Page 1

SPRING/SUMMER 2011 A C C E N T/ T H E M A G A Z I N E O F L I F E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N S

BOLD& BEAUTIFUL! THE NEW GEMSTONES Special Watch Section:

IT’S ABOUT TIME PLUS: Jewelry on the Runways Celebrity Spotlight Gorgeous Gifts!


2011 JOHN HARDY LIMITED

NAGA COLLECTION


WELCOME

Bruce, Michelle and staff mingle with clients at the Denise Robergé event in November, 2010.

W

elcome to the spring issue of Accent magazine. It’s our way of keeping you informed about what’s happening at Bruce G. Weber Precious

Jewels, and to show you what’s new in jewelry and fashion.

In this issue, you’ll meet Donna Grant, one of our wonderful sales associates.

We’re fortunate to have Donna, as she brings more than 30 years of jewelry experience to our staff. Also in this issue, you’ll find a special section dedicated to Swiss watches. If you’re interested in fine timepieces, I think you’ll find some valuable information there. And of course, we’ll have lots of jewelry, watches and fashion to browse. As good as it looks in a magazine though, to truly appreciate it, there’s nothing better than seeing it in person. So take some time and visit us soon. We’d love to show you what’s new and help you find the perfect gift for that special occasion, whether it’s Mother’s Day, a special birthday or a big anniversary. We look forward to seeing you.

Bruce G. Weber, Founder

Michell Holdgrafer, Store Director

1


Contents spring/summer 2011 1700 Utica Square

24

918-749-1700 800-749-1771 www.brucegweber.com

PUBLISHED BY THE BUSINESS J O U R N A L S FA S H I O N G R O U P PUBLISHER

Stu Nifoussi EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian Sprague PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Montemorra CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Beth Bernstein DESIGNERS

Cynthia Lucero Jean-Nicole Venditti PRODUCTION MANAGER

FEATURES 1 Welcome Letter 4 Our People: Donna Grant 6 Bruce G. Weber Events 8 Accent Advisor 10 Caring for the Community: Philbrook Museum of Art 12 Gifts for Moms and Dads 15 Fashion: Spring Bling 22 Trends: The Joy of Jewelry 24 Profile: Mikimoto

44 Travel: Into Africa 46 Perfect Gems 48 Essay: The Family Pearls

Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

Hugh K. Stanton PRESIDENT AND CEO

WATCH SECTION 32 Watch Advisor 34 What’s New: Fashionably on Time

Britton Jones CHAIRMAN AND COO

Mac Brighton

36 First Person: Hand-Me-Downs Welcome

Copyright 2011. Published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550, Norwalk,

38 Travel: Watch Lover’s Mecca

Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018, 212-686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821;

CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175; Advertising Office: 1384

ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. The publishers accept no responsibilities for advertisers

26 Fashion: From the Runways

claims, unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of

40 Tulsa Food & Wine: Warm Weather Wines

this magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the publishers. Volume 9, Issue 1. Printed In The U.S.A.

42 Speed: Grand Sport

2


OUR PEOPLE

Donna Grant

SALES ASSOCIATE AT BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS

Where are you from originally? I was born and raised in New Bedford, Massachusetts and all of my family still lives there. I moved to Oklahoma in 1982, so I guess you could say I’m practically an Okie now! How long have you been at Bruce G. Weber? I started in September, 2008. I met Bruce Weber by chance when he came into the business where I worked. He called me the next day and asked me to come to work for him. How long have you been in the jewelry business? I’ve been selling jewelry for over 30 years! It started out as a part-time job to pay for college. I loved the job AND the jewelry, so I stuck with it and here I am. What’s your favorite part of your job and why? Helping people celebrate the important events of their lives and the relationships that you form with them as a result of that. Maybe it’s because I’m a mom to two sons, but I especially love helping these nervous young guys who are getting engaged. I enjoy educating them so that they can make an informed decision and seeing them become confident and excited about their choice. If you weren’t doing this job, what might you be doing for a living? I always thought it would be fun to be a food critic. Who wouldn’t want to eat great food and get paid to write about it? What is the greatest personal or professional challenge you’ve faced? I have been blessed with a good life, but it has been a challenge living so far away from my extended family, especially when my kids were young. It was difficult not having that support system. Who has been your biggest influence? Without a doubt—my mom. She’s the strongest, most giving person I know. She taught me how to be a mom, love my family and work hard. What’s the best piece of advice you’ve ever received? God does not have problems. Only plans. What do you do to unwind? I love to read! My idea of the perfect day is a great book and a pot of good coffee. What is something you can’t live without? My Bible. It’s where I turn when I need direction. Where is your favorite vacation spot? I love New England, especially Cape Cod and Martha’s Vineyard. I love how green it is and the rugged beauty of the beaches, but mostly I love it because it’s still “home” to me. What’s your favorite type of food? Unfortunately, there’s not a lot that I don’t like. Didn’t you see what my dream job was? But, if I have to pick a favorite, probably Mexican or barbeque. What’s your favorite local restaurant? Albert G’s Barbeque—and it’s right on my way home. How convenient!

4


MODERN ROCK CANDY® IN 18K GOLD WITH GEMSTONES. ©2011 IPPOLITA®. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


BRUCE G. WEBER EVENTS

THE THIRD ANNUAL BRUCE G. WEBER TENNIS CLASSIC September 15 and 16, 2010, benefitting the Children’s Hospital at Saint Francis. The event kicked off with a cocktail party at Bruce G. Weber’s Jewelry Salon where brackets were unveiled for the much anticipated tournament. Tulsa’s local tennis talent gathered at the Michael D. Case Tennis Center for two days of friendly competition, loads of fun and a very worthy cause!

6


DINNER WITH DENISE Tuesday, November 16, 2010. About 100 Denise Roberge jewelry fans from Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels Salon got to personally dine with the renown jewelry designer at Tulsa’s trendy Wolfgang Puck Bistro in Brookside. The holiday event was a treat for clients who enjoyed selecting delectable tidbits of scrumptious 22K gold handcrafted designs offered up on silver trays from the new 2011 jewelry collection.

7


ACCENTADVISOR

HOW DO I MIX FINE AND FASHION JEWELRY?

I’VE BEEN SEEING A LOT OF BLACK USED IN FINE JEWELRY. WHAT ARE THE KEY

Use a pretty black dress or a simple top as the backdrop for mixing pieces. Wear a gold medallion

STONES AND METALS, AND HOW CAN I WEAR THEM?

pendant along with multiple chains in blackened and tonal antiqued base metal. Or you can mix in real baroque pearls with a large colored pendant in crystal rather than a precious gem. A low-risk way to mix real and faux is on the wrist; you have more room to be playful as it’s further from your face. Here, mix leather or suede wrap styles with pavé charms, or Bakelite and wood with precious stones. Throw in some high karat gold thin bangles to create a truly eclectic look. This season, designers are even mixing these materials into one piece to offer a statement at an affordable price. But if you prefer simplicity, stick to a pair of cuffs in wood with center gemstones, and a mesh necklace with chains of matte gold. The combination will be different and dramatic, and take you through the season in style.

The trend started with designers adding a black rhodium finish to white gold and mixing it with high karat yellow gold for a richer look. As the darker metal began to sell and the prices for gold went up, the next step was to use blackened or highly oxidized silver. (Some designers still use black rhodium plated 18K white gold, which can mean a slightly higher price tag.) These metals look great with the of-the-moment diamonds—also black—which are spectacular in rose, brilliant and polished rough cuts. Black can be done in styles from gothic to feminine, such as pavé leaves and flowers with a black diamond center. If you want to add color to your black jewelry look, try a hint of rough cut fancy sapphires, the pretty watercolor shades of moonstones and aquamarines, or the

IMAGES COURTESY OF JOHN HARDY

more saturated orange hues of citrines.

8


CARING FOR THE COMMUNITY

Philbrook Museum of Art BRUCE G. WEBER PRECIOUS JEWELS IS PROUD TO SUPPORT ANOTHER GEM OF TULSA, THE PHILBROOK MUSUEM OF ART. hilbrook as a museum began in 1938 when the Waite Phillips family and the Tulsa Art Association joined forces to create the city’s first private, not-for-profit art museum. Oil magnate Waite Phillips (brother of Phillips Petroleum founder Frank Phillips) and his wife Genevieve donated their home to house the future museum. Named Villa Philbrook, the Phillips’ 1927 residence was designed in the Italian Renaissance Revival style by Beaux Arts architect Edward Buehler Delk. With its spacious rooms, wide corridors and great halls, the immense home was a “natural” for the future museum. The family’s decorative arts, sculpture, and Southwestern art objects were combined with artworks belonging to the Tulsa Art Association to begin Philbrook’s permanent collection. In 1939, the museum opened to the public. Today, Philbrook Museum of Art is the premier cultural institution in the city of Tulsa and a statewide leader in the cultural life of Oklahoma. It is distinguished by nationally recognized gardens, exhibitions, quality collections and innovative educational programming. Set within a 23-acre site three miles from downtown Tulsa, Philbrook is a unique combination of historic house, modern museum complex, major gardens and permanent collections.

P

Upcoming Exhibits: American Streamlined Design, The World of Tomorrow Through May 15, 2011 This exhibition features more than 180 objects from the late 1920s to the 1950s, when streamlining became the popular American design idiom for objects ranging from toy scooters to typewriters. Rauschenberg at Gemini June 12 through September 11, 2011 From 1967 to 2001, legendary artist Robert Rauschenberg partnered with master printmakers at LA's Gemini G.E.L. to produce the groundbreaking prints and multiples featured in this exhibition. Magnificent Vision, Two Centuries of European Masterworks from the Speed Art Museum October 9, 2011 through January 8, 2012 More than 70 paintings carefully selected from The Speed Art Museum in Louisville, KY, by such major artists as Rubens, Rembrandt, Gainsborough and Tiepolo will be featured in this exhibition.

10


With the support of customers like you, we can give back to the community we love.

Tulsa

Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels is proud to support these worthy causes: Alzheimer’s Association, Memory Gala • Brush Creek Ranch • National Vaccine Safety/Vaccine for Victoria Habitat for Humanity • The Little Light House • Philbrook, Wine Experience • Tulsa Medical Missions Indian Health Care Resource Center, Dance of the Two Moons Heart Association, Go Red for Women, Heart Ball Tulsa Opera • American Cancer Society, Cattle Barons Ball & Rib Crib Golf Tournament • Leukemia Society The Children’s Hospital at St. Francis, Painted Pony & our Annual Ladies Tennis Tournament • United Way Indian Nations Council, Boy Scouts of America • American Lung Association, Beaujolais Noveau American Legion • Tulsa Project Women • Family & Children’s Services, Brainiac Ball & Care Card • Tulsa Ballet Light Opera of Oklahoma • Oklahoma State University Alumni Association Bartlesville Symphony Society OU College of Pharmacy/ Make a Wish Foundation • Extreme Home Makeover • ALS, Hunt for a Cure


GIFTS FOR MOMS AND DADS

David Yurman From the Confetti collection in sterling silver with blue topaz, necklace $1,100, earrings $695

Elizabeth Locke 19K yellow gold earrings in turquoise with diamonds, $1,650

Cartier Small Tank Francaise in stainless steel, $3,875 Denise RobergĂŠ 22K yellow gold Link necklace with toggle, $17,965


John Hardy Kali Arus drop pendant on 36� chain necklace, $450 Kali Arus slim bangles, set of three, $595 David Yurman Stainless steel Classic timepiece with mother of pearl and diamond dial and diamond bezel on white strap, $6,200

Marco Bicego Jaipur bracelets, starting at $890

Panerai PAM104 44mm Automatic in stainless steel, $6,300


The Mother’s Ring Collection. Stackable designs custom-made for Mom with the birthstones of her children.


FASHION

Spring Bling BOLD SILVERS AND GOLDS PAIR WITH PASTEL GEMSTONES TO COMPLEMENT SPRING’S NEUTRALS, ANIMAL PRINTS AND SOFT, FLOWING SILHOUETTES. CLOTHING BY ROWE BOUTIQUE


FASHION

Inside/outside diamond hoop earrings, starting at $1,100

Penny Preville Diamond pendant in 18K white gold, $4,775

Ballerina by Day

Ippolita Sterling silver hammered bangle bracelets, starting at $395

A neutral palette is soft and subtle so try punching up this look with a statement dress in the neutral family like this Ali Ro silk and macrame dress paired with a Jeffrey Campbell lace pump and beaded clutch from Santi


Ippolita Gold dome ring, $995

Orange Crush The color of the season, a vibrant orange shown here in this Robert Rodriguez silk halter romper paired with an Ada sogo belt

Stephen Webster Superstud bracelet, $1,850

Jaeger-LeCoultre Reverso Squadra, $15,500


FASHION

Marina Minx Joie makes the perfect nautically inspired striped maxi paired with Ada's studded rolling belt, a rafia fedora from Hat Attack and a pair of Cocobelle sandals

Elizabeth Locke Intaglio 19K gold ring, $3,375

Elizabeth Locke 19K gold collection 35� chain, $6,825 Small Maltese cross with diamond, $2,100 Roman bronze coin, $1,700 Turquoise drop, $875


Stephen Webster Superstud necklace, $1,650

Animal Magnetism A safari inspired linen anorak from Ali Ro is the perfect complement to this metallic sequined dress from Parker, accented with a bold animal printed DVF clutch

Rolex Datejust 36mm in stainless steel and 18K gold with diamond bezel, $13,925

Roberto Coin Capri Plus ebony and diamond ring, $1,848


FASHION

Charles Krypell Gold and diamond Figure 8 necklace, $31,980

Penny Preville diamond earrings, $5,865

Minimal Femme This strong yet subtly draped dress from Ever makes a statement all on its own accented simply with a beaded Santi clutch

Diamond eternity bracelet, prices vary


Roberto Coin Amethyst and mother of pearl ring in rose gold with diamonds, $8,300 Marco Bicego Paradise Perle necklace, $4,470

She Wears the Pants A feminine soft cropped pinstripe blazer and silk top both from Robert Rodriguez are the perfect complement to a strong menswear-inspired pant like these from Yoana Baraschi, shown with pair of Kelsi Dagger gladiator heels

Charles Krypell Gold and diamond Figure 8 bracelet, $17,400 Ippolita Gelato bangle in mother of pearl and 18K gold, $3,650

All clothing and accessories by Rowe Boutique www.roweboutique.com


TRENDS

The Joy of Jewelry COLORFUL GEMS FIT FASHION’S BRIGHT OUTLOOK BY LORRAINE DEPASQUE

THE GEMS Adam Graham, marketing director of The American Gem Trade Association (AGTA), agrees that bright blues and greens, as well as shades of purple, are leading trends in colored gemstone jewelry this year. Among the azures, he points to traditional blue sapphire, aquamarine and blue topaz, but emphasizes that lesser-known stones like labradorite, turquoise, blue moonstone, chalcedony, tanzanite and blue shaded black onyx are extremely significant as well. With dramatically-sized jewelry in vogue, it helps that many of the latter gemstones can be purchased in high quality at affordable prices.

22

IMAGES COURTESY OF DAVID YURMAN, STEPHEN WEBSTER, ROBERTO COIN

T

his season, there’s one simple rule on the road to great jewelry style: Don’t get stuck in neutral! Get into gear and follow the direction of spring 2011 fashion, which is all about color. Does this mean that neutrals like black—so strong these past few years—are no longer fashionable? Is it time to abandon your Little Black Dress? “Absolutely not,” says Meredith Smith, designer and cultural trend analyst at The Doneger Group in New York City. “Even though fashion’s biggest names flooded the spring runways with bright-colored clothes, you can still wear your classic LBD. However, the perennial cocktail classic and other neutral-toned attire needs to be popped with colorful jewelry and accessories. Right now, our culture is all about finding joy; adorning ourselves in happy, escapist colors (like bright blues and greens) is one way to do that.”


LAYERING NECKLACES While models strutted down

“This year, you’re also going to see more engagement ring center stones in blues and greens,” notes Graham. “Kate Middleton’s blue sapphire from Prince William has re-ignited the trend that his mother, Princess Diana, started back in 1981, when she received the engagement ring from Prince Charles. Blue sapphire is a great option for women who don’t want to be too ‘bling,’ and at the same time, it’s a high-end gem of great color.” At the AGTA’s annual Spectrum jewelry design awards for 2011, Graham tells us, “One of the winning pieces was a platinum ring with a neongreen tsavorite center stone. Our panel of judges, all in the fashion or jewelry industries, said it represents a definite style direction.” In fact, many of the best jewelry designers are also premiering dazzling fashion collections with great green gems, especially green tourmalines, peridots, green diamonds, emeralds, green agates, green sapphires and tsavorites. “And for the past year,” says Graham, “celebrity stylists have been requesting to borrow green gemstone jewelry for their A-list clients to wear to awards shows.” The green jewelry they’ve been borrowing will coordinate with many red carpet fashion styles according to Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of The Pantone Color Institute, which named ‘Peapod’ green as one of its top fashion colors for spring/summer. “We’ve learned that green really works well as a neutral and we see people more inclined to wear it on a regular basis,” she says. This past fall, Pantone chose ‘Purple Orchid’ as its number-one fashion color and, for spring/summer, the passion for purple continues, with ‘Lavender’ in its top ten selection. Jewelry designers are showing violet gem creations in everything from deep amethysts and fancy purple sapphires to pastel pinky-purple sugilites and quartzes.

the runways wearing mega-necklaces, in this case you have another option. Instead of investing in one massive neck piece, a more practical purchase might be to buy several long chains and links that can each be doubled or tripled. With layering necklaces, you can experiment and create many different looks, for both daywear and evening. Play with the necklaces, graduating the lengths differently to accommodate the neckline of whatever you’re wearing. To complete the look, add a 16-inch chain with a pendant or enhancer. In this season of bold color, choose one with a bright gemstone center. EPIC RINGS Typically, you ladies buy these supersized and super stylish rings for yourself. (Well, why not—you deserve it!) They’re statement pieces that reflect your personality and personal style, so be sure to select gemstones you really like—plus, since it’s on your hand, you’ll be looking at it all day. Should you invest a lot of money in this epic ring? That depends, to some degree, on whether you’ll be wearing it every day or if you’ll want to buy several and switch—much like some people do with watches. Unlike the big cocktail rings of eras past, the epic ring is no longer a dress-up-only accessory. GUMDROP EARRINGS And you thought gumdrops were just those chewy sugar-coated candies you shouldn’t be eating! Think again: It’s the season’s strongest earring silhouette. More medium-large than ultra-large in size, this drop-style earring focuses on one prominent colored gem that hangs to about mid-neck. It’s classic, yet, at the same time, fashion. Ask your jeweler about the earrings’ stone shape and cut. Some gumdrops have slices of color with a flat bottom, allowing light to pass through the gemstone, much in the way natural light shines through a stained glass window. MORE THAN ONE METAL COLOR No, you can’t be a yellow-only or white-only jewelry lover anymore. It just isn’t fashionable. If most—or all—of your jewelry is still the same metal color that you’ve been wearing forever, this is the season to start collecting pieces made in different surface colors. If you want to stick to karat gold for your precious metal, that’s okay, but there are many different gold colors to choose from: rose, blackened and sometimes peach. Even the texture on a piece slightly changes the look of the color. (For example, a high-polished blackened gold bracelet will appear to have a different hue than a satin-finished or matte blackened gold piece.) Once you begin to add different colored pieces to your jewelry wardrobe, you’ll see how all the shades really do work together. And no need to worry if you don’t have “enough” of a certain color when you start. Part of the fun of jewelry is collecting it over time.

FIVE TO BUY Now that you know what these post-winter pickme-up colors and coordinating gemstones are, which jewelry pieces in particular should you be considering? Ultimately that depends on your individual style as well as what jewelry you already own, but here are the five jewelry must-haves we highly recommend: BIG BANGLES The number-one jewelry item adorning spring runway models was the big bangle, and they usually wore two or three per arm. The uber bangles—not slim stackables and not ultra-wide cuffs—almost always featured stones, beads, or some sort of bright embellishment.

23


PROFILE Mikimoto strands are world-renowned for their perfectly matched pearls; this process becomes exponentially more difficult when strands are longer.

Timeless Beauty

MIKIMOTO CULTURED PEARLS—A PERFECT BALANCE OF TRADITION AND INNOVATION BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

24

A Unique History

After many years of trials and tribulations, Kokichi Mikimoto succeeded in creating the world’s first cultured pearl in 1893. He then sent artisans on missions to Europe to master the techniques of jewelry production and design. This knowledge, supplemented by the Japanese aesthetics of form, line and workmanship, produced the distinctive originality of Mikimoto designs. In 1899, equipped with his first collection, Mr. Mikimoto opened the first Mikimoto Pearl Store, Japan’s first specialty pearl shop, in Tokyo’s Ginza district. After improving his cultivating and harvesting techniques, he was able to ship his product overseas, making cultured pearls available to women around the world.

IMAGES COURTESY OF MIKIMOTO

O

f all the love stories over the ages, does anything beat the intensity of Cleopatra and Marc Antony? Betting him that she could consume the wealth of an entire nation in one meal, Cleopatra removed a pearl earring, crushed it, and drank the powder mixed with wine. Under her spell and hopelessly enchanted, Antony neglected his duties to the Roman Empire, thus changing forever the course of history. Since ancient times, pearls have indeed symbolized everything from purity of love to victory in battle. From symbol of chastity to mystical aphrodisiac, pearls have reflected the power of love. Worn by ancient Greeks at their wedding ceremonies to ensure marital bliss (and prevent new brides from crying), pearls are worn today by modern brides for strangely similar reasons. After all this time, pearls still represent innocence, sophistication and timeless beauty. In 1893, Kokichi Mikimoto successfully created the world’s first cultured pearl, launching today’s cultured pearl industry and making cultured pearls available to women all over the world. The company is internationally respected for its dedication to beauty and quality. Since each pearl is as different and individual as a fingerprint, quality grading standards are essential. Mikimoto has maintained the highest standards of quality and consistency by devoting more than a century to understanding the sea and researching the oyster. They’ve developed a proprietary grading system,


unique within the cultured pearl industry. Although no single factor can solely represent the worth of a pearl, luster and surface perfection are most important. There are four Mikimoto grades: A, A+, AA and AAA, with AAA being the highest quality. A mere three to five pearls out of every 100 harvested are deemed worthy to bear the Mikimoto name. While there is nothing more cherished than a classic strand of Mikimoto pearls, numerous fashion options abound. For 2011, these include:

LONGER STRANDS Ranging in length from 32 to an astounding 100 inches, these longer strands are the perfect accessory and a wonderful gift for today’s modern woman. Taking the classic beauty of a traditional choker to a whole new level, these versatile strands, whether worn for day or evening, alone or layered with another piece of jewelry, add glamour to any occasion. Not only a unique fashion look, these long strands truly showcase the superior quality for which Mikimoto is revered. Each strand is a work of art, requiring incredible skill, judgment and craftsmanship. Mikimoto strands are worldrenowned for their perfectly matched pearls and this process becomes exponentially more difficult when strands are longer. Demanding the finest judgment and artistic sense, only Mikimoto has the ability to sort and match such long lengths of pearls.

PEARLS IN MOTION

contrast to the classic, feminine elegance of white pearls, Mikimoto Black South Seas are pearls with attitude, emitting an air of confidence. Day or night, from the boardroom to the runway, Black South Sea pearls are the perfect complement to any outfit, and an icon of style and taste. Because of their breathtaking natural hues, fashion mavens and connoisseurs alike consider Mikimoto’s Black South Sea cultured pearls to be among the most distinctive of all gems. With their hypnotic depth of color ranging from light gray to peacock green to midnight black, these treasures of the sea seem lit from within, conferring a remarkable radiance and sophistication upon those fortunate enough to wear them. In 1914, Kokichi Mikimoto established a culturing site for Black South Sea pearl oysters on Ishigaki Island in Okinawa, Japan. Since that time, the brand has remained the authority on Black South Sea cultured pearls of the highest quality. Almost a century later, Black South Sea jewelry remains a formidable fashion trend as style-savvy consumers are embracing these gems as never before. Mikimoto’s international design team uses Black South Sea cultured pearls to create jewels of impeccable style and quality, from a perfectly-matched choker to a multi-colored 45” strand that can be layered or wrapped.

CARING FOR PEARLS

The rules are simple:

Wipe gently with a soft cloth after wearing and store separately so they don’t get scratched. Remember: pearls are organic gemstones, and thus vulnerable to acid, alkaline and humidity. That said, pearls beg to be worn; left alone in a box they risk dehydration, so wear them often and flaunt your elegance and style!

With Pearls in Motion, the possibilities are unlimited. This unique concept in jewelry design offers the versatility to wear Mikimoto cultured pearls in an infinite number of ways. Place the cultured pearls anywhere along the slim, elegant chain. The gems will remain in place thanks to Mikimoto’s exclusive, patented mechanism.

BLACK SOUTH SEA Mikimoto Black South Sea cultured pearls, with their exotic origins and mysterious color palette, are a versatile must-have for today’s trendsetters looking to make an edgy fashion statement. In direct

BAROQUE COUTURE COLLECTION

The natural beauty of Mikimoto’s Baroque South Sea cultured pearls is derived from their superb luster and irregular, yet beautiful, silhouettes. The unique organic shapes of these pearls make them a constant marvel to behold, a true fashion statement and conversation piece. Baroque Couture is a collection of one-of-a-kind Mikimoto jewelry inspired by the Baroque pearl. The Baroque Couture Collection uses the distinctive shape and size of each individual pearl as the subject of each exclusive design. Nature determines the setting and Mikimoto designers fulfill each pearl’s destiny. Says Amy Kim-Araneo, Mikimoto’s vice president of product development and design: “Designing baroque pearl jewelry is incredibly exciting and challenging because no two pearls are alike, so each piece takes on its own personality. The unique shape of each pearl truly dictates the design…as if it knows what it wants to be. The organic, fluid designs of Baroque Couture really conform to the body and showcase a more modern, less traditional look in pearl jewelry.”

25


FASHION

IMAGES COURTESY OF ACCESSORIESDIRECTIONS.COM

SUBSTANTIAL PENDANTS PROVIDE PERFECT CONTRAST TO PRETTY PRINTS


Runways

From the NOTICE-ME NEUTRALS TEMPERED A

KALEIDOSCOPE OF COLORS

ON SPRING 2011 RUNWAYS ACROSS THE GLOBE. BY JILLIAN SPRAGUE


FASHION LAYER HEARTS OVER LACE FOR AN ON-TREND VINTAGE LOOK

A LITTLE SHINE GOES A LONG WAY…

MOONSTONE MANIA! THESE COOL STONES ARE HOT FOR SPRING


Runways

From the NOTICE-ME NEUTRALS


SOME GIFTS ARE ENJOYED FOR DAYS.

OTHERS, FOR GENERATIONS.

Handcrafted Exclusively for You by Bruce G. Weber Prcious Jewels.


ACCENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SECTION SPRING/SUMMER 2011

getty 1 / Peter Dazeley

ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

H

W

WATCHES


ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

H

W

WHAT TO KNOW WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR TIMEPIECES

WATCH ADVISOR

IS IT OKAY TO WEAR A SPORTS WATCH AS AN EVERYDAY WATCH?

IMAGE COURTESY OF TW STEEL

If you love it, why not?

Unless you’re talking about a tacky plastic watch, most of today’s better sports watches are thin enough to wear as an everyday watch, and offer features that most of us appreciate even at home or in the office. These can include water resistance, built-in chronographs, readable dials and various subdials, calendars and other complications. That said, there’s nothing classier than a beautiful dress watch and for spring 2011, classical elegance is all the rage. Our suggestion: build a watch wardrobe that includes both sports and dress watches and alternate according to the occasion, and your mood.

WHAT ARE MECHANICAL WATCHES AND WHY ARE THEY SO EXPENSIVE?

As opposed to quartz watches that function electronically, a mechanical watch is driven by a spring which must be periodically wound. A series of gears power the balance wheel, which oscillates back and forth at a constant rate. A device called an escapement releases the wheels with each swing of the balance wheel, moving the hands forward at a constant rate and creating a ticking sound. It’s technology dating back to 17th century Europe, and the expense is the design, the old world craftsmanship, the maintenance and replacement parts, and of course the intrinsic value of precious metals and other fine materials. But for those whose hearts beat to the pulse of a mechanical timepiece, there’s nothing else quite like it!

I HAVE MY GRANDFATHER’S TIMEPIECE FROM THE 1950 S ; IS IT WORTH THE INVESTMENT TO RESTORE IT?

GETTY 1/ RTI IMAGES

T H E D E C I S I O N T O R E S T O R E A V I N TA G E T I M E P I E C E is part rational (Will the restored timepiece be worth more?) and part emotional (This is my grandfather’s watch!). Bottom line: the joy of wearing an heirloom, especially one with family history, is unique and priceless. That said, only you can decide if it’s worth the investment. Once you’ve made the decision to restore your vintage timepiece, entrust it only to a qualified technician with proper training in assessing and working on older timepiece movements. Improper repair of an older watch can damage the movement irreparably. Incorrect replacement parts, finishing techniques and lubrication are just some of the issues we’ve seen. In general, older timepieces cannot be expected to function with the same level of accuracy as new models. However, if properly restored, the watch should be suitable for daily wear. One must allow ample time for the work to be completed, as parts might not be readily available, and the technician might have to search the marketplace for the proper part, or in some cases, make the part by hand. Once the work is done, consider enhancing your newly restored vintage watch with an interesting strap—perhaps one in a bold color or with contrast stitching—to make a unique statement. 32


WHAT TO KNOW WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR TIMEPIECES

WATCH ADVISOR

I'M ABOUT TO INVEST IN A WATCH AND WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT ITS COMPLICATIONS. CAN YOU HELP? Moon Phase Subdial Strap

30-Minute Register for Chronograph Second Counter for Chronograph

Lug Hour Marker or Index

Repeating Slide (Chimes Time Aloud When Activated)

Start/Stop for Chronograph Minute Hand

Hour Hand Crown

Second Hand

Date Indicator

Day of Week Indicator Year Indicator

Reset for Chronograph

Bezel

Month Indicator

Dial (Below the Hands)

ILLUSTRATION BY HARRY BATES; INFORMATION PROVIDED BY JOHN HORNE

12-Hour Register for Chronograph

Crystal (Above the Hands)

Understanding the parts and functions of a timepiece can help you select the style that’s right for you. It’s also helpful later, when your watch requires service or repair. This particular model has both time-telling and time-keeping capabilities. The chronograph, for time-keeping, is essentially an advanced stopwatch. 33


by Laurie Kahle

ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

H

W

FOCUS: WHAT’S NEW

FASHIONABLY ON TIME

CURVES AHEAD The French word délice translates to delight, an emotion that Cartier intends to conjure with its new ladies’ watch collection, Délices de Cartier, which launches in June. Comparing the lozenge-shaped watch to a baker’s confection, Cartier once again demonstrates its design mastery by manipulating basic shapes to present something new and aesthetically intriguing. By positioning the smoothly-tapered, oval-shaped case on the diagonal across the wrist, designers created a curvaceous and feminine timepiece available in three sizes in 18K rose or white gold. The watch exudes a different personality depending on whether you choose the shimmering gold bracelet or sleek toile strap, and, of course, with varying amounts of brilliant-cut diamonds sprinkled on the case and dial. Amid Cartier’s highly impressive lineup of innovative complicated timepieces this year, Délices de Cartier is a chic reminder of the simple pleasure of a beautiful design.

34


Like color?

The colored stone jewelry collection, exclusively at Bruce G. Weber Precious Jewels.


by Joseph Ungoco

ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

H

W

FOCUS: FIRST PERSON

HAND-ME-DOWNS WELCOME A MILESTONE WATCH PASSED AMONG FAMILY GIVES THE PHRASE NEW MEANING.

A

s my plane touched down at LAX, the pilot cheerily reminded us to set our watches back three hours to the local time. I glanced at my hand-me-down Rolex, my father’s stainless steel Air-King Oyster Perpetual, bought for his swearing in as a U.S. citizen on July 4, 1965. This watch had kept him on time for more than a decade. I honestly couldn’t recall the last time I had worn this watch on a plane, but this would be its last transcontinental crossing on my wrist. My father gave me “The Air-King”, his very first Rolex, on my 11th birthday. Two months prior, to commemorate his own birthday, he had “invested in” an 18 karat yellow gold and stainless steel Datejust with Jubilee bracelet, pulling ahead of his stainless steel-clad siblings in our family version of the Rolex Stakes. (The Bond films of the ’60s and ’70s introduced my father and his three brothers to the Rolex brand, but the ’80s brought my family’s obsession to a whole new level.) Later that year, my father took me with him to the watchmaker’s shop, where we had the Air-King cleaned, the crystal polished, and the luminous hour markers and hands repainted—an annual tradition. Just as I thought we were ready to leave, the watchmaker came forward with a green leather box stamped with a gold coronet. Inside was the

matching women’s version of my father’s new watch. That summer, my mother handed her stainless steel Rolex with the Oyster bracelet—an engagement present from my father—down to her younger sister for her birthday. Years later, before my 30th birthday, I called my watch dealer about buying myself a special watch—perhaps a brand new Submariner. But when I arrived at his shop, he had found the perfect tribute to my milestone birthday: a watch exactly as old as me. It was a mint condition 1969 18 karat yellow gold Rolex Date with graduated Oyster bracelet. Its South American seller swore it had sat untouched in his father’s safety deposit box for at least 25 years! I was assured that after a quick swipe of my credit card, a slightly longer FBI check (for the watch, not me) and a thorough inspection (again for the watch), this gorgeous timepiece would be mine. My “new” Rolex arrived just in time to accompany me to my birthday party. I lived happily with my Rolexes for several years, until the event that prompted this story: my godson’s birthday. The fourth of six boys, he was well acquainted with the phrase “hand-me-down”, but I think that my present to him that day—a green leather box with a gold coronet, the Air-King safely tucked inside—may have changed his opinion of that phrase forever. At least I hope so…

The Bond films of the ’60s and ’70s introduced my father and his three brothers to the Rolex brand.

36


Quality for quality, the best price anywhere.

Guaranteed.

1700 Utica Square, Tulsa, Oklahoma 74114

(918) 749-1700

www.brucegweber.com


by Roberta Naas

ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

H

W

FOCUS: TRAVEL

WATCH LOVER’S MECCA 48 HOURS IN LA CHAUX-DE-FONDS

I

f you find yourself in Switzerland and have some extra time (those two words being the operative ones) on your hands, La Chaux-de-Fonds is definitely worth a visit. The capital city of the district known as La Chauxde-Fonds, in the canton of Neuchâtel, is widely known as the watchmaking center of the world, the place where many world-renowned brands took root hundreds of years ago. Located in the 1,000meter-high Jura Mountains, the townspeople were unable to rely on farming once the winter snows set in. Watchmaking provided at first a great hobby, then a lucrative craft, and finally a proud tradition. La Chaux-de-Fonds has received recognition as a UNESCO World Heritage Site because of its exceptional history and universal contributions. It suffered extensive fire damage in 1794, when it was almost decimated and then totally rebuilt. It owes its survival solely to the manufacture and export of watches. The town is one of few that offers an architectural concept juxtaposing residential housing with artisanal workshops—bringing the once cottage industry into today’s world, but on its own terms. There is still an odd mix of modern and post-modern architecture, with soaring glass towers right next to old tileroofed homes. Some of the world’s most famous watch brands have roots in La Chaux-de-Fonds, including Pierre Jacquet-Droz (best known for his automata), Girard-Perregaux, Omega, Movado, Gallet and TAG Heuer. Since the city and its surrounding canton remain one of the most lively and important Swiss watchmaking centers, the Musée International d’ Horlogerie (International Museum of Watchmaking) is a must-see. This popular

establishment showcases the history of timekeeping projects and products, from sundials to water clocks to table clocks, wall clocks, pocket watches and more. It is one of the richest collections in Switzerland with more than 4,500 exhibits. In the park outside the museum is a giant tubular-steel carillon clock with digital readout, built about 30 years ago. It melodically chimes the time every quarter-hour. For those who love watchmaking but might want a diversion, La Chaux-de-Fonds is rich with other influences, including Art Nouveau architecture, famous paintings and even automotive heritage. The Villa Jeanneret-Perret is the first independent project of architect Le Corbusier (nee Charles-Edouard Jeanneret), born in 1887 in La Chaux-deFonds; there are several other examples of his architecture around town as well. Be sure to check out the Museée des Beaux-Arts, an impressive neo-classical building with a collection of Van Gogh, Delacroix and Renoir, among others. An interesting tidbit for American car aficionados: This city is also the birthplace of Louis Chevrolet (born 1878), founder of the Chevrolet Motor Car Company. Something for everyone can be found during your two day visit. IF YOU’RE LOOKING FOR A FINE HOTEL, CHOICES ARE SLIM. WE CAN RECOMMEND: ATHMOS HÔTEL A four-star hotel in the center of town, near the train station and around the corner from the art and watch museums. GRAND HÔTEL LES ENDROITS A four-star modern, but in a country setting. The hotel overlooks the town, with a shuttle to the city center.

ABOVE: An arial view of the Grand Fontaine in the Neuchâtel canton region. 38


THE BEST WAY TO BUY A DIAMOND IS CONFIDENTLY. C arat Weight: 1.53

C olor Grade: E

C larity Grade: VS1

C ut Grade: Excellent Laser Inscription Registry Number: GIA 16354621 Shape & Cutting Style: Round Brilliant Natural Diamond: Not Synthetic

Beauty is one thing, but certainty is everything. A GIA report is the most technologically advanced diamond evaluation possible. It gives you a unique blueprint of your diamond’s attributes and an indisputable record of its quality. As creators of the 4Cs and the International Diamond Grading System,™ GIA is known for the kind of unbiased scientific information that has guided diamond buyers for generations. To learn more about this unique resource, please visit W W W. G I A 4 C S . G I A . E D U

THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WONDERING AND KNOWING.


TULSA FOOD & WINE

Warm Weather Wines TULSA WINE EXPERTS WEIGH IN ON YOUR BEST BETS IN WINE AS THE WEATHER TURNS WARMER BY ADAM SCOPPA

W

inter has come and gone, and that means it’s time to put away—along with the winter coats—those heavy reds and start considering lighter, patio-friendly wines. We chatted with a few of Tulsa’s most knowledgeable wine enthusiasts about what’s hot for the warmer months. It’s no surprise that white wine experiences a surge in interest during this time of year. From crisp, effervescent Vinho Verde to robust, creamy Chardonnay, something chilled and fruity seems to be on everyone’s agenda. Sonoma Bistro’s Johnna Hayes was quick to suggest Ken Forrester’s Sauvignon Blanc. This South African wine holds true to the region’s reputation for highly acidic and refreshing Sauvignon Blanc, with dominant accents of gooseberry and grapefruit. “One of the most versatile wines for food pairing” is how Chris Girouard of Girouard Vines describes the varietal, and suggested his own 2009 Warehouse Market Sauvignon Blanc, touting its clean, crisp, lemonand-lime flavor profile. From Spain, Bodegas Las Cana Albariño is a favorite of Joe Breaux, wine manager of Fleming’s Steakhouse. “It’s real lively, it kind of wakes you up,” said Breaux, adding that the

wine’s slight effervescence and subtle tropical fruit notes work well when paired with Thai cuisine and seafood. Can’t decide between red and white? Think pink! It’s the perfect time of year to rediscover rosé. Hayes enjoys the fruit-forward but dry-finishing Pinot Noir rosé from Oregon’s Van Duzer Vineyards. The delicate grape, most famous for its transcendent red Burgundy, is also known for producing spellbinding pink wine. Pomegranate, cherry and cranberry accents abound, working wonders with grilled salmon or chicken. Breaux finds the rose petal and apricot notes in the Sangiovese/Merlot blend of California’s SoloRosa to be a good pick as well. Speaking of Pinot Noir, few reds work so well in warm weather as this varietal. Hayes endorsed Whole Cluster Pinot Noir from Willamette Valley Vineyards in Oregon, due to its balance of fruit (think strawberry and cherry) and underlying spice (clove, cinnamon). Chilling this wine down to about 52 degrees is ideal for picnics and barbeques. Similarly, Quinta da Cortezia, a Portuguese wine made from the Touriga Nacional varietal, has a soft body and supple fruitiness that Breaux finds well-suited to outdoor excursions. Girouard cited his “very approachable” 2009 Spotlight Merlot as a candidate; the wine’s silky mouth feel and smooth tannins won’t weigh heavily on the tongue. Who doesn’t love sparkling wine? Be it Champagne or Cava, those playful bubbles are especially welcome during the spring and summer. Hayes favors Te Amo, an Italian Prosecco that’s “just like biting into an apple and a pear.” At under seven percent alcohol by volume, this wine makes an ideal aperitif or dessert accompaniment.

40


Sauvignon “Blanc is one of the most versatile wines for food pairing.

—Chris Girouard, Girouard Vines

41


SPEED

Grand Sport THE INTERSECTION OF HISTORY AND TECHNOLOGY BY DAVID A. ROSE

I

on. The driver, James Dean, was Hollywood’s newest heartthrob. He died within minutes of the crash, and a legend was born. Although only 90 Porsche 550 Spyders were made between 1953 and 1956, many have survived. At the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion held at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in 2010, one of the 600 cars entered was a Porsche 550 Spyder identical to the one James Dean planned to race 55 years ago. Vintage racing has grown to become one of the most exciting forms of motorsports. It brings to life what most people will only see on the pages of coffee table books, in museums or in movies. Rolex has sponsored motorsports since the 1930s. As the leading name in luxury timepieces, it’s fitting that they are title sponsor for one of the world’s most significant vintage race events. “Motor racing has an enormous following around the world. It appeals to those who appreciate the ultimate in technology as well as extreme competition,” said Peter Nicholson, vice president and director of communications, Rolex Watch U.S.A. “Since split-second timing is so critical for drivers and crews, it is Top: A full field of three-liter Formula 1 racecars, considered the pinnacle of motor racing from 1966 to ’83. Center left: A Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona was presented to Graham Wallis. Center right: Some of the many cars raced or built by Dan Gurney. Bottom right: Patrick Dempsey and Jay Leno.

42

fitting that Rolex adds its reputation for precision timekeeping to these magnificent events.” Participants at the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion hail from 13 countries and bring with them the most exotic cars on the planet to race at Laguna Seca’s challenging 11-turn circuit. Not long ago, one would have been able to see a Type 35 Bugatti Grand Prix car only in a museum. Last year 90 Bugattis were in Monterey, 35 of them racing in the Bugatti Grand Prix as part of the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion. (They later toured the California coastline as part of the Bugatti Rally 2010.) At vintage races, the cars are not necessarily the only stars. Patrick Dempsey, a passionate driver best known for his role as Dr. Derek Shepherd on TV’s Grey’s Anatomy, raced a Mazda GTP Prototype at the event. Always a crowd favorite, he was visibly thrilled with his racecar—and his results. Jay Leno and other celebrities are perennial attendees, but this year it was a true American legend who garnered the most attention. Dan Gurney, who was honored at the event, is widely considered to be the greatest American

ROLEX / STEPHAN COOPER

t was a late afternoon in September when two young men were driving to Salinas, Calif., in a brand new 1955 Porsche 550 Spyder. The owner of the car planned to compete in the Salinas Sports Car Race that weekend, but rather than transport the car by trailer from Los Angeles as intended, he felt he needed seat time in the new car before he raced it. As they approached an intersection near Cholame, a 1950 Ford coming from the opposite direction suddenly crossed lanes and the two cars collided head-


Left: Luc Slijpen from the Netherlands stands next to his original, unrestored 1925 Type 35 Bugatti. Bottom left: Graham Wallis in his 1929 Lagonda, for which he won The Spirit of Monterey Trophy for overall excellence. Below: Patrick Dempsey races the Jeremy Barnes Mazda RX-92 GTP.

fitting that Rolex adds its reputation for precision timekeeping to these magnificent events.” Participants at the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion hail from 13 countries and bring with them the most exotic cars on the planet to race at Laguna Seca’s challenging 11-turn circuit. Not long ago, one would have been able to see a Type 35 Bugatti Grand Prix car only in a museum. Last year 90 Bugattis were in Monterey, 35 of them racing in the Bugatti Grand Prix as part of the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion. (They later toured the California coastline as part of the Bugatti Rally 2010.) At vintage races, the cars are not necessarily the only stars. Patrick Dempsey, a passionate driver best known for his role as Dr. Derek Shepherd on TV’s Grey’s Anatomy, raced a Mazda GTP Prototype at the event. Always a crowd favorite, he was visibly thrilled with his racecar—and his results. Jay Leno and other celebrities are perennial attendees, but this year it was a true American legend who garnered the most attention. Dan Gurney, who was honored at the event, is widely considered to be the greatest American

racecar driver of all time. As a driver he has won races in Indy cars, Formula 1, NASCAR stock cars and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. He was the only American to win a Formula 1 Grand Prix in a car of his own design when, in 1967, he won the Belgian Grand Prix at Circuit Spa Francorchamps in the beautiful Gurney Weslake Eagle F1. Despite all his wins, Gurney is most well-known for his sportsmanship, which has won him the respect and admiration of peers and race fans around the world. As he was honored, Gurney reflected back on his prime, when cars were fast, drivers colorful and tragedy seemed always to be lurking around the next corner. “We were certainly driven by enormous passion for the sport, and we had great respect for those who came before us...we weren’t thinking about future history at the time,” said Gurney. He thanked his role model Phil Walters (better known as Ted Tappet), who “could move through traffic gracefully without knocking anybody off the road.” Gurney is thrilled about the growth and popularity of vintage racing and enjoys seeing enthusiastic gentlemen drivers behind the wheel of the cars that he and his peers made famous. “I’m sure these guys are as crazy as we were,” said Gurney. “I don’t know what it is about human beings...we all have an affinity for the internal combustion engine and its sounds and smells, as well as all the history. It’s great to see decades touching each other and new generations appreciating similar things.” The Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion is part of Monterey Auto Week, when sophisticated people, exotic cars, fine food and superb wines combine for a celebration that has become internationally recognized as a showcase for luxury and glamour. Automobile enthusiasts and connoisseurs of culture enjoy the atmosphere of elegance while attending auto-related shows, auctions, cocktail parties and elaborate dinners. At the Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance, grand touring cars drive some of the most scenic portions of Monterey’s 17Mile Drive and then parade down Carmel’s Ocean Avenue for bystanders to enjoy. The week-long festival of automobile culture culminates with the internationally acclaimed Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where some of the world’s most extraordinary cars are judged for authenticity, function, history and style. As trailers and auto-transporters are reloaded with their valuable cargo and participants head for home, the quiet and lovely Monterey peninsula returns to its normal tranquility. But plans are already underway for making the next event, from August 19th to the 21st, 2011, even more unforgettable.

43


TRAVEL

Into Africa IN ZAMBIA, SPOTTING WILDLIFE IS A WALK IN THE PARK. BY CAROLINA BOLADO HALE

PHOTOS NATHAN HALE

A

s we glided silently on the Zambezi River, we soaked in the stillness of the moment. To our right was Zimbabwe; to our left, Zambia. Above, the vast African sky enveloped us in its limitless supply of blue. Then we saw the hippos. Our reverie was broken by the creatures, who bobbed slowly up and down and grunted their displeasure at our having trespassed in their corner of the Zambezi. Our path ahead—and behind—was blocked by two pods of the roly poly beasts, among the deadliest in Africa. The promise of getting close to wildlife on a canoe trip was part of what had drawn us to Zambia’s Lower Zambezi National Park. But this was, perhaps, a bit too close. We gave them as wide a berth as possible. After several minutes, our guide, who was well versed in hippopotamus habits, dipped his oar into the water. “Let’s go. Quickly now,” he said, calmly but firmly. It was one of the many reminders we had while on safari that despite the gourmet food, plush beds and clawfoot bathtubs, we were very much in the wild, in the home of often unpredictable animals engaged in a daily life-and-death struggle. It’s easy to forget while sipping afternoon tea and watching the river float lazily by, until an elephant lumbers into camp searching for a snack. Being able to get deep into the bush was part of the allure of Lower

44


Zambezi National Park, a 4,000-square kilometer piece of riverfront land about a half-hour’s flight south of Lusaka. Though Zambia isn’t at the top of most people’s safari lists, it should be. Zambia’s guides are renowned beyond the country’s borders, and better park management and increased tourism revenue have helped to greatly reduce poaching. o roads lead to the park, so visitors must come via boat or prop plane; the latter lands on one of three red-dirt airstrips inside the park that often have to be cleared of zebras and warthogs. Formerly a private game reserve for Zambian ex-President Kenneth Kaunda, the park is now home to just six small camps, which means visitors are more likely to see resident wildlife as opposed to safari truck convoys. And there’s plenty of wildlife to see. Despite the park’s small size, it boasts most of the big game that bring people to Africa, plus more than 300 different bird species. After the rainy season has passed and the watering holes have dried up, the animals all come to drink at the river, which means those six riverfront camps are perfectly positioned for wildlife viewing. My husband and I split our visit there between Chiawa Camp, the first one established after the national park’s creation in 1983, and Old Mondoro, a more rustic and intimate camp a 45-minute boat ride downstream. The park has distinct regions, and the two camps are situated in completely different terrain. Dense shrubs, behind which lions hide while eyeing their prey, characterize the area around Chiawa, while large acacia trees with low-hanging, thick branches—perfect leopard perches—dominate the terrain downstream. We were up before the sun each day (the animals don’t sleep in, so we couldn’t either) to explore the area by safari truck, boat, canoe or even on foot. Zambia is, after all, the

N

Dr. Livingstone, I Presume No visit to Zambia is complete without a stop in Livingstone, next door to Victoria Falls. The local name for the falls, Mosi oa Tunya, means “the smoke that thunders.” When water levels are high, the towering clouds of mist can be seen clearly from downtown Livingstone, six miles away. The falls are at their mightiest in May and June, making the viewing experience a very wet one. The flow slows to a comparative trickle by the end of the year, which means each individual waterfall is clearly visible, and activities like whitewater rafting or taking a dip in the Devil’s Swimming Pool (literally inches from where the water plummets 360 feet down) are available. The Royal Livingstone Hotel, situated on the banks of the Zambezi River just upstream from the falls, offers luxurious rooms, and wildlife viewing right from your window—giraffes and zebras freely roam the grounds of the hotel. Rates start at $653 for double occupancy, including breakfast and national park fees.

Inside the canvas tent at Chiawa Camp

45

birthplace of the walking safari. Listening to bird calls and examining termite mounds, we saw the bush in a way that we never could have in a noisy safari vehicle. Every day brought a new adventure, whether it was hooking tigerfish in the river or finding lion cubs playing in the tall grass. And each evening, we paused to engage in another safari ritual: the sundowner. No matter what we were doing at the time, as soon as the sun began to sink below the horizon, we would stop, prepare drinks and watch the sky turn various shades of orange, pink and purple as we discussed the lasting memories we’d just made. Lower Zambezi National Park is open from mid-April until mid-November. Prices for Chiawa Camp range from $595 to $895 per person per day, depending on the time of year. Old Mondoro’s rates begin at approximately $600 per person per day. Rates include transportation within the park, all activities, food and drinks.


PerfectGems

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER. BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

CAPE ESCAPE Nestled on 25 acres atop a bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Chatham Bars Inn has been a landmark on Cape Cod since 1914. The hotel is famous for its extensive outdoor activities and lavish dining. But now guests can also indulge in the comfort of a contemporary spa that boasts a dozen king and queen-size suites, each with a hydrotherapy tub, sauna, steam shower, plasma TV, Bose sound system and fireplace. This spring, the spa is featuring a renewal and cleansing treatment that includes a body polish made of sugar drenched in plant oils, an application of botanical Shea butter, a linen body wrap, and face massage.

Since 1989, the Garden Conservancy has been restoring and preserving America’s exceptional gardens, from those made by wardens and prisoners at San Francisco’s Alcatraz Island (at left) to the Pearl Fryar topiary garden in South Carolina. Along with lectures and events, the group also offers members of the Garden Conservancy’s Society of Fellows the opportunity to see some of the most lavish gardens in the world. This year, along with U.S. destinations, the Fellows are traveling to Île de France to see Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte, a 17th century Baroque chateau and garden designed by the André le Nôtre (who later designed the gardens at Versailles), and Normandy to visit Château de Brécy, another 17th century chateau with a meticulously restored Italian style garden.

46

ABOVE: CHATHAM BARS INN; AT LEFT: GARDEN CONSERVANCY

GARDEN VARIETY


THE INN CROWD

ELYSIAN HOTEL

GETTY 1

YADES GREEK HISTORICAL HOTELS

On a narrow cobblestone street in Rethymnon old town on the island of Crete, a small, unassuming doorway opens to a large courtyard filled with masses of bougainvillea. A central fountain is surrounded by antiques, works of art, comfortable sofas and tables set with flowers. This stunning setting is the very fashionable restaurant of the Hotel Avli. Greeks come from all over the island for the superb food made from local sources and the incomparable Greek wines (the Avli has the largest wine cellar on Crete). Now a member of the prestigious Yades hotels, the Avli was once the home of a Venetian lord, and the elegant architecture and gracious style of the past remain. There are only seven (very chic) suites, each designed in an individual color theme with every modern convenience carefully integrated into the exposed stone, wood beams and original Venetian arches. Have a glass of wine on the rooftop and look out over this beautiful town to the sea.

PICNIC PLEASURES A quiet afternoon. China plates, good silver, a vintage tablecloth. And these sophisticated pairings from sommelier and gourmet Edward Costa, director of food and beverage at New York’s Waldorf Astoria Hotel. These elements combine to create a truly chic picnic with European flair. To evoke the flavor of a romantic afternoon in Italy, mingle the sharp and nutty flavors of Parmigiano Reggiano with the gentle Sangiovese grapes in Vignamaggio Chianti Classico Riserva Castello di Monna Lisa, 2006. Or, to give your picnic sparkle, try the light citrus Borgo Magredo Prosecco that highlights the flavors of smoked salmon. If you prefer a French ambiance, a fresh, crisp rosé is the perfect wine on a warm afternoon. Robert Oatley Rosé, 2008 is ideal with any chicken dish. And of course there must be champagne (and caviar). The bright and refreshing citrus flavors of Perrier Jouet Fleur de Champagne Blanc de Blanc, 1999 is a perfect match to the creaminess and richness of Osetra caviar. For a picnic of this caliber, pearls are appropriate.

KIDDING AROUND Guest rooms at the Elysian Hotel in Chicago boast white Carrera marble bathrooms with soaking tubs, inset LCD televisions and separate showers. Rooms have fireplaces and expansive terraces, and the beds are draped with 460-thread count Rivolta Carmignani Italian linens. To give couples traveling with children an opportunity to enjoy all these appurtenances, the hotel invites kids to the kitchens of either Balsan or Ria, the hotel’s restaurants, for a cooking session with the pastry chef. They “assist” in the preparation of a dessert such as Balsan’s Paris Brest, a cream-filled pastry, or Ria’s spiced hazelnut cake, nestled in ice cream and topped with cherries and hazelnuts. When the creation is finished, the kids get to take it with them. Maybe they’ll share.

47


ESSAY

THE FAMILY PEARLS A

s the cathedral bells pealed, the “new” bride and her groom turned to walk down the aisle. My mother and I were in Manila to celebrate her sister’s golden wedding anniversary. The assembled crowd of stylish men and women had spent months consulting their embroiderers, modistes and tailors—all to design traditional butterfly-sleeved ternos and barongs tagalog that would comply with the “Native Dress” request engraved in gold on the invitation. While the keen-eyed could distinguish between piña that had been embroidered and tatted at one pet convent versus another, what really set the women apart were their pearls. My mother wore her prized princess length strand of golden 10 mm baroque natural (not cultured) pearls and her younger sister wore her stunning choker length strand of blue 8 mm natural pearls. But the real showstopper glowed on the bride—a perfectly matched 10 foot strand of creamy pink 6 mm natural pearls. As my aunt glided gracefully past us, she resembled my grandmother in the formal wedding portrait that hangs in the gallery of our family home in Manila. A few days earlier, upon arriving at the traditional Spanish-style hacienda, my mother and her younger sister chatted about fittings with their modistes and donations to the convents while I lingered in the gallery studying the family portraits. At the very end stood the “lifesize” (at 5’10” I stand taller than the frame) oil painting of my maternal grandparents on their wedding day almost 75 years ago. The diminutive figures in the painting were resplendent in their native Filipino dress. I was struck by how realistically and beautifully the artist had rendered each pearl in my

grandmother’s necklace, which dramatically looped her tiny neck and grazed the hem of her dress. Upon my grandmother’s death, she left each of her daughters the parure in her birthstone—emeralds for my mother, rubies for her elder sister and sapphires for her younger sister—but she left the “family pearls” to all three of them. After consulting our family jeweler, who had brokered the original acquisition of this extraordinary single strand that had taken over 50 years to match, the sisters decided to separate the necklace into three equal strands, each finished with a new platinum clasp adorned with a ruby, an emerald and a sapphire to represent the three sisters. Over the years, as they dutifully had their pearls restrung annually, each one divided her strand and had the clasp reproduced to create a single strand with jeweled stations that could also be worn as nested strands, a shorter strand and a bracelet, or a choker with several bracelets. The “family pearls” (as my mother and her sisters always called them) had made many appearances over the years at various family events including weddings, christenings, anniversaries and even funerals. Once, as mother of the bride, my elder aunt had even worn her set combined with my younger aunt’s. But the entire original strand had never been reunited until that golden wedding anniversary. Almost another decade will pass before my own parents celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary—an event as rare and special as the pearls that will be worn to commemorate it. While high-definition video has long replaced oil portraits, the idea of several generations and one very beautiful necklace reuniting to celebrate a milestone will never become outdated.

48

IMAGE COURTESY OF MIKIMOTO

REUNITED AND IT FEELS SO GOOD BY JOSEPH UNGOCO


© D.YURMAN 2011


BRUCE G. WEBER ACCENT THE MAGAZINE OF LIFE’S CELEBRATIONS

SPRING/SUMMER 2011

Bruce G Weber  

Welcome to the spring/summer edition of Bruce G. Weber's Accent magazine featuring the latest jewelry and watches, plus fashion and lifestyl...

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you