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SPRING/SUMMER 2011

T H E M A G A Z I N E O F L I F E ’ S C E L E B R AT I O N S

BOLD& BEAUTIFUL! THE NEW GEMSTONES

Special Watch Section:

IT’S ABOUT TIME

PLUS:

Celebrity Spotlight Impeccable Pearls Gorgeous Gifts!


WELCOME

To our Valued Customers and Friends, Welcome to the spring edition of our Accent magazine. In addition to bringing us some much-needed warmth, the arrival of spring is a great reason for giving a beautiful gift. Whether it is pearls for Mother’s Day, a touch of sparkle for an engagement, or a watch for Father’s Day, we have what you are looking for at Bachendorf’s. And for upcoming high school and college graduations, we have great suggestions! Bring your graduate in to see us, or better yet, surprise him or her with something special to commemorate the occasion. While you already know Bachendorf’s as the leading jeweler in Dallas, our commitment to provide you with a wonderful experience continues to grow. We have added world class designers like Chanel watches and, most recently, Ivanka Trump, to our family of brands. Additionally, we continue to support the local community with our charity events and donations. It is imperative that, regardless of the times, we give back to Dallas. Area schools, hospitals and other charities need all of our support, and we continue our strong commitment to giving back. Please drop in for a visit at any of our locations. Develop a repertoire with one of our knowledgeable sales associates so they can better assist you, now and in the future, with all your jewelry, watch and gift-giving needs.

Galleria Level 1 13350 Dallas Parkway Suite 1415 Dallas, TX 75240 (972) 392-9900

Shops at Legacy – North 7401 Lone Star Drive Suite B100 Plano, TX 75024 (972) 596-2090

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Plaza at Preston Center 8400 Preston Road Dallas, TX 75225 (214) 692-8400


Contents spring/summer 2011 S T O R E L O C AT I O N S : P L A Z A AT P R E S T O N C E N T E R

8400 Preston Road Dallas, TX 75225 214-692-8400 GALLERIA LEVEL 1

13350 Dallas Parkway Suite 1415 Dallas, TX 75240 972-392-9900 S H O P S AT L E G A C Y– N O R T H

7401 Lone Star Drive Suite B100 Plano, TX 75024 972-596-2090

PUBLISHED BY THE BUSINESS J O U R N A L S FA S H I O N G R O U P PUBLISHER

Stu Nifoussi EDITOR-IN-CHIEF

Karen Alberg Grossman C R E AT I V E D I R E C T O R

Hans Gschliesser MANAGING EDITOR

Jillian Sprague PROJECT MANAGER

Lisa Montemorra CONTRIBUTING EDITOR

Beth Bernstein DESIGNERS

FEATURES 2 Welcome Letter 6 The Trip of a Lifetime 8 Events at Bachendorf’s 10 Accent Advisor 12 Red Carpet 14 Best Bets at Bachendorf’s 16 Trends: The Joy of Jewelry 20 Profile: Mikimoto 22 Proposals: Gloves at the Shoe 34 Perfect Gems

44 Art: Man’s Best Friend in the Spotlight

Cynthia Lucero Jean-Nicole Venditti

46 Spirits: Orange You Glad?

PRODUCTION MANAGER

48 Essay: The Family Pearls

Peg Eadie DIRECTOR OF PREPRESS

WATCH SECTION 26 Watch Advisor 30 Celebrity Ambassadors: Beautiful Women, Beautiful Watches 32 First Person: Hand-Me-Downs Welcome

Hugh K. Stanton PRESIDENT AND CEO

Britton Jones CHAIRMAN AND COO

Mac Brighton Copyright 2011. Published by Business Journals, Inc, P.O. Box 5550, Norwalk, CT 06856, 203-853-6015 • Fax: 203-852-8175; Advertising Office: 1384 Broadway, 11th Floor, NY, NY 10018, 212686-4412 • Fax: 212-686-6821; All Rights Reserved. The publish-

38 Travel: Into Africa

ers accept no responsibilities for advertisers claims, unsolicited manuscripts, transparencies or other materials. No part of this

40 Speed: Grand Sport

magazine may be reproduced without written permission of the

42 His Side: Romancing the Stone

publishers. Volume 9, Issue 1. Printed In The U.S.A.

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ON THE COVER: PHOTOGRAPHER: PETER SAKAS; MODEL: ANGELA MARTINI – ELITE MODEL MANAGEMENT; HAIR AND MAKEUP: KIM BAKER; STYLIST: SHARON ELLIOT; WARDROBE: CYRUS; JEWELRY: DAVID YURMAN, ROBERTO COIN, ROLEX

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THE SIMPLICITY OF INNOVATION.

LUMINOR 1950 8 DAYS GMT Hand-wound mechanical movement P.2002 calibre, three spring barrels, second time zone with 12/24 h indicator, 8-day power reserve with linear indicator, seconds reset. Steel case 44 mm Ă˜. Steel buckle.

www.panerai.com


EXPERIENCES

The Trip of a Lifetime

A

t the invitation of DeBeers and the Julius Klein Group, one of the largest siteholders and diamond cutters in the world, Lawrence and Katy Bock traveled to Africa late last year, along with five other American jewelry retailers. The trip began with a two-day visit to London for a tour of the DeBeers diamond sorting facility. From there, the group flew to Johannesburg, in South Africa, the first of five African countries they visited, which also included Botswana, Namibia, Zambia and Zimbabwe. While in southern Africa, the group was flown by helicopter to a diamond mining vessel 36 miles out to sea, where they were given a private tour of DeBeers’ offshore mining operations. In fact, they were the first Americans to ever set foot on the ship! They also visited state-of-the-art diamond cutting and manufacturing facilities. During their time in Namibia, they were guests of highranking government officials, including the President, Prime

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Minister and the U.S. diplomat. They then went on to Botswana for a visit to the Jwaneng diamond mine, the largest open pit diamond mine in the world (pictured on opposite page). But the trip wasn’t all work! The Bocks also went on several safaris, where they viewed all manner of wild game and, of course, breathtaking scenery and sunsets. They even walked with the lions at a game reserve! They also had the opportunity to visit children at the Moria Grace Children’s Home and the Embizweni Day Care

Center, where they contributed financial support and toys to some very deserving children (pictured above). An incredible time was had by all, and many lasting memories were made. But most importantly, the Bocks gained greater insight into the complex logistics of diamond mining, and were able to see firsthand how the diamond industry positively affects job creation, social care and education in Africa.

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EVENTS AT BACHENDORF’S SUPER SOIREE EVENT FEATURING CLINT BLACK AND ARTIST J.D. MILLER

CBB THEME ANNOUNCEMENT PARTY AT THE PLAZA STORE SPONSORED BY BACHENDORF’S AND CHOPARD

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SCAN. EXPLORE.

FIND YOUR TAG HEUER

Invented in 1887 by Edouard Heuer and reengineered for our new in-house Calibre 1887 movement, the oscillating pinion enables our CARRERA chronograph to start in less than 2/1000th of a second.

1.866.675.2080 www.tagheuer.com


ACCENTADVISOR

HOW DO I MIX FINE AND FASHION JEWELRY?

I’VE BEEN SEEING A LOT OF BLACK USED IN FINE JEWELRY. WHAT ARE THE KEY

Use a pretty black dress or a simple top as the backdrop for mixing pieces. Wear a gold medallion

STONES AND METALS, AND HOW CAN I WEAR THEM?

pendant along with multiple chains in blackened and tonal antiqued base metal. Or you can mix in real baroque pearls with a large colored pendant in crystal rather than a precious gem. A low-risk way to mix real and faux is on the wrist; you have more room to be playful as it’s further from your face. Here, mix leather or suede wrap styles with pavé charms, or Bakelite and wood with precious stones. Throw in some high karat gold thin bangles to create a truly eclectic look. This season, designers are even mixing these materials into one piece to offer a statement at an affordable price. But if you prefer simplicity, stick to a pair of cuffs in wood with center gemstones, and a mesh necklace with chains of matte gold. The combination will be different and dramatic, and take you through the season in style.

The trend started with designers adding a black rhodium finish to white gold and mixing it with high karat yellow gold for a richer look. As the darker metal began to sell and the prices for gold went up, the next step was to use blackened or highly oxidized silver. (Some designers still use black rhodium plated 18K white gold, which can mean a slightly higher price tag.) These metals look great with the of-the-moment diamonds—also black—which are spectacular in rose, brilliant and polished rough cuts. Black can be done in styles from gothic to feminine, such as pavé leaves and flowers with a black diamond center. If you want to add color to your black jewelry look, try a hint of rough cut fancy sapphires, the pretty watercolor shades of moonstones and aquamarines, or the

IMAGES COURTESY OF JOHN HARDY

more saturated orange hues of citrines.

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Your Premier Shopping and Dining Destination Our unmatched collection of shops has established Galleria Dallas as the Southwest’s most prestigious shopping destination. Explore the finest styles at Façonnable, Karen Millen, Michael Kors, St. Croix, Tourneau, TOUS, Thomas Pink and more. Tempting dining options such as The Grill on the Alley, Grand Lux Cafe and The Second Floor Bistro help complete the ideal experience. =k^ll%Lah^lZg]C^p^ekruLZdl?b_ma:o^gn^

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RED CARPET

Shining Stars AWARDS SEASON PROVIDES A PLETHORA OF CELEBRITY EYE CANDY BY JILLIAN SPRAGUE

Amy Adams

Kim Kardashian

W

ith a smile like that, who needs jewelry? Halle Berry and her earrings were radiant at the 13th Annual Costume Designer Guild Awards, held at the Beverly Hilton Hotel. Take your spring style cue from her and try a piece that mixes different stone colors and metal tones. Here, white and champagne diamonds set in black and yellow gold are subtle, but so-right-now. At the Vanity Fair Campaign Hollywood 2011 Kick-off with Chrysler, Amy Adams chose a classic earring shape with a modern twist. Her textured hoops in blackened gold were an unexpected surprise peeking out from underneath those perfectly tousled waves. Reality star Kim Kardashian rocked a bold yellow gold choker and simple studs at the People’s Choice Awards in L.A.’s Nokia Theater. While her show, Keeping Up With the Kardashians, won the award for TV’s Guiltiest Pleasure, her Art Nouveau-inspired necklace was our pick for eye-catching accessory.

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JEWELRY THIS PAGE LEFT TO RIGHT: AMRAPALI, HELLMUTH, RINA LIMOR

Halle Berry


JEWELRY THIS PAGE FROM LEFT TO RIGHT: H. STERN, AMRAPALI, MOUAWAD

Julia Stiles

LeAnn Rimes

Nicky Hilton

She plays the love interest of a devilish serial killer on Showtime’s Dexter, but Julia Stiles looked heavenly in star-shaped stud earrings at the 68th Annual Golden Globe Awards. A dramatic ruffle and bold fuchsia lips—both huge trends this spring—made for stellar red carpet style. LeAnn Rimes sparkled in sequins at the Grammys. Head-to-toe metallic can be hard to accessorize, but her stacked gold bangles and mother of pearl earrings complemented instead of competed with her beautifully draped gown. It’s tough to contend with angel wings covered in peacock feathers, but at the Victoria’s Secret Fashion Show, Nicky Hilton’s diamond necklace and earrings were almost as jaw-dropping as the models. Almost.

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BEST BETS AT BACHENDORF’S

NORMAN SILVERMAN diamondsby-the-yard chain necklace with toggle clasp in 18K white gold featuring 5.47 carats of round brilliant diamonds and 0.31 carats of pavĂŠ diamonds.

MIKIMOTO Akoya cultured pearl strand with diamond rondelles in 18K white gold.

TACORI pale seafoam-mint prasiolite lily ring in sterling silver and 18K yellow gold featuring signature Tacori crescent accents.

PANERAI Luminor Marina 1950 3 Days Automatic, 44mm polished steel case, automatic P. 9000 Calibre movement, black dial, black calf strap, waterresistant to 300 meters, PAM00359.

CHOPARD Imperiale, 18K rose gold case, 58 diamonds (2.27 carats), five amethysts (0.58 carats), mother of pearl dial.

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OMEGA De Ville Chronoscope GMT, 44mm stainless steel case, automatic co-axial movement, official chronometer, gray dial with black subdials, black alligator strap, water-resistant to 100 meters.

CHANEL Premiere, stainless steel case set with diamonds, quartz movement, mother of pearl dial set with four diamond markers, white rubber strap.

IVANKA TRUMP 18K rose gold chain featuring mother of pearl and diamonds, 36�.

JOHN HARDY Bedeg dome ring in sterling silver.

AARON BASHA Assorted charms in 18K white gold and enamel featuring diamonds and gemstones on diamond heart link bracelet.

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TRENDS

The Joy of Jewelry COLORFUL GEMS FIT FASHION’S BRIGHT OUTLOOK BY LORRAINE DEPASQUE

THE GEMS Adam Graham, marketing director of The American Gem Trade Association (AGTA), agrees that bright blues and greens, as well as shades of purple, are leading trends in colored gemstone jewelry this year. Among the azures, he points to traditional blue sapphire, aquamarine and blue topaz, but emphasizes that lesser-known stones like labradorite, turquoise, blue moonstone, chalcedony, tanzanite and blue shaded black onyx are extremely significant as well. With dramatically-sized jewelry in vogue, it helps that many of the latter gemstones can be purchased in high quality at affordable prices.

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IMAGES COURTESY OF DAVID YURMAN, STEPHEN WEBSTER, ROBERTO COIN

T

his season, there’s one simple rule on the road to great jewelry style: Don’t get stuck in neutral! Get into gear and follow the direction of spring 2011 fashion, which is all about color. Does this mean that neutrals like black—so strong these past few years—are no longer fashionable? Is it time to abandon your Little Black Dress? “Absolutely not,” says Meredith Smith, designer and cultural trend analyst at The Doneger Group in New York City. “Even though fashion’s biggest names flooded the spring runways with bright-colored clothes, you can still wear your classic LBD. However, the perennial cocktail classic and other neutral-toned attire needs to be popped with colorful jewelry and accessories. Right now, our culture is all about finding joy; adorning ourselves in happy, escapist colors (like bright blues and greens) is one way to do that.”


息 2011 NACE Marketing, New York, All Rights Reserved.

Christopher Designs Crisscut

Generic Round 58 Facet

Crisscut 速 Round 121 Facet

Generic Emerald 46 Facet

Crisscut速 Emerald 77 Facet

Generic Cushion 58 Facet

1.800.955.0970 or www.christopherdesigns.com

Crisscut 速 Cushion 77 Facet


LAYERING NECKLACES While models strutted down

“This year, you’re also going to see more engagement ring center stones in blues and greens,” notes Graham. “Kate Middleton’s blue sapphire from Prince William has re-ignited the trend that his mother, Princess Diana, started back in 1981, when she received the engagement ring from Prince Charles. Blue sapphire is a great option for women who don’t want to be too ‘bling,’ and at the same time, it’s a high-end gem of great color.” At the AGTA’s annual Spectrum jewelry design awards for 2011, Graham tells us, “One of the winning pieces was a platinum ring with a neongreen tsavorite center stone. Our panel of judges, all in the fashion or jewelry industries, said it represents a definite style direction.” In fact, many of the best jewelry designers are also premiering dazzling fashion collections with great green gems, especially green tourmalines, peridots, green diamonds, emeralds, green agates, green sapphires and tsavorites. “And for the past year,” says Graham, “celebrity stylists have been requesting to borrow green gemstone jewelry for their A-list clients to wear to awards shows.” The green jewelry they’ve been borrowing will coordinate with many red carpet fashion styles according to Leatrice Eiseman, executive director of The Pantone Color Institute, which named ‘Peapod’ green as one of its top fashion colors for spring/summer. “We’ve learned that green really works well as a neutral and we see people more inclined to wear it on a regular basis,” she says. This past fall, Pantone chose ‘Purple Orchid’ as its number-one fashion color and, for spring/summer, the passion for purple continues, with ‘Lavender’ in its top ten selection. Jewelry designers are showing violet gem creations in everything from deep amethysts and fancy purple sapphires to pastel pinky-purple sugilites and quartzes.

the runways wearing mega-necklaces, in this case you have another option. Instead of investing in one massive neck piece, a more practical purchase might be to buy several long chains and links that can each be doubled or tripled. With layering necklaces, you can experiment and create many different looks, for both daywear and evening. Play with the necklaces, graduating the lengths differently to accommodate the neckline of whatever you’re wearing. To complete the look, add a 16-inch chain with a pendant or enhancer. In this season of bold color, choose one with a bright gemstone center. EPIC RINGS Typically, you ladies buy these supersized and super stylish rings for yourself. (Well, why not—you deserve it!) They’re statement pieces that reflect your personality and personal style, so be sure to select gemstones you really like—plus, since it’s on your hand, you’ll be looking at it all day. Should you invest a lot of money in this epic ring? That depends, to some degree, on whether you’ll be wearing it every day or if you’ll want to buy several and switch—much like some people do with watches. Unlike the big cocktail rings of eras past, the epic ring is no longer a dress-up-only accessory. GUMDROP EARRINGS And you thought gumdrops were just those chewy sugar-coated candies you shouldn’t be eating! Think again: It’s the season’s strongest earring silhouette. More medium-large than ultra-large in size, this drop-style earring focuses on one prominent colored gem that hangs to about mid-neck. It’s classic, yet, at the same time, fashion. Ask your jeweler about the earrings’ stone shape and cut. Some gumdrops have slices of color with a flat bottom, allowing light to pass through the gemstone, much in the way natural light shines through a stained glass window. MORE THAN ONE METAL COLOR No, you can’t be a yellow-only or white-only jewelry lover anymore. It just isn’t fashionable. If most—or all—of your jewelry is still the same metal color that you’ve been wearing forever, this is the season to start collecting pieces made in different surface colors. If you want to stick to karat gold for your precious metal, that’s okay, but there are many different gold colors to choose from: rose, blackened and sometimes peach. Even the texture on a piece slightly changes the look of the color. (For example, a high-polished blackened gold bracelet will appear to have a different hue than a satin-finished or matte blackened gold piece.) Once you begin to add different colored pieces to your jewelry wardrobe, you’ll see how all the shades really do work together. And no need to worry if you don’t have “enough” of a certain color when you start. Part of the fun of jewelry is collecting it over time.

FIVE TO BUY Now that you know what these post-winter pickme-up colors and coordinating gemstones are, which jewelry pieces in particular should you be considering? Ultimately that depends on your individual style as well as what jewelry you already own, but here are the five jewelry must-haves we highly recommend: BIG BANGLES The number-one jewelry item adorning spring runway models was the big bangle, and they usually wore two or three per arm. The uber bangles—not slim stackables and not ultra-wide cuffs—almost always featured stones, beads, or some sort of bright embellishment.

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PROFILE Mikimoto strands are world-renowned for their perfectly matched pearls; this process becomes exponentially more difficult when strands are longer.

Timeless Beauty

MIKIMOTO CULTURED PEARLS—A PERFECT BALANCE OF TRADITION AND INNOVATION BY KAREN ALBERG GROSSMAN

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A Unique History

After many years of trials and tribulations, Kokichi Mikimoto succeeded in creating the world’s first cultured pearl in 1893. He then sent artisans on missions to Europe to master the techniques of jewelry production and design. This knowledge, supplemented by the Japanese aesthetics of form, line and workmanship, produced the distinctive originality of Mikimoto designs. In 1899, equipped with his first collection, Mr. Mikimoto opened the first Mikimoto Pearl Store, Japan’s first specialty pearl shop, in Tokyo’s Ginza district. After improving his cultivating and harvesting techniques, he was able to ship his product overseas, making cultured pearls available to women around the world.

IMAGES COURTESY OF MIKIMOTO

O

f all the love stories over the ages, does anything beat the intensity of Cleopatra and Marc Antony? Betting him that she could consume the wealth of an entire nation in one meal, Cleopatra removed a pearl earring, crushed it, and drank the powder mixed with wine. Under her spell and hopelessly enchanted, Antony neglected his duties to the Roman Empire, thus changing forever the course of history. Since ancient times, pearls have indeed symbolized everything from purity of love to victory in battle. From symbol of chastity to mystical aphrodisiac, pearls have reflected the power of love. Worn by ancient Greeks at their wedding ceremonies to ensure marital bliss (and prevent new brides from crying), pearls are worn today by modern brides for strangely similar reasons. After all this time, pearls still represent innocence, sophistication and timeless beauty. In 1893, Kokichi Mikimoto successfully created the world’s first cultured pearl, launching today’s cultured pearl industry and making cultured pearls available to women all over the world. The company is internationally respected for its dedication to beauty and quality. Since each pearl is as different and individual as a fingerprint, quality grading standards are essential. Mikimoto has maintained the highest standards of quality and consistency by devoting more than a century to understanding the sea and researching the oyster. They’ve developed a proprietary grading system,


unique within the cultured pearl industry. Although no single factor can solely represent the worth of a pearl, luster and surface perfection are most important. There are four Mikimoto grades: A, A+, AA and AAA, with AAA being the highest quality. A mere three to five pearls out of every 100 harvested are deemed worthy to bear the Mikimoto name. While there is nothing more cherished than a classic strand of Mikimoto pearls, numerous fashion options abound. For 2011, these include:

LONGER STRANDS Ranging in length from 32 to an astounding 100 inches, these longer strands are the perfect accessory and a wonderful gift for today’s modern woman. Taking the classic beauty of a traditional choker to a whole new level, these versatile strands, whether worn for day or evening, alone or layered with another piece of jewelry, add glamour to any occasion. Not only a unique fashion look, these long strands truly showcase the superior quality for which Mikimoto is revered. Each strand is a work of art, requiring incredible skill, judgment and craftsmanship. Mikimoto strands are worldrenowned for their perfectly matched pearls and this process becomes exponentially more difficult when strands are longer. Demanding the finest judgment and artistic sense, only Mikimoto has the ability to sort and match such long lengths of pearls.

PEARLS IN MOTION

contrast to the classic, feminine elegance of white pearls, Mikimoto Black South Seas are pearls with attitude, emitting an air of confidence. Day or night, from the boardroom to the runway, Black South Sea pearls are the perfect complement to any outfit, and an icon of style and taste. Because of their breathtaking natural hues, fashion mavens and connoisseurs alike consider Mikimoto’s Black South Sea cultured pearls to be among the most distinctive of all gems. With their hypnotic depth of color ranging from light gray to peacock green to midnight black, these treasures of the sea seem lit from within, conferring a remarkable radiance and sophistication upon those fortunate enough to wear them. In 1914, Kokichi Mikimoto established a culturing site for Black South Sea pearl oysters on Ishigaki Island in Okinawa, Japan. Since that time, the brand has remained the authority on Black South Sea cultured pearls of the highest quality. Almost a century later, Black South Sea jewelry remains a formidable fashion trend as style-savvy consumers are embracing these gems as never before. Mikimoto’s international design team uses Black South Sea cultured pearls to create jewels of impeccable style and quality, from a perfectly-matched choker to a multi-colored 45” strand that can be layered or wrapped.

CARING FOR PEARLS

The rules are simple:

Wipe gently with a soft cloth after wearing and store separately so they don’t get scratched. Remember: pearls are organic gemstones, and thus vulnerable to acid, alkaline and humidity. That said, pearls beg to be worn; left alone in a box they risk dehydration, so wear them often and flaunt your elegance and style!

With Pearls in Motion, the possibilities are unlimited. This unique concept in jewelry design offers the versatility to wear Mikimoto cultured pearls in an infinite number of ways. Place the cultured pearls anywhere along the slim, elegant chain. The gems will remain in place thanks to Mikimoto’s exclusive, patented mechanism.

BLACK SOUTH SEA Mikimoto Black South Sea cultured pearls, with their exotic origins and mysterious color palette, are a versatile must-have for today’s trendsetters looking to make an edgy fashion statement. In direct

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BAROQUE COUTURE COLLECTION

The natural beauty of Mikimoto’s Baroque South Sea cultured pearls is derived from their superb luster and irregular, yet beautiful, silhouettes. The unique organic shapes of these pearls make them a constant marvel to behold, a true fashion statement and conversation piece. Baroque Couture is a collection of one-of-a-kind Mikimoto jewelry inspired by the Baroque pearl. The Baroque Couture Collection uses the distinctive shape and size of each individual pearl as the subject of each exclusive design. Nature determines the setting and Mikimoto designers fulfill each pearl’s destiny. Says Amy Kim-Araneo, Mikimoto’s vice president of product development and design: “Designing baroque pearl jewelry is incredibly exciting and challenging because no two pearls are alike, so each piece takes on its own personality. The unique shape of each pearl truly dictates the design…as if it knows what it wants to be. The organic, fluid designs of Baroque Couture really conform to the body and showcase a more modern, less traditional look in pearl jewelry.”


PROPOSALS

Gloves at the Shoe M

e, the dental hygienist and lifelong Ohio State girl; Daniel, the dental student and die-hard Notre Dame boy. I always thought “it” would happen after he moved to Indiana, where he planned to practice dentistry in the shadows of the Golden Dome of Notre Dame. We had a date to celebrate Daniel’s completion of his dental school clinical requirements, and he kept the location a secret. He mentioned that he needed to stop by his office, located in Ohio State University’s Ohio Stadium (The Horseshoe), after dinner to drop off a Secret Santa gift for the exchange he would not be able to attend. The night began innocently enough at Burgundy Room, a trendy wine and tapas restaurant. Surprisingly we hadn’t been there since our first date. Daniel pretended to be shocked too. After dinner we made our way to campus to drop off the “gift.” I noticed the stadium lights were on; the lights are never on. Daniel looked at me with mischievous eyes. “Do you think we can sneak onto the field?” I balked, not wanting to get in trouble. We made our way to the north stadium entrance and the padlock was open. Daniel exclaimed with confidence, “It’s open… C’mon, Hayley!” I was carrying Daniel’s Secret Santa gift as we walked down the ramp onto the field. I couldn’t believe I was doing this, putting my head down, trying not to get caught. Despite my protest, we finally got to the 50-yard line, right inside the Block O, and faced each other. (You may need to be an Ohio State fan to realize how big of a deal it is to be inside the Block O, let

alone getting a Notre Dame graduate to join you.) “Crazy, isn’t it?” Daniel said, glancing around the stadium. I thought to myself, “I can’t wait to tell everyone that we snuck into the Shoe!” I was cold at this point. My fingers were numb and he knew it. He smiled. “Why don’t you open that present? I’ll get another one for the party; it’ll be an early Christmas present. I got it in Italy and you look like you could use them about now.” I eagerly began ripping into the package, and before I could even lift the lid, my frigid hands dropped the box. Finally, I opened the box and my breath faltered. Leather gloves, black and tan, from Florence, Italy. Gorgeous. But it was the sparkle that emanated from the third finger on the left glove that stunned me. I was so surprised; he was down on one knee, there was a ring, and I was saying yes. We hugged, we twirled, we laughed; he yelled at his friend, hiding out in the stands, to come down to take more photos. He arranged for it all: the lights, open padlock, hidden photographer… the whole nine yards, pun intended. Jewelry is inextricably connected to life’s most memorable moments. The Jewelry Information Center’s Ultimate Proposal Contest allowed couples nationwide to submit their special proposal stories at www.JIC.org. Consumers entered more than 1,200 stories and over 6,000 people cast their votes over 10 days. Winner Hayley Wood and her fiancé Daniel won a trip for two to Santorini, Greece, along with a stunning platinum diamond necklace.

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IMAGE COURTESY OF JIC

A WINNING ENGAGEMENT MOMENT BY HAYLEY WOOD


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THE DIFFERENCE BETWEEN WONDERING AND KNOWING.


ACCENT MAGAZINE SPECIAL SECTION SPRING/SUMMER 2011

getty 1 / Peter Dazeley

ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

H

W

WATCHES


ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

H

W

WHAT TO KNOW WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR TIMEPIECES

WATCH ADVISOR

IS IT OKAY TO WEAR A SPORTS WATCH AS AN EVERYDAY WATCH?

IMAGE COURTESY OF TW STEEL

If you love it, why not?

Unless you’re talking about a tacky plastic watch, most of today’s better sports watches are thin enough to wear as an everyday watch, and offer features that most of us appreciate even at home or in the office. These can include water resistance, built-in chronographs, readable dials and various subdials, calendars and other complications. That said, there’s nothing classier than a beautiful dress watch and for spring 2011, classical elegance is all the rage. Our suggestion: build a watch wardrobe that includes both sports and dress watches and alternate according to the occasion, and your mood.

WHAT ARE MECHANICAL WATCHES AND WHY ARE THEY SO EXPENSIVE?

As opposed to quartz watches that function electronically, a mechanical watch is driven by a spring which must be periodically wound. A series of gears power the balance wheel, which oscillates back and forth at a constant rate. A device called an escapement releases the wheels with each swing of the balance wheel, moving the hands forward at a constant rate and creating a ticking sound. It’s technology dating back to 17th century Europe, and the expense is the design, the old world craftsmanship, the maintenance and replacement parts, and of course the intrinsic value of precious metals and other fine materials. But for those whose hearts beat to the pulse of a mechanical timepiece, there’s nothing else quite like it!

I HAVE MY GRANDFATHER’S TIMEPIECE FROM THE 1950 S ; IS IT WORTH THE INVESTMENT TO RESTORE IT?

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T H E D E C I S I O N T O R E S T O R E A V I N TA G E T I M E P I E C E is part rational (Will the restored timepiece be worth more?) and part emotional (This is my grandfather’s watch!). Bottom line: the joy of wearing an heirloom, especially one with family history, is unique and priceless. That said, only you can decide if it’s worth the investment. Once you’ve made the decision to restore your vintage timepiece, entrust it only to a qualified technician with proper training in assessing and working on older timepiece movements. Improper repair of an older watch can damage the movement irreparably. Incorrect replacement parts, finishing techniques and lubrication are just some of the issues we’ve seen. In general, older timepieces cannot be expected to function with the same level of accuracy as new models. However, if properly restored, the watch should be suitable for daily wear. One must allow ample time for the work to be completed, as parts might not be readily available, and the technician might have to search the marketplace for the proper part, or in some cases, make the part by hand. Once the work is done, consider enhancing your newly restored vintage watch with an interesting strap—perhaps one in a bold color or with contrast stitching—to make a unique statement. 26


raymond-weil.com

| freelancer collection


WHAT TO KNOW WHEN IT COMES TO YOUR TIMEPIECES

WATCH ADVISOR

I'M ABOUT TO INVEST IN A WATCH AND WOULD LIKE TO KNOW MORE ABOUT ITS COMPLICATIONS. CAN YOU HELP? Moon Phase Subdial Strap

30-Minute Register for Chronograph Second Counter for Chronograph

Lug Hour Marker or Index

Repeating Slide (Chimes Time Aloud When Activated)

Start/Stop for Chronograph Minute Hand

Hour Hand Crown

Second Hand

Date Indicator

Day of Week Indicator Year Indicator

Reset for Chronograph

Bezel

Month Indicator

Dial (Below the Hands)

ILLUSTRATION BY HARRY BATES; INFORMATION PROVIDED BY JOHN HORNE

12-Hour Register for Chronograph

Crystal (Above the Hands)

Understanding the parts and functions of a timepiece can help you select the style that’s right for you. It’s also helpful later, when your watch requires service or repair. This particular model has both time-telling and time-keeping capabilities. The chronograph, for time-keeping, is essentially an advanced stopwatch. 28


EBEL BELUGA

©2011 Ebel - www.ebel.com - Ref 1215855-1215924


ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

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FOCUS: CELEBRITY AMBASSADORS

by Jillian Sprague

BEAUTIFUL WOMEN, BEAUTIFUL WATCHES THE WORLD’S FINEST TIMEPIECES MAKE THESE SUPERSTARS SHINE (AND OF COURSE, VICE VERSA). GWYNETH PALTROW FOR BAUME & MERCIER When opportunity arose for Paltrow to partner with the famed Swiss Maison d’Horlogerie, she felt an instant connection to the brand’s motto: Life is about moments. “That very much represents my personal philosophy on life,” she explains. For the actress and singer who recently got her star on Hollywood’s Walk of Fame, quiet moments with her family are rare and precious. At a seaside party in the Hamptons, she shared that many of these moments have taken place at her home there, where she enjoys relaxing, playing with her children and grilling seafood in the garden. “I feel at home in the place between land and sea,” she says.

DIANE KRUGER FOR JAEGER-LECOULTRE Kruger fell in love with Jaeger-LeCoultre when she received a Reverso timepiece on her 18th birthday. Little did she know that over a decade later, the watch manufacturer would ask her to represent their prestigious brand on red carpets around the globe. Her elegant beauty, strong personality and incredible talent made Kruger the perfect muse for Jaeger-LeCoultre’s designers, who strive to encompass a balance between charm and strength of character in each

MARIA SHARAPOVA FOR TAG HEUER TAG Heuer believes that women experience time

of their timepiece collections.

differently than men. Men cut it up into fractions in order to visualize it, while women see it as a a poetic flow. For men, time is linear. For women, it is cyclical. The brand recently asked tennis superstar Maria Sharapova to help design its new Formula 1 ceramic watches because “she is a woman endowed with the systematic approach that comes with the territory.” The ceramic bracelet with butterfly clasp is ideal for delicate wrists. The black edition is perfect for night on the town; the white, for anytime and anyplace.

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FOCUS: CELEBRITY AMBASSADORS

NICOLE KIDMAN FOR OMEGA Since 2004, this Academy Awardwinning actress has been a champion of Omega’s graceful and timeless designs.

KATE WINSLET FOR LONGINES

This year, she’s wearing the Ladymatic,

What does time mean to you?

a design first launched in 1955.

In my 20s it meant doing as much as I could very quickly, and in my 30s I’m

Who better than a strong woman

discovering that this needs to change.

like Kidman to represent this product,

What has been the highlight of your time as an actress? What further aspirations do you have?

which Omega’s president describes as a

The highlight of my career was being cast in my very first film, Heavenly

customers have been to us over the

Creatures, at 17. And the only aspiration I have is to remain as passionate

years, and our idea of what a

about my job as I always have been.

mechanical watch for women should

What do you consider your greatest strength?

be in the 21st century.”

tribute to “how important our women

You should probably ask my friends and family, but I would say that loyalty

Says Kidman, “These days, interest

is up there on my list of moral priorities.

in the quality of a watch movement isn’t gender specific; women have the

ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

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same interest in its performance as men do. The Ladymatic addresses that perfectly.”

DANICA PATRICK FOR TISSOT What has been the most memorable time in your life? I would have to say competing at the Indianapolis 500. Growing up, it was always a goal of mine to one day race at the Brickyard, and to have gotten to that level in my career is something that I hold very dear. What would you do with more time? I think I’d spend it with my family and friends. As you can imagine, my life can be hectic at times and it would be nice to be able to slow down and enjoy the company of my loved ones more often. What would you do differently if you could turn back time? I wouldn’t change a single thing in my life. I’m very proud of my accomplishments on the track and of where I’m at in my career.

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by Joseph Ungoco

ATC IT’S ABOUT TIME

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FOCUS: FIRST PERSON

HAND-ME-DOWNS WELCOME A MILESTONE WATCH PASSED AMONG FAMILY GIVES THE PHRASE NEW MEANING.

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s my plane touched down at LAX, the pilot cheerily reminded us to set our watches back three hours to the local time. I glanced at my hand-me-down Rolex, my father’s stainless steel Air-King Oyster Perpetual, bought for his swearing in as a U.S. citizen on July 4, 1965. This watch had kept him on time for more than a decade. I honestly couldn’t recall the last time I had worn this watch on a plane, but this would be its last transcontinental crossing on my wrist. My father gave me “The Air-King”, his very first Rolex, on my 11th birthday. Two months prior, to commemorate his own birthday, he had “invested in” an 18 karat yellow gold and stainless steel Datejust with Jubilee bracelet, pulling ahead of his stainless steel-clad siblings in our family version of the Rolex Stakes. (The Bond films of the ’60s and ’70s introduced my father and his three brothers to the Rolex brand, but the ’80s brought my family’s obsession to a whole new level.) Later that year, my father took me with him to the watchmaker’s shop, where we had the Air-King cleaned, the crystal polished, and the luminous hour markers and hands repainted—an annual tradition. Just as I thought we were ready to leave, the watchmaker came forward with a green leather box stamped with a gold coronet. Inside was the

matching women’s version of my father’s new watch. That summer, my mother handed her stainless steel Rolex with the Oyster bracelet—an engagement present from my father—down to her younger sister for her birthday. Years later, before my 30th birthday, I called my watch dealer about buying myself a special watch—perhaps a brand new Submariner. But when I arrived at his shop, he had found the perfect tribute to my milestone birthday: a watch exactly as old as me. It was a mint condition 1969 18 karat yellow gold Rolex Date with graduated Oyster bracelet. Its South American seller swore it had sat untouched in his father’s safety deposit box for at least 25 years! I was assured that after a quick swipe of my credit card, a slightly longer FBI check (for the watch, not me) and a thorough inspection (again for the watch), this gorgeous timepiece would be mine. My “new” Rolex arrived just in time to accompany me to my birthday party. I lived happily with my Rolexes for several years, until the event that prompted this story: my godson’s birthday. The fourth of six boys, he was well acquainted with the phrase “hand-me-down”, but I think that my present to him that day—a green leather box with a gold coronet, the Air-King safely tucked inside—may have changed his opinion of that phrase forever. At least I hope so…

The Bond films of the ’60s and ’70s introduced my father and his three brothers to the Rolex brand.

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CLOETTE FLEUR


PerfectGems

EXPLORE THE LITTLE LUXURIES THE WORLD HAS TO OFFER. BY DONALD CHARLES RICHARDSON

CAPE ESCAPE Nestled on 25 acres atop a bluff overlooking the Atlantic Ocean, Chatham Bars Inn has been a landmark on Cape Cod since 1914. The hotel is famous for its extensive outdoor activities and lavish dining. But now guests can also indulge in the comfort of a contemporary spa that boasts a dozen king and queen-size suites, each with a hydrotherapy tub, sauna, steam shower, plasma TV, Bose sound system and fireplace. This spring, the spa is featuring a renewal and cleansing treatment that includes a body polish made of sugar drenched in plant oils, an application of botanical Shea butter, a linen body wrap, and face massage.

Since 1989, the Garden Conservancy has been restoring and preserving America’s exceptional gardens, from those made by wardens and prisoners at San Francisco’s Alcatraz Island (at left) to the Pearl Fryar topiary garden in South Carolina. Along with lectures and events, the group also offers members of the Garden Conservancy’s Society of Fellows the opportunity to see some of the most lavish gardens in the world. This year, along with U.S. destinations, the Fellows are traveling to Île de France to see Château de Vaux-le-Vicomte, a 17th century Baroque chateau and garden designed by the André le Nôtre (who later designed the gardens at Versailles), and Normandy to visit Château de Brécy, another 17th century chateau with a meticulously restored Italian style garden.

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ABOVE: CHATHAM BARS INN; AT LEFT: GARDEN CONSERVANCY

GARDEN VARIETY


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PerfectGems THE INN CROWD

ELYSIAN HOTEL

GETTY 1

YADES GREEK HISTORICAL HOTELS

On a narrow cobblestone street in Rethymnon old town on the island of Crete, a small, unassuming doorway opens to a large courtyard filled with masses of bougainvillea. A central fountain is surrounded by antiques, works of art, comfortable sofas and tables set with flowers. This stunning setting is the very fashionable restaurant of the Hotel Avli. Greeks come from all over the island for the superb food made from local sources and the incomparable Greek wines (the Avli has the largest wine cellar on Crete). Now a member of the prestigious Yades hotels, the Avli was once the home of a Venetian lord, and the elegant architecture and gracious style of the past remain. There are only seven (very chic) suites, each designed in an individual color theme with every modern convenience carefully integrated into the exposed stone, wood beams and original Venetian arches. Have a glass of wine on the rooftop and look out over this beautiful town to the sea.

PICNIC PLEASURES A quiet afternoon. China plates, good silver, a vintage tablecloth. And these sophisticated pairings from sommelier and gourmet Edward Costa, director of food and beverage at New York’s Waldorf Astoria Hotel. These elements combine to create a truly chic picnic with European flair. To evoke the flavor of a romantic afternoon in Italy, mingle the sharp and nutty flavors of Parmigiano Reggiano with the gentle Sangiovese grapes in Vignamaggio Chianti Classico Riserva Castello di Monna Lisa, 2006. Or, to give your picnic sparkle, try the light citrus Borgo Magredo Prosecco that highlights the flavors of smoked salmon. If you prefer a French ambiance, a fresh, crisp rosé is the perfect wine on a warm afternoon. Robert Oatley Rosé, 2008 is ideal with any chicken dish. And of course there must be champagne (and caviar). The bright and refreshing citrus flavors of Perrier Jouet Fleur de Champagne Blanc de Blanc, 1999 is a perfect match to the creaminess and richness of Osetra caviar. For a picnic of this caliber, pearls are appropriate.

KIDDING AROUND Guest rooms at the Elysian Hotel in Chicago boast white Carrera marble bathrooms with soaking tubs, inset LCD televisions and separate showers. Rooms have fireplaces and expansive terraces, and the beds are draped with 460-thread count Rivolta Carmignani Italian linens. To give couples traveling with children an opportunity to enjoy all these appurtenances, the hotel invites kids to the kitchens of either Balsan or Ria, the hotel’s restaurants, for a cooking session with the pastry chef. They “assist” in the preparation of a dessert such as Balsan’s Paris Brest, a cream-filled pastry, or Ria’s spiced hazelnut cake, nestled in ice cream and topped with cherries and hazelnuts. When the creation is finished, the kids get to take it with them. Maybe they’ll share.

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Since 1992, Doug Boster Gourmet Catering has earned a loyal following of both corporate and private clients by integrating fine dining experiences with customized event planning that makes every occasion memorable - all under the creative direction of owner and founder Doug Boster. Combining innovative menus that emphasize the freshest seasonal ingredients, with attentive, professional service and an overall unique presentation, Doug Boster Gourmet Catering has become one of the premier catering and event companies in North Texas. Our team has the experience and global resources to execute every aspect of an event, from site selection, entertainment, and conceptualizing theme and decor, to floral, lighting, transportation, rentals and all other related services. Whether you are planning an intimate cocktail party for two, an elaborate gala for 1,000, or a corporate event for 10,000, the experienced and creative Doug Boster staff has the skill set and resources to make your occasion memorable and unique. www.bostercatering.com 214.752.2022 doug@bostercatering.com 2025 Irving Boulevard, Suite 213 Dallas, TX 75207


TRAVEL

Into Africa IN ZAMBIA, SPOTTING WILDLIFE IS A WALK IN THE PARK. BY CAROLINA BOLADO HALE

PHOTOS NATHAN HALE

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s we glided silently on the Zambezi River, we soaked in the stillness of the moment. To our right was Zimbabwe; to our left, Zambia. Above, the vast African sky enveloped us in its limitless supply of blue. Then we saw the hippos. Our reverie was broken by the creatures, who bobbed slowly up and down and grunted their displeasure at our having trespassed in their corner of the Zambezi. Our path ahead—and behind—was blocked by two pods of the roly poly beasts, among the deadliest in Africa. The promise of getting close to wildlife on a canoe trip was part of what had drawn us to Zambia’s Lower Zambezi National Park. But this was, perhaps, a bit too close. We gave them as wide a berth as possible. After several minutes, our guide, who was well versed in hippopotamus habits, dipped his oar into the water. “Let’s go. Quickly now,” he said, calmly but firmly. It was one of the many reminders we had while on safari that despite the gourmet food, plush beds and clawfoot bathtubs, we were very much in the wild, in the home of often unpredictable animals engaged in a daily life-and-death struggle. It’s easy to forget while sipping afternoon tea and watching the river float lazily by, until an elephant lumbers into camp searching for a snack. Being able to get deep into the bush was part of the allure of Lower

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Zambezi National Park, a 4,000-square kilometer piece of riverfront land about a half-hour’s flight south of Lusaka. Though Zambia isn’t at the top of most people’s safari lists, it should be. Zambia’s guides are renowned beyond the country’s borders, and better park management and increased tourism revenue have helped to greatly reduce poaching. o roads lead to the park, so visitors must come via boat or prop plane; the latter lands on one of three red-dirt airstrips inside the park that often have to be cleared of zebras and warthogs. Formerly a private game reserve for Zambian ex-President Kenneth Kaunda, the park is now home to just six small camps, which means visitors are more likely to see resident wildlife as opposed to safari truck convoys. And there’s plenty of wildlife to see. Despite the park’s small size, it boasts most of the big game that bring people to Africa, plus more than 300 different bird species. After the rainy season has passed and the watering holes have dried up, the animals all come to drink at the river, which means those six riverfront camps are perfectly positioned for wildlife viewing. My husband and I split our visit there between Chiawa Camp, the first one established after the national park’s creation in 1983, and Old Mondoro, a more rustic and intimate camp a 45-minute boat ride downstream. The park has distinct regions, and the two camps are situated in completely different terrain. Dense shrubs, behind which lions hide while eyeing their prey, characterize the area around Chiawa, while large acacia trees with low-hanging, thick branches—perfect leopard perches—dominate the terrain downstream. We were up before the sun each day (the animals don’t sleep in, so we couldn’t either) to explore the area by safari truck, boat, canoe or even on foot. Zambia is, after all, the

N

Dr. Livingstone, I Presume No visit to Zambia is complete without a stop in Livingstone, next door to Victoria Falls. The local name for the falls, Mosi oa Tunya, means “the smoke that thunders.” When water levels are high, the towering clouds of mist can be seen clearly from downtown Livingstone, six miles away. The falls are at their mightiest in May and June, making the viewing experience a very wet one. The flow slows to a comparative trickle by the end of the year, which means each individual waterfall is clearly visible, and activities like whitewater rafting or taking a dip in the Devil’s Swimming Pool (literally inches from where the water plummets 360 feet down) are available. The Royal Livingstone Hotel, situated on the banks of the Zambezi River just upstream from the falls, offers luxurious rooms, and wildlife viewing right from your window—giraffes and zebras freely roam the grounds of the hotel. Rates start at $653 for double occupancy, including breakfast and national park fees.

Inside the canvas tent at Chiawa Camp

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birthplace of the walking safari. Listening to bird calls and examining termite mounds, we saw the bush in a way that we never could have in a noisy safari vehicle. Every day brought a new adventure, whether it was hooking tigerfish in the river or finding lion cubs playing in the tall grass. And each evening, we paused to engage in another safari ritual: the sundowner. No matter what we were doing at the time, as soon as the sun began to sink below the horizon, we would stop, prepare drinks and watch the sky turn various shades of orange, pink and purple as we discussed the lasting memories we’d just made. Lower Zambezi National Park is open from mid-April until mid-November. Prices for Chiawa Camp range from $595 to $895 per person per day, depending on the time of year. Old Mondoro’s rates begin at approximately $600 per person per day. Rates include transportation within the park, all activities, food and drinks.


SPEED

Grand Sport THE INTERSECTION OF HISTORY AND TECHNOLOGY BY DAVID A. ROSE

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on. The driver, James Dean, was Hollywood’s newest heartthrob. He died within minutes of the crash, and a legend was born. Although only 90 Porsche 550 Spyders were made between 1953 and 1956, many have survived. At the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion held at Mazda Raceway Laguna Seca in 2010, one of the 600 cars entered was a Porsche 550 Spyder identical to the one James Dean planned to race 55 years ago. Vintage racing has grown to become one of the most exciting forms of motorsports. It brings to life what most people will only see on the pages of coffee table books, in museums or in movies. Rolex has sponsored motorsports since the 1930s. As the leading name in luxury timepieces, it’s fitting that they are title sponsor for one of the world’s most significant vintage race events. “Motor racing has an enormous following around the world. It appeals to those who appreciate the ultimate in technology as well as extreme competition,” said Peter Nicholson, vice president and director of communications, Rolex Watch U.S.A. “Since split-second timing is so critical for drivers and crews, it is Top: A full field of three-liter Formula 1 racecars, considered the pinnacle of motor racing from 1966 to ’83. Center left: A Rolex Oyster Perpetual Cosmograph Daytona was presented to Graham Wallis. Center right: Some of the many cars raced or built by Dan Gurney. Bottom right: Patrick Dempsey and Jay Leno.

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ROLEX / STEPHAN COOPER

t was a late afternoon in September when two young men were driving to Salinas, Calif., in a brand new 1955 Porsche 550 Spyder. The owner of the car planned to compete in the Salinas Sports Car Race that weekend, but rather than transport the car by trailer from Los Angeles as intended, he felt he needed seat time in the new car before he raced it. As they approached an intersection near Cholame, a 1950 Ford coming from the opposite direction suddenly crossed lanes and the two cars collided head-


Left: Luc Slijpen from the Netherlands stands next to his original, unrestored 1925 Type 35 Bugatti. Bottom left: Graham Wallis in his 1929 Lagonda, for which he won The Spirit of Monterey Trophy for overall excellence. Below: Patrick Dempsey races the Jeremy Barnes Mazda RX-92 GTP.

fitting that Rolex adds its reputation for precision timekeeping to these magnificent events.” Participants at the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion hail from 13 countries and bring with them the most exotic cars on the planet to race at Laguna Seca’s challenging 11-turn circuit. Not long ago, one would have been able to see a Type 35 Bugatti Grand Prix car only in a museum. Last year 90 Bugattis were in Monterey, 35 of them racing in the Bugatti Grand Prix as part of the Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion. (They later toured the California coastline as part of the Bugatti Rally 2010.) At vintage races, the cars are not necessarily the only stars. Patrick Dempsey, a passionate driver best known for his role as Dr. Derek Shepherd on TV’s Grey’s Anatomy, raced a Mazda GTP Prototype at the event. Always a crowd favorite, he was visibly thrilled with his racecar—and his results. Jay Leno and other celebrities are perennial attendees, but this year it was a true American legend who garnered the most attention. Dan Gurney, who was honored at the event, is widely considered to be the greatest American

racecar driver of all time. As a driver he has won races in Indy cars, Formula 1, NASCAR stock cars and the 24 Hours of Le Mans. He was the only American to win a Formula 1 Grand Prix in a car of his own design when, in 1967, he won the Belgian Grand Prix at Circuit Spa Francorchamps in the beautiful Gurney Weslake Eagle F1. Despite all his wins, Gurney is most well-known for his sportsmanship, which has won him the respect and admiration of peers and race fans around the world. As he was honored, Gurney reflected back on his prime, when cars were fast, drivers colorful and tragedy seemed always to be lurking around the next corner. “We were certainly driven by enormous passion for the sport, and we had great respect for those who came before us...we weren’t thinking about future history at the time,” said Gurney. He thanked his role model Phil Walters (better known as Ted Tappet), who “could move through traffic gracefully without knocking anybody off the road.” Gurney is thrilled about the growth and popularity of vintage racing and enjoys seeing enthusiastic gentlemen drivers behind the wheel of the cars that he and his peers made famous. “I’m sure these guys are as crazy as we were,” said Gurney. “I don’t know what it is about human beings...we all have an affinity for the internal combustion engine and its sounds and smells, as well as all the history. It’s great to see decades touching each other and new generations appreciating similar things.” The Rolex Monterey Motorsports Reunion is part of Monterey Auto Week, when sophisticated people, exotic cars, fine food and superb wines combine for a celebration that has become internationally recognized as a showcase for luxury and glamour. Automobile enthusiasts and connoisseurs of culture enjoy the atmosphere of elegance while attending auto-related shows, auctions, cocktail parties and elaborate dinners. At the Pebble Beach Tour d’Elegance, grand touring cars drive some of the most scenic portions of Monterey’s 17Mile Drive and then parade down Carmel’s Ocean Avenue for bystanders to enjoy. The week-long festival of automobile culture culminates with the internationally acclaimed Pebble Beach Concours d’Elegance, where some of the world’s most extraordinary cars are judged for authenticity, function, history and style. As trailers and auto-transporters are reloaded with their valuable cargo and participants head for home, the quiet and lovely Monterey peninsula returns to its normal tranquility. But plans are already underway for making the next event, from August 19th to the 21st, 2011, even more unforgettable.

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HIS SIDE

Romancing the Stone MY ROCKY EXPERIENCES BUYING JEWELRY FOR GIRLFRIENDS BY MICHAEL GIULIETTI

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was 10 and at an Italian ski resort the first time I gave jewelry to a female. She was 18, beautiful, and to prove my love, I left a gift of shiny dark purple beads by her door, a bold move I was sure would make up for our eight-year age difference. She sweetly accepted the gift but turned down my proposal of undying devotion. Heartbroken, I was not yet aware that this would be the last time I’d give a gift of jewelry without trepidation. While dating Jen, a professional dancer, I considered buying her a ring but quickly decided it would represent a commitment I wasn’t ready to make. Instead, I chose an ornate crystal choker that ended up being so tight that it cut off her air supply. Although she had left magazines open to pages featuring her favorite jewelry designer, I’d been oblivious to these not-sosubtle hints. We broke up six months later. I soon met Arianna. For her birthday, I purchased a Turkish handcrafted sterling silver necklace with a carved pendant. Upon careful examination, the carving revealed a well-endowed naked man with open arms. Aware of possible misinterpretations, I worried: Was I showing sexual insecurity? Was it in really bad taste? But when I gave it to Arianna, she was delighted and wore the piece close to her heart. Ultimately the guy in the carving would remain in her life a lot longer than I would. Moving to New York from my native Milan, I started dating Bettina, a style writer who dragged me to esoteric jewelry exhibits at various museums. “I don’t want to see a bunch of jewelry,” I protested in response to a Castellani exhibit. “But it’s as much your heritage as the Vatican and its frescoes,” Bettina replied as I marveled at the intricate pieces behind the glass cases. The word for ‘jewel’ in Italian is related to ‘joy’ and I wanted to give Bettina a sense of gioia di vivere. She loves rose cut diamonds, so I picked out a pair of stones and had them made into drop earrings, one-of-a-kind, just like her. It’s the closest I’ve come to truly committing to a woman with a gift of jewelry. And while I’m now more adept at taking hints, I’m still hoping to recapture the courageous young boy who declared his feelings with unabashed audacity and an open heart.


ART

Man’s Best Friend In The Spotlight Animated Dogs Come to Life Paul Fierlinger’s parents were caught up in an international life of Czech politics, diplomacy and intrigue. They had little time for or interest in their young child. When they were called back to Czechoslovakia from the States, they left Paul with an American foster family they’d found through a newspaper ad. To cope with this benign neglect, Paul found solace in the company of loveable dogs. At the tender age of 10, due to a regime change in Czechoslovakia, Paul was abruptly yanked from the American home he’d come to call his own and sent off to an elite boarding school in Prague (future playwright and president Vacel Havel and film director Milos Forman were his schoolmates). Miserable, homesick for America, and unable to speak the language, Paul expressed himself through drawing. It turned out he had quite a talent. Art school followed, coupled with an intense desire to return to the U.S. (no mean feat during the Communist era).

Eventually, using his artistic talent to forge documents, Fierlinger escaped to America. Over time, as his acclaim as an animator grew, Paul and his wife Sandra, a fine arts painter, began to create animated films together. Shown on PBS and at prestigious film festivals such as Sundance and the Toronto Film Festival, their work received numerous Peabody Awards, an Oscar nomination for Best Animated Short, and several other major film festival awards. Paul’s lifelong love of dogs informed many of these projects. Some favorites include the award-winning films Still Life with Animated Dogs, starring dogs Paul had come to love over his lifetime, and Drawn From Memory, an autobiographical film featuring the canine companions that helped him survive those unhappy years in Czechoslovakia. In their latest feature from New Yorker Films, My Dog Tulip (based on Above: Painter Juan Torcoletti used his love of dogs to turn his life around by painting their portraits.

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© JUAN TORCOLETTI/BOLTAX.GALLERY

FOR THOUSANDS OF YEARS, FROM THE EARLIEST CAVE PAINTINGS TO CONTEMPORARY CANVASES, ARTISTS HAVE BEEN INSPIRED BY DOGS. TODAY, THESE ARTISTS BRING A UNIQUE VISION TO THEIR WORK. BY JACQUELIN CARNEGIE


British author J.R. Ackerley’s book), an animated German Shepherd gets top billing alongside the voices of Christopher Plummer, Lynn Redgrave and Isabella Rossellini.

Through a Photographer’s Lens Award-wining photographer Rosanne Olson is mostly known for her stunning portraits of people. But as she photographed her Knowing Portraits clients, she noticed that their pets were intrigued by the process, often hovering at the edge of the proceedings. Olson became intrigued with them in return and came up with the concept of photographing dogs in the painterly style of the Old Masters. Her regal dog portraits à la Thomas Gainsborough and John Singer Sargent look as if lit by the natural light of a window. “When photographing dogs—and children—I am very patient,” explains Olson. “Sometimes it works quickly and sometimes it takes a while—there’s no forcing anything. Animals (and kids) are so honest. They don’t know how to ‘fake it;’ that’s something we learn as we grow up.

dressed in black leather with two black dogs, a Rottweiler and a German Shepherd. In a stroke of bad luck, the Rottweiler bit me so badly that I had to go to the hospital for stitches. “I wanted to sue the lady, but felt sorry for the dogs. Also, because I was here illegally, I feared being sent back to South America. I was happy and in love with New York City, fully determined to fulfill my American dream. “At first, to ‘heal’ myself from the frightening experience with that Rottweiler, I painted dogs with ferocious teeth, wild dogs and all black ones. I started selling my paintings on the street, at the corner of Prince and Greene. Luckily, many sales followed. “I had famous clients such as Giorgio Armani and many artists. Also, neighborhood residents and tourists bought my work. But, finally, I was arrested for selling on the street and was almost deported. However, fortune smiled and I got my paintings back—and my freedom—as well as my papers and a green card. So, I decided to change my life and stop selling my work on the street. I started doing dog portraits on request. “First, I’d meet the dogs and their owners (the clients), do sketches,

HAVE A HEART

© ROSANNE OLSON/GETTY IMAGES

Other ways to help: Visit 4pawsforability.org, which provides service dogs to people with disabilities; www.humanesociety.org, the nation’s largest animal protection organization; or www.aspca.org, which rescues and shelters abused and neglected animals. Left: Esther the Great Dane, as photographed by Rosanne Olson, has the regal look of Gainsborough’s The Blue Boy. Top Right: Art imitates life. In the award-winning Still Life with Animated Dogs, Paul Fierlinger gets his dog Spinnaker to do a barking “voice over.” Bottom Right: In the film, Paul Fierlinger also goes sailing with Spinnaker. “I simply try to make photographing them an enjoyable experience so that the expressions I get reflect the genuine feelings of the subject.” Yes, you can almost see the dogs smiling.

Canine Creatures on Canvas Argentine painter Juan Torcoletti’s inspiration for painting dogs is best told in his own words: “My history painting dogs was born in the streets of New York. I had just moved to the city in 1993 and found a place in Soho. One morning, like any other, I went for coffee at Dean & Deluca on Prince Street. I passed a lady

make drawings and take photos. Afterwards, I’d work on the paintings in my studio (by then, I’d moved to an old storage building in Tribeca with a hotplate and a bathroom down the hall). That’s where I lived until I became disillusioned with my beloved America. And, when I started painting ferocious dogs again, I knew it was time to move back to Buenos Aires.” Since 2004, Juan Torcoletti and his amazing dog portraits have been represented by boltax.gallery on Shelter Island, New York. These very different portraits by this group of talented artists pay tribute to the long relationship people have had with dogs—not only as hunters, guardians and guides, but as loving companions.

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© PAUL & SANDRA FIERLINGER/AR&T ASSOCIATES, INC.

Animator Paul Fierlinger and Mutts cartoonist Patrick McDonnell teamed up to create commercials for The Shelter Pet Project (www.theshelterpetproject.org) to encourage people to adopt a pet.


SPIRITS

Orange You Glad? ORANGES RETURN TO SPIRITS, COCKTAILS AND CULINARY CULTURE BY ROBERT HAYNES-PETERSON

R

enewed interest in the cocktail over the past few years means highquality citrus fruits, from the exotic (yuzu, dragonfruit) to the everyday (lemons and limes), have come to the fore as important drink ingredients. Lost in this renaissance until recently, the unassuming orange. Oranges were a luxury in Marie Antoinette’s day when any manor worth its zest boasted an orangerie greenhouse. In the 17th and 18th centuries, the cognescenti drank Planter’s Punch, which included exotic ingredients like rum and orange juice. Unfortunately, somewhere in the 1960s, oranges got a bad rap following one too many corny Polynesian restaurants and a cocktail culture that devolved the Tequila Sunrise into a syrupy mess. Thankfully, these days the lowly orange is squeezing into better cocktails and cuisine. In drinking establishments around the country orange bitters, orange flower water, Orgeat and orange marmalade are all increasingly common ingredients on the bar. They’re also showing up inside the bottle, in both liqueurs and the hard stuff. Where once tipplers chose between pricey Cointreau or Grand Marnier and cheap, sugary triple secs for their Margaritas and Sidecars, an entire shelf’s-worth of premium options is now available, including Combier and Mathildé Orange XO (both out of France), Creole Schrubb (Martinique) and Patrón Citronge (Mexico). Each has a distinctive flavor profile ranging from “intense, fresh orange” to “creamsicle,” something to consider when crafting drinks. Combier, for example, uses a blend of sun-dried sweet and bitter orange peels for a not-too-sweet, palate-cleansing finish. You can also now seek out variations like Solerno Blood Orange Liqueur (rich, red and tart) or Bols Dry Orange containing rum. Tuaca, an Italian liqueur rich Left: A few of the high-quality options drinkers now have to upgrade their Margaritas, Harvey Wallbangers and Sidecars.

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“FOR THE LIFE OF ME, I CAN’T SEE WHY ANY BAR USES ANYTHING BUT PURE FRESH LEMON OR ORANGE JUICE.” —VICTOR “TRADER VIC” BERGERON, 1948 in vanilla and orange, has made an unlikely resurgence at Arizona bars, according to a spokesperson. In spirits, orange-flavored vodkas dance on bars in Miami and Vegas, adding a sweet-tart component to nightclub drinks. Last fall, Stolichnaya introduced a limited edition Stoli Ohranj featuring the Playboy bunny logo to “celebrate our brand relationship” with Playboy founder Hugh Hefner. Seagram’s, meanwhile, launched an Orange Twisted Gin that ratchets up the orange peel most London Dry Gins already include in their distillations. Most intriguing on the premium end is Compass Box Whisky’s recently re-launched Orangerie, a lightly infused whisky out of Scotland, featuring fresh orange zest “actually zested for us by little old ladies in Bath,” according to Compass Box president John Glaser. The 10+-year blend of grain and malt whiskies undergoes three infusions: cassia bark, clove and orange zest, the result being a mild, well-balanced sipping Scotch sure to infuriate purists and intrigue newcomers. When it comes to cocktails, the rediscovery of classics like the Blood and Sand (OJ, sweet vermouth, scotch, cherry liqueur) and a variety of upgraded and refined Tiki drinks are putting oranges back on the bar in a big way. “The juice, flesh and zest can all be used in making both sweet and savory dishes and drinks,” says restaurateur Todd English. “Oranges specifically are great acid enhancers in salads, fish and meat dishes. They also pair beautifully with flavors such as vanilla and chocolate in desserts and cocktails.” At English’s Food Hall in New York’s Plaza Hotel, diners can sip on a Food Hall Old Fashioned (Hennessy, Aperol and St. Germain, muddled oranges and freshsqueezed orange juice). Adding oranges to booze is nothing new, of course, according to spirits historian and Esquire drinks columnist David Wondrich in his latest book, Punch: The Delights (and Dangers) of the Flowing Bowl (2010 Perigee Trade). Among the fashionable people drinking alcoholic punch in the late 17th and early 18th centuries, limes were decidedly unfashionable (in part due to their association with sailors and the rough-and-tumble British Royal Navy), while lemons and oranges were “in.” Oranges were, at first, used when lemons weren’t available, “but eventually there arose a faction of tipplers who made

their Punch with oranges alone,” Wondrich writes in a chapter dedicated to Orange Punch. Kimberly Patton-Bragg, a New Orleans bartender and an On the Rocks semi-finalist, agrees: “Fresh orange juice can bring a softness, acidity and mouthfeel other citrus can’t,” she says. But not everyone is sold on contemplating the Navel. Momofuku mogul David Chang says he’s focused on exploring the savory rather than the sweet side of citrus. “Not that we don’t love oranges,” he assures, “but on the culinary side we like yuzu, Kefir limes, and similar Asian citrus.”

Orange Punch Adapted from Jerry Thomas’ Bordeaux Wine and Liquor Dealer’s Guide, 1858. Reprinted in Punch (David Wondrich 2010) and reprinted here with the author’s permission. Serves 16. The juice of 3 to 4 oranges (Navel for sweetness or Seville for complexity) The peel of 1 or 2 oranges 3/ 4 lb. of sugar 3 1/2 pints boiling water 1/ 2 pint Porter 3/ 4 to 1 pint each dark rum and brandy Make an oleo-saccarum by infusing/marinating peels and sugar for a half hour, add juice, then strain into a punch bowl. Add boiling water, 1/2 pint Porter (beer) and 3/4 to 1 pint each of dark rum and brandy. Add more warm water and sugar as desired for proper strength and sweetness.

Earl Grey Garden by Kimberly Patton-Bragg, Clever, New Orleans 2 oz. Ketel One Orange vodka 1 oz. Earl Grey simple syrup 1/ 2 fresh lemon 1/ 2 fresh orange 1 Thyme sprig Club soda To make the simple syrup, combine 1 cup hot tea with 1 cup sugar, stir until dissolved and cool. Cut lemon and orange halves into quarters and muddle with Earl Grey syrup in a mixing glass. Add vodka and ice. Shake and strain into a tall glass. Top with club soda, and garnish with thyme.

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ESSAY

THE FAMILY PEARLS A

s the cathedral bells pealed, the “new” bride and her groom turned to walk down the aisle. My mother and I were in Manila to celebrate her sister’s golden wedding anniversary. The assembled crowd of stylish men and women had spent months consulting their embroiderers, modistes and tailors—all to design traditional butterfly-sleeved ternos and barongs tagalog that would comply with the “Native Dress” request engraved in gold on the invitation. While the keen-eyed could distinguish between piña that had been embroidered and tatted at one pet convent versus another, what really set the women apart were their pearls. My mother wore her prized princess length strand of golden 10 mm baroque natural (not cultured) pearls and her younger sister wore her stunning choker length strand of blue 8 mm natural pearls. But the real showstopper glowed on the bride—a perfectly matched 10 foot strand of creamy pink 6 mm natural pearls. As my aunt glided gracefully past us, she resembled my grandmother in the formal wedding portrait that hangs in the gallery of our family home in Manila. A few days earlier, upon arriving at the traditional Spanish-style hacienda, my mother and her younger sister chatted about fittings with their modistes and donations to the convents while I lingered in the gallery studying the family portraits. At the very end stood the “lifesize” (at 5’10” I stand taller than the frame) oil painting of my maternal grandparents on their wedding day almost 75 years ago. The diminutive figures in the painting were resplendent in their native Filipino dress. I was struck by how realistically and beautifully the artist had rendered each pearl in my

grandmother’s necklace, which dramatically looped her tiny neck and grazed the hem of her dress. Upon my grandmother’s death, she left each of her daughters the parure in her birthstone—emeralds for my mother, rubies for her elder sister and sapphires for her younger sister—but she left the “family pearls” to all three of them. After consulting our family jeweler, who had brokered the original acquisition of this extraordinary single strand that had taken over 50 years to match, the sisters decided to separate the necklace into three equal strands, each finished with a new platinum clasp adorned with a ruby, an emerald and a sapphire to represent the three sisters. Over the years, as they dutifully had their pearls restrung annually, each one divided her strand and had the clasp reproduced to create a single strand with jeweled stations that could also be worn as nested strands, a shorter strand and a bracelet, or a choker with several bracelets. The “family pearls” (as my mother and her sisters always called them) had made many appearances over the years at various family events including weddings, christenings, anniversaries and even funerals. Once, as mother of the bride, my elder aunt had even worn her set combined with my younger aunt’s. But the entire original strand had never been reunited until that golden wedding anniversary. Almost another decade will pass before my own parents celebrate their 50th wedding anniversary—an event as rare and special as the pearls that will be worn to commemorate it. While high-definition video has long replaced oil portraits, the idea of several generations and one very beautiful necklace reuniting to celebrate a milestone will never become outdated.

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IMAGE COURTESY OF MIKIMOTO

REUNITED AND IT FEELS SO GOOD BY JOSEPH UNGOCO


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