Page 1


Essex County, 1888


SUBURBAN DOMESTIC ARCHITECTURE S E R I E S

NORTH SHORE BOSTON H OUSES OF E SSEX C OUNTY 1865–1930

PAMELA W. FOX FOREWORD BY

JONATHAN WINTHROP

AC A N T H U S P R E S S N E W Y O R K : 2005


CONTENTS Acknowledgments • [ 9 ] Foreword • [ 11 ] Introduction • [ 13 ]

1865–1879 INDIAN HILL, West Newbury • [ 44 ] THE STONE HOUSE; SHARKSMOUTH, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 50 ] WINNEKENNI, Haverhill • [ 54 ] CLIFFS, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 57 ]

1880–1889 MORAINE FARM, Beverly • [ 62 ] GENERAL CHARLES GREELY LORING HOUSE, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 66 ] GRASSHEAD, Swampscott • [ 72 ] KRAGSYDE, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 75 ] OSGOOD HILL, North Andover • [ 79 ] THE COMMONS, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 84 ] NETHERFIELD, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 86 ] PINE LODGE, Methuen • [ 91 ] ELIHU THOMSON HOUSE, Swampscott • [ 95 ]

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1890–1899 GREYCOURT, Methuen • [ 100 ] GLEN MAGNA FARMS, Danvers • [ 104 ] WHITE COURT, Swampscott • [ 112 ] MOSTLY HALL, Ipswich • [ 114 ] HIGHWOOD and WOODHOLM, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 118 ] JAMES GARLAND RESIDENCE, Hamilton • [ 124 ] SUNSET ROCK, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 132 ]

1900–1909 SWIFTMOOR, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 142 ] UNDERCLIFF, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 147 ] VILLA AL MARE, Beverly Farms • [ 152 ] TURNER HILL FARM, Ipswich • [156 ] ALLANBANK, Beverly Cove • [ 164 ] ROCKMARGE, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 167 ] EAGLE ROCK, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 171 ] WILLOWDALE, Topsfield • [ 178 ] THOMAS JEFFERSON COOLIDGE, JR. HOUSE, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 181 ] THE ROCKS, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 188 ] OVERLOCH, Wenham • [ 196 ] HIGH WALL, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 199 ] CROWHURST, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 204 ] VILLA CREST, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 208 ] AVALON, Pride’s Crossing, Beverly • [ 211 ] BEAUPORT, Gloucester • [ 216 ]

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1910–1919 EDGEWATER, Beverly Farms • [ 226 ] CASTLE HILL I, Ipswich • [ 231 ] LILLIOTHEA, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 240 ] ASHDALE FARM, North Andover • [ 248 ] MORSS HOUSE, Marblehead • [ 252 ] STONE ACRE, Gloucester • [ 256 ] BLYNMAN FARM, Manchester-by-the-Sea • [ 260 ] HOUSE ON THE MOORS, Gloucester • [ 266 ]

1920–1930 DRUIMTEAC, Gloucester • [ 274 ] HUNTWICKE, Topsfield • [ 277 ] BRATENAHL RESIDENCE, Gloucester • [ 281 ] CASTLE HILL II, Ipswich • [285 ] STILLINGTON HALL, Gloucester • [ 293 ] ABBADIA MARE (HAMMOND CASTLE), Gloucester • [ 296 ] PENGUIN HALL, Wenham • [ 302 ]

APPENDICES Portfolio • [ 312 ] Architects’ Biographies • [ 322 ] Bibliography • [ 334 ] Index • [ 339 ] Photo Credits • [ 348 ]

[8]


A U T H O R ’ S N OT E are among the hundreds of country places built on the North Shore in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. I have tried to include houses of particular architectural or historical interest, as well as those whose owners featured prominantly in the social life of the day. One essential criterium was the availability of good quality architectural photographs. It is my hope that this book will stimulate further research and appreciation of the domestic architecture of the post-Civil War period on the North Shore, and will encourage preservation of remaining examples.

T

HE HOUSES FEATURED IN THIS BOOK


PINE LODGE



Methuen, 1887–1915

T

M E T H U E N E S TAT E Pine Lodge was created by Edward Searles (1841–1920), the son of a poor local farmer. Searles began work at age 12 as a laborer in a cotton mill and eventually became an interior decorator for the prestigious New York firm of Herter Brothers. In the early 1880s, he traveled to California for health reasons and visited the widow of Southern Pacific Railroad magnate Mark Hopkins, for whom Herter Brothers had decorated a mansion on San Francisco’s Nob Hill. Mrs. Hopkins, who was 21 years his senior, fell in love with the 42-year-old bachelor and proposed marriage. It was several years before he agreed, and in the interim, Searles supervised the construction and decoration of Mrs. Hopkins’s country estate, Kellogg Terrace, in Great Barrington, Massachusetts. They were married in 1887, and at her death four years later, Mrs. Searles left her entire multimillion-dollar estate to her new husband. H E S T R A N G E A N D E X T R AO R D I N A RY

Residence and towers, present-day view

[ 91 ]


PINE LODGE

Exterior wall and concourse

Exterior walls

Searles chime tower and chapel

[ 92 ]


PINE LODGE

Marble Museum, present-day view Searles’s advantageous marriage allowed him to indulge in dozens of building projects throughout his lifetime, most designed by the distinguished Gothicist Henry Vaughan. Searles became Vaughan’s greatest private patron. At Pine Lodge, where he owned several hundred acres, Searles greatly expanded a simple 19th-century farmhouse into a classically styled mansion with an idiosyncratic plan, surrounded on three sides by Ionic colonnades. One of the reported 74 rooms contained a groin-vaulted Baroque alcove created to house an 1859 three-manual organ from the Broadway Tabernacle in New York. Searles himself almost certainly took charge of interior decoration to accommodate his collection of tapestries, sculptures, and furniture. Over the years, he added a variety of half-timbered buildings, a chapel, and several towers and enclosed the eclectic ensemble within a high, fortresslike granite wall. A half-timbered concourse over the road allowed him to travel between parts of his property without being bothered by curiosity seekers. The jewel of the collection was the Gothic chapel, its three-level square tower terminating in a crenelated parapet. It was built in 1915 as a scale replica of a parish church in Stanton-Harcourt, England, home of Searles’s ancestors.

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PINE LODGE

Garden

Although he continually expanded the facilities at Pine Lodge, Searles lived there as a virtual recluse. Eccentric but public-spirited, he gave many important buildings to the Town of Methuen, including Searles High School, Serlo Organ Hall, and three churches. Searles willed his estate and its contents to Benjamin Allen Rowland, the minor son of his cousin. In 1957, Pine Lodge was sold to the Presentation of Mary Sisters, a Catholic religious order that has worked to preserve the buildings and uses them for a girls’ high school, two Montessori schools, a provincial house, and a retirement home.



[ 94 ]


W H I T E C O U RT  Swampscott, 1894–95

W

C O U RT WA S T H E S U M M E R R E S I D E N C E O F F R E D E R I C K E. S M I T H of Dayton, Ohio, whose company, Barney & Smith Car Works, manufactured railway cars. Located overlooking the ocean on prestigious Little’s Point in Swampscott, White Court represented yet another novel departure for the firm of Little & Browne. The semicircular two-story portico on the landward side provided an imposing formal entrance. The addition of a gambrel roof, corner quoins, a Chinese Chippendale–inspired roof balustrade, and a cupola resulted in a Neoclassical-style house that bore only a faint resemblance to its simpler Colonial and Federal predecessors. The inspiration may have been the 1893 World’s Columbian Exposition in Chicago, which was replete with dramatic white colonnaded buildings, including a replica of Mount Vernon created for the Virginia pavilion. HITE

Entrance facade

[ 112 ]


WHITE COURT

Living hall Inside, the elaborate two-story French-style living hall was generously proportioned. The library and music room faced inland, whereas the sitting rooms, octagonal sun parlor, and dining room faced the terrace and sloping lawns leading to the open sea. Original furnishings consisted of simple straw mats and wicker, cane, and painted wood furniture, along with sheer white curtains, both plain and ruffled. White Court gained a measure of celebrity in 1925, when President Calvin A. Coolidge rented it for the summer. In 1928 the Smith family sold White Court to Timothy Falvey, who enlarged it for yearround use and redecorated the 28-room house with hand-painted murals and scenic wallpapers that remain today. In 1954 the house and six-acre property were sold to the Sisters of Mercy. The order established a day school and later a secretarial school called Marian Court. Now a junior college of business and general studies, the name has been changed to Marian Court College.

 [ 113 ]


THOMAS JEFFERSON COOLIDGE JR. HOUSE



Manchester-by-the-Sea, 1902–04

T

HOMAS JEFFERSON

C O O L I D G E J R ., a founder and first president of Old Colony Trust Company, was the son of a prominent Boston merchant, financier, and diplomat and the great-great-grandson of Thomas Jefferson. The family summered in Manchester beginning in the early 1870s, when T. J. Coolidge Sr. built a shingled house on the peninsula later known as Coolidge Point. Three decades later, there was plenty of frontage along the shore for his son’s elegant brick mansion with marble trim, designed by the celebrated Charles McKim, a friend and a relative by marriage. By 1902, the New York

Entrance facade, c.1905

[ 181 ]


THOMAS JEFFERSON COOLIDGE JR.

architectural firm of McKim, Mead & White was arguably the most preeminent in the nation, having been engaged by President Theodore Roosevelt to expand the White House. Although today the home’s style might be described as “eclectic neoclassicism,” Coolidge himself referred to it as “a pure example of the best Georgian architecture.” According to Coolidge’s letters, the design was inspired by old Portsmouth and Salem houses, Virginia mansions of the “Jeffersonian” type and English models. Harrie T. Lindeberg worked with McKim on the Coolidge house and later established his own practice designing large country homes. The balanced, slightly asymmetrical three-part design extended 230 feet and consisted of a main block and two wings. The formal floorplan represented a departure from the casual late-19th-century entrance hall with fireplace and stairs. Instead, visitors entered an anteroom and continued into a separate oval living hall, 42 feet long and 25 feet wide, overlooking the ocean. Paneled in English oak with a richly detailed cornice, the hall featured a carved fireplace mantel and floors of imported Yorkshire stone. Walls were hung with old English portraits. Symmetrical grand staircases were located at right angles between the anteroom and hall. On one side of the living hall was the living room/library and on the other, a formal dining room. Outside, a terrace extended the entire length of the main block on the ocean side. The two-story east wing contained the kitchen and servants’ rooms. At the opposite end, a one-story, 52-by-26-foot outdoor room, labeled by McKim as the “portico,” was open on the south and west sides. Marble columns framed

Ocean facade

[ 182 ]


THOMAS JEFFERSON COOLIDGE JR.

Elevation drawings

First and second floor plans

[ 183 ]


THOMAS JEFFERSON COOLIDGE JR.

View from open loggia

[ 184 ]


THOMAS JEFFERSON COOLIDGE JR.

Loggia, as designed (above) and as later enclosed (below)

[ 185 ]


THOMAS JEFFERSON COOLIDGE JR.

Oval living hall

Living room

[ 186 ]


THOMAS JEFFERSON COOLIDGE JR.

extraordinary views over 700 feet of open lawn to the sea. After Stanford White’s death in 1906, Coolidge bought tiles for the portico from White’s estate, along with a Flemish tapestry. The space was later enclosed with glass and furnished as an informal lounge. To one side were terraces, a small formal garden, a rose garden, and a rhododendron bed. Also on Coolidge Point was a well-known Italian garden established by Coolidge Sr. The mansion was demolished in 1958 by T. J. Coolidge III, eldest of the four sons. The Trustees of Reservations, a nonprofit group, now owns the site and maintains about 60 acres as conservation land. The gardener’s cottage and greenhouses have been removed. A preserved carriage house remains, along with a barn converted into a superintendent’s residence. The original perimeter of the mansion has been outlined with stones set into the lawn.



[ 187 ]


B E AU P O RT



Gloucester, 1907–34

B

for collector and interior decorator Henry Davis Sleeper (1878–1934), whose well-to-do Boston family had summered on the North Shore for many years. Designed by Sleeper in collaboration with local architect Halfdan M. Hanson, the house was located on Eastern Point overlooking le beau port of Gloucester, so named by the French explorer Samuel de Champlain. The original 26-room house was inspired by the English Arts and Crafts movement and constructed of stucco, later replaced by brick and stone. Over the next 27 years, frequent remodeling turned it into a labyrinth of 40 rooms filled with American and European furniture and decorative arts, arranged in theatrical compositions that balanced light, color, and form. In his use of E AU P O RT B E G A N A S A M O D E S T S U M M E R C OT TAG E

Exterior with tower library, c. 1910

[ 216 ]


BEAUPORT

Belfry tower, c. 1917

Entrance facade, 1910

[ 217 ]


BEAUPORT

Sunken garden and terrace, 1910

Terrace, 1910

[ 218 ]


BEAUPORT

Plan architectural fragments from early American houses, Sleeper followed in the footsteps of Ben: Perley Poore, whose house at Indian Hill Farm is pictured on pages 44–49. Each room at Beauport had a name and a historic, literary, or aesthetic theme. The entrance foyer, known as Cogswell Hall, was lined with paneling from the 18th-century William Cogswell house in Essex, which Sleeper acquired in 1907. The popular Golden Step Room, painted in white and sea-green colors with a ship model on one side, was flooded with sunlight from a bank of diamond-paned windows overlooking the harbor. The largest and most widely imitated room—and Sleeper’s personal favorite—was the Pembroke Room, or Pine Kitchen, modeled after the idealized “colonial kitchen” dominated by a vast cooking fireplace. The Octagon Room, painted a deep plum color with red tole accents, featured an octagonal table made to Sleeper’s design. A Norman-style tower with carved and painted wooden “curtains” contained his two-tiered library. The Master Mariner’s Room was reserved for Sleeper’s collection of nautical objects, and the China Trade Room, originally decorated as a

[ 219 ]


BEAUPORT

Fireplace in Pine Kitchen

Golden Step Room

Pembroke Room, or Pine Kitchen

[ 220 ]


BEAUPORT

Tower Library with carved wood curtains

[ 221 ]


BEAUPORT

Master Mariner’s Room

China Trade Room as remodelled by Helena McCann

Master Mariner’s Room

[ 222 ]


BEAUPORT

Bedroom medieval hall, was redecorated after he discovered a pristine set of hand-painted Chinese wallpapers. Work on the house was suspended during World War I, when Sleeper joined his neighbor and friend A. Piatt Andrew in forming the volunteer American Ambulance Field Service (AFS) in France. He ran the Paris office for two years and was awarded the French Legion of Honor. After the war, his funds depleted by the war effort, Sleeper turned to decorating homes for the wealthy. His most famous client, Henry Francis du Pont, was so impressed by Beauport that he hired Sleeper to decorate his summer house on Long Island and later to assist him—at least initially—in the creation of Winterthur. Literary figures and artists also found their way to Beauport. An elite circle of friends, including Isabella Stewart Gardner, attended imaginative costume parties there. Henry Davis Sleeper died suddenly in 1934 without making plans for the future of the house. Antiques dealers bid for pieces of the collection. Fortunately, Charles McCann and his wife, Helena, eldest daughter of F. W. Woolworth, purchased Beauport and its contents. One of the few rooms Mrs. McCann changed was the China Trade room, which she made into a Chippendale parlor displaying her Chinese Export porcelain. In 1942 the McCann children gave Beauport to the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities (now Historic New England) as a museum. The small gatehouse also remains.

[ 223 ]


BIBLIOGRAPHY

INSTITUTIONS NORTH SHORE Beverly Historical Society Beverly Public Library, History Room Cape Ann Historical Association Endicott College Essex County Greenbelt Association Essex County Registry of Deeds Hamilton Historical Society Haverhill Public Library, Special Collections Historical Society of Old Newbury, Cushing House Museum Ipswich Historical Society Landmark School Lynn Historical Society and Museum Manchester Historical Society Marblehead Museum and Historical Society Methuen Historical Commission Methuen Historical Society Nahant Historical Society Newburyport Public Library North Andover Historical Society Peabody Essex Museum Peabody Institute of Danvers Project Adventure, Moraine Farm Swampscott Historical Society Topsfield Historical Society The Trustees of Reservations Wenham Museum West Newbury Public Library OUTSIDE NORTH SHORE Boston Athenaeum Boston Public Library, Fine Arts Department Chicago Historical Society Francis Loeb Library, Harvard Graduate School of Design Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site

Frick Art Reference Library Harvard University Archives Historic New England (formerly the Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, SPNEA) Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management Massachusetts Historical Commission Massachusetts Historical Society Massachusetts State Library Annex Olmsted Associates Records, Library of Congress Shepley, Bulfinch, Richardson, & Abbott, Archives Woodlawn Museum, Ellsworth, Maine

GENERAL REFERENCES Birnbaum, Charles A., and Robin Karson, eds. Pioneers of American Landscape Design. New York: McGraw-Hill, 2000. Boston city directories, local directories, atlases, maps, obituaries in New York Times and Boston Transcript. Malone, Dumas. Dictionary of American Biography. New York: Charles Scribner’s Sons, 1935. Withey, Henry F., and Elise R. Withey. Biographical Dictionary of American Architects (Deceased). Detroit: Omnigraphics, 1996 (originally published 1956). Who’s Who along the North Shore. Salem: Salem Press Company, 1911. Who’s Who in New England. New York: A. N. Marquis and Company, 1916 (second edition) .

N E W S PA P E R S

AND

PERIODICALS

American Architect and Building News, or American Architect (August 19, 1882 [Grasshead]; October 4, 1884 [Loring]; March 7, 1885 [Kragsyde]; May 1, 1912, “The Country House in America”; January 1, 1919 [Morss]). American Homes and Gardens (November 1905, “Craigston”; March 1908, “Overloch, the Country Home of John A. Burnham, Esq.”). Ames, Robert L. “A North Shore Country Home.” American Homes and Gardens 13, no. 1, January 1915. [Avalon]

[ 334 ]


BIBLIOGRAPHY

The Architectural Record (July 1908 [Avalon]; September 11, 1908 [The Rocks]; October 1916 [Stone Acre]; November 1907, “Some Houses on the North Shore of Massachusetts”; November 1924 [Long Hill]). Architectural Review (June 1902, “House and Stable at Wenham, Mass.” [Craigston]; September 1902 [stables issue]; September 1902, “House for Geo. Lee, Esq. of Beverly Farms”; January 1904, “House of Mr. Bradley W. Palmer, Topsfield, Mass.”). Arts and Decoration (November 1930, “A Home Built on the Rocky Gloucester Coast” [Hammond Castle]). The Brickbuilder (July 1908 [Eagle Rock]; April 1912 [Edgewater]). The [Boston] Sunday Herald (“Picturesque Nahant: The Summer Home of Some of Boston’s Leading Residents,” August 3, 1890; “North Shore Life: Summer Homes of Boston’s Four Hundred,” September 23, 1894). Brown, Frank Chouteau. “Boston Suburban Architecture.” The Architectural Record 21, no. 4, April 1907. Cameron, Richard. “A Gold Medal Garden in Massachusetts.” Horticulture, January 15, 1929. [Castle Hill] Campbell, Robert. “Saving the Shingle Style Summer Homes.” Boston Sunday Globe, November 23, 2003. Country Life in America (November 1917, “An Architectural Garden.” [Evans]; August 1925 and August 1934 [Castle Hill]; September 1936 [Pingree Estate]). Crowly, Herbert. “Rich Men and Their Houses.” Architectural Record, May 1902. Dexter, Eleanor P. “Recapturing the Past at Beauport.” Antique Monthly, July 1979. Eberlain, Harold. “Five Phases of the American Country House” and “The Formal American Country House.” Architectural Record 36, October 1914. Ferree, Barr. “The House and Garden of W. S. Spaulding, Esq., Prides Crossing, Massachusetts.” American Homes and Gardens 7, no.10, October 1910. ———. “The House of C. P. Searle, Esq., at Ipswich, Massachusetts.” Notable American Homes series in American Homes and Gardens. February 1909. ———. “The House of James H. Proctor, Esq., in Hamilton, Massachusetts.” Notable American Homes series in American Homes and Gardens, November 1906. ———. “‘Indian Ridge,’ the Summer Home of Dr. F. B. Harrington at Ipswich, Mass.” American Homes and Gardens, November 1910. ———. “‘The Rocks,’ the Country Seat of Eben D. Jordan, Esq., West Manchester, Massachusetts.” Notable American Homes series in American Homes and Gardens, July 1905.

———. “The Seaside Home of Mr. T. Jefferson Coolidge Jr., Coolidge Point, Manchester, Massachusetts.” Notable American Homes series in American Homes and Gardens, October 1906. ———. “The Summer Home of Ambassador Geo. von L. Meyer.” Notable American Homes series in American Homes and Gardens, September 1906. ———. “The Summer Home of Oliver Ames, Esq., Pride’s Crossing, Massachusetts.” Notable American Homes series in American Homes and Gardens, February 6, 1906. ———. “‘Villa al Mare,’ the Country Home of George Lee, Esq., at Beverly Farms, Massachusetts.” Notable American Homes series in American Homes and Gardens, November 1909. Garden and Forest (March 30, 1892, “A Modern Massachusetts Farm.” [Moraine Farm]). Holden, Wheaton A. “The Peabody Touch: Peabody & Stearns of Boston, 1870–1917.” Journal of The Society of Architectural Historians 32, no. 2, May 1973. The House Beautiful (August 1916, “The New Old House” [Beauport]; January 1923, “An Architect’s House in Marblehead” [William T. Aldrich House]; December 1932 and February 1933, “Abbadia Mare: Quiet Retreat by the Sea.” [Hammond Castle]). Hutcheson, Martha Brookes. “The Garden of the Home of Dr. J. Henry Lancashire, Manchester, Mass., Mrs. Wm. A. Hutcheson, Landscape Architect.” House and Garden, June 1920. With photographs by Mary Northend. Landi, Ann. “John Cottrell: Henry Davis Sleeper’s Stillington Hall Legacy Restored in Massachusetts.” Architectural Digest, September 2000. Loring, Katharine Peabody. “The Earliest Summer Residents of the North Shore and Their Houses.” Essex Institute Historical Collections 67, no. 3, July 1932. Marion, Frieda. “The House of the Month: Indian Hill Farm.” The Shoreliner Magazine, September 1952. Munch, Ann. “George Milford Harding: Portland’s HighVictorian Architect.” Landmarks Observer, March–April 1982. Newburyport Daily News (May 13, 1896 ,Obituary of Henry W. Moulton; October 7, 1943, “Historical Record Relates Facts about Famed Moulton Castle and Brick Building”). New Country Life (March 1918, “The House on the Moors”). Northend, Mary. “‘Crowhurst’: Manchester by the Sea.” American Homes and Gardens, February 1907. ———. “A North Shore Garden at Manchester-by-the-Sea.” American Homes and Gardens, November 1907. [The Chimneys] ———. “A North Shore House of the Georgian Type.” American Homes and Gardens, July 1915. [Rockedge]

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———. “The Summer Home of Mr. Eben D. Jordan.” Town and Country, June 10, 1905. ———. “Villa al Mare: Summer Home of Mr. Geo. Lee, Beverly Farms,” House and Garden, December 1908. North Shore Breeze and Reminder (November 18, 1921, “North Shore Homes,” supplement). O’Gorman, James F. “A Tragic Circle.” Nineteenth Century 2, no. 3–4, Autumn 1976. ———. “Twentieth-Century Gothick: The Hammond Castle Museum in Gloucester and Its Antecedents.” Essex Institute Historical Collections, April 1981. Perrett, Antoinette. “In the Pilgrim Manner.” House and Garden, December 1925. [Bratenahl House] Russell, Benjamin F. W. “The Works of Guy Lowell.” Architectural Review 13, no. 2, February 1906. [Allanbank, Selwood] Scully, Vincent. “Shingle-Minded Pursuits.” House and Garden, November 1990. Singleton, Esther. “Indian Hill.” American Homes and Gardens, December 1908. Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities. “Formal Dedication to the Public of Indian Hill, Newbury, Massachusetts,” June 21, 1941. Somerby, Charles I., Sr. “The Moulton Castle.” Newburyport Daily News, November 3, 1950. Sturgis, Walter Knight. “Arthur Little and the Colonial Revival.” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 32, no. 2, May 1973. Vogel, Susan Maycock. “Hartwell and Richardson: An Introduction to Their Work.” Journal of the Society of Architectural Historians 32, no. 2, May 1973. Walker, C. Howard. “The Country Houses of Winslow & Bigelow.” Architectural Review, April 1904. White, Elizabeth Rose. “Oceanfront Estate Offers Window on the Past.” Real Estate Marketplace, Essex County Newspapers, January 3, 2003. [Blynman Farm] Whitehead, Russell F. “American Seaside Homes.” Architectural Record, August 1910. Whitham, George G. “The North Shore Beckons.” North Shore Breeze and Reminder, April 29, 1921. Witham, Corine B. “A Visit to Medieval Europe in America.” Stained Glass 64, no. 4, Winter 1969–70.

BOOKS

AND

P R I N T E D M AT T E R

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American Country Houses of Today, with preface by Samuel Howe. New York: The Architectural Book Publishing Company, 1915. Amory, Cleveland. The Proper Bostonians, New York: E.P. Dutton, 1947. Anderson, Dorothy May. The Era of the Summer Estates: Swampscott, Massachusetts, 1870–1940. W. Kennebunk, Maine: Published for the Swampscott Historical Society by Phoenix Publishing, 2000 (original copyright 1985). Aslet, Clive. The American Country House. New Haven: Yale University Press, 1990. Bartlett, Albert L. “Some Annals of Essex County in Mass.,” Art Work of Essex County, Mass. Chicago: The W.H. Parish Publishing Company, 1896. Beveridge, Charles E., and Paul Rocheleau. Frederick Law Olmsted: Designing the American Landscape. New York: Rizzoli International Publications,1995. Cabot, Carroll. The Great House. The Trustees of Reservations, 1992. [Castle Hill] Cavalier, Julian, American Castles. South Brunswick and New York: A. S. Barnes and Company, 1973. Cortissoz, Royal. Domestic Architecture of H. T. Lindeberg, with new introduction by Mark Alan Hewitt. New York: Acanthus Press, 1996 (originally published New York: William Helburn, 1940). Curtis, Nancy, and Richard C. Nylander. Beauport. Boston: Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities, 1990. Department of Printing and Graphic Arts, Harvard College Library. Selected Drawings: H. H. Richardson and His Office: A Centennial of His Move to Boston, 1874. Exhibition catalogue, 1974. Embury, Aymer, II. One Hundred Country Houses: Modern American Examples. New York: Century Company, 1909. Flinton, Sister Martina, P. M. The Searles Saga. Published by the author, 1976. Ferree, Barr, American Estates and Gardens, New York: Munn and Company, 1904. Freeman, Donald C. The Story of Winnekenni: 1640–1976. Haverhill, MA: Winnekenni Foundation, 1977. Garland, Joseph E. Eastern Point: A Nautical, Rustical, and Social Chronicle of Gloucester’s Outer Shield and Inner Sanctum, 1606–1950. Peterborough, New Hampshire: Noone House, 1971. ———. The North Shore: A Social History of Summers Among the Noteworthy, Fashionable, Rich, Eccentric and Ordinary on Boston’s Gold Coast, 1823–1929. Revised one-volume edition. Beverly, Massachusetts: Commonwealth Editions, 1998. (Portions of this book were originally published in Boston’s North Shore: Being an Account of Life Among the Noteworthy, Fashionable, Wealthy, Eccentric,

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M.I.T. Press, Cambridge, Massachusetts, and London, 1983. Morison, Samuel Eliot. The Maritime History of Massachusetts, 1783–1860. Boston: Houghton Mifflin Company, 1921. Moulton, Henry W. Moulton Annals. Chicago: Edward A. Claypool, 1906. Ochsner, Jeffrey K. H. H. Richardson: Complete Architectural Works. New ed. Cambridge, Massachusetts: MIT Press, 1984. O’Connor, Thomas H. Bibles, Brahmins, and Bosses: A Short History of Boston. Trustees of the Boston Public Library, 1991. O’Gorman, James F. H. H. Richardson: Architectural Forms for an American Society. Chicago and London: University of Chicago Press, 1987. ———. Living Architecture: A Biography of H. H. Richardson. New York: Simon and Schuster, 1997. ———. This Other Gloucester: Occasional Papers on the Arts of Cape Ann Massachusetts., Boston: N.p., 1976. O’Malley, Patricia. Haverhill: From Town to City. Images of America Series. Arcadia Publishing Company, 1997. Patterson, Augusta. American Homes of To-day: Their Architectural Style, Their Environment, Their Characteristics, New York: Macmillan, 1924. [Stone Acre] Patterson, Stanley C., and Carl G. Seaburg. Nahant on the Rocks. Nahant Historical Society, 1991. Pinkham, Harold A. Jr. A Reference Guide to the Residential Development of the Eastern Shore of Beverly, 1844–1919. Published by the author, 1997. Pratt, Richard. David Adler. New York: M. Evans and Company, Inc., 1970 (copyright held by Art Institute of Chicago). Pulsifer, Janice P. Changing Town: Hamilton, Massachusetts 1850–1910. Published by the author in 1976, reprinted by Hamilton Historical Society in 1985. Roper, Stephen J. A Good In-Land Town: Buildings and Landscapes in North Andover, Massachusetts, from 1640 to 1940. North Andover Historical Society, 2001. Roth, Leland M. Shingle Styles: Innovation and Tradition in American Architecture, 1874–1982. New York: Harry N. Abrams Inc., 1999. Photography by Bret Morgan. Sanger, Martha Frick Symington. The Henry Clay Frick Houses: Architecture, Interiors, Landscapes in the Golden Era, with foreword by Wendell Garrett. New York: The Monacelli Press, 2001. Scully, Vincent J., Jr., The Shingle Style and the Stick Style (revised edition). New Haven, CT: Yale University Press,1971. Sheldon, George William. Artistic Country Seats: Types of Recent American Villas and Cottage Architecture, with Instances of Country Club-Houses. New York: Appleton and Company,1886–87, I. Shurcliff, Sidney N. Upon the Road Argilla. Boston: S. N. Shurcliff, 1958.

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Spanierman Gallery. Painters of Cape Ann, 1840–1940: One Hundred Years in Gloucester and Rockport. Exhibit catalogue, 1996. Stillinger, Elizabeth. The Antiquers. New York: Alfred A. Knopf, 1980. Tapley, Charles S. Country Estates of Old Danvers. Danvers: The Mirror Press, .N.d Thorne, Martha, ed. David Adler, Architect: The Elements of Style, with essays by Richard Guy Wilson, Pauline C. Metcalf, and Chenete Zelleke, and foreword by Robert A. M. Stern. New Haven and London: The Art Institute of Chicago, in association with Yale University Press, 2002. Trask, Richard B. Danvers from 1850 to 1899. Images of America series. Arcadia Publishing Company, 1996. Two Hundred Fiftieth Anniversary of Beverly, Massachusetts, 1668–1918. Beverly Evening Times, 1918. Varrell, William M. Ipswich. Images of America series. Arcadia Publishing Company, 2001. Waters, Thomas F. Ipswich in the Massachusetts Bay Colony, volume II. Ipswich Historical Society, 1917. Warnock, Donald J. The Elihu Thomson House: A National Historic Landmark. Swampscott Historical Committee, 1978. Wexler, Dorothy. Reared in a Greenhouse: The Stories—and Story—of Dorothy Winthrop Bradford. New York and London: Garland Publishing, 1998. Whitehead, Walter Muir. “Glen Magna Farms, Danvers, Massachusetts” (printed brochure, undated, c. 1965). Wright, John Hardy. Marblehead, Volumes I and II, Images of America series. Arcadia Publishing Co, 1996 and 2000. Wright, Richardson. House and Garden’s Book of Gardens. New York: Condé Nast, 1921. Youngman, Elsie P. Summer Estates from the 19th Century: Manchester-bythe-Sea. With photographs by George M. Cushing. Manchester Historical Society, 1981. Zaitzevsky, Cynthia. The Architecture of William Ralph Emerson, 1833–1917. With photography by Myron Miller. Catalogue for exhibition presented by the Fogg Art Museum, in collaboration with the Carpenter Center for the Visual Arts, Harvard University. May 30–June 20, 1969. Zollo, Richard P., Richard P. Trask, and Joan M. Reedy. As the Century Turned: Photographic Glimpses of Danvers, Massachusetts, 1880–1910. A Centennial Publication of the Danvers Historical Society, 1989.

U N P U B L I S H E D M AT E R I A L S Albee, Peggy. “Arthur Little in Manchester-by-the-Sea.” Unpublished typescript, 1981, at Boston Public Library. Brown (Mulholland), Elizabeth R. “The General Charles G. Loring House (1881): Later known as ‘Pompey’s Garden,’ Pride’s Crossing, Massachusetts.” Unpublished typescript, 1994. Brown, Joan, ed. “Summer Cottages of Six Bostonians in Pride’s Crossing and Manchester-by-the-Sea.” Boston: Society of Architectural Historians, New England Chapter, 1983. “Buswell, Lt. Colonel H. Leslie, December 3, 1887–October 13, 1964.” Memorial booklet at Cape Ann Historical Association. Davis, Karen, ed., “Preliminary Master Plan for The StevensCoolidge Place, 139 Andover Street, North Andover, Massachusetts.” Presented to The Trustees of Reservations, May 1996, by Boston University Preservation Studies Program, Preservation Planning Colloquium. Gray, Dennis J., and Associates. “Historic Structures and Priority Garden Restoration Plan: Maudslay State Park, Newburyport, Massachusetts.” Submitted to Massachusetts Department of Environmental Management, November, 1993. “Henry Cabot Lodge Memorial Park at East Point, Nahant.” Dedication brochure, July 2, 1994. Hibbard, Virginia, and Jane Crandell-Glass. “Landscape History of Castle Hill.” Unpublished typescript, 1984. Letters of Thomas J. Coolidge Jr., courtesy of Kitty Coolidge Lastavica. Little & Browne, account books and scrapbooks, SPNEA. Massachusetts Historical Commission. Beverly survey by M. Hepler, 1993, Topsfield (G. Schuler and A. Forbes), Swampscott (Claire W. Dempsey). Also Moraine Farm (Valerie Talmage, 1991), Maudslay (Jane Carolan, 1998), The Rocks (Tremont Preservation Service, 1997), Thomson House (Swampscott Historical Commission), Porphyry Hall (Richard B. Trask), and others. “Penguin Hall—The Tour.” Unpublished typescript, Mullen Advertising. Real estate brochures for Blynman Farm and Governor’s Landing [Alexander Cochrane House], undated. Private collections. Records of the Olmsted Associates, 1863–1971 (Library of Congress, microfilmed office records) and Frederick Law Olmsted National Historic Site (photograph albums). Shurcliff, W. A. “A Casual History of the Upper Part of Argilla Road, Ipswich, Mass., since 1897.” Unpublished typescript, April 1, 1952.

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INDEX

Abbadia Mare - 296 Abbotsford (Scotland) - 44 Adams, Henry - 85 Adler, David - 236, 285, 292, 322 Agassiz, Louis - 16 Agassiz, Rodolphe - 321 Agriculture, gentleman’s farm – 25, 26, 47, 63, 107, 160, 205, 233 Albro, Louis Colt - 327 Alcott, Louisa May - 21 Aldrich, Nelson - 323 Aldrich, William T. - 319, 321, 323, 333 Aldrich, Winthrop - 323 All Oakes - 316 Allan, Bryce J. (Anna) – 40, 164, 165, 328 Allanbank – 164-166 Allen & Collens - 333 Allen, Ethan - 321 American Ambulance Field Service (AFS) - 223, 271, 293, 333 American Architect and Building News - 36, 72 American Red Cross - 323 American Woolen Company - 211, 317 America’s Cup - 29 Ames Gate Lodge, North Easton - 81 Ames Plow Company - 199 Ames, Gov. Oliver - 256 Ames, Oliver - 199 Andover, MA - 317, 323 Andrew, A. Piatt - 22, 31, 223, 271, 293, 333 Andrews, Jaques & Rantoul - 314, 315, 318, 322, 325, 330 Andrews, Robert D. - 35, 322 Annisquam, MA - 22, 23 Appleton & Stephenson - 21 Appleton Farms - 11, 12, 24, 25, 30 Appleton, Daniel - 25 Appleton, Francis R. - 25 Appleton, Julia Amory - 329 Appleton, Nathan - 50 Appleton, Samuel - 24 Appleton, Thomas Gold - 18 Appleton, William - 29 Appleton, William Sumner - 52, 323 Archdiocese of Boston - 12, 299, 308

Arches, The - 317 Architecture, Beaux Arts – 211; Chateauesque - 100, 240; Colonial - 36, 40, 41, 281, 325, 327; Colonial Revival - 35, 36, 38, 40, 41, 57, 58, 127, 323, 324, 327, 329, 330 (see also Georgian Revival); Craftsman – 40, 177; English – 40; English Arts and Crafts – 216; First Period – 37, 41, 281; Georgian - 41, 182; Georgian Revival 97, 226, 248, 277, 285; Gothic Revival - 33, 34, 44, 93; Italian Renaissance - 152, 164, 233, 252, 329; Jacobethan - 114, 124, 156; Japanese – 38, 58, 69; Mediterranean – 208; Mission – 40; Neoclassical – 39, 112, 145, 169, 173, 182; Norman French – 204; Prairie School – 326; Queen Anne - 34, 36, 63, 88, 103; Richardsonian Romanesque - 40, 79, 88, 326; Shingle style - 36, 37, 69, 71, 72, 75, 82, 88, 325, 328, 330; Tudor - 122, 149, 188, 260 Argilla Road - 23, 331 Armour, Mary - 204 Arnold Arboretum - 327, 328 Arts and Crafts Society, Chicago - 326 Artists, Cape Ann – 22-23, 266, 271 Ashdale Farm (see Stevens-Coolidge Place) Atwood, William E. (Emmeline Abbott)23, 266, 271 Avalon - 211-215 (plan, 213) Avery, Milton - 23 Ayer, Beatrice - 215 Ayer, Frederick – 211, 329 Back Bay, Boston - 17, 57, 65, 199, 255, 327 Baker, Charles M. - 260 Balcurrain - 320 Ball, H.B. – 315 Ball, Isaac, House (Charleston, S.C.) - 41 Baltimore, MD - 15 Bar Harbor, ME - 27 “Barn” house - 39 Barney & Smith Car Works - 112 Barott, Chauncey E. - 330 Barry, William Edward - 327 Bartol, Rev. Dr. Cyrus - 38, 39, 57 Basilican Salvatorian Order - 103 Bass Rocks, MA - 22, 30, 326 Batchelder Trust - 65 Batchelder, George III (Mimi) - 65 Batchelder, George Jr. (Katherine) - 65

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Beacon Hill, Boston - 15, 17, 35, 50, 51, 77, 190, 251, 324 Beal, Boylson A. - 314 Beal, J. Williams - 319, 323 Beauport - 41, 216-223, 326 (plan, 219) Beaux, Cecilia - 22, 271 Bellows & Aldrich - 256, 281, 319, 323 Bellows, Robert P. - 323 Belton House, Lincolnshire, England - 285 Beverly, MA - 13, 15, 17, 18, 19, 20, 23, 25, 30, 31, 33, 35, 38, 62, 65, 66, 77, 135, 152, 164, 167, 171, 199, 211, 312, 313, 314, 315, 317, 318, 319, 320, 321, 325, 328, 329 (see also Pride’s Crossing) Beverly Cove - 18, 164, 313, 314 Beverly Farms - 18, 135, 152, 312, 317, 320, 325 Bigelow & Wadsworth - 240, 319, 320, 333 Bigelow, Henry F. - 321, 333 Bigelow, William - 35, 329 Billings, Joseph and Hammatt - 326 Biltmore estate, Ashville, N.C. - 62, 329 Birchbrow – 37, 325 Black, Colonel John - 78 Black, George Nixon - 78 Black, George Nixon Jr. - 77, 78 Blackall, Clapp & Whittemore - 323 Blackall, Clarence H. - 315, 323 Blighty - 320 Blossom, Harold Hill - 280 Blynman Farm - 260-265 Blythewood - 17 Boardman family - 315 Bodley, George Frederick - 332 Booth, Junius Brutus Jr. - 20 Boston, MA - 15-20, 40-41 (see also Beacon Hill, Back Bay) Boston Art Commission - 329, 332 Boston Jumper Classic Grand Prix - 128 Boston Opera House - 190, 333 Boston Public Garden - 244 Boston Society of Architects - 325, 326, 329 Boston Transcript Company - 319 Boston University - 82 Bosworth, Welles - 35 Boulderwood - 318 Bowditch, Ernest W. - 81, 103, 323 Boyer, Joseph - 302 Brace’s Cove - 281 Brackenside - 127 Bradlee, Nathaniel J. - 333 Bradley Palmer State Park - 180 Bradley, Robert S. - 315 Bradstreet Farm - 11, 26 Bratenahl Residence - 281-284 Bratenahl, Florence Brown - 41, 281, 283 Bratenahl, Very Rev. George C. F. - 281 Brigham, Charles - 86, 331 Brisco, Maurice - 332 Brookline, MA - 314 Brooks School - 316

Brooks, Van Wyck - 22 Brookwood School - 209 Brown, Frank Chouteau - 40 Brown, John Burnham - 236 Browne, Herbert W.C. - 39, 104, 107, 110, 169, 316, 327, 328 Bryant, Gridley - 330, 331 Burling & Whitehouse - 333 Burling, Edward - 333 Burnett, Edward - 233 Burnham, John A. – 196, 333 Burrage, Albert C. - 315 Burroughs Adding Machine Company - 302 Bussey Institute - 331 Buswell Pond - 295 Buswell, Leslie (Mary Armstrong) - 293, 295, 333 Byrd, Admiral Richard - 303 Cabot & Chandler - 312 Calumet and Hecla Mining Company - 71, 321 Caner, Harrison - 315, 330 Cape Ann – 13, 22, 23 Carcassonne - 321 Carlson, Henry J. - 325 Carnegie, Andrew - 171 Carrere & Hastings - 100, 323-324 Carrere, John Merven – 100, 323 Carswell, Harold T. - 274 Cassiobury Park, England - 290 Castle Hill - 12, 24, 322, 329, 331 Castle Hill I (Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge, architects) - 231-239 Castle Hill II (David Adler, architect) - 285-292 Castle Neck - 23, 231 Chamberlain, Joseph (Mary Endicott) - 107 Champlain, Samuel de - 216 Chandler, Joseph Everett - 41, 248, 249, 324 Chase & Sanborn - 314 Chebacco Lake - 26 Chicago, IL – 18, 27, 40, 127, 142, 204, 208, 226, 231, 233, 274, 285, 321, 322, 326, 326, 330, 331, 333 Chicago Architectural Club - 326 Childs (Frick), Adelaide - 171 Chimneys, The - 316, 329 Choate Island - 231 Church of St. Margaret, Beverly - 38 Clark & Russell - 316 Clark, Forrester (Katherine) - 128 Clark, Mrs. F. Haven - 321 Clarke, James Freeman - 21 Cliffs - 35, 36, 57-58 (plan, 58) Clifton, MA - 317 Clipston - 314 Cobb, Bertha - 208 Cobb (Walker), Louise - 118 Cochrane, Alexander - 38, 313, 325 Codman, Ogden Jr. - 38, 199, 201, 318, 324, 327 Codman, Sam - 71

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INDEX

Codman, Stephen - 317 Coffin, Marian - 328 Cogswell, Charles N. - 318, 325 Cogswell, William (house) - 219 Collens, Willis & Beckonert - 333 Colonial Arms Hotel - 256 Colonial Williamsburg - 323, 330 Columbia University, Dept. of Architecture - 332 Commons, The - 84-85, 329 Coolidge & Carlson - 252, 325 Coolidge Point - 181, 187 Coolidge, Calvin - 31, 32, 113, 260 Coolidge, Charles A. - 35, 331 Coolidge, John G.(Helen Stevens) - 249, 248, 324 Coolidge, Joseph R. Jr. - 325 Coolidge, May Humphries - 263 Coolidge, Mrs. J. Randolph - 251 Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson - 30, 181, 187, 260, 280, 328 Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson III - 187 Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson Jr. - 181, 182, 187 Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson Jr. House - 181-187 Coolidge, Thomas Jefferson Jr. House (elevations and plans) - 183 Coolidge, William Appleton - 280 Coolidge, William Henry - 260, 263 Corinthian Yacht Club - 29, 252 Cornelius and Mine S. Crane Wildlife Refuge - 292 Cottier & Company - 173 Cottrell, John - 295 Couch, Lester - 328 Cove Farm - 204 Craigston - 315, 330 Cram & Ferguson - 270 Cram, Ralph Adams - 23, 266, 321, 332 Cram, Robert Nathan - 128 Crane, Cornelius - 290 Crane, Florence (Jr.) - 290 Crane, Richard T. Jr. (Florence) – 12, 24, 30, 40, 231, 233, 236, 285, 292, 322, 331, 329 Crane’s Beach - 292 Crescent Beach Hotel - 21 Crowhurst - 204-207, 209, 327, 333 Crowninshield, B.W. (estate) - 323 Cummings & Sears - 313, 314, 327 Cummings, Charles A. - 325 Cummings, Charles K. - 178, 318, 325 Cummings, Margaret - 318, 325 Curran, Maurice J. - 320 Curtis, Elinor - 52 Curtis, General Greely Stevenson (Harriot Appleton) – 50,52 Curtis, Harriot - 52 Curtis, Margaret - 52 Cushing Hall Juniorate - 308 Cushing, Richard (Cardinal) - 299 Cutler Majestic Theater - 190 DABSville - 22

Damon, C. Willis – 56, 103, 325 Damon, Charles – 103, 325 Dana, Richard H. Sr. - 20 Danvers, MA - 15, 30, 41, 104, 110, 313 Danvers Historical Society - 110 Davidge, Joanna - 22 Davis, Stuart - 23, 271 Dean, Eldon - 78 Dean, Robert Charles - 330 DeCamp, Joseph - 23 Denegre, Walter D. - 40, 208 Denny, John W. (house), Milton, MA - 35, 330 Derby, Elias Hasket – 15, 107 Derby, Elizabeth - 15 Dexter, Franklin - 17, 33 Dexter, George Minot - 33 Dexter, Philip - 318 Diamond Match Company - 167 Dobyne, George A.(Margaret) - 320 Dodd, Arthur Hooper - 311 Dodge Farm - 29 Dodge, Virginia - 45 Downing, Andrew Jackson - 33 Druimteac - 274-276 duPont, Henry Francis - 223 Duveen, Joseph - 173 Duveneck, Frank - 23 Eagle Rock - 39, 142, 169, 171-177 Early New England Interiors - 38, 57, 327 East Point - 16, 312 Eastern Point – 21, 22, 30, 216, 256, 274, 326 Eastern Point Associates - 21 Eastern Point gate lodge - 22 Eastern Point Retreat House - 320 Eastern Railroad - 17 Eastern Yacht Club - 29, 30, 323, 330 Ecole des Beaux-Arts - 40, 100, 165, 201, 322, 323, 325, 326, 328, 329, 330, 331, 333 Edgewater - 226-230 (plan, 230) Edgewood Farm - 82 Edward Albert, Prince of Wales - 29 Eliot, Charles W. - 85 Elmwood - 17, 33 Emerson, Ralph Waldo - 325 Emerson, William Ralph - 22, 35, 37, 38, 69, 313, 325 Endicott College - 165, 319, 321 Endicott Park - 110 Endicott, John - 15 Endicott, William - 17 Endicott, William C. Jr. - 104 Endicott, William C. Sr.(Ellen) – 104, 110 Enfield Hall, England - 205 Essex, MA - 25 Essex Agricultural Society - 26 Essex County – 2, 13, 15

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INDEX

Essex County Club - 30, 329 Essex County Greenbelt Association - 12, 32 Essex County Trail Association - 12 Essex County, history - 15 Essex, Earls of (house) - 290 Evans, Maria Antoinette - 31 Evans, Robert Dawson - 31 Fairbanks House, Dedham - 36, 37 Falvery, Timothy - 113 Farnetti, S. - 158 Fehmer, Carl - 325 Felsenmere - 315 Fenno, Lawrence - 318 Fenno, Pauline Shaw - 318 Fernald, George P. - 328 Field, Marshall - 226 Fields, James T. - 20 First National Stores - 127 Flying Horse Farm - 11, 321 Foote, Harriett Risley - 236 Forest Hills Cemetery - 244 “Fort house” - 39 Foxhollow - 128 French, Daniel Chester - 244 Frick Art and Historical Center - 176, 177 Frick Art Museum - 176 Frick Collection - 176 Frick, Childs - 176 Frick, Helen Clay - 176 Frick, Henry Clay – 27-28, 39, 40, 171, 173, 176 Gale, Herbert E. - 319 Gallery-on-the-Moors – 23-24, 266, 270 Gambrill & Richardson - 329, 331 Gambrill, Charles D. - 331 Gannett, Thomas B. - 319, 333 Gardner, Isabella Stewart - 22, 38, 223 Gardner, William Amory - 319 Garland Residence - 124-131, 333 Garland, James A. “Jack” - 124, 127 General Electric Company - 95 George Robert White Fund - 244 Gibbons, Grinling - 290 Gildersleeve, Raleigh C. - 316 Gillette Company - 320 Glen Magna Farms - 41, 104-111 Gloucester, MA - 15, 17, 21, 22-23, 32, 216, 256, 266, 274, 281, 293, 296, 315, 320, 321, 326, 333 Gloucester Civic and Garden Council - 32 “Gold Coast” - 27 Goodwin, Augustus (Julia) - 127-128 Gordon College - 26 Gordon Conwell Theological Seminary - 319 Gove, Aroline Chase - 321 Graftonwood - 149

Grant, Robert - 21, 22 Grasshead - 39, 72-74 (plan, 74) Graves, Harold S. - 327 Graystone Hall - 319 Great Estates Preservation and Development bylaw - 12, 117, 160 Greene, Charles and Henry - 69, 328 Grew, Edward S. - 316 Greycourt - 100-103 (plan, 102) Greycourt State Park - 103 Grosse Point, MI - 302 Groton House Farm - 11, 12, 26, 316 Guild, Samuel E. - 314 Gulliver, J.P. - 323 Gurney, E. W.(Gurney House) – 35, 84, 85, 331 Haddington Hall, Edinborough, Scotland - 158 Hagerty, Summerfield - 317 Hale & Rogers - 149 Hale, Edward Everett - 21, 326 Hale, Herbert D. - 149, 326 Hall, Frederick G. (Evelyn Ames) - 256 Ham House, Surrey, England - 289 Hamilton, MA - 13, 17, 19, 24, 25, 26, 29, 31, 124, 128, 169, 316, 319, 320, 321 Hammond Castle - 296-301, 333 Hammond Castle Museum - 299 Hammond Laboratory - 293, 296 Hammond, John Hays - 293 Hammond, John Hays Jr. - 296, 297, 299, 333 Hancock House, Beacon Hill - 35, 51, 330 Hanson, Halfdan M. - 216, 326 Harding, George M. - 313, 326 Hardtcourt - 317 Harleston Parker Medal – 329, 330 Harrington, Dr. Francis B. – 24, 316 Hartley, Marsden - 23 Hartwell & Richardson - 79, 82, 326 Hartwell, Henry W. - 326 Harvard College – 18, 26, 34, 51, 84, 85, 117, 178, 208, 260, 325, 326, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333 Harvard Law School - 178, 260 Hassam, Childe - 23 Hastings, Thomas - 323 Haven, Franklin - 18 Haven, Parkman B. - 333 Haverhill, MA - 15, 20, 38, 54, 56, 325 Head, Charles - 149 Heinz, H.J. - 27 Hemenway, Mary – 38, 325 Hepburn, Andrew H. - 330 Herter Brothers - 91 Hesperus House - 21 Heun, Arthur - 209, 326 Hewett, Mattie Edwards – 292 Higginson, Francis Lee – 313, 329 Higginson, Henry Lee - 313

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INDEX

High Wall - 199-203, 327 Highwood - 118-123, 329 Higinbotham, Harlow - 236 Historic New England (see Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities) Hoare, William - 38 Hog Island - 231, 292 Hollander, Theodore C. - 315 Holmes, Dr. Oliver Wendell - 20 Holt, Henry - 332 Homer, Winslow - 22 Hooper (Gurney), Ellen - 84 Hooper, R.C. - 315 Hooper, Robert “King” - 15 Hopkins, Mrs. Mark - 91 Hopkinson, Charles - 23, 52, 271 Hopper, Edward - 23 Hotels - 16, 17, 20, 21 House-on-the-Moors - 266-270 (plans, 268) Howard, John Galen - 35 Howe, Frank M. - 332 Howe, George Dudley - 57, 327 Hoyt, Edward A. - 333 Huessler, George - 107 Hunt, Richard Morris - 323, 332 Hunt, William Morris - 22 Huntwicke - 41, 277-280 (plan, 280) Hutcheson, Martha Brookes – 26, 147, 149, 203, 205, 327, 328 Indian Hill Farm - 34, 41, 44-49, 219 Indian Ridge - 316 Inglelowe - 320 Inglesby - 318 Innisfree - 318 Innocenti and Webel - 176 Interstate Commerce Commission - 169 Ipswich, MA - 15, 17, 23, 24, 26, 30, 114, 156, 231, 236, 285, 316, 318, 322, 328, 331 Ipswich River - 178, 277 Irving, Casson & Davenport - 241 Irving, Washington (Sunnyside) - 33 Italian Gardens - 107, 147, 187, 236, 238, 251, 327 J.C. Phillips Nature Preserve - 65 Jackson, Patrick Tracy - 18 James, George Abbott - 312 Jaques & Rantoul - 328 Jaques, Herbert - 35, 322 Jefferson, Thomas - 181 Jekyll Island, GA - 236, 322 Johnstone, Hugo Richards - 127 Jordan Hall, Boston - 190, 333 Jordan, Eben Dyer Jr. - 188, 190, 333 Jordan, Marsh & Company - 188 Kelley, James T. - 97, 327

Kellogg Terrace, Great Barrington, Mass - 91 Kenoza Lake - 54 Kernwood - 33 Kernwood Country Club - 30 Ketherlinus Lithographic Manufacturing Co. - 315 Kettle Cove and Island – 21, 260 Kidder, Henry P.(Elizabeth) - 86, 88, 331 Kidder, Peabody & Company - 86 Kilham & Hopkins - 318 Kimball, Thomas R. - 332 King, Mrs. H.P.(nee Spaulding) - 132 Kragsyde - 38, 75-78, 329, 330 (plan, 77) Kuehne, Max - 23 Kunhardt, George F. - 317 Labor-in-Vain golf course – 30, 292 Lake Cochichewick - 79 Lancashire, Dr. J. Henry - 149 Landmark School - 209, 313, 319 Lane, Fitz Hugh - 22 Lane, Gardiner Martin – 316, 329 Larcom, Lucy - 21 Lawrence, MA - 15 Lawrence Scientific School - 329 Ledgelawn - 314 Ledges, The - 320 Lee, Colonel Henry C. - 152 Lee, George - 152 Lee, Henry C. - 312 Lee, Higginson & Co - 325 Leiter, Levi Z. - 226 Leiter, Mary (Mrs. Levi Z.) - 226, 329 LeNotre, Andre - 233 Lenox, MA - 27 Leonard, Arthur - 274, 276 Lewis, William Whitney - 314, 327 Lilliothea - 240-247, 329 (plans, 247) Lincoln, MA - 324 Lindeberg, Harrie T. - 182, 302, 303, 308, 320, 327 Lindens, The - 15, 41 Little & Browne - 39, 41, 71, 104, 112, 123, 132, 135, 142, 169, 173, 314, 315, 316, 317, 327-328 Little, Alden & Company - 73 Little, Arthur - 17, 35, 38, 57, 72, 169, 314, 327-328 Little, Browne & Moore - 327 Little, James L. – 17, 73 Little’s Point - 17, 38 Lodge, Henry Cabot - 16, 31, 312 Long Hill - 41, 320 Longfellow, Alexander - 35 Longfellow, Fanny Curtis - 52 Longfellow, Henry Wadsworth - 16, 21, 52 Longworth, Alice Roosevelt - 31 Longworth, Congressman Nicholas Jr. - 31 Longworth, Nicholas Sr. (Susan) – 314, 330 Loring Residence – 38, 66-70 (plan, 70)

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INDEX

Loring, Charles Greely - 18, 28 Loring, Gen. Charles Greely - 38, 66, 71, 325 Loring, Katharine Peabody - 27, 28 Lothrop, Beverly - 303 Lowell family – 328 Lowell, Guy - 11, 26, 164, 165, 316, 317, 319, 328, 333 Lowell, John Amory - 18 Lowland - 312 Ludlow Manufacturing Associates - 313 Lutyens, Edwin - 327 Lynn, MA - 15

Morss House - 252-255 Morss, Henry Adams - 252, 255 Moseley, Frederick S.(Helen) - 26, 48 Mostly Hall - 11, 12, 29, 114-117, 328 Moulton Castle - 34, 312 Moulton, Henry W. - 312 Mudge, Enoch Redington - 17, 33 Mullen Advertising - 308 Museum of Fine Arts, Boston - 66, 78, 86, 135, 244, 328, 331, 332, 333 Myopia Hunt Club - 11, 25, 29, 30, 128, 329 Mystic River (Tobin) Bridge - 32

Machado, Ernest M.A. - 114, 316, 328 MacNichol, Edward F. - 320 Maddock, Steven - 12 Magnolia, MA - 21, 22 Manchester, MA - 13, 19, 20, 22, 23, 25, 30, 35, 38, 50, 57, 75, 118, 122, 147, 181, 188, 204, 208, 209, 231, 240, 260, 311, 313, 314, 315, 316, 318, 319, 325, 327, 328, 329, 330, 333 Mandell, George S. - 319 Manship, Paul - 23, 289 Marblehead, MA – 13, 15, 17, 29, 31, 252, 314, 317, 319, 321, 323, 328, 330 Marblehead Neck - 29, 252, 255 Marblehead Neck Improvement Association - 255 Marian Court College - 113 Masconomo Hotel - 20 Mason, Mortimer Blake - 314 Massachusetts Audubon Society - 26, 32 Massachusetts Bay Colony - 15 Massachusetts Horticultural Society - 103, 110, 251, 292, 308 Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) - 38, 54, 69, 73, 280, 322, 323, 324, 325, 326, 327, 328, 329, 330, 331, 332, 333 Maudesleigh (Maudslay) - 26, 48, 327, 330 Maudslay State Park - 26 McCann, Charles (Helena Woolworth) - 223 McIntire, Samuel - 15, 107 McKee, Thomas - 317, 328 McKim, Charles F. - 35, 181, 329 McKim, Mead & White - 35, 182, 313, 323, 327, 328-329, 332, 333 McMillan, James - 27 Mead, William R. - 329 Merrimack River - 15, 26 Methuen, MA - 15, 34, 91, 94, 100 Methuen Historical Society - 103 Meyer, George Von Lengerke – 31, 316 Miles River - 114 Miller, Ruby Boyer - 302, 303 Milton, MA - 35, 325 Mink Cottage - 315 Mink, Oliver W. - 315 Misery Island - 30, 240 Missionaries of Our Lady of LaSalette - 160 Moore, George A. - 328Moore, “Judge” William Henry - 27, 39, 40, 167, 169, 170, 173 Moraine Farm - 30, 35, 62-65, 77, 329

N.W. Rice Company - 156 Nahant, MA - 13, 16, 19, 20, 30, 32, 312, 314, 321, 329 Nahant Hotel - 16 National Agricultural Society - 47 National Biscuit Company - 167 National Historic Landmark - 97, 292 Netherfield - 86-90 New England Biolabs - 12, 117 New House, The - 25 New York City - 15, 16, 19, 124, 317, 321, 326, 328, 331, 333 Newburyport, MA - 15, 17, 26, 34, 44, 48, 312 Newport, RI - 14, 16, 19, 27, 28, 323, 324, 330 Nichols, Dr. James R. - 34, 54, 56 Norman’s Woe - 21 North American Review - 85, North Andover, MA - 79, 82, 248, 251, 316, 317, 321, 324 North Easton, MA - 203 North Shore Arts Association - 23, 271 Norton, Charles Eliot - 16 Oak Hill - 15, 41 Oakland - 316 Oakwood assisted living - 263 Obear, Samuel - 17 Ober, Frederick - 19 Oberland - 17, 33, 34 Ocean House - 17 Oceanside Hotel - 21 Old Colony Trust Co. - 181 Old Fort - 313 Old Ship Meeting House, Hingham, MA - 35, 325 Olmsted Brothers - 24, 107, 122, 173, 215, 233, 244, 280, 292, 315, 316, 329 Olmsted, Frederick Law - 35, 62, 63, 77, 84, 107, 251, 329, 330, 331 Olmsted, Frederick Law Jr. - 233, 329, 331 Olmsted, John Charles - 329 Orchard Farm - 15Order of Don Bosco - 117 Osgood Hill - 79-83, 323 Overloch - 196-198 Ox Pasture Hill Farm - 318 Ozzie, Raymond (Dawna) - 195 Paine, Charles Cushing - 18

[ 344 ]


INDEX

Palmer & Dodge - 178 Palmer, Bradley W. – 11, 178, 180, 325 Parker, J. Harleston – 211, 226, 329 Parker, Thomas & Rice - 211, 329 Parramatta - 30, 32 Parrish, Maxfield - 23 Parson Capen House - 281, 333 Patton, Gen. George S. Jr. - 180, 215 Paxton, William - 23, 256 Peabody, MA - 15, 30, 32, 41 Peabody & Stearns - 35, 38, 62, 63, 322, 323, 327, 330, 333 Peabody, Captain Joseph - 104, 107 Peabody, Francis - 15 Peabody, Henry W. - 30 Peabody, Robert - 35, 38, 77, 330 Peabody, S.E. - 33 Peach’s Point - 31, 314, 323 Peare & Quiner - 320 Penguin Hall - 302-309 (plans, 307, 309) Perkins, Thomas Handasyd - 16 Perry, Shaw & Hepburn - 321, 330 Perry, William Graves - 330 Philadelphia, PA – 15, 57, 313, 315 Philadelphia Centennial Exposition - 57 Phillips, Anna - 65 Phillips, John Charles - 62 Phillips, John Charles Jr. - 65 Phillips, William - 65 Picknell, William Lamb - 23 Pierce, Jack - 12 Pierce, T.W. - 323 Pine Lodge - 34, 91-94 Pingree School - 321 Pingree, Sumner - 11, 321 Pinkham, Lydia - 321 Playhouse-on-the-Moors - 23, 271 Pleon Yacht Club - 29 Pompey’s Garden - 66, 71 Poole, Abram - 290 Poore, Alice - 48 Poore, Ben: Perley - 34, 41, 44, 45, 47, 219 Poore, Ben: Perley Poore Moseley - 48 Poore, Benjamin - 44 Porphyry Hall - 34, 313 Portland, ME - 17, 326 Potter Drug and Chemical Company - 244 Pratt, William - 311 Prendergast, Maurice - 23 Prentiss, John Wing - 320 Presentation of Mary Sisters - 94 Preston, Andrew E. - 317 Preston, Jonathan - 325 Pride’s Crossing (Beverly) MA – 18, 35, 84, 86, 132, 145, 167, 171, 173, 199, 211, 313, 314, 315, 317, 318, 319, 321, 329 Pride’s Crossing, name - 18 Prince of Wales – 29, 180

Prince, Frederick H. - 25, 274 Prince, Frederick O. - 25, 29 Prince, Warren - 17 Princemere - 25, 26 Princess Anne - 128 Proctor, James Howe (Mattina Riker) - 11, 26, 29, 114, 156, 328, 330 Proctor, Thomas Emerson - 115 Proctor, Thomas Emerson Jr. - 11, 26, 117, 156 Project Adventure - 65 Rail transportation – 17, 18, 167, 169, 177, 236 Ramparts, The - 315 Rantoul, Augustus Neal - 318, 322, 330 Rantoul, Neal - 317 Rantoul, Robert S. - 17 Rantoul, William Gibbons - 26, 152, 156, 314, 315, 317, 319, 322, 330 Raymond Property Company - 160 Revere Sugar Company - 132 Rice, Arthur W. - 329 Rice, Charles G.(Anne Proctor) - 26, 156, 158, 160 Richards, Henry - 319 Richardson, Barott & Richardson - 320 Richardson, Frederick L. - 330 Richardson, Henry Hobson - 34, 35, 41, 81, 84, 122, 322, 326, 330, 331 Richardson, Philip - 41, 280, 330 Richardson, William C. - 326 “River” house - 39 Roberts & Hoare - 38, 77 Roberts, Oliver T. - 38 Robinson, Edward - 313, 332 Rock Island Railroad - 167, 169 Rock Maple Farm - 316 Rockedge - 318 Rockefeller family - 323 Rockmarge - 39, 142, 145, 167-170 Rockport, MA - 22, 30 Rocks, The - 188-195, 333 Rogers, Isaiah - 33 Rogers, James Gamble - 326 Rolling Ridge - 321 Ross, Donald - 30 Rouse, Henry Clark - 27, 315 Route 128 - 32 Rowland, Benjamin A. - 94 Rowley, MA - 318 Royal Mail Steamships - 164 Russell, Richard S. - 316 Russell, William A. - 316 Rutan, Charles H. - 35, 331 Salem - 15, 17, 30, 33, 38, 322, 328, 330 Salem Country Club - 30 Salem Turnpike - 16 Saltonstall, John L. - 41, 277 Saltonstall, Nathaniel (house) - 280

[ 345 ]


INDEX

Sanders, Thomas - 37, 38, 325 Sargent, Charles Sprague - 328 Sargent, Henrietta - 328 Sargent, Mrs. Lucius M. - 318 Savin Hill - 29, 320 Sawyer, Henry - 12 Saxon (Cutler Majestic) Theater, Boston - 188 Scott, Sir Walter - 44 Searle, Charles P. - 318 Searles High School - 94 Searles, Edward - 34, 91, 94, 332 Sears, Eleanora - 318 Sears, Frederick R. III - 280 Sears, Willard T. - 88 Sedgwick, Ellery (Mabel) – 41, 320 Selwood - 317 Serlo Organ Hall - 94 Sharksmouth (see Stone House, Sharksmouth) Shaw, George R. - 330 Shaw, Pauline Agassiz - 85 Shaw, Quincy Adams - 318 Shaw, Quincy Adams Jr. - 71 Shaw, Quincy Adams Sr. - 85 Shaw, Robert Gould II – 11, 26, 316 Shaw, Thomas M. - 330 Shepley Bulfinch Richardson & Abbott - 331 Shepley, George F. - 35, 331 Shepley, Henry Richardson - 331 Shepley, Rutan & Coolidge - 122, 233, 285, 316, 317, 331 Sheppard, Mary - 188 Shingleside - 38 Shipman, Ellen Biddle - 315 Shurcliff, Arthur A. (see Shurtleff) Shurcliff, Sidney - 24 Shurtleff (a.k.a. Shurcliff), Arthur A. – 23, 233, 236, 292, 316, 318, 331 Sias, Charles D. - 314 Silloway, Thomas - 326 Simplex Wire and Cable Company - 255 Singing Beach, Manchester – 14, 20 Sinkler, Caroline - 22 Sisters of Mercy - 113 Sisters of Notre Dame - 318 Sisters of Notre Dame de Namur - 308 Skillin, John and Simeon - 110 Sleeper, Henry Davis - 22, 41, 216, 219, 223, 281, 293, 295, 314, 321, 326, 333 Sleeper, J.H. - 314 Sloan, John - 23, 271 Smith, F. Patterson - 320, 332 Smith, Frederick E. - 112 Smith’s Point - 57 Society for the Preservation of New England Antiquities SPNEA (now Historic New England) - 39, 48, 52, 223, 323, 328 Society of Arts and Crafts, Boston - 332 Society of Beaux Arts Architects - 324

Society of Jesus - 320 Society of Oblate Fathers for Missions - 117 Spaulding, John Taylor – 132, 135 Spaulding, William Stuart – 132, 135 Sports, equestrian - 26, 127, 128, 169; fox hunting - 25, 29, 127; golf - 29, 30; polo - 29, 127; tennis – 29; yachting - 29, 135 Spring, Jacob E. - 313 St. Basil Seminary - 103 St. John’s School - 313 St. Margaret’s Catholic Church - 325 Stackpole, Edith V. - 329 Stanton-Harcourt, England - 93 Stearns, John G. Jr. - 330 Steele, Fletcher - 321 Stetson, John - 314 Stevens (Coolidge), Helen - 251 Stevens Estate at Osgood Hill - 82 Stevens, Capt. Nathaniel - 81 Stevens, Moses T. - 79, 81 Stevens, Nathaniel - 82 Stevens-Coolidge Place, Ashdale Farm - 41, 248-251 Stillington Hall - 333, 293-295 Stillington Hall Players - 295 Stone Acre - 256-259 (plans 257,259) Stone House (William Amory Gardner) - 319 Stone House, Sharksmouth - 34, 50-53 Sturgis & Brigham - 327, 331 Sturgis, John H. - 86, 331 Sturgis, Russell - 329 Sullivan, Louis - 35 Sumner Tunnel - 32 Sunset Hill - 313 Sunset Rock - 132-139 (plan, 135) Swampscott, MA - 15, 17, 30, 32, 33, 38, 72, 95, 97, 112, 317, 319, 320, 327, 328 Swampscott Town Hall - 97 Swan’s Island, ME - 78 Swift & Company - 142 Swift, Edwin C. - 27, 39, 142 Swiftmoor - 39, 142-146, 169 Taft, William Howard - 31, 180, 314 Taggert, Lucy M. - 321 Taxes - 19, 20 Tenney, Charles H. - 100, 103 Thatch Banks - 318 The Trustees of Reservations - 12, 25, 32, 41, 78, 187, 251, 292Theater - 20, 23, 271 Thomas, Douglas H. Jr. - 329 Thomas, Washington B. - 88 Thomson, Elihu (house) - 95-97, 327 Thomson-Houston Company - 95 Topsfield, MA - 11, 13, 24, 26, 41, 178, 277, 281, 318, 323, 325, 333 Torrey, Charles - 313 Tower of Four Winds - 321 Trolleys - 23

[ 346 ]


INDEX

Trustees of Reservations (see The Trustees of Reservations) Tuckerman, Bayard (Phyllis Sears) – 29, 320, 333 Turner Hill Farm - 11, 12, 26, 156-163, 330 (plan, 158) Turner, Lydia Eliot Codman - 71 Twachtman, John Henry - 23 Tyson, Russell - 321 U.S. Smelting, Refining, and Mining Co. - 156 U.S. Steel - 171 Undercliff - 147-151, 327 (site plan, 148) Union Club, Boston - 73, 323 Union Stockyards, Chicago - 274 United Fruit Company - 317 United Methodist Retreat Center - 321 Van Brunt, Henry - 330, 332 Vaughan, Henry – 34, 93, 332 Villa al Mare - 152-155, 330 Villa Crest - 208-210 W. & J. Sloane, NYC - 290 Wadsworth, Philip - 333 Waldingfield - 25 Waldyn - 319 Wales, George C. - 318, 332 Walker & Carswell - 274 Walker & Wrenn - 118 Walker, C. Howard - 313, 332 Walker, Charles Cobb - 123 Walker, William B.(Louise Cobb) - 40, 118, 329 Wallace, Col. Cranmore N. - 313 Wambolt, R.H. - 240 Ware & Van Brunt - 34, 51, 332 Ware, William R. - 332 Warren & Smith - 332 Warren, Bayard - 319 Warren, Herbert L. - 35, 332 Washington National Cathedral - 281, 332 Webb, Leila Griswold - 325 Webb, William G. - 56 Weeks, Arthur L. - 328 Wells, Bulkeley - 325 Wells, Joseph - 329 Wenham, MA - 13, 17, 19, 24, 25, 30, 65, 196, 302, 314, 315, 320 Wenham Lake - 30, 62, 63 West Newbury, MA - 34, 44, 45 West Newbury Farmers Club - 47 Westcote - 314 Weston, MA - 333 Wetherell, George H. - 333 Wharton, Edith - 199, 324 Wheelwright & Haven - 190, 332 Wheelwright, Edmund M. - 190, 332 White Beach - 204 White Court - 32, 112-113 White, George Robert - 240, 244, 329

White, Stanford - 35, 187, 327, 329 Whitehouse, Francis M. - 40, 204, 209, 333 Whitehouse, Rev. Henry J. - 333 Whittier, John Greenleaf - 20 Wichfeld, Mrs. Askel P.C. - 145 Willis, Harold B. - 293, 296, 297, 321, 333 Willow Cottage - 21 Willowdale - 178-180 Willowdale (plan) - 180 Wilson, Woodrow - 180 Winchester, MA - 29 Winnekenni - 34, 54-56, 325 Winnekenni Foundation - 56 Winslow & Bigelow - 124, 333 Winslow & Wetherell - 328, 333 Winslow, Walter T. - 333 Winslow, Wetherell & Bigelow - 196, 333 Winterthur - 223 Winthrop, Frederic – 11, 26, 316 Winthrop, Frederic Jr. - 11, 12, 26, 160 Winthrop, John - 15 Wood, William Madison - 317 Woodbury Point - 31 Woodholm - 118, 123 Woodlawn, Ellsworth, ME - 78 Woodstock - 317 World War I - 32, 209, 223, 293, 325, 333 World’s Columbian Exposition, Chicago - 112 Wright, Frank Lloyd - 35, 326 Wyck - 244 Wyeth, N.C. - 23

[ 347 ]


North Shore Boston: Houses of Essex County, 1865-1935  

Since the mid-19th century, wealthy Bostonians have migrated each summer to the fabled North Shore, drawn by cool sea breezes and the elemen...

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