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Contents fall/winter 2012 H A M I LT O N J E W E L E R S 2542 BRUNSWICK PIKE LAWRENCEVILLE, NJ 08648 609-771-9400 HAMILTONJEWELERS.COM CHAIRMAN MARTIN SIEGEL PRESIDENT HANK B. SIEGEL VICE PRESIDENT DONNA J. BOUCHARD VICE PRESIDENT DAVID S. KASTER CONTRIBUTING WRITER KATHLEEN BROMMER GRAPHIC DESIGNER CHRISTOPHER D. NAVARRO

P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P PUBLISHER STU NIFOUSSI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R HANS GSCHLIESSER

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MANAGING EDITOR JILLIAN LAROCHELLE PROJECT MANAGER LISA MONTEMORRA

72 Food: First-Generation Fame

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Welcome Letter

74 Photography: Always in Fashion

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The Year in Review

78 The Arts: Cabaret Renaissance

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Pantone Color Report

82 Speed: The Thrill of Victory

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Centennial Preview

84 Travel: It’s About Time

13 Our 100 Favorite Things Ever

86 Spirits: Get the Skinny

BRIDAL SECTION

38 Ralph Lauren: Inspiration at Every Turn

56 The Rings: New and Non-Traditional

40 Red Carpet: Standout Style

60 The Traditions: Worldwide Weddings

46 Guy Style: Express Yourself 48 Runway Trends 54 Timepieces: Baume & Mercier 68 Perfect Gems

JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI PRODUCTION MANAGER PEG EADIE PRESIDENT AND CEO BRITTON JONES CHAIRMAN AND COO MAC BRIGHTON

34 Breguet: The Lost Art of Cameo Carving

44 Accent Advisor

DESIGNERS CYNTHIA LUCERO

64 The Invitations: Set the Tone 67 The Details: Something Even Newer

Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2012. Accent® is published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550, Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175; Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018, 212686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The publishers accept no responsibilities for advertisers’ claims, unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publishers. Volume 10, Issue 2. Accent® is a trademark of Business Journals, Inc. registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark office. Printed In The U.S.A.

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IMAGE COURTESY MEMOIRE

FEATURES


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Oscar Heyman and Hamilton Jewelers: Each celebrating 100 years as family-owned businesses creating exceptional jewelry.

Princeton / Palm Beach / Red Bank / Palm Beach Gardens / Lawrenceville


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CONGRATULATIONS ON

100 YEARS OF TIMELESS STYLE FROM YOUR PARTNERS

AT THE GARDENS MALL

c e le brate in st yle... 1912-2012

the gardens maLL THEGARDENSMALL.COM


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RED CARPET

Standout Style

WITH MEGAWATT SMILES AND FASHIONS TO MATCH, THESE STARS CAN’T HELP BUT CATCH YOUR EYE. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

P

ADRIEN BRODY

MARIA MENOUNOS

roof positive that socialite and reality TV personality Olivia Palermo deserves her reputation as a trendsetter. At Fabergé’s party in the Loft & Garden atop Rockefeller Center, her outfit was simple but stylish, featuring subtle nautical details perfectly

complemented by a large link necklace, pretty bangles and statement-making cocktail ring. In a classic tuxedo and Audemars Piguet Royal Oak timepiece, Adrien Brody looks every bit the consummate gentleman. Over 150 guests joined the Academy Award-winning actor at a black tie gala in Milan to celebrate the 40th anniversary of the iconic watch design. On the rooftop of New York City’s STK, Maria Menounos brought star power to the launch 40

GETTY FOR FABERGE; JACOPO RAULE/GETTY FOR AUDEMARS PIGUET; FINDYOURFACEMATE.COM

OLIVIA PALERMO


Signature Collection

Rock Tradition.


RED CARPET party for dating site findyourfacemate.com. Her stack of mixed-material bracelets was right on trend, while her dainty and delicate white gold necklace flashed a subtle show of sparkle to those lucky enough to get close. Golden goddess Frida Pinto (with boyfriend Dev Patel at the world premiere of her film Black Gold in Qatar) chose bold bangles to play up the braided trim on her ethereal gown. The result: a look that’s both flowing and glowing.

SEAN GALLUP/GETTY; JAEGER-LECOULTRE; ANDREAS RENTZ/GETTY

FRIDA PINTO AND DEV PATEL

DIANE KRUGER

JESSICA ALBA

As a juror at the 2012 Cannes Film Festival, Diane Kruger was expected to walk every red carpet...and she didn’t disappoint. This heavenly sheath was just one of many wow-worthy ensembles she chose. In order to let floral appliqués and feathers take the spotlight, Kruger accessorized simply with a sparkly clutch and vintage Jaeger-LeCoultre timepiece. In a white hot curve-hugging dress and jewelry inspired by Princesse Grace de Monaco, actress Jessica Alba looked like royalty at a party hosted by Montblanc in Beijing. 42


ACCENT(ADVISOR) OVER THE YEARS, MY HUSBAND HAS GIVEN ME MANY SMALL AND DELICATE PENDANTS THAT I SOMETIMES WEAR TO MAKE HIM HAPPY, BUT DON’T REALLY LOVE. ANY IDEAS? How about buying a beautiful gold link chain and creating a charm bracelet or necklace? Or combining a few of the smaller pendants into a more significant piece? Bring them into the store and we’ll be happy to work with you on designing something truly special that you’ll wear with pride and that you BOTH will love.

Yes! The intrinsic value of precious metal is always a good investment, particularly in a precarious economy. In fact, a gold ring purchased 25 years ago is worth at least 10 times as much today. Gold is indestructible: it does not corrode or tarnish; all the gold that has ever been mined still exists. In addition, jewelry designers today are creating more spectacular works in gold than ever before. Next time you visit us, we’ll show you some truly irresistible investments—both financial and emotional!

I OFTEN HEAR TALK ABOUT “LAYERING” JEWELRY. BUT ISN’T ONE GREAT PIECE MORE IMPACTFUL THAN MANY LESSER PIECES? Depending on the outfit, one great piece is often the most dramatic way to wear jewelry, but mixing pieces (layering) is another good option, an expressive way to create looks that are more personal and uniquely you. And these days, there are few rules. Yellow, white and rose gold can be combined in a single piece or worn at the same time in separate pieces. Modern and Deco-inspired styles can work hand in hand; colored gemstones can be mixed and matched according to your tastes, your personality, your mood of the moment. (Contrast colors are very “in” this season.) Spend some time experimenting with creative combinations and see what moves you. Often, an old piece worn differently can become a new favorite!

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DO I NEED TO BUY MY WATCH FROM AN AUTHORIZED DEALER? Absolutely yes! Unfortunately, today there are plenty of decent-seeming knockoffs available on the internet and even in stores. Unless your dealer is authorized, you can never be sure what you’re buying, so when the time comes for repairs or your watch requires a replacement part, you could be out of luck. Why jeopardize your investment in such an important item, which is often not just a timepiece, but a treasured heirloom?

ERICA MOLINARI

IS THIS A GOOD TIME TO INVEST IN GOLD?


T H E O R I G I N ATO R O F C U LT U R E D P E A R L S . S I N C E 1 8 9 3 .


GUY STYLE

EXPRESS YOURSELF! TEN GREAT WAYS FOR GUYS TO WEAR JEWELRY IN 2013. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

NOLET’S GIN

“HOW ELSE CAN A MAN REVEAL HIS TRUE PERSONALITY?”

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STEPHEN WEBSTER; DAVID YURMAN

I

t’s no secret: Men’s jewelry is uptrending this season and more guys are wearing more interesting jewelry pieces than at any time since the 1960s. And that’s a good thing, according to women everywhere who have been begging their men to step it up a bit, fashion-wise. And what better way for a guy to express his personality than with jewelry, the perfect accent for uniform male attire, be it a navy suit, golf shirt with khakis, or jeans and a T-shirt.... While it’s no longer about bling, men’s jewelry today is creative in a subtle, sophisticated, artisan-inspired kind of way, making it just as appropriate with business and formal wear as it is with casual wear. So bring out your inner rock star and consider the following: Stacks of bracelets. Mixing materials like leathers, metals, interesting beads and colored stones creates a unique look that reflects personal style. (We know a few corporate execs whose rolled up shirt sleeves reveal stacks of cool bracelets…) Pendants, dog tags, necklaces of all kinds. These might include the proverbial “skull” motifs, religious symbols and “slices” of colored minerals (agates, geodes, etc.). There are even pendants made from dinosaur bone, tire treads and other unusual materials. Wear them on anything from a gold or silver chain to a beaded or leather cord. A simple ID bracelet. Whether it’s yours, your dad’s or your partner’s, it’s sure to turn heads and sure to become a family heirloom. A modern link bracelet. Maybe in a non-traditional metal like titanium or hammered sterling with a gunmetal finish (gold is good too!). Cuff links. Have fun with them! Vintage designs like subway tokens, golf clubs and typewriter keys are always fun, but you can’t go wrong with sleek modern styling and/or anything personalized. (Young men are wearing French cuff shirts, even when they’re not wearing suits!) A tie bar. Not for everyone, but this retro-inspired accessory adds a touch of hipster, especially worn with skinny ties. The ring’s the thing! Wedding bands, commitment bands, anniversary, eternity, fraternity: nothing symbolizes devotion more emphatically than a band of gold (or platinum!). If it’s been awhile since your original wedding bands, you and your loved one might want to consider a more contemporary statement. (Even if you still have the same partner after all these years, your taste has likely evolved.) A bold signet-type ring with a fabulous colored stone. A fun watch. Something colorful, playful, not so serious. Something sporty, rugged or with complications. (Because life can be complicated…) The quintessential classic dress watch. In gold of course. Because he deserves it. (And if not now, when?)


HAMILTON JEWELERS RUNWAY TRENDS

BIGGER IS BETTER

Hamilton’s Gemstone Collection 18k white gold necklace featuring oval peridot and blue topaz, round sapphire and brilliant cut diamonds totaling over 100 carats of gemstones and diamonds Hamilton’s Gemstone Collection earrings in 18k white gold with black rhodium finish, green tourmaline and diamonds Ippolita 18k gold Ondine Hero necklace crafted with brown and black shell, mother of pearl, quartz and smoky topaz Hamilton’s Gemstone Collection open teardrop earrings with white diamonds and chocolate rose cut diamonds in 18k yellow gold Paul Morelli 16” leaf necklace in yellow, white, pink and black gold, black rhodium, white diamonds, black diamonds, cognac diamonds and yellow diamonds


HAMILTON JEWELERS RUNWAY TRENDS

FALL FOR COLOR

Hamilton’s Rare Gemstone Collection handmade ring set in 18k white and yellow gold with emerald cut pink tourmaline and yellow zircon side stones Temple St. Clair 18k yellow gold owl pendant with mixed garnets and diamonds Hamilton’s Rare Gemstone Collection hand-wrought fancy colored natural sapphire bracelet with round brilliant cut diamonds; each sapphire is set in a four prong setting and each round brilliant cut diamond is set in a smooth bezel of platinum Hamilton’s Private Reserve Collection one-of-a-kind handmade drop earrings set with two rare matched, carved natural emeralds weighing 29 carats, two sugarloaf cabochon violet sapphires weighing a total of 9.09 carats, set with diamonds and tsavorites Hamilton’s Private Reserve Collection 25-carat cabochon ruby ring in an intricate setting of 18k white and yellow gold, flanked by 2 bright pearshape diamonds and round diamonds on the shank


CATALOG

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shop.catalogspree.com Win a $1,000 Hamilton Jewelers gift card through Nov 30 See details on catalogspree.com/contest

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HAMILTON JEWELERS RUNWAY TRENDS

CUFFS & COLLARS

Hamilton’s Gemstone Collection textured 18k white gold and blackened sterling silver hinged bangle bracelet with sapphires and diamonds Hamilton’s Diamond Fashion Collection open link cuff bracelet with diamond links in 18k rose gold Hamilton’s Diamond Fashion Collection vintage design 18k rose gold cuff bracelet with princess and brilliant-cut chocolate and white diamonds and baguette diamonds Ippolita hand-hammered sterling silver Gladiator cuff Paul Morelli 18k white gold Labyrinth flexible cuff in black rhodium, with white diamonds, cognac diamonds and black diamonds Paul Morelli 18k white gold wire cuff bracelet with 11 rows of diamonds and 23 diamond clusters and snapover door clasp


TIMEPIECES

WHAT WOMEN WANT S

ince 1830, Baume & Mercier has been making fine Swiss watches that last. And since the early 1900s—when women first started wearing timepieces on brooches, as necklaces and around their wrists—the brand has designed specifically with discerning females in mind. “In the early days, there were only larger men’s timepieces. Baume & Mercier was one of the first (in fact, we helped start the trend) to manufacture timepieces for women,“ explains Rudy Chavez, brand president of North America. “Because we’ve been doing it for over 100 years, it’s a part of our DNA; we aren’t just making smaller versions of men’s watches. “There are more similarities than differences between men and women when it comes to choosing a timepiece,” Chavez asserts. “They’re both looking for a brand with a pedigree, an attractive style and a good value. But one difference is that women are really seeking versatility. They want a watch they can wear formally, at work and on the weekends.” With that aim, Baume & Mercier introduced the Linea collection, designed exclusively for women and offered in steel, steel with 18K gold, and steel with diamonds. This year they’ve expanded the collection with new sizes and materials, including rose gold (above), and a larger collection of straps that allows a woman to choose between links, colored leathers, and even satin for evening.

The watch maker has also recently unveiled a delicate new size in its Hampton collection, first introduced in 1994. Inspired by a museum piece from the 1940s, the collection combines key original design elements, like a distinctive rectangular case, with stylish modern accents. Today’s reinterpretation of this iconic piece in its smaller size (left) gracefully embodies vintage Art Deco styling with a timeless twist. Baume & Mercier’s timeless designs are precisely what make its watches the perfect gift. “You want to give a watch with a rich history and a Swiss pedigree,” says Chavez. “And you don’t want to give a gift that five years from now will be outdated. You want that someone special to love it as much years later as they did on day one.” The brand’s campaign theme is ‘Life is About Moments,’ so when Chavez, who spends much of the year traveling, runs into someone wearing a Baume & Mercier timepiece, he likes to ask how they acquired it. “It’s incredible how many times they reply that the watch was a gift, and they glow as they tell me the story of where they were and who gave it to them, whether it was from their father on graduation day, or their husband to commemorate the birth of a first child. It’s a gift that constantly reminds the wearer of the special occasion they celebrated and the person who gave it to them. “It’s much more than a timepiece; it’s a piece of your life.”

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NOLET’S GIN

BAUME & MERCIER LADIES TIMEPIECES OFFER MODERN STYLING AND A RICH HISTORY. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE


WEDDINGS

STORY PHOTOGRAPHERS

A SPECIAL BRIDAL SECTION FROM ACCENT MAGAZINE


THE RINGS

BY LAURIE SCHECHTER

NEW AND NON-TRADITIONAL UNIQUE OPTIONS ABOUND TO SUIT EVERY COUPLE’S TASTE.

ince engagement and wedding rings are choices you live with forever, it’s no wonder that current bridal ring trends reflect the individual style and personality of their wearers more than a strict tradition or a certain set of rules. In fact, non-traditional is the new trend! One has only to look to recent famous weddings and engagements for proof: think Angelina Jolie’s custom-designed engagement ring of graduated tablet-shaped diamonds, or the new Mrs. Mark Zuckerberg and Jessica Simpson, both showing off ruby engagement rings. Many of today’s rings are rooted in history. The giving of rings along with taking vows of marriage dates back to ancient times. The wedding band, fashioned into a circle, symbolizes never-ending immortal love, and

the finger it is worn on was thought to have a special vein connected directly to the heart. Both customs are said to have originated in Ancient Egypt. The forerunner to the modern-day engagement ring was the ancient Greeks’ betrothal rings. Early betrothal rings from the Middle Ages, called ‘‘posy’’ rings, were inscribed with poems and love notes. Engagement rings with diamonds were first given by royalty and nobles beginning in the 15th century, mixed with rubies in the 17th and 18th centuries, and had messages spelled out in colored stones in the 18th and 19th centuries. Today’s betrothed have all this history to mine, with the benefit of modernity found in unusual designs and wide range of metals, stones and shapes available.

In actuality, the halo has never really gone away, but it has been trending more strongly for the past few years, which aligns with the reigning popularity of round diamond cuts. The difference now is the variety of designs available, and the cuts and arrangement of the stones. Double halos with two rows of surrounding stones, three-stone rings (a descendent of the early 20th-century princess ring) incorporating halo diamonds, and the stilltrending-strong eternity wedding bands with halo diamonds are all turns on the halo’s road to success. A. Jaffe reports, ‘‘Styles with cushion shaped halos surrounding the center diamond, as well as a cushion cut diamond standing alone in the center setting, are very popular engagement rings. Matching halo earrings and pendants for the bride have also become increasingly popular.’’

2.RESPONSIBLY SOURCED

Choosing diamonds that are sourced in an ethical manner is increasingly important among socially conscious brides. Without question, all the stones we sell in our store are responsibly sourced. Forevermark is among those that guarantee diamonds are carefully selected to meet “high standards of business, social and environmental integrity" (less than 1% of the world's diamonds are eligible to become a Forevermark diamond). Along with this heightened consciousness is the popularity of “recycling” diamonds: wearing vintage or heritage rings, family heirlooms which can be adapted and updated for a fresh look.

3.COLOR MY WORLD

Color seems to be the biggest driver at retail today. It’s the big story for women’s and men’s fashion on the runways and in the stores. Today’s bride, to set herself apart, might even opt for color instead of traditional white for her wedding dress. And color is, of course, also a big trend in engagement rings. Beautiful colored diamonds and other colored gemstones are surging in popularity in no small part due to the Duchess of Cambridge’s (previously Princess Diana’s) gorgeous sapphire engagement ring.

A C C E N T

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B R I D A L

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: FOREVERMARK, FOREVERMARK, SCOTT KAY, A. JAFFE, BEAUDRY

1.RETURN OF THE HALO


IF YOU HAD JUST ONE WISH...


TRENDS FOR SAME-SEX COUPLES

4.I’LL TAKE MINE

According to recent stats, there are currently around 50,000 samesex marriages in the United States. This number will continue to grow, and many brands are tailoring their designs to appeal to the emerging market. Of course, since same-sex marriages are grounded in the same traditions as conventional marriages, many of these design trends cross over to the mainstream.

WITH A TWIST

You can’t get much more non-traditional and unique than a twisted band engagement ring. It’s an individual statement with a modern spin that can quickly update the classic solitaire or take pavé in a new direction. In streamlined metal or an all-diamond band, it’s an attention grabber either way.

5.WIDEN

YOUR HORIZONS

Wide diamond bands and channel rings—where the band can be any width with diamonds filling the “channel” in the center—are trending as wedding bands and, in some cases, can even serve as both the engagement and wedding ring. With the high-powered real estate it occupies on the finger, it’s a glamorous and practical all-in-one statement.

6. MIXING IT UP

Using alternative metals and mixing metals are trends, and the unique options available have increased at an exponential rate. In both engagement rings and women’s wedding bands, there’s been a strong introduction of rose gold on its own or mixed with white gold, platinum or yellow gold. In men’s wedding bands, in addition to the classic yellow gold, white gold and platinum, there are many examples of alternate metals and materials: everything from palladium, tungsten carbide and cobalt to ceramic, titanium and seranite, all with two-tone as a leading direction.

A C C E N T

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WEDDING BANDS AND COMMITMENT RINGS Like the alternative lifestyle they represent, same-sex couples are choosing alternatives for their wedding bands. In traditional yellow or white gold, there might be some kind of unique treatment, like hammered details, on the band. But rings in less common metals are where personal statements can really stand out, especially for men. BioBlu27 Cobalt, the same material used in aerospace and medical applications, has a unique look and is available with diamonds or without. And with new ring styles come new traditions. Some women are foregoing engagement rings altogether, while men can opt for man-gagement rings: wedding bands worn on the right hand before the marriage, then transferred to the left during the wedding ceremony (a mini-trend in opposite sex relationships, as well). At the end of the day, says Dan Scott, CMO of Scott Kay, ‘‘Love is love. We need to remind ourselves that wedding bands are much more than jewelry; wedding bands embody precious, lifelong vows made between any two people in love." And no matter the sexual orientation, today’s couples are choosing rings that suit their personal style.

B R I D A L

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP: MEMOIRE, SCOTT KAY, RITANI, ROBERTO COIN, SCOTT KAY, ROBERTO COIN CENTO, MEMOIRE, RITANI, MEMOIRE

VINTAGE AND VINTAGE-LOOK ENGAGEMENT RINGS Some women in same-sex marriages are opting for customary engagement and wedding rings, but with more of a personal statement. Perhaps because of the sentimental value that they hold, vintage and vintage-look rings bring to mind the sentiments behind a marriage itself. (Christine Quinn, New York City’s City Council Speaker, married using her fiancée’s mother’s engagement ring.) Vintageinspired is also becoming a coveted look in new rings. Pavé-set diamonds, intricate hand engraving, filigree work and halos are all details reflecting this movement.


THE TRADITIONS

BY JACQUELIN CARNEGIE

Worldwide Weddings

INDIA TOURISM OFFICE, NY

BIG-DAY CUSTOMS FROM CENTURIES-OLD CULTURES.

lthough American-style weddings have gained popularity throughout the world, many countries retain their own colorful wedding traditions. These customs can vary from region to region and according to local religious traditions, but it’s interesting to note that almost all cultures have some version of “tying the knot.” A current trend in the U.S. is to research one’s family heritage and incorporate some of the noteworthy elements into a Western-style ceremony, or to replicate a traditional wedding outright. Here are a few highlights from centuries of tradition around the globe.

Hindu woman is married involve jewelry: Mangalsutra: black and gold beaded necklace with a gold or diamond pendant. The groom ties it around the bride’s neck during the ceremony; it’s comparable to a Western-style wedding ring. Bangles: gold and glass, often studded with precious and semi-precious stones such as diamonds, gems and pearls; mandatory, signifying long life for the husband. Armlets: encrusted with jewels or hanging crystals. Bichiya: toe rings worn as a symbol of the married state along with Anklets on both feet. Mang Tika: gold pendant adorned with jewels that hangs in the middle of the forehead. Nose Ring: an essential In many cultures, before the INDIA gold accessory in the left nostril. Rani Haar: gold wedding, the women gather Indian weddings are planned in accordance with filigree necklace with precious stones symbolizing at the bride’s house for a age-old customs and are known to be some of the prosperity. Earrings and Jhoomar: a piece of henna party with singing most beautiful and lavish. Weddings usually last five jewelry with gems worn on the side of the head; and dancing. The bride’s hands and feet are covered days with a number of rituals before, during and matches the design of the rani haar necklace. Waist with beautiful after the ceremony. The bride is adorned with lots of Band: like a necklace around the belly studded with henna designs. gold jewelry to symbolize wealth (a wearable “savings precious or semi-precious stones. Rings: worn on both account”) and purity. The gold given to the bride by her hands, attached to a bracelet by a central medallion. family, which they often start acquiring as soon as she’s born, contributes These are the most important aspects of a Hindu wedding ceremony: to her own “independent” wealth. Many of the symbols that indicate a Mangalfera: The couple walks around the sacred fire four times,

DID YOU KNOW?

A C C E N T

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B R I D A L


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stopping to touch a stone in the path with their toes to symbolize obstacles in life that they’ll overcome together. The four rounds signify: Dharma, righteousness; Artha, monetary accomplishment; Kama, energy and passion; Moksha, liberation from everything in life. Saptapadi: After the groom's scarf has been tied to the bride's dress signifying they’ll always stay together, the couple takes seven steps around the sacred fire representing nourishment, strength, prosperity, happiness, progeny, long life and marital harmony. The marriage is then considered legalized according to the Hindu Marriage Act as well as traditional customs.

MEXICO

have a Scottish surname, there’s a good chance you have a corresponding family tartan, so the men in your wedding party can all sport kilts. Bagpipes are appropriate music as is dancing the Lang Reel. Other Scottish wedding traditions vary by region: In the Borders, a sprig of heather in the bridal bouquet brings luck. In Aberdeen, Grampian, Angus and Dundee, luck comes with a sixpence in the bride’s shoe. And for financial luck, the bride’s father throws a handful of coins for the children to “scramble.” In the northeast, the best man gifts the happy couple with a clock, while the maid of honor gives them a tea set. In Shetland, wedding celebrations continue for two days with dancing and drinking. It’s said that “tying the knot” comes from an ancient Celtic practice with roots in pagan rituals. The bride and groom rip their wedding tartans and tie two strips together to symbolize the unity of the two families.

“I once read that watching a traditional Mexican boda is like studying the history of the country over the past seven centuries. Rituals and traditions from the Spanish, Aztec, Native American and AngloAmerican cultures are all incorporated into the ceremony,” says Carmen Laborin of the Mexico Tourism Board. Many Mexican wedding processions are accompanied by a JAPAN mariachi band and a donkey carrying bottles of It’s believed that the wedding tequila and wine for toasts along the way. Traditional Shinto wedding ceremonies are held ring originated in ancient Egypt Mexican brides have several vestido de novia at shrines. Brides wear shiromuku (formal white about 4,800 years ago. The ring’s (wedding dress) options depending on their kimono) and grooms wear montsuki (formal circlular shape was said to region and personal taste: everything from black kimono). The bride gets a ring and nine represent eternity, eternal love and a Western-style fancy white dress to a lucky gifts for happiness. It's common that only devotion. Rings were placed on the third finger of the left hand because beautifully embroidered, simple cotton huipil family members and close relatives attend. ancient Egyptians believed to an elaborately embroidered velvet dress or A Shinto priest offers prayers to the deities that it contained a vein one made from the local textiles with and the ceremony begins by purifying the couple. (vena amoris) that symbolic designs. After the purification and vows, the bride and groom led to the heart. Las Arras: In an ancient tradition, during the exchange cups ceremony, the groom gives the bride 13 gold coins of sake (rice wine) representing Jesus and the 12 apostles, which symbolizes the groom’s in the sansan-kudo (threecommitment to support his wife throughout their life together; her times-three) ceremony acceptance is a promise to take care of him. The bride also receives an symbolizing their union and ornate box for the coins’ safekeeping. the uniting of their families. El Lazo: The lasso is a beaded or jeweled rope or ribbon tied around Finally, symbolic offerings of the couple in a figure eight as they exchange their vows, signifying their sakaki (tree sprigs) are given to eternal bond and unity. Once the service is over, it’s removed. The the Kamisama (deity). During ceremony is followed by a parade with mariachi music and a reception that the kekkon hiroen (reception), lasts ’til the wee hours of morning with eating, drinking and dancing. the bride changes clothes several times, a tradition SCOTLAND dating to the 14th century, Today, at most Scottish weddings, the groom, his best man and the signifying her readiness to groomsmen are kitted out Highland-style in matching tartans. If you return to everyday life. A C C E N T

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B R I D A L

CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: JORGE TINAJERO; JOYCE YOUNG OF TARTAN SPIRIT; YASUFUMI NISHI COURTESY JNTO

DID YOU KNOW?


Set the Tone BY JILLIAN L A ROCHELLE

QUIRKY WORDING

THE NEW NEONS LOCATION LOCATION LOCATION “We get a lot of clients asking to do something location-specific, like this custom design that features the Boston skyline,” says Samantha Finigan of Gus & Ruby Letterpress in Portsmouth, N.H. Whether your bash is in the city or country, it’s a great personalized touch. (Bonus points if the design is handillustrated.)

Neon colors are hot right now. They’re showing up everywhere from fashion to home décor, and of course, in wedding design. Neon on white looks fresh and is the prefect way to make a simple graphic statement. For the not-so-bold, Finigan assures us that “muted watercolor pastels are also a big color trend, especially in letterpress printing.”

HAVE FUN WITH FONTS With typefaces this interesting, who needs colors or imagery? We think they’re plenty pretty on their own. According to Finegan, “Justified [centered] type with variations in font has been a huge hit.”

Carolina and Logan replaced the usual “reception to follow” with this fun phrase promising “wild revelry” after the ceremony. RSVP cards are another great place to experiment with expressions. Instead of “will attend” and “will not attend,” try “wouldn’t miss it for the world” and “we’ll be there in spirit,” or the simple-but-cheeky “yay” and “nay.”

IMPACTFUL INVITATIONS WILL GET YOUR GUESTS EXCITED FOR THE BIG DAY. In addition to the trends we’ve highlighted here, Finigan recommends adding a foil stamp or a splash of unexpected color to freshen up a traditional invitation design. Envelope liners are a fun way to introduce a pattern that might otherwise overwhelm your invitation. And don’t forget about the front of the envelope: it’s the very first thing guests will see when they open the mailbox! Hand calligraphy is always the ultimate luxe touch, and some brides are choosing an assortment of vintage stamps to add a final pop of visual interest. A C C E N T

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B R I D A L

SECOND IMAGE FROM RIGHT COURTESY BELLA FIGURA; ALL OTHER IMAGES COURTESY BREA MCDONALD FOR GUS & RUBY LETTERPRESS

T H E I N V I TAT I O N S


PEACE OF MIND STARTS WITH PROOF OF QUALITY. Carat Weight 1.53

Color Grade E

Clarity Grade VS1

Cut Grade

Excellent

Laser Inscription Registry Number GIA 16354621

Natural Diamond Not Synthetic

A GIA report is certainty from the source. As creator of the 4Cs and the International Diamond Grading System™, GIA sets the standards for diamond assessment, worldwide. Unbiased. Scientific. A report from GIA gives you a clear understanding of your diamond’s quality. Look for GIA Diamond Grading Reports and the jewelers who offer them. www.4cs.gia.edu

THE UNIVERSAL STANDARD BY WHICH GEMS ARE JUDGED.


PRICELESS INSIGHT HANK SIEGEL knows jewelry from the inside, out.

T

hree things a jeweler can’t do without. A clear business philosophy. A great employee team. The trust of your clients. How did you get into the business? I’m a third-generation jeweler. For me, there was never any question I would follow the footsteps of my father and grandfather into this extraordinary business. All-time favorite piece of jewelry? Wow. Tough one. Probably a platinum and diamond bracelet my grandfather designed for a client in the 1960s. Now it’s part of our permanent historic collection. Most valuable lesson learned at work? Find new ways to create excitement. We love special events and have some spectacular ones. From a 1958 store opening we commemorated by giving customers a new silver dollar to displays of our jewelry in the New Jersey State Museum. What should a customer always look for? A jeweler that inspires confidence. Design that is timeless. Value, in terms of craftsmanship and quality of the materials.

Why is a GIA report so important? GIA exists to protect the public trust in gems. The combination of a reputable jeweler and a GIA lab report is the ultimate assurance in a purchase. Insider’s tip? Here’s a little-known fact. The word “carat” takes its name from the carob seed. Because they had a fairly uniform weight, early gem traders used carob seeds as counterweights in their balance scales. Best source for diamond know-how? 4cs.gia.edu. Not only to explain what to look for in a diamond, it’s information jewelers use themselves.


T H E D E TA I L S

BY LISA MONTEMORRA MENGHI

Something Even Newer AS TIME MOVES FORWARD, SO DOES OUR DESIRE TO RE-INVENT OLD TRADITIONS.

It’s a ritual dating back to the Victorian era that’s meant to bring luck to newlyweds: on her wedding day, the bride carries or wears something old, something new, something borrowed and something blue. Here, a few ideas for the modern bride who wants to honor this age-old custom with a fresh, updated twist.

Above: Sterling Silver Floral Stemmed Pair Candlesticks ca. 1943, USA

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SOMETHING OLD • Think out of the box. Your ‘somethings’ can be places or decorations instead of worn items. One example: hold your wedding at a historic site. • Display old photos of ancestors (extra points if taken on their wedding days) at your ceremony and/or reception. It’s heartfelt and gives your guests an insight into your family history. • Wear lace or a button from a family member’s wedding dress in your hair, or incorporate it into your bouquet. • Have your ring bearer carry the rings in a treasured heirloom instead of on the standard satin

pillow. A jewelry box from a beloved family member could also hold a flower girl’s petals. • Instead of wearing heirloom jewelry in its intended manner, pin or sew it onto your gown as a featured design element. • Find an alternative use for your mother’s or grandmother’s veil. Use it to wrap your bouquet or drape it over a photo display table.

book table. It will elicit good memories of shared family meals and togetherness. • Give your grandmother’s crystal candleholders or vase a vacation from the curio cabinet with a place of honor at your ceremony. • Borrow a pretty silver knife from a friend or family member and use it to cut the cake. • Set your sweetheart table with heirloom china and silver, to make your first meal as husband and wife even more special. • If your parents are sentimental, they probably still have their wedding cake topper. Get it out of that dusty box in the garage and give it another go.

SOMETHING BLUE our bouquet Embellish y a family dress. m o with lace fr

SOMETHING BORROWED • Borrow a family tablecloth to dress up the escort card or guest

A C C E N T

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• Incorporate a beautiful blue stone or side stones into your wedding band. Sapphire, blue topaz, tanzanite and aquamarine are all excellent choices. • Why not wear a pair of strappy blue evening shoes? They’ll be a fun flash of color beneath your dress. • Getting rid of wedding cake guilt

B R I D A L

Something b and yummy lue... too! is easy: decorate it with delicious fresh blueberries and meet your daily fruit quota! • When you go for your wedding day pedicure, choose a pretty pale blue. Or how about a strip of blue to replace the white on a French manicure? • Use a small blue clutch for your lipstick, cell phone and other wedding day necessities. • Signature drinks are always fun. Why not use Blue Curaçao to concoct your custom cocktail? • Splurge on luxurious blue lingerie for your wedding night.

SOMETHING NEW

• A brand new piece of jewelry, of course! You’ll be investing in an heirloom that will have special meaning for the next generation of your family.


PerfectGems

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER.

CHRIS LEE

SLH

BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

UPSTAGED

Renée Fleming, the Simon Bolivar Symphony Orchestra of Venezuela, and the New York Pops are just a few of the artists performing at Carnegie Hall this season. You could buy tickets, but to really be involved in these remarkable occasions, join the Patrons. You’ll have access to rehearsals and meet-the-artist cocktail parties, a ticket concierge to arrange for special seating requests, and the very glamorous Opening Night Gala. In addition, Patrons are offered one of the most fascinating insider experiences in New York City: while telling stories and sharing his extraordinary knowledge, Carnegie Hall archivist Gino Francesconi escorts Patrons on a private tour up, down and all around, including visits to the Maestros’ Suite and other fascinating parts of the historic hall. Chances are this excursion will end on a high note.

TRUFFLE TIME!

Every autumn, New York’s famed SD26 offers white truffles gathered in the Piedmont region of Italy. To celebrate the arrival of these delicacies, the restaurant presents a special menu (through December). Marisa May, who owns and runs SD26 with her father, Tony May, has a favorite among the elaborate dishes: uovo in raviolo con burro tartufato. Created by Nino Bergese (personal chef to the last king of Italy) and now prepared by SD26 chef Matteo Bergamini, a single, large raviolo is stuffed with a barely cooked egg whose yolk spills forth into a sauce of brown butter, all under a mantle of white truffles. SD26’s wine director, Michael Doctor, pairs this treat with a Barolo, La Corda della Briccolina, Batasiolo 1995. Ms. May ha gusto bella.

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S ER EI N D I A MON D SER EI N D I A MON D T W O- T ON E


LAGERFELD’S ODYSSEY

It’s hard to imagine Monte Carlo’s belle epoch Hotel Metropole being any more stylish. A gathering place for the social and chic since 1886, the Metropole has lavish guest rooms, a comfortable bar with outstanding wines, and a concierge who can arrange pretty much anything, from racecar driving to co-piloting a fighter jet. However, the Metropole is adding additional opulence. Designer Karl Lagerfeld has recently revamped the outdoor spaces— including the pool, terrace and gardens—and even added a new Joel Robuchon restaurant (this one has a Mediterranean-influenced menu). One of Lagerfeld’s most impressive innovations is a fresco-style installation of 15 imposing glass panels portraying Ulysses’ journey.

WEAVING PAST AND PRESENT

ACTIVE ISLAND

Vojtech Blau is the only business in the United States dedicated exclusively to tapestries. By appointment only, clients can discover some of the world’s most exquisite examples of woven art. Director Simona Blau, a brilliant historian and art collector, started with creations from the 16th through 18th centuries and has recently added works though the mid-20th century. Among the marvelous pieces displayed on the walls of her attractive showroom are Flemish and Bruges tapestries along with creations by Alexander Calder, whose interest in tapestry led him to partner directly with Aubusson weavers, and Sonia Delaunay, one of the greatest translators of a modernist consideration of color and form to the material and texture of tapestry. Brilliant combinations of ancient skill and contemporary art.

Ah, winter vacation. You might locate a secluded beach and stretch out in the sun. Or, you could sail over to the Bitter End Yacht Club on Virgin Gorda, where there’s lots to do. Take to the water: Bitter End’s fleet has over 100 vessels, including sailboats, catamarans, kayaks, paddleboats and motorboats. Shape up: Fitness guru Andrea Metcalf offers one-onone training. Give a party: Bitter End will bring in a major musical act (The Beach Boys and Michael McDonald have been booked in the past). Indulge: Winston’s Bakery is known around the world for its breads, pastries and luscious desserts. And if you really just want to chill: Bitter End has three white sand beaches where you can simply sit.

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For Over 25 Years


FOOD

FIRST-GENERATION FAME CHEF GEORGE MENDES IS A NATIONAL TREASURE. BY SHIRA LEVINE

What’s your ideal meal? I love my beef. At Keens Steakhouse, I dig into a nice porterhouse, a Caesar

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salad, some oysters and wine. A good steak on my day off helps me feel nourished and relaxed. You’ve traveled a lot during your career. Besides New York’s, what other food scenes do you take inspiration from? My family roots in Portugal are a huge influence. I go twice a year and love visiting the local cafés, beer bars and gastropubs. Everything is so simply prepared and fresh. Also, Paris, the south of France, Barcelona and San Sebastian are important to me. That’s where I spent my early years learning. What Canada and Denmark are doing with the foraging movement is another great influence. It’s nothing extremely new though, just a return to the basics. It’s funny that people today see eating locally as a trend. Everything is in season somewhere in the world. It’s my responsibility as a chef to utilize what’s nearby, support farmers, focus on what is sustainable for the area and care about our oceans. It’s a responsibility I take seriously. How do your Portuguese roots shape your sensibility as a chef? My parents are immigrants and farmed their own food. They continued a lot of those values at our home in Connecticut. We had a garden that I’d help my dad prepare each season. It was a way of life for us. Our kitchen table was especially influenced in the spring and summer months because of that garden. It taught me the importance of knowing where my food came from. The [Portuguese] culture, the homey rustic feel of eating at home during the holidays, and the feasts my family would prepare are my strongest memories. Christmas, New Year’s Eve and Thanksgiving were always big lavish feasts that my mom and aunt would spent days preparing for.

JERRY ERRICO

I

f you watch Bravo’s cooking shows, Chef George Mendes might be a familiar face. He appeared on the third season of Top Chef Masters, which won him many foodie fans of the (mostly) female variety. But sex appeal isn’t the only dish Mendes serves up. For this first-generation American born to Portuguese parents, cooking has always been about the fresh, the local, the in-season, the simple: in other words, the most delicious foods nature has to offer. Growing up in Danbury, Connecticut, Mendes was always surrounded by good food. He’d help his mother and aunt in the kitchen and work in the garden out back with his father. As a result, Mendes enjoys working with his hands. It was either a career in interior design and architecture, or working as a chef. His decision to cook came ultimately, he says, “because I constantly have to be in motion and doing something; I couldn’t be stuck in an office.” A graduate of the Culinary Institute of America in Hyde Park, New York, he worked under culinary legends Alain Ducasse and David Bouley and refined his palate in France, Spain, San Francisco and D.C. at a number of Michelin-starred hotspots. In 2009, he finally went solo to open Aldea in New York City. The rustic yet classic restaurant featuring Spanish, French and Portuguese influences has already scored a Michelin star of its own, been deemed one of the country’s 10 best new restaurants by GQ’s Alan Richman, and helped Mendes become a finalist for the James Beard Foundation’s Best Chef New York Award. Accent managed to catch Mendes in a rare free moment to chat about his impressive accomplishments.


How do you describe the cuisine at Aldea? I operate with my history in mind: the Portuguese were seafarers and explorers, discovering new lands. We brought spices and new flavors that influenced a lot of menus. Aldea is Portuguese-inspired with global influences. Early on, Portugal had colonies throughout the world, so you can see flavors from Brazil, Japan and India in my menu. You can also see my French training in there. All of my exploring has helped define my style. What is your presentation style? Minimalist. I like to focus on the color of food. My favorite time of year is spring, where all these edible colors pop out naturally. I’m not one to manipulate. I love the bounty of what comes in during those months. And maybe it’s my Mediterranean roots, but I love to enjoy my meals in the sun.

Top Chef really give food the opportunity to shine. I love to be in my restaurant, but it was a great platform for exposure. Would you do TV again? I would, if it were the right fit. I’d love an educational role where I teach the public about Portuguese cuisine, about growing your own food and eating as local as possible. I don’t want to be formed into a character. Do you have a cookbook in the works? It’s scheduled for spring 2014. It will be about Aldea, and be an introduction to Portuguese cuisine for the home cook. It will also include the story of my life and, of course, some great recipes.

FROM GEORGE MENDES’ KITCHEN

I know the term ‘fusion’ is kind of overused... I hate the word fusion. Some chefs will mismatch cuisines just to be creative, but they don’t necessarily know what they’re doing in terms of pairing flavors. You should know your history and combine things because they work. You don’t just pair because you want to create some new, unheard-of style. These fusion chefs overlook history and ancestry. True cooking comes from your heart, your ancestry, what was in your home. What are some exciting things on your menu right now? We’re using a lot of ramps, wild leeks, wild onions and wildflowers. We’re working with a forager, Evan Strusinski, who is bringing in things from the wild—herbs and plants not readily available from our regular sources. We’re always looking for new ingredients. We’re using chickweed, different kinds of mints and wintergreens, fiddlehead ferns, ramps and all kinds of exciting stuff in the mushroom category. If you’ve never eaten at Aldea, try the sea urchin toast; it’s refined and elevated. Or anything with shrimp, my duck rice... I’d say they all encompass rustic refinement. That’s a lot to introduce to the average (potentially not-soadventurous) eater! It’s about coming across what grows naturally in the woods that people don’t know they can eat. The forager has been providing us with things that I didn't know existed! For winter we’ll work with more robust, heartier flavors. Warm foods with an elevated level of refinement. Look for the tripe stew with root vegetables and quail eggs. Plus, winter means blue truffle season. Are there plans to open a second restaurant? We have plans but there is no forecast. When the right place comes along, then it’s the right time. We need a place that allows our vision to flourish, so it could take another 18 months to come together. You were on Top Chef Masters, so you’ve got an insider’s perspective on the reality show business. What are your thoughts about these cooking shows? I’m really split on it. Food TV can have a great impact on business, but it really depends on the chef’s desires. Does he want to be on TV, or does he want to be in his restaurant? Top Chef Masters was difficult, but it was a fantastic experience. Some of the food shows are just about entertainment; they pretty much forget the food. But Tom Colicchio and

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Eggs Baked with Peas, Linguiça and Bacon extra-virgin olive oil, as needed 11/2 ounces slab bacon cut into 1/2-inch slices, then into 1/4-inch batons 1/ 2

white Spanish onion, finely diced

3

garlic cloves, thinly sliced

1

fresh California bay leaf, notches torn every 1/2 inch

1

pinch crushed red chile flakes

3

tbsp. strained tomatoes

2

ounces linguiça, cut into 1/2-inch dice

1/ 4

ounce chorizo, casing removed and thinly sliced

2

cups frozen petit peas kosher salt to taste

4

large eggs

1/ 2

cup parsley leaves, chopped

fresh lemon juice, to taste Preheat oven to 350°F. Heat a 4-quart cocotte over medium heat. Add just enough olive oil to coat the bottom, then add the bacon. Cook, stirring

occasionally, until the fat is rendered and the bacon lightly browned, about 4 minutes. Transfer the bacon to a dish. Add the onion, garlic, bay leaf and chile flakes to the cocotte and cook, stirring, until tender but not browned, about 3 minutes. Add the tomatoes and 1 teaspoon olive oil and cook, stirring and scraping down the sides of the pan, for 4 minutes. The tomatoes should be sizzling steadily. Stir in the linguiça, chorizo, reserved bacon and 1 teaspoon olive oil. Cook, stirring occasionally, until heated through, about 2 minutes. Stir in the peas and season to taste with salt. Make 4 little nests for the eggs in the mixture, spacing them a few inches apart. Carefully break an egg into each nest, making sure each egg is nestled in the stew and flush with the top. Transfer to the oven and bake until the egg whites are set but the yolks are still runny, about 8 minutes. Top with the parsley and season to taste with lemon juice. Serve immediately. Serves 4.


PHOTOGRAPHY

ALWAYS IN FASHION

THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. © 2012 CINDY SHERMAN.

CELEBRATED ARTIST CINDY SHERMAN GOES INCOGNITO. BY DAVID HOWLETT

All of the photographs in Sherman’s MoMA show are untitled. As in a children’s picture book with no text, the viewer has to supply his or her own narrative. The scenarios require some thought to decipher; men and women or people from different backgrounds may see two different stories. Following the “film stills,” Sherman produced a series of “centerfolds,” in which she appears sprawled on a sofa or stretched on a floor—but fully clothed. In Untitled #96, she wears an orange plaid ensemble and looks

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Above: Sherman appears four times in a Balenciaga dress for a gala event. Untitled #463. 2007-08. Chromogenic color print, 68 5/8” x 6 (174.2 x 182.9 cm). Courtesy the artist and Metro Pictures, New York © 2012 Cindy Sherman.

NOLET’S GIN

E

ven though she’s one of the most photographed women in America, you probably wouldn’t recognize Cindy Sherman if you saw her on the street. That’s because Sherman has built a career—the subject of a superb and exciting retrospective at New York’s Museum of Modern Art— of photographing herself in a wide variety of disguises. In the late-’70s, Sherman first made a splash with her series of untitled “film stills.” The black-and-white photos show a woman in a scene from a movie that could have been directed by Alfred Hitchcock. But the stills are not from real movies. Instead they come from Sherman’s imagination. She appears as a character about to discover a clue to a crime, or looking over her shoulder, suddenly certain she’s being followed.


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A

From top left: “I know a lot of people in the entertainment business.” Untitled #474. 2008. Chromogenic color print, 7’ 6 3/4” x 60”(230.5 x 152.4 cm). “On her first trip to the big city, our heroine suspects she is being followed.” Untitled Film Still #21. 1978. Gelatin silver print, 7 1/2 x 9 1/2”(19.1 x 24.1 cm). “Will I ever find true love?” An image from Sherman’s centerfold series. Untitled #96. 1981. Chromogenic color print, 24 x 47 15/16 (61 x 121.9 cm). high fashion itself. One photo shows four young women (all Cindy Sherman, of course) at what could be a party for a gallery opening or fashion show. Identically dressed and holding red plastic drink cups, they display a sort of forced gaiety, with toothy smiles and expressions of excitement. The photo was commissioned by Vogue Paris, and Sherman wears a Balenciaga dress. We are free to think what we want, but it seems that Sherman is critiquing the fashion scene and the red carpet mentality it fosters. In another picture, we see a wealthy, middle-aged woman in a sequined couture dress. She has on tasteful gold jewelry and stands in front of a display of what might be celebrity publicity shots. Perhaps the pictures are of an earlier generation, but this woman is a survivor. She is confident, comfortable and famous. And she is Cindy Sherman. This exhibition travels to the San Francisco Museum of Modern Art (July 14 to Oct. 7, 2012), Walker Art Center, Minneapolis (Nov. 10, 2012 to Feb. 17, 2013) and Dallas Museum of Art (March 17 to June 9, 2013).

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THE MUSEUM OF MODERN ART, NEW YORK. © 2012 CINDY SHERMAN.

languidly into the distance. The character clutches a newspaper clipping that has advertisements for “singles,” suggesting a failed romance. The pose, perhaps based loosely on a Playboy spread, makes us ask whether a clothed woman is not more interesting by far than a naked one. In Sherman’s photos, the body parts are hidden but her characters’ souls are exposed. In the late-’80s, Sherman posed herself in the guise of famous portraits from art history. In elaborate costumes, she is a nursing Renaissance Madonna or a bald (male) Italian aristocrat. She seems to suggest that photography is a serious rival to the art of painting. Sherman is not a narcissist, concerned only with her own image. She started photographing herself simply because no model was willing to sit for the six hours she needs to make a single picture. Sherman performs every role herself: model, wardrober, hairdresser, photographer, a fact that helps make sense of the varied disguises in the pictures. Perhaps Sherman is commenting on the different roles we all play as we live our lives: worker, daughter, mother and so forth. In each role we behave—and appear—differently. trip through this exhibit also shows the way the science of photography has evolved over recent decades. In the ’70s, Sherman took 23 small pictures of herself against a white curtain in the style of a photo booth. In them, she progressively changes from a woman with glasses (we would guess Sherman as herself) to a Geisha, and finally a film star. These are simple black-and-white photos made from contact prints. In her recent “society” portraits, Sherman poses in front of a green screen so that she can later fill in whatever background she wants (in several cases, The Cloisters museum in New York). She also uses Photoshop to move her eyes closer together, to make herself look older, or to appear heavier. Sherman has mastered the modern techniques and one suspects she will continue to use all the latest special effects. A key to understanding Sherman’s relationship to fashion is buried in a side room in the middle of her MoMA show. A stop-action movie she made in the ‘70s shows Sherman as a cut-out paper doll in her underwear. The doll selects paper clothes to try on, and admires herself. Essentially, this is Sherman playing dress-up, something she has done with great success for the last 35 years. More recently, Sherman seems to have been examining the world of


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THE ARTS

“IN HERE, LIFE IS BEAUTIFUL.” BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

J

ohn Iachetti doesn’t spend much time behind his desk at the entrance to Feinstein’s. Smiling and charming, the director of entertainment greets guests and personally escorts them to their tables, as if hosting an exclusive private dinner party. His enthusiasm is infectious. There’s an air of anticipation as musicians settle on the small stage, the lights dim, and a voice announces the performer. The audience applauds (when a favorite takes the stage they cheer like baseball fans). For the next 70 minutes, a talented entertainer will be close enough to touch, playing to each individual, talking and joking with the crowd. On an average night, it’s exciting. On a great night, when a truly incomparable artist is at the peak of his or her powers, it’s an unforgettable experience. Cabaret in America has had its ups and downs. Popular at speakeasies during the Roaring Twenties and again at supper clubs during and after the Second World War, today it’s having a renaissance in grand rooms with gourmet chefs and elaborate wine lists, as well as little, out-of-the-way clubs. “I think cabaret is popular again because it’s a personal experience,” says Iachetti. “For the audience, it’s like sitting in a living room listening to brilliant performers tell their stories.” While cabarets occasionally feature instrumentalists or comedy acts, it’s the singers that fill the rooms. The great stars, like the legendary Barbara Cook, Marilyn Maye and Michael Feinstein, blend equal measures of artistry, emotion, and nostalgia…and often dress to the nines. Michael Feinstein is

always in a tuxedo. Marilyn Maye wears a jeweled brooch, a gift from Bob Mackie and Joe McFate, as well as an enormous star sapphire ring. (“I think it’s my obligation to be chic and I love jewelry,” she says.) Then there are the “insiders,” often brilliant entertainers with devoted followings in cabaret circles. And, of course, new performers who appear at open-mic shows, hoping for their big breaks. New York is the bastion of cabaret. Feinstein’s, currently at the Loews Regency (moving to a new location in January 2013), and the Café Carlyle at the Carlyle Hotel offer the ultimate in elegance and entertainment. Renowned for its sophisticated style, the glamorous Café Carlyle has been a classic New York destination since 1955 and still maintains the ambiance of a 1930s supper club. Famous and very fashionable guests settle back on comfortable blue-hued banquettes beneath enchanting (recently restored) Marcel Vertes murals for truly superb food and illustrious performers. Farther downtown, there’s Birdland, where on Monday nights the multitalented Jim Caruso holds his celebrated Cast Party. At this casually elegant gathering, eminent show business names, Broadway and cabaret pros, and new talent including the staff (bartender William Minyard brings down the house when he sings) show up to perform and mingle with the audience until the wee hours of the morning. The Duplex has been a Greenwich Village landmark for nearly 60 years. New Yorkers (and visitors anxious to explore the real thing) climb a set of

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THIS PAGE: COURTESY OF FEINSTEIN’S AT THE LOEWS REGENCY. OPPOSITE PAGE: PAT JOHNSON STUDIOS; RICHARD TERMINE; CHRISTOPHER HADLO CK

CABARET RENAISSANCE


Above: The Rrazz Room in San Francisco Right: Michael Feinstein and Barbara Cook perform Left: The Duplex in New York City’s Greenwich Village

somewhat rickety stairs to a long narrow room where some of the greatest entertainers, including Barbara Steisand and Woody Allen, have appeared. Booking manager Thomas Honeck says, “The Duplex has always been a place of beginnings…giving young performers a shot, a place to feel comfortable to try new things and stretch.” Today, audiences pack the room nightly for acts such as superb songstress Colleen McHugh, who offers enchanting contemporary interpretations of classic tunes, the comedic Recignos Brothers, and other fresh, innovative singers and comedy acts. abaret is, fortunately, not limited to New York. In Austin, the charming Austin Cabaret Theater, produced by Stuart Moulton, has presented Carol Channing, Elaine Stritch and Natalie Douglas in her tribute to Lena Horne. The attractive Royal Room at the Colony in Palm Beach combines gourmet food with shows by some of the best cabaret performers in the business. And then there’s the Rrazz Room in San Francisco. Owners Robert Kotonly and Rory Paull have created a plush nightclub with an extraordinary wine list and uncommon cocktails. Alternating tradition and innovation, some nights, the Rrazz Room sticks with the standards and the city’s society figures gather for Betty Buckley or Tony Martin. On other evenings, the club encourages young people to venture into the cabaret experience with acts like The Three Degrees and Jefferson Starship. Chances are, there’s now a cabaret near you. Go hear the music play.

C

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THE ARTIST’S VIEWPOINT Bebe Neuwirth “There is nothing that can compare to the experience of attending a live performance. The music is more deeply felt, the performance more deeply felt….” Barbara Cook “Cabaret is a place where honesty has a lot to do with how effective you are. You’re not playing a character, you’re your honest self.” Marilyn Maye “You create a real relationship with your audience; you make a moment, an evening.” Pianist Tedd Firth “I’ve worked with very well-known performers and first-timers. Cabaret has a common appeal: the chance to perform in an intimate setting that’s unlike any other performance environment.” Natalie Douglas “Sometimes I can feel the audience’s reactions…[they develop] an almost spiritual connection with me, the music, the lyrics and the musicians.” Colleen McHugh “Cabaret, at its best, provides the ultimate connection between song, performer and audience.” Jim Caruso “People have been ringing the death-knell for cabaret for years, yet it continues to thrive….”


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SPEED

THE THRILL OF VICTORY O

ver the decades, numerous Hollywood film stars have been bitten by the racing bug. There may be some profound reasons for this, or it may simply be that famous actors are accustomed to glamour and attention. When filming is over, the thirst for the excitement, danger and competition kicks in. (Or as Paul Newman once put it, “There’s no acting needed when driving; it’s just you and the machine.”) The connection between film stars and motor racing dates back to the turn of the 20th century, when Barney Oldfield became the first man to travel at one mile per minute. His fame as a racecar driver led to film stardom in the first half of that century. A significant number of racing films were made during that time, but the greatest of all was John Frankenheimer’s 1966 film Grand Prix starring James Garner. Garner went on to form a successful racing organization called American International Racers (AIR); when filming was completed, his cars raced with considerable success at Le Mans, Daytona, Sebring and other famous race circuits around the world. Steve McQueen’s film Le Mans may not have been a critic’s choice for best drama, but the racing action was brilliant, and his reputation as an accomplished racecar driver and motorcycle racer subsequently grew. Paul Newman filmed Winning around the same time; while it also lacked dramatic quality, the racing scenes

filmed at the Indianapolis 500 brought viewers to the edge of their seats. Newman’s racing was legendary, and at the age of 80 he was even part of a winning team at the Rolex 24 at Daytona. James Dean, James Coburn and Tom Cruise also enjoyed motor racing, earning respect in the amateur ranks of the sport. But today it’s Patrick Dempsey who charms race fans on and off the track. His dedication to the sport is unparalleled as a driver, team owner and ambassador for motor racing. Actors may not appreciate equal billing on film credits, but at a race circuit, they overwhelmingly acknowledge the team effort, giving much credit to their crews, their sponsors and their cars. Famous names like Ferrari, Porsche, Aston Martin, Lotus, Corvette, BMW and others have loyal fans of their own. In certain cases, the driver and the car are even upstaged by the race circuit. Just hearing names like Daytona, Sebring, Le Mans, Monaco, Spa-Francorchamps and Monza brings intense emotion to motor racing enthusiasts. And just as actors aspire to win an Academy Award, racecar drivers dream of winning a series championship. In 2012, endurance road racing in America celebrated two remarkable anniversaries: The Rolex 24 at Daytona marked its 50th and Sebring its 60th. Both venues have earned a unique place in the history of international motorsports—stars in their own right.

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Above: Patrick Dempsey enjoys a day at the races.

NOLET’S GIN

CARS, STARS AND HISTORIC RACE CIRCUITS. BY DAVID A. ROSE


TRAVEL

IT’S ABOUT TIME

AT FLORENCE’S HOTEL L’OROLOGIO, THE MAGIC IS IN THE DETAILS. BY STU NIFOUSSI

T

o the casual tourist, Hotel L’Orologio is a luxurious boutique inn overlooking Florence’s famed Piazza Santa Maria Novella, with a theme relating to clocks and watches. But to those who share owner Sandro Fratini’s passion for horology (the measurement of time), the hotel is a treasure trove of memorabilia and unique design, with discoveries around every corner. Fratini owns the small upscale hotel chain WTB (which stands for Why the Best?), with six hotels in Florence; he is also chairman of Super Rifle

S.p.A, the parent company of Rifle jeans. A lifelong collector of vintage watches, he owns more than two thousand, mainly from his three favorite brands: Rolex, Vacheron Constantin and Patek Philippe. At L’Orologio, Fratini has been able to combine his affinity for fine watches with his talent for consumer marketing, creating a singular and fascinating hotel experience. Each room at Hotel L’Orologio is identified in two ways: with a room number, as you might expect, and also with a name corresponding to a watch owned by

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NOLET’S GIN

ONE COULD SPEND HOURS CATALOGING THE LITTLE TOUCHES THAT MAKE THIS HOTEL UNIQUE IN THE WORLD.


A LIFELONG COLLECTOR OF VINTAGE WATCHES, FRATINI OWNS MORE THAN TWO THOUSAND. Signore Fratini. Each floor is devoted to a particular brand: the first to Vacheron Constantin, the second to Rolex, and the top two floors to Patek Philippe. Within each room are photos or artwork related to its namesake watch. For true watch aficionados, however, the real excitement is on the ground floor within the rooms off the lobby. Claudio Delli, general manager of WTB Hotels, showed off the incredible details waiting to be discovered by those who choose to look more closely. Among them: the exclusive mirrors designed in the style of Rolex watch bands, and the sundial etched into the floor beside a reflecting pool that appears to be illuminated by stellini, tiny stars in the ceiling above. Then there are the door handles in the shape of Rolex watch hands (sometimes called Mercedes because they’re similar to the Mercedes logo), and the hand-painted reproductions of watch faces that decorate the floor in the smoking lounge beside Il Bar de L’O. But the pieces de resistance were the elegant busts of Messieurs Patek and Philippe that grace the pedestals in the sitting area. One could literally spend hours cataloging the little touches that make this hotel unique in the world. WTB plans to roll out L’Orologio as their premier nameplate to other “artistic” cities in Italy, with new hotels planned for Venice and Rome. The company also markets L’Orologio products including scarves, alligator sneakers and other items, with an eye toward building L’Orologio into an internationally recognized brand.

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SPIRITS

GET THE SKINNY LOW-CAL DRINKS THAT DON’T SKIMP ON TASTE. BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON mint, Perrier and lime juice, for example, comes in at only 74 calories. In addition to the Skinnygirl brand, you’ll now find other pre-made and low-cal options on liquor store shelves. New Zealand-based VnC Cocktails’ pre-mixed drinks feature real fruit juices and about 14% vodka or tequila, keeping calories down to around 150 a serving. And Voli Vodka drops its potency a bit (to 70 proof), meaning the flavored brand requires less flavoring (sweeteners) to overcome the alcohol. Just remember— moderation is still the key. Drinking three or four of these tasty treats leads to trouble. And a tighter-fitting dress.

A Ty-Ku mojito with mint, Perrier and lime juice comes in at 74 calories.

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SLENDERIZE YOUR COCKTAILS • Replace sodas and tonics with sparkling water. This can cut your calories in half. (Mitigate flavor loss with a lime or grapefruit-flavored Perrier.) • Use fresh, seasonal fruits rather than high-calorie purees, juices or pre-bottled mixers. • Replace rum or light whiskies with sake or soju, lower in calories while still adding flavor (unlike vodka). • Don't discount liqueurs: Cointreau has a lower calorie count than many grain-distllied spirits, according to Williams. • Avoid booze with additives. Many lower-quality liquors (and wines) add sugar, caramel and other goodies to their ‘‘pure’’ product. • When drinking (or mixing with) Champagne, develop a taste for the drier varieties (Extra Sec, Brut and Ultra Brut) which have far less residual sugar. • In the 1790s, before there were cocktails, there were Slings: a little booze and a lot of water (think Scotch Highball). The Japanese drink similar cocktails, like 2 ounces of Hibiki or Yamakazi whiskey, with a large dose of soda water and ice. Refreshing and light. • Or follow Partida Tequila’s lead with its signature margarita: using agave nectar and spring water in place of triple sec and reducing the tequila by a half ounce shaves off 200 calories but actually enhances flavor.

NOLET’S GIN

O

ur national waistline may be expanding, but our palate has evolved. Where ‘‘diet drinking’’ was once limited to rum and Diet Coke or a cheap Chardonnay, we now want to have our mixology cake and drink it, too. Enter the ‘‘skinny’’ cocktail. First popularized by Real Housewife Bethenny Frankel and her line of Skinnygirl premixed cocktails (and now wines), the idea has spread, particularly to beach and resort destinations where a few extra calories go a long way. New York’s Haru Sushi recently launched a Skinny Happy Hour. The very posh St. Julien Hotel and Spa in Boulder is offering an elegant lineup of low-cal and no-cal (mock) cocktails, as is the Saltbox gastropub in San Diego. While most mixed drinks run in the 200 to 500 calorie range (or more!), drinks on the new menu have as few as 90 calories per glass (usually a 4ounce serving) and are still full of flavor. ‘‘We have plenty of higher proof and classic cocktails on the menu,’’ says Erin-Elizabeth Williams, the beverage manager for Saltbox. ‘‘But San Diego is also a driving city and a fitness-oriented city. The designated driver and dieter shouldn’t have to miss out on all the fun.’’ Patti Stanger, host of Bravo’s The Millionaire Matchmaker, agrees. She recently became a strategic partner at TyKu spirits (sake, soju and liqueurs), in part because of her desire to promote tasty, low-cal cocktail options. ‘‘A while back, I had lost a lot of weight, and wanted something that could get me over first-date jitters without a lot of calories. Sake was the drink.’’ A mojito made with Ty-Ku liqueur,


© D.YURMAN 2012


HAMILTON JEWELERS ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

FALL/WINTER 2012

Hamilton Jewelers  

The Magazine of Life's Celebrations!

Hamilton Jewelers  

The Magazine of Life's Celebrations!