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2018

Activities Report CONNECTING THE I NNOVATION COMMUNITY


The National Academy of Inventors is a member organization comprising U.S. and international universities, and government and non-profit research institutes, with over 4,000 individual inventor members and Fellows spanning more than 250 institutions. It was founded in 2010 to recognize and encourage inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society. The NAI publishes the multi-disciplinary journal Technology & Innovation.

WWW.ACADEMYOFINVENTORS.ORG


Contents

THE CONVERSATION

THE NETWORK

02 Points of Pride.................................................... 03 From the USPTO................................................ 05 Collaborators...................................................... 29

Technology & Innovation ����������������������������������� 04

THE ORGANIZATION

THE INNOVATORS

NAI Fellows.........................................................06

Arizona State University ������������������������������������ 08

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Auburn University...............................................09

From the President.............................................

Membership...................................................... • Institutional Members • International Affiliates • Sustaining Member Institutions • Chapter Members • Senior Members • NAI Fellows

15 Annual Meeting................................................... 18 Student Innovation Showcase ���������������������������� 24 GAIN Mentorship Platform ���������������������������������

12 New York University............................................ 13 Texas Tech University ������������������������������������������ 16 University of Central Florida ������������������������������� 17 University of Florida........................................... 20 University of Nebraska-Lincoln ��������������������������� 21 University of South Florida ��������������������������������� 25 Louisiana State University �����������������������������������

Senior Members...................................................14

22 2017 Class of NAI Fellows �����������������������������������26 NAI Chapters......................................................

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NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE CONVERSATION

From the President DEAR FRIENDS:

On behalf of the NAI Board of Directors, I am pleased to present the 2018 Activities Report of the National Academy of Inventors. In the following pages, we invite you to review the exciting initiatives led by the NAI and our members. It is a pleasure to highlight our accomplishments from the past year as well as unveil exciting new opportunities that align with our mission to honor, educate, and connect the inventor community.

now represented by over 250 research universities and governmental and non-profit research institutes. More than 2,600 inventor members from NAI chapters worldwide collectively hold nearly 20,000 U.S. patents. With the induction of the 2017 class of NAI Fellows, the Fellows Program now boasts 912 renowned academic inventors responsible for over 1.4 million jobs, 9,000 companies and $190 billion in revenue.

At the NAI, we are passionate about innovators whose discoveries stimulate the economy and benefit society on a local, national, and international scale. As we focus on the future, the NAI looks to further our efforts in academic innovation through building our comprehensive network of thought leaders, advocating for culture change in academia so that work in technology transfer is recognized, and inspiring the next generation. We are pleased to introduce two major developments to support this vision: NAI Senior Membership and the Global Academic Inventor Network (GAIN), which is a mentorship platform exclusively for academic inventors.

I am in awe as I consider the NAI’s many accomplishments in under a decade, and I would like to thank our members, partners, and friends for their continued support. It is an honor to lead this incredible organization and we look forward to a bright future full of collaboration and success in recognizing and inspiring excellence in academic innovation and invention.

We are not alone in our vision, and our membership continues to grow at a remarkable rate. The NAI is

PA U L R . S A N B E R G , P H . D . , D . S C . , F N AI PRESIDENT

Sincerely,

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NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE CONVERSATION

Points of Pride The NAI was founded to recognize inventors with patents issued from the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office, enhance the visibility of academic technology and innovation, encourage the disclosure of intellectual property, educate and mentor innovative students, and translate the inventions of its members to benefit society.

V A L U E S TAT E M E N T S :

POINTS OF PRIDE:

Network – The NAI will offer the most comprehensive network of innovative thought leaders and change agents in the invention ecosystem. Advocate – The NAI will serve as an advocate for a culture within academia that enhances the visibility of intellectual property, invention, and innovation for the benefit of society. Inspire – The NAI will strive to inspire present and future inventors through education, mentorship, and recognition of innovative discoveries.

NAI members are optimizing cybersecurity, discovering new ecosystems, and revolutionizing drug discovery.

The inventions of NAI Fellows have collectively created over 1.4M jobs, 9,000 companies, and $190B in revenue.

The winning invention of the 2018 NAI Student Innovation Showcase is a novel therapeutic agent that combats catheterassociated urinary tract infections. 03

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE NETWORK

T&I TECHNOLOGY & INNOVATION, JOURNAL OF THE NAI

Technology & Innovation (T&I), edited and published by the National Academy of Inventors, is a forum for presenting information encompassing the entire field of applied sciences, with a focus on transformative technology and academic innovation. If you would like to submit a manuscript, please contact the T&I editorial team at tijournal@academyofinventors.org.

UPCOMING ISSUES:

Technologies for Disabilities Special Editor: Troy McDaniel, Arizona State University Failures in Invention and Innovation Special Editor: Kyle Reed, University of South Florida Patent Infringement in the Innovation Economy Special Editor: Kevin Parker, University of Rochester, FNAI Invention Education: Preparing the Next Generation of Innovators Team of Special Editors led by: Stephanie Couch, Lemelson-MIT Program

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NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE CONVERSATION

From the USPTO On June 19, 2018, the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) issued utility patent number 10,000,000 to Joseph Marron and Raytheon Company for a “Coherent Ladar Using Intra-Pixel Quadrature Detection,” an invention that improves laser detection and ranging. Patent 10 million represents an achievement of human ingenuity and innovation. It is a distinct moment in which to celebrate the millions of inventors, entrepreneurs, and professionals who have made our nation an economic giant and a global leader in innovation.

could have never predicted how smartphones have enabled billion-dollar ridesharing apps. While the future is unknowable, a reliable, predictable, and highquality patent system, in the words of Thomas Jefferson, can give “a spring to invention beyond my conception” (Monticello 2018).

From the earliest American inventors whose ideas improved our quality of life, to today’s innovators whose research is advancing technology, patents have played an indispensable role in bringing these ideas to life. American patents have protected the intellectual property rights for inventions as simple as the flat-bottomed paper bag, and as complex as the processes to synthesize DNA. Brilliant innovators are changing the world with their research and inventions. Shuji Nakamura, FNAI, invented the blue LED light, U.S. patent no. 5,290,393. His inventions have numerous applications in communication, energy, and life sciences (NIHF 2015). Energy storage expert Esther Takeuchi, FNAI, holds U.S. patent nos. 5,389,472 and 6,221,534 for “Lithium/Silver Vanadium Oxide (Li/SVO) Battery Technology in Implantable Cardioverter Defibrillators (ICDs).” This lifesaving battery technology is utilized in the majority of today’s ICDs. Patented inventions like these have created progress, prosperity, and a better way of life for billions of people. The upward trajectory of patent issuance in the last few years makes divining the inventions of the future difficult and exhilarating. Patent one million was issued to Francis H. Holton for a tubeless vehicle tire, on August 8, 1911. Holton probably

For the intellectual property system to function as the Founding Fathers intended, rights owners and the public alike must have confidence in the USPTO and the IP system as a whole. When they do, inventors are encouraged to invent, investments are made, companies grow, jobs are created, and science and technology advance. “Born of our Constitution and steeped in our history, our patent system is the crown jewel that provides both the incentives and the protections necessary to enable that innovation and resulting growth,” said Under Secretary of Intellectual Property and Director of the USPTO Andrei Iancu. The USPTO is the guardian of that system, and the people of the USPTO work to ensure that it meets its full constitutional mandate, “to promote the progress of science and useful arts” (Iancu 2018). The earliest etymology of the word patent stems from thirteenth century Latin. It derives from the present participle of patere, meaning to stand wide open (Merriam-Webster 2018). Throughout our nation’s history, and backed by our patent system, American ingenuity has been at the forefront of every major scientific and technological revolution. It is fitting then that at the issuance of the 10 millionth patent, the doors of the USPTO stand open to promote and protect the best of American innovation.

Learn more about the USPTO’s 10 Million Patents initiative at https://10millionpatents.uspto.gov/.

REFERENCES: Dobyns KW. 1997. The Patent Office Pony. Fredericksburg (VA): Sergeant Kirklands Museum. 249 p.; Famous Quotations from Thomas Edison. n.d. Newark (NJ): Edison Innovation Foundation.; Esther Sans Takeuchi. 2011. National Inventors Hall of Fame [Internet]. North Canton (OH); [cited 2018 May 30; Frances Arnold. 2014. National Inventors Hall of Fame [Internet]. North Canton (OH); [cited 2018 May 30; Gristmill. 2018. Mount Vernon [Internet]. Mt. Vernon (VA); [cited 2018 May 29; Iancu A. 2018. Remarks by Andrei Iancu at U.S. Institute of Peace. Remarks presented at “Unleashing American Innovation” Symposium; Washington, D.C.; Origin and etymology of patent. 2018. Merriam-Webster [Internet]. Springfield (MA); [cited May 31, 2018; Shuji Nakamura. 2015. National Inventors Hall of Fame [Internet]. North Canton (OH); [cited 2018 May 30].; Trahan MP. (2013). Diffusion of innovations. Salem Press Encyclopedia [Internet]. Ipswich (MA) [cited 2018 June 1].; Waskey J. 2016. Oliver Evans [Internet]. Salem Press Biographical Encyclopedia.

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NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE ORGANIZATION

NAI Fellows INFORMATION Election to the NAI Fellows Program is the highest professional distinction awarded solely to academic inventors. Our Fellows have demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions that have made a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society. Nominees must be a named inventor on one or more patents issued by the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office and must be affiliated with a university, non-profit research institute, or other academic entity. Nominations for the 2018 Class of NAI Fellows closed on July 31. The elected class will be announced in December 2018 and inducted at the 2019 Annual Meeting in Houston, TX on April 11.

OUR FELLOWS ARE:

• Nobel Laureates • University presidents and senior leaders • Fellows of the AAAS, IEEE, and the American Academy of Arts & Sciences • Recipients of over 800 prestigious honors and awards

The NAI inducted 140 Fellows at the Seventh Annual NAI Meeting on April 5, 2018 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C. Learn more about the Annual Meeting on pages 18 and 19.

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NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE ORGANIZATION

FELLOWS IMPACT

Fellows have formed over

9,000 companies.

912

Collectively the

32,000 Fellows hold more than

Throughout their careers, our Fellows have involved more than

28,000

students in their work.

patents.

Over

$190 billion

in revenue has been generated by the inventions of Fellows.

1.4 Over

million jobs have been created as a result of NAI Fellow Inventions.

NAI Fellows represent more than NAI Fellows have generated more than

11,000 licensed technologies.

250

universities and non-profit research institutes worldwide.

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NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE INNOVATORS

ARIZONA STATE UNIVERSITY

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Creating life-saving vaccines and treatments using plants as biofactories I

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Professor Charles “Charlie” Arntzen, Ph.D., FNAI, spent two decades as a trailblazing leader in bioscience at Arizona State University (ASU) before retiring in 2017. He served as the founding director of the Biodesign Institute and co-director of the Biodesign Center for Infectious Diseases and Vaccinology. He was appointed the Florence Ely Nelson Presidential Endowed Chair at ASU in 2000. In 2004, he was awarded a Regents’ Professorship in the School of Life Sciences within the College of Liberal Arts and Sciences.

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Prior to coming to ASU, he served as president and CEO of Boyce Thompson Institute, a not-for-profit corporation affiliated with Cornell University. He served as director of the Michigan State University Department of Energy Plant Research Laboratory, director of research at DuPont, and deputy chancellor for agriculture at Texas A&M.

Arntzen and his team helped put ASU’s Biodesign Institute on the map through their dedicated efforts to use plants as biofactories for the production of life-saving vaccines and treatments, gaining international recognition in the process. Treatments include plant-based anti-cancer agents, therapeutic agents to protect populations from bioterror threats, proteins to combat rabies, and plant-derived vaccines against Hepatitis C, noroviruses, and many infectious diseases.

Ebola virus disease, I agreed to take an experimental drug called ZMapp. It seemed like a last resort in my fight against the infection.” On the occasion of Arntzen’s retirement, Brantly said, “I offer my sincerest thanks to Charles Arntzen for his pioneering role in establishing plantmade manufacturing, and especially for ZMapp. The importance of lifesaving medications cannot be overstated, a lesson I have learned firsthand!”

Throughout his career, Arntzen has also served the nation through science societies and policy. He was elected as a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors in 2015 and to the U.S. National Academy of Sciences in 1983. He received the U.S. Department of Agriculture Award for Superior Service and served as chairman of the National Biotechnology Policy Board of the National Institutes of Health. From 2001 to 2009, he served as a member of President George W. Bush’s Council of Advisors on Science and Technology. He was awarded honorary doctorates from the University of Minnesota, Purdue University, and The Hebrew University of Jerusalem.

Arntzen helped create an experimental drug called ZMapp™ that was used to treat U.S. aid workers infected with Ebola during the 2014 epidemic in West Africa. Within 24 hours of taking ZMapp, the two aid workers fully recovered.

For his leadership role in developing ZMapp, Arntzen was nationally recognized in 2015 as the number 1 honoree in Fast Company’s annual “100 Most Creative People in Business.” Arntzen received the 2014 Arizona Bioscience Researcher of the Year award, granted for significant contributions to Arizona bioscience advancement.

His primary research interests focus on plant molecular biology and protein engineering, as well as the utilization of plant biotechnology for enhancing food quality and value, expressing pharmacologically active products in transgenic plants, and overcoming health and agricultural constraints in the developing world.

One of those workers was Dr. Kent Brantly. “In 2014, as I was dying from

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE INNOVATORS

AUBURN UNIVERSITY

Using autonomous sentinels for the detection and capture of invasive pathogens Bryan A. Chin, Ph.D., has spent 13 years researching the issue of global food sourcing and the challenges it presents for food safety inspection. As director of the Auburn University Detection and Food Safety Center, Chin has led the development of new technology that will affordably and significantly improve food safety and the food inspection process.

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Chin holds seven patents, has received $51 million in external research grants, and has maintained continuous funding with a minimum of three external research grants since 1982. As the director and founder of the Detection and Food Safety Center, Chin leads a collaborative research team of 25 faculty members from 18 departments and five colleges. The center has received more

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Chin’s other research interests include medical analysis, agriculture, nuclear reactors, coal-fired reactors, aerospace vehicles, automobiles and trucks, and environmental degradation of materials. He is also interested in sensors used in applications to control manufacturing processes in additive manufacturing, robotic manipulation, welding, joining, and soldering.

than $18 million in direct USDA funding and more than $59 million in ancillary funding. More than 150 master’s and doctoral students have graduated with multidisciplinary training in microbiology, food safety, sensors, and engineering. Through the center, 145 invention disclosures have been filed, 29 patents have been granted, and six commercial products have been licensed and marketed.

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An Auburn faculty member in materials and mechanical engineering since 1981, Chin also serves as director of the Materials Research and Education Center and is the Daniel F. and Josephine Breeden Endowed Professor in the Department of Mechanical Engineering. He previously held the positions of alumni associate professor and McWane Professor of Materials Engineering, and he served as the university’s associate vice president for research from 19922000. Chin earned a bachelor’s degree

in materials engineering from Auburn and master’s and doctoral degrees in materials science and engineering from Stanford University.

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Chin and colleagues have developed biosentinels that mimic the function of white blood cells, detecting and destroying bacterial pathogens in water and food products. Created using microelectronic fabrication techniques, over one million biosentinels can be generated on a 1/8-inch wafer at a cost of less than 1/1000 of a cent each, and facilitate quick and accurate detection of common food pathogens such as listeria and salmonella.

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THE ORGANIZATION

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Membership IP

Sustaining Member Institution

NAI

INSTITUTIONAL MEMBERSHIP Institutional members of the NAI include U.S. and international universities, as well as public and private government research institutes of all sizes. These members and the NAI have the same goal in mind: to increase the visibility of academic invention and to honor it. Institutional Members are encouraged to launch local NAI Chapters to further this goal. The NAI Institutional Membership structure is divided into three categories, including Sustaining Member Institutions, Member Institutions, and International Affiliates.

For more information, visit www.academyofinventors.org/benefits.

MEMBERSHIP FACTS IN BRIEF

The highest level of institutional membership available to a limited number of institutions to receive exclusive benefits with the Activities Report, Annual Meeting, Technology & Innovation, special committees, and more

Member Institution Increases the visibility of institutional research and offers opportunities to recognize and honor inventors on campus

International Affiliate International membership level that promotes institutional research and innovation on a global scale, and allows for worldwide recognition of campus inventors

32,000 4,000

NAI Fellows hold over

Over

issued U.S. patents

individual NAI members

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NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


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NAI Fellow

NAI

INDIVIDUAL MEMBERSHIP Membership with the NAI offers a unique opportunity to join a growing global network of academic inventors. Individual membership includes three categories: Chapter Members, Senior Members, and NAI Fellows. Chapter membership is gained through local NAI Chapters at NAI Member Institutions. For more information about chapters, see page 22.

A peer-nominated and committeeelected inventor who has demonstrated a prolific spirit of innovation in creating or facilitating outstanding inventions for the betterment of society (See pages 6 and 7 for more information on the Fellows Program)

Senior Member An active researcher with success in patents, licensing, and commercialization who has produced technologies that have brought, or aspire to bring, real impact on the welfare of society (See page 14 for more information on senior membership)

Chapter Member An inductee of a local NAI Chapter, typically including faculty, staff, students and community members (varies by institution) with at least one issued U.S. patent (For more information on local chapters, see pages 22 and 23)

Fellows and Members from over

250

universities and research institutes

NAI Fellows have generated over

$190 Billion in revenue

50

Member Institutions have launched local chapters 11

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


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Improving health and wellbeing for people and animals

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Mandi Lopez, DVM, Ph.D., DACVS, FNAI, is a professor of veterinary surgery and the director of the Laboratory of Equine and Comparative Orthopedic Research at Louisiana State University (LSU) School of Veterinary Medicine. Originally from the Pacific Northwest, she attended the Davis School of Veterinary Medicine at the University of California. She completed a large animal surgery residency and obtained the Master of Science degree at the University of Wisconsin - Madison. Her areas of interest are within comparative musculoskeletal research and surgery. Lopez is board certified by the American College of Veterinary Surgeons, has extensive expertise in both applied and basic research, and has multiple patents for several biomedical devices. There are three major areas of focus within her research repertoire: medical devices, regenerative medicine, and motion analysis/ mechanical testing. The overarching goal of her work is to improve the quality of life for all creatures by restoring function to tissues and organs lost to trauma, disease, or age.

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When she was elected as a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors in 2016, Lopez was honored for her work in device design and for encouraging ingenuity and innovation in others. Her issued U.S. patents include one for the GraftGrab, her most recent invention.

“That is a device that I’ve been working on for many years,” Lopez said. “It is now patented—both nationally and internationally. It’s extremely versatile and can be used in any surgery that includes fastening soft tissue to bone.” The GraftGrab is a small yet robust device about the size of a button that surgeons use to secure anterior cruciate ligament (ACL) grafts. When performing procedures, the challenge is to ensure grafts have the right tension. Currently, surgeons have few options to adjust graft tension and readjusting is difficult and prolongs surgery. The GraftGrab allows doctors to easily control and adjust graft tension for the best possible results. The GraftGrab can be made from plastic, absorbable materials or metal. It is versatile enough to fit any sized animal or person. In addition to ACL reconstruction in humans and dogs, the GraftGrab may also be useful in dental procedures, shoulder surgeries, and spinal surgeries. Lopez also shows innovation in stem cell

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

research, where she and her team have led discoveries in stem cells from many species. They recently grew functional pancreatic tissue from adipose tissue stem cells. This innovation may lead to a cure or treatment for diabetes in humans and cats. “Our goal is to identify populations of stem cells and learn to direct or manipulate them to make tissue to replace damaged tissues in the body,” Lopez said. Lopez’s motion research includes studies in dogs, horses, and people. “We’re looking at different ways to reduce pain associated with arthritis, including degenerative hip disease in dogs and humans,” Lopez said, noting that this is a major health problem in both species. Currently, Lopez collaborates with clinicians at the LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans to determine how current technology causes wrist injuries.


THE INNOVATORS

NEW YORK UNIVERSITY

Inventing the future of wireless telecommunications Theodore “Ted” Rappaport, Ph.D., became the David Lee/Ernst Weber Professor of Electrical and Computer Engineering at the New York University (NYU) Tandon School of Engineering in 2012. Rappaport created NYU WIRELESS, a world-leading research center that has spawned the theories and technologies that underpin the global move to fifth generation (5G) wireless networks and beyond.

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Since then, his research has continually explored new frequency ranges and developed models, simulation tools, and measurement systems that enable researchers and industries to exploit new frequency bands. His cutting edge work in studying and characterizing the mobile radio channel in higher frequencies and wider bandwidths was at the core of all five generations of the cellular telephone industry. Academic, industry, and regulatory bodies have used his work to open up higher frequency bands, creating a higher magnitude of more bandwidth, thus playing an influential role in the global adoption of cellular and Wi-Fi networks.

At NYU, Rappaport pioneered the use of mm-waves for future wideband mobile communications, dispelling the myth that such high frequencies could never work in urban environments. Rappaport’s pioneering experiments, modeling, and theoretical analysis of mm-wave communications have led the way to their recent global adoption for 5G networks.

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Rappaport’s research combines experimental investigations of wireless propagation and antennas with communication theory, and

focuses on developing and using novel measurement systems to gain fundamental understanding of radio frequencies never before conceived for commercial use. His doctoral work in 1987 became a key contribution to the development of the world’s first Wi-Fi standard (IEEE 802.11).

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Prior to joining NYU, Rappaport was a chaired professor at The University of Texas at Austin, where he founded the Wireless Networking and Communications Group. Earlier in his career, he founded one of the world’s first academic wireless research centers, the Mobile and Portable Radio Research Group at Virginia Tech. He is the recipient of the Marconi Young Scientist Award (1990), Frederick E. Terman Outstanding Educator Award from the American Society of Engineering Education (2002), Sarnoff Citation from the Radio Club of America (2000), Sir Monty Finniston Medal from the Institute of Engineering and Technology (2011), William Sayle Award from the IEEE Education Society (2012), and IEEE Donald Fink Prize (2015). He was elected fellow of IEEE in 1998 and fellow of the Radio Club of America in 1990.

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NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE ORGANIZATION

ANNOUNCING:

Senior Membership M E MB E

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SENIOR MEMBER NOMINATIONS OPENING FALL 2018

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NAI Senior Members are active researchers with success in patents, licensing, and commercialization and have produced technologies that have brought, or strive to bring, real impacts on the welfare of society. Senior Members also foster a spirit of discovery and creativity within their communities through enhancing an inventive atmosphere at their institutions, while educating and mentoring the next generation of innovators.

NAI

Nominations will open on October 1, 2018. Subsequently, nominations will be accepted on a rolling basis. Nominations will be reviewed and announced quarterly.

N O M I N AT I O N E L I G I B I L I T Y

At minimum, must demonstrate a high degree of innovation by holding one issued U.S. patent that has been licensed or commercialized and/or five or more U.S. patents.

Nominees must be affiliated with a NAI Member Institution.

Recommended seven years of practice/ research at the professional level.

Self-nominations are accepted. Posthumous nominations will not be accepted.

CONTACT JACQUIE BURCKLEY, SENIOR MEMBER COORDINATOR, AT JBURCKLEY@ACADEMYOFINVENTORS.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION. 14

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE ORGANIZATION

GAIN Mentorship Platform OVERVIEW Introducing the new mentorship platform exclusively available to our members: the Global Academic Inventor Network (GAIN). In this unique program created in partnership with Firsthand, members around the globe can easily connect for mentoring consultations. This network is the first of its kind and enables one-on-one connection for advice regarding careers, academics, admissions, business, and startups.

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— D  R. KAREN J.L. BURG, FNAI, UNIVERSITY OF GEORGIA, NAI BOARD OF DIRECTORS

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Firsthand’s user-friendly platform includes a powerful matching algorithm and robust search engine to bring the right people together. Intelligent scheduling and synchronized calendars make it easy for members to find a time to connect, and digital meeting rooms let people connect over the phone, share files, and chat. We are thrilled to bring you this opportunity to further engage with the NAI community.

“The Global Academic Inventor Network is a unique platform that will allow us to bridge the perceived gaps between NAI membership levels and foster a community spirit of innovation and collaboration. By connecting early-career innovators with world-renowned and seasonal inventors, the NAI furthers its mission to educate and mentor students and junior professionals.”

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FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT CHRISTOPHER LEE AT GAIN@ACADEMYOFINVENTORS.ORG. MEMBERS CAN SIGN UP FOR THE PLATFORM AT NAI.FIRSTHAND.CO.

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

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THE INNOVATORS

TEXAS TECH UNIVERSITY

Shining a light on the future of LEDs

Hongxing Jiang, Ph.D., and Jingyu Lin, Ph.D., knew when they filed their patent more than 18 years ago that the future of LED was micro. It just took the rest of the world a couple of decades to catch up.

Eighteen years ago, Jiang and Lin imagined microLED could transform wearable tech and screen displays. Today, they know the technology can go well beyond that. Jiang and Lin can see a time, eventually, when microLED technology could shrink and eliminate a computer or phone screen altogether. “We were also developing this technology for projection. You can display all the information on a wall, on a window, on a car windshield,” Jiang said, “Or you can have a very small device, like a pen, that can project the images.”

It is no surprise that such illuminating technology has come from this power couple. Married for more than 34 years, Jiang and Lin are partners both inside and outside of the lab. They are professors in the Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, as well as co-directors of the Center of Nanophotonics. Together, they have been issued 19 patents, and each researcher has been published more than 400 times.

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

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MicroLEDs have also allowed developers to think larger – in 2018, Samsung unveiled its first microLED television, “The Wall” 4K TV, that measures 146-inches. Additionally, microLEDs are the most suitable technology for the

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MicroLEDs last longer and can operate in temperatures between -100 degrees to 120 degrees Celsius. They are more shock resistant and produce light more efficiently than current microdisplay technologies. Combined with its fast turn on/off speed and low production cost, microLEDs are proving to be a lucrative piece of the tech industry. The microLED market is estimated to reach $20 billion by 2025, which has led to the creation of thousands of jobs with the potential for thousands more in the coming years. Technology giants like Apple, Samsung, Sony, LG, Huawei, and Google are all racing to develop

microLEDs for their next-generation mobile and wearable products.

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Most people know LEDs, or lightemitting diodes, as a more efficient alternative to incandescent lightbulbs or the technology that lights their flatscreen televisions. As the name suggests, Jiang and Lin’s microLEDs are smaller, measuring about 20 microns or less, or 20 millionths of a meter.

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Going green in waterways and outer space

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Sudipta Seal, Ph.D., FNAI, engineering professor at the University of Central Florida (UCF), is quite simply changing the world. His discoveries, which blend engineering, materials science, and nanotechnology, have resulted in applications to medicine, space, and the environment. Seal, a Pegasus Professor and Trustee Chair at one of the largest metropolitan research universities in the nation, has developed surface-engineered nanoscale transition metals and earth oxide ceramics that work as catalysts, which can be used in a variety of ways. For example, the oxide ceramics have led to a way to use fly ash – the dirty byproduct of burning coal – to absorb oil. The technology may be used to clean up oil spills in waterways, because while the material absorbs oil, it repels water. Seal calls the technology Zerocrete – a “green” cement substitute. In 2009, he launched nSolgel to help get the product out of his lab and into the marketplace. Another potential application of his ceramics work is to create coatings that help protect against corrosion, wear, and unwanted chemical reactions with other biomaterials, which may be useful to a variety of industries. For example, the coating could be helpful to keep spacecraft materials stable under extreme conditions. He has also engineered

nanoceria formulation for various biomedical applications, a technology that has since been licensed to Biocurity. Seal also takes teaching the next generation of scientists seriously. He has successfully mentored several doctoral students and helped many of them launch their own companies to develop their inventions and then take them to market. Colleagues have cited his cutting-edge work more than 18,000 times, according to Google Scholar, and thousands more times before that. His ongoing research is supported through grants and contracts from the National Science Foundation, National Institutes of Health, the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA), Department of Defense, Northrop Grumman, and other industries. He has degrees from the Indian Institute of Technology, the University of Sheffield in England, and the University of

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

Wisconsin, and he was a post-doctoral fellow at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory at the University of California before heading to work for a private company. He joined UCF in 1997 as an engineering professor of materials science and went on to become the director of the Advanced Materials Processing and Analysis Center, and later the NanoScience Technology Center. He now serves as the department chair for materials science and engineering. Seal has received many accolades and honors, including an Office of Naval Research Young Investigator Award, Fellow of the Japan Society for the Promotion of Science, and Alexander Von Humboldt Fellow. He is a Fellow of the National Academy of Inventors and was named to the World Academy of Ceramics in June 2018. In recognition of his work’s impact, Seal will be inducted into the Florida Inventors Hall of Fame in 2018. 17


THE NETWORK

NAI Fellows at the Networking Breakfast: Zeev Zalevsky, Bar-Ilan University; Raghunath A. Mashelkar, National Innovation Foundation - India; and Suresh V. Garimella, Purdue University.

Annual Meeting The NAI Annual Meeting is the premier arena where academic innovation and entrepreneurship is recognized, honored, and cultivated. We bring together innovators and thought leaders from organizations worldwide who are making a tangible impact on quality of life, economic development, and the welfare of society. The Annual Meeting features stimulating presentations and networking, and culminates in the formal NAI Fellows Induction Ceremony.

7th Annual Meeting Held on

APRIL 4-6, 2018 at the Mayflower Hotel in Washington, D.C.

450 Over

attendees

18

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

215 Over

Worldwide Universities and Organizations Represented


THE NETWORK

(top) Shown here with NAI President Dr. Paul R. Sanberg, David J. Skorton, Smithsonian Institute, and Andrei Iancu, USPTO and United States Department of Commerce, gave special remarks at the Signature Gala, which was held at the Smithsonian American Art Museum (bottom). The museum was the original home of the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office in 1867. (left) Paul R. Sanberg, NAI President, and Andrew H. Hirshfeld, U.S. Commissioner for Patents, induct Tsu-Jae King Liu as a Fellow of the NAI.

KEYNOTE ADDRESSES

Ronald M. Evans “The Dawn of Synthetic Physiology” Salk Institute for Biological Studies, FNAI

140

New Fellows Inducted

Arthur Daemmrich

Gilda A. Barabino

“A History of (Learning from) Failure” Lemelson Center for the Study of Invention and Innovation at the Smithsonian Institution

“Reframing Innovation” The City College of New York, AIMBE

S A V E T H E D AT E # N A I 2 0 1 9 The Eighth Annual Meeting will be held April 10-11, 2019 in Houston, TX. Fellows will be inducted at Space Center Houston. (Photo courtesy of Space Center Houston)

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

19


THE INNOVATORS

UNIVERSITY OF FLORIDA

Helping millions of people say goodbye to termites

Nan-Yao Su, Ph.D., FNAI, is one of the world’s leading authorities on subterranean termites and their management. Along with colleagues at Dow AgroSciences, Su developed a revolutionary approach for protecting homes and other buildings from these wood-consuming insects: the Sentricon® termite colony elimination system.

AC

ADEMY O F

TORS

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

L

VEN

20

Su has received eight U.S. patents and continues to develop innovations to make the Sentricon® system more practical, effective, and affordable.

IN

To honor his accomplishments with Sentricon®, Su has received numerous awards, including the Presidential Green Chemistry Challenge Award from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

Su received a Bachelor of Science in 1975 and a Master of Science in 1977 from Kyoto Institute of Technology, and a doctorate in entomology from the University of Hawaii in 1982. He has been with the University of Florida since 1984 and works at the Fort Lauderdale Research and Education Center.

NA

In 1995, the Sentricon® system became commercially available. Since then it has been used in 18 countries, protected more than three million homes, and saved more than nine million metric tons of insecticide that would have been applied otherwise. Su has used the system to protect historic landmarks including the Statue of Liberty, and has helped fight largescale termite infestations in other countries including Chile, China, New Zealand, and Vietnam.

He has authored and co-authored more than 250 peer-reviewed articles and book chapters on termite biology and management.

N

I

Beginning in the late 1980s, Su and Dow scientists pioneered a safe, effective new approach to termite management, using a slow-acting compound called hexaflumuron. It kills termites by interfering with their molting process. The team incorporated hexaflumuron into a bait that could be placed underground in feeding stations. Foraging termites would feed on the bait and carry portions back to the nest to share with other members of the colony. This was a key advantage because it

meant the bait could reach the majority of termite workers, and potentially destroy the colony. Hexaflumuron is harmless to people and pets and poses no threat to other insect species when properly used.

N AT I O

For much of the 20th century, the standard treatment for subterranean termites involved application of liquid insecticide to soil around the exterior of a building. This method was not environmentally sustainable and not always successful at stopping infestations, because it only killed termites in the treated area. Subterranean termites can travel hundreds of feet from their nests to forage.

N

O VAT OR


THE INNOVATORS

UNIVERSITY OF NEBRASKA-LINCOLN

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ADEMY O F IN

NA

Small town innovator goes microscopic for surgery

TORS

N AT I O

VEN

I

N

N

O VAT OR

Shane Farritor, Ph.D., FNAI, grew up in a small Nebraska town, constantly tinkering and building things in his parents’ hardware store. It was the perfect environment for a future inventor. Today, Farritor is the Lederer Professor of Mechanical and Materials Engineering at the University of Nebraska-Lincoln (UNL); co-founder and chief technology officer of Virtual Incision Corp., a medical device company developing advanced miniaturized robots for general abdominal surgery procedures; and holds more than 50 patents for surgical devices and railroad technologies. Farritor and Dmitry Oleynikov, M.D., chief of minimally invasive surgery at the University of Nebraska Medical Center, founded Virtual Incision in 2006 to further develop their surgeoncontrolled robot. Colorectal and lower gastrointestinal procedures are among the fastest-growing surgeries in the U.S. Using the robot for colon resection – a procedure to treat Crohn’s disease, inflammatory bowel disease, and colon cancer – can make procedures less invasive, improve patients’ recovery, reduce hospital stays, and cut costs. In a 2016 feasibility trial, the Virtual Incision device became the first miniaturized robot to perform complex surgical tasks inside a living human. “This was a significant milestone in

robotics and medicine,” Farritor said. In 2018 the company received $18 million in equity funding to prepare a next-generation surgical robot for human trials and consideration for commercial approval by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration. Farritor didn’t set out to build medical devices. After graduating from UNL with an engineering degree, he earned his doctorate at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology while also working in the Field and Space Robotics Laboratory. He studied at the Kennedy Space Center, Goddard Space Flight Center and the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, designing and building robots for planetary exploration. Upon joining the Nebraska faculty in 1998, Farritor led a team of engineers that developed a patented sensor system for measuring railroad track integrity and identifying weaknesses that could lead to derailments. A laser-mounted sensor searches for problems by measuring the shape of the rail, then transmits measurements and geographic information to the laboratory for analysis. MRail Inc., the technology’s

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

licensee, uses the system to test railroad track safety across the U.S. and Canada. Farritor’s latest venture is rooted in his past and aimed at shaping the future generation of inventors. “Nebraska is full of makers,” Farritor says. “So many talented kids grow up in rural areas building and creating things.” Farritor drove the effort to develop Nebraska Innovation Studio, the university’s makerspace that now has more than 300 members. Equipment ranges from kilns, woodworking, and machine shops to high-tech CNC laser cutters and a 12-station computer lab. His new venture is bringing high-tech makerspaces to communities like the one that fostered his early innovations. With funding from the National Science Foundation, Farritor is establishing an Innovation Makerspace Co-Laboratory in Sidney, Nebraska, population 6,888. The goal is to build a network of makerspaces across the state. “This kind of innovation is key to America’s future,” Farritor said. ”It’s our competitive advantage.”

21


THE ORGANIZATION

Local NAI Chapters Timeline of Chapter launches and events since March 2017. E V E N T

LAUNCH

2017 MARCH

APRIL

JUNE

SEPTEMBER

NOVEMBER

Arizona State University

Kansas State University Texas Tech University

Taipei Medical University Institut Pasteur

Florida Institute of Technology University of South Florida University of Connecticut

Southern Illinois University University of Central Florida

(right) The University of Southern California inducted 23 new chapter members in the spring of 2018.

(below) Lakshmi Nair, FNAI, represented the University of Connecticut in the first ever NAI Chapter Exhibition at the 2018 Annual Meeting.

“UCONN is making cutting edge advancements in emergent areas – working to enhance the nation’s hardware security, finding new applications for advanced three-dimensional printing technology and developing sustainable energy systems. Our Chapter of the NAI helps us not only to recognize the outstanding minds behind these innovations, but also to foster a community of creative thinkers and inventive spirit.” — C  AT O L A U R E N C I N , UCONN, FNAI

22

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE ORGANIZATION

NAI chapters are useful tools for recognizing and honoring investigators who translate their research findings into inventions that may benefit society. Member Institutions are encouraged to develop chapter programs that support their individual innovative initiatives, so no two chapters are the same. The NAI currently has nearly 50 active chapters ranging in size from six members to over 400, with a total patent count of nearly 20,000. To launch a chapter, contact chapters@academyofinventors.org.

2018 JANUARY

FEBRUARY

MARCH

APRIL

M AY

Medical University of South Carolina

University of Arkansas

University of Kentucky

Georgetown University The University of Alabama Virginia Commonwealth University Australian National University

Stony Brook University Worcester Polytechnic Institute Stevens Institute of Technology

“The Australian National University was thrilled to launch our Chapter of the NAI this year. We are excited for the opportunity to further recognize our inventor community through this chapter, as well as strengthen our innovative collaborations across disciplines. We look forward to showcasing our network of inventors and their incredible contributions to society.”

(top) The Medical University of South Carolina held a chapter event in January of 2018. (above) The University of Texas at Arlington in the first ever NAI Chapter Exhibition at the 2018 Annual Meeting. (right) L’Institut Pasteur launched their NAI chapter in June of 2017. This poster displays the trophy given to chapter members.

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

— C H E N N U P AT I JAGADISH, AUSTRALIAN N AT I O N A L U N I V E R S I T Y, F N A I

23


THE NETWORK

Student Innovation Showcase

About the Showcase: The 2018 NAI Annual Meeting featured the second NAI Student Innovation Showcase, a unique platform for students to demonstrate their inventions before an esteemed panel of judges. The showcase aims to recognize and strengthen the culture of inventorship for the next generation. Student teams from NAI Member Institutions were invited to submit their inventions, and six selected teams were given the opportunity to present their inventions at the Annual Meeting.

(above) Student Innovation Showcase winners Todd Alexander and Lindsay Lozeau with Spencer Montgomery, Director of the NAI. (right) The judges of the 2018 Student Innovation Showcase from left to right: Arthur Daemmrich, Glenn Vonk, Stephen Key, Andy Rathmann-Noonan and Helena S. Wisniewski, FNAI

About the Winners: Lindsay Lozeau and Todd Alexander of Worcester Polytechnic Institute were selected as the winners of the 2018 Student Innovation Showcase. They co-founded AMProtection, a startup in the medical device industry that developed a novel therapeutic agent to combat catheter-associated urinary tract infections. As part of their victory, Lozeau and Alexander received the benefit of being matched with NAI Fellows for mentorship in the potential commercialization process of their technology. 24

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


AC

ADEMY O F

TORS

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VEN

N

I

Lidar’s Laser Beam View of the World

L

IN

UNIVERSITY OF SOUTH FLORIDA

NA

THE INNOVATORS

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O VAT OR

Dennis K. Killinger, Ph.D., FNAI, is a distinguished university professor emeritus in the Department of Physics, past director of the Lidar Remote Sensing Laboratory, and professor in the Institute for Advanced Discovery and Innovation at the University of South Florida. Prior to joining USF in 1987, he was a research physicist for 10 years at MIT Lincoln Laboratory. He is currently CTO of SenOptics LLC, working on laser communication and lidar for vehicles. He is also a Fellow of the NAI, OSA, AAAS, and SPIE, and has several hundred publications and eight patents. Killinger earned a B.A. from the University of Iowa, M.S. from DePauw University, and his doctorate in physics from the University of Michigan. Killinger’s research is in laser spectroscopy and optics, and he focuses on the development and use of laser beams as remote probes of the environment. This includes either sensing reflected laser backscatter from remote targets and measuring its range and size, or detecting the chemical composition of the target or atmosphere due to absorption or fluorescence of the laser beam. Killinger was an early pioneer in laser radar/Lidar and laser remote sensing of the atmosphere. His research group has been involved with the invention and development of close to 20 new high-resolution tunable lasers at different wavelengths, new saturation fluorescence and multiwavelength absorption spectroscopic techniques, and their application for remote sensing of remote targets, atmospheric gases, and trace species

in water. His group is responsible for some of the major advances in this field, including the first laser remote sensing of atmospheric methane, CO emissions from automobiles, NO, HCl, hydrazine from rocket exhaust, and ammonia gas emissions from farm fertilizers. They are also responsible for precision measurements of CO2 in the atmosphere, the detection of parts-pertrillion trace plastics (BPA) and organics leached into drinking water, and remote laser-induced-breakdown spectroscopy of explosives. Killinger’s lidar technique to measure CO2 in the atmosphere is now used by NASA and NOAA for global measurements of this important greenhouse gas. His group also established the first vehicle traffic laser radar testing laboratory in Florida, and developed and commercialized the HITRAN-PC© software program used

world-wide for spectroscopic analysis of lidar and laser beam transmission through the atmosphere. The entire field of laser remote sensing, and especially lidar applications, is booming. Lidar initially started in 1961 with bouncing pulsed laser beams off the moon, but during the past few years has expanded in application due to new compact diode lasers, high-speed micromirror scanners, and image processing computers. Lidar is now used in flying drones to map with millimeter precision the location and movement of buildings and physical structures. It is also used to see through jungle foliage to reveal the hidden buildings and terraces of Mayan ruins. The newest application of lidar is for precision 3D mapping of vehicle traffic for autonomous driverless cars, which is expected to become a multibillion dollar market within the next few years. 25

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE ORGANIZATION

2017 Class of NAI Fellows Achilefu, Samuel I., Washington University in St. Louis

Cheng, Yang-Tse, University of Kentucky

Agonafer, Dereje, The University of Texas at Arlington

Chiang, Yet-Ming, Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Allen, Mark G., University of Pennsylvania

Chory, Joanne, Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Allison, James P., The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center

Chuah, Mooi Choo, Lehigh University Clemmer, David E., Indiana University

Amano, Hiroshi, Nagoya University

Coates, Geoffrey W., Cornell University

Anderson, Richard R., Massachusetts General Hospital Andersson, Leif, Texas A&M University, Uppsala University Angel, J. Roger P., The University of Arizona

Cohen, Stanley N., Stanford University Crowe, Jr., James E., Vanderbilt University Medical Center Cullis, Pieter R., The University of British Columbia

Apelian, Diran, Worcester Polytechnic Institute, University of California Irvine

Dezawa, Mari, Tohoku University

Atanassov, Plamen B., The University of New Mexico

Ditto, William L., North Carolina State University

Benson, Craig H., University of Virginia

Dutta, Prabir K., The Ohio State University

Berkland, Cory J., The University of Kansas

Elias, Jack A., Brown University

Bhagavatula, Vijayakumar, Carnegie Mellon University

Fang, Zhigang Z., The University of Utah

Bishop, David J., Boston University

Fischell, Tim A., Michigan State University, Western Michigan University

Bitzer, Donald L., North Carolina State University

Fisher, Paul B., Virginia Commonwealth University, Columbia University

Blakely, Randy D., Florida Atlantic University Blau, Helen M., Stanford University

Furlani, Edward P., University at Buffalo, The State University of New York

Block, Timothy M., Baruch S. Blumberg Institute

Gao, Guangping, University of Massachusetts Medical School

Blumenthal, Daniel J., University of California, Santa Barbara

Garimella, Suresh V., Purdue University

Bose, Susmita, Washington State University

Gnade, Bruce E., Southern Methodist University

Boyce, Steven T., University of Cincinnati Boyden, Edward S., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Grant, Sheila A., University of Missouri

Brennan, Anthony B., University of Florida

Griswold, Mark A., Case Western Reserve University

Byington, Carrie L., Texas A&M University Caruthers, Marvin H., University of Colorado Boulder Charney, Dennis S., Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai

Gold, Lawrence, University of Colorado Boulder

Harn, Horng-Jyh, Hualien Tzu Chi Hospital Heath, Jr., Robert W., The University of Texas at Austin Herbst, Walter Brown, Northwestern University

26

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE ORGANIZATION

Hersam, Mark C., Northwestern University Holtzman, David M., Washington University in St. Louis

Krein, Philip T., Zhejiang University/University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign Institute La Scala, John J., U.S. Army Research Laboratory

Hsieh, Ming, University of Southern California Hunter, Ian W., Massachusetts Institute of Technology

Langberg, Jonathan J., Emory University Lee, Fred C., Virginia Tech

Hupa, Mikko, Åbo Akademi University Ibe, Oliver C., University of Massachusetts, Lowell

Lee, Sang Yup, Korea Advanced Institute of Science and Technology

Isaacs, Eric D., The University of Chicago

Leuthardt, Eric C., Washington University in St. Louis

Iyer, Subramanian S., University of California, Los Angeles

Lewis, Nathan S., California Institute of Technology

Izatt, Joseph A., Duke University

Liu, Tsu-Jae King, University of California, Berkeley

Jacobs, Jr., William R., Albert Einstein College of Medicine

Lu, Chih-Yuan, National Taiwan University

Jain, Rakesh K., Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard University

Ma, Zhenqiang, University of Wisconsin-Madison

Johnston, Stephen Albert, Arizona State University

Marcolongo, Michele, Drexel University Marcu, Laura, University of California, Davis

Jung, Ranu, Florida International University

Marcus, R. Kenneth, Clemson University

Justus, Brian L., U.S. Naval Research Laboratory Kabanov, Alexander V., The University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill

Margules, Gary S., Nova Southeastern University McCay, Mary Helen, Florida Institute of Technology

Kar, Aravinda, University of Central Florida

Mehta, Kishor C., Texas Tech University

Kataoka, Kazunori, The University of Tokyo

Meldrum, Deirdre R., Arizona State University

Katz, Howard E., Johns Hopkins University

Mishra, Bhubaneswar, New York University

Kaufman, Arie E., Stony Brook University, The State University of New York

Möller, Gregory, University of Idaho

Keck, Donald B., University of South Florida Kelly, Jeffery W., The Scripps Research Institute Kerns, Jr., David V., Olin College of Engineering Keynton, Robert S., University of Louisville Killinger, Dennis K., University of South Florida Kim, Kwang J., University of Nevada, Las Vegas

Mote, Jr., Clayton Daniel, University of Maryland Nikzad, Shouleh, NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Division of Caltech Nottingham, John R., Case Western Reserve University, Cleveland Clinic Paranthaman, M. Parans, Oak Ridge National Laboratory Parish, Christopher R., The Australian National University

Knox, Wayne H., University of Rochester

Pirolli, Peter L.T., Florida Institute for Human and Machine Cognition

Kortum, Philip T., Rice University

Portnoy, Daniel A., University of California, Berkeley

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018

27


THE ORGANIZATION

2017 Class of NAI Fellows (continued) Prather, Dennis W., University of Delaware

Taylor, Russell H., Johns Hopkins University

Prucnal, Paul R., Princeton University

Toretsky, Jeffrey A., Georgetown University

Ramanujam, Nirmala, Duke University

Tuan, Rocky S., University of Pittsburgh, The Chinese University of Hong Kong

Rexford, Jennifer L., Princeton University

Vince, Robert, University of Minnesota

Rice, Kenner C., National Institutes of Health

Viterbi, Andrew J., University of Southern California

Ricordi, Camillo, University of Miami

Vo-Dinh, Tuan, Duke University

Rincรณn-Mora, Gabriel Alfonso, Georgia Institute of Technology

Waldman, Scott A., Thomas Jefferson University

Rosen, Bruce R., Massachusetts General Hospital

Waldmann, Thomas A., National Cancer Institute

Rothbaum, Barbara O., Emory University

Walter, Peter, University of California, San Francisco

Rothberg, Jonathan M., Yale University

Wang, Fei, The University of Tennessee, Knoxville

Rothschild, Max F., Iowa State University

Weaver, Scott C., The University of Texas Medical Branch

Rubin, Clinton T., Stony Brook University, The State University of New York

Webster, Thomas J., Northeastern University Wey, Chin-Long, National Chiao Tung University

Sakiyama-Elbert, Shelly, The University of Texas at Austin

Whitehead, Lorne, The University of British Columbia

Samueli, Henry, University of California, Los Angeles, University of California, Irvine

Willman, Cheryl L., The University of New Mexico

Schubert, Ulrich S., Friedrich-Schiller-University Jena

Willson, Jr., Alan N., University of California, Los Angeles

Seib, Paul A., Kansas State University

Woodruff, Teresa K., Northwestern University

Sejnowski, Terrence J., Salk Institute for Biological Studies

Wright, Amy E., Florida Atlantic University

Shahidehpour, Mohammad, Illinois Institute of Technology

Yablonovitch, Eli, University of California, Berkeley

Shi, Yun-Qing, New Jersey Institute of Technology

Yager, Paul, University of Washington

Shinde, Subhash L., University of Notre Dame

Ying, Jackie Y., Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnology

Siegel, Richard W., Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute Singh, Krishna P., University of Pennsylvania Soh, Hyongsok, Stanford University Stice, Steven L., University of Georgia

Yu, Bin, The State University of New York Polytechnic Institute Zaghloul, Mona E., The George Washington University Zalevsky, Zeev, Bar-Ilan University Zechiedrich, Lynn, Baylor College of Medicine

Suib, Steven L., University of Connecticut

28

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


THE CONVERSATION

Collaborators The NAI is proud to work alongside organizations that understand the importance of recognizing academic innovation.

29

NAI ACTIVITIES REPORT 2018


“The speed of invention in the future will be as fast as we can dream up ideas. We’ll be able to use each other’s innovations to test drive ideas and find inspiration to keep solving everyday problems.” - L I S A S E A C AT D E L U C A , F N A I

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NAI Activities Report 2018  

The 2018 Activities Report focuses on Connecting the Innovation Community. This year, the NAI launched two new programs: the Senior Member p...

NAI Activities Report 2018  

The 2018 Activities Report focuses on Connecting the Innovation Community. This year, the NAI launched two new programs: the Senior Member p...

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