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A C C E N T/ T H E M A G A Z I N E O F L I F E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N S

CELEBRATE SPRING!

Fashion Favorites All About Watches Last Bid for Love

SPRING/SUMMER 2012


If dreams came in shapes… Crisscut Diamond

© 2011 NACE Marketing, New York, All Rights Reserved.

®

Christopher Designs Crisscut

Generic Round 58 Facet

Crisscut ® Round 121 Facet

Generic Emerald 46 Facet

Crisscut ® Emerald 77 Facet

Generic Cushion 58 Facet

Crisscut ® Cushion 77 Facet

www.christopherdesigns.com or on Facebook: www.christopherdesigns.com/facebook


WELCOME

Dear Friends, As spring blooms this year, so does color in both fashion and accessories. Here at Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels, we seek out trendsetting jewelry to accent every wardrobe. A set of gemstone-adorned bangles or a vibrant cocktail ring brings a splash of color to a neutral outfit or accentuates a bold look. Spring 2012 is rich with color that brightens up not only our moods, but also our appearance. Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels can help you accessorize your favorite ensembles. Whether you are looking for a conversation starter or a subtle yet chic accessory, we’re proud to offer an extensive array of jewelry and timepieces. Throughout this issue you’ll find contemporary takes on the blending of color in fashion. Pale and vivid hues run together to create looks with vibrant color or demure beauty. Once again, we’ve assembled a fun fashion section, and this time we’ve added men’s looks too. We think you’ll see some interesting combinations, and hopefully find a few pieces for your wish list. We hope that after you’ve looked through this issue we’ll see you at Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels. We are truly happiest when we see how a piece of jewelry from one of our fine collections can make you feel extraordinary. With our expertise, we can assist you in creating an exceptional look for spring and summer. We’re dedicated to making you look and feel your best no matter what the occasion. We look forward to seeing you soon.

Bruce G. Weber, Founder

Michell Holdgrafer, Store Director

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Contents spring/summer 2012

1700 UTICA SQUARE 918-749-1700 800-749-1771 WWW.BRUCEGWEBER.COM

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P U B L I S H E D B Y T H E B J I FA S H I O N G R O U P PUBLISHER STU NIFOUSSI EDITOR-IN-CHIEF KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R HANS GSCHLIESSER MANAGING EDITOR JILLIAN LAROCHELLE PROJECT MANAGER LISA MONTEMORRA

FEATURES

DESIGNERS

1 Welcome Letter

CYNTHIA LUCERO

4 Our People: Shelly Byrne

JEAN-NICOLE VENDITTI

6 Events

PRODUCTION MANAGER

8 Caring for the Community:

PEG EADIE

Junior League of Tulsa

PRESIDENT AND CEO

10 Designers: Penny Preville

BRITTON JONES

12 Profile: John Hardy

CHAIRMAN AND COO

14 Profile: Forevermark

MAC BRIGHTON

16 Designers: Marco Bicego

Prices are subject to change without notice and may vary

18 Red Carpet

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WATCH SECTION

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44 Collecting: Time on His Side

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46 Complications: Passing Time

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FOREVERMARK DIAMOND NECKLACE

depending on size, quality and availability. Copyright 2012.

22 Trends: Renewal


OUR PEOPLE

Shelly Byrne CONTROLLER FOR BRUCE G. WEBER

How long have you worked for Bruce G. Weber? I've been working here for 15 years. Bruce still tells the story of when he interviewed me… I looked at the financial statements and told him "I can do it."

What is your favorite book of all time and why? With two young kids, I don't have much time for reading! What makes you smile? A child who has the giggles!

Where are you from originally? I grew up in Tulsa. I moved to Dallas for a few years after college, but I decided to move back home to be close to my family. Tulsa is a great place to live and raise a family. Describe your perfect day. Sleep late, coffee, lunch with a friend, spend a fun afternoon with my kids, and then go out on a date with my husband. (No cleaning, cooking, or laundry!) Actually, I think this is more of a fantasy. What’s your favorite way to spend a Sunday morning? I like to have a good cup of coffee and breakfast, read the newspaper, and go to church. What do your friends depend on you for, and why? I'm a good listener and a very loyal person. So when they need someone to talk to, they always know I will listen and be in their corner. What’s your favorite part of your job and why? I love that I get to work in accounting and I also get to be a part of such an interesting industry. Our jewelry is beautiful and well-designed so it's always fun to look at the inventory! It's also fun to see the joy that the gift of jewelry brings, whether it's for an engagement, anniversary, or just to say "I love you." You’ve planned the perfect vacation. Where are you going and what will you do? I would take my kids to Disney World. There's nothing better than seeing big smiles on their faces and hearing their laughter. Who has been the biggest influence in your life and how did they influence you? My parents have been the biggest influence in my life. They taught me to work hard and go for my dreams. They also taught me the importance of family. What kind of food do you crave most often? I love to go to my parents' house for dinner. They are the best cooks I know. My dad has a smoker and he cooks the best ribs, brisket and pork tenderloin. And my mom makes all the sides and the best desserts! They always cook for the holidays and for everyone's birthday! Name your top three favorite movies of all time. The Shawshank Redemption, The Sixth Sense and Forrest Gump

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BRUCE G. WEBER EVENTS

Top: Along with Bell & Ross Time Instruments, we were pleased to host a group of customers at the Air and Space Museum for an evening of discovery and fun, October 18, 2011. Guests learned about Bell & Ross timepieces amid the fascinating, interactive displays at the museum. Bottom: Our fourth annual Bruce G. Weber Tennis Classic was a huge success, with a record number of players participating. The event once again took place at The Michael D. Case Tennis Center on September 21 & 22. The tournament benefits the Children’s Hospital at St. Francis.

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CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY

Junior League of Tulsa Never underestimate the power of a woman.

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t’s a saying we’ve all heard before – and at some point in our lives, we’ve all witnessed how true it is. But what happens when you combine the power of many women? For an answer to that question, look no further than the Junior League of Tulsa. Started in 1923 with just 13 members, the Junior League of Tulsa, a non-profit, women’s volunteer organization, has grown to more than 800 members representing all walks of life. From homemakers to executives, these women come together for one purpose: to improve their community. Through a focus on women and children in transition, the Junior League has left a permanent mark on the city of Tulsa, establishing programs that are now wellknown organizations such as Leadership Tulsa, Domestic Violence Intervention Services, the Ronald McDonald House and many more. Today, Junior League members have contributed more than 1.6 million volunteer hours and raised more than $5 million in support of community projects. (A list of current key projects for the League are listed at right.)

While the focus of the Junior League is community improvement through voluntarism, members are also challenged to improve themselves at the same time. A “trained volunteer” program allows members to develop their potential for leadership opportunities and to turn their ideas into effective action plans for the betterment of Tulsa – and of themselves. Membership in the Junior League of Tulsa is open to any woman interested in making a difference. Each year, the Junior League hosts a series of training sessions targeted to new members. These sessions provide an opportunity to introduce League projects as well as train the newest members in community service, personal growth and leadership skills. As an added bonus, many members credit the League for life-long friendships established while working together to improve the community. For more information on joining the Junior League of Tulsa or to find out how you can support their efforts, simply visit jltulsa.org or call 918-663-6100.

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Current Junior League of Tulsa Initiatives: (for a full list visit jltulsa.org) Harvest Market / Kids in the Kitchen Through a partnership with Global Gardens, Junior League volunteers teach families about preparing affordable, nutritious meals and promoting mealtime as a family affair. Family Resource Library at Saint Francis Hospital Volunteers staff the resource library located in the Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis, assisting families in obtaining information about their child’s medical condition and helping them become informed participants in the health care process. The library also stocks books, DVDs and video games for the children’s enjoyment. Gilcrease / University of Tulsa Task Force In 2012, the Gilcrease Museum will open the doors to a new art facility located in downtown Tulsa. A Junior League task force coordinates efforts with Gilcrease and the University of Tulsa to research and develop an art education curriculum program as well identify volunteer, management and marketing needs and strategies.


Mother’s jewelry that’s as unique as her love for her children.

1700 Utica Square, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74114

(918) 749-1700

www.brucegweber.com


DESIGNERS

Signature Style PENNY PREVILLE’S JEWELRY IS AS FEMININE AND FABULOUS AS SHE IS! BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

W

orld renowned for its elegance, innovation and unique attention to detail, Penny Preville jewelry has been worn by fashionable women from Jackie Onassis to Nicole Kidman to Blake Lively. Here, an exclusive interview with the designer. How did you first get interested in jewelry design? As a little girl, I’d go into New York City every Sunday to visit my grandmother (Adele Preville, a self-described “Hungarian Gypsy”) at her Park Avenue apartment. It was filled with amazing artwork: Chinese screens, Buddhas, rare art pieces. But what intrigued me most was her jewelry box, overflowing with Cartier, Tiffany, Van Cleef & Arpels: exquisite pieces from different eras that my grandfather bought her. I would touch them, try them on, dream about them. My other grandmother was an artist (she painted Limoges china) as was my mother. Ultimately, I chose a major in fine arts. I loved art history, re-living different eras. Describe your jewelry and the process to create it. Words that come to mind are intricate, romantic,

elegant, timeless. I’m all about the detail: beading, engraving, twisting, layering, texture… My jewelry is made by artisans here in New York City: we start with an original model and most of the work is done by hand: engraving, stone setting, polishing, finishing. Depending on the piece, the process can take a few days to a few months. What inspires your designs? Travel. Nature. Architecture. Paintings. Fabrics. Lifestyle. Different civilizations (Egyptian, Byzantine, Ancient Greek, Russian…) How would you describe your personal style? What are your favorite jewelry pieces? There are two sides to me: very driven and practical, but also romantic, very much a girly-girl. My favorite pieces include a garland ring, a wide scroll-y diamond cuff that I wear for black tie events, and a thin diamond bangle that I wear everyday. (It’s part of my body!) I also love a Harry Winston ring with diamonds from the 1930s that my grandmother wore, and a blue star sapphire that my husband’s mother got from her mother…

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You work with your husband and two sons: how hard is it to combine business and family? It can be challenging! Fortunately, we have separate roles: I do the design/creative and Jay (who started the business with me) manages financial/operations. Our two sons Skyler (32) and Derek (28) are learning all aspects and will hopefully find their niche. I didn’t expect the boys to join us: growing up, they were into sports and showed little interest in the business. What are the key jewelry looks for 2012? Long chains, statement earrings, bangles and cuffs to mix and match, collectibles, different stones, blackened metals and lots of color (especially blues!). I also believe in the mystical powers of certain stones—for strength or for protection. What does a woman’s jewelry say about her? It’s reflects her style and individuality; it provides insight into who she is as a person: spiritual, sentimental, practical... In fact, I love watching a woman select jewelry: when she finds the perfect piece, it’s magical; it brings out something in her soul.


PROFILE

SCALING BACK JOHN HARDY REVISITS ITS NAGA COLLECTION WITH FIERY NEW DESIGNS TO USHER IN THE YEAR OF THE DRAGON. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

F

irst introduced in 2009, on the anniversary of John Hardy’s 20th year in business, the Naga collection tells the Balinese myth of the dragon and the pearl. As legend has it, the dragon would leave his volcano each night and dive down to the bottom of the sea to visit his love, the pearl. At sunrise, as he burst from the water and returned home to the volcano, the water dripping from his scales fertilized rice fields across the land and brought prosperity to the Balinese. Now, for the Chinese Year of the Dragon, John Hardy head designer and creative director Guy Bedarida has dramatically expanded the 2012 Naga collection with more pieces featuring this mythical symbol of good fortune, prosperity and success. Like the dragon in the myth, one of John Hardy’s missions is to help the Balinese land and people flourish. The company views itself as a collaborative effort between designers and artisans, and believes that “a business can prosper while respecting people and nature.” Their “Greener Everyday” policy signifies an ongoing commitment to environmental conservation, which includes the planting of bamboo, rice and even the black palm wood used in some of its men’s designs. The brand’s Hong Kong headquarters are completely green, and its Mambal, Bali compound is a village unto itself, composed of traditional bamboo and mud structures, rice paddies and an organic farm that provides lunch for the entire workforce there. The Naga collection, like all John Hardy collections, is handcrafted in Bali by these talented native artisans, some of whom have previously served as jewelers to Balinese kings. Some pieces feature full dragons or dragon heads, while others showcase a more abstract dragon scale motif. Crafted from sterling silver, yellow gold and an assortment of precious and semiprecious gems, the collection’s cuffs, bracelets, rings, necklaces and earrings are rich with detail, inside and out.

“I LIKE TO THINK THAT THE WEARERS OF THE NAGA COLLECTION WILL ENJOY LOVE, PROSPERITY AND LUCK.” –GUY BEDARIDA, HEAD DESIGNER 12


PROFILE

THERE ARE DIAMONDS, AND THERE ARE FOREVERMARK DIAMONDS. BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

QUINTESSENTIAL DIAMONDS F

or those who demand perfection, there are few options. Forevermark, part of the De Beers group (the foremost international diamond expert for 120-plus years), offers only the finest carefully selected, responsibly sourced diamonds, meticulously cut and inscribed by highly trained master craftsmen. Less than one percent of the world’s diamonds are eligible to bear the Forevermark inscription and only a select group of jewelers (we among them) are authorized to sell these incredible gems. Inscribed using highly advanced proprietary technology, these superlative diamonds feature the Forevermark icon and a unique identification number, both invisible to the naked eye. The actual size of the inscription is one 20th of a micron deep (one 500th the size of a human hair) and can be seen in our store using a special viewer. Although the inscription in no way affects the exceptional internal quality of the diamond, it does ensure beauty, rarity, responsible sourcing and added security. Expert gemologists at The Forevermark Diamond Institute in Antwerp assess each stone according to rigorous standards of integrity and accuracy. The result is the Forevermark Diamond Grading Report, your guarantee of excellence and authenticity. Those of us who are socially conscious should know that Forevermark diamonds are guaranteed conflict-free. But more than that, the company goes above and beyond industry standards to ensure that their sourcing actively benefits communities in their countries of origin, countries committed to the highest business, social and environmental standards. Beauty, rarity and integrity in one quintessential diamond: No wonder Forevermark is the jewel of choice for Gwyneth Paltrow, Uma Thurman, Nicole Kidman, Michelle Williams and fabulous women everywhere, on and off the red carpet.

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DESIGNERS

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COLOR POPS WARM GOLD AND SATURATED SEMI-PRECIOUS GEMS BRING MARCO BICEGO’S SPRING COLLECTION TO LIFE. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

The bold spheres and jewels of the Africa collection are tangible and pronounced, yet remarkably light.

n the 12 years since launching his collection, one thing has remained unchanged for jewelry designer Marco Bicego: his love of gold. “Almost all of our collections are crafted from 18 karat yellow gold. It’s intrinsic to our brand DNA,” says the Italian native with goldsmithing in his family’s history. His loyalty to the metal makes for a smooth transition between collections and pieces that can always be mixed, matched and layered. “I don’t really see jewelry as a trend,” Bicego tells us. “Each season our customers gravitate towards certain [different] silhouettes, but there are always constants in jewelry. It’s about a woman’s connection to a piece—an emotional feeling.” This spring, the designer is excited to introduce his Africa collection, filled with long layering necklaces and colorful gems, which Bicego cites as absolute must-haves for any woman looking to update her jewelry wardrobe. He has long been drawn to the beauty of Africa and was inspired by unexpected natural elements, from baobab seeds to the stratified lava of Kilimanjaro. “I was taken by the fascinating imperfections of yellow-gold jewels, similar to the imperfections found in the tribal jewels worn by African women. The hand-engraved gold finishes generate warmth that evokes the colors of the sub-Saharan land.” Bicego is an avid traveler and often names his collections—Africa, Jaipur, Paradise, etc.—after the destinations that inspire them. When he’s not busy dreaming up new designs, Bicego relishes the chance to spend time with his wife and children, play in his local soccer league and hunt for mushrooms. He can frequently be found outdoors, exploring his surroundings and searching for new ideas in “the beauty I find in everyday life, colors in nature and architectural design.” And of course, he adds, “I always try to imagine what my clients want to wear next!”

GETTING PERSONAL

What are you reading? I just bought a new apartment in Venice, so I’ve been looking to the shelter magazines for design inspiration. What are you wearing? I try to wear pieces that are relaxed and casual and fit into my everyday life—mostly Armani. What are you eating? Anything with fresh local ingredients and always vino! Where are you traveling? Basel, Switzerland to the jewelry fair to debut my newest collections.

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RED CARPET

Blonde Bombshells WITH LIGHT LOCKS AND HEAD-TO-TOE STYLE, WE’D GIVE THESE STUNNING CELEBS AN AWARD ANY DAY. BY JILLIAN LAROCHELLE

AMBER HEARD

T

ZAC EFRON & MICHELLE PFEIFFER

CLAIRE DANES

hough the Guess model-turned-actress is always striking, Amber Heard truly smoldered

at the SAG Awards. Her fitted black satin gown epitomized covered-up sexy, while sparkly

Zac Efron and Michelle Pfeiffer sure made a good looking pair at the New Years Eve premiere.

Yellow gold and pink tourmaline chandelier earrings lit up Pfeiffer’s face and helped prepetuate that youthful glow. We don’t know how she does it. For Showtime’s Emmy Nominee Reception at the Mondrian Los Angeles, Claire Danes chose pavé diamond drop earrings that popped against the silvery threads of her dress. With a confident

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HEARD AND PFEIFFER WEAR H. STERN. DANES WEARS MCL.

diamond studs and metallic smoky eyes added just the right amount of shimmer.


RED CARPET smile, flushed cheeks and dewey décolletage, the nominee for Best Actress in a TV Drama looked like a winner long before they called her name. Stacy Keibler knows how to accessorize. Adorable arm-candy aside, the former Ravens cheerleader still looks sensational in the old purple and black, topped off with teardrop earrings,

STACY KEIBLER & GEORGE CLOONEY

KATHERINE HEIGL

MARLEY SHELTON

stacked bangles and a notice-me cocktail ring. As if we wouldn’t have noticed her without it. KEIBLER WEARS MCL. HEIGL WEARS SUTRA. SHELTON WEARS AMRAPALI.

All tassel, no hassle! Katherine Heigl’s blue sapphire and black rough-cut diamond earrings lent an effortless glamour to her gown at the 39th Annual American Music Awards. Paired with a sparkly strap and matte red lips, the look recalled old Hollywood at its best. Nothing amps up a little black dress like a statement necklace. At the L.A. premiere of The Mighty Macs, Marley Shelton chose this blackened beauty to elevate her outfit from ho-hum to yum! Kelly Osbourne, Kate Mara and Kristin Cavallari have recently been spotted in identical designs; you can bet that style-savvy ladies everywhere are following suit.

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Plucked from nature. Choose your color. The colored stone jewelry collection, exclusively at Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.


TRENDS

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here are many ways to reenergize: yoga and meditation, a day at the spa, a cruise to wherever! But this year, it seems like everyone is talking about adding gemstone jewelry to that list of natural mood elevators. From fashion insiders to celebrities and their stylists, it’s being recognized as a de rigueur accessory. As jewelry lovers, we know it’s beautiful...so why such big buzz now? Part of it has to do with the trending fashion colors this year—all of which are available in gemstones—being touted as über uplifting. But equally important, it seems, are the many new jewelry collections fashioned around exhilarating non-traditional stone cuts, as well as gems that are either new to the market or haven’t been widely used for quite some time.

COLORS TO CHEER ABOUT When “Tangerine Tango” was chosen by the Pantone Color Institute as the Color of the Year, it set the stage for 2012 to be a year of sunny shades in both fashion and jewelry. Leatrice Eiseman, Pantone’s executive director, says, “It’s attention-getting, for sure, and surprisingly flattering,” alluding to the reality that not all women have a zest for the color orange—despite the many tones of tangerine gracing dozens of spring runways. “But orange must be a new addition to every woman’s closet this year. If you’re not daring enough to wear it as a dress, pants, or jacket, wear this color in accessories—especially jewelry. You need at least one strong statement piece with vibrant orange gems. I myself didn’t have any orange jewelry, but I went shopping as soon as I saw all the orange lighting up the fashion shows. Be the woman your friends look at. Don’t be afraid to let the adventure of childhood abandon come back into your life.” Three other important citrus shades for spring and summer, says Eiseman, for fashion and its gemstone jewelry complements, are “Solar Power” yellow, “Cabaret” pink and “Margarita” green. “Fashion designers are also showing a lot of blue and taupe, but they’re toned down. The blue is fresh without being too out-there. All the blue gems are perfect accents [for each other], and great for blue tone-on-tone layering.” The other important classic neutrals for spring and summer are both in the taupe family—what Pantone calls “Starfish” and “Driftwood,” so gray is taking a backseat, at least until fall. Shades in the brown family are “perfect when paired with any of your bright, attention-getting gemstone jewelry,” adds Eiseman.

SOME REALLY COOL CUTS

RENEWAL! THE SEASON’S FRESHEST COLORS, NEWEST CUTS AND GOTTA-HAVE-’EM GEMS WILL ENERGIZE YOUR JEWELRY BOX. BY LORRAINE DEPASQUE

While classic rounds, cushions, squares and the like continue to be important, so, too, are the less conventional cuts, especially doublets, slices, roughs and rose cuts. Veteran actress Regina King, one of this year’s celebrity models at the 2012 American Gem Trade Association’s prestigious Spectrum jewelry awards, says, “It’s important for people to be open to considering gemstones and cuts they’ve never contemplated before.” The current star of TV’s hit police drama Southland adds, “There is so much artistry out there in contemporary gemstone jewelry—you really see that in some of the unusual cuts.” DOUBLETS These are basically two-layered gem designs, with one gem on the bottom and the second stone laid over it, creating a very distinctive look. Says Cindy Edelstein, president of the Jeweler’s Resource Bureau: “Thanks to clever gem cutters, designers are combining translucent rose cuts and gem slices with complementary opaque stones.” SLICES Typically, these gems are 2-D in form, with flat sides and bottoms. The Left: Cocktail rings from Roberto Coin’s diamond-accented, 18K gold Haute Couture collection, in green garnet, peridot and black sapphires; yellow topaz and citrine; and pink sapphires.

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flatness allows light to pass through the piece, much like natural light shining through a stained glass window. Sometimes the sliced gem is polished on both sides, depending on the designer’s individual vision. Helena Krodel, director of media and special events for Jewelers of America, says, “Think about gemstone-slice earrings if you want something lightweight and, at the same time, very flattering; they bring light and color near the face.” ROUGH CUTS These asymmetrically shaped gems—also called “raw”—are, for the most part, three dimensional, almost sculptural. They have an inherent, organic beauty because they aren’t precision-cut to mathematic perfection. Each stone is, therefore, one of a kind. Vicente Agor, owner of an eponymous jewelry line and president of the Contemporary Jewelry Design Group, says, “If you want jewelry that’s handcrafted and authentic, with irregularities inspired by nature, designs with rough cuts are a great choice.” ROSE CUTS Steeped in history, various forms of rose cuts have been around since the mid-16th century. The gems, usually circular in outline, have a flat base and a crown composed of triangular facets in symmetrical arrangement, which rise to form a point. If you’re familiar with the oval briolette, that’s one variation of the rose cut and a favorite among contemporary designers who love color. This year, rose-cut sapphires—especially in pink, green and blue—are showing up everywhere.

spessartite garnet, red agate. A GO-TO GREEN ZULTANITE: This transparent diaspore gem, found only in Turkey, hasn’t been used much in jewelry—until now. With its inherently interesting color-change properties— from kiwi green to champagne brown to raspberry pink—it’s certainly out of the ordinary, and the perfect choice for anyone looking for something unique or a true conversation starter. Other favorites: chrysoprase, green agate, peridot, green opal, green jade, green quartz, green amethyst, green garnet, green tourmaline. A PRIMARY YELLOW CITRINE: “Lately, citrine has been particularly popular, both for its color and the variety of cutting styles being used on it,” says Wheat. With its sunny hue and often affordable prices, citrine has recently captured the fancy of a growing number of typically high-end designers, many mixing it with a range of orange and pink stones on a single piece of jewelry for a kind of overall neutral effect. Other favorites: topaz, golden beryl, chrysoberyl, yellow moonstone, yellow sapphire. A “NEW” BLUE AQUAMARINE: One of the most invogue gems right now is aquamarine. Hardly new, March’s birthstone is increasingly being spotlighted in designer collections in every cut imaginable. “Yes, aquamarine is in a revival period, especially hot in large sizes with good color saturation. I’ve also seen an increasing number of modern brides choosing aquamarine for their engagement ring center stone,” says Wheat. The lucid color—from the light blue of the sky to the deep blue of the sea— captivates. Other favorites: chalcedony, moonstone, labradorite, sapphire, Iolite, Tanzanite, blue topaz. A PERFECT PINK CHALCEDONY: A treasured favorite of the ancient world, chalcedony is being featured more and more by trendsetting contemporary artisans. While it’s certainly one of the perfectly beautiful pinks, chalcedony is well liked in its blue and green varieties, too. “Translucent chalcedony in all three shades is hot—particularly big, smooth cabochons,” says Wheat. Other favorites: pink tourmaline, rubellite, pink sapphire and raspberry quartz.

EVERYONE IS TALKING ABOUT ADDING GEMSTONE JEWELRY TO THE LIST OF NATURAL MOOD ELEVATORS.

...AND SOME REALLY HOT GEMS Barbara Wheat, executive director of the International Colored Gemstone Association, tracks colored gemstone popularity worldwide. Here, she points to five gems she sees trending—especially in light of fashion’s leading color choices, which, she says, likely means these gems will get even more popular as we progress through 2012. A TOP TANGERINE FIRE OPAL: These radiant orange-red gemstones are renowned in legend and lore for their positive effect on the psyche. That said, you may have to pay the price for that profound sensation of peace and harmony! Often the cost of these expressive and fiery gems is determined by the play of color, body color and transparency. “Fire opal is really popular in Asia,” says Wheat. With tangerine as this year’s “Color ot the Year,” it will likely get stronger here, too. Other favorites: Mandarin garnet, carnelian, orange sapphire, spinel,

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Top: Zultanite and diamond necklace by Stephen Webster. Bottom: Bracelets from Ippolita’s Silk Road collection in 18K gold, featuring peach moonstone, aquamarine, gray and white moonstone, mother of pearl, champagne citrine, labradorite and blue topaz doublet


Behold,

OUR FIVE-TABLE DIAMOND EARRINGS.

Brilliant from five tables away.

1700 Utica Square, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74114

(918) 749-1700

www.brucegweber.com


FASHION

StyleInBloom


FASHION

Sophisticated Fringe Fringe is in this season, but if you tend to shy away from this look, try pairing it with something more sophisticated, like these printed shorts from Glam, and a solid brightly colored silk top, like this one from SW3 Bespoke. You willl feel comfortable and look chic all while pulling off this trend.

Penny Preville 18K Yellow Gold Signature Chain with Turquoise and Diamonds $9,990

Charles Krypell Carved Sterling Silver and 18K Yellow Gold Diamond Scrollwork Ring $3,927

Tank Louis de Cartier XL in Rose Gold with Diamond Bezel $32,300

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Aaron Basha Evil Eye Bracelets, Starting at $3,200

Christopher Designs 14K White/Yellow/Rose Gold and Diamond Rolling Ring $12,205

Kwiat 18K White Gold Diamond Woven Ring $7,850

Ippolita Sterling Silver Mixed Gemstone, Diamond and Motherof-Pearl Bangles starting at $550 Prices are subject to change.

Carla Amorim Pistachio Earrings $10,450

David Yurman Ladies Classic in 18K Rose Gold with Diamond Bezel $21,000

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Roberto Coin 18K Circle A Pendant $580, 14K Yellow Gold Diamond Station Necklace $3,360, Bondanza Diamond Necklace in 18K Yellow Gold $2,695, Ippolita 18K Yellow Gold Lollipop Necklace with Mother-ofPearl Stations $3,595, David Yurman 18K Yellow Gold Lantana Necklace $7,300


FASHION

Spliced Smokey Labradorite Necklace with Diamonds $1,694

Akoya Pearl and Diamond Choker Necklace $7,722

PlayDate A chiffon flirty frock from Dolce Vita is perfect for a daytime date. Try adding a floppy hat like this one from Christy's London. With some Tory Burch sunnies, you'll be ready to play outside all day long. On him: Life After Denim Military jacket, RVCA Henley, A.P.C New Standards jeans, Sebago + Brothers Bray Co. Trail Oxford

Gents David Yurman Stainless Steel Classic on Alligator Strap $3,400

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18K Rose and White Gold Diamond Dangle Earrings $8,840

Ippolita Sterling Silver 37.5” Kidney Chain Necklace $795, Ippolita Sterling Silver 42” Wonderland Gelato Necklace in Desert $1,795, Mikimoto 18K White Gold 32”Akoya Pearl Strand $6,400 Ivanka Trump 36” Pearl Necklace with Signature Oval Clasp $6,200

Penny Preville 18K White Gold Diamond Necklace $7,469

Rolex Ladies in Stainless Steel with Diamond Bezel and Flower Motif Dial $12,900

Cartier Ladies Tank Anglaise in Rose Gold $31,000

Roberto Coin 18K Yellow and Rose Gold Diamond Primavera Bracelets $4,500 Each

18K Yellow Gold, White Agate, and Diamond Open Oval Link Bracelet $2,015

Prices are subject to change.

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FASHION David Yurman Etruscan Necklace $650 Charles Krypell Ivy Necklace in Sterling Silver $1,595

Ippolita 18K Yellow Gold and Diamond Hoops $7,700

ChicComfort These palazzo pleated trousers from Cut25 give you the look of a skirt with the comfort of a pant. Add a silk top like this one from Clover Canyon and a funky belt and you have the perfect comfortable and chic look.

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Scott Kay Positive Cross Cuff in Sterling Silver $660

Rolex Lady Datejust with Gold Crystal Diamond Dial and Diamond Bezel $16,200

Christine Cooper Hill Sterling Silver Black Onyx Ring $440

Ivanka Trump Black Diamond Tassel Necklace $32,000 18K Yellow Gold, Black and Yellow Diamond Flower Earrings $19,170

Ippolita Sterling Silver Diamond Wicked Link Bracelet $1,495

Carla Amorium Sunset Ring in Calcite and Black Diamonds $8,580

Prices are subject to change.

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FASHION Gents Bell & Ross BR01-92 Heritage Automatic in PVD Stainless Steel $4,200

On Him: Gant Rugger Fall Madras Top, Topman Arc Pant, Common Projects sneaker

John Hardy Men’s Sterling Silver Bedeg Black Leather Double Wrap Bracelet $250

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Gents Rolex Explorer II in Stainless Steel $7,750

David Yurman Sterling Silver Waves Money Clip $595

David Yurman Sterling Silver Black Onyx Sculpted Cufflinks $400

Stephen Webster Sterling Silver Men’s Black Sapphire Ring $750

David Yurman Sterling Silver Black Onyx Tag Necklace $925

David Yurman Sterling Silver Lapis Lazuli Spiritual Bead Bracelet $595 Stephen Webster Black Rhodium Plated Sterling Silver Black Onyx Raven’s Head Bracelet $495

Gents Bell & Ross WWI-92 Heritage in Grey PVD Stainless Steel $3,700

Prices are subject to change.

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FASHION

Roberto Coin 18K Yellow Gold and Yellow Sapphire Fantasia Earrings $4,400

’70sChic High-waisted wide-leg pants are a classic shape that has resurfaced, and James Jeans makes the perfect pair. Comfortable and flattering, they will not only elongate the leg, but by adding a brightly colored top, they won't directly draw your eye down and will allow you to focus on the pop of color on top, like this silk blouse from Cut25. Try adding a belt to complete this polished look. Ippolita RiveriaSky Cocktail Ring $3,995

Scott Kay Vermeil Double Drop Guardian Necklace $935

Penny Preville 18K yellow gold stackable bangles starting at $4,830 All clothing and accessories by Rowe Boutique www.roweboutique.com

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Elizabeth Locke 19K Yellow Gold White Round Gambling Coiunter Pendant $3,225, Elizabeth Locke 19K Yellow Gold Orvietto Chain with Toggle Clasp 35� $14,600, Elizabeth Locke 19K Yellow Gold Crystal Over Mother of Pearl Plutto Earrings $3,650

John Hardy Bedeg Oval Hoop Drop Earrings $995

Cartier Ladies Tank Anglaise De Cartier in Steel and Rose Gold $8,600

Bruce G. Weber 18K Yellow Gold Smokey Quartz Ring $1,999

John Hardy Bedeg Concave Flex Cuff $1,895

Bulgari 18K Yellow Gold Monette Antiche Silver Coin Ring $3,480

Prices are subject to change.

David Yurman Ladies Classic with Black Mother-of-Pearl Diamond Dial $3,000

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FASHION

Lagos Sterling Silver and Pearl Long Necklace $795 Ippolita Polished Rock Candy Earrings in 18K Yellow Gold and Mother-of-Pearl $4,250

IvoryElegance A simple white dress is the perfect backdrop to show off beautiful jewelry. Julie Haus makes this elegant ivory frock; the high neckline allows you to showcase earrings, bracelets and rings without looking overdone.

Ladies Rolex 18K White Gold Pearlmaster with Diamonds $66,750

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Sterling Silver Purple Charoite/Rutilated Quartz Doublet and Diamond Earrings $3,025

18K White Gold Diamond Flower Cluster Earrings $30,698

18K White Gold Five-Row Diamond Cuff $31,350

Stephen Webster 18K White Gold, Turquoise/Clear Quartz doublet, and Diamond Crystal Haze Earrings $8,950

Cartier Ladies Ballon Bleu in 18K White Gold with PavĂŠ Diamond Bezel $39,000

Fancy Pink Diamond Ring and Bracelet Set, Price Upon Request

Vintage Inspired One-of-a-Kind Diamond Necklace $72,800

Prices are subject to change.

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FASHION

Mix&Match Be daring this season by mixing patterns and textures. This beautiful lace cropped top from Lauren Moffat helps the bold print of the SW3 Bespoke slit skirt standout. Add a colorful clutch from Cleobella, layer on the jewels and you have a chic bohemian look.

On Him: Life After Denim Belfast Cardigan, Cheap Monday V-Neck, Topman Arc Pants, Wolverine 1000 Mile Original Boot in Brown

Gents Rolex Submariner in Stainless Steel and Cerachrome Bezel $8,000

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John Hardy Bedeg Linked Necklace $995 Ivanka Trump Stackable Rings, Starting at $800

Rolex Ladies Stainless Steel Datejust $7,050

Sterling Silver Labradorite/Rutilated Quartz Doublet and Diamond ‘Slice’ Earrings $2,420

Carla Amorium Orange Sapphire Aurora Earrings $5,390

Ippolita Hammered Sterling Silver Glamazon Cuff Bracelet $795

Gents Rolex Yacht-Master II in Stainless Steel and Everose Gold $25,150

Roberto Coin Black Sterling Silver Primavera Woven Bracelet $290, Roberto Coin Rose Colored Sterling Silver Primavera Woven Bracelet $270, Roberto Coin Sterling Silver Primavera Woven Bracelet $270

Cartier Ladies Automatic Ballon Bleu in 18K Rose Gold $12,600

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Prices are subject to change.


FASHION

TeamEffort

Our spring fashion section came together over several months thanks to the hard work of many individuals: Our buying and marketing teams, including Andy Johnson, Sara Kravetsky, Kimberly Lambert, Jackie Brooks, Jen Walker and David Pollner, along with Maren Roth of Rowe Boutique, Peter Coe of Coe Photographic, retoucher Jeff Sesslar, stylist Mikah Brown and our models Kate and Tommy from Wings Model Management. Clothing, shoes and accessories were provided by Rowe Boutique, the Milk Bar and Repertoire. Behind the scenes photos by Jesse Johnson and David Pollner. Descriptions and pricing by Alyssa Gualtieri. Jewelry wrangling by Alex Johnson.

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Celebrate.

The three-stone anniversary ring from Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.

1700 Utica Square, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74114

(918) 749-1700

www.brucegweber.com


When it’s for anEternity

Asscher cut, cushion cut, emerald cut, princess cut and radiant cut rings, from two to ten carats total weight.

1700 Utica Square, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74114

(918) 749-1700

www.brucegweber.com


ACCENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SECTION SPRING/SUMMER 2012

COURTESY LITITZ WATCH TECHNICUM

WATCHES


FOCUS: COLLECTING

by David A. Rose

TIME ON HIS SIDE SCOTT PRUETT IS AN UNDISPUTED CHAMPION, ON AND OFF THE TRACK.

A

As a world famous racecar driver still at the top of his game, it’s remarkable that Pruett makes time for other ventures. He and his wife Judy have joined forces to establish Pruett Vineyard, as well as Word Weaver Books, publishers of a series of children’s books they authored. Not surprisingly, the theme is racing, including titles like Twelve Little Race Cars, Rookie Racer and Racing Through the Alphabet. Based on actual aspects of Scott’s racing career, these books provide inspiration and excitement for young readers. As for his winemaking business, Pruett explains that even though racing and winemaking are spectrums apart, the feelings of accomplishment are similar. “Racing is literally minute to minute, day to day; things happen in a matter of seconds. Wine making, on the other hand, takes years: you can’t rush the process; the wine absolutely tells you when it’s ready. But it’s the blend of chemistry and artistry in winemaking that I find so rewarding. I’m not one of these athletes who puts my name on a project without involvement; in fact, I am totally hands on at my winery, involved in every aspect of the process (pressing, corking, labeling), with the help of some incredible winemakers.” Scott Pruett began his career in karting at the age of eight and has raced every year since. 2011 was his 43rd year of racing and it was another extraordinary one. With teammate Memo Rojas, Pruett won the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series Championship, earning yet another Rolex timepiece. “At 51 years old, I’m racing against drivers half my age,” says Pruett, “so being the fastest driver out there is incredible! But I never take it for granted: I’ve been blessed with this ability and feel very fortunate.” ROLEX / TOM O'NEAL

mong the many rewards of success in sports, perhaps the best is garnering the respect and admiration of fans and peers. But for those athletes competing in Rolex-sponsored events, the grand prize comes in the form of a luxury timepiece, a goal drivers set for themselves long before they’re strapped into their racecars. One man, Scott Pruett from Auburn, California, is a true champion in all forms of motor sports, with the additional honor of having won more Rolex-sponsored races than any other driver. Thus, he has become the proud owner of racing’s largest collection of Rolex timepieces. Pruett has won the Rolex 24 at Daytona four times. He’s also won the Grand-Am Rolex Sports Car Series Championship three times and was awarded a Rolex timepiece for each of these accomplishments. In all, Scott owns 12 Rolex timepieces, of which 10 were awarded for his brilliant race wins. “My first Rolex is by far the one I love the most,” he confides. “When I won the Championship in 1986 while driving for Jack Roush and Ford Motor Company, I was invited to compete in what was known as the International Race of Champions (IROC). It was such an honor just to be invited to compete in this series, and I promised myself that if I were ever to win one of these races, I’d go out and buy myself a Rolex timepiece. At the last race ever to run at Riverside Raceway in California, and with just a few laps left in the race, I took the lead and held on to take the win. The first thing I did after that was to go out and buy my first beautiful Rolex Submariner.” (In addition to this Submariner, Pruett also bought himself a solid gold GMT-Master.)

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PEACE OF MIND STARTS WITH PROOF OF QUALITY. Carat Weight 1.53

Color Grade E

Clarity Grade VS1

Cut Grade

Excellent

Laser Inscription Registry Number GIA 16354621

Natural Diamond Not Synthetic

A GIA report is certainty from the source. As creator of the 4Cs and the International Diamond Grading System,™ GIA sets the standards for diamond assessment, worldwide. Unbiased. Scientific. A report from GIA gives you a clear understanding of your diamond’s quality. Look for GIA Diamond Grading Reports and the jewelers who offer them. www.4cs.gia.edu

THE UNIVERSAL STANDARD BY WHICH GEMS ARE JUDGED.


FOCUS: COMPLICATIONS

by Laurie Kahle

Rolex Oyster Perpetual

PASSING TIME CHRONOGRAPH AND CALENDAR COMPLICATIONS LET YOU TRACK FLEETING TIME FROM SECONDS TO MONTHS.

O

nce watchmakers mastered the measurement of hours, minutes and seconds, they naturally advanced beyond mere timetelling to create ever more intricate and ingenious mechanisms. Referred to as complications, these mechanisms perform a myriad of additional functions from the simple to the sublime. The more complicated a watch

is, the more difficult and expensive it is to produce. Despite technology’s advancement, complicated watches are still in demand—from Raymond Weil’s diminutive ladies’ quartz Parsifal with a simple date window, to IWC’s made-to-order, seven-figure, astronomical Portuguese Sidérale Scafusia. While some complications are fanciful and superfluous,

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: Jaeger-LeCoultre Masterdate Tourbillon, Baume & Mercier Capeland, Panerai Luminor GMT

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chronographs and calendars remain perennial favorites with practical uses for modern lifestyles. The chronograph, with a timing mechanism similar to a stopwatch, originated in France in 1821, when Nicolas Rieussec, watchmaker to King Louis XVIII, demonstrated his novel device for timing horse races. Using a clock movement, ink-filled markers and two rotating discs—a seconds disc that completed a revolution every minute and a minutes disc that made a complete rotation every hour—the contraption accurately measured the horses’ times by pushing the markers onto the discs when each horse crossed the finish line. The term chronograph translates to “time writer,” particularly endearing the complication to Montblanc, which is most famous for its pens. The brand acquired the rights to use Nicolas Rieussec’s name, and built a collection of chronographs that shows elapsed time with two fixed hands poised above two turning discs (the seconds and minutes counters), a unique system reminiscent of Rieussec’s original invention.

hand while the bottom one progresses, allowing the measurement of two separate periods of time. After recording, another push synchronizes the hands again, until the split hand is once again stopped for another time measurement. Categorized as astronomical complications, calendar functions track the passing days and months, with varying degrees of complexity. A simple calendar displays the numeric date in a window with a single disc, or with two discs to create what’s known as a big date, featured on Glashütte Original’s Seventies Panorama Date. A full calendar expands on the basic calendar display to show date, day of the week, month and moon phases. Full and partial simple calendars cannot automatically adjust for months with fewer than 31 days, so you have to adjust them five times per year. An annual calendar, however, automatically adjusts for months with 30 or 31 days, though it needs to be reset each year on February 28 of non-leap years. Vacheron Constantin recently put a contemporary twist on the annual calendar by adding a retrograde annual calendar to its Quai de l’Ile collection.

FROM LEFT TO RIGHT : Hermès Arceau Chrono, Patek Philippe 5270, Raymond Weil Parsifal, Frédérique Constant Vintage Racing Automatic Chrono

Rather than using turning discs, sporty chronographs typically feature a mechanism that controls a central chronograph hand, which is started, stopped and returned to zero by using push buttons on the side of the case. As the chronograph hand completes a full turn of the dial each minute, subdial totalizers track the number of revolutions and show the elapsed time in minutes and hours. Variations on chronographs include a flyback function that can be reset to zero and immediately start a new timing episode with a single push, instead of using three to stop, reset and restart. A split-seconds chronograph allows you to time separate events that begin but do not finish simultaneously, such as tracking cars in a race. Also called a rattrapante, or double chronograph, watches such as IWC’s Ingenieur Double Chronograph Titanium feature two central stopwatch hands that are precisely superimposed so they appear as one hand as they move, until you press a button, which stops the top chronograph

The most complex calendar complication is a perpetual calendar, which is mechanically programmed to account for leap years and requires no manual correction until March 1, 2100. The watch’s mechanical memory uses sequences that are repeated every 48 months, to correspond to the cycle of leap years. Jaeger-LeCoultre’s Master Eight Days Perpetual 40, for example, boasts an impressive eight-day power reserve while displaying the date, the day of the week, the month and the year in four digits, along with the power reserve, the moon phase, a day/night indicator, and even the security zone between 10 p.m. and 3 a.m. during which changes must not be made. This year, Patek Philippe offered the best of both timing and calendar complications when it combined a perpetual calendar with its new in-house chronograph movement for the Reference 5270. Sure to be on every connoisseur’s hit list, this extremely rare, highly complicated timepiece will land on only a precious few wrists with its price of $156,000.

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Community Supported Agriculture

Photo by Troy L. Amber

TULSA FOOD & WINE

A GREAT WAY TO ENJOY LOCALLY GROWN FOODS STRAIGHT FROM THE FARM WITHOUT GETTING YOUR FINGERNAILS DIRTY. BY CAROLE AMBER

A

s the world becomes more global, it is comforting to know that one food trend in America is shifting local. Community Supported Agriculture, individually called CSAs, are partnerships between farmers and consumers where seasonal produce is purchased up front and harvested goods are distributed throughout the season. Providing fresh and nutrient-rich foods to nearby communities, this trend contributes to our environmental well-being and supports local economies. CSAs date back to the 1960s in Europe and Japan, where they were created to help maintain food safety as agricultural areas were undergoing urbanization. Spreading to the United States in the mid-1980s, CSA farms now thrive in nearly 13,000 locations from coast to coast. The beauty of CSAs is that they allow consumers to learn where their food comes from, get to know local farmers, contribute to their community and enjoy the most vibrant and flavorful foods of the season. CSA distributions typically include vegetable produce such as vine ripened heirloom tomatoes, crisp greens, sweet peas and spicy radishes. More recently, many CSAs have expanded their offerings to include fruits, responsibly

grown meats, free-range eggs, artisan cheeses and even homemade prepared foods. As a bonus, most CSAs invite members to their farms for an appreciation day. After researching CSAs in our area, we discovered the environmentally responsible Three Springs Farm located in Cherokee County. Operated by Emily Oakley and Mike Appel, this six-acre organic vegetable farm provides “an intimate connection to the people growing your food.” At Three Springs Farm, the CSA works a bit differently. Emily Oakley explains: “CSA members purchase a share ranging from $150 to $300 at the beginning of the season, which they then spend like cash throughout the year at the farmer’s market.” This system allows customers to buy exactly what they want, when they want it, at the Cherry Street Farmer’s Market. Emily’s favorite crops are asparagus, strawberries and heirloom tomatoes, but “I also love the tender new potatoes in the spring, sweet beets and crispy lettuce,” she says. Be sure to reserve your CSA this season and taste Tulsa in a fresh new way.

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Photo by Troy L. Amber

Three Springs Farm 1367 Highway 82A Oaks, OK 74359 threespringsfarm.com farmers@threespringsfarm.com 918-868-5450

Cherry Street Farmer’s Market 15th Cherry Street [between Quaker & Rockford] Tulsa, OK 74103 Saturdays: 7a.m. until 11a.m. Begins the 2nd Saturday in April through Labor Day cherrystreetfarmersmarket.com

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WELLNESS

HAUTE HEALTHCARE W

hen was the last time you went to a spinning class with your doctor? How about bike riding or grocery shopping together? Like fashion and jewelry trends, healthcare trends evolve. One “new” trend (it’s actually been around for a decade) is concierge medicine. Also referred to as boutique medicine, concierge medicine often works with insurance or Medicare, offering members 24/7 access to their primary care physicians, immediate appointments, better connections to top specialists and, in some cases, house calls. (In order to participate, patients also pay a fee independent of insurance.) This unique approach is designed not only to enhance routine exams and the treatment of illnesses, but also to educate patients and create awareness in preventive care. The theory is that a closer doctor-patient relationship encourages the patient to become savvy and proactive enough to ward off ailments that can lead to sickness. One trendsetter in concierge medicine is MDVIP, a company with over 175,000 patients and 500 physicians in its network across 34 states and the District of Columbia. Annual memberships range from $1,500 to $1,800. MDVIP was founded in 2001 by two primary care physicians who wanted to focus on personalized care and a reinvention of the primary care model. “These doctors believed there had to be a better way to put the patient first, emphasizing not just treating people after they became sick, but actually helping them stay healthy,” says Mark Murrison, MDVIP’s president of marketing and innovation. According to Murrison, the average primary care practice has about 2,400 patients, so it’s not unusual for doctors to see around 35 to 40 patients in a typical day. It’s

estimated most doctors spend approximately eight minutes or less with each patient, which Murrison believes is barely enough time to address the symptoms or underlying causes of an illness. MDVIP doctors cap their practice at 600 patients, with about 10 to 12 patient visits per day, allowing for higher levels of specialized care. Data shows MDVIP has a patient yearly renewal rate of 92%, with a patient satisfaction rate of 96%. There’s also evidence that MDVIP members are hospitalized significantly less than non-MDVIP members—Medicare beneficiaries have 75% fewer hospitalizations and insured patients 65% fewer. Other member-based companies are gaining recognition for infusing traditional medicine with specialized care. WhiteGlove Health, based in Austin, Texas, works primarily with self-insured companies, helping them with costs and enabling them to provide better healthcare to their employees and dependents. Their model involves mobile primary care, essentially house calls, where a nurse practitioner comes to a member’s home, workplace, hotel room, etc., offering dedicated care for both acute and chronic illnesses, wellness counseling, diagnostic testing and prescription medications. “It’s like Marcus Welby: the good old fashioned house call that we’ve brought back and made affordable,” says Michael Cohen, VP of marketing. Clearly, concierge medicine has the potential for significant growth. With an estimated 5,000-plus physicians now practicing it, it might just be a matter of time before you too are organizing bike rides and supermarket outings with your doctor in order to stay healthy.

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I STOCK

BOUTIQUE MEDICINE IS ALL THE RAGE. BY LISA MONTEMORRA MENGHI


BLOOMBERG VIA GETTY IMAGES

END PAGE

LAST BID FOR LOVE

AN ACTRESS, AN AUCTION, A YOUNG MAN’S DREAM… BY JOSEPH UNGOCO

M

y heart was pounding as I handed my passport to the smartly dressed associate from Christie’s. Just a week before, I’d been holding the “hottest ticket in town”—a prime 3 p.m. pass to preview the world-renowned jewelry collection of Elizabeth Taylor. The entire Christie’s block was lined with stately private limos dropping off elegantly dressed “ladies who lunch,” no doubt fresh from nibbling on micro-vegetable salads and savory soufflés at La Grenouille. In addition to the magnificent jewels, what struck me as I perused the various lots at the preview was how many lives Elizabeth Taylor had touched. In every room of the seemingly endless exhibit, people passionately discussed her movies, her personal style, her tremendous influence. Women well past their fashion prime whispered about how this 1960s Pucci tunic or that 1970s Halston caftan had inspired their own wardrobe choices. My personal connection with this incredible lady was our shared astrological sign: Elizabeth Taylor was the archetype of Pisces’ “soulful eyes” and tendency to be “in love with love.” The cheerful Christie’s associate wished me luck as she handed me my paddle—number 5217. I tried to calm my nerves as I mounted the stairs to the James Christie room. Working my way through the television cameras, I settled into a fifth row seat right under the auctioneer. I took a cue from the “serious” bidders in the rows ahead of me and stayed focused on the

bidding board and the auctioneer in his lavender silk tie. I had carefully studied the catalogs, settling on two lots of Zodiac pendants and a lot of two Aldo Cipullo for Cartier Love bracelets. I had been considering a lot of aquamarines until I remembered that Liz was a February Pisces, not a March one like me. Her vast amethyst collection— including mineral specimens—suddenly had meaning beyond complementing her violet eyes. The night before, I’d witnessed the mounting frenzy at the sale of the “Legendary Jewels,” but I was certain there’d be less insanity for the “ordinary” jewels. In fact, I was quite confident that I’d be able to secure a lot—perhaps even two. But such illusions evaporated by the time the bidding closed on the fifth lot of the day, a pair of Van Cleef & Arpels Pisces pendants on opera-length chains. I had researched the intrinsic value of the items, estimated a premium for their venerable provenance and set what I thought were reasonable bidding limits. I realized I was sadly mistaken when I was outbid by $50,000! As the auction progressed, prices skyrocketed and I was feeling increasingly dejected. By the time the hammer went down on the Cartier Love bracelets, the price was $75,000 over my top bid. I left the auction to wander Rockefeller Center and reflect wistfully over my lost chance at Love (or at least the Love bracelets) and the beauty, style and legend of a truly amazing woman.

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Explore, discover, shop, learn. 24 hours a day. Browse and shop products by: Roberto Coin Kwiat Mikimoto John Hardy Cartier ...and many more

Learn about jewelry: Diamond buying guide The 4C’s of diamonds Jewelry care and cleaning Custom design

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BRUCE G. WEBER ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2012

BRUCE G. WEBER  

Fashion Favorites All About Watches Last Bid for Love A C C E N T/ T H E M A G A Z I N E O F L I F E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N S S P R I N G...

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