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Contents fall/winter 2012 MANN’S JEWELERS 2945 MONROE AVENUE ROCHESTER, NY 14618 585-271-4000 MANNSJEWELERS.COM STORE HOURS: 10:00 AM - 5:30 PM MON/TUE/WED/FRI/SAT 10:00 AM - 8:30 PM THURS CLOSED SUNDAY CALL FOR EXTENDED HOLIDAY HOURS. CHAIRMAN OF THE BOARD IRVING MANN CHIEF EXECUTIVE OFFICER NANCY MANN PRESIDENT ROBERT MANN C H I E F O P E R AT I N G O F F I C E R MICHAEL GALLINA DIRECTOR OF MARKETING MEGAN CRAWFORD

P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P

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PUBLISHER STU NIFOUSSI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R HANS GSCHLIESSER MANAGING EDITOR

FEATURES

BRIDAL SECTION

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The Rob Report

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MJ Scene

64 The Invitations: Set the Tone

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Fabulous in Rochester

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Timepieces: Evan Yurman

10 Photography: Always in Fashion 14 Perks: Fly in Style 18 Guy Style: Express Yourself 20 Speed: The Thrill of Victory 22 Interiors: Heavy Metals 26 Trends: Roaring Twenties Redux 31 Fashion: Rochester Romance 44 Food: First-Generation Fame

68 Lights, Camera, Action 70 The Beauty: Inner Glow 72 The Traditions: Worldwide Weddings 82 Todd Reed: Organic Luxe 84 The Details: Something Even Newer 90 The Stories: Wedding Day Magic

JILLIAN LAROCHELLE PROJECT MANAGER LISA MONTEMORRA DESIGNERS CYNTHIA LUCERO JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI PRODUCTION MANAGER PEG EADIE PRESIDENT AND CEO BRITTON JONES CHAIRMAN AND COO MAC BRIGHTON

Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2012. Accent® is published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550, Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175; Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018, 212686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The publish-

48 Spirits: Get the Skinny

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50 Perfect Gems

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54 From the Runways

publishers. Volume 10, Issue 2. Accent® is a trademark of

60 Accent Advisor

Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. Printed In The U.S.A.

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IMAGE BY TAMMY SWALES. VESPA PROVIDED BY COUNTRY RODE MOTOWERKS. COVER ILLUSTRATION BY DARIA JABENKO.

KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN


MJCOMMUNIQUÉ

TheRobReport THIS FALL, COME FALL IN LOVE ALL OVER AGAIN. BY ROBERT MANN, PRESIDENT OF MANN’S JEWELERS

It takes two to be friends, It takes two to be lovers, You know you got it made, When you got one that’s same as the other

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re these the immortal words of Shakespeare? Robert Frost? Close: Stephen Stills from Crosby, Stills, Nash & Young.

Making the transition from a single to a couple — to a forever couple — is probably the most significant transformation that we go through (that is until we have kids…and until we become parents to our parents…but we’ll save those for later). Through most of our young lives, it’s all about the individual; we’re all WIIFM’s: What’s In It For Me? But then you meet that special someone, and (hopefully) your selfcentric mindset starts to slowly change. The needs, wants, desires and dreams of another person have made you temper yourself — in a good way. The first step from being selfish to selfless begins. What you find is truly amazing. Things take on a deeper meaning and become even more rewarding: the Power of Two...Me and You! We see a lot of couples at Mann’s Jewelers as they start their life journey together. Whether it’s for a gift, an engagement ring, or wedding bands, what makes our role so rewarding is to witness love at its many stages. We hear so many great stories and actually help people choose treasured pieces that say “I Love You 24/7,” even when their loved one is far from them. Our Platinum Proposal contest (pictured on page 4) always reminds me just how wonderful the world seems when you’re in love: the sun shines brighter, the birds sing louder, and daily troubles seem trivial. Being in love just makes everything seem better. We can’t wait to hear your story, no matter what stage of the wonderful journey you’re in. !

Rob Mann, President Mann’s Jewelers


MJSCENE

Center: Josh proposes to Kristen. Clockwise starting top left: Josh and Kristen hug moments after the proposal. CMAC performer, Kelly Clarkson, is in awe over the Sylvie Collection ring. Josh meets Scott Spezano from 98PXY. The crowd at CMAC. Josh and Kristen wave from the Mann’s Jewelers cab. Kristen shows off her ring to family and friends.

Platinum Proposal

Josh Dennie and Kristen Tracy were the grand prize winners of Mann’s Jewelers’ second annual Platinum Proposal online love story contest. The grand prize included a $12,000 Sylvie Collection platinum engagement ring with 1.25 carats of diamonds, a private party for 24 friends and family at CMAC and tickets to the Kelly Clarkson/The Fray concert. The proposal took place on CMAC’s front lawn with friends and family watching on August 29th. Their love story and Josh’s proposal to Kristen was broadcast live on 98PXY. Two additional couples received a second and third place romantic prize package that may also be used to help create memorable marriage proposals. Michael Calarco and Angela Scalzo claimed second place, which includes a getaway for two at the DelMonte Lodge Hotel & Spa and a Mann’s Jewelers gift card. The third place couple, Rob Masten and Kellie Kibler, will enjoy a private friends and family dinner for 14 at the Upstairs Bistro at the New York Wine & Culinary Center and a Mann’s Jewelers gift card to be used toward a gift of love.


FASHION411

Fabulous in Rochester BY COURTNEY WINSLOW

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he change is upon us. I’m trading in my sunburn for windburn, dark mornings, Elf on a Shelf, hot cocoa…and the flu. I’m going to head to Trata at the Armory with my multitextured overcoat, and leave my short-shorts on the patio at The Inn on the Lake ’til next year. I’m exchanging my swimsuit for a snowsuit, and I’ll be fur trimmed and fancy on my way to Stokoe Farms to cut down our glorious tree.

The holidays just scream Norman Rockwell, don’t they? Scream as in “Mother, stop

criticizing me!” and “No, you cannot have another candy cane; it’s 6 in the morning!” Well, just stay tuned ’cause the characters for this year’s family reunion are a bunch of fabulously styled nuts; a Royal Prince, a Bond Girl, a naughty Dominatrix, and the enchanting Ms. Snow White, with special appearances by Princess Peplum and Little Red Riding Hood’s Granny. Let’s take a look…

Granny Tweed: It looks like the runways stole the queen’s wardrobe and bejeweled brooches from her country estate.

Oh, and for once can we please leave Pippa out of this? I’m so over her. For the

royal treatment, bring nana’s shawls out to play and steal a dorky owl graphic sweater out of granny’s yarn bag to rock with a pleated skirt. Needlepoint embroidery embellishes hunting-inspired overcoats, tweeds are trimmed with fringe, tartan plaids are layered like blankets, and chunky fisherman knits with high boots make for a sexy take on the proper look (note to Pippa).

Jewel Tones: Rich colors take the place of the neon craze that spread like a virus (hand, foot and mouth) this summer. Sapphires, jades and rubies, crushed and soaked to dye fitted pantsuits. Yes, I


said pantsuit; if you’re daring you’ll flaunt it in velvet and squash the competition at your holiday office party. And hey, if Santa’s offering, hit him up for emerald earrings, a very merry double

hexagon sapphire ring by Caleo, or anything colorful with deco-inspired fringe.

The World Traveler: Wait for James to bust down the door and take you by force in a gorgeous Asian-inspired gown. This Bond Girl goes from jade silk, to embellished sheers, to a militaryinspired jacket all in one day. A long dress draped in gold sequins and a slit that will make Angelina jealous will have you ready for the Golisano Ball (add some door-knocker earrings to complete your Goldfinger look).

Snow White: Get cozy in a white fuzzy angora sweater paired with a calf-length white wool skirt. Wideleg white pants with a sheer white button down and fur shawl will have you looking angelic at The Rochester City Ballet’s Nutcracker. Pure as snow, and sexy as a kitten in this fluffy dramatic take on winter white. Complete the look with forget-me-not bows or a dramatic diamond to complement the neutral palate while staying interesting.

The Dominatrix: Replace your boyfriend jeans with a pair of black leather pants. Don’t just steal the jeans, steal the boyfriend! Structured leather dresses are a perfect way to corset in the extra apple pie. Get your whip (cream) and motorcycle jacket and get cracking. Peplum: Peplum jackets, dresses and anything with a flare are amazing ways to wear a girly silhouette. How many squats do you need to do this fall? NONE. The peplum trend

has come around just in time for the Thanksgiving feasts to begin. Eat up, cause

you’ll never be able to see those love handles under that marvelous peplum ruffle. So forget the gym and use your membership money on a new outfit! Just to be clear…. I am not telling you what to wear to the Bills game, the bowling alley, or holiday shopping at the outlet mall. ’Tis the season to cocktail! These trends are designed for Holly Golightly Champagne parties (or afterhours at the Valley Club), Thanksgiving at the country estate (or rugby at Highland Park) and Christmas in Paris (or a brisk walk down Park Avenue…no, not that Park Avenue). Enjoy Rochester, and as always dress accordingly...dress fabulously. !


TIMEPIECES

When and why did David Yurman enter the timepiece business? We entered the business in 1994 with the introduction of the Cable collection, a bracelet that ticks. In 2000 we launched the Thoroughbred collection, our first traditional watches, addressing what we saw as a void in the market. No one was doing iconic timepieces rooted in the tradition of fine Swiss watchmaking, but with an American design sensibility. Is that what makes Yurman watches so special? Yes. David Yurman is America’s only fine timepiece designer and to us, that in itself is special. The Yurman brand has always been inspired by American art and design and our timepiece collections adhere to this aesthetic. Each watch is treated like a piece of art, reflecting David Yurman’s casual sense of luxury and high standards of precision. At the heart of our timepieces is our commitment to quality, design and innovation. From the Classic Ancestrale to the Revolution collection, each watch combines the precision of Swiss movements and manufacturing with sophisticated American design. Tell us about your passion for classic cars and motorsports, and the launch of Shelby Revolution? Cars have always been a passion of mine. I enjoy the mechanical nature of cars. They’re a lot like timepieces in that way—thousands of machined parts coming together to create one cohesive mechanical movement. The Shelby Revolution watch collection came about because Shelby is an iconic American brand and I wanted to celebrate their achievements and the mark they’ve left on American design.

EVAN YURMAN ON WATCHES, CARS AND PERSONAL FAVORITES. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

AMERICAN DESIGN

What are your best-selling watch styles at the moment? The new Revolution collection has had an incredible response, both the automatic and the chronograph. We offer it in a number of variations, including a beautiful rose gold case. The Shelby, which is a limited edition within the Revolution collection, is extremely popular and is mostly reserved on pre-order. What’s your personal favorite watch these days and why? Recently, I’ve been wearing a steel chronograph Revolution with a bracelet. It has a beautiful, clean aesthetic and I like the heft and feel of it. Plus it’s a sport watch, so I also appreciate its ruggedness.

“I enjoy the mechanical nature of cars. They’re a lot like timepieces: thousands of machined parts coming together to create one cohesive mechanical movement.” –Evan Yurman, Director of Design, Men’s and Timepieces, David Yurman

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EVAN AND DAVID YURMAN

And your personal favorite car? There are so many beautiful cars out there that it’s difficult to pick one, but my favorite genre is certainly American muscle. There’s an elegant simplicity to American muscle cars, both vintage and modern, that I find appealing. It’s that simple design that makes it so easy for owners to customize and improve them, and essentially express their own personalities.


PHOTOGRAPHY

ALWAYS IN FASHION

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. © 2012 CINDY SHERMAN.

CELEBRATED ARTIST CINDY SHERMAN GOES INCOGNITO. BY DAVID HOWLETT

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All of the photographs in Sherman’s MoMA show are untitled. As in a children’s picture book with no text, the viewer has to supply his or her own narrative. The scenarios require some thought to decipher; men and women or people from different backgrounds may see two different stories. Following the “film stills,” Sherman produced a series of “centerfolds,” in which she appears sprawled on a sofa or stretched on a floor—but fully clothed. In Untitled #96, she wears an orange plaid ensemble and looks Above: Sherman appears four times in a Balenciaga dress for a gala event. Untitled #463. 2007-08. Chromogenic color print, 68 5/8” x 6 (174.2 x 182.9 cm). Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York © 2012 Cindy Sherman.

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ven though she’s one of the most photographed women in America, you probably wouldn’t recognize Cindy Sherman if you saw her on the street. That’s because Sherman has built a career—the subject of a superb and exciting retrospective at New York’s Museum of Modern Art— of photographing herself in a wide variety of disguises. In the late-’70s, Sherman first made a splash with her series of untitled “film stills.” The black-and-white photos show a woman in a scene from a movie that could have been directed by Alfred Hitchcock. But the stills are not from real movies. Instead they come from Sherman’s imagination. She appears as a character about to discover a clue to a crime, or looking over her shoulder, suddenly certain she’s being followed.


languidly into the distance. The character clutches a newspaper clipping that has advertisements for “singles,” suggesting a failed romance. The pose, perhaps based loosely on a Playboy spread, makes us ask whether a clothed woman is not more interesting by far than a naked one. In Sherman’s photos, the body parts are hidden but her characters’ souls are exposed. In the late-’80s, Sherman posed herself in the guise of famous portraits from art history. In elaborate costumes, she is a nursing Renaissance Madonna or a bald (male) Italian aristocrat. She seems to suggest that photography is a serious rival to the art of painting. Sherman is not a narcissist, concerned only with her own image. She started photographing herself simply because no model was willing to sit for the six hours she needs to make a single picture. Sherman performs every role herself: model, wardrober, hairdresser, photographer, a fact that helps make sense of the varied disguises in the pictures. Perhaps Sherman is commenting on the different roles we all play as we live our lives: worker, daughter, mother and so forth. In each role we behave—and appear—differently. trip through this exhibit also shows the way the science of photography has evolved over recent decades. In the ’70s, Sherman took 23 small pictures of herself against a white curtain in the style of a photo booth. In them, she progressively changes from a woman with glasses (we would guess Sherman as herself) to a Geisha, and finally a film star. These are simple black-and-white photos made from contact prints. In her recent “society” portraits, Sherman poses in front of a green screen so that she can later fill in whatever background she wants (in several cases, The Cloisters museum in New York). She also uses Photoshop to move her eyes closer together, to make herself look older, or to appear heavier. Sherman has mastered the modern techniques and one suspects she will continue to use all the latest special effects. A key to understanding Sherman’s relationship to fashion is buried in a side room in the middle of her MoMA show. A stop-action movie she made in the ‘70s shows Sherman as a cut-out paper doll in her underwear. The doll selects paper clothes to try on, and admires herself. Essentially, this is Sherman playing dress-up, something she has done with great success for the last 35 years. More recently, Sherman seems to have been examining the world of

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high fashion itself. One photo shows four young women (all Cindy Sherman, of course) at what could be a party for a gallery opening or fashion show. Identically dressed and holding red plastic drink cups, they display a sort of forced gaiety, with toothy smiles and expressions of excitement. The photo was commissioned by Vogue Paris, and Sherman wears a Balenciaga dress. We are free to think what we want, but it seems that Sherman is critiquing the fashion scene and the red carpet mentality it fosters. In another picture, we see a wealthy, middle-aged woman in a sequined couture dress. She has on tasteful gold jewelry and stands in front of a display of what might be celebrity publicity shots. Perhaps the pictures are of an earlier generation, but this woman is a survivor. She is confident, comfortable and famous. And she is Cindy Sherman. This exhibition travels to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (July 14 to Oct. 7, 2012), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (Nov. 10, 2012 to Feb. 17, 2013) and Dallas Museum of Art (March 17 to June 9, 2013).

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THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. © 2012 CINDY SHERMAN.

From top left: “I know a lot of people in the entertainment business.” Untitled #474. 2008. Chromogenic color print, 7’ 6 3/4” x 60”(230.5 x 152.4 cm). “On her first trip to the big city, our heroine suspects she is being followed.” Untitled Film Still #21. 1978. Gelatin silver print, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2”(19.1 x 24.1 cm). “Will I ever find true love?” An image from Sherman’s centerfold series. Untitled #96. 1981. Chromogenic color print, 24 x 47 15/16 (61 x 121.9 cm).


PERKS Radiolaria Grid by Nuala O’Donovan

PARISIAN PAMPERING

Arrive refreshed in an Open Skies BizBed.

Dream up any excuse you can— birthday, anniversary, graduation—to fly to Paris in style on Open Skies, an all business class airline. Choose from a selection of unbelievably comfortable BizBeds or ample BizSeats. The flight attendants are friendly and the fares are reasonable for the service offered (check the website for seasonal deals). Flights from New York (Newark) arrive at Orly Ouest, a much smaller airport that’s easier to navigate than Charles de Gaulle, with the same direct transport links into the center of Paris. Visit flyopenskies.com. —JC

THESE AMENITIES WILL LEAVE YOU FEELING LIGHTER THAN AIR… BY JACQUELIN CARNEGIE AND SHIRA LEVINE

FLY IN STYLE

Remember when the open skies were friendly and flying felt glamorous? Your vacation started at the airport, before security measures became a burden. Flight attendants were bright-eyed, gorgeous and envied for having the dream job. Inflight amenities were small treasures, and yes, bags flew free. We think it’s high time to bring the fun back to flying.

Finally, an edible in-flight meal.

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NOLET’S GIN

FLYING CHEFS

Most airline food is just dreadful, but Turkish Airlines has remedied the problem with on-board chefs on all its long-haul, business class service. So whether you’re headed to Cape Town, Hong Kong or Istanbul, you can enjoy meals prepared by chefs with years of top restaurant and hotel experience. The menu includes traditional Turkish dishes as well as international favorites like Chilean Sea Bass. In addition to the food, the business class service is impeccable, with attentive flight attendants and plush sleep seats. With more than 200 international flight destinations, you can enjoy a decent meal and great service around (and above) the globe. Visit turkishairlines.com. —JC


THE GOLDEN AGE OF TRAVEL

Embracing the idea that a luxe lifestyle shouldn’t stop when you’re suspended 34,000 feet above ground, Singapore Air has introduced the Airbus A380, a behemoth double-decker flying cruise ship. Enjoy one of the 60 leather lie-flat business class seats, the most spacious in the world at 34 inches wide, in the upper deck of the plane. When you’re not asleep beneath Givenchy bedding, the entertainment is addictive courtesy of SilverKris, an extensive multimedia library of current and classic movies and TV shows from around the world. A true mark of luxury is choice. That means making delightful decisions such as: Dom Perignon or Krug? Should I sample eight wine varietals or two Singapore Sling recipes? You’ll also relish the options on the seasonal menu, served on fine Givenchy china and linens. Think capsicum confit and kalamata olive potatowa. (Passengers can pre-reserve their entrées using the Book-The-Cook feature, exclusively at singaporeair.com.) And for $18,000 a seat, choose a Pullman train car-inspired single- or double-occupancy cabin suite—the ultimate in in-flight privacy. —SL

WE HAVE LIFT-OFF

Only a cheeky billionaire like Sir Richard Branson can get away with using the term “Upper Class” to distinguish top-deck seating aboard his Virgin Atlantic flights. Considered businessclass-affordable, yet not-quite-first class, the 33-seat cabin offers fabulous quirks that make that other class the forgotten one. The nightclub-esque walk-up bar decked out in 1,000 Swarovski crystals and manned by a generous bartender comes off as exclusive and hip without seeming pretentiously stuffy. (Booze and that thick velvety curtain help, too.) Mood lighting changes color throughout the flight, encouraging passengers to “relax, unwind, fall asleep and adjust time zones.” The loungelike seats flip forward into the longest flat beds in business class, complete with down duvets. The black cotton sleepwear is a charming and comfy offering not to be passed up before you disappear into the pod-like seats; they’re angled into a herringbone formation and enclosed with cubicle-like “suite” walls, so high that the person seated next to you has to peer over to communicate. The solution: Come mealtime, personal entertainment systems fold away so a couple can face one another to dine. Visit virginatlantic.com. —SL

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©2012 movado group, inc.

SERIES 800® THE ART OF PERFORMANCE. NEW BRACELET CHRONOGRAPH IN PERFORMANCE STEEL™ WITH BLACK ALUMINUM TACHYMETER BEZEL. MOVADO.COM


GUY STYLE

EXPRESS YOURSELF! TEN GREAT WAYS FOR GUYS TO WEAR JEWELRY IN 2013. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

NOLET’S GIN

“HOW ELSE CAN A MAN REVEAL HIS TRUE PERSONALITY?”

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STEPHEN WEBSTER; DAVID YURMAN

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t’s no secret: Men’s jewelry is uptrending this season and more guys are wearing more interesting jewelry pieces than at any time since the 1960s. And that’s a good thing, according to women everywhere who have been begging their men to step it up a bit, fashion-wise. And what better way for a guy to express his personality than with jewelry, the perfect accent for uniform male attire, be it a navy suit, golf shirt with khakis, or jeans and a T-shirt.... While it’s no longer about bling, men’s jewelry today is creative in a subtle, sophisticated, artisan-inspired kind of way, making it just as appropriate with business and formal wear as it is with casual wear. So bring out your inner rock star and consider the following: Stacks of bracelets. Mixing materials like leathers, metals, interesting beads and colored stones creates a unique look that reflects personal style. (We know a few corporate execs whose rolled up shirt sleeves reveal stacks of cool bracelets…) Pendants, dog tags, necklaces of all kinds. These might include the proverbial “skull” motifs, religious symbols and “slices” of colored minerals (agates, geodes, etc.). There are even pendants made from dinosaur bone, tire treads and other unusual materials. Wear them on anything from a gold or silver chain to a beaded or leather cord. A simple ID bracelet. Whether it’s yours, your dad’s or your partner’s, it’s sure to turn heads and sure to become a family heirloom. A modern link bracelet. Maybe in a non-traditional metal like titanium or hammered sterling with a gunmetal finish (gold is good too!). Cuff links. Have fun with them! Vintage designs like subway tokens, golf clubs and typewriter keys are always fun, but you can’t go wrong with sleek modern styling and/or anything personalized. (Young men are wearing French cuff shirts, even when they’re not wearing suits!) A tie bar. Not for everyone, but this retro-inspired accessory adds a touch of hipster, especially worn with skinny ties. The ring’s the thing! Wedding bands, commitment bands, anniversary, eternity, fraternity: nothing symbolizes devotion more emphatically than a band of gold (or platinum!). If it’s been awhile since your original wedding bands, you and your loved one might want to consider a more contemporary statement. (Even if you still have the same partner after all these years, your taste has likely evolved.) A bold signet-type ring with a fabulous colored stone. A fun watch. Something colorful, playful, not so serious. Something sporty, rugged or with complications. (Because life can be complicated…) The quintessential classic dress watch. In gold of course. Because he deserves it. (And if not now, when?)


AUTOMATIC MOVEMENT TWA200 Ø 45 MM $595.00


SPEED

THE THRILL OF VICTORY O

ver the decades, numerous Hollywood film stars have been bitten by the racing bug. There may be some profound reasons for this, or it may simply be that famous actors are accustomed to glamour and attention. When filming is over, the thirst for the excitement, danger and competition kicks in. (Or as Paul Newman once put it, “There’s no acting needed when driving; it’s just you and the machine.”) The connection between film stars and motor racing dates back to the turn of the 20th century, when Barney Oldfield became the first man to travel at one mile per minute. His fame as a racecar driver led to film stardom in the first half of that century. A significant number of racing films were made during that time, but the greatest of all was John Frankenheimer’s 1966 film Grand Prix starring James Garner. Garner went on to form a successful racing organization called American International Racers (AIR); when filming was completed, his cars raced with considerable success at Le Mans, Daytona, Sebring and other famous race circuits around the world. Steve McQueen’s film Le Mans may not have been a critic’s choice for best drama, but the racing action was brilliant, and his reputation as an accomplished racecar driver and motorcycle racer subsequently grew. Paul Newman filmed Winning around the same time; while it also lacked dramatic quality, the racing scenes

filmed at the Indianapolis 500 brought viewers to the edge of their seats. Newman’s racing was legendary, and at the age of 80 he was even part of a winning team at the Rolex 24 at Daytona. James Dean, James Coburn and Tom Cruise also enjoyed motor racing, earning respect in the amateur ranks of the sport. But today it’s Patrick Dempsey who charms race fans on and off the track. His dedication to the sport is unparalleled as a driver, team owner and ambassador for motor racing. Actors may not appreciate equal billing on film credits, but at a race circuit, they overwhelmingly acknowledge the team effort, giving much credit to their crews, their sponsors and their cars. Famous names like Ferrari, Porsche, Aston Martin, Lotus, Corvette, BMW and others have loyal fans of their own. In certain cases, the driver and the car are even upstaged by the race circuit. Just hearing names like Daytona, Sebring, Le Mans, Monaco, Spa-Francorchamps and Monza brings intense emotion to motor racing enthusiasts. And just as actors aspire to win an Academy Award, racecar drivers dream of winning a series championship. In 2012, endurance road racing in America celebrated two remarkable anniversaries: The Rolex 24 at Daytona marked its 50th and Sebring its 60th. Both venues have earned a unique place in the history of international motorsports—stars in their own right.

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Above: Patrick Dempsey enjoys a day at the races.

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CARS, STARS AND HISTORIC RACE CIRCUITS. BY DAVID A. ROSE


Elemento Limited Edition The Graf von Faber-Castell Collection is celebrating the 250th anniversary of Faber-Castell with a very special limited edition. Like a masterpiece of marquetry, the cross-grained olive wood is fitted into the barrel in six individual elements which are varnished and hand-polished several times. Only in this way does the wood reveal its flamboyant and interesting structure.


INTERIORS

HEAVY METALS

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urniture designer Sylvan Fiss had a wonderfully whimsical idea while watching a show about gemstones on the Discovery Channel. Inspired by the other-worldly geometric forms, the Indonesia-based designer conceived his innovative Popova writing desk in the shape of a meteor-sized gem. So impressed was he with the result, Fiss also translated the radiant design (with an $8,600 price tag to match) into a coordinating metallic Popova coffee table. Both pieces are now part of the collection for Scala Luxury, the Los Angeles-based dealer of upscale home furnishings. Lorin Marsh was thinking less about gemstones than where to store them when he came up with the company’s new Jewel Box ottoman, formed in the shape of...you guessed it...a jewel box, upholstered in metallic gold with polished nickel trim. Then there’s designer Gary Hutton’s shapely

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bronze and stainless steel Facet and Grand Facet cocktail tables, small enough to hold a single cocktail and named for the thousands of multifaceted Swarovski crystals that cover the surface. “I found a woman who worked for handbag designer Judith Lieber, who sets those stones—7,000 in all—one at a time with a pair of tweezers,” says the San Francisco-based Hutton, who works exclusively in stainless steel and bronze. The tables range from $4,200 to $14,000. Much like Dutch designer Marcel Wanders’ idea a few years back to turn a hulk of plastic into colorful Stone barstools cut like chunks of tourmaline, Clockwise from top left: Scala Luxury Truffle Trunk table; Christopher Guy Feather mirror; Ktribe by Philippe Starck metal table lamp; Lorin Marsh Diamond credenza

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COOL METALLIC FINISHES ADD WARMTH TO ANY HOME. BY WILLIAM KISSEL


T H E O R I G I N ATO R O F C U LT U R E D P E A R L S . S I N C E 1 8 9 3 .


topaz and diamonds, furniture makers are now turning heavy metals— sterling silver, gold, nickel, bronze and even wrought iron and stainless steel—into their own beautiful little jewels for the home. In particular, brooches on steroids seem to be a compelling source of inspiration to today’s metal workers. That would no doubt please the late designer Robert Hutchinson, who often equated mirrors with brooches and freely complimented those who translated them well. Today the “brooch effect” can be found on everything from mirrors and headboards to table lamps. ake for example the work of luxury furniture maker Christopher Guy, who had French designer Coco Chanel in mind when he presented his new Mademoiselle collection of furnishings and accessories, inspired by the Paris apartment of the influential couturier. Among the offering straight from the designer’s jewelry box was a gold and black balled mirror resembling a strand of Chanel’s famous pearls, another gold metal feather-framed mirror, reminiscent of a brooch or hat pin, and an upholstered chair with a golden fan-shaped back. “The fan-back chair is Coco’s successor’s trademark accessory,” says the designer, referring to the fan-waving Karl Lagerfeld, who has reigned over the house of Chanel since 1983. Heather Palmer was clearly channeling the work of another French designer, jewelry maker Jean Schlumberger, when the San Francisco-based glass artist conceived her $3,800 blue Sea Fan ceiling light fixture for Bespoke Global, the Southampton, New York atelier fostering the designs of artisan craftsmen from around the world. Looking at the polished nickel and glittering coral-shaped glass sconce, it’s easy to imagine Palmer poring over the early 20th-century French jewelry designer’s colorful pins and brooches in an effort to capture their translucent forms and intricate detailing. Meanwhile, if you didn’t know otherwise, you might swear Scala Luxury’s nickelplated brass Jewel Specimen mirror with its starburst shape and colorful goatskin panels set to look like precious gems was a jeweled family heirloom passed down through the generations. “I was always fascinated by the cuts of gemstones, the framing and mounting around jewels and the color coordination,” says designer Sylvan Fiss, who translated the mirror after a piece of jewelry he gifted to his wife. “I used the gemstone cut on several furniture

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From top: John Lyle Turtle table; Gary Hutton A-5 cube tables; Christopher Guy Fan chair pieces that I made for Scala Luxury, but for the Jewel Specimen mirror I had to integrate some colors and didn’t want to deal with any jewels or stones. Instead I used goatskin that I dyed in different colors, such as eggplant, charcoal gray, celadon green and lapis blue, and finished it in a high gloss polished finish, which really created a fascinating look.” Additional pieces in the collection include the Truffle Trunk gold leaf side table, which looks more like a sand-cast gold bracelet than a functional cocktail table, and the Hedge Stone table, made of meteor-sized brass. “I’ve always said there are only two kinds of people in the world: those who love sparkly things and those who won’t admit it,” says San Francisco-based designer Gary Hutton, whose jewel-like designs include a stainless steel or bronze Ver mirror featuring spikes of Swarovski pearls fanning out like a sunburst. “It’s a take on Dutch painter Johannes Vermeer’s painting Girl with a Pearl Earring,” he says. Look closely at that home you call your jewel box, adds Hutton. These days it might actually be furnished like one. Of course, there was a time when most people equated metal designs with the stark cold interiors of the 1970s, or with the modern trappings of a museum. But the chill factor is only an illusion, most designers agree. Rather than mere shiny distractions, theses pieces actually reflect the warmth of the other furnishings that surround them. “With my new Inox New York collection I’ve moved into mirror-polished stainless steel that has an immaculate reflection,” explains New York designer John Lyle, who works exclusively in metal. Among his new designs are statuesque Klismos chairs, sinuous bar stools and shapely tables wax-cast like jewelry in bronze, nickel and even 24-karat gold. “The reason these pieces aren’t cold is because they reflect that Persian or Turkish rug and those coral-colored walls. They sort of act as a chameleon in the room,” says Lyle, whose Adelphi mirror for Inox New York is akin to a Baroque earring. But this Baroque mirror is hardly a sign of bad luck; rather, it’s a beautiful good luck charm. Rather than stand out, it accentuates a room just as a piece of jewelry might do to an outfit. Something chemical also happens when metal designs accent a room. “Sparkle is really nothing more than the reflection of light, and human beings respond dramatically to light,” says designer Gary Hutton. “The love of things that sparkle is just hotwired into our DNA.”

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TRENDS

Nicole Kidman wears Deco-inspired earrings

ROARING TWENTIES REDUX THIS YEAR’S FUN-TO-WEAR FASHION MOVEMENT.

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rom fashion to jewelry, Art Deco is currently the leading style inspiration. “And come this spring and summer, it will get stronger, then even bigger by fall/winter 2013,” says Ellen Sideri, CEO of ESP Trendlab in New York City, which tracks fashion trends and cultural patterns. Interestingly, the real excitement isn’t about original vintage jewelry and fashion, but rather contemporary styles inspired by that roarin’ era of the 1920s and ’30s. It’s more “Deco redefined.” Each in its own signature style, luxury brands are creating modern collections based on design elements that defined the Deco movement: streamlined shapes, a strong color palette, graphic patterns, geometric stone cuts, linear symmetry, elongated silhouettes and ancient Egyptian and Aztec forms.

designer after another using the 1920s (and the 1910s) as their muse.” For his fall/winter haute couture collection, Jean Paul Gaultier has embraced the period in a big way, with highly graphic gold metal cage designs pieced into dresses and jackets, as well as softer glam flapper looks. And Alexander McQueen’s 2013 resort collection spectacularly marries Art Deco with inspirations from the linear work of the legendary Gustav Klimt. Amanda Gizzi, director of communications for the Jewelry Information Center in New York, explains: “As our country has been coming out of difficult economic times, more and more customers are asking for jewelry that isn’t cookie-cutter. And these modern pieces, which are influenced by Deco but a bit edgier, are perfectly suited to what they want.”

FILM AND FASHION INFLUENCES

THE “NEW DECO” LOOK

Before we tell you what you should look for and how to wear it, let’s explore the big question of why Deco, why now? What brought on jewelry’s obsession with the brilliance of the Jazz Age? In spring 2013, The Great Gatsby remake hits theatres and, with A-lister Leonardo DiCaprio starring as Jay Gatsby, Art Deco designs will be very much in the spotlight. Added to that, in both ready-to-wear and couture for 2012/2013, Art Deco references ruled the runways. Sideri notes, “We’re seeing lots of beads, feathers, and embroidery—but elegant and luxurious—with one

To do New Deco, there are a few jewelry items you want on your wish list: TASSEL EARRINGS AND PENDANTS Swinging tassel earrings and

Above from left: Stephen Webster Cascade tassel earrings with blue sapphires and white diamonds in 18K white gold from the Forget Me Knot collection; Stephen Webster Forget Me Knot Cascade pendant in 18K white gold; Roberto Demeglio bracelets with diamonds in ceramic and 18K gold

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IMAGE.NET BY GETTY

BY LORRAINE DEPASQUE


Diamond dewdrops glimmer with the dawn of a new day.

MJ Dewdrops sparkle & shine. Collection from $750


pendants were the perfect complements to high-hemline dresses, and today you’ll find lots of colorful versions in whatever gemstone you like.

emerald cuts. “In our Important Estate Jewelry auctions, the top three diamond cuts in original Art Deco are emerald, Asscher and cushion,” says Lange. “Emerald ROPES OF PEARLS cuts are forever classics, and I’m If you already have a strand seeing a lot of interest in of opera-length pearls, think contemporary jewelry with Clara Bow or Daisy Buchanan cushion cuts.” Step-cut shapes and drape them on! Then be like trapezoids and half-moons sure to get another long rope are often seen as side stones in of pearls to layer in; finish the Deco designs, so this year and going look by knotting that second strand. forward, you’ll see them in the New The knotted pearl necklace is back! Deco collections, too. Actress Sofia Above: A look from DANGLY COLORED-GEM Vergara’s engagement ring, for example, Jean Paul Gaultier’s DROPS “Deco earrings are always features a cushion-cut center stone with a fall/winter 2012 Paris Haute Couture very desirable at auction,” says Ann trapezoid diamond on either side. collection Lange, senior vice president and COLORS Deco jewelry tends to rely director of jewelry for the prestigious on bold gemstone colors, in contrast to the auction house Doyle New York. “The linear austerity of the Edwardian period that hanging kind, because they’re simple yet they preceded the Roaring ’20s. The most notable have strong design.” shades are black, green, red and blue, plus white, DIAMOND CASCADE EARRINGS In the which, if done in enamel, for example, can impart ’20s and ’30s, women often donned earrings a distinctive boldness. made of cascading diamonds to add femininity to Black: Onyx was perhaps the most widely their newly in-vogue short bobbed haircuts. Back then, used black gemstone during the 1920s and ’30s, so diamond chandeliers (as they’re now known) replaced ear some New Deco pieces incorporate it, too. But they more clips, hair combs and hat pins. often feature black diamonds, black sapphires and black BIG GEOMETRIC RINGS Rings were large and opals. rectangular, and women often wore several on one hand. For Green: “Carved jade was [used] in a lot of vintage Deco,” evening, oversized emeralds and rubies played a strong role, in notes Lange, so modern jewelry artisans are favoring this white or yellow metal. Contemporary Deco jewelry gives you green variety as well. But emeralds and agates are two other lots of price options, with many brands even making Deco-style green favorites. This year, in fact, emeralds are so hot in fashion uber-rings with sterling silver and natural gemstones. that it may even be difficult for May-born women (whose BANGLES AND BRACELETS When women started birthstone is emerald) to get their hands on it! wearing sleeveless styles, bracelets became an important Red: Rubies, ruby-red enamels and deep red corals top the list accessory. Bangles were clustered on their wrists or higher on of must-have New Deco reds, but especially ruby, as Lange notes, the upper arms. As for flexible gemstone bracelets, Lange says, “because there were a lot of Burma rubies in original Art Deco “Deco diamond bracelets are also very desirable at our auctions; jewelry.” Gizzi adds, “Since this movement started to grow, I’ve the workmanship was exceptional.” seen a lot more dark-red corals in jewelry—something I hadn’t DECO-THEME PIECES If you’re someone who likes to seen in a long time.” wear symbolic jewelry, there’s a lot of New Deco pieces Blue: Look for primary-color blue gems, like lapis-lazuli inspired by the iconography of the ’20s and ’30s, skyscrapers and sapphire, but also cobalt blue alternative materials like like the Eiffel Tower and the Chrysler Building á la the era’s enamel, resin and ceramic. A wealth of lapis jewelry was found in unique architectural movement. Or choose something King Tut’s tomb, a key reason the blue gem became an unique with carvings or silhouettes of pyramids, important influence on jewelry of the period. obelisks, palm fronds and lotus flowers—motifs that White: Rock crystal, white pearls and white diamonds often appeared in period pieces, influenced by the 1922 top New Deco’s white stone list. “Certainly, rock crystal was discovery of King Tut’s tomb. used a lot in Art Deco—it was very prized then and it is now, too,” says Lange. “There were also lots of natural pearls NEW DECO CUTS & COLORS back then.” Consider, too, some of the New Deco pieces that CUTS With the exception of tiny beads used for mix black Tahitian pearls with white metal, as the black-and-white tassels, reminiscent of renowned Deco jewelers like Jean color scheme was a key color combination then and now. Fouquet, the geometric bent of Art Deco jewelry design is Center: Mikimoto necklace with South Sea pearls and typically achieved by incorporating angular stones, especially multi-colored sapphires in 18K white gold

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MJ Rocks

A rough luxe collection designed and created exclusively

by Mann’s Jewelers.

Tassels from $975 Collection from $295


Romance Rochester A Journey of Love

Summer romance transitions to fall and sets the scene for a lifetime of love. The Flower City provides the backdrop for a day of unfolding fantasy with fabulous jewels and fearless love. Photographed by Tammy Swales.


On her: necklaces by MCL (from $1190), bracelets by Roberto Coin, MCL and Miriam Salat (from $495), cameo ring by MJ Rocks ($4595), vintage hair ornament/brooch ($1900). On him: bracelets by MJ Rocks, David Yurman and Chan Luu (from $245), ring by David Yurman ($1850), necklaces by David Yurman (from $400). All jewelry available at Mann’s Jewelers.


On her: necklace by Caleo ($7850), chains by David Yurman (from $825), bangle bracelets by Miriam Salat (from $125), cocktail rings by MJ Rocks and Roberto Coin (from $2850). On him: bracelets by David Yurman and Chan Luu (from $325), watch by TAG Heuer, from the Monaco collection ($6300 suggested retail). All jewelry available at Mann’s Jewelers.


On her: hair ornament / brooch by MCL ($950), necklaces by MJ Rocks, Caleo and Temple St. Clair (from $775), bracelets by MJ Rocks and Chan Luu (from $230), stack rings by MJ Facets (each, $695). On him: necklaces by David Yurman (from $400), bracelets by David Yurman (from $1595). All jewelry available at Mann’s Jewelers.


On her: necklaces by MJ Facets and MJ Dewdrops (from $1695), cocktail ring by Sutra (from $28,500), bracelets by MJ Rocks and Roberto Coin (from $1380). On him: necklaces by David Yurman (from $350), bracelets by David Yurman and Stephen Webster (from $450), watch by TAG Heuer from the Carrera collection ($4800 suggested retail), ring by David Yurman ($1550). All jewelry available at Mann’s Jewelers


On her: South Sea cultured pearl strand by Mikimoto ($88,000), diamond necklace by MJ Dewdrops ($4190), earrings by the MJ Estate collection ($25,000), diamond bracelet ($89,000), fashion rings by David Yurman and Stephen Webster (from $575), engagement ring by Henri Daussi (price upon request), vintage hair ornament/ brooch ($1190). On him: necklaces by David Yurman (from $350), cufflinks by David Yurman ($850), watch by Breitling from the Navitimer collection ($7170 suggested retail). All jewelry available at Mann’s Jewelers


On her: Tahition South Sea pearl strand by Mikimoto ($26,000), earrings by Miriam Salat ($495), bracelets by MJ Rocks and Miriam Salat (from $175), engagement ring by Henri Daussi (price upon request).

All jewelry available at Mann’s Jewelers. Styling by Carin Lilja of Style Clean. Hair by Jason Ripple and makeup by Michelle Rauber, co-owners of Rock Paper Scissors Salon. Featured models Nina Lutz and John Abisch. A special thank you to Antiques and Old Lace, Country Rode Motowerks, Le Petit Poutine, and the Rochester & Genesee Valley Railroad Museum. To see the complete love story unfold, visit RochesterRomance.com


FOOD

FIRST-GENERATION FAME CHEF GEORGE MENDES IS A NATIONAL TREASURE. BY SHIRA LEVINE

What’s your ideal meal? I love my beef. At Keens Steakhouse, I dig into a nice porterhouse, a Caesar

salad, some oysters and wine. A good steak on my day off helps me feel nourished and relaxed. You’ve traveled a lot during your career. Besides New York’s, what other food scenes do you take inspiration from? My family roots in Portugal are a huge influence. I go twice a year and love visiting the local cafés, beer bars and gastropubs. Everything is so simply prepared and fresh. Also, Paris, the south of France, Barcelona and San Sebastian are important to me. That’s where I spent my early years learning. What Canada and Denmark are doing with the foraging movement is another great influence. It’s nothing extremely new though, just a return to the basics. It’s funny that people today see eating locally as a trend. Everything is in season somewhere in the world. It’s my responsibility as a chef to utilize what’s nearby, support farmers, focus on what is sustainable for the area and care about our oceans. It’s a responsibility I take seriously. How do your Portuguese roots shape your sensibility as a chef? My parents are immigrants and farmed their own food. They continued a lot of those values at our home in Connecticut. We had a garden that I’d help my dad prepare each season. It was a way of life for us. Our kitchen table was especially influenced in the spring and summer months because of that garden. It taught me the importance of knowing where my food came from. The [Portuguese] culture, the homey rustic feel of eating at home during the holidays, and the feasts my family would prepare are my strongest memories. Christmas, New Year’s Eve and Thanksgiving were always big lavish feasts that my mom and aunt would spent days preparing for.

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JERRY ERRICO

I

f you watch Bravo’s cooking shows, Chef George Mendes might be a familiar face. He appeared on the third season of Top Chef Masters, which won him many foodie fans of the (mostly) female variety. But sex appeal isn’t the only dish Mendes serves up. For this first-generation American born to Portuguese parents, cooking has always been about the fresh, the local, the in-season, the simple: in other words, the most delicious foods nature has to offer. Growing up in Danbury, Connecticut, Mendes was always surrounded by good food. He’d help his mother and aunt in the kitchen and work in the garden out back with his father. As a result, Mendes enjoys working with his hands. It was either a career in interior design and architecture, or working as a chef. His decision to cook came ultimately, he says, “because I constantly have to be in motion and doing something; I couldn’t be stuck in an office.” A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, he worked under culinary legends Alain Ducasse and David Bouley and refined his palate in France, Spain, San Francisco and D.C. at a number of Michelin-starred hotspots. In 2009, he finally went solo to open Aldea in New York City. The rustic yet classic restaurant featuring Spanish, French and Portuguese influences has already scored a Michelin star of its own, been deemed one of the country’s 10 best new restaurants by GQ’s Alan Richman, and helped Mendes become a finalist for the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef New York Award. Accent managed to catch Mendes in a rare free moment to chat about his impressive accomplishments.


CELEBRATING FOOD – EVERY DAY.


How do you describe the cuisine at Aldea? I operate with my history in mind: the Portuguese were seafarers and explorers, discovering new lands. We brought spices and new flavors that influenced a lot of menus. Aldea is Portuguese-inspired with global influences. Early on, Portugal had colonies throughout the world, so you can see flavors from Brazil, Japan and India in my menu. You can also see my French training in there. All of my exploring has helped define my style. What is your presentation style? Minimalist. I like to focus on the color of food. My favorite time of year is spring, where all these edible colors pop out naturally. I’m not one to manipulate. I love the bounty of what comes in during those months. And maybe it’s my Mediterranean roots, but I love to enjoy my meals in the sun.

Top Chef really give food the opportunity to shine. I love to be in my restaurant, but it was a great platform for exposure. Would you do TV again? I would, if it were the right fit. I’d love an educational role where I teach the public about Portuguese cuisine, about growing your own food and eating as local as possible. I don’t want to be formed into a character. Do you have a cookbook in the works? It’s scheduled for spring 2014. It will be about Aldea, and be an introduction to Portuguese cuisine for the home cook. It will also include the story of my life and, of course, some great recipes.

FROM GEORGE MENDES’ KITCHEN

I know the term ‘fusion’ is kind of overused... I hate the word fusion. Some chefs will mismatch cuisines just to be creative, but they don’t necessarily know what they’re doing in terms of pairing flavors. You should know your history and combine things because they work. You don’t just pair because you want to create some new, unheard-of style. These fusion chefs overlook history and ancestry. True cooking comes from your heart, your ancestry, what was in your home. What are some exciting things on your menu right now? We’re using a lot of ramps, wild leeks, wild onions and wildflowers. We’re working with a forager, Evan Strusinski, who is bringing in things from the wild—herbs and plants not readily available from our regular sources. We’re always looking for new ingredients. We’re using chickweed, different kinds of mints and wintergreens, fiddlehead ferns, ramps and all kinds of exciting stuff in the mushroom category. If you’ve never eaten at Aldea, try the sea urchin toast; it’s refined and elevated. Or anything with shrimp, my duck rice... I’d say they all encompass rustic refinement. That’s a lot to introduce to the average (potentially not-soadventurous) eater! It’s about coming across what grows naturally in the woods that people don’t know they can eat. The forager has been providing us with things that I didn't know existed! For winter we’ll work with more robust, heartier flavors. Warm foods with an elevated level of refinement. Look for the tripe stew with root vegetables and quail eggs. Plus, winter means blue truffle season. Are there plans to open a second restaurant? We have plans but there is no forecast. When the right place comes along, then it’s the right time. We need a place that allows our vision to flourish, so it could take another 18 months to come together. You were on Top Chef Masters, so you’ve got an insider’s perspective on the reality show business. What are your thoughts about these cooking shows? I’m really split on it. Food TV can have a great impact on business, but it really depends on the chef’s desires. Does he want to be on TV, or does he want to be in his restaurant? Top Chef Masters was difficult, but it was a fantastic experience. Some of the food shows are just about entertainment; they pretty much forget the food. But Tom Colicchio and

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Eggs Baked with Peas, Linguiça and Bacon extra-virgin olive oil, as needed 11/2 ounces slab bacon cut into 1/2-inch slices, then into 1/4-inch batons 1/ 2

white Spanish onion, finely diced

3

garlic cloves, thinly sliced

1

fresh California bay leaf, notches torn every 1/2 inch

1

pinch crushed red chile flakes

3

tbsp. strained tomatoes

2

ounces linguiça, cut into 1/2-inch dice

1/ 4

ounce chorizo, casing removed and thinly sliced

2

cups frozen petit peas kosher salt to taste

4

large eggs

1/ 2

cup parsley leaves, chopped

fresh lemon juice, to taste Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat a 4-quart cocotte over medium heat. Add just enough olive oil to coat the bottom, then add the bacon. Cook, stirring

occasionally, until the fat is rendered and the bacon lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Transfer the bacon to a dish. Add the onion, garlic, bay leaf and chile flakes to the cocotte and cook, stirring, until tender but not browned, about 3 minutes. Add the tomatoes and 1 teaspoon olive oil and cook, stirring and scraping down the sides of the pan, for 4 minutes. The tomatoes should be sizzling steadily. Stir in the linguiça, chorizo, reserved bacon and 1 teaspoon olive oil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until heated through, about 2 minutes. Stir in the peas and season to taste with salt. Make 4 little nests for the eggs in the mixture, spacing them a few inches apart. Carefully break an egg into each nest, making sure each egg is nestled in the stew and flush with the top. Transfer to the oven and bake until the egg whites are set but the yolks are still runny, about 8 minutes. Top with the parsley and season to taste with lemon juice. Serve immediately. Serves 4.


IF YOU HAD JUST ONE WISH...


SPIRITS

GET THE SKINNY LOW-CAL DRINKS THAT DON’T SKIMP ON TASTE. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON mint, Perrier and lime juice, for example, comes in at only 74 calories. In addition to the Skinnygirl brand, you’ll now find other pre-made and low-cal options on liquor store shelves. New Zealand-based VnC Cocktails’ pre-mixed drinks feature real fruit juices and about 14% vodka or tequila, keeping calories down to around 150 a serving. And Voli Vodka drops its potency a bit (to 70 proof), meaning the flavored brand requires less flavoring (sweeteners) to overcome the alcohol. Just remember— moderation is still the key. Drinking three or four of these tasty treats leads to trouble. And a tighter-fitting dress.

A Ty-Ku mojito with mint, Perrier and lime juice comes in at 74 calories.

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SLENDERIZE YOUR COCKTAILS • Replace sodas and tonics with sparkling water. This can cut your calories in half. (Mitigate flavor loss with a lime or grapefruit-flavored Perrier.) • Use fresh, seasonal fruits rather than high-calorie purees, juices or pre-bottled mixers. • Replace rum or light whiskies with sake or soju, lower in calories while still adding flavor (unlike vodka). • Don't discount liqueurs: Cointreau has a lower calorie count than many grain-distllied spirits, according to Williams. • Avoid booze with additives. Many lower-quality liquors (and wines) add sugar, caramel and other goodies to their ‘‘pure’’ product. • When drinking (or mixing with) Champagne, develop a taste for the drier varieties (Extra Sec, Brut and Ultra Brut) which have far less residual sugar. • In the 1790s, before there were cocktails, there were Slings: a little booze and a lot of water (think Scotch Highball). The Japanese drink similar cocktails, like 2 ounces of Hibiki or Yamakazi whiskey, with a large dose of soda water and ice. Refreshing and light. • Or follow Partida Tequila’s lead with its signature margarita: using agave nectar and spring water in place of triple sec and reducing the tequila by a half ounce shaves off 200 calories but actually enhances flavor.

NOLET’S GIN

O

ur national waistline may be expanding, but our palate has evolved. Where ‘‘diet drinking’’ was once limited to rum and Diet Coke or a cheap Chardonnay, we now want to have our mixology cake and drink it, too. Enter the ‘‘skinny’’ cocktail. First popularized by Real Housewife Bethenny Frankel and her line of Skinnygirl premixed cocktails (and now wines), the idea has spread, particularly to beach and resort destinations where a few extra calories go a long way. New York’s Haru Sushi recently launched a Skinny Happy Hour. The very posh St. Julien Hotel and Spa in Boulder is offering an elegant lineup of low-cal and no-cal (mock) cocktails, as is the Saltbox gastropub in San Diego. While most mixed drinks run in the 200 to 500 calorie range (or more!), drinks on the new menu have as few as 90 calories per glass (usually a 4ounce serving) and are still full of flavor. ‘‘We have plenty of higher proof and classic cocktails on the menu,’’ says Erin-Elizabeth Williams, the beverage manager for Saltbox. ‘‘But San Diego is also a driving city and a fitness-oriented city. The designated driver and dieter shouldn’t have to miss out on all the fun.’’ Patti Stanger, host of Bravo’s The Millionaire Matchmaker, agrees. She recently became a strategic partner at TyKu spirits (sake, soju and liqueurs), in part because of her desire to promote tasty, low-cal cocktail options. ‘‘A while back, I had lost a lot of weight, and wanted something that could get me over first-date jitters without a lot of calories. Sake was the drink.’’ A mojito made with Ty-Ku liqueur,


PerfectGems

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER.

CHRIS LEE

SLH

BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

UPSTAGED

Renée Fleming, the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, and the New York Pops are just a few of the artists performing at Carnegie Hall this season. You could buy tickets, but to really be involved in these remarkable occasions, join the Patrons. You’ll have access to rehearsals and meet-the-artist cocktail parties, a ticket concierge to arrange for special seating requests, and the very glamorous Opening Night Gala. In addition, Patrons are offered one of the most fascinating insider experiences in New York City: while telling stories and sharing his extraordinary knowledge, Carnegie Hall archivist Gino Francesconi escorts Patrons on a private tour up, down and all around, including visits to the Maestros’ Suite and other fascinating parts of the historic hall. Chances are this excursion will end on a high note.

TRUFFLE TIME!

Every autumn, New York’s famed SD26 offers white truffles gathered in the Piedmont region of Italy. To celebrate the arrival of these delicacies, the restaurant presents a special menu (through December). Marisa May, who owns and runs SD26 with her father, Tony May, has a favorite among the elaborate dishes: uovo in raviolo con burro tartufato. Created by Nino Bergese (personal chef to the last king of Italy) and now prepared by SD26 chef Matteo Bergamini, a single, large raviolo is stuffed with a barely cooked egg whose yolk spills forth into a sauce of brown butter, all under a mantle of white truffles. SD26’s wine director, Michael Doctor, pairs this treat with a Barolo, La Corda della Briccolina, Batasiolo 1995. Ms. May ha gusto bella.

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Photography by Tammy Swales


LAGERFELD’S ODYSSEY

It’s hard to imagine Monte Carlo’s belle epoch Hotel Metropole being any more stylish. A gathering place for the social and chic since 1886, the Metropole has lavish guest rooms, a comfortable bar with outstanding wines, and a concierge who can arrange pretty much anything, from racecar driving to co-piloting a fighter jet. However, the Metropole is adding additional opulence. Designer Karl Lagerfeld has recently revamped the outdoor spaces— including the pool, terrace and gardens—and even added a new Joel Robuchon restaurant (this one has a Mediterranean-influenced menu). One of Lagerfeld’s most impressive innovations is a fresco-style installation of 15 imposing glass panels portraying Ulysses’ journey.

WEAVING PAST AND PRESENT

ACTIVE ISLAND

Vojtech Blau is the only business in the United States dedicated exclusively to tapestries. By appointment only, clients can discover some of the world’s most exquisite examples of woven art. Director Simona Blau, a brilliant historian and art collector, started with creations from the 16th through 18th centuries and has recently added works though the mid-20th century. Among the marvelous pieces displayed on the walls of her attractive showroom are Flemish and Bruges tapestries along with creations by Alexander Calder, whose interest in tapestry led him to partner directly with Aubusson weavers, and Sonia Delaunay, one of the greatest translators of a modernist consideration of color and form to the material and texture of tapestry. Brilliant combinations of ancient skill and contemporary art.

Ah, winter vacation. You might locate a secluded beach and stretch out in the sun. Or, you could sail over to the Bitter End Yacht Club on Virgin Gorda, where there’s lots to do. Take to the water: Bitter End’s fleet has over 100 vessels, including sailboats, catamarans, kayaks, paddleboats and motorboats. Shape up: Fitness guru Andrea Metcalf offers one-onone training. Give a party: Bitter End will bring in a major musical act (The Beach Boys and Michael McDonald have been booked in the past). Indulge: Winston’s Bakery is known around the world for its breads, pastries and luscious desserts. And if you really just want to chill: Bitter End has three white sand beaches where you can simply sit.

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$WODQWLF$YHQXH‡ in the Neighborhood of the Arts

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Designed by David Senise, Spectrum Design Group


Bigger IS BETTER

IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIESDIRECTIONS.COM

FROM THE RUNWAYS


Color FALL FOR


Carin Lilja Style Advisor for Men & Women By Appointment Only styleclean@live.com 585-978-2660


Cuffs AND COLLARS

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Express yourself with

MJ Precious Petites Life is better with little luxuries. Collection from $725


ACCENT(ADVISOR) OVER THE YEARS, MY HUSBAND HAS GIVEN ME MANY SMALL AND DELICATE PENDANTS THAT I SOMETIMES WEAR TO MAKE HIM HAPPY, BUT DON’T REALLY LOVE. ANY IDEAS? How about buying a beautiful gold link chain and creating a charm bracelet or necklace? Or combining a few of the smaller pendants into a more significant piece? Bring them into the store and we’ll be happy to work with you on designing something truly special that you’ll wear with pride and that you BOTH will love.

Yes! The intrinsic value of precious metal is always a good investment, particularly in a precarious economy. In fact, a gold ring purchased 25 years ago is worth at least 10 times as much today. Gold is indestructible: it does not corrode or tarnish; all the gold that has ever been mined still exists. In addition, jewelry designers today are creating more spectacular works in gold than ever before. Next time you visit us, we’ll show you some truly irresistible investments—both financial and emotional!

I OFTEN HEAR TALK ABOUT “LAYERING” JEWELRY. BUT ISN’T ONE GREAT PIECE MORE IMPACTFUL THAN MANY LESSER PIECES? Depending on the outfit, one great piece is often the most dramatic way to wear jewelry, but mixing pieces (layering) is another good option, an expressive way to create looks that are more personal and uniquely you. And these days, there are few rules. Yellow, white and rose gold can be combined in a single piece or worn at the same time in separate pieces. Modern and Deco-inspired styles can work hand in hand; colored gemstones can be mixed and matched according to your tastes, your personality, your mood of the moment. (Contrast colors are very “in” this season.) Spend some time experimenting with creative combinations and see what moves you. Often, an old piece worn differently can become a new favorite!

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DO I NEED TO BUY MY WATCH FROM AN AUTHORIZED DEALER? Absolutely yes! Unfortunately, today there are plenty of decent-seeming knockoffs available on the internet and even in stores. Unless your dealer is authorized, you can never be sure what you’re buying, so when the time comes for repairs or your watch requires a replacement part, you could be out of luck. Why jeopardize your investment in such an important item, which is often not just a timepiece, but a treasured heirloom?

ERICA MOLINARI

IS THIS A GOOD TIME TO INVEST IN GOLD?


freelancer collection


WEDDINGS A SPECIAL BRIDAL SECTION FROM ACCENT MAGAZINE

FLOWERS BY ARENAS. PHOTOGRAPHY BY RED STONE STUDIOS.


Set the Tone BY JILLIAN L A ROCHELLE

QUIRKY WORDING

THE NEW NEONS LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION “We get a lot of clients asking to do something location-specific, like this custom design that features the Boston skyline,” says Samantha Finigan of Gus & Ruby Letterpress in Portsmouth, N.H. Whether your bash is in the city or country, it’s a great personalized touch. (Bonus points if the design is handillustrated.)

Neon colors are hot right now. They’re showing up everywhere from fashion to home décor, and of course, in wedding design. Neon on white looks fresh and is the prefect way to make a simple graphic statement. For the not-so-bold, Finigan assures us that “muted watercolor pastels are also a big color trend, especially in letterpress printing.”

HAVE FUN WITH FONTS With typefaces this interesting, who needs colors or imagery? We think they’re plenty pretty on their own. According to Finegan, “Justified [centered] type with variations in font has been a huge hit.”

Carolina and Logan replaced the usual “reception to follow” with this fun phrase promising “wild revelry” after the ceremony. RSVP cards are another great place to experiment with expressions. Instead of “will attend” and “will not attend,” try “wouldn’t miss it for the world” and “we’ll be there in spirit,” or the simple-but-cheeky “yay” and “nay.”

IMPACTFUL INVITATIONS WILL GET YOUR GUESTS EXCITED FOR THE BIG DAY. In addition to the trends we’ve highlighted here, Finigan recommends adding a foil stamp or a splash of unexpected color to freshen up a traditional invitation design. Envelope liners are a fun way to introduce a pattern that might otherwise overwhelm your invitation. And don’t forget about the front of the envelope: it’s the very first thing guests will see when they open the mailbox! Hand calligraphy is always the ultimate luxe touch, and some brides are choosing an assortment of vintage stamps to add a final pop of visual interest. A C C E N T

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SECOND IMAGE FROM RIGHT COURTESY BELLA FIGURA; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY BREA MCDONALD FOR GUS & RUBY LETTERPRESS

T H E I N V I TAT I O N S


PEACE OF MIND STARTS WITH PROOF OF QUALITY. Carat Weight 1.53

Color Grade E

Clarity Grade VS1

Cut Grade

Excellent

Laser Inscription Registry Number GIA 16354621

Natural Diamond Not Synthetic

A GIA report is certainty from the source. As creator of the 4Cs and the International Diamond Grading System™, GIA sets the standards for diamond assessment, worldwide. Unbiased. Scientific. A report from GIA gives you a clear understanding of your diamond’s quality. Look for GIA Diamond Grading Reports and the jewelers who offer them. www.4cs.gia.edu

THE UNIVERSAL STANDARD BY WHICH GEMS ARE JUDGED.


PRICELESS INSIGHT NANCY MANN knows jewelry from the inside, out.

T

hree things a jeweler can’t do without. An impeccable reputation. Professional credentials. Great jewels and people who love them. How did you get into the business? I’m a 9th-generation jeweler. As a kid, conversations around the dinner table invariably included talk about diamonds, gemstones and jewelry. So it wasn’t much of a stretch. All-time favorite piece of jewelry? As a Gemini, I really struggle with the concept of being able to only choose one of anything. Most valuable lesson learned at work? I am amazed at the level of intimacy and vulnerability that is often shared across the counter. I am humbled and honored by that trust, never cavalier. What should a customer always look for? A comfortable environment staffed with professionals who make suggestions motivated by your needs, not theirs.

Why is a GIA report so important? GIA is the world’s most respected gemological laboratory. They created the 4Cs and set the grading standards everyone follows. They are entrusted with grading the world’s most renowned gems. It’s hard to ignore that kind of pedigree. Insider’s tip? Jewelry is truly one of the few gifts that is imbued with lasting sentiment and meaning. The recipient will always remember where and when they received it; looking through a jewelry box is like taking a walk down memory lane. Best source for diamond know-how? 4cs.gia.edu. Not only to explain what to look for in a diamond, it’s information jewelers use themselves.


Full service caterer: Weddings Festive Galas Corporate Gatherings Intimate Backyard Dinners Bar and Bat Mitzvahs Fundraisers Birthdays

(585) 204-0999 marcheculinaryevents.com

Marché Culinary Events offers the excellent cuisine and hospitality our guests have come to expect from our sister restaurants — black&blue steak and crab, jojo bistro & winebar, Village Bakery & Café, and TRATA.


WEDDINGTRENDS

LightsCameraAction! TAYLOR SMITH FROM MANN’S JEWELERS CHATS WITH PHOTOGRAPHER TAMMY SWALES ABOUT BRIDAL PHOTOGRAPHY TRENDS.

ABOUT TAMMY MJ: What’s your favorite photography accessory? TS: Light. I’m obsessed with how light moves and changes and how you can re-create light. Obsessed. MJ: How would you describe your photography style? TS: You know, what I think is an absolute in photography is that your personality gets injected into your images. The way you see the world is uniquely yours—I could stand next to you and point my camera at the same thing and the images would turn out completely differently! So when people tell me that there’s so much energy, color, playfulness and happiness in my images, I think that’s a reflection of who I am and how I see the world. Plus I love to play! I think my images have a playful quality to them because of it. I want to play and have fun always! I have the absolute best job in the world. MJ: What is one of the craziest shoots you have done? TS: My team and I just finished this crazy shoot at the Seneca Park Zoo. It was one of the most amazing experiences in my life. We got into the penguin tank…the sea lion cage… we had an owl, an armadillo: it was crazy and cool and exciting. It was one of those times when you kind of can’t believe it’s happening when it’s happening. A total out-of-body experience! [laughing] MJ: Where would be your dream place to shoot a destination wedding? TS: Iceland. Seriously.

ENGAGEMENT AND WEDDING TRENDS MJ: Have you seen a trend in capturing engagement photos? TS: There is definitely a growing trend in having a photographer capture the proposal, the actual moment of a couple’s engagement. The person doing the proposing hires a photographer who arrives at a set place and time and inconspicuously photographs the whole proposal. Then, later

on, they surprise their fiancée with an album or slideshow or something like that, which lets them relive and remember their engagement! MJ: Do you have any examples of how you pull it off? TS: I have actually done this and from the photographer’s end this is trickier than you might think! It took a lot of coordination and some serious ninja skills as I (I’m not joking either) actually crawled through the couple’s house on my belly in the dark and hid behind the living room couch to capture the proposal happening on the porch! The result, though, still makes me cry. We made a slide show for Jason and Stephen and every time they watch it they remember that moment all over again. I think it’s definitely a trend worth hanging on to! MJ: What are the latest trends you have seen in wedding photography? TS: Wedding photography evolves a lot and frequently. Couples today are very aware of what is going on in fashion and magazines and television, and that influences what they want in their images. I think the trend towards clean, crisp, colorful images is trending back – more real life instead of styled. There are way fewer “themes” and far more “this is who we are” weddings. And I’m excited about that! Couples still want amazing photos, and I see them making more and more time for that portion of their day. They realize that the photographs are one of the only wedding tangibles that you are left with, so they are taking the time to really think that through. MJ: How do you get to know the couple to find out their personal style? TS: Our process starts from the moment we get the inquiry. We are not passive participants with our couples – we are involved! I feel very strongly that I want a relationship with my clients; it makes me more effective in delivering photographs that are uniquely about them. The most amazing thing that’s helped is Pinterest. I always ask if they use Pinterest, because it’s an amazing way to visualize what their wedding


day fantasy is. It’s incredibly interesting to see each couple’s uniqueness. MJ: Do you often ask for a shot list pre-wedding? Or is your style photo-journalistic? TS: Ha ha! I think the answer might surprise you: I always ask for a list. Always. I think weddings have to be a mix of photo journalism and preenvisioned shots. I know some photographers prefer to just photograph things as they happen, but I want to make sure. If you have a group of friends from college traveling from Siberia to see you, there should be a photograph of that. I always tell my couples, “How many times does everyone who loves you gather in one place and one time?” You have to document that both ways: planned and unplanned. Or as I like to call it: planned spontaneity.

HOW TO PREPARE MJ: What planning advice do you give a bride and groom before shooting their big day? TS: I always feel sympathy for my couples. As soon as they get engaged they have to become instant experts in all areas of event planning! It’s overwhelming to say the least. I spend a lot of time in the month leading up to the wedding offering advice and help in whatever way I can. I tell them to trust their vendors. Let them take care of executing your plans. I assume they have already set their date. Then there are ceremony and reception locations, photographer, music and hiring a wedding planner. After that they have more breathing room to figure the rest out. But don’t wait until the month before your wedding to start looking. Things book fast! MJ: Do you suggest any skin tricks to look flawless on your big day? TS: The biggest complaint brides have on their wedding day is that they have dark circles under their eyes from stress and lack of sleep. I think (especially for photos) that glowing skin is a major thing to think about, and you get that from drinking lots of water and moisturizing. And for goodness sake don’t go out without sunscreen on. Sunburn is not good for wedding day skin. MJ: Do you have any advice when posing for that perfect photo? TS: The best photos are when you aren’t feeling stressed about having your photo taken. You should work with your photographer, preferably before your wedding day, to work out what stresses you out, how you look best in photos and what poses are most flattering for you. Don’t be afraid to ask your photographer for help on this. You do not want to be trying to figure out how to pose on your wedding day. You should already know and feel confident about it. MJ: How do you calm the nerves of your bride and groom before their wedding day? TS: I tell my couples that you have spent months preparing. You have thought through the details and imagined how it’s all going to roll out. When the wedding day comes, the kindest and most amazing gift you can give to yourself and the people around you is to let it all go. You’ve set it all in place – now let the vendors and the people who are helping you make it all happen. Take deep breaths and remember why this day is important. It is about the person you love and who loves you back. It is about everyone gathering to celebrate with you because they love you. Nothing else matters in that moment. !


THE BEAUTY

BY AMY SCIARETTA & JILLIAN L A ROCHELLE

Inner Glow

ESTEEMED MAKEUP ARTIST TRISH M C EVOY SHARES HER SECRETS FOR A RADIANT WEDDING DAY.

What are your favorite wedding day looks? A woman looking like herself at her prettiest, happiest, radiant best! Her makeup should suit her personal style and be natural looking, longwearing and adjusted to photograph well.

Any tips for the groom? He should get his skin exfoliated and eyebrows groomed.

The Makeup Planner is one of your best-selling products. How can it help streamline the getting ready process?

t 25, McEvoy founded Trish McEvoy Beauty, which became a multimillion dollar company just five years later. Then in 1978, she partnered with her husband, Dr. Ronald Sherman, to open the Trish McEvoy/Dr. Ronald Sherman Skin Care Center—the very first medispa in the U.S.—in New York City. Well known for her amazing brushes, products and Makeup Planners, McEvoy is eager to teach every bride how to glow.

When should a woman start preparing her wedding day beauty plan? As soon as she gets engaged! In the months leading up to the big day, she should follow a customized exercise, facial and skincare regimen, depending on her specific needs, to make sure she looks her best.

My patented Makeup Planner is the only portable makeup vanity. I designed it to make women’s lives easier when it comes to makeup organization. Its refillable mirrored magnetic “pages” hold individual pans of eye and face color, keeping all your makeup in one place and visible at a glance, while adjacent brush sleeves are instantly accessible. The allaround zipper makes it portable.

Can you tell us a little about your makeup lessons? Women leave my lessons and the makeup lessons my artists teach confident in their ability to apply their own makeup well. We demonstrate and test the client on each step one feature at a time, ensuring a woman can execute the step herself and duplicate her look at home. We take the guesswork out of the steps that make a difference, and demystify how each of our clients can achieve her desired look.

What’s new at the Dr. Ronald Sherman/Trish McEvoy Skin Care Center? It houses a full medical and cosmetic dermatology practice and beauty studio under one roof. All my skincare products are created in partnership with my Skin Care Center. From injectables and laser treatments to facials, microdermabrasion and chemical peels, to airbrush tanning, lash extensions, brow and makeup services, we have a well-edited list of popular treatments that are all recommended based on the age and needs of the individual.

How much should time of day and time of year influence a bride’s makeup choices? I don’t believe they should. Beautiful wedding makeup is timelessly beautiful. But a dramatic red lip and smoky eye, while timeless, are probably not appropriate for a bride. B R I D A L

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S E C T I O N


Thank you Rochester for making Waterlily the #1 Makeup and Skincare store in WNY! We’ve transformed the beauty shopping culture at Waterlily and have made the counter experience a more pleasant one, a place to find the best makeup and most advanced anti-aging products in the world, a haven for beauty junkies where you can play with powders, lipsticks and fragrance, a beautiful and colorful place with a SPA known for amazing facials and brow styling. We’re your neighborhood store for friendly, expert honest advice... a place where women can feel empowered. Waterlily’s highly trained staff looks forward to serving you!

Beth Gamble FOUNDER

2383 Monroe Avenue | Brighton NY

585.442.5140 | waterlilybeauty.com

MAKEUP | SKINCARE | SPA


THE TRADITIONS

BY JACQUELIN CARNEGIE

Worldwide Weddings

INDIA TOURISM OFFICE, NY

BIG-DAY CUSTOMS FROM CENTURIES-OLD CULTURES.

lthough American-style weddings have gained popularity throughout the world, many countries retain their own colorful wedding traditions. These customs can vary from region to region and according to local religious traditions, but it’s interesting to note that almost all cultures have some version of “tying the knot.” A current trend in the U.S. is to research one’s family heritage and incorporate some of the noteworthy elements into a Western-style ceremony, or to replicate a traditional wedding outright. Here are a few highlights from centuries of tradition around the globe.

Hindu woman is married involve jewelry: Mangalsutra: black and gold beaded necklace with a gold or diamond pendant. The groom ties it around the bride’s neck during the ceremony; it’s comparable to a Western-style wedding ring. Bangles: gold and glass, often studded with precious and semi-precious stones such as diamonds, gems and pearls; mandatory, signifying long life for the husband. Armlets: encrusted with jewels or hanging crystals. Bichiya: toe rings worn as a symbol of the married state along with Anklets on both feet. Mang Tika: gold pendant adorned with jewels that hangs in the middle of the forehead. Nose Ring: an essential In many cultures, before the INDIA gold accessory in the left nostril. Rani Haar: gold wedding, the women gather Indian weddings are planned in accordance with filigree necklace with precious stones symbolizing at the bride’s house for a age-old customs and are known to be some of the prosperity. Earrings and Jhoomar: a piece of henna party with singing most beautiful and lavish. Weddings usually last five jewelry with gems worn on the side of the head; and dancing. The bride’s hands and feet are covered days with a number of rituals before, during and matches the design of the rani haar necklace. Waist with beautiful after the ceremony. The bride is adorned with lots of Band: like a necklace around the belly studded with henna designs. gold jewelry to symbolize wealth (a wearable “savings precious or semi-precious stones. Rings: worn on both account”) and purity. The gold given to the bride by her hands, attached to a bracelet by a central medallion. family, which they often start acquiring as soon as she’s born, contributes These are the most important aspects of a Hindu wedding ceremony: to her own “independent” wealth. Many of the symbols that indicate a Mangalfera: The couple walks around the sacred fire four times,

DID YOU KNOW?

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stopping to touch a stone in the path with their toes to symbolize obstacles in life that they’ll overcome together. The four rounds signify: Dharma, righteousness; Artha, monetary accomplishment; Kama, energy and passion; Moksha, liberation from everything in life. Saptapadi: After the groom's scarf has been tied to the bride's dress signifying they’ll always stay together, the couple takes seven steps around the sacred fire representing nourishment, strength, prosperity, happiness, progeny, long life and marital harmony. The marriage is then considered legalized according to the Hindu Marriage Act as well as traditional customs.

“I once read that watching a traditional Mexican boda is like studying the history of the country over the past seven centuries. Rituals and traditions from the Spanish, Aztec, Native American and AngloAmerican cultures are all incorporated into the ceremony,” says Carmen Laborin of the Mexico Tourism Board. Many Mexican wedding processions are accompanied by a JAPAN mariachi band and a donkey carrying bottles of It’s believed that the wedding tequila and wine for toasts along the way. Traditional Shinto wedding ceremonies are held ring originated in ancient Egypt Mexican brides have several vestido de novia at shrines. Brides wear shiromuku (formal white about 4,800 years ago. The ring’s (wedding dress) options depending on their kimono) and grooms wear montsuki (formal circlular shape was said to region and personal taste: everything from black kimono). The bride gets a ring and nine represent eternity, eternal love and a Western-style fancy white dress to a lucky gifts for happiness. It's common that only devotion. Rings were placed on the third finger of the left hand because beautifully embroidered, simple cotton huipil family members and close relatives attend. ancient Egyptians believed to an elaborately embroidered velvet dress or A Shinto priest offers prayers to the deities that it contained a vein one made from the local textiles with and the ceremony begins by purifying the couple. (vena amoris) that symbolic designs. After the purification and vows, the bride and groom led to the heart. Las Arras: In an ancient tradition, during the exchange cups ceremony, the groom gives the bride 13 gold coins of sake (rice wine) representing Jesus and the 12 apostles, which symbolizes the groom’s in the sansan-kudo (threecommitment to support his wife throughout their life together; her times-three) ceremony acceptance is a promise to take care of him. The bride also receives an symbolizing their union and ornate box for the coins’ safekeeping. the uniting of their families. El Lazo: The lasso is a beaded or jeweled rope or ribbon tied around Finally, symbolic offerings of the couple in a figure eight as they exchange their vows, signifying their sakaki (tree sprigs) are given to eternal bond and unity. Once the service is over, it’s removed. The the Kamisama (deity). During ceremony is followed by a parade with mariachi music and a reception that the kekkon hiroen (reception), lasts ’til the wee hours of morning with eating, drinking and dancing. the bride changes clothes several times, a tradition SCOTLAND dating to the 14th century, Today, at most Scottish weddings, the groom, his best man and the signifying her readiness to groomsmen are kitted out Highland-style in matching tartans. If you return to everyday life.

DID YOU KNOW?

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CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: JORGE TINAJERO; JOYCE YOUNG OF TARTAN SPIRIT; YASUFUMI NISHI COURTESY JNTO

MEXICO

have a Scottish surname, there’s a good chance you have a corresponding family tartan, so the men in your wedding party can all sport kilts. Bagpipes are appropriate music as is dancing the Lang Reel. Other Scottish wedding traditions vary by region: In the Borders, a sprig of heather in the bridal bouquet brings luck. In Aberdeen, Grampian, Angus and Dundee, luck comes with a sixpence in the bride’s shoe. And for financial luck, the bride’s father throws a handful of coins for the children to “scramble.” In the northeast, the best man gifts the happy couple with a clock, while the maid of honor gives them a tea set. In Shetland, wedding celebrations continue for two days with dancing and drinking. It’s said that “tying the knot” comes from an ancient Celtic practice with roots in pagan rituals. The bride and groom rip their wedding tartans and tie two strips together to symbolize the unity of the two families.


Flexible Financing Options When it comes to important purchases, we know savvy shoppers appreciate financing options. We are pleased to provide the Mann’s Jewelers Credit Card, one more way we can help make your dreams come true. CREDIT CARD BENEFITS INCLUDE: đƍ+ƍ**1(ƍ"!! đƍ,!%(ƍ!2!*0ƍ+Ý!./ đƍ */0*0ƍ.! %0ƍ2%((! đƍ4(1/%2!ƍ. $+( !.ƍ,.+)+0%+*/ Call today and find out how Mann’s Jewelers can provide you 3%0$ƍ!*$*! ƍ,1.$/%*#ƍ,+3!.ƍ* ƍý!4%(!ƍß**%*#ƍ+,0%+*/ċƍ ƍ. ƍ ! %0! ƍ!4(1/%2!(5ƍ0+ƍ5+1.ƍß*!ƍ30$ƍ* ƍ&!3!(.5ƍ ,1.$/!/ƍĥƍ((ƍ3%0$ƍ0$!ƍ%*0!#.%05ƍ* ƍ2(1!ƍ0$0ƍ$2!ƍ!!*ƍ0$!ƍ +.*!./0+*!ƍ+"ƍ **Ě/ƍ !3!(!./ƍ"+.ƍ*%*!ƍ#!*!.0%+*/ċ


Luxury & value.

Two become one.

MJ Bridal created exclusively

by Mann’s Jewelers. Engagement rings from $595 Diamond bands from $495 Classic & comtemporary bands from $95


We recommend that you begin preparing for your Wedding Dance about 3 to 6 months before the wedding. However, if your circumstances do not allow such ample time, we have crash courses available that will get you ready for your wedding. Call for more information.


PROFILE

OrganicLuxe

WITH DESIGNER TODD REED, RAW ROCKS TAKE CENTER STAGE. BY TAYLOR SMITH

T

hese days, when not in his studio, you can find Todd Reed cruising through the winding roads and hairpin turns of the Colorado Rockies on his BMW motorcycle. With a personality best described as “chill,” Reed’s gentle nature and easy smile reflect the calming influence of his grandiose surroundings in Boulder — a land where nature envelopes an individual, causing visitors and residents alike to marvel at the earth’s significance. The impact of such raw beauty is strikingly evident in Todd’s jewelry designs. Uncut and unpolished diamonds are prominent features and are offered in an array of natural colors — oranges, grays, browns,

blacks — making your standard white, polished diamond seem almost passé. Upon discovering the work of Todd Reed at a jewelry show, Mann’s Jewelers’ CEO Nancy Mann was caught by the understated elegance. She says, “Jewelry like Todd’s is completely original and is offered at Mann’s with the quietly sophisticated customer in mind. Shoppers are captivated by his artistic approach to diamonds; his work broadens their diamond vocabulary and gives them choices they never knew existed.” Although Todd’s diamonds tend not to have as many facets as a typical diamond, the stones exude a distinctive brilliance one would look for when shopping for a diamond engagement ring or a luxurious piece of jewelry. Marrying these stones with recycled metals completes Todd’s homage to Mother Nature. “It’s all about the material and how we can show it in its most intriguing light,” he explains. In the early 1990s, while Reed was working for Eric Hodges, a well-known leather artist, he created his first piece of jewelry, a pair of concho style earrings in silver and turquoise. It was this experience with metalsmithing that shaped his future in the jewelry industry. Now, he works closely with a team of artisans at his newly built workshop and headquarters in Boulder. Everything is fabricated from scratch and is open for the public to watch. “The studio highlights community and creativity” and the quality of the work “has to do with the manufacturing process; material choice, energy in the details and in the process, rather than the finished work,” says Reed. For a bride-to-be, a Todd Reed creation can be particularly intriguing. “We see an array of brides being drawn to his work. It’s a way to keep tradition by choosing a diamond, but make it your own with Todd’s signature craftsmanship,” says Mann. “Todd Reed gives the bride ‘something old and something new’…for the borrowed and blue you’re on your own!” !

To see a video of Todd at home in his Boulder studio, scan this code with your smartphone or visit toddreed.com


An extraordinary event requires an extraordinary setting. Hold your wedding, reception, rehearsal dinner or other special event at Rochester’s landmark art museum.

500 University Avenue, Rochester, NY mag.rochester.edu events booking: 585.276.8950 catering by Max at the Gallery maxrochester.net 585.697.0491 offering perfect wedding gifts and favors maggallerystore.com 585.276.9010

photos: Brandon Vick Photography


T H E D E TA I L S

BY LISA MONTEMORRA MENGHI

Something Even Newer AS TIME MOVES FORWARD, SO DOES OUR DESIRE TO RE-INVENT OLD TRADITIONS.

It’s a ritual dating back to the Victorian era that’s meant to bring luck to newlyweds: on her wedding day, the bride carries or wears something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue. Here, a few ideas for the modern bride who wants to honor this age-old custom with a fresh, updated twist.

SOMETHING OLD • Think out of the box. Your ‘somethings’ can be places or decorations instead of worn items. One example: hold your wedding at a historic site. • Display old photos of ancestors (extra points if taken on their wedding days) at your ceremony and/or reception. It’s heartfelt and gives your guests an insight into your family history. • Wear lace or a button from a family member’s wedding dress in your hair, or incorporate it into your bouquet. • Have your ring bearer carry the rings in a treasured heirloom instead of on the standard satin

book table. It will elicit good memories of shared family meals and togetherness. • Give your grandmother’s crystal candleholders or vase a vacation from the curio cabinet with a place of honor at your ceremony. • Borrow a pretty silver knife from a friend or family member and use it to cut the cake. • Set your sweetheart table with heirloom china and silver, to make your first meal as husband and wife even more special. • If your parents are sentimental, they probably still have their wedding cake topper. Get it out of that dusty box in the garage and give it another go.

SOMETHING BLUE our bouquet Embellish y a family dress. m o with lace fr

SOMETHING BORROWED • Borrow a family tablecloth to dress up the escort card or guest

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• Incorporate a beautiful blue stone or side stones into your wedding band. Sapphire, blue topaz, tanzanite and aquamarine are all excellent choices. • Why not wear a pair of strappy blue evening shoes? They’ll be a fun flash of color beneath your dress. • Getting rid of wedding cake guilt

B R I D A L

Something b and yummy lue... too! is easy: decorate it with delicious fresh blueberries and meet your daily fruit quota! • When you go for your wedding day pedicure, choose a pretty pale blue. Or how about a strip of blue to replace the white on a French manicure? • Use a small blue clutch for your lipstick, cell phone and other wedding day necessities. • Signature drinks are always fun. Why not use Blue Curaçao to concoct your custom cocktail? • Splurge on luxurious blue lingerie for your wedding night.

SOMETHING NEW

• A brand new piece of jewelry, of course! You’ll be investing in an heirloom that will have special meaning for the next generation of your family.

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Above: Sterling Silver Floral Stemmed Pair Candlesticks ca. 1943, USA

pillow. A jewelry box from a beloved family member could also hold a flower girl’s petals. • Instead of wearing heirloom jewelry in its intended manner, pin or sew it onto your gown as a featured design element. • Find an alternative use for your mother’s or grandmother’s veil. Use it to wrap your bouquet or drape it over a photo display table.


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THE STORIES

BY MICHAL D I MICELI

Wedding Day Magic

PHOTO BY GREG WOOD PHOTOGRAPHY

A GREAT-GRANDMOTHER VISITS A NEW BRIDE…

had always wanted a vintage wedding, and my dream came true on Saturday, June 9th, 2012 when I wed the man of my dreams in Madison, Connecticut. We worked hard to get all the details right, but I swear it was a few pieces of jewelry from my beloved late great-grandmother that made the day magical. My dress was a magnificent 1960s lace gown I discovered at my local consignment shop. It had puffy shoulders and a high collar, but I saw the potential and had it tailored into a sleeveless mermaid shape. The veil was the original, also from the ’60s, and the engagement and wedding rings were English platinum dating from the early 1900s. The ceremony and reception were held at the beautiful Madison Beach Club, which dates back to the 1920s. My family and I have spent many happy times there, so it was a delight to share it with 140 people I adore. We collected old mason jars to use as flower vases, and I decorated the reception with family wedding photos going back three generations. Everything was in place for my vintage theme, but the most important element was surely the influence of my great-grandmother, Mama Crowley. As a kid, I’d spend hours sitting with Mama. She was confined to her bed, but always looked elegant in her silk and lace robe, with her pink high-heel slippers waiting on the floor. I can’t remember now what we talked about, but I do remember loving to be in her presence and arranging all of her glass figurines and miniature Limoges shoes (a wonderful collection I now own). B R I D A L

90

Mama Crowley loved family, loved to travel and always looked stylish. She believed in living life fully and with passion...and that you might as well look beautiful while you’re doing it! I learned so much from her, and I know that she shaped the woman I am today. Although we lost her almost 30 years ago, I’ve felt her presence throughout my life, never more so than on my wedding day. My lovely grandmother Joan is convinced that her mother (Mama Crowley) sent me Joe. He is everything I could have asked for in a life partner, and exactly who my great-grandmother would have chosen for me. The weather on the morning of June 9th was a little iffy, so my hairstylist (of all people) suggested that I leave rosary beads facing outside to guarantee sunshine. It just so happens that I had packed Mama Crowley’s rosary beads at the last minute, so my mother dutifully hung them from the balcony of my hotel room. The weather continued to be touch-and-go for a while, but the minute I took my first step down the aisle, Mama cleared the skies and the weather stayed gorgeous for the remainder of the day. (I should mention that Mama was a novice nun before she married, so I’m sure she had some pull…) Not only did Mama’s rosary beads work their magic on my big day, but I also wore her gold and pearl drop earrings and her pearl and sapphire gold bracelet, connecting me physically, emotionally and spiritually to this amazing lady. I look forward to passing on the love, traditions and family heirlooms to my future family. S E C T I O N


© D.YURMAN 2012


MANN’S JEWELERS ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

FALL/WINTER 2012


Mann's Jewelers