily institutionalizing people with intellectual disabilities. The court ruled that the Americans with Disabilities Act (ADA) requires states to provide services to people with disabilities in the “most integrated settings” appropriate to their needs. That means people have the right to live in their communities with appropriate services and supports, and not be institutionalized. Minnesota’s Olmstead Plan got a jump start as a result of the December 2011 settlement of a lawsuit against Minnesota Extended Treatment Options. By executive order, Gov. Mark Dayton established the Olmstead SubCabinet and asked the group to develop and implement a comprehensive plan supporting freedom of choice and opportunity for people with disabilities. In 2012, the Minnesota Olmstead Planning Committee discussed public programs to see what works, what doesn’t work, and how to fix the parts that don’t work. On October 23, 2012, Minnesota’s Olmstead Planning Committee presented a report to DHS Commissioner Lucinda Jesson. The report included recommendations to ensure that Minnesotans with disabilities have choices about where they live and are served in community settings more suitable to their needs and desires. One of the committee’s recommen-

dations asked “that the Governor establish an Olmstead Sub-Cabinet to ensure the most efficient and effective interagency coordination, planning and implementation of an Olmstead Plan.” A subcabinet has been meeting to develop the draft plan. Each state department has prepared a summary of information on its Olmstead-related activities. The overviews typically include a description of current services, goals to be reached, activities addressing accessibility needs, and descriptions of barriers to achieving integration. Some overviews include proposals for community engagement. Others list the fiscal impacts of providing accommodations or other services. ■

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Pg 6 October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

$70,000 settlement is paid to nurse

REGIONAL NEWS Coach’s epilepsy a chance for education The University of Minnesota athletic director has voiced strong support for head football coach Jerry Kill, in the wake of a critical newspaper column suggesting Kill is unfit to coach because of his epilepsy. Kill had a seizure on the sidelines at TCF Bank Stadium, September 14 during halftime of the Gophers’ home game against Western Illinois University. It was the third seizure he’s had at a game during his coaching tenure at Minnesota. A Star Tribune columnist called for Kill to step aside. But university officials and advocacy groups disagree. “I support him 100 percent,” said U of M Athletic Director Norwood Teague. “He’s an epileptic. He has seizures. We deal with it and we move on.” Teague conceded people who don’t understand epilepsy can become uncomfortable around a person experiencing a major seizure. But he said it’s a health issue that can be managed and that it doesn’t affect coaching and recruiting. The Minnesota Epilepsy Foundation objected to the Star Tribune column, especially a paragraph that suggested football fans shouldn’t be subjected to witnessing a seizure. The newspaper’s executive editor apologized for the column. Brett Boyum, president of the Minnesota Epilepsy Foundation Board, told KARE 11 News, “The verbiage and the judgments that Mr. (Jim) Souhan made in the article hearken back to 50, 60 or 70 years ago when there was a lot less known about epilepsy.” “There are plenty of people today in the sports, entertainment and business world who have epilepsy and are very successful,” said Boyum. “If you’re anyone with any sort of disability you work hard to prove yourself. You feel you have to go that extra step to prove yourself. And I think Coach Kill has done more than that.” ■ (Source: KARE 11 News)

A nurse who worked for Health East and Health Inventures in Maplewood until she was fired in 2009 will receive $70,000 in settlement of a charge of disability and age discrimination filed with the Minnesota Department of Human Rights. State officials found probable cause to believe that Health Inventures discriminated against Bernice Schwab by failing to accommodate a disability she developed after she fell and injured her shoulder. The state also found that disability and age were factors in the decision to terminate her employment following a medical leave, in September 2009. Schwab was 73 when she filed her charge. During her total tenure of 37 years, she had received good

performance reviews, had received no formal performance warnings, and had rarely missed a day of work. But Health Inventures refused to allow Schwab to return to work, even though it knew her doctor had cleared her to do so. Although Schwab repeatedly tried to communicate with her employer about returning to work, Health Inventures was uncooperative in replying. In addition to paying $70,000 to Schwab, Health Inventures has agreed to provide training to its managers regarding the Minnesota Human Rights Act. The settlement does not constitute and admission of wrongdoing and Health Inventures denies that it discriminated against Schwab. ■ (Source: Minnesota Department of Human Rights)

Health care company troubles outlined

Tricycle recovered, returned to owner

Richfield-based Crystal Care Home Health Services is being taken over by a North St. Paul company this fall. But that may be too late for some employees who claim they haven’t been paid since early July. Employees said some paychecks bounced in March. The company told workers it was preparing a new pay schedule, and then checks stopped coming. Some employees are owed for hundreds of hours and feared losing their homes. Crystal Care is currently under investigation by the state. HealthStar Home Health of North St. Paul recently notified employees it is taking over the Crystal Care clients and wants to transfer the employees. Letters to Crystal Care employees also indicate that Healthstar will work with an attorney to collect the funds due Crystal Care in an expedited manner. The funds will be used to pay for wages until the employees are fully transitioned to HealthStar. But clients are still trying to get information, according to the Fairmont Sentinel. Clients have had to deal with constant changes in service. Clients have had to cope with changes in personal care assistants, as workers who cannot get paid have quit. One woman reported she went without help for three weeks. ■ (Source: Fairmont Sentinel)

Two anonymous tips led police September 17 to an $1,800 adult tricycle stolen from a West St. Paul man the previous weekend. The tricycle had been stolen from a bus stop where it was chained. It turned up on St. Paul’s West Side. The tricycle’s owner, 22-year-old Elliott Albright, has autism and needs the tricycle to get around. He had purchased the Workman PAV3 tricycle online in 2010 after receiving a grant from Dakota County Social Services. The theft received widespread media attention, which generated many tips to police. Police do have a suspect but have made no arrest. Albright’s and his family were pleased that the tricycle sustained minimal damage. ■ (Source: Pioneer Press)

Changes sought after child’s death With the death in August of an 11-year-old Minnesota boy, there are now at least 14 children with autism known to have died in the U.S. this year after slipping away from their caregivers. The phenomenon of children with autism leaving their caregivers goes by a number of different names but no matter what it is called, it is a life-threatening issue. About half of the children with autism are believed to be prone to doing so. Regional News - p. 13


October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

Pg 7

Kent’s Accounting Service, LLC Kent Fordyce 612-889-2959 • fordyce6@aol.com Fax: 952-472-1458 6371 Bartlett Blvd, Mound, MN 55364

ADVOCACY Advocating Change Together (ACT)

V-651-641-0297

TF-800-641-0059

www.selfadvocacy.org

Arc Greater Twin Cities

V-952-920-0855

F-952-920-1480

www.arcgreatertwincities.org

Arc of Minnesota

V-651-523-0823x115

TF-800-582-5256

www.thearcofminnesota.org

Association of Residential Resources in MN

V-651-291-1086

TTY-800-551-2211

www.arrm.org

Courage Kenny Rehabilition Institute

V-763-520-0725

TTY-763-520-0245

www.CourageCenter.org

MCIL

V-651-646-8342

MN Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities

V-651-523-0829x112

F-651-523-0829

www.mnccd.org

MN Developmental Achievement-Center Assoc

V-651-647-9200

F-651-647-9353

www.mndaca.org

PACER Center, Inc.

V-952-838-9000

TTY-952-838-0190

www.pacer.org

Accessible Space, Inc. (ASI)

V-651-645-7271

TTY-800-466-7722

www.accessiblespace.org

Dungarvin Minnesota, LLC

V-651-699-6050

TTY-651-695-5802

www.dungarvin.com

Mary T. Inc. Catered Living

V-763-754-2505

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com

Brain Injury Association of Minnesota

V-612-378-2742

TTY-800-669-6442

www.braininjurymn.org

Courage Kenny Rehabilition Institute

V-763-520-0312

TTY-763-520-0245

www.CourageCenter.org

Dungarvin Minnesota, LLC

V-651-699-6050

TTY-651-695-5802

www.dungarvin.com

Mary T. Inc. Human Service Programs

V-763-754-2505

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com

www.mcil-mn.org

ASSISTED-LIVING PROGRAMS

BRAIN INJURY

Tandem Residential

V-651-641-0491x315

F-651-645-2780

www.tandemresidential.com

TBI Metro Services - Richfield & W. St. Paul

V-612-869-3995

V-651-457-4756

www.opportunitypartners.org

V/TTY-763-479-3555

F-763-479-2605

www.vinlandcenter.org

DeafBlind Services Minnesota (DBSM)

V-612-362-8454

TTY-612-362-8422

www.dbsm.llc.org

Dungarvin Minnesota, LLC

V-651-699-6050

TTY-651-695-5802

www.dungarvin.com

Mary T. Inc. Human Service Programs

V-763-754-2505

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com

MCIL

V-651-646-8342

Metro Work Center, Inc

V/TTY-612-729-7381

F-612-729-7382

Opportunity Partners

V-952-938-5511

TTY-952-930-4293

Reach for Resources

V-952-988-4177

F-952-988-6728

www.reachforresources.org

REM Minnesota

V-952-945-4952

F-952-922-6885

www.remminnesota.org

S. MN Independent Living Enterprises & Services

V/TTY-507-345-7139

TF-888-676-6498

CHEMICAL HEALTH Vinland National Center

COMMUNITY LIVING

www.mcil-mn.org www.metroworkcenter.org www.opportunitypartners.org

www.smilescil.org

CONSUMER-DIRECTED COMMUNITY SUPPORTS Community Involvement Programs (CIP)

V-612-362-4437

www.cipmn.org

Lifeworks Services, Inc.

TF-866-454-2732

TTY-651-365-3736

V-651-748-7436

V-507-494-0950

V-320-529-6500 x6271

www.lifeworks.org

EDUCATION Community Education Network on Disabilities Institute on Community Integration

V-612-624-6300

F-612-624-8279

www.ici.umn.edu

MRC - Minnesota Resource Center

V-612-752-8100

TTY-612-752-8019

www.mrc-mn.org

Upstream Arts

V-612-331-4584

F-612-353-6638

www.upstreamarts.org

www.allypeoplesolutions.org

EMPLOYMENT/VOCATION Ally People Solutions

V-651-641-0709

F-651-641-0976

Assistive Technology of MN - DBA Equip A Life

V-763-479-8239

TF-866-535-8239

CCP Works! - Cooperating Community Programs

V-651-379-9744

Chrestomathy, Inc.

V-952-974-0339

Community Connections Partnership (CCP)

V-763-540-6833x302

www.equipalife.org

www.theccpinc.com/employment_support.aspx F-952-974-0307

www.chrestomathyinc.org www.communityconnectionspartnership.org

Community Involvement Programs (CIP)

V-612-353-4595x101

V-612-353-4595x102

Courage Kenny Rehabilition Institute

V-763-520-0564

TTY-763-520-0245

East Suburban Resources, Inc.

V-651-351-0190

Goodwill/Easter Seals Minnesota

V-651-379-5800

www.cipmn.org www.CourageCenter.org www.esrworks.org

F-651-379-5803

www.goodwilleasterseals.org

CONTINUED

Your home, your independence . . . 763-546-1000 At In Home Personal Care, we pride ourselves not only on the help we provide, but also on our ability to listen. We understand that each of our clients has different needs at different times. Our quality home care services are formed around a plan that works for you and your individual situation. Serving Adults and Children with Long-Term Needs since 1991

8441 Wayzata Blvd; Suite 130 Golden Valley, MN 55426

“ I have been an In Home client for at least 20 years. During that time I have received excellent, reliable, consistent care from PCAs and HHA’s trained and supervised by In Home.” - Jean T (Client)

Certified QuickBooks ProAdvisor 2013 & 2005-2012


Pg 8 October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

We’re here 24/7 on

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EMPLOYMENT/VOCATION (continued) Kaposia Inc.

V/TTY-651-224-6974

F-651-224-7249

www.kaposia.com

Lifetrack - Minneapolis

V-612-788-8855

F-612-788-8577

www.lifetrackmn.org

Lifetrack - St. Paul

V-651-227-8471

TTY-651-227-3779

www.lifetrackmn.org

Lifeworks Services, Inc.

TF-866-454-2732

TTY-651-365-3736

www.lifeworks.org

Merrick, Inc.

V-651-789-6231

F-651-789-9960

www.merrickinc.org

Metro Work Center, Inc.

V/TTY-612-729-7381

F-612-729-7382

www.metroworkcenter.org

Midwest Special Services, Inc.

V-651-778-1000

F-651-772-4352

www.mwsservices.org

Minnesota Diversified Industries (MDI)

V-651-999-8200

F-651-999-8242

MRC - Minnesota Resource Center

V-612-752-8100

TTY-612-752-8019

www.mdi.org www.mrc-mn.org

Opportunity Partners

V-952-938-5511

TTY-952-930-4293

Partnership Resources, Inc.

V-952-925-1404

F-952-925-6055

www.partnershipresources.org

Partnership Resources, Inc. - Minneapolis

V-612-331-2075

F-612-331-2887

www.partnershipresources.org

Partnership Resources, Inc. - Older Adults Program V-952-746-6206

F-952-746-6209

www.partnershipresources.org

ProAct Inc.

F-651-686-0312

www.proactinc.org

V-651-686-0405

www.opportunitypartners.org

Rise, Inc.

V/TTY-763-786-8334

F-763-786-0008

www.rise.org

TBI Metro Services - Richfield & W. St. Paul

V-612-869-3995

V-651-457-4756

www.opportunitypartners.org

TSE, Inc.

V-651-489-2595

F-651-489-0410

www.tse-inc.org

University of Minnesota Disability Services

V-612-626-1333

F-612-625-5572

Work Incentives Connection

V-651-632-5113

TF-800-976-6728

http://ds.umn.edu www.mnworkincentives.com

GOVERNMENT Minnesota State Council on Disability

V/TTY-651-361-7800

TTY-800-945-8913

MN Gov. Council on Developmental Disabilities

V-651-296-4018

TF-800-627-3529

www.disability.state.mn.us www.mncdd.org

STAR Program

V-651-201-2640

TF-888-234-1267

www.starprogram.state.mn.us

HEALTH CARE COORDINATION AXIS Healthcare

V-651-556-0887

F-651-556-0880

www.axishealth.com

Cornerstone Solutions

TF-888-562-8000

TTY-800-627-3529

www.cornerstone-solutions.org

Medica

V-800-266-2157

TTY-800-855-2880

www.medica.com

UCare

V-800-707-1711

TTY-800-688-2534

www.ucare.org

Break-Thru Home Care, Inc.

V—763-502-1505

F-763-502-6777

www.breakthrucare.com

In Home Personal Care

V-763-546-1000

F-763-546-1018

www.inhomepersonalcare.com

HEALTH CARE PLANS

HOME HEALTH CARE SERVICES

Mary T. Inc. Home Health Care

V-763-754-2505

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com

People Enhancing People (PEP)

V-763-586-0049

F-651-234-0864

www.pepeople.org

F-800-632-0798

www.accessoptionsmn.com

HOUSING-CONSTRUCTION/REMODELING AccessAbility Options, Inc.

V-763-571-6789

Accessibility Design

V-952-925-0301

F-952-926-7712

www.accessibilitydesign.com

Accessible Homes, LLC.

V-612-978-1054

F-651-554-3085

www.accessiblehomesllc.net

Equal Access Homes, Inc.

V-651-249-7751

F-651-450-1330

McCarthy Builders & Remodelers, Inc.

V-612-250-0816

www.McCarthyBuildersandRemodelers.com

SRR Construction, LLC

V-612-419-5787

www.SRRConstruction.com

www.EqualAccessHomes.com

HOUSING-RENTAL Accessible Space, Inc. (ASI)

V-651-645-7271

TTY-800-466-7722

www.accessiblespace.org

Ebenezer Park Apartments

V-612-879-2233

F-612-879-8889

HousingLink

V-612-522-2500

F-612-521-1577

www.housinglink.org

National Handicap Housing Institute, Inc

V-651-639-9799

F-651-639-9699

www.nhhiaccessiblehousing.com

Villas and Townhomes by Mary T. Inc.

V-763-754-2505

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com

www.atmn.org

www.fairviewebenezer.org/minneapolis

INFORMATION AND REFERRAL RESOURCES Assistive Technology of Minnesota

V-763-479-8239

TF-866-535-8239

Minnesota State Council on Disability

V/TTY-651-361-7800

TTY-800-945-8913

www.disability.state.mn.us

The Natl Multiple Sclerosis Society - MN Chapter

V-612-335-7900

TF-800-582-5296

PACER Center, Inc.

V-952-838-9000

TTY-952-838-0190

www.mssociety.org

STAR Program

V-651-201-2640

TF-888-234-1267

www.starprogram.state.mn.us

V-651-294-0710

TF-800-886-7201

F-651-644-9137

V-612-334-5970

TF-800-292-4150

www.mndlc.org

www.pacer.org

INSURANCE Lee F. Murphy Insurance Group

LEGAL MN Disability Law Center

MEDICAL SUPPLIES/EQUIPMENT Handi Medical Supply

V-651-644-9770

HME Medical Shop

V-800-258-6313

F-800-258-6313

www.hmemedicalshop.com

Key Medical Supply

V-651-792-3860

F—651-792-3867

www.keymedicalsupply.com

Liberty Oxygen & Medical Equipment

V-952-920-0460

F-952-920-0480

www.libertyoxygen.com

Phoenix Medical Services Inc.

V-651-636-0848

F-651-636-5746

www.PhoenixMedical.org

Tamarack Habilitation Technologies, Inc.

V-763-795-0057

TF-866-795-0057

CONTINUED

F-651-644-0602

www.handimedical.com

www.tamarackhti.com


October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

Pg 9

MENTAL HEALTH Community Involvement Programs (CIP)

V-612-362-4434

V-612-362-4452

Courage Kenny Rehabilition Institute

V-763-520-0312

TTY-763-520-0245

www.CourageCenter.org

Dungarvin Minnesota, LLC

V-651-699-6050

TTY-651-695-5802

www.dungarvin.com

Fraser

V-612-861-1688

F-612-861-6050

www.fraser.org

Lifetrack - Minneapolis

V-612-788-8855

F-612-788-8577

www.lifetrackmn.org

Lifetrack - St. Paul

V-651-227-8471

TTY-651-227-3779

www.lifetrackmn.org

National Alliance on Mental Illness of MN

V-651-645-2948

TF-888-NAMI-Helps

www.namihelps.org

People Incorporated Mental Health Services

V-651-774-0011

TTY-651-774-6535

Vinland National Center

V/TTY-763-479-3555

F-763-479-2605

V-715-268-0175

TTY-715-268-0177

www.cipmn.org

www.PeopleIncorporated.org www.vinlandcenter.org

PHYSICIANS Wound Healing Center

www.AmeryMedicalCenter.org

RECREATION-ADAPTIVE HOBBY/EXERCISE/SPORTS/ARTS Capable Partners Inc.

V-763-439-1038

Courage Kenny Rehabilition Institute

V-763-520-0537

www.capablepartners.org TTY-763-520-0245

www.CourageCenter.org

Mind Body Solutions

V-952-473-3700

www.mindbodysolutions.org

Mixed Blood Theatre Company

V-612-338-6131

www.mixedblood.com

Upstream Arts

V-612-331-4584

F-612-353-6638

www.upstreamarts.org

RECREATION-TRAVEL/CAMPING Camp Character

V-218-760-8442

Camp Winnebago

V-507-724-2351

Camps of Courage & Friendship

V-952-852-0101

Hammer Travel

V-952-277-2458

info@familyfoundationsmn.com F-507-724-3786

www.campwinnebago.org www.campscouragefriendship.org

TF-877-345-8599

www.HammerTravel.org

Ventures Travel

V-952-852-0107

TF-866-692-7400

www.venturestravel.org

Wilderness Inquiry

V-612-676-9400

TF-800-728-0719

www.wildernessinquiry.org

REHABILITATION (PHYSICAL, OCCUPATIONAL, SPEECH, AUDIOLOGY THERAPISTS) Courage Kenny Rehabilition Institute

V-763-588-0811

TTY-763-520-0245

www.CourageCenter.org

DeafBlind Services Minnesota (DBSM)

V-612-362-8454

TTY-612-362-8422

www.dbsm.org

Fraser

V-612-861-1688

F-612-861-6050

www.fraser.org

Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare

V-651-291-2848

TF-800-719-4040

In Home Personal Care

V-763-546-1000

F-763-546-1018

www.gillettechildrens.org www.inhomepersonalcare.com

Lifetrack - Minneapolis

V-612-788-8855

F-612-788-8577

www.lifetrackmn.org

Lifetrack - St. Paul

V-651-227-8471

TTY-651-227-3779

www.lifetrackmn.org

RESIDENTIAL/GROUP HOME PROGRAMS Capstone Services, LLC

V-651-641-0042 x211

F-651-645-2780

www.capstoneservices.net

Community Involvement Programs (CIP)

V-612-362-4403

V-612-362-4417

www.cipmn.org

Dungarvin Minnesota, LLC

V-651-699-6050

TTY-651-695-5802

www.dungarvin.com

Fraser

V-612-861-1688

F-612-861-6050

www.fraser.org

Living Well Disability Services

V-651-9688-8808

F-651-688-8892

www.dakotacommunities.org

Mary T. Inc. Human Services Programs

V-763-754-2505

TF-888-255-6400

Mt. Olivet Rolling Acres

V-952-474-5974

F-952-474-3652

CONTINUED

www.marytinc.com www.mtolivetrollingacres.org

YOU MAKE A DIFFERENCE!!!

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Pg 10 October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

RESIDENTIAL/GROUP HOME PROGRAMS (continued) Opportunity Partners

V-952-938-5511

TTY-952-930-4293

www.opportunitypartners.org

Phoenix Residence

V-651-227-7655

F-651-227-6847

www.phoenixresidence.org

Restart, Inc.

V-952-767-3350

F-952-767-3351

www.restartincmn.org

Can Do Canines

V-763-331-3000

F-763-331-3009

www.can-do-canines.org

Helping Paws, Inc.

V-952-988-9359

F-952-988-9296

www.helpingpaws.org

V-952-226-2063

www.PawPADS.org

F-651-224-1014

www.welcov.com

SERVICE ANIMALS

Pawsitive Perspectives Assistance Dogs (PawPADs)

SKILLED NURSING FACILITIES Bethel Healthcare Community

V-651-224-2368

Ebenezer Care Center

V-612-879-2262

www.fairviewebenezer.org/minneapolis

SOCIAL SERVICES Metro Meals On Wheels

V-612-623-3363

F-612-331-9401

www.meals-on-wheels.com

Restart, Inc.

V-952-767-3350

F-952-767-3351

www.restartincmn.org

TECHNOLOGY Assistive Technology of MN - DBA Equip A Life

V-763-479-8239

TF-866-535-8239

www.equipalife.org

Gillette Children’s Specialty Healthcare

V-651-291-2848

TF-800-719-4040

www.gillettechildrens.org

Marbesoft - Simtech

V-763-755-1402

TF-888-755-1402

www.marblesoft.com

Mary T. Assistive Technology

V-763-754-2505

TF-888-255-6400

www.marytinc.com

PACER Center, Inc.

V-952-838-9000

TTY-952-838-0190

STAR Program

V-651-201-2640

TF-888-234-1267

www.starprogram.state.mn.us

Tamarack Habilitation Technologies, Inc.

V-763-795-0057

TF-866-795-0057

www.tamarackhti.com

www.pacer.org

TRANSPORTATION RENTAL/SALES/MODIFICATION IMED Mobility

V-651-635-0655

TF-800-788-7479

www.imedmobility.com

Vision Loss Resources

V-612-871-2222

F-612-872-0189

www.visionlossresources.org

Volunteer Braille Services

V-763-544-2880

F-763-544-3612

www.vbsmn.org

V-651-556-0887

F-651-556-0880

www.axishealth.com

VISION IMPAIRMENT

WAIVER CASE MANAGEMENT AXIS Healthcare


October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10 Pg 11

PEOPLE & PLACES Simply Jane/Artable offers opportunities

panded the programming to include pre-K morning time and more after-school classes. Simply Jane was founded in 2007 by local artist, Jane Elias. Her vision was to create an environment of art and therapy for everyone to experience. Simply Jane started out in a space on Nicollet Avenue and 48th Street and grew into a larger, light-filled studio space on 54th and Nicollet with three new party and special event rooms. Although the studio was put to great use for drop-in paint, adult classes, children’s birthdays and team-building events, Elias saw the potential to reach even more budding artists. She wished to expand to further include those artists with both mental and physical disabilities. One year ago Simply Jane formed the non-profit Sim-

ply ArtAble. The space became fully accessible thanks in part to funding from the Minnesota Arts and Cultural Heritage Fund and a facade improvement grant through the Nicollet East Harriet Business Association. Ramps and an automatic door-opener were installed. Equipment was purchased for accessible arts programming. Simply Jane/ArtAble now offers a wide range of art programming for adults and children with disabilities. The studio also now employs three wonderful studio assistants with special needs: Morgan, Pedar and Jane’s sister Mary. All have been a great addition to the studio, bringing in new vitality and viewpoints. ■ To contact the studio, call 612-354-3961, email jane@simplyjanestudio.com or check the website at simplyjanestudio.com

‘A Playground for Everyone’ campaign

An Artability client enjoys drawing. Photo courtesy of Simply Jane/Artability

A Minneapolis-based arts organization has evolved to work with more artists and expand its space and programming. Now Simply Jane/ArtAble has hired its first full-time staff member, Jean Birkelli. Birkelli has been with Simply Jane since the beginning but recently became a full-time contributor to the studio, managing the studio floor. An accomplished artist, Birkelli brings a wealth of knowledge in painting and craft mediums as well as experience teaching after-school and pre-school programs. She has ex-

The Turtle Lake Elementary PTA Playground Leadership group is raising $280,000 to bring inclusive play to the Shoreview school. After nearly two years of dreaming and planning, supporters are starting to raise funds for the project. The goal is to build “A Playground for Everyone” by summer 2014. Turtle Lake Elementary is a public elementary school that serves approximately 1,000 students and 720 families from 20 different cities. It is in the Mounds View School District. Built nearly 20 years ago, the current playground is in need of replacement. It has only two accessible

swings, which face away from the rest of the play area. Much of the surface is wood chips, which are difficult for children who use wheelchairs or other mobility devices to navigate. Ian, a kindergartner who uses a wheelchair for mobility, said that having an accessible or universal playground at school would be welcomed. “It would be like a vacation,” he said. ■ For detailed information on this project and the benefits of inclusive play visit http:// turtlelakeplayground.weebly.com. People & Places - p. 14

Minnesota State Council on Disability honors nine with annual awards The Minnesota State Council on Disability shipping and document services. Its Fridley center is a (MSCOD) is marking 40 years of service at its annual presort mailing house that commingles mail to provide awards banquet, 1-3:30 p.m. Thursday, October 17 at savings on postage for their customers. Executives the DS Event Center, 415 Pascal St. N., St. Paul. AdMike Wright and Scott Bersheid have established a hirmission is $15. Call 651-361-7800 for tickets or email ing process that encourages an environment of inclucouncil.disability@state.mn.us sion. Their center in Fridley currently has 41 employKeynote speaker is John Kriesel, as former state ees who have disclosed as having a disability. The emrepresentative who is now Anoka County Director ployees with disabilities at the Fridley site are some of Veterans Services. Kriesel was injured while dethe highest performers with little turnover. ployed in Iraq, and lives as a veteran with a disability. Employer of the Year (small)—Azule Staffing, He’ll speak about his work and life experiences. Twin Cities. Formed in 2012, Azule Staffing provides MNSCOD will also present several awards. The employment solutions for skilled and talented veterhonorees are: ans by placing them with excellent career opportuniAdvocacy Award (a one-time award for 2013) — ties. Its corporate goal is that 80% of their placements Aaron Holm, founder, Wiggle Your Toes. The nongo to veterans. Owner Mike Wolbrink and his staff profit Wiggle Your Toes is dedicated to helping amhave placed more than 50 veterans who have disabiliputees and their families regain independence and ties. Azule was recently awarded the Service Disabled mobility. Holm, a bi-lateral, above the knee amputee, Veteran Owned Small Business certification from the and Wiggle Your Toes have helped people raise Veterans Administration. money for prosthetics (which insurance doesn’t usuMentorship Award—Bridget Siljander, Executive ally cover), and find equipment, home modifications Director, the Youth Legacy Foundation. Siljander’s and other supports and technical assistance. commitment to people with disabilities led to her Wiggle Your Toes helped the victims of the Boston work to start the Youth Legacy Foundation. The founMarathon bombings, who suffered limb loss. dation engages youth with disabilities in humanitarAbove and Beyond Veteran’s Employment ian, charitable, and service activities. It helps them Award—Sue Worlds, Regional Director, Minnesota make a difference and changing the world. Siljander Assistance Council for Veterans. Worlds is regional believes that if given the right support and guidance director of the Minnesota Assistance Council for Vet- along the way, youth with disabilities can make many erans in Mankato. Worlds has dedicated herself to positive contributions. helping veterans with disabilities by assisting them in Minnesota Award—Secretary of State Mark returning to the workforce and recognizing the many Ritchie. Ritchie has served two terms as Minnesota issues that accompany returning vets from combat. Secretary of State. He and his agency partner with Access Award—Midwest Outdoors Unlimited. township, city and county officials to organize elecMidwest Outdoors Unlimited provides outdoor recreational activities for people with disabilities, Diamond Hill Townhomes is a great property located near the throughout Minnesota, Minneapolis International Airport. We have spacious two and three Michigan, Montana and Canada. Organization bedroom townhomes that are HUD subsidized and rent is 30% of the leader Ron Welle has dedi- total household’s adjusted gross income. cated his life to helping people who enjoy activities such as hunting and fishing Our Three Bedroom waiting list is now open and we are currently accepting applications. Our non-accessible Two Bedroom waiting list but find it challenging due is also opened. to having a disability. His team of volunteers provides assistance, equipment We are always accepting applications for our large number of mobility and gear at all his events to impaired accessible units. Please contact us for more information. get everyone involved. Employer of the Year We look forward to hearing from you! (large)—Pitney Bowes, Fridley. Pitney Bowes proPlease call (612) 726-9341. vides packaging, mailing,

Diamond Hill Townhomes

tions on behalf of Minnesota’s nearly 4 million eligible voters. Another part of his job is to oversee a People & Places; State Council awards - p. 15


Pg 12 October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

Attend The Arc conference

UPCOMING EVENTS Advocacy Mobility is topic Join key organizations and professionals in exploring ways to improve mobility for the disability community at Getting There: A Public Transportation Disability Town Hall Forum, 6:30-8 p.m. Wed, Nov. 6 at Maplewood Library, 3025 Southlawn Dr., Maplewood. Presented by the Self-Advocacy Advisory Committee of The Arc Greater Twin Cities, the free forum spotlight ideas for making transportation more efficient and reliable. There will also be a presentation on efforts to pass an equitable transit bill by Transit for Livable Communities. Co-sponsors of the forum are the Metropolitan Center for Independent Living, Minnesota State Council on Disability, Transit for Livable Communities, Epilepsy Foundation of Minnesota, Minnesota Consortium for Citizens with Disabilities, Down Syndrome Association of Minnesota, and the Intellectual and Developmental Disabilities Committee of the Ramsey County Citizens Advisory Council. Light refreshments served. Preregister by Thu, Oct. 24. FFI: 952-915-3665 email denafelper@thearcgtc.org Autism & Employment The Autism Society of Minnesota (AuSM) hosts its third annual Autism & Employment Forum Thu, Oct. 24 at Cargill Excelsior Crossings, 9320 Excelsior Blvd., Hopkins. The theme for the 2013 event is “Working Locally, Thinking Globally.” Designed for senior leadership and human resource representatives, the Leadership Summit Luncheon will include presentations from top Minnesota corporate leaders, state agencies, advocates and individuals with autism. Forum participants include hiring managers, human resource representatives, executives, managers, owners, individuals with ASD, parents, family members, caregivers, and support staff. Space is limited. FFI: ausm.org Attend home visits Home visits are coming up for The Arc Greater Twin Cities. Home visits allow citizens to meet with elected officials and discus concerns. Metropolitan Council, county, city and school district officials are invited guests. The events are free but space is limited, and preregistration is requested. Call to see if other home visits are offered in your area. People with disabilities and their families are invited to a home visit with elected officials, 6:30-8 p.m. Thu, Oct. 17 at the home of host Eve Lee, 1089 Englewood Ave., St. Paul. The visits are free and open to the public but space is limited, so preregister. FFI: 952-915-3665, denafelper@thearcgtc.org

Grants Grant opportunity for artists Grants to assist Minnesota emerging artists with disabilities in creating new work are available from VSA

Raising Expectations: Achieving Goals and Dreams is the theme of The Arc Minnesota Statewide Conference, Nov. 1-2 at DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel Park Place, St. Louis Park. Self-advocates and their families are raising their expectations about what their future can be like, what goals they can set, and what dreams they can achieve. The Arc Minnesota conference is designed to continue pushing the boundaries of what’s possible, to transform the ways we receive needed supports, and to move systems and policies forward so our dreams become concrete achievements. Saturday luncheon keynote is Derrick Dufresne, Founder and Founder and Senior Partner of the Community Resource Alliance. A founder and a senior partner of Community Resource Alliance, Derrick conducts trainings nationwide to bring greater self-determination and person-centered thinking to disability services. Derrick has also used creative approaches to create affordable, inclusive housing for individuals with disabilities across the U.S. FFI: www.arcmn.org ■ Minnesota. With funding from the Jerome Foundation, seven grants of $1500 each will be awarded to writers, performers, visual or multi-media artists through a competitive grant application process. November 8, 2013, is the deadline. Applications and guidelines are available at www.vsamn.org or can be requested in several formats. FFI: 612-332-3888, 800-801-3883, emerginggrant@vsamn.org.

Youth and families Spinal cord injury research University of Wisconsin-Madison doctoral student Britta M. Jabbar needs participants in a study of spinal cord injury. No travel is needed and the online survey takes about 35 minutes to complete. There will be a drawing for three participants to receive gift cars. Participants are eligible if they have had a spinal cord injury and have a child between 1-10 years old. Participants themselves must be at least 18 years old. Cut-off date is mid-October. FFI: jabbar@gmail.com New PACER workshop newsletter PACER Center offers many useful free or low-cost workshops and other resources for families of children with disabilities. Workshops are at PACER Center, 8161 Normandale Blvd., Bloomington, unless specified. Several are offered around the state. Check out PACER’s website and link to a new bimonthly newsletter of workshops that allows participants to pick and choose sessions catered to their needs. Advance registration required for all workshops. FFI: 952-838-9000, 800-537-2237 (toll free), www.PACER.org/workshops

Information and assistance UCare meetings UCare hosts informational meetings about its UCare for Seniors Medicare Advantage plan. Meetings are held all over the region. UCare for Seniors has more than 75,000 members across Minnesota and western Wisconsin. UCare serves Medicare-eligible individuals and families enrolled in income-based Minnesota Health Care Programs, such as Minnesota Care and Prepaid Medical Assistance Program; adults with disabilities and Medicare beneficiaries with chronic health conditions and Minnesotans dually eligible for Medical Assistance and Medicare FFI: 1-877-523-1518 (toll free), www.ucare.org Mental Illness Awareness Week is Oct. 6-12 National Mental Illness Awareness Week is Oct. 6-12. This week is marked by community education efforts in all 50 states to raise awareness that mental illnesses are treatable medical conditions, and that there is help and hope for children and adults with mental illnesses and their families. NAMI-MN free support groups for families who have a relative with a mental illness. NAMI has about two dozen family support groups, more than 20 support groups for people living with a mental illness, anxiety support groups, groups for veterans and other groups. Led by trained facilitators, the various groups provide help and support. FFI: 651-645-2948. A full calendar of all events is offered online. A free 12-week educational course is offered for those who have a family member living with a mental illness? Families can gain a greater understanding of mental illness, discuss resources, build communication skills, reduce stress and find support. Over 3,000 Minnesota families have benefited from this course. The Family-toFamily course meets weekly on Tuesdays for 12 weeks. It starts 6:30 p.m. Tue, Sept. 10, at North Heights Lutheran Church, Roseville. Registration is required. FFI: Stacia, 651-330-1730 or Anne, 651-653-5116. Partners and Spouses support group meets 6:45 p.m. the first Tue of each month at Falcon Heights United Church of Christ, 1795 Holton St. FFI: Lois, 651-7881920, or Donna, 651-645-2948 ext. 101. Open Door Anxiety and Panic support, meets at 6:30 p.m. the first

Derrick Dufresne

and third Thu at Woodland Hills Church, 1740 Van Dyke St., St. Paul and 6:30-6 p.m. on the second and fourth Thu at Goodwill-Easter Seals, 553 Fairview Ave. N., St. Paul. FFI: 651-645-2948. NAMI Connection peer support group for adults are led by trained facilitators who are also in recovery lead NAMI Connection groups. One group meets at 6:30 p.m. on the fourth Tue, . A group meets at 6:30 p.m., on the fourth Tuesday of the month, at Goodwill-Easter Seals, 553 Fairview Av., St. Paul (The group previously met at Lutheran Church of the Redeemer.) FFI: Shelly, 651-228-1645. Bi-weekly adult recovery groups meet at 6:30 p.m. the second and fourth Wed at Centennial United Methodist Church, 1524 Co. Rd. C-2 West, Roseville. FFI: Will, 651-578-3364. A family support group meets in St. Paul on the second Wednesday of each month from at 6-7:30 p.m., at Goodwill-Easter Seals, 553 Fairview Ave. N., St. Paul, in room 123. FFI: Sonja, 651-357-2077. A family support group meets in Oakdale on the second and fourth Tuesday of each month, from 7:00-8:30 p.m., at Canvas Health, 7066 Stillwater Blvd., in the community room. FFI: Dan, 651-341-8918. A group also meets at 6:30 p.m. on the second and fourth Wednesday of each month at Centennial United Methodist Church, 1524 Co. Rd. C-2 West, on the second and fourth Wednesdays of the month. FFI: Anne Mae, 651-730-8434

Activities for adults Independent living classes offered The Metropolitan Center for Independent Living offers free and accessible classes on living independently for people with disabilities. Most classes are held at 1600 University Ave., #16, the green tile building at University and Snelling, St. Paul, unless specified. A full calendar of all events is offered online. Enjoy field trips, knitting and crafts, wii fun, cooking, and classes to help with everyday living. Field trips to destinations including the farmers’ market and area parks are also offered. Weekenders outings are for those who are tired of sitting home all weekend. Meet other people who share similar interests and want to meet new people. Guests are welcomed. Please bring spending money for weekenders events. All other events are free of charge, accessible and mostly scent-free. MCIL has an online newsletter which includes event information. It is available in alternate forms. Please RSVP and give two weeks’ notice of needed accommodations for any events. FFI: Corbett Laubignat, 651-603-2028, corbettl@mcil-mn.org, Cindy, 651-603-2037, cindyl@mcil-mn.org,or www.mcil-mn.org

Volunteer, Donate Share a smile Brighten the day of a senior citizen in north or southwest Minneapolis and have fun. Visit an elder and do things together: movies, games, crafts or just friendly conversation. Hang out with an elder on a regular basis and do things that you both enjoy, like watching a movie, building stuff, playing games or friendly conversation. One-time or ongoing opportunities through the NIP Senior Program. FFI: Jeanne, 612-746-8549, srvolunteer@ neighborhoodinvolve.org, or www.neighborhoodinvolve.org Open the Door to Education Help adults reach their educational goals and earn their GED. Tutor, teach or assist in a classroom with the Minnesota Literacy Council. Give just 2-3 hours a week and help people expand their opportunities and change their lives through education. The literacy council provides training and support and accommodations for volunteers with disabilities. FFI: Allison, 651-251-9110, volunteer@mnlit eracy.org, www.mnliteracy.org/volunteers/opportunities/adults ■


October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10 Pg 13

CHANGE is coming

ACCESSIBLE FUN Welcome to the Access Press Accessible Fun listings. Readers looking for additional opportunities to enjoy the arts have these options: For information on galleries and theater performances around the state join the Access to Performing Arts email list at access@vsamn.org or call VSA Minnesota, 612-332-3888 or statewide 800-801-3883 (voice/TTY). To hear a weekly listing of accessible performances, call 612-332-3888 or 800-801-3883. The web accessible performance listings at www.vsamn.org/calendar.html, www.mrid.org, www.accesspress.org, or http://c2net.org (c2: caption coalition, inc.), which does most of the captioned shows in Minnesota and across the country. Performances on Facebook; sign up to connect with Audio Description Across Minnesota (www.facebook.com/pages/Audio-Description-AcrossMinnesota/202035772468). Connect with ASL Interpreted and Captioned Performances across Minnesota on Facebook http://tinyurl.com/FBcaption

Twin Cities Book Festival Sponsored by Rain Taxi, this free, day-long festival brings together 7,000 people to the largest literary gathering in the Upper Midwest. The festival welcomes famous authors, local literary heroes, publishers, kids and book lovers, who connect over real-live books and conversations. At the Minnesota State Fairgrounds, Progress Center, 1265 Snelling Ave. N., St. Paul. ASL is throughout the day Sat, Oct. 12. The event is free. FFI: 612-8251528; bookfest@raintaxi.com, www.raintaxi.com.

Hormel Girls Lyric Arts Company of Anoka presents a musical about the Hormel women’s sales squad, which transition from a drum and bugle corps to starts of a national radio show, at Lyric Arts Main Street Stage, 420 E. Main Street, Anoka. ASL show is 2 p.m. Sun, Oct. 13. Tickets are reduced by $5 for guests requiring ASL interpretation and a companion (regular $13-26); phone: 763-422-1838; email: boxoffice@lyricarts.org. Seats for ASL patrons are held in reserve until two weeks prior to the show, then released to the general public. When ordering tickets, please indicate the need for seating in this section; if there are no reservations a week before the show, the interpretation will be canceled. FFI: www.lyricarts.org

Tribes Guthrie Theater presents the story of Billy, a young man born deaf and raised in a loud, opinionated family that talks constantly. Not only have his parents and siblings never bothered to learn sign language, neither has Billy, who has had to adapt to the hearing world. Then he meets Sylvia, a young woman from a deaf family who introduces him to sign language. Billy feels a confidence and sense of belonging he’s not known before and finally understands what it means to be understood. Winner of the 2012 Drama Desk Award for Outstanding Play and a 2010 Olivier Award nominee for Best Play. Performances at the Guthrie Theater, McGuire Proscenium Stage, 818 2nd St. S., Mpls. AD shows are 1 p.m. Sat., Oct. 19 and 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 8. ASL and Captioning: 1 p.m. Wed., Oct. 30; 7:30 p.m. Fri., Nov. 1; Wed., Nov. 6; Thurs., Nov. 7. Tickets are reduced to $20 for AD/ASL, $25 for Captioning (regular $34-64). FFI: 612-377-2224, TTY 612-377-6626, www.guthrietheater.org/visit/ access_services.

Regional News - from p. 6 The body of the latest victim, 11-year-old Anthony Kuznia, was found in the Red River near his home in East Grand Forks in August. Family members had searched for him after he disappeared. A number of autism advocacy groups say wandering has led to the deaths of more than 60 children in the past four years. They are working to raise awareness and find more effective preventive measures. All but one of this year’s victims drowned, which may be evidence of a fascination that many autistic children have with water. ■ (Source: KARE 11 News)

CHANGE is a juried exhibition that promotes transformation, including 18 artists with disabilities from around the state who have experienced change either in their life, career, or art form. MRA/Trusight is an employers association that offers membership, consulting and training on a wide range of human resources and management topics. To educate and raise awareness about key employment issues such as employing persons with disabilities, MRA/Trusight partnered with VSA Minnesota to coordinate this free exhibition. Forty works of art will be on display through Dec. 31at MRA/Trusight’s headquarters in Plymouth, along the main hallways leading to their training rooms. The building is at 9805 45th Ave. N., Plymouth. The exhibition can be viewed during normal business hours 9 a.m. to 4 p.m. Artists include Ethan E Heidlebaugh, Annie Young, Jill Ness, Lisa Dietz, Jon Leverentz, Tara Innmon, Mary Anne Kinane, Jane Strauss, Gail Harbeck, Halle O’Falvey, Michelle Morine, Daniel Chapa, Sheri Pfau, David Spohn, Sam Lynn, Steven Accola and Felix Cheng. ■

People Incorporated’s Artability Art Show & Sale More than 90 artists who live with mental illness will have their annual show and sale at Landmark Center, 75 West 5th St., St. Paul. People Incorporated’s Artability program is an annual celebration of the creativity and contributions of people with mental illness to the community. The free show will feature 300 pieces of art, from landscapes and nature photography to anime and abstracts. Artists can sell their work and keep 90% of the sales price, with 10% going to the Artability program. A Celebrating Our Present is gala’s theme Celebrating Our Present . . . I Have a Gift is the theme of the Merrick, Inc. gala Friday, Oct. 11 at Prom Center in Oakdale. The evening is centered on the book Princess Sophia’s Gifts by Diane Hovey. It is based on the true story of Hovey’s daughter, Sonia, as Princess Sophia who becomes disabled due to a tragic accident. Sonia’s family discovers the gifts of joy and wisdom that she brings to others. The night kicks off with social time with appetizers followed by a sit-down dinner catered by The Prom Center. One of the highlights of the Golden Gala is the silent auction, where bidders have the opportunity to walk away with everything from a one night stay in the Symphony Suite at the Heathman Hotel in Portland, Ore. to a football autographed by Viking Adrian Peterson. A live auction is also planned, as are a variety of fun games and exciting activities take place throughout the evening that help make the event a successful fundraiser for Merrick’s mission. Register online at www.MerrickInc.org by by clicking on “Golden Gala” on the home page. Period dress is encouraged, so raid your closet a majestic look. Merrick is based in Vadnais Heights and provides jobs for adults with developmental disabilities. Merick works with companies needing help with document destruction, digital imaging, plastics recycling, and other office/support work. ■

special installation features artwork by people who experience auditory hallucinations (they hear voices due to their mental illness) combined with recordings of the artists talking about their work. The art for this installation will be created at a special workshop, co-led by artist Ethan Heidlebaugh, winner of this year’s poster contest and a past Jerome/VSA Emerging Artist Grant recipient. Opening reception is 6 p.m. Fri, Oct. 25.Viewing hours are 6-9 p.m. Friday, Oct. 25, in the Cortile; 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sat., Oct. 26, in Courtroom #317; and 11 a.m. to 4 p.m. Sun., Oct. 27 in Courtroom #317. No AD or ASL announced yet. FFI: 651-288-3532, www.PeopleIncorporated.org.

BareBones Halloween Outdoor Puppet Extravaganza. BareBones Productions presents its 20th annual show of puppetry, music, pageantry and fire at Hidden Falls Regional Park, North Gate (Magoffin Ave) entrance, 1305 Mississippi River Blvd S, St. Paul. The park performance site is fully accessible. ASL show is 7 p.m. Sat., Oct. 25. AD show is 7 p.m. Sat., Nov. 2. Tickets are pay what you can ($5-20 suggested donation). Advanced reservations are not accepted. All 7 p.m. performances are followed by audience receptions featuring free hot food and drink by Sisters’ Camelot and live music. FFI: www.barebonespuppets.org (also for information about weather and park rules).

Bethel’s Spooky Hollow Have fun for all ages at Bethe Care Center’s Spooky Hollow, 3-5 p.m. Thu, Oct. 31 at 420 Marshall Ave., St. Paul. Enjoy trick or treating, hot dogs and chips, games and a costume contest. The event is fully accessible and there is no need to preregister.

The Memory Of Water Commonweal Theatre Company presents a moving and sometimes funny story about family, love and loss at Commonweal Theatre, 208 Parkway Ave. N., Lanesboro. AD show is 1:30 p.m. Sun, Nov. 3, pre-show at 1:10; and tactile tour at 12:30 by advance reservation. Tickets are $30; student $15; FFI: 507-467-2525 or 800-657-7025; info@commonwealtheatre.org, www.commonwealtheatre.org ■


Pg 14 October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

Radio Talking Book October Sampling Books available through Faribault Books broadcast on the Minnesota Radio Talking Book Network are available through the Minnesota Braille and Talking Book Library in Faribault Call 1-800722-0550, 9 a.m. - 4 p.m., Monday through Friday. The catalog is online at www.mnbtbl.org, click on the link Search the Library Catalog. Persons living outside of Minnesota may obtain copies of books via inter-library loan by contacting their home state’s Network Library for the National Library Service. Listen to the Minnesota Radio Talking Book, either live or archived programs from the previous week, on the Internet at www.mnssb.org/rtb. Call the Talking Book Library for a password to the site. To find more information about Minnesota Radio Talking Book Network events go to the Facebook site at http://tinyurl.com/ RadioTalkBook. Access Press is one of the publications featured at 9 p.m. Sundays on the program It Makes a Difference.

Weekend Program Books Your Personal World (Saturday at 1 p.m.) is airing Weight Loss for People Who Feel Too Much, by Colette Baron-Reid, and Happier at Home, by Gretchen Rubin; For the Younger Set (Sunday at 11 a.m.) is airing The Opposite of Hallelujah, by Anna Jarzab; Poetic Reflections (Sunday at noon) is airing Useless Landscape or A Guide for Boys, by D.A. Powell; The U.S. and Us (Sunday at 4 p.m.) is airing The Orchid Murder, by Christine Hunt. Chautauqua • Tuesday – Saturday 4 a.m. Salt Sugar Fat, Nonfiction by Michael Moss, 2013. 14 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 24. Since 1999, the food industry has been aware of the connections between the salt-, sugar-, and fat-laden foods and the increase in obesity. But without them, the food industry would cease to exist. Read by June Prange. Past is Prologue • Monday – Friday 9 a.m. The Ordinary Acrobat, Nonfiction by Duncan Wall, 2013. 16 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 15. When Wall visited his first nouveau cirque in Paris, it was captivating. Soon, he was attending circuses several times per week. The circus has a long and fascinating history, full of ambitions, beauty, and thrills. Read by Judith Johannessen. Bookworm • Monday – Friday 11 a.m. The Kings and Queens of Roam, Fiction by Daniel Wallace, 2013. 11 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 28. Rachel is blind. When their parents die, both she and her sister, Helen, think that Rachel will need to depend on her sister for everything. Read by Don Gerlach. The Writer’s Voice • Monday – Friday 2 p.m. Beyond the Bear, Nonfiction by Dan Bigley and Debra

McKinney, 2013. 9 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 23. A young backcountry wanderer, Bigley writes of his experience going from able-bodied wilderness hiker to being blinded by a grizzly attack. It happened on a day full of promise. V - Read by Brad Bronk. Choice Reading • Monday – Friday 4 p.m. The Code, Fiction by G.B. Joyce, 2012. 10 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 21. After fourteen years playing pro hockey, Brad Shade is retired and scouting for Los Angeles. But when Red Hanratty, coaching legend, turns up murdered, Shade’s scouting job overlaps with investigation. Read by Jim Gregorich. PM Report • Monday – Friday 8 p.m. My Life in Politics, Nonfiction by Jacques Chirac, 2012. 20 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 14. A lifelong French politician and president of France from 1995 to 2007, Jacques Chirac was also prime minister of France twice in the 1970s and 1980s, and mayor of Paris from 1977 to 1995. A recent poll voted him the most admired political figure in France. Read by Arlan Dohrenburg. Night Journey • Monday – Friday 9 p.m. Angel Baby, Fiction by Richard Lange, 2013. 10 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 28. Luz planned her escape carefully, only taking the clothes on her back, a Colt .45, and all the money in her husband’s safe. The corpses weren’t part of her plan. L - Read by Dan Sadoff. Off the Shelf • Monday – Friday 10 p.m. Woke Up Lonely, Fiction by Fiona Maazel, 2013. 15 broadcasts. Begins October 21. Thurlow Dan’s cult, the Helix, promises to cure loneliness, but he is lonely for his ex-wife Esme, and their daughter whom he hasn’t seen in ten years. But Esme is a covert agent who has spent her life spying on Thurlow. L, S - Read by Kristi Sullivan. Potpourri • Monday – Friday 11 p.m. The Art of Intimacy, Nonfiction by Stacey D’Erasmo, 2013. 4 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 29. What is the nature of intimacy, of what happens in the space between us? And how do writers catch it on the page? D’Erasmo examines the craft of creating relationships in fiction, arguing for clear, honest depictions. Read by Stuart Holland. Good Night Owl • Monday – Friday midnight The Skull and the Nightingale, Fiction by Michael Irwin, 2013. 18 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 16. Aging James Gilbert asks his ward, Richard Fenwick, to experience (and report on) the extremes of human feeling for him. But it becomes clear that Gilbert wants correspondence of a titillating nature. S - Read by Neil Bright. After Midnight • Tuesday – Saturday 1 a.m. Three Sisters, Fiction by Susan Mallery, 2013. 9 broadcasts. Begins Oct. 24. Andi Gordon, jilted at the altar, buys one of the three Queen Anne houses on Blackberry Island. Her neighbors, Deanna Phillips and Boston King, become great friends as each deals with her own emotional life. S - Read by Jenny O’Brien. ■ Abbreviations: V - violence, L - offensive language, S - sexual situations.

People & Places - from p. 11

Changes at The Arc Mower County The Arc Mower County has announced updates and changes to its website, email contacts and Facebook page. The changes took effect in September and were made to better reflect the organization’s name The new website is at www.thearcmc.org. Staff and general email contact information can be found there. The new Facebook page link is at www.facebook.com/ thearcmc The Arc Mower County serves residents of Mower County in southern Minnesota. It is based in Austin. The phone number remains the same, at 507-433-8994. ■

PACER Center leader wins honors Paula F. Goldberg, executive director and a founder of the national nonprofit PACER Center, has been named Woman of the Year by the Gamma Sigma Sigma service sorority. Goldberg was honored at the sorority’s recent national convention in St. Louis. Goldberg has dedicated her life to making a difference in the lives of children through her work with PACER. “The young women and alumnae of Gamma Sigma Sigma volunteer to help many individuals in their communities across the country. It is an honor to be recognized by such a wonderful organization,” said Goldberg. “It speaks to the hard work of our terrific PACER staff and the many volunteers who make such a positive difference in the lives of children and families.” Goldberg was nominated for the Woman of the Year award by a teacher and PACER volunteer. As part of the nomination process, many parents of children with disabilities, along with leaders of other parent organizations, wrote letters of support for Goldberg and PACER. Gamma Sigma Sigma is a sorority that promotes a lifelong commitment to service and diversity, in an environment of unity and equality. Last year, members and alumnae contributed over 288,000 hours of service to a wide variety of projects across the country. Previous winners of the award include former First Lady Barbara Bush and Mae Jemison, the first African-American astronaut. PACER is a national parent center located in Minneapolis. It was founded on the concept of parents helping parents. The organization strives to improve and expand opportunities that enhance the quality of life for children and young adults with disabilities and their families. Goldberg now oversees more than 30 different projects and a staff of 70, most of whom are parents of children with disabilities. ■

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October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10 Pg 15

continued from p. 11

PEOPLE & PLACES State Council awards - from p. 11 range of services for businesses, including the archiving of official and corporate documents, and administering Safe and Home. He has shown great commitment to allow everyone full access to the voting booth, including nonvisual and physical access, so that everyone can vote independently and privately. Friend of the Council Award—Kathy Hern, Employment Specialist, Human Development Center, Cloquet. Hern’s work with the Human Development Center Employment Connection in Cloquet has helped many people find work. She has an 85% placement rate, so it’s no surprise that her consumers and employers love and trust her. This unassuming and quiet woman is unwavering in her dedication to her clients, and her commitment to finding competitive employment for individuals who have mental illness is unparalleled. With more than 20 years’ experience, Hern helps those whom others have “given up” on. Media Award—Dan Voss, Manager, RP Broadcasting, Bemidji. Voss hired Bradley, a music fan, after the two met at a fishing event. Voss discovered that Bradley had a great interest in and knowledge of music. Bradley helped organize more than 6,000 songs in the music database at one of his stations, Real Country 98.3, completing the task within eight hours. He’s since been on the air. Listeners are benefiting from Bradley’s experience, thanks to the decision to hire him. ■

Reelabilities - from p. 3 cade, this film allows viewers to watch as Bent overcomes her own unspoken prejudices and begins inventing cameras accessible to her new friends. Her efforts grew into an award-winning photography program. ■

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FOR RENT Lewis Park Apartments: Barrier-free housing with wheelchair users in mind. Section 8 subsidized. Oneand two-bedroom units. For more information on availability call 651-488-9923. St. Paul, MN. Equal Opportunity Housing. Oak Park Village: We are accepting applications for the waiting list for one-bedroom wheelchair accessible apartments. Section 8 subsidized. Convenient St. Louis Park location. Call 952-935-9125 for information. Equal Opportunity Housing. Calvary Center Apts: 7650 Golden Valley Road, Golden Valley, MN. A Section 8 building now accepting applications for our waiting list. Call 9 am to 4 pm, Mon – Fri 763-546-4988 for an application. Equal Opportunity Housing. Holmes-Greenway Housing: One- and two-bedroom wheelchair-accessible apartments. Section 8 subsidized. Convenient SE Minneapolis location. Call 612378-0331 for availability information. Equal Opportunity Housing.


Pg 16 October 10, 2013 Volume 24, Number 10

Ap13 10final  

October 2013 Issue

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