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Contents spring/summer 2012 MANN’S JEWELERS 2945 MONROE AVENUE ROCHESTER, NY 14618 585-271-4000 WWW.MANNSJEWELERS.COM STORE HOURS: 10:00 AM - 5:30 PM MON/TUE/WED/FRI/SAT 10:00 AM - 8:30 PM THURS CLOSED SUNDAY CALL FOR EXTENDED HOLIDAY HOURS. CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD IRVING MANN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER NANCY MANN PRESIDENT ROBERT MANN C H I E F O P E R AT I N G O F F I C E R MICHAEL GALLINA DIRECTOR OF MARKETING MEGAN CRAWFORD

P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P

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PUBLISHER STU NIFOUSSI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R HANS GSCHLIESSER MANAGING EDITOR JILLIAN LAROCHELLE PROJECT MANAGER LISA MONTEMORRA DESIGNERS

WATCH SECTION

2 Illumannations

48 The Rob Report

4 MJ Scene

50 Winders: Winding it Up

6 Fabulous in Rochester

54 Cool Blue & White Hot Watches

8 Flower Power

56 Watchmaking: Lititz Watch Technicum

10 Designers: Temple St. Clair 14 From the Runways

JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI PRODUCTION MANAGER PEG EADIE PRESIDENT AND CEO BRITTON JONES CHAIRMAN AND COO MAC BRIGHTON

60 Collecting: Time on His Side Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary

18 Home: Al Fresco

depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2012. Accent® is published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550,

26 Red Carpet

Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175;

30 Profile: John Hardy

Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018, 212-

32 Perfect Gems

ers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims, unsolicited

686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The publish-

manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of this

36 Food: Making Magic

magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the

64 End Page: Last Bid for Love

publishers. Volume 10, Issue 1. Accent® is a trademark of Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. Printed In The U.S.A.

1

JOHN HARDY CUFF. COVER ILLUSTRATION BY DARIA JABENKO.

FEATURES

CYNTHIA LUCERO


ILLUMANNATIONS

Life as a

“Glam-ma” BY NANCY MANN, CEO

W

ell, it’s finally happened to me, and I love it! I have a dog in my house…now… after both of my children have left the nest. And I must admit, he is wonderful company and other than my father, the nicest guy I know. It happened so innocently. His mother (my daughter) moved to NYC and can barely fit herself into her apartment, never mind Allen. So now Allen lives with me, a light blond golden retriever spreading his fur and his love

Now that we’ve gotten started, there’s no stopping us. We have some new designs in the works, in styles so beautifully executed that I fear for my wallet. In addition to bones and cookies, do I present Allen with a new piece of jewelry for holidays and his birthday like I’ve done with my daughters year after year? Should his charms match his collars? Should he wear seasonal sentiments? Do I

all over my dark hardwood floors.

We seem to have developed a nice routine. Some days he goes to camp. Some days he hangs out at home. And on the best days, he comes to Mann’s Jewelers. He spends

anoint him with “Born to Run” or “Bad to the Bone?”

time with anyone willing to pet him and even more time with anyone willing to feed him. It’s hard to argue with that kind of love.

After nine generations of Mann’s Jewelers commemorating life’s most meaningful moments, it feels great to have opened our hearts even wider in an effort to improve the quality of life of our furriest friends. Because, as I learn every day from Allen, their love knows no bounds.

Mann’s Jewelers is a family of dog lovers. We talk the talk and bark the bark. We have dog treats at the ready for visiting canines, share stories about our dogs and their antics, and unabashedly applaud the efforts of pups who accessorize. So, we asked ourselves, why not show our support with some jewelry designed

especially for dogs and the people who love them?

Our Cause For Paws collection was designed to share the love with dogs and their owners, especially pups currently in shelters. Every year in the U.S., millions of animals die in shelters. A portion of sales from Our Cause For Paws helps build and support humane no-kill shelters providing spay and neuter services nationally. And locally we

donate a percentage of these sales to Lollypop Farm, the Humane Society of Greater Rochester, to raise awareness and support for the prevention of animal cruelty.

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MJSCENE

The New York Wedding Affair

Each January, the finest bridal professionals in Upstate New York gather to present an afternoon of enchanting décor, mouth-watering treats, sparkling jewelry and lavish wedding inspiration. Hosted by Well Wed magazine, brides-to-be were able to attend educational seminars, peruse area vendors and enjoy complimentary spa treatments. The evening concluded with a fabulous couture wedding gown fashion show featuring bridal jewels by Mann’s Jewelers.

Photos courtesy of Brandon Vick & Kelly Ernst

Rochester Young Professionals Mann’s Jewelers hosted the Rochester Young Professionals, a local Rochester group dedicated to volunteerism, professional development and social connections for an evening of beer and bling. Attendees took photos in our Bling Booth, decorating themselves in jewelry from Mann’s Jewelers and using fun props. Music was provided by the Bob Sneider Duo, and the evening culminated with a Chan Luu bracelet giveaway. Photos courtesy of Mann’s Bling Booth


Diamond dewdrops glimmer with the promise of a new day.

MJ Dewdrops

Sparkle and shine. Collection from $750


FASHION411

Fabulous in Rochester BY COURTNEY WINSLOW

I

a light socket. Not your baby girl’s pastels, but rather a vibrant version of a girly hue. The Brights. And when I say bright I mean get

’m back and I’m oh-so-excited for the snow to go and the sun to shine! Spring and summer fashion are by far my favorite. So let’s pretend that you won’t be wearing your winter boots this spring in Rochester and talk about all the fabulous things to glam up your summer events. Big Prints, Big Patterns, Big Color and All White. Do not

your sunglasses out and wear them everywhere. They are a cross between Rainbow Brite and the

Care Bears (big fans of both). I have always been a lover of neon and fluorescent hues; they bring me back to my Body Glove coordinating outfits of the ’90s. Bright yellow, tangerine, and pink striped shorts mixed with embroidered tops for Posh Spice and mixed-media neon patent sandals for Sporty Spice. Shoot for a scuba-after-dark look and pick a racerback dress in fluorescent pink for shock value at the Rochester City Ballet Motown Event. Pattern me up. You can’t go wrong with lots of pattern this spring and summer. Mixing graphics with minimalistic cuts, head-to-toe prints in mismatched ikats, tweeds, floral and animal prints create the perfect summer storm of fabulousness. To help bring this trend to the lake for your favorite CMAC concerts, tug on a pair of shorts

skimp; my advice is to Be Brave, Be Daring,

and if you can’t then pack up your boring black carryall and go home. I’m talking about matching fabrics, pastel shades, and neon hues. This is not a season to wimp out. This is where you can be noticed, this is the season to stand out. Sounds like my kinda summer. There are a lot of women that tone it down ’cause they don’t want to stick out in the crowd. Tell me, what’s wrong with “trying too hard?” That just doesn’t make sense to me. Believe it or not, things that are effortless can actually LOOK fabulous...if you pick the right things. And if it wasn’t effortless, than who’s to be ashamed? So you tried to look like a glam queen? Bravo baby! It may appear that I spend all day keeping the baby in the playpen while I contemplate my looks. Not the case; I just armed myself with the staples for the season, I pulled my hair up into a high bun, and piled on my jewels, then grabbed the baby on the way out the door. May I be accused of looking like I “tried too hard?” Fantastic. Here are some of my favorite trends for spring and summer: effortless or not, they’re what will go best with your colorful boat drinks at the Inn on the Lake. White on White: I am sure that you have a pair of white jeans and a white tank (do not grab your hubby’s Fruit of the Loom). The key to updating the white summer look is to layer the neutrals, sheers and beading, even fur. Almost all designers at Spring 2012 Fashion Week started out with a white ensemble. So get a tan (a real one please), a great lip gloss (a juicy peach shade), style yourself some beachy waves and you’re dressed. No joke, that easy. But seriously, it is an effortless trend that will

with patterns that look like they were made out of your grandma’s curtains and add a graphic top.

You can’t go wrong. Either match it up or mix stripes along with tribal accents and dance the night away. Glamour and fun collide with the mix of colors and textures this season. Embellished and over-embellished will give you a killer outfit at the Hillside Work Scholarship event. Flapper dresses with feathers and beading will be a perfect backdrop for your most incredible tassel necklaces and earrings. The only way you can mess up these trends is by wimping out. Go Big or Go Home.

always create the illusion of glamour and style. So don’t be so afraid of standing out on a blank

canvas. I promise, you will not be mistaken for a golfer at the LPGA as long as you keep it flowy, and accessorize with some round tortoise shades and your largest vintage-y colored stone rings. Pastels: This season you can get your rays a number of different ways. Denim is not just for blue; it’s for lavender, lemon, pink and mint. Sugary colors dust through

your 501s like you’ve spent your day decorating Easter cookies. Yum. So easy to wear:

pair them with a simple sheer white blouse if you’re feeling wimpy, or with a complementary colored cropped jacket for an extra layer of frosting. The colors are pastels that look like they have been plugged into

6


MJSTYLECHECK

1 2 Rolex Datejust with pink floral Arabic dial and diamond bezel in 18k white gold and stainless steel. $12,900

Ippolita digital lace floral teardrop earrings in rosĂŠ. $375

3

4

Heather Moore leather wrap bracelet in sterling silver and 14k gold with diamonds. Each made to order with personalized sentiments. As shown $2,265

Caleo flower cuff bracelet with chrysophrase, moonstone and diamonds in sterling silver. $3,095

8


MJ Soleil necklace with diamonds in 14k yellow gold. $4,675

5 6

Diamond bands in 14k white or yellow gold. MJ Collection wide vine & flower band with white and yellow diamonds. $2,090 MJ Collection narrow leaf & vine band with diamonds. $1,540 Henri Daussi eternity bands with yellow diamonds. Each $1,540

8

7

Sutra earrings with gray moonstone and diamonds in 18k white gold. $7,250 Temple St. Clair flower bracelet with blue moonstone and diamonds in 18k yellow gold. $13,500

10

9 Miriam Salat resin bangles with cubic zirconia and sterling silver flower accents. Each, $175

Roberto Coin cocktail ring with pink and purple sapphires and diamonds in 18k rose gold. $7,400

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DESIGNERS

A Colorful Life THE DESIGNS OF TEMPLE ST. CLAIR STAND THE TEST OF TIME. BY LAURIE SCHECHTER

I

n person, Temple St. Clair shows the same qualities that infuse her designs: a softness like the southern breezes of her childhood, and an old world intellectual rigor rooted in classical history. From the past to the adventure of her present, her inspirations remain history, travel, the arts, nature and the sea. Growing up in the South (Virginia and the coastal barrier islands of South Carolina), her childhood was filled with colorful stories from her American and European ancestry. Her father’s ancestors crossed with William the Conqueror from France to England, coming to America just prior to the Civil War. Her maternal grandmother studied in Versailles, played shuffleboard with F. Scott Fitzgerald aboard a transatlantic trip, and was one of the first to enter King Tut’s tomb just after its discovery. Add her mother’s enthusiasm for new places and her father’s love of history and the sea, and you can imagine the starting point from which Temple St. Clair’s own journey was launched. Traveling for a month every summer, St. Clair was encouraged to keep a journal and gather treasures to make scrapbooks. Before each trip, she studied the language, history and literature of each destination, from Ireland to Egypt. As a teenager she studied abroad in Switzerland. When her family moved to the barrier islands, she spent her summers studying marine biology with Jean-Michel Cousteau’s Project Ocean Search. The work involved macro photography of small sea creatures and plankton, which St. Clair describes in her book, Alchemy: “At that level of intimacy, everything appears to be gemlike.” It’s no mystery then that she loves to work with colors of the sea: aquamarines, blue sapphires, blue-green Blue Moods Temple St. Clair showcases her singular style, layers of design spanning a nearly 25-year career.

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Thank you Rochester for making Waterlily the #1 Makeup and Skincare store in WNY! We appreciate you supporting our locally owned and operated store and look forward to serving you! We ship everywhere, so don’t buy online or in NYC…stop by or call in your order today! We are proud to exclusively offer the top two makeup artistry lines from Saks, Neiman’s and Nordstrom’s as well as the most effective and patented skincare lines in the world…WE FIX SKIN! Beth Gamble, Owner

2383 Monroe Avenue | Brighton, NY

585-442-5140 | waterlilybeauty.com

MAKEUP | SKINCARE | FACIALS | PEELS | WAXING | PEDICURES


IT’S NO MYSTERY THAT SHE LOVES TO WORK WITH COLORS OF THE SEA: AQUAMARINES, BLUE SAPPHIRES, BLUE-GREEN TOURMALINE, SEAFOAM GREEN BERYL, AND HER FAVORITE, BLUE MOONSTONE. tourmaline, seafoam green beryl, and her favorite, blue moonstone. At Smith College majoring in literature, St. Clair spent a year studying abroad in Florence, cementing a love of all things Florentine. Looking for a reason to return to Italy, she embarked on a masters degree program in Italian literature in Florence and remained there after its completion. At this time, she was introduced to “the world of the artisan” and like so much else in her life, was propelled into jewelry design by her family. While visiting St. Clair in Italy, her mother was intent on finding an ancient coin and having a necklace made from it. Together they searched and found one her mother loved, from Carthage dating to the 4th century B.C. Her mother, scheduled to leave, tasked St. Clair with creating a necklace out of the coin. From this experience came not only her first jewelry creation, but relationships with antiquarians and goldsmiths with whom she worked (and still does) much the same way as artisans collaborated in the 14th and 15th centuries. “A world opened for me. It brought together my years of study and love for Mediterranean culture with its timeless and classic aesthetic.” Her use of coins spawned a fascination with the histories and mythologies that the coins represented, and as she studied them, she also studied the ancient techniques of gold work (granulation and filigree) that would eventually become Temple St. Clair signatures. (The granulation pyramid is a hallmark of her designs.) Another of her trademarks, in addition to the prevalent use of gold, is extensive work with colored gemstones. Inspired by Byzantine mosaics, she uses colored stones as if they were tiles. She prickles at the term “semiprecious” since all of her stones are natural certified, not treated or enhanced, and for that reason they can be rarer than typical diamonds. They also speak to her nomadic nature. Unique colored gems require a hunt

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and they come from all over the world, sometimes from only one place in the world, like the spinal from Madagascar. In fact, natural colored gemstones are one-of-a-kind, “as individual as people,” discovered by “nomad” gem dealers traveling the globe. Her fascination with the history and the stories behind these elements, from coins to gemstones, goes hand-in-hand with her recurring use of ageold symbols: talismans and amulets “attributed with power and meaning by their wearer,” religious symbols, zodiac signs, angels, mythological serpents, butterflies, doves and pomegranates, all imbued with ancient meanings that she incorporates into modern designs. “Each tells a story, mythological or religious, and ultimately personal. Especially the locket, which we fill with our own stories,” she explains. These themes repeat throughout her collections. Her rock crystal amulet (St. Clair still wears her very first one) gets updated every season. Since her customer, like herself, is all about personal style, each piece acquired adds another layer to that personality. Last year St. Clair added a series to her collections called Save Japan Dolphins (pendants and a ring) to support the organization’s efforts to cease the capture and slaughter of dolphins in Taiji, Japan. Her lifelong love of the sea and her history of supporting causes made this a very personal endeavor, particularly striking in that her beloved blue moonstone is now endangered, too. And so the Temple St. Clair journey continues, beckoning us with gold and magical colored gemstones to travel with her and create our own personal story with these treasures. Or as the designer herself puts it, “Collecting, discovering and nodding to historical influences preserves a visceral link with the past, retelling wonderful stories in new and surprising ways.”


Gold GO FOR THE

IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIESDIRECTIONS.COM

FROM THE RUNWAYS


Bright RAINBOW


Dark

AND DANGEROUS


Soulful. Subtle. Sparkling.

MJ Rocks

A rough luxe collection designed and created exclusively

by Mann’s Jewelers. From $295


HOME

AL FRESCO

G

rowing up, an “outdoor kitchen” (if such a term even existed) generally meant a portable barbecue sitting atop an aqua-colored slab of cement. Basketweave plastic lounge chairs might be protected by a corrugated tin awning, and Dad spent more time swearing at non-functioning equipment than actually grilling. Today, a host of high-tech innovations, weatherproof custom appliances, and a desire to maximize the social space of even the largest houses have redefined the concept of cooking and dining al fresco. “We actually require our homeowners to include a summer kitchen in

their construction,” says Page Pierce, vice president of Walt Disney World Resort’s new Golden Oak luxury housing development. The community, which opened last September with eight homes, will eventually host as many as 800 homes, along with a top-tier restaurant and demonstration kitchen, community center and other amenities. Homeowners have VIP access to the neighboring Disney theme parks, along with available perks like door-to-park car service, concierge services for the greater Orlando region and access to special and private events.

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"Outdoor kitchens are about being social, not about formality,” says architect Doug Burdge, who designed the spaces above and left.

TOP: BURDGE & ASSOCIATES. BOTTOM LEFT: BURDGE & ASSOCIATES ARCHITECTS BOTTOM RIGHT: ARCH INTERIORS

TODAY’S OUTDOOR KITCHENS ARE FOR MORE THAN JUST GRILLING BURGERS. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON


Designed By Kevin Crego Location shot Crego Realty 383 Park Ave 0DU\6SLQHOOL *DU\6LFRQROĂ€5HVLGHQFH


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: ARCH INTERIORS, FLORIDA BUILDER APPLIANCES, FLORIDA BUILDER APPLIANCES, GOLDEN OAK AT WALT DISNEY RESORT, FLORIDA BUILDER APPLIANCES

“One of our thoughts in planning Golden Oak was to not create a development that was just boxes,” says Pierce. “Because this is Florida, it’s important to celebrate the indoor/outdoor living we’re able to enjoy.” At a minimum, most houses have a covered area with a great barbecue, outdoor sink, refrigerator and outdoor seating. But they can get much more elaborate. “Some have remote control retractible screens to keep the bugs out while allowing flow from the indoor kitchen, past the summer kitchen, all the way to the swim-up bar.” Flow, and the efficient use of indoor/outdoor space seem to be key ingredients in designing a successful outdoor kitchen. “When we pay taxes and insurance on a house, we’ve paid for the environment around that house,” says Julian Exclusia of Florida Builder Appliances, an upscale division of Sears Holding Corporation. “We’re not just sitting in a cubby hole.” Exclusia works with athletes, entertainers and others to design and equip custom homes, and he’s critical of some architects who “hide” a house’s kitchen in the corner. “If you’re entertaining, you’re looking at the expanse, or you should be, whether it’s the Colorado Rockies or the Caribbean.” Christopher Grubb, president of Arch Interiors in Beverly Hills, notes that “we’re trying to create a cohesive look and bring these spaces together.” His full-service design firm has created several L.A.-area outdoor spaces, featuring popular elements like warming drawers, beer taps and an outdoor pizza oven, adding utility and distinction. Doug Burdge, a Malibu architect, designed an oceanfront property with not one, but three outdoor spaces: a grill area, a semi-enclosed chef’s kitchen and a rooftop social space.

“Outdoor kitchens are now a part of almost every design we do.” Many significant outdoor improvements, however, tend to happen after completion of the house itself. This seems, in a large part, due to the economy. “In Southern California right now, 99% of all the home contracts are improvements on existing properties, not new construction,” says Grubb. Meanwhile in Florida, Exclusia notes that banks are reluctant to finance what they see as an elective (and expensive—elaborate kitchens can run $50,000 to $100,000 or more) element. Thus, even high-end custom homeowners are completing the house first, then financing the outdoor activity spaces. However, Grubb notes that a professional, welldesigned outdoor kitchen and social area could add hundreds of thousands of dollars or more in resale value to a luxury property. here are other reasons to design a space more elaborate than the average lonely Weber grill on an island of concrete. Owners who rent their homes for charity events or other gatherings effectively double or triple the number of available hosting venues (or, alternatively, keep guests and visitors outside, away from living areas and damage-prone furnishings). Simple physics may also be at play in the rising popularity of the outdoor kitchen. “We’ve kind of peaked on our maximum house size,” says Jeff Dross, corporate director of industry trends for Kichler Lighting. “So a lot of architects are building in courtyards, adding large glass walls, and creating indoor/outdoor flow. You’re essentially adding more rooms, and your yard becomes a really nice, usable space.”

T

Today's outdoor kitchens are designed to ensure that entertainment, design and service flow smoothly from inside to outside.

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Luxury & affordability. Two become one.

MJ Bridal Created exclusively

by Mann’s Jewelers.

Engagement rings from $975


PEACE OF MIND STARTS WITH PROOF OF QUALITY. Carat Weight 1.53

Color Grade E

Clarity Grade VS1

Cut Grade

Excellent

Laser Inscription Registry Number GIA 16354621

Natural Diamond Not Synthetic

A GIA report is certainty from the source. As creator of the 4Cs and the International Diamond Grading System,™ GIA sets the standards for diamond assessment, worldwide. Unbiased. Scientific. A report from GIA gives you a clear understanding of your diamond’s quality. Look for GIA Diamond Grading Reports and the jewelers who offer them. www.4cs.gia.edu

THE UNIVERSAL STANDARD BY WHICH GEMS ARE JUDGED.


RED CARPET

Blonde Bombshells WITH LIGHT LOCKS AND HEAD-TO-TOE STYLE, WE’D GIVE THESE STUNNING CELEBS AN AWARD ANY DAY. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

AMBER HEARD

T

ZAC EFRON & MICHELLE PFEIFFER

CLAIRE DANES

hough the Guess model-turned-actress is always striking, Amber Heard truly smoldered

at the SAG Awards. Her fitted black satin gown epitomized covered-up sexy, while sparkly

Zac Efron and Michelle Pfeiffer sure made a good looking pair at the New Years Eve premiere.

Yellow gold and pink tourmaline chandelier earrings lit up Pfeiffer’s face and helped prepetuate that youthful glow. We don’t know how she does it. For Showtime’s Emmy Nominee Reception at the Mondrian Los Angeles, Claire Danes chose pavé diamond drop earrings that popped against the silvery threads of her dress. With a confident

26

HEARD AND PFEIFFER WEAR H. STERN. DANES WEARS MCL.

diamond studs and metallic smoky eyes added just the right amount of shimmer.


RED CARPET smile, flushed cheeks and dewey décolletage, the nominee for Best Actress in a TV Drama looked like a winner long before they called her name. Stacy Keibler knows how to accessorize. Adorable arm-candy aside, the former Ravens cheerleader still looks sensational in the old purple and black, topped off with teardrop earrings,

STACY KEIBLER & GEORGE CLOONEY

KATHERINE HEIGL

MARLEY SHELTON

stacked bangles and a notice-me cocktail ring. As if we wouldn’t have noticed her without it. KEIBLER WEARS MCL. HEIGL WEARS SUTRA. SHELTON WEARS AMRAPALI.

All tassel, no hassle! Katherine Heigl’s blue sapphire and black rough-cut diamond earrings lent an effortless glamour to her gown at the 39th Annual American Music Awards. Paired with a sparkly strap and matte red lips, the look recalled old Hollywood at its best. Nothing amps up a little black dress like a statement necklace. At the L.A. premiere of The Mighty Macs, Marley Shelton chose this blackened beauty to elevate her outfit from ho-hum to yum! Kelly Osbourne, Kate Mara and Kristin Cavallari have recently been spotted in identical designs; you can bet that style-savvy ladies everywhere are following suit.

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PROFILE

SCALING BACK JOHN HARDY REVISITS ITS NAGA COLLECTION WITH FIERY NEW DESIGNS TO USHER IN THE YEAR OF THE DRAGON. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

F

irst introduced in 2009, on the anniversary of John Hardy’s 20th year in business, the Naga collection tells the Balinese myth of the dragon and the pearl. As legend has it, the dragon would leave his volcano each night and dive down to the bottom of the sea to visit his love, the pearl. At sunrise, as he burst from the water and returned home to the volcano, the water dripping from his scales fertilized rice fields across the land and brought prosperity to the Balinese. Now, for the Chinese Year of the Dragon, John Hardy head designer and creative director Guy Bedarida has dramatically expanded the 2012 Naga collection with more pieces featuring this mythical symbol of good fortune, prosperity and success. Like the dragon in the myth, one of John Hardy’s missions is to help the Balinese land and people flourish. The company views itself as a collaborative effort between designers and artisans, and believes that “a business can prosper while respecting people and nature.” Their “Greener Everyday” policy signifies an ongoing commitment to environmental conservation, which includes the planting of bamboo, rice and even the black palm wood used in some of its men’s designs. The brand’s Hong Kong headquarters are completely green, and its Mambal, Bali compound is a village unto itself, composed of traditional bamboo and mud structures, rice paddies and an organic farm that provides lunch for the entire workforce there. The Naga collection, like all John Hardy collections, is handcrafted in Bali by these talented native artisans, some of whom have previously served as jewelers to Balinese kings. Some pieces feature full dragons or dragon heads, while others showcase a more abstract dragon scale motif. Crafted from sterling silver, yellow gold and an assortment of precious and semiprecious gems, the collection’s cuffs, bracelets, rings, necklaces and earrings are rich with detail, inside and out.

“I LIKE TO THINK THAT THE WEARERS OF THE NAGA COLLECTION WILL ENJOY LOVE, PROSPERITY AND LUCK.” –GUY BEDARIDA, HEAD DESIGNER 30


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PerfectGems

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER.

SLH

BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

A CHÂTEAU IN NORMANDY

At the end of a boulevard shaded with ancient trees, past clusters of huge roses in brilliant, almost illusory colors is the Château La Cheneviere. The grand three-story mansion, built in the 18th century, is set in the Normandy countryside, between the exquisite town of Bayeux and the historic beaches, in Port-en-Bessin. During WWII the residence was occupied by the Germans, then by the Americans after the June 1944 landing. Restored in 1988, the manor became a fully equipped hotel and restaurant, with a swimming pool, lovely terrace and beautiful views. Each guest room has a different décor, some with marble fireplaces, others with private patios. An intimate bar leads to a graceful dining room, where the brilliant chef uses local produce to present the distinctive and legendary dishes of Normandy.

SCOTT CHANEY

STEP IN STYLE

32

Located in a small shop on New York City’s East Side, designer Barbara Barran’s Classic Rug Collection puts fashion underfoot with fascinating custom rugs. Her unique creations can be seen in very stylish homes all over the world, as well as the Whitney Museum, the Smithsonian, and other museum stores. Barran’s rugs, inspired by everything from Art Deco to traditional American quilts and her personal passion, Eastern art, are made of natural fibers including wool, silk, pashmina, hemp, linen, nettle and banana silk. She’s the only rug designer in the U.S. to offer hand-knotted rugs from Nepal in 300 knot silk. Go barefoot!


REST ASSURED

JULIE SOEFER

DAVID TURNER PHOTOGRAPHY

Hôtel Le Toiny is, if possible, even more fashionable and exclusive than the island of St. Barth’s itself. Set away from the throngs on a gently sloping hillside in the Côte Sauvage area, each of the 15 luxurious private villas has its own gated entrance and a red mailbox flag that serves as a “Do Not Disturb” sign. Inside, enjoy netting-draped four-poster mahogany beds, high-tech entertainment centers and kitchenettes. Outside, you’ll find private plunge pools and incredible views across the lush hills to a beach, popular with surfers. The sommelier has selected superb wines and the chef creates amazing dishes (including the hotel’s signature pasta in cream with black truffles). If you choose to stir from your villa, arrangements can be made for a sunset cruise or a fishing expedition. Or, you can just put up your flag, order the excellent room service, and hide out like the other privacyseeking celebrity guests.

HOUSTON, WE HAVE ART

BUBBLES IN THE AIR

Inspired by the celebrated French inn, Houston’s La Colombe d’Or hotel takes its muse seriously. This 1923 mansion, located near the museum district, owns an extensive art collection that includes Corot, Matisse and Chagall, as well as the 1715 panels, thought to be one of the finest examples of authentic French Regence décor in North America. When staying in one of the hotel’s rooms or villas (like the Cezanne Suite, pictured above), art- and food-loving guests can arrange to take a personal tour of the collection, then dine on Pan-seared Chilean Sea Bass or Stuffed Quail, (naturally paired with the appropriate wines) and Champagne sorbet, created by chef Jeramie Robison in the hotel’s famed Restaurant CINQ.

Pops for Champagne is one of Chicago’s most elegant nightclubs, presenting a Champagne list comprising nearly 200 selections. Beverage director W. Craig Cooper offers the lowdown on Champagne for the summer: "When the mercury rises, it is always better to select a drier Champagne. A higher dosage [sweetness level] in a sparkling wine can be cloying when the weather is warm and balmy....” Cooper suggests Laurent-Perrier Ultra Brut. “Composed of 60% Pinot Noir and 40% Chardonnay, this wine…is perhaps one of the best of all Champagnes to pair with oysters…but can go just as well with a simple summer crudité.” Here’s to a sparkling summer!

34


FOOD

MAKING MAGIC IN THE FIRST INSTALLMENT OF OUR LEGENDARY CHEF SERIES, WE DISCOVER THAT DAVID BURKE IS MUCH MORE THAN A WHIZ IN THE KITCHEN. BY SHIRA LEVINE

F

or those who dig classic conceptual cuisine outside of the traditional restaurant box setup, David Burke has become somewhat of a hero. In addition to his classic surf and turf joints, Chef Burke holds court with his fancy foods inside a Bloomingdale’s, a bowling alley and an airport. If by chance you don’t recognize the oft-showy culinologist (an expert who blends culinary arts and food technology) with a penchant for whimsically sculpting his dishes to dazzle diners by name, there’s still a decent chance you’ve eaten in one of his 10 restaurants, or purchased his gourmet products. (“Burke in the Box” takeout meal at Las Vegas’ McCarran Airport, anyone?) Or perhaps you’ll recall his very near win against Bobby Flay on Iron Chef, or his too-early kissoff from Top Chef Masters. Chef Burke has been a longtime pioneer in the biz of celebrity chefery, cooking up a career that “blurs the lines between chef, artist, entrepreneur and

inventor.” His factory of fabulous foodspots tantalizes taste buds through a slew of dramatically different spaces, with entertaining concoctions appearing on plates throughout New York, and in New Jersey, Chicago, Connecticut and Las Vegas. Then there’s David Burke Townhouse, David Burke’s Primehouse, Fromagerie, David Burke Prime, Fishtail by David Burke and David Burke Kitchen. Burke is also the mastermind behind Pastrami Salmon, GourmetPops, flavor-transfer spice sheets and various flavor sprays and oils. He’s got two cookbooks and even DAVID BURKE Magazine. We managed to catch this Renaissance man at his local greenmarket, shopping for fresh, in-season finds.

36

You have so many titles! Chef, entrepreneur, artist, inventor.... Which do you feel describes you best? I’ve always felt at home in the kitchen. I was a dish washer in high school. I’d work on the weekends, and that’s when I fell in love with the idea of working in a kitchen. I get real excitement from the energy and creative teamwork that happens in there. So all of the other things I am today came out of me working in the kitchen. I get a real satisfaction out of putting together a good product for someone else to enjoy. Above: The lively dining room at Fishtail by David Burke. Left: David Burke, longtime pioneer of celebrity chefery.


Many of today’s entrepreneurial celebrity chefs don’t actually do the cooking anymore, but shift their focus to the business side of things. I still do cook in my kitchens, but it’s been a natural progression for me to be in and out of the kitchen when need be. I made an early decision that I was going to conquer one level of this business at a time. After I reached the level of what I truly felt was “me as a good chef,” then it was time to be partner in a company. Then the next course was to start my own company. I was one of the first chefs to do that. That road had not been paved yet. It was the late ’70s and the beginning of modern American food and of chefs as businessmen. A lot of the David Burke dining experience is about setting the scene, and your restaurants each have very specific, thoughtout designs. Would you describe yourself as fashion forward? When you work in the kitchen it’s nearly impossible to be fashion forward! But we do take a lot of pride in the ambiance and décor of the restaurants, especially Townhouse and Kitchen. I was very involved in helping decorate them, but I’m not a designer. Kitchen is supposed to feel dark and woodsy, comfy—like a home. Bloomingdale’s has an intimate neighborhood feel. Our steakhouses are more masculine.

there. In those cases we make exceptions—it’s what the customers want! But when it comes to fruit and people wanting raspberries or blueberries year round, we suggest maybe trying a dish with mango or pineapple. Your menus run the deliciously garish gamut, from Bowlmor Lanes’ badass burger replete with applewood-smoked bacon, spicy tempura shrimp, cheddar cheese and blue cheese slaw, to David Burke Kitchen’s pretzel crabcake with tomato, orange and green peppercorn. What do you love to order when you eat out, and what do you like to cook at home? I love ordering Peking duck! For myself, I love to prepare pasta. I’ll make gemelli with sweet sausage, tomatoes, olive oil and butter. When I cook for friends and family, I love to prepare a whole roasted fish, chicken, squab or turkey. My favorite is roasted squab foie gras, cabbage with corn bread and pickled onions. Is there anything you wish your guests would be a little more adventurous about trying? Game birds, sweet potatoes and kidneys!

What are some other ideas you’re currently excited about? We have a moveable garden in a parking lot at the Rumsfield, New Jersey restaurant. This summer we’re going to put each of the gardens in little red wagons so they can move around easily. When guests walk into the restaurant, they will be greeted with a bushel of tomatoes and basil plants that they can cut themselves and bring to the hostess. Then we’ll prepare it at the table as part of their appetizer. I just love the idea of that. What’s your overall food philosophy? I’m always looking to cut out the middleman as much as possible. It’s what is most economically sound for us. I am always in a local produce market myself. We’ve done it with our bread, our dairy and our produce. Fish and seafood are next. We’re also currently building a dry beef company with my patented salt treatment. Our beef comes from right here in New Jersey. I bought a bull five years ago in Kentucky so I would know exactly where my beef comes from and can ensure the quality of what we’re serving. We have the product down to the genetics, for the perfect marbleization and grading. It was superior planning on our part. We always want to know where our stuff is coming from. Do you think all the recent hype around “local” and “seasonal” is silly? Haven’t good chefs been doing this all along? The seasonal and local thing has been done forever, but it hasn’t been touted. It’s being emphasized now because of the the state of the economy, and high fuel prices. All the recent PR is good, especially since it helps support American farmers, but it’s always been what we try to do. However, you have to understand, it’s hard to do local in Chicago in the winter. It’s absolutely what the mom and pop shops should be aiming for, but it’s hard for big [national] chains to do it. It’s tough to be 100 percent local; you might simply not have a good local person for something you need. How do you please loyal customers who request something that isn’t in season? In New Jersey we have a lot of clientele who want calamari, but it’s not local

38

Maple Bacon Dates Yields 20 stuffed dates

INGREDIENTS:

1 ⁄4 pound peanuts 2 1⁄2 ounces honey 1 teaspoon cayenne pepper or 1⁄2 minced jalapeño 20 Medjool dates, cut in half 10 strips of par-baked smoked bacon 20 seedless grapes 1 egg Flour Breadcrumbs

METHOD: 1. Heat peanuts, honey and cayenne pepper until caramelized. Cool and puree. 2. Stuff puree into Medjool date half, then wrap with a half piece of par-baked smoked bacon. 3. Lightly beat egg. Dredge grapes in flour, dip in egg wash, then breadcrumbs. Place into a deep fryer filled with hot oil and fry until crispy. 4. Place grapes, and then bacon wrapped dates, on bamboo skewers and serve.


MJCUSTOMERCARE

Safe.Trusted.

SELL YOUR GOLD, PLATINUM AND SILVER AT MANN’S JEWELERS

Do you have tangled chains, half pairs of earrings or broken bracelets? Do you have

jewelry with outdated styling that you no longer wear? Mann’s Jewelers is your safe and trusted precious metals buying resource. We buy gold, platinum and silver every day. You may be pleasantly surprised by how much value you find hidden away in your jewelry box.

Stop by for a friendly consultation with our precious metal buying professionals, who will weigh and evaluate your gold and other precious metals as you watch, answering any questions you may have, in a safe and professional atmosphere. Sell with confidence, knowing that we are a 9th-generation, family-owned local business, with a reputation for honesty and integrity.

We offer confidential same-day service and your choice of either immediate payment or a store credit. If you’d prefer to trade

your old gold for something new with contemporary styling, you will receive a 10% premium on the value of your metals toward your purchase. If something in our showroom catches your eye, take it home on the same day. If not, we are happy to provide you with a store credit, held on your account with no expiration date. At Mann’s Jewelers, there is never any pressure to sell. Should you choose not to sell, there is never a charge and never a hassle. We look forward to

serving you.


F O R A LOVE THAT LASTS A LI FETI M E

w w w. l i e b e r fa r b . c o m HONORED TO SAY, MADE IN THE USA


MIDCENTURY AMERICAN ART AND DESIGN

FEBRUARY 26 – MAY 20, 2012 mag.rochester.edu 500 University Ave. Rochester NY 14607

This exhibition is made possible through the generosity of the National Endowment for the Arts; the Henry Luce Foundation; and the Craft Research Fund of the Center for Craft, Creativity and Design. It was organized by the Museum of Arts and Design, New York City. In Rochester, it is sponsored by Harter Secrest & Emery LLP, with additional support from the Mabel Fenner Lyon Fund, the Gallery Council of the Memorial Art Gallery, Ron and Cathy Paprocki and Mann’s Jewelers.

(left to right): Isamu Noguchi, Akari 820 Lamp (1951–52), © 2010 The Isamu Noguchi Foundation and Garden Museum, New York/Artists Rights Society (ARS), NY., Photo by Kevin Noble; Rick Turner, Pretzel Guitar (1969), Collection of the artist; Harry Bertoia (Knoll International),“Bird” Lounge Chair and Ottoman (after 1952), Private collection.


CELEBRATING FOOD – EVERY DAY.


WE ARE FRESH, UNIQUE, INNOVATIVE AND DELICIOUS.

deliciously Different

Just like any great dish, your event demands the right ingredients. Not only do we use the highest quality ingredients, we pride ourselves on our exceptional service. Bring something special to your next event, a distinct combination of cuisine and service that will unquestionably leave a lasting impression on you and your guests.

www.deliciouslydifferent.com 1850 Penfield Road Penfield, NY


ACCENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SECTION SPRING/SUMMER 2012

COURTESY LITITZ WATCH TECHNICUM

WATCHES


MJCOMMUNIQUE

TheRobReport

OUR PRESIDENT, ROB MANN, INTERVIEWS MJ WATCHMAKER DAVID STRASSNER.

A

t the heart of Mann’s Jewelers is a commitment to customer service. For many generations, my family worked as repair craftsmen. In fact, both my father, Irving, and his father, Al (affectionately known as Al the Watch Doctor), entered the jewelry industry as watchmakers. In 2012 there are only two authorized Rolex watchmakers in Rochester, and they both work at Mann’s Jewelers. Our Head Watchmaker, David Strassner, is now celebrating his 30th year with Mann’s Jewelers. Here, he answers some important questions about caring for your fine timepiece. RM: What first got you interested in the field of watch repair? DS: When I was 15 years old I started working at a small jewelry store washing windows, vacuuming and doing odd jobs. They taught me how to do minor jewelry repairs and engraving. Eventually their watchmaker asked if I would like to learn to repair watches. So I apprenticed with him, practiced, and studied watchmaking theory and history. I became fascinated with the technology of watches and how the development of timekeeping devices related to world history. Today I regularly attend trainings hosted by our premium Swiss brands to stay current with new technology. RM: What’s done when a watch is serviced? DS: When a watch is serviced the movement is first removed from the case, then disassembled. All the parts are cleaned, worn parts are replaced, then re-assembled and lubricated using several different oils and greases. We then adjust and time for accuracy. The case and bracelet are cleaned and sometimes refinished. The movement is then re-installed in the case and the watch is tested for proper function. On water-resistant models, the case is fit with new parts and pressure tested to restore it to factory water-resistance specs. RM: Are some watches really waterproof? What’s the difference between water-resistant and waterproof? DS: Actually the term waterproof is too absolute. It leads most people to believe that water could not enter their watch under any circumstances. The term water-resistant is more accurate. Watches are not all constructed to withstand exposure to water to the same level. If a watch is used in conditions beyond its design capabilities, it can leak. Customers should purchase a watch that is water-resistant to the degree that fits their needs. RM: Why is it important to buy from an authorized retailer? DS: A fine watch is an important purchase. Buying from an authorized retailer assures the customer of getting a watch that is new, not used; all the parts are genuine, none are counterfeit and the manufacturer’s warranty is valid. The customer will get exactly what they are paying for and expecting. RM: What is the real value of the Mann’s Jewelers Ultimate Watch Warranty? DS: Mann’s Ultimate Watch Warranty shows our customers how seriously we stand behind their watch purchase. It gives them the peace of mind that we will be taking care of their watch for many years, while saving them money on maintenance and repairs. We estimate the average value of our warranty at about $600.

48


FOCUS: WINDERS

by Laurie Kahle

WINDING IT UP TRANSCEND SHEER FUNCTION WITH A STYLISH CUSTOM INSTALLATION.

L

ike early automatic wristwatches designed to eliminate the need for winding, watch winders originated as practical items to keep timepieces ready for action at all times. Aside from the convenience factor, winders can also extend the life of a watch movement. They ensure that essential lubricants are evenly distributed throughout the mechanism, and reduce wear and tear on the crown winding system by limiting the need for resetting. But as watch collecting becomes a

consuming passion for many affluent consumers, some are seeking ever more elaborate storage systems to keep their horological treasures energized and secure. From models with high-concept designs featuring inlaid wood cabinetry and carbon fiber accents, to humidor components and stereo systems, winders have entered the realm of luxury furnishings with an array of options to create a personalized unit—the ultimate of which is a completely custom installation. (Continued)

50


©2011 movado group, inc.

DEREK JETER. humanitarian, leader, athlete. new series 800® chronograph. performance steel™ case. black aluminum tachymeter bezel. black dial, leather strap.


The design of the Object of Time One-77 watch winder (above, right) emulates the muscular curves of the Aston Martin One-77 supercar.

Upon his retirement in the 1990s, Chuck Agnoff, founder and president of Orbita in Wilmington, N.C., received a gold Rolex automatic watch from his wife. He wore the watch on weekends, and found himself frustrated by the need to constantly reset it when the power reserve ran out. He solved the problem by devising a “gadget,” as he calls it, to keep the watch moving when it wasn’t on his wrist. Soon, friends and jewelers started making requests, and Orbita was born. “First and foremost it was a convenience,” he explains. “But later, I learned that when a watch lays flat for a long time, the lubricants can wick away from moving parts, so keeping your watch on a winder is also about preventative maintenance that can extend its life.” Orbita’s recent Avanti system was designed to accommodate your ever-growing collection and cater to your personal needs. “It became a sort of lifestyle cabinet,” says Agnoff of the expandable storage system that incorporates drawers where you can install a safe, a humidor, a wine cooler, or other options. You can store up to 48 watches in the Italian-made Macassar or burl wood cabinets. “It’s a semi-custom winder,” explains Agnoff, “so it is priced economically because it’s built off a standard configuration—like buying a car and adding options.” A similar made-to-measure approach is taken at Buben & Zorweg of Austria. Known for its modern, slick aesthetic, the company can expand and tailor their winders to your wishes, or you can choose a custom installation. The Treasury, for example, presents an array of 10 interchangeable modules

that include winding modules for four or 16 watches, a humidor, display cabinets for barware and red wine, and storage drawers for manual watches and jewelry. The brand’s limited-edition Objects of Time collection includes a model produced in partnership with Aston Martin. The Object of Time One-77 (pictured above) seamlessly combines a safe, a collection of the brand’s proprietary Time Mover watch winders, humidors, storage drawers, four world clocks, a sound system with a subwoofer and iPod docking station, and a flying minute tourbillion clock. The striking design emulates the muscular curves of the One-77 supercar, which, like the winder, has a limited production of 77 pieces. The next level of watch storage is building a custom room, like the space commissioned by one of Orbita’s West Coast clients. “It was a unique project,” explains Agnoff. “He was building a new house and wanted a security room (basically an exhibition area) for all his watches, so he could relax and enjoy his collection.” The project involved constructing a room with built-in storage units that hold 108 winders for automatic timepieces, in addition to storage drawers for over 200 watches. “But very few people want to go through that kind of process—starting from scratch and working with architects,” says Agnoff, who said the project cost around $125,000 and required six to eight months from concept to completion. Luckily, you have options.

Winders have entered the realm of luxury furnishings with an array of options to create a personalized unit.

52


noemia collection


MJTIMECHECK

Swiss Army Chrono Classic in stainless steel. $595

Movado Bold in white TR90 composite material and stainless steel on leather strap. $350

Watches to watch for summer style

TAG Heuer Calibre 16 Heritage Carrera in stainless steel. $4,300

at Mann’s Jewelers

Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Squadra Lady Duetto with diamonds in stainless steel on articulated rubber strap. $12,000

TW Steel Grandeur Tech chronograph in rose gold vermeil on leather strap. $1,095

54


Breitling SuperOcean Heritage in stainless steel. $4,200

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona with diamonds and motherof-pearl dial in 18k white gold on leather strap. $80,350

TAG Heuer Formula 1 with diamonds in stainless steel and white ceramic. $3,200

Rolex Oyster Perpetual in stainless steel. $5,200

Rolex Oyster Perpetual Yacht-Master II in stainless steel and 18k Everose gold. $25,150

All watches are shown at the manufacturer’s retail price

55


FOCUS: WATCHMAKING

by Karen Alberg Grossman

LITITZ WATCH TECHNICUM: TEACHING WATCHTHINK A REMARKABLE SCHOOL THAT INSTRUCTS THE ART, SCIENCE AND SOUL OF SWISS WATCHMAKING.

T

he first thing one notices upon entering the stately stone building nestled in the rolling hills of Lititz, Pennsylvania (a town with a strong watchmaking tradition) is the magnificent brass clock in the lobby. One soon learns it was crafted totally by hand by students in this Rolex-sponsored watch school, under the direction of its esteemed principal Herman Mayer. Mayer is a certified watchmaker with tremendous pride in, and respect for, the Swiss watchmaking tradition. His goal is to develop independent retail watchmakers who are technically exceptional, of course, but who are also business-savvy, service-oriented, personable, well rounded and creative, a tall order to say the least. “The watchmaker of today needs to be compatible and in sync with the spirit of the highend watch culture,” Mayer maintains. His intense two-year program, established in 2001, is fully funded by Rolex (but totally separate from the Rolex Service Center upstairs in the building). Mayer is personally responsible for creating and updating the curriculum, which is also used at watchmaking schools in Seattle and Oklahoma. It features six main areas of training: history/culture, micromechanics, mechanical movement diagnostics

and repair, electronic movement diagnostics and repair, customer service and case/bracelet diagnostics and repair. The school is small and selective, with a capacity for only 28 students (there are currently 12 first year students and 13 in their second year). It’s an intense eight-hour school day (7:30 to 4:00, with a 30 minute lunch break) and requires much outside reading and research. According to Mayer, most students are highly motivated and even talk watchmaking in their free time. “We emphasize that whatever they don’t learn in these two years, they pay for later on…” Of utmost importance to Mayer, who interviews and tests 70 to 80 applicants each year looking for various skills, from strategic reasoning to social competence, is abstract thinking. “Because often in a fine watch,” he explains, “you can’t diagnose problems just visually. You need to analyze based on input and output of the mechanism: it’s behaving a certain way so the problem must be this or that. You can’t always see the problem because many watches are built in layers, so the movements might be covered, or else just too small.” Mayer admits that among his greatest frustrations is a decline in abstract thinking

56


Faber-Castell USA • Tel: 800-311-8684 • www.graf-von-faber-castell.com


skills among young people over the past decade. “I’m sorry to say this, but in many applicants, these skills have gone down the drain. It’s a very visual world these days; we rely on computers to do everything so young people don’t learn to think for themselves. But in a watchmaking curriculum, abstract thinking skills are essential. It’s all about deductive reasoning, which is no longer taught in school…” Why are these skills so critical? “Because even if the student has worked on hundreds of watches, the next movement that comes along might be totally different than anything he’s experienced. So it’s not a matter of simply learning to piece the puzzle together: students need to understand what the parts do and how they interact and whether or not the watch is worth repairing. Of course it’s rare when you can’t fix it at all (e.g. serious salt water damage where parts are caked together), because even if spare parts are not available, we can always make the parts. That’s what we teach them in the ‘micromechanics’ segment of the program.” According to Mayer, his ideal applicant is midto late 20s (the actual age range is 17 to 45 and mostly male; there are only one or two females per class), in a second career but with some previous exposure to watchmaking. “If they’ve had some exposure, at least they know what the profession is about: having to deal all day long with these tiny parts, the responsibility of working on such valuable pieces. Of course, there are always some who drop out because it’s too stressful…” Recent applicants have included bankers and real estate brokers, some from major cities. “People have more appreciation for job security when it’s a second career,” he explains. “And watchmaking certainly offers job security: all of our graduates who want jobs get them.” Beyond technical expertise (which Mayer believes can be taught),

the most important trait is the desire—the passion—to repair and build watches. Also necessary is the ability to communicate. Explains Mayer, “It’s essential that we teach students how to network: with peers, with mentors, with superiors, so they’re not left alone with important decisions. In fact, I’m working on making this an active component of the curriculum.” On a personal note, Mayer grew up in Würzburg, Germany; his university studies focused on philology and teaching. But at some point, his love of watches inspired him to study watchmaking, which led him to servicing jobs in the States, and ultimately to Lititz. In addition to restoring watches, Mayer is a collector: he wears a different watch every day and favors those that combine technical precision with a beautiful finish. So dedicated is Mayer to the Lititz program that he even lets his students work on his personal watches (excluding vintage handmade pieces, of course!). His first expensive watch was in fact a classic Rolex. Does he still have it? “Of course: Rolex watches are forever…” His most meaningful watch is one he inherited from his father. “When my dad returned from WWII, the economy was down so he drove a taxi on weekends. An American soldier who couldn’t afford the fare gave him his automatic Cyma. I wore it every day for years but at some point, it was difficult to get replacement parts because their factory had burned down. Observing the watchmaker adapting spare parts by hand was my first exposure to the craft and its artistry, which triggered my lifelong passion.” Mayer’s best advice to graduating students? “Remember to take the loupe off on occasion and engage in meaningful, positive dialogue with members of your professional environment. You need to actively live the exciting and ever-evolving watchmaking culture you are part of.”

“Nobody buys a fine watch just to tell time…” —Herman Mayer

58


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FOCUS: COLLECTING

by David A. Rose

TIME ON HIS SIDE SCOTT PRUETT IS AN UNDISPUTED CHAMPION, ON AND OFF THE TRACK.

A

As a world famous racecar driver still at the top of his game, it’s remarkable that Pruett makes time for other ventures. He and his wife Judy have joined forces to establish Pruett Vineyard, as well as Word Weaver Books, publishers of a series of children’s books they authored. Not surprisingly, the theme is racing, including titles like Twelve Little Race Cars, Rookie Racer and Racing Through the Alphabet. Based on actual aspects of Scott’s racing career, these books provide inspiration and excitement for young readers. As for his winemaking business, Pruett explains that even though racing and winemaking are spectrums apart, the feelings of accomplishment are similar. “Racing is literally minute to minute, day to day; things happen in a matter of seconds. Wine making, on the other hand, takes years: you can’t rush the process; the wine absolutely tells you when it’s ready. But it’s the blend of chemistry and artistry in winemaking that I find so rewarding. I’m not one of these athletes who puts my name on a project without involvement; in fact, I am totally hands on at my winery, involved in every aspect of the process (pressing, corking, labeling), with the help of some incredible winemakers.” Scott Pruett began his career in karting at the age of eight and has raced every year since. 2011 was his 43rd year of racing and it was another extraordinary one. With teammate Memo Rojas, Pruett won the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series Championship, earning yet another Rolex timepiece. “At 51 years old, I’m racing against drivers half my age,” says Pruett, “so being the fastest driver out there is incredible! But I never take it for granted: I’ve been blessed with this ability and feel very fortunate.” ROLEX / TOM O'NEAL

mong the many rewards of success in sports, perhaps the best is garnering the respect and admiration of fans and peers. But for those athletes competing in Rolex-sponsored events, the grand prize comes in the form of a luxury timepiece, a goal drivers set for themselves long before they’re strapped into their racecars. One man, Scott Pruett from Auburn, California, is a true champion in all forms of motor sports, with the additional honor of having won more Rolex-sponsored races than any other driver. Thus, he has become the proud owner of racing’s largest collection of Rolex timepieces. Pruett has won the Rolex 24 at Daytona four times. He’s also won the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series Championship three times and was awarded a Rolex timepiece for each of these accomplishments. In all, Scott owns 12 Rolex timepieces, of which 10 were awarded for his brilliant race wins. “My first Rolex is by far the one I love the most,” he confides. “When I won the Championship in 1986 while driving for Jack Roush and Ford Motor Company, I was invited to compete in what was known as the International Race of Champions (IROC). It was such an honor just to be invited to compete in this series, and I promised myself that if I were ever to win one of these races, I’d go out and buy myself a Rolex timepiece. At the last race ever to run at Riverside Raceway in California, and with just a few laps left in the race, I took the lead and held on to take the win. The first thing I did after that was to go out and buy my first beautiful Rolex Submariner.” (In addition to this Submariner, Pruett also bought himself a solid gold GMT-Master.)

60


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LAST BID FOR LOVE

AN ACTRESS, AN AUCTION, A YOUNG MAN’S DREAM… BY JOSEPH UNGOCO

M

y heart was pounding as I handed my passport to the smartly dressed associate from Christie’s. Just a week before, I’d been holding the “hottest ticket in town”—a prime 3 p.m. pass to preview the world-renowned jewelry collection of Elizabeth Taylor. The entire Christie’s block was lined with stately private limos dropping off elegantly dressed “ladies who lunch,” no doubt fresh from nibbling on micro-vegetable salads and savory soufflés at La Grenouille. In addition to the magnificent jewels, what struck me as I perused the various lots at the preview was how many lives Elizabeth Taylor had touched. In every room of the seemingly endless exhibit, people passionately discussed her movies, her personal style, her tremendous influence. Women well past their fashion prime whispered about how this 1960s Pucci tunic or that 1970s Halston caftan had inspired their own wardrobe choices. My personal connection with this incredible lady was our shared astrological sign: Elizabeth Taylor was the archetype of Pisces’ “soulful eyes” and tendency to be “in love with love.” The cheerful Christie’s associate wished me luck as she handed me my paddle—number 5217. I tried to calm my nerves as I mounted the stairs to the James Christie room. Working my way through the television cameras, I settled into a fifth row seat right under the auctioneer. I took a cue from the “serious” bidders in the rows ahead of me and stayed focused on the

bidding board and the auctioneer in his lavender silk tie. I had carefully studied the catalogs, settling on two lots of Zodiac pendants and a lot of two Aldo Cipullo for Cartier Love bracelets. I had been considering a lot of aquamarines until I remembered that Liz was a February Pisces, not a March one like me. Her vast amethyst collection— including mineral specimens—suddenly had meaning beyond complementing her violet eyes. The night before, I’d witnessed the mounting frenzy at the sale of the “Legendary Jewels,” but I was certain there’d be less insanity for the “ordinary” jewels. In fact, I was quite confident that I’d be able to secure a lot—perhaps even two. But such illusions evaporated by the time the bidding closed on the fifth lot of the day, a pair of Van Cleef & Arpels Pisces pendants on opera-length chains. I had researched the intrinsic value of the items, estimated a premium for their venerable provenance and set what I thought were reasonable bidding limits. I realized I was sadly mistaken when I was outbid by $50,000! As the auction progressed, prices skyrocketed and I was feeling increasingly dejected. By the time the hammer went down on the Cartier Love bracelets, the price was $75,000 over my top bid. I left the auction to wander Rockefeller Center and reflect wistfully over my lost chance at Love (or at least the Love bracelets) and the beauty, style and legend of a truly amazing woman.

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MANN’S JEWELERS ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2012


MANNS